Science.gov

Sample records for additional doe sites

  1. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  2. Does finger sense predict addition performance?

    PubMed

    Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-05-01

    The impact of fingers on numerical and mathematical cognition has received a great deal of attention recently. However, the precise role that fingers play in numerical cognition is unknown. The current study explores the relationship between finger sense, arithmetic and general cognitive ability. Seventy-six children between the ages of 5 and 12 participated in the study. The results of stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that while general cognitive ability including language processing was a predictor of addition performance, finger sense was not. The impact of age on the relationship between finger sense, and addition was further examined. The participants were separated into two groups based on age. The results showed that finger gnosia score impacted addition performance in the older group but not the younger group. These results appear to support the hypothesis that fingers provide a scaffold for calculation and that if that scaffold is not properly built, it has continued differential consequences to mathematical cognition. PMID:26993292

  3. Comprehensive, integrated, remote sensing at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, J.G.; Burson, Z.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy has established a program called Comprehensive, Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS). The overall objective is to provide a state-of-the-art data base of remotely sensed data for all users of such information at large DOE sites. The primary types of remote sensing provided consist of the following: (1) large format aerial photography; (2) video from aerial platforms; (3) multispectral scanning; and (4) airborne nuclear radiometric surveys. Implementation of the CIRS Program began with field operations at the Savannah River Plant in 1982 and is continuing at that DOE site at a level of effort of about $1.5 m per year. Integrated remote sensing studies were subsequently extended to the West Valley Demonstration Project in the summer and fall of 1984. It is expected that the Program will eventually be extended to cover all large DOE sites on a continuing basis. 2 figures.

  4. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-12-01

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  5. Natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria for DOE sites: DOE Standard DOE-STD-1023-95

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-03-24

    This paper summarizes hazard assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95) for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. The DOE has established policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE sites and facilities using a graded approach by DOE Order 5480.28. The graded approach is implemented by five performance categories established for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) at DOE facilities based on criteria provided by DOE-STD-1021-93. In applying the design/evaluation criteria of DOE-STD-1020-94 for DOE facilities subjected to one of the natural phenomena hazards, the establishment of design basis load levels consistent with the corresponding performance category is required. This standard provides general criteria as well as specific criteria for natural phenomena hazard assessments to ensure that adequate design basis load levels are established for design and/or evaluation of DOE facilities.

  6. DOE/KEURP site operator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles.

  7. Site Preference of Ternary Alloying Additions to AuTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of several alloying additions, namely. Na, Mg, Al, Si. Sc, V, Cr, Mn. Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr. Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt in B2 TiAu is reported. The 30 elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. Results of large scale simulations are also presented, distinguishing between additions that remain in solution from those that precipitate a second phase.

  8. 20. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. A(8-1), Military Construction, Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California; Additional Construction, Location Plan, Sheet No. 2, October 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 19. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Grading & Paving Plan, Sheet No. 1 of 21, March 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. 18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Plan, February 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Specificity of site directed psoralen addition to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teare, J; Wollenzien, P

    1989-01-01

    We describe the attachment of a psoralen derivative (site specific psoralen, SSP) to the 5' end of a DNA oligonucleotide and the hybridization and the photoreaction of this reagent with a complementary target site on an RNA molecule. SSP was coupled to a variety of DNA oligonucleotides to investigate the structural requirements for addition to the RNA. Efficient SSP photoadducts were made on specific uridines by designing an intercalation site at an unpaired nucleotide in the RNA strand within the heteroduplex region. The optimal location for this site was five nucleotides from the oligonucleotide 5' end and just 5' to the target uridine residue. Because the attachment of the SSP to the oligonucleotide is through a disulfide bond, the DNA oligonucleotide can be removed with reduction to leave SSP attached to the RNA strand. The SSP adduct made in this way will be useful for subsequent biochemical and biophysical experiments. Images PMID:2471154

  12. Survey of portable radiological instrumentation at 16 DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, G.W.; Hickman, D.

    1995-06-01

    The DOE-DP complex initiated a Radiological Instrument Standardization and Qualification Program to ensure the quality of radiological measurements within each DOE site. As part of the program, a complex-wide survey was conducted of all portable instruments in use at 16 DOE facilities. This paper presents the data gathered and suggests several possible standardization options.

  13. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  14. Reactor-pumped laser facility at DOE`s Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one excellent possibility for a laser power beaming site. It is in the low latitudes of the US, is in an exceptionally cloud-free area of the southwest, is already an area of restricted access (which enhances safety considerations), and possesses a highly-skilled technical team with extensive engineering and research capabilities from underground testing of our nation`s nuclear deterrence. The average availability of cloud-free clear line of site to a given point in space is about 84%. With a beaming angle of {plus_minus}60{degree} from the zenith, about 52 geostationary-orbit (GEO) satellites could be accessed continuously from NTS. In addition, the site would provide an average view factor of about 10% for orbital transfer from low earth orbit to GEO. One of the major candidates for a long-duration, high-power laser is a reactor-pumped laser being developed by DOE. The extensive nuclear expertise at NTS makes this site a prime candidate for utilizing the capabilities of a reactor pumped laser for power beaming. The site then could be used for many dual-use roles such as industrial material processing research, defense testing, and removing space debris.

  15. Reactor-pumped laser facility at DOE`s Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one excellent possibility for a laser power beaming site. It is in the low latitudes of the US, is in an exceptionally cloud-free area of the southwest, is already an area of restricted access (which enhances safety considerations), and possesses a highly-skilled technical team with extensive engineering and research capabilities from underground testing of their nation`s nuclear deterrence. The average availability of cloud-free clear line of site to a given point in space is about 84%. With a beaming angle of {+-}60{degree} from the zenith, about 52 geostationary-orbit (GEO) satellites could be accessed continuously from NTS. In addition, the site would provide an average view factor of about 10% for orbital transfer from low earth orbit to GEO. One of the major candidates for a long-duration, high-power laser is a reactor-pumped laser being developed by DOE. The extensive nuclear expertise at NTS makes this site a prime candidate for utilizing the capabilities of a reactor pumped laser for power beaming. The site then could be used for many dual-use roles such as industrial material processing research, defense testing, and removing space debris.

  16. Assessing aerobic natural attenuation of trichloroethene at four DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Koelsch, Michael C.; Starr, Robert C.; Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2005-03-01

    A 3-year Department of Energy Environmental Science Management Program (EMSP) project is currently investigating natural attenuation of trichloroethane (TCE) in aerobic groundwater. This presentation summarizes the results of a screening process to identify TCE plumes at DOE facilities that are suitable for assessing the rate of TCE cometabolism under aerobic conditions. In order to estimate aerobic degradation rates, plumes had to meet the following criteria: TCE must be present in aerobic groundwater, a conservative co-contaminant must be present and have approximately the same source as TCE, and the groundwater velocity must be known. A total of 127 TCE plumes were considered across 24 DOE sites. The four sites retained for the assessment were: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory, OU III; (2) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Northwest Plume; (3) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Industrialized Area--Southwest Plume and 903 Pad South Plume; and (4) Savannah River Site, A/M Area Plume. For each of these sites, a co-contaminant derived from the same source area as TCE was used as a nonbiodegrading tracer. The tracer determined the extent to which concentration decreases in the plume can be accounted for solely by abiotic processes such as dispersion and dilution. Any concentration decreases not accounted for by these processes must be explained by some other natural attenuation mechanism. Thus, ''half-lives'' presented herein are in addition to attenuation that occurs due to hydrologic mechanisms. This ''tracer-corrected method'' has previously been used at the DOE's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in conjunction with other techniques to document the occurrence of intrinsic aerobic cometabolism. Application of this method to other DOE sites is the first step to determining whether this might be a significant natural attenuation mechanism on a broader scale. Application of the tracer-corrected method to data from the Brookhaven

  17. ASSESSING AEROBIC NATURAL ATTENUATION OF TRICHLOROETHENE AT FOUR DOE SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael C. Koelsch; Robert C. Starr; Kent S. Sorenson, Jr.

    2005-03-01

    A 3-year Department of Energy Environmental Science Management Program (EMSP) project is currently investigating natural attenuation of trichloroethane (TCE) in aerobic groundwater. This presentation summarizes the results of a screening process to identify TCE plumes at DOE facilities that are suitable for assessing the rate of TCE cometabolism under aerobic conditions. In order to estimate aerobic degradation rates, plumes had to meet the following criteria: TCE must be present in aerobic groundwater, a conservative co-contaminant must be present and have approximately the same source as TCE, and the groundwater velocity must be known. A total of 127 TCE plumes were considered across 24 DOE sites. The four sites retained for the assessment were: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory, OU III; (2) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Northwest Plume; (3) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Industrialized Area--Southwest Plume and 903 Pad South Plume; and (4) Savannah River Site, A/M Area Plume. For each of these sites, a co-contaminant derived from the same source area as TCE was used as a nonbiodegrading tracer. The tracer determined the extent to which concentration decreases in the plume can be accounted for solely by abiotic processes such as dispersion and dilution. Any concentration decreases not accounted for by these processes must be explained by some other natural attenuation mechanism. Thus, ''half-lives'' presented herein are in addition to attenuation that occurs due to hydrologic mechanisms. This ''tracer-corrected method'' has previously been used at the DOE's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in conjunction with other techniques to document the occurrence of intrinsic aerobic cometabolism. Application of this method to other DOE sites is the first step to determining whether this might be a significant natural attenuation mechanism on a broader scale. Application of the tracer-corrected method to data from the Brookhaven

  18. DOE site-specific threat assessment

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.J.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.

    1985-07-12

    A facility manager faced with the challenges of protecting a nuclear facility against potential threats must consider the likelihood and consequences of such threats, know the capabilities of the facility safeguards and security systems, and make informed decisions about the cost-effectivness of safeguards and security upgrades. To help meet these challenges, the San Francisco Operations Office of the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, has developed a site-specific threat assessment approach and a quantitative model to improve the quality and consistency of site-specific threat assessment and resultant security upgrade decisions at sensitive Department of Energy facilities. 5 figs.

  19. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  20. Framework for DOE mixed low-level waste disposal: Site fact sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Hospelhorn, M.B.; Chu, M.S.Y.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required to prepare and submit Site Treatment Plans (STPS) pursuant to the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct). Although the FFCAct does not require that disposal be addressed in the STPS, the DOE and the States recognize that treatment of mixed low-level waste will result in residues that will require disposal in either low-level waste or mixed low-level waste disposal facilities. As a result, the DOE is working with the States to define and develop a process for evaluating disposal-site suitability in concert with the FFCAct and development of the STPS. Forty-nine potential disposal sites were screened; preliminary screening criteria reduced the number of sites for consideration to twenty-six. The DOE then prepared fact sheets for the remaining sites. These fact sheets provided additional site-specific information for understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the twenty-six sites as potential disposal sites. The information also provided the basis for discussion among affected States and the DOE in recommending sites for more detailed evaluation.

  1. DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is the 2nd quarter report of year four of the Kansas State University electric vehicle research program. Kansas State University (K-State), in support of the Department of Energy's and the Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program's subject contract, continues to demonstrate and develop electric vehicle and infrastructure technology. K-State is operating two Soleq's EVcort vehicles. During this reporting period both vehicles were returned to Chicago for warranty service. These vehicles have continued to operate and 'show' in a functional manner; however, one vehicle failed while being driven and the other vehicle's charger failed. It is expected that both vehicles will be returned to operational status within the early part of the next quarter. K-State continues to remain appraised of the issues surrounding the purchase of new technology S-10 electric pickup trucks, along with other Site Operator Program membership. K-State remains concerned that these vehicles may not ever arrive on site due to problems being discussed at this time.

  2. Effluent emissions monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.W.

    1993-05-01

    There are numerous regulatory requirements controlling the effluent emissions monitoring at a U.S. Department of Energy site. This paper defines how these regulatory effluent emissions monitoring requirements and the Quality Assurance oversight of these requirements were implemented by Westinghouse Hanford Company, the operations contractor, at the DOE Hanford Site.

  3. Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL's Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

  4. 34 CFR 477.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE AND POLICY STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 477.22 What additional factors does the... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary...

  5. LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575

    SciTech Connect

    MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

    2012-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between

  6. Collaboration in long-term stewardship at DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Moren, R. J.; Zeisloft, J. H.; Feist, E. T.; Brown, D.; Grindstaff, K. D.

    2013-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan, DOE/RL-2010-35 Rev 1. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large

  7. River Corridor Closure at DOE's Hanford Site - 12503

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan; Franco, Joe

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's River Corridor will cover work that has already been completed plus the work remaining to be done. This includes the buildings, waste sites, and groundwater plumes in the 300 Area; large-scale burial ground remediation in the 600 Area; plutonium production reactor dismantling and 'cocooning' along the river; preservation of the world's first full-scale plutonium production reactor; removal of more than 14 million tons of contaminated soil and debris along the Columbia River shoreline and throughout the River Corridor; and the excavation of buried waste sites in the river shore area. It also includes operating an EPA-permitted low-level waste disposal facility in the central portion of the site. At the completions of cleanup in 2015, Hanford's River Corridor will be the largest closure project ever completed by the Department of Energy. Cleanup of the River Corridor has been one of Hanford's top priorities since the early 1990's. This urgency has been due to the proximity of hundreds of waste sites to the Columbia River. In addition, removal of the sludge from K West Basin, near the river, remains a high priority. This 220-square-mile area of the Hanford Site sits on the edge of the last free-flowing stretch of the Columbia River. The River Corridor portion of the Hanford Site includes the 100 and 300 Areas along the south shore of the Columbia River. The 100 Areas contain nine retired plutonium production reactors. These areas are also the location of numerous support facilities and solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. The 300 Area, located just north of the city of Richland, contains fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear research and development facilities, and their associated solid and liquid waste disposal sites that have contaminated groundwater and soil. In order to ensure that cleanup actions address all threats to human health and the environment, the River Corridor includes the

  8. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-11-15

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio.

  9. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Ronau, Judith A.; Paul, Lake N.; Fuchs, Julian E.; Corn, Isaac R.; Wagner, Kyle T.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes phenylalanine oxidation to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH features a regulatory domain where binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, such as certain bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum (cPAH), a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site, 15.7Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 µM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, no detectable binding was observed in ITC for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) lead to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Kinetic analysis reveals that the distal site mutants suffer a discernible loss in their catalytic activity. However, x-ray structures of Y155A and F258A, two of the mutants showing more noticeable defect in their activity, show no discernible change in their active site structure, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may transpire through protein dynamics in solution. PMID:23860686

  10. A Public Opinion Survey on Correctional Education: Does Additional Information on Efficacy Lead to Additional Support?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterland, Keri Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Though much research has been done on the efficacy of correctional education on reducing recidivism rates for prison inmates, there is little research on the effect that information about the efficacy of correctional education has on public opinion. This study examined whether providing additional information regarding the efficacy of correctional…

  11. 34 CFR 658.32 - What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... institution's current strength as measured by the number of international studies courses offered; (ii) The... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to... criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications? In addition to the criteria referred to...

  12. 34 CFR 658.32 - What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... institution's current strength as measured by the number of international studies courses offered; (ii) The... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to... criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications? In addition to the criteria referred to...

  13. 34 CFR 658.32 - What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... institution's current strength as measured by the number of international studies courses offered; (ii) The... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to... criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications? In addition to the criteria referred to...

  14. 34 CFR 658.32 - What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... institution's current strength as measured by the number of international studies courses offered; (ii) The... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to... criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications? In addition to the criteria referred to...

  15. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  16. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  17. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  18. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  19. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, Robert R.

    2007-06-29

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  20. Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs RR

    2007-06-01

    This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

  1. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D.; Stevens, L.

    1992-12-31

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  2. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D. ); Stevens, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  3. DNAPLs at DOE sites: Background and assessment of characterization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP) within the Office of Technology Development (OTD) has responsibility for identification, evaluation, and delivery of technologies needed for the work of the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This report addresses part of that responsibility by providing summary information on DNAPL site characterization. A dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) is a source of contamination that can persist in the subsurface for decades before dissipating completely into the vapor phase and groundwater. The DNAPL chemicals of particular concern to the DOE are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl VOCS) such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), trichloroethylene (TCE), and perchloroethylene (PCE). These Cl VOCs were used in multiple ton quantities at DOE sites and were often released to the subsurface. The predicted fate of released Cl VOC liquid is downward movement through the soil under the force of gravity. As it moves, some of the Cl VOC liquid becomes trapped in the soil pores as residual saturation. The liquid also moves rapidly downward if small fractures are present. This migration continues until an impermeable or semi-permeable layer is encountered. Then lateral movement or spreading occurs. The downward and lateral migration in the subsurface leads to DNAPL pools, lenses, and residual saturation that can cause long-term contamination of groundwater at levels well above drinking water standards. Although Cl VOCs have been detected as dissolved components in the groundwater and as vapor in the soil gas at several DOE sites, direct evidence of their presence as DNAPL is sparse and no measurements of the amounts of DNAPL present within a given volume of subsurface have been made. Consequently, unresolved DNAPL issues exist at DOE sites.

  4. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  5. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  6. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  7. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does...

  8. Use of DOE site selection criteria for screening low-level waste disposal sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.; Stinton, L.H.

    1983-09-01

    The proposed Department of Energy (DOE) site selection criteria were applied to the Oak Ridge Reservation, and the application was evaluated to determine the criteria's usefulness in the selection of a low-level waste disposal site. The application of the criteria required the development of a methodology to provide a framework for evaluation. The methodology is composed of site screening and site characterization stages. The site screening stage relies on reconnaissance data to identify a preferred site capable of satisfying the site selection criteria. The site characterization stage relies on a detailed site investigation to determine site acceptability. The site selection criteria were applied to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation through the site screening stage. Results of this application were similar to those of a previous siting study on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The DOE site selection criteria when coupled with the methodology that was developed were easily applied and would be adaptable to any region of interest.

  9. Overview and History of DOE's Hanford Site - 12502

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Karen; McCormick, Matt

    2012-07-01

    Hanford's DOE offices are responsible for one of the largest nuclear cleanup efforts in the world, cleaning up the legacy of nearly five decades of nuclear weapons production. Nowhere in the DOE Complex is cleanup more challenging than at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Hanford cleanup entails remediation of hundreds of large complex hazardous waste sites; disposition of nine production reactors and the preservation of one as a National Historic Landmark; demolition of hundreds of contaminated facilities including five enormous process canyons; remediation of billions of gallons of contaminated groundwater; disposition of millions of tons of low-level, mixed low-level, and transuranic waste; disposition of significant quantities of special nuclear material; storage and ultimate disposition of irradiated nuclear fuel; remediation of contamination deep in the soil that could impact groundwater; decontamination and decommissioning of hundreds of buildings and structures; and treatment of 56 million gallons of radioactive waste in 177 large underground tanks through the construction of a first-of-its-kind Waste Treatment Plant. Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The DOE Richland Operations Office has a vision and a strategy for completing Hanford's cleanup including the transition to post-cleanup activities. Information on the strategy is outlined in the Hanford Site Completion Framework. The framework describes three major components of cleanup - River Corridor, Central Plateau, and Tank Waste. It provides the context for individual cleanup actions by describing the key challenges and approaches for the decisions needed to complete cleanup. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), is implementing a strategy to achieve final cleanup decisions for the River Corridor portion of the Hanford Site. The DOE Richland

  10. Central Plateau Cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site - 12504

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    The discussion of Hanford's Central Plateau includes significant work in and around the center of the Hanford Site - located about 7 miles from the Columbia River. The Central Plateau is the area to which operations will be shrunk in 2015 when River Corridor cleanup is complete. This work includes retrieval and disposal of buried waste from miles of trenches; the cleanup and closure of massive processing canyons; the clean-out and demolition to 'slab on grade' of the high-hazard Plutonium Finishing Plant; installation of key groundwater treatment facilities to contain and shrink plumes of contaminated groundwater; demolition of all other unneeded facilities; and the completion of decisions about remaining Central Plateau waste sites. A stated goal of EM has been to shrink the footprint of active cleanup to less than 10 square miles by 2020. By the end of FY2011, Hanford will have reduced the active footprint of cleanup by 64 percent exceeding the goal of 49 percent. By 2015, Hanford will reduce the active footprint of cleanup by more than 90 percent. The remaining footprint reduction will occur between 2015 and 2020. The Central Plateau is a 75-square-mile region near the center of the Hanford Site including the area designated in the Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (DOE 1999) and Record of Decision (64 FR 61615) as the Industrial-Exclusive Area, a rectangular area of about 20 square miles in the center of the Central Plateau. The Industrial-Exclusive Area contains the 200 East and 200 West Areas that have been used primarily for Hanford's nuclear fuel processing and waste management and disposal activities. The Central Plateau also encompasses the 200 Area CERCLA National Priorities List site. The Central Plateau has a large physical inventory of chemical processing and support facilities, tank systems, liquid and solid waste disposal and storage facilities, utility systems, administrative facilities, and groundwater monitoring

  11. Darwin : The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site /

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, William E.; Jones, L. A.; Baldwin, T.; Nitschke, K.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998, a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. The Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites are operated through collaborative agreements with the PNG National Weather Service, The Nauru Department of Industry and Economic Development (IED), and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Special Services Unit (SSU) respectively. All ARM TWP activities in the region are coordinated with the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) based in Apia, Samoa. The Darwin ARM site and its role in the ARM TWP Program are discussed.

  12. 49 CFR 350.345 - How does a State apply for additional variances from the FMCSRs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does a State apply for additional variances... apply for additional variances from the FMCSRs? Any State may apply to the Administrator for a variance from the FMCSRs for intrastate commerce. The variance will be granted only if the State...

  13. Does Prebiopsy, Nonsterile Ultrasonography Gel Affect Biopsy-Site Asepsis?

    SciTech Connect

    Gurel, Kamil Karabay, Oguz; Gurel, Safiye; Hildebolt, Charles

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the use of nonsterile gel, prior to antiseptic procedures in ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous biopsies, results in contamination of the biopsy site. Materials and Methods. Patients referred for US-guided percutaneous biopsies were included in this study. Transmission material used for US evaluation before biopsy-site antiseptic procedures were performed was either nonsterile gel or sterile saline. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: nonsterile gel (n = 30) and sterile saline (n = 30). Before the transmission material was used and after antiseptic procedures were performed, microbial swabs of a 10-cm{sup 2}-diameter area were obtained at the biopsy site. Swabs were also obtained from the gel, saline, and povidine-iodine. Inoculated specimen plates were incubated at 37{sup o}C under aerobic conditions, and the numbers of colony-forming units recorded. Nominal logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the odds of postantisepsis bacterial growth (after antiseptic procedures were performed) based on group, gender, coincidental disease (diabetes, chronic renal failure, and malignancy), biopsy-site location (head and neck or breast and abdomen), and local factors (skin fold, skin tag, and hair). Results. The following odds ratios (adjusted for the other variables) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated: (1) group (2.9 [0.8-11.1]; p = 0.10); (2) gender (1.2 [0.3-5.2]; p = 0.78); (3) coincidental disease (7.6 [0.9-166.7]; p = 0.09); (4) biopsy site location (6.2 [1.4-31.3]; p = 0.02); and (5) local factors (7.0 [1.6-36.0]; p = 0.01). No bacterial growth occurred with swabs obtained from gel, povidine-iodine, or saline. Conclusion. We conclude that nonsterile gel used prior to percutaneous biopsy does not affect biopsy-site asepsis.

  14. Integrated wastewater management planning for DOE`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, J.; Barthel, J.; Wheeler, M.; Conroy, K.

    1996-02-01

    Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, L.L.C. (RMRS), jointly formed by Morrison Knudsen Corporation and BNFL Inc., provides international experience in the nuclear, environmental, waste management, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) , and project management industry. The company is currently the environmental restoration, waste management, and D&D subcontractor for Kaiser-Hill Company at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). RMRS offers unique solutions and state-of-the-art technology to assist in resolving the issues that face industries today. RMRS has been working on methods to improve cost savings recognized at RFETS, through application of unique technologies and process engineering. RMRS prepared and is implementing a strategy that focused on identifying an approach to improve cost savings in current wastewater treatment systems and to define a low-cost, safe and versatile wastewater treatment system for the future. Development of this strategy, was targeted by Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, DOE Rocky Flats Field Office and Kaiser-Hill as a ``Project Breakthrough`` where old concepts were thrown out the door and the project goals and objectives were developed from the groundup. The objectives of the strategy developed in a project break through session with DOE included lower lifecycle costs, shutdown of one of two buildings at RFETS, Building 374 or Building 774, reduced government capital investment, and support of site closure program goals, identified as the site`s Accelerated Site Action Plan (ASAP). The recommended option allows for removal of water treatment functions from Building 374, the existing process wastewater treatment facility. This option affords the lowest capital cost, lowest unit operating cost, lowest technical management risk, greatest support of ASAP phasing and provides the greatest flexibility for design with unforeseen future needs.

  15. Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.; Brady, P.V.; Brady, W.D.; Krupka, K.M.; Spalding, B.P.; Waters, R.D.; Zhang, P.

    1999-03-01

    Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites briefly outlines the biological and geochemical origins of natural attenuation, the tendency for natural processes in soils to mitigate contaminant transport and availability, and the means for relying on monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for remediation of contaminated soils and groundwaters. This report contains a step-by-step guide for (1) screening contaminated soils and groundwaters on the basis of their potential for remediation by natural attenuation and (2) implementing MNA consistent with EPA OSWER Directive 9200.4-17. The screening and implementation procedures are set up as a web-based tool (http://www.sandia.gov/eesector/gs/gc/na/mnahome.html) to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) site environmental managers and their staff and contractors to adhere to EPA guidelines for implementing MNA. This document is intended to support the Decision Maker's Framework Guide and Monitoring Guide both to be issued from DOE EM-40. Further technical advances may cause some of the approach outlined in this document to change over time.

  16. The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Moren, Richard J.; Grindstaff, Keith D.

    2013-11-12

    Hanford's Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area -- the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another first, the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford's LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM's Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program's records management

  17. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  18. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE...

  19. 34 CFR 658.32 - What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional criteria does the Secretary apply to institutional applications? 658.32 Section 658.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE...

  20. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION... Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  1. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  2. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  3. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  4. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  5. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  6. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  7. 34 CFR 477.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 477.22 Section 477.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE...

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Summary of the environmental dose models used at DOE nuclear sites in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Mueller, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. This review includes a summary of the methods used in 1979 as described in annual environmental reports submitted by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors. The methods used ranged from estimating public doses based on environmental measurements and comparison to the DOE concentration guides, to complex methods using environmental pathway modeling and estimated radionuclide releases. No two sites used the same combination of measurements and pathway models in their analysis. While most sites used an atmospheric dispersion model to predict air concentrations of radioactive material, only about half of the sites provided enough information about the model used to permit proper model evaluation. The waterborne pathways related to drinking water or ingestion of fish were generally well described, while the external exposure or terrestrial food pathways were often not considered. The major recommendation resulting from this review was that complete documentations of the models used should be included either within the annual reports or as separate readily available documents. In addition, most sites could make better use of graphics (i.e., tables and figures) to better communicate the findings of their analyses.

  10. Pulp fiction - The volunteer concept (or how not to site additional LLRW disposal capacity)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Experiences of compacts and of individual states throughout the nation indicate that low-level radioactive waste disposal siting processes, based from the beginning upon the volunteer concept are fraught with problems. Most apparent among these problems is that the volunteer concept does not lead to scientifically and technically based siting endeavors. Ten years have passed since the Amendments Act of 1985, and no compact or state has been - successful in providing for new LLRW disposal capacity. That failure can be traced in part to the reliance upon the volunteer concept in siting attempts. If success is to be achieved, the future direction for LLRW management must focus on three areas: first, a comprehensive evaluation of all LLRW management options, including reduction of waste generated and on-site storage; secondly, a comprehensive evaluation of the current as well as projected waste stream, to determine the amount of disposal capacity actually needed; and, finally, sound scientifically and technically based siting processes.

  11. Environmental projects, volume 11. Environmental assessment: Addition to operations building, Mars site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment was performed of the proposed addition to building G-86 at the Mars Site, which will provide space for new electronic equipment to consolidate the Deep Space Network (DSN) support facilities from other Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex (GDSCC) sites at the Mars Site, and will include a fifth telemetry and command group with its associated link monitor, control processor, and operator consoles. The addition of these facilities will increase the capability of the DSN to support future sophisticated NASA spacecraft missions such as the International Solar and Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. The planned construction of this building addition requires an Environmental Assessment (EA) document that records the existing environmental conditions at the Mars Site, that analyzes the environmental effects that possibly could be expected from the construction and use of the new building addition, and that recommends measures to be taken to mitigate any possible deleterious environmental effects.

  12. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  13. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  14. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  15. 43 CFR 3832.1 - What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What does it mean to locate mining claims or sites? 3832.1 Section 3832.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... CLAIMS OR SITES Locating Mining Claims or Sites § 3832.1 What does it mean to locate mining claims...

  16. MANIPULATING SUBSURFACE COLLOIDS TO ENHANCE CLEANUPS OF DOE WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colloidal phases, such as submicrometer iron oxyhydroxides, aluminosilicate clays, and humic macromolecules, are important subsurface sorbents for the low-solubility chemicals in DOE wastes. Recent research we have performed as part of DOE's Subsurface Science Program has demonst...

  17. On the site preferences of ternary additions to triple defect B2 intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Chen, S.L.; Chang, Y.A.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge of the site preference of ternary solute additions is essential to developing an understanding of how these solutes affect the properties of B2 intermetallic compounds. A quasichemical model will be presented which is able to predict the site preferences of dilute solute additions to triple defect B2 compounds. The only parameters required are enthalpies of formation at the stoichiometric composition. General equations are developed which can be used to determine site occupations and defect concentrations for dilute as well as non-dilute solute additions. These equations use atom pair bond enthalpies as the parameters. It is found that the site preferences of dilute additions are not always in agreement with predictions based on the solubility lobes in ternary Gibbs isotherms, Predictions for dilute additions to NiAl and FeAl are compared to experimental results found in the literature. Satisfactory correlation is found between the model and the experimental results. In addition, the predictions from the model on vacancy concentrations in Fe doped NiAl are compared to recent experimental results by the authors.

  18. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to the policies, criteria, and procedures of 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a),...

  19. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to the policies, criteria, and procedures of 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a),...

  20. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by reference... 10 CFR part 707 to agree to develop and implement a workplace substance abuse program that complies with the requirements of 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, as...

  1. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to the policies, criteria, and procedures of 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a),...

  2. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to the policies, criteria, and procedures of 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a),...

  3. 48 CFR 970.5223-3 - Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to the policies, criteria, and procedures of 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at... Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. 970.5223-3 Section 970.5223-3 Federal Acquisition... Agreement regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE sites. As prescribed in 970.2305-4(a),...

  4. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Regulations concerning DOE's contractor workplace substance abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites. (a) The Department of Energy (DOE),...

  5. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R. J.

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  6. [Clinical evaluation of an oxygen concentrator and humidifier that does not require additional reservoir water].

    PubMed

    Burioka, Naoto; Nakamoto, Sachiko; Fukuoka, Yasushi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2011-02-01

    A conventional humidifier with a reservoir of water for humidification can produce micro-aerosols contaminated with bacteria. The present study was undertaken to determine the clinical efficiency of a membrane humidifier that does not require additional reservoir water. We analyzed relative room air humidity and oxygen levels obtained from 2 pressure-swing adsorption (PSA)-type oxygen concentrators with membrane humidifiers. A significant correlation was found between relative room air humidity and that of oxygen moistened by a membrane humidifier. Several patients with chronic respiratory failure experienced improvements in subjectively reported nasal dryness using an oxygen concentrator with a membrane humidifier. This device avoids the need to change reservoir water, and may improve patient quality of life in the home. PMID:21400902

  7. 34 CFR 660.33 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application to develop...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application to develop specialized instructional materials? 660.33 Section 660.33...

  8. Potential application of the Motorola MSR-20 Radar to DOE site security

    SciTech Connect

    Arlowe, D.; Rebeil, P.; Vigil, R.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the results of testing the MSR-20 radar and provides guidance on how this radar may be used to provide early detection and warning of approaching intruders beyond DOE facility site boundaries.

  9. Lessons learned from DOE site culture change activities: Implications for waste management organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.; Howard, E.M.; Doss, A.R.; Mallak, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Management Systems Laboratories (MSL) has worked with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and several of its contractors as they understand and assess the DOE culture change and change the contractor culture to serve DOE's needs. Primarily, these contractors have been those whose responsibilities include starting up and operating weapons materials facilities. The number and scope of these activities have escalated and expanded to contractors at DOE sites such as Westinghouse at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, EG G at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado, and Westinghouse at the Feed Materials Processing Center (FMPC) in Fernald, Ohio. The point of this paper is not to compare or contrast the relative merit of one site over another. It is to show the lessons, good and bad, and use and communicate those lessons, especially those lessons transferable to other sites in similar situations. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Addition of Azathioprine to Corticosteroids Does Not Benefit Patients with IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Andrulli, Simeone; Pani, Antonello; Scaini, Patrizia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Fogazzi, Giambattista; Vogt, Bruno; De Cristofaro, Vincenzo; Allegri, Landino; Cirami, Lino; Procaccini, Aldo Deni; Locatelli, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    The optimal treatment for IgA nephropathy (IgAN) remains unknown. Some patients respond to corticosteroids, suggesting that more aggressive treatment may provide additional benefit. We performed a randomized, multicenter, controlled trial to determine whether adding azathioprine to steroids improves renal outcome. We randomly assigned 207 IgAN patients with creatinine ≤2.0 mg/dl and proteinuria ≥1.0 g/d to either (1) a 3-day pulse of methylprednisolone in months 1, 3, and 5 in addition to both oral prednisone 0.5 mg/kg every other day and azathioprine 1.5 mg/kg per day for 6 months (n = 101, group 1) or (2) steroids alone on the same schedule (n = 106, group 2). The primary outcome was renal survival (time to 50% increase in plasma creatinine from baseline); secondary outcomes were changes in proteinuria over time and safety. After a median follow-up of 4.9 years, the primary endpoint occurred in 13 patients in group 1 (12.9%, 95% CI 7.5 to 20.9%) and 12 patients in group 2 (11.3%, CI 6.5 to 18.9%) (P = 0.83). Five-year cumulative renal survival was similar between groups (88 versus 89%; P = 0.83). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that female gender, systolic BP, number of antihypertensive drugs, ACE inhibitor use, and proteinuria during follow-up predicted the risk of reaching the primary endpoint. Treatment significantly decreased proteinuria from 2.00 to 1.07 g/d during follow-up (P < 0.001) on average, with no difference between groups. Treatment-related adverse events were more frequent among those receiving azathioprine. In summary, adding low-dose azathioprine to corticosteroids for 6 months does not provide additional benefit to patients with IgAN and may increase the risk for adverse events. PMID:20634300

  11. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, Carl J.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hubler, Timothy L.

    2009-09-28

    During the period of this grant several significant milestones have been passed pursuant to designing a fluorescence sensor for pertechnetate (TcO4-). They are as follows: Fluorescence spectroelectrochemistry and less than picomolar limit of detection for a model non-radioactive analyte have been demonstrated. The spectroelectrochemical sensor and associated instrumentation for fluorescence mode of operation have been made, are portable, and easily transported to and used at DOE sites. The sensor has sufficient selectivity for its application to complex samples, even including tank waste, that exist at DOE sites such as the Hanford Site. Pertechnetate has been preconcentrated in sensor films and electrochemically reduced. This is the first critical step in operation of a spectroelectrochemical sensor for TcO4-. New Tc complexes have been made that fluoresce and these complexes have been preconcentrated and electrochemically modulated in a sensor film leading to fluorescence modulation, which is the second critical step in operation of the spectroelectrochemical sensor for TcO4-. We have determined that fluorescence offers a means of dramatically improving the limit of detection. Based on measurements on our new fluorescent complexes of Tc, we estimate the limit of detection for the sensor to be 5 x 10-12M. In related work, we have shown that the sensitivity of the spectroelectrochemical sensor for some metal cations can be improved by forming a metal complex with better optical and electrochemical properties. In addition, some heavy metals can be detected with the spectroelectrochemical sensor by depositing them directly as metals on the sensor surface.

  12. EMP Attachment 3 DOE-SC PNNL Site Dose Assessment Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.

    2011-12-21

    This Dose Assessment Guidance (DAG) describes methods to use to determine the Maximally-Exposed Individual (MEI) location and to estimate dose impact to that individual under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). This guidance applies to public dose from radioactive material releases to the air from PNNL Site operations. This document is an attachment to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) and describes dose assessment guidance for radiological air emissions. The impact of radiological air emissions from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) PNNL Site is indicated by dose estimates to a maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). Reporting requirements associated with dose to members of the public from radiological air emissions are in 40 CFR Part 61.94, WAC 246-247-080, and DOE Order 458.1. The DOE Order and state standards for dose from radioactive air emissions are consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dose standards in 40 CFR 61.92 (i.e., 10 mrem/yr to a MEI). Despite the fact that the current Contract Requirements Document (CRD) for the DOE-SC PNNL Site operations does not include the requirement to meet DOE CRD 458.1, paragraph 2.b, public dose limits, the DOE dose limits would be met when EPA limits are met.

  13. Application of microseismic technology to hydraulic fracture diagnostics: GRI/DOE Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmer, R.; Warpinski, N.R.; Wright, T.B.; Branagan, P.T.; Fix, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project (M-Site) is to conduct field experiments and analyze data that will result in definitive determinations of hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments will be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment as well as surface facilities and equipment conducive to acquiring high-quality data. It is anticipated that the project`s research advancements will provide a foundation for a fracture diagnostic service industry and hydraulic fracture optimization based on measured fracture response. The M-Site Project is jointly sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site developed for M-Site hydraulic fracture experimentation is the former DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site located near Rifle, Colorado. The MWX project drilled three closely-spaced wells (MWX-1, MWX-2 and MWX-3) which were the basis for extensive reservoir analyses and tight gas sand characterizations in the blanket and lenticular sandstone bodies of the Mesaverde Group. The research results and background knowledge gained from the MWX project are directly applicable to research in the current M-Site Project.

  14. 40 CFR 63.7882 - What site remediation sources at my facility does this subpart affect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What site remediation sources at my... Remediation What This Subpart Covers § 63.7882 What site remediation sources at my facility does this subpart... remediation as designated by paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this section. (1) Process vents. The...

  15. New instrument calibration facility for the DOE Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, W.H.; Polz, E.J.

    1993-12-31

    A new laboratory facility is being designed, constructed, and equipped at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a fiscal year 1992 line item project. This facility will provide space and equipment for test, evaluation, repair, maintenance, and calibration of radiation monitoring instrumentation. The project will replace an obsolete facility and will allow implementation of program upgrades necessary to meet ANSI N323 requirements and National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) criteria for accreditation of federally owned secondary calibration laboratories. An outline of the project is presented including description, scope, cost, management organization, chronology, and current status. Selected design criteria and their impacts on the project are discussed. The upgraded SRS calibration program is described, and important features of the new facility and equipment that will accommodate this program are listed. The floor plan for the facility is shown, and equipment summaries and functional descriptions for each area are provided.

  16. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    SciTech Connect

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory's previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory's Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  17. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    SciTech Connect

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory`s previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory`s Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, ``Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  18. Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL`s Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

  19. Kansas State University (KSU), DOE EV Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. The G-Van has been signed in order for the public to be aware that this is an electric drive vehicle. Financial participant's names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. This vehicle is available for short term loan to interested utilities and companies. When other vehicles are obtained, the G-Van will be maintained on K-State's campus.

  20. Demonstrating and Deploying Private Sector Technologies at DOE Sites - Issues to be Overcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) continues to pursue cost-effective, environmental cleanup of the weapons complex sites with a concomitant emphasis on deployment of innovative technologies as a means to this end. The EM Office of Science and Technology (OST) pursues a strategy that entails identification of technologies that have potential applications throughout the DOE complex: at multiple DOE sites and at multiple facilities on those sites. It further encourages a competitive procurement process for the various applications entailed in the remediation of a given facility. These strategies require a competitive private-sector supplier base to help meet EM needs. OST supports technology development and deployment through investments in partnerships with private industry to enhance the acceptance of their technology products within the DOE market. Since 1992, OST and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have supported the re search and development of technology products and services offered by the private sector. During this time, NETL has managed over 140 research and development projects involving industrial and university partners. These projects involve research in a broad range of EM related topics, including deactivation and decommissioning, characterization, monitoring, sensors, waste separation, groundwater remediation, robotics, and mixed waste treatment. Successful partnerships between DOE and Industry have resulted in viable options for EM's cleanup needs, and require continued marketing efforts to ensure that these technology solutions are used at multiple DOE sites and facilities.

  1. Savannah River Site Eastern Transportation Hub: A Concept For a DOE Eastern Packaging, Staging and Maintenance Center - 13143

    SciTech Connect

    England, Jeffery L.; Adams, Karen; Maxted, Maxcine; Ruff Jr, Clarence; Albenesius, Andrew; Bowers, Mark D.; Fountain, Geoffrey; Hughes, Michael; Gordon, Sydney; O'Connor, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is working to de-inventory sites and consolidate hazardous materials for processing and disposal. The DOE administers a wide range of certified shipping packages for the transport of hazardous materials to include Special Nuclear Material (SNM), radioactive materials, sealed sources and radioactive wastes. A critical element to successful and safe transportation of these materials is the availability of certified shipping packages. There are over seven thousand certified packagings (i.e., Type B/Type AF) utilized within the DOE for current missions. The synergistic effects of consolidated maintenance, refurbishment, testing, certification, and costing of these services would allow for efficient management of the packagings inventory and to support anticipated future in-commerce shipping needs. The Savannah River Site (SRS) receives and ships radioactive materials (including SNM) and waste on a regular basis for critical missions such as consolidated storage, stabilization, purification, or disposition using H-Canyon and HB-Line. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has the technical capability and equipment for all aspects of packaging management. SRS has the only active material processing facility in the DOE complex and is one of the sites of choice for nuclear material consolidation. SRS is a logical location to perform maintenance and periodic testing of the DOE fleet of certified packagings. This initiative envisions a DOE Eastern Packaging Staging and Maintenance Center (PSMC) at the SRS and a western hub at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), an active DOE Regional Disposal Site. The PSMC's would be the first place DOE would go to meet their radioactive packaging needs and the primary locations projects would go to disposition excess packaging for beneficial reuse. These two hubs would provide the centralized management of a packaging fleet rather than the current approach to design, procure, maintain and dispose

  2. Management of comments on DOE`s Site Characterization Plan (SCP) and integration with the planned geotechnical program

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerstedt, T.W.; Gil, A.V.; Baird, F.A.

    1991-12-31

    The US DOE has committed to respond to comments on the SCP throughout the site characterization process. As of January 1990 DOE has received 4,574 comments on both the SCP/Consultation Draft and the statutory SCP. Of these, 2,662 responses have been completed and returned to the originators. Many comments are programmatic in nature and express diverse concerns beyond the scope of the SCP. DOE uses a three-tiered process in responding to comments that integrated technical and management responsibilities. The process defines specific roles in developing, reviewing, and concurring on responses. Commitments or open-items can be generated in DOE responses to comments, which are tracked on a relational database. Major changes reflected in the Secretary of Energy`s 1989 reassessment of the high-level waste program were advocated in comments on the SCP. Most DOE commitments, however, deal with consideration of recommendations contained in SCP comments relevant to low-levels of technical planning detail (SCP Study Plans). Commitments are discharged when referred to the appropriate quality-affecting or management process whereupon their merits can be evaluated.

  3. 34 CFR 396.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... selection criteria listed in § 396.31 and 34 CFR 75.210, the Secretary, in making awards under this part... INTERPRETERS FOR INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF AND INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF-BLIND How Does the Secretary Make...

  4. 34 CFR 425.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 425.22 What... vocational and academic curricula; and (3) Serve individuals described in § 425.3(b). (b) The Secretary...

  5. 34 CFR 425.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 425.22 What... vocational and academic curricula; and (3) Serve individuals described in § 425.3(b). (b) The Secretary...

  6. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites... NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  7. Collaboration in Long-Term Stewardship at DOE's Hanford Site - 13019

    SciTech Connect

    Moren, Rick; Brown, David; Feist, Ella; Grindstaff, Keith; Zeisloft, Jamie

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan [1]. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years,, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large parcel that

  8. Site/Systems Operations, Maintenance and Facilities Management of the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Susan

    2005-08-01

    This contract covered the site/systems operations, maintenance, and facilities management of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site.

  9. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Robert L.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this review is to assess the need for updating Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) assessments for the DOE's Hanford Site, as required by DOE Order 420.1B Chapter IV, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, based on significant changes in state-of-the-art NPH assessment methodology or site-specific information. This review is an update and expansion to the September 2010 review of PNNL-19751, Review of Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) Assessments for the Hanford 200 Areas (Non-Seismic).

  10. Transition and Closeout of the Former DOE Mound Plant Site: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C. P.; Marks, M. L.; Smiley, S.L.; Gallaher, D. M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) manages the Miamisburg Closure Project (MCP) by cleaning up the Mound site, located in Miamisburg, Ohio, to specific environmental standards, conveying all excess land parcels to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation, and transferring all continuing DOE post-closure responsibilities to the Office of Legacy Management (LM). Presently, the EM cleanup contract of the Mound site with CH2M Hill Mound Inc. is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2006. LM manages the Mound transition efforts and also post-closure responsibilities at other DOE sites via a contract with the S.M. Stoller Corporation. The programmatic transfer from EM to LM is scheduled to take place on October 1, 2006. The transition of the Mound site has required substantial integration and coordination between the EM and LM. Several project management principles have been implemented to help facilitate the transfer of programmatic responsibility. As a result, several lessons learned have been identified to help streamline and improve integration and coordination of the transfer process. Lessons learned from the Mound site transition project are considered a work in progress and have been summarized according to a work breakdown structure for specific functional areas in the transition schedule. The functional areas include program management, environmental, records management, information technology, property management, stakeholder and regulatory relations, procurement, worker pension and benefits, and project closeout. Specific improvements or best practices have been recognized and documented by the Mound transition team. The Mound site is one of three major cleanup sites within the EM organization scheduled for completion in 2006. EM, EM cleanup contractor, LM, and LM post-closure contractor have identified lessons learned during the transition and closure of the Mound site. The transition effort from

  11. Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Pyeloplasty Using Additional 2 mm Instruments: A Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung Ho; Lee, Dong-Gi; Lee, Jun Ho; Baek, Min Ki; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Despite a recent surge in the performance of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS), concerns remain about performing LESS pyeloplasty (LESS-P) because of the technical difficulty in suturing. We report our techniques and initial experiences with LESS-P using additional needlescopic instruments and compare the results with conventional laparoscopic pyeloplasty (CL-P). Materials and Methods Nine patients undergoing LESS-P were matched 2:1 with regard to age and side of surgery to a previous cohort of 18 patients who underwent CL-P. In both groups, the operating procedures were performed equally except for the number of access points. In the LESS-P group, we made a single 2 cm incision at the umbilicus and used a homemade port. We also used additional 2 mm needlescopic instruments at the subcostal area to facilitate suturing and the ureteral stenting. Results The preoperative characteristics were comparable in both groups. Postoperatively, no significant differences were noted between the LESS-P and CL-P cases in regard to length of stay, estimated blood loss, analgesics required, and complications. But, LESS-P was associated with a shorter operative time (252.2 vs. 309.7 minutes, p=0.044) and less pain on postoperative day one (numeric rating scale 3.7 vs. 5.6, p=0.024). The success rate was 94% with CL-P (median, 23 months) and 100% with LESS-P (median, 14 months). Conclusions Our initial experiences suggest that LESS-P is a feasible and safe procedure. The use of additional 2 mm instruments can help to overcome the difficulties associated with LESS surgery. PMID:22025957

  12. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  13. 34 CFR 658.33 - What additional criterion does the Secretary apply to applications from organizations and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional criterion does the Secretary apply to applications from organizations and associations? 658.33 Section 658.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  14. 38 CFR 20.304 - Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal. 20.304 Section 20.304 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Filing § 20.304 Rule 304. Filing...

  15. 34 CFR 660.33 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application to develop...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... use for an application to develop specialized instructional materials? 660.33 Section 660.33 Education...? § 660.33 What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application to develop... evaluates an application to develop specialized instructional materials on the basis of the criteria in...

  16. 34 CFR 658.33 - What additional criterion does the Secretary apply to applications from organizations and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional criterion does the Secretary apply to applications from organizations and associations? 658.33 Section 658.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES...

  17. 34 CFR 658.33 - What additional criterion does the Secretary apply to applications from organizations and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional criterion does the Secretary apply to applications from organizations and associations? 658.33 Section 658.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES...

  18. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  19. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  20. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  1. Characterization of candidate DOE sites for fabricating MOX fuel for lead assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Holdaway, R.F.; Miller, J.W.; Sease, J.D.; Moses, R.J.; O`Connor, D.G.; Carrell, R.D.; Jaeger, C.D.; Thompson, M.L.; Strasser, A.A.

    1998-03-01

    The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is directing the program to disposition US surplus weapons-usable plutonium. For the reactor option for disposition of this surplus plutonium, MD is seeking to contract with a consortium, which would include a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabricator and a commercial US reactor operator, to fabricate and burn MOX fuel in existing commercial nuclear reactors. This option would entail establishing a MOX fuel fabrication facility under the direction of the consortium on an existing DOE site. Because of the lead time required to establish a MOX fuel fabrication facility and the need to qualify the MOX fuel for use in a commercial reactor, MD is considering the early fabrication of lead assemblies (LAs) in existing DOE facilities under the technical direction of the consortium. The LA facility would be expected to produce a minimum of 1 metric ton heavy metal per year and must be operational by June 2003. DOE operations offices were asked to identify candidate sites and facilities to be evaluated for suitability to fabricate MOX fuel LAs. Savannah River Site, Argonne National Laboratory-West, Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as final candidates to host the LA project. A Site Evaluation Team (SET) worked with each site to develop viable plans for the LA project. SET then characterized the suitability of each of the five plans for fabricating MOX LAs using 28 attributes and documented the characterization to aid DOE and the consortium in selecting the site for the LA project. SET concluded that each option has relative advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other options; however, each could meet the requirements of the LA project as outlined by MD and SET.

  2. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2domains reveal that the (HhH)2domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  3. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  4. 40 CFR 63.7882 - What site remediation sources at my facility does this subpart affect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What site remediation sources at my facility does this subpart affect? 63.7882 Section 63.7882 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  5. 40 CFR 63.7882 - What site remediation sources at my facility does this subpart affect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true What site remediation sources at my facility does this subpart affect? 63.7882 Section 63.7882 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  6. Land Surface Product Validation Using the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, R.; Revercomb, H.; Tobin, D.; Osborne, B.

    2003-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) is making use of the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site for validation of NASA EOS land surface products. The DOE ARM site covers a 250 km square region that includes most of Oklahoma and southern Kansas. The site is dominated by a mixture of vegetation and bare soil with a vegetation fraction that changes with the growing season. The land use is divided between cattle ranching (permanent pasture) and wheat farming (seasonal). The DOE ARM site provides routine state-of-the-art vertical profile measurements of the atmospheric state. Special radiosonde launches have been conducted by DOE ARM to coincide with overpasses of the NASA Aqua platform. The UW-SSEC has provided ground truth measurements of surface characteristics using a mobile research vehicle (the AERIbago) during several aircraft field campaigns. The UW-SSEC Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) has provided high altitude observations of the thermal infrared spectrum for comparison to satellite observations. Coincident measurements of ground-based and aircraft observations with AIRS and MODIS satellite observations have been obtained during TX-2001, TX-2002, and IHOP. Preliminary land surface products from AIRS will be compared with MODIS land products and the validation measurements obtained from aircraft and ground-based sensors.

  7. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by reference... implement a workplace substance abuse program that complies with the requirements of 10 CFR part 707... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Workplace Substance...

  8. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by reference... implement a workplace substance abuse program that complies with the requirements of 10 CFR part 707... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Workplace Substance...

  9. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at...

  10. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at...

  11. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at...

  12. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by reference... implement a workplace substance abuse program that complies with the requirements of 10 CFR part 707... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Workplace Substance...

  13. 48 CFR 970.5223-4 - Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites, incorporated herein by reference... implement a workplace substance abuse program that complies with the requirements of 10 CFR part 707... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Workplace Substance...

  14. 48 CFR 923.570 - Workplace substance abuse programs at DOE sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... abuse programs are promulgated at 10 CFR part 707, Workplace Substance Abuse Programs at DOE Sites. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Workplace substance abuse... SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 923.570 Workplace substance abuse programs at...

  15. How does the QB site influence propagate to the QA site in photosystem II?

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Koji; Noguchi, Takumi

    2011-06-21

    The redox potential of the primary quinone Q(A) [E(m)(Q(A))] in photosystem II (PSII) is lowered by replacement of the native plastoquinone (PQ) with bromoxynil (BR) at the secondary quinone Q(B) binding site. Using the BR-bound PSII structure presented in the previous Fourier transform infrared and docking calculation studies, we calculated E(m)(Q(A)) considering both the protein environment in atomic detail and the protonation pattern of the titratable residues. The calculated E(m)(Q(A)) shift in response to the replacement of PQ with deprotonated BR at the Q(B) binding site [ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR)] was -55 mV when the three regions, Q(A), the non-heme iron complex, and Q(B) (Q(B) = PQ or BR), were treated as a conjugated supramolecule (Q(A)-Fe-Q(B)). The negative charge of BR apparently contributes to the downshift in ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR). This downshift, however, is mostly offset by the influence of the residues near Q(B). The charge delocalization over the Q(A)-Fe-Q(B) complex and the resulting H-bond strength change between Q(A) and D2-His214 are crucial factors that yield a ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR) of -55 mV by (i) altering the electrostatic influence of the H-bond donor D2-His214 on E(m)(Q(A)) and (ii) suppressing the proton uptake events of the titratable residues that could otherwise upshift ΔE(m)(Q(A))(PQ→BR) during replacement of PQ with BR at the Q(B) site. PMID:21585193

  16. Why does threonine, and not serine, function as the active site nucleophile in proteasomes?

    PubMed

    Kisselev, A F; Songyang, Z; Goldberg, A L

    2000-05-19

    Proteasomes belong to the N-terminal nucleophile group of amidases and function through a novel proteolytic mechanism, in which the hydroxyl group of the N-terminal threonines is the catalytic nucleophile. However, it is unclear why threonine has been conserved in all proteasomal active sites, because its replacement by a serine in proteasomes from the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum (T1S mutant) does not alter the rates of hydrolysis of Suc-LLVY-amc (Seemüller, E., Lupas, A., Stock, D., Lowe, J., Huber, R., and Baumeister, W. (1995) Science 268, 579-582) and other standard peptide amide substrates. However, we found that true peptide bonds in decapeptide libraries were cleaved by the T1S mutant 10-fold slower than by wild type (wt) proteasomes. In degrading proteins, the T1S proteasome was 3.5- to 6-fold slower than the wt, and this difference increased when proteolysis was stimulated using the proteasome-activating nucleotidase (PAN) ATPase complex. With mutant proteasomes, peptide bond cleavage appeared to be rate-limiting in protein breakdown, unlike with wt. Surprisingly, a peptide ester was hydrolyzed by both particles much faster than the corresponding amide, and the T1S mutant cleaved it faster than the wt. Moreover, the T1S mutant was inactivated by the ester inhibitor clasto-lactacystin-beta-lactone severalfold faster than the wt, but reacted with nonester irreversible inhibitors at similar rates. T1A and T1C mutants were completely inactive in all these assays. Thus, proteasomes lack additional active sites, and the N-terminal threonine evolved because it allows more efficient protein breakdown than serine. PMID:10809725

  17. Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1998, DOE operations at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.D.

    1999-09-22

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1998 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 1998 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, and direct radiation. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  18. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2001-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2000 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2000 continue to indicate no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  19. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.; Graf, J.M.; Dewart, J.M.; Buhl, T.E.; Wenzel, W.J.; Walker, L.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This guide was prepared to provide the experienced safety analyst with accident analysis guidance in greater detail than is possible in Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The guide addresses analysis of postulated serious accidents considered in the siting and selection of major design features of DOE nuclear facilities. Its scope has been limited to radiological accidents at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The analysis steps addressed in the guide lead to evaluation of radiological dose to exposed persons for comparison with siting guideline doses. Other possible consequences considered are environmental contamination, population dose, and public health effects. Choices of models and parameters leading to estimation of source terms, release fractions, reduction and removal factors, dispersion and dose factors are discussed. Although requirements for risk analysis have not been established, risk estimates are finding increased use in siting of major nuclear facilities, and are discussed in the guide. 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Oliver T.; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A.; Kramm, Christof M.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5–exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution. PMID:26355749

  1. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL...

  2. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL...

  3. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL...

  4. Geology Report: Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2006-07-01

    Surficial geologic studies near the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) were conducted as part of a site characterization program. Studies included evaluation of the potential for future volcanism and Area 3 fault activity that could impact waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS. Future volcanic activity could lead to disruption of the Area 3 RWMS. Local and regional studies of volcanic risk indicate that major changes in regional volcanic activity within the next 1,000 years are not likely. Mapped basalts of Paiute Ridge, Nye Canyon, and nearby Scarp Canyon are Miocene in age. There is a lack of evidence for post-Miocene volcanism in the subsurface of Yucca Flat, and the hazard of basaltic volcanism at the Area 3 RWMS, within the 1,000-year regulatory period, is very low and not a forseeable future event. Studies included a literature review and data analysis to evaluate unclassified published and unpublished information regarding the Area 3 and East Branch Area 3 faults mapped in Area 3 and southern Area 7. Two trenches were excavated along the Area 3 fault to search for evidence of near-surface movement prior to nuclear testing. Allostratigraphic units and fractures were mapped in Trenches ST02 and ST03. The Area 3 fault is a plane of weakness that has undergone strain resulting from stress imposed by natural events and underground nuclear testing. No major vertical displacement on the Area 3 fault since the Early Holocene, and probably since the Middle Pleistocene, can be demonstrated. The lack of major displacement within this time frame and minimal vertical extent of minor fractures suggest that waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS will not be impacted substantially by the Area 3 fault, within the regulatory compliance period. A geomorphic surface map of Yucca Flat utilizes the recent geomorphology and soil characterization work done in adjacent northern Frenchman Flat. The approach taken was to adopt the map unit boundaries (line

  5. Ecological assessments at DOE hazardous waste sites: Current procedures and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Krummel, J.R.; Irving, J.S.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    Major actions at US Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous waste sites require CERCLA compliance that meets NEPA considerations. Although NEPA compliance includes ecological considerations, neither the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) nor the DOE provide detailed guidance for conducting ecological assessments under NEPA. However, the identification of the form and magnitude of potential ecological impacts associated with a proposed action is directly dependent on the quality of the baseline data available for a particular site. Using the Surplus Facilities Management Program Weldon Spring site as an example, we discuss the collection of baseline ecological data for the site. This site is surrounded by approximately 17,000 acres of wildlife area. Available wildlife data consisted of qualitative, county-level species lists, and vegetation data was in the form of a regional qualitative narrative. Detailed site-specific occurrence data for listed species and high quality natural communities was provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation Heritage data base. 30 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Descriptions of representative contaminated sites and facilities within the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Short, S.M.; Buck, J.W.; Clark, L.L.; Fletcher, J.F.; Glantz, C.S.; Holdren, G.R.; Huesties, L.R.; Williams, M.D.; Oates, L.

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated efforts to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that will analyze the existing environmental restoration and waste management program and evaluate alternatives for an integrated program. The alternatives being evaluated include (1) a {open_quotes}No Action{close_quotes} alternative as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) an Applicable, Relevant, and Appropriate Requirements (ARAR)-driven alternative, (3) a land-use-driven alternative, (4) a health-risk-driven alternative, and (5) a combination land-use and health-risk-driven alternative. The analytical approach being taken to evaluate each of these alternatives is to perform a remedial engineering analysis and human health and ecosystem effects analyses on every contaminated site and facility in the DOE complex. One of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) roles in this approach has been to compile the source term and environmental setting data needed to drive each of these analyses. To date, over 10,000 individual contaminated sites and facilities located throughout the DOE complex of installations have been identified and at least some minimal data compiled on each. The PEIS analyses have been appreciably simplified by categorizing all of these contaminated sites and facilities into six broad categories: (1) contaminated buildings, (2) contaminated soils, (3) solid waste sites (e.g., burial grounds), (4) liquid containment structures (e.g., tanks), (5) surface water sites, and (6) contaminated groundwater sites. A report containing a complete description of each of these thousands of contaminated sites and facilities would be tremendously large and unwildy, as would separate reports describing the application of the analytical methodologies to each.

  7. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Leee, Majelle

    2002-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2001 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Boeing Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Closure of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2001 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway. No structural debris from buildings, released for unrestricted use, was transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2001.

  8. Does Visual Impairment Lead to Additional Disability in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Sjoukes, L.; Koot, H. M.; Kooijman, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study addresses the question to what extent visual impairment leads to additional disability in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Method: In a multi-centre cross-sectional study of 269 adults with mild to profound ID, social and behavioural functioning was assessed with observant-based questionnaires, prior to expert…

  9. Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements at the DOE SGP CART Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was deployed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma September - December, 2000 for two DOE sponsored field campaigns: 1) the Water Vapor Intensive Operations Experiment 2000 and 2) the Atmospheric Radiations Measurement First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment Experiment (AFWEX). WvIOP2000 focussed on water vapor measurements in the lower troposphere while AFWEX focussed on upper tropospheric water vapor. For the first time ever, four water vapor lidars were operated simultaneously: one airborne and three ground-based systems. Intercomparisons of these measurements and others will be presented at the meeting.

  10. Understanding the Subsurface Reactive Transport of Transuranic Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Mark O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Saiers, James E.; Shuh, David K.

    2013-12-20

    Our primary hypothesis is that actinides can interact with surfaces in fundamentally different ways than other metals, metalloids, and oxyanions and that this fundamental difference requires new approaches to studying and modeling transuranic sorption to minerals and geomedia. This project supports a key mission of the SBR program to develop sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites will be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical, and biological processes into decision making for environmental management and long-term stewardship, while also supporting DOE’s commitment to education, training, and collaboration with DOE user facilities.

  11. Does remediation save lives? - on the cost of cleaning up arsenic-contaminated sites in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Johanna; Samakovlis, Eva; Johansson, Maria Vredin; Barregard, Lars

    2010-07-15

    Sweden has only just begun remediation of its many contaminated sites, a process that will cost an estimated SEK 60,000 million (USD 9100 million). Although the risk assessment method, carried out by the Swedish EPA, is driven by health effects, it does not consider actual exposure. Instead, the sites are assessed based on divergence from guideline values. This paper uses an environmental medicine approach that takes exposure into account to analyse how cancer risks on and near arsenic-contaminated sites are implicitly valued in the remediation process. The results show that the level of ambition is high. At 23 contaminated sites, the cost per life saved varies from SEK 287 million to SEK 1,835,000 million, despite conservative calculations that in fact probably underestimate the costs. It is concluded that if environmental health risks are to be reduced, there are probably other areas where economic resources can be used more cost-effectively. PMID:20439110

  12. Does the addition of proteases affect the biogas yield from organic material in anaerobic digestion?

    PubMed

    Müller, Liane; Kretzschmar, Jörg; Pröter, Jürgen; Liebetrau, Jan; Nelles, Michael; Scholwin, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical disintegration effect of hydrolytic enzymes in lab scale experiments. Influences of enzyme addition on the biogas yield as well as effects on the process stability were examined. The addition of proteases occurred with low and high dosages in batch and semi-continuous biogas tests. The feed mixture consisted of maize silage, chicken dung and cow manure. Only very high concentrated enzymes caused an increase in biogas production in batch experiments. In semi-continuous biogas tests no positive long-term effects (100 days) were observed. Higher enzyme-dosage led to a reduced biogas-yield (13% and 36% lower than the reference). Phenylacetate and -propionate increased (up to 372 mgl(-1)) before the other volatile fatty acids did. Volatile organic acids rose up to 6.8 gl(-1). The anaerobic digestion process was inhibited. PMID:26741852

  13. Geographic Information System Tools for Management of US DOE Sites - 13489

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Cliff; Pilz, Elaine; Pawel, Steve

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) uses a variety of GIS tools to support long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at DOE closure sites. These geo-spatial applications provide access to data both for external public viewing and for internal analysis and decision making. LM uses a custom geo-spatial application called geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System (GEMS) that draws validated information from a database of 4.6 million analytical results and 232,000 water level measurements for 58 LTS and M sites. These data were collected from transferred sites over a period of 40 years. The database is used to capture and store historical environmental information such as analytical chemistry data, groundwater depths and elevations, well logs, well construction data, geo-referenced boundaries, site physical features, and sampling locations from LTS and M sites. Stakeholders, regulators, and project personnel can use this Web-based application and data to display information in several forms, such as a tabular report, a graph, and a geo-spatial display, or the data can be labeled or highlighted in a map view. Institutional controls, with their LTS and M requirements and documentation, have recently been incorporated into a prototype GEMS Web page for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. LM uses multiple internal GIS viewers to help ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. For example, at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site, LM uses a GIS application to display real property interests on authoritative maps. Another project is used to facilitate discussions at stakeholder meetings for the Rocky Flats site's Original Landfill. The Uranium Leasing Program uses multiple interactive maps that assist in ongoing monitoring and the oversight of lease-holders' activities. (authors)

  14. Sulfur-Modified Zero-Valent Iron for Remediation Applications at DOE Sites - 13600

    SciTech Connect

    Fogwell, Thomas W.; Santina, Pete

    2013-07-01

    Many DOE remediation sites have chemicals of concern that are compounds in higher oxidation states, which make them both more mobile and more toxic. The chemical reduction of these compounds both prevents the migration of these chemicals and in some cases reduces the toxicity. It has also been shown that zero-valent iron is a very effective substance to use in reducing oxygenated compounds in various treatment processes. These have included the treatment of halogenated hydrocarbons in the form volatile organic compounds used as solvents and pesticides. Zero-valent iron has also been used to reduce various oxidized metals such as chromium, arsenic, and mercury in order to immobilize them, decrease their toxicity, and prevent further transport. In addition, it has been used to immobilize or break down other non-metallic species such as selenium compounds and nitrates. Of particular interest at several DOE remediation sites is the fact that zero-valent iron is very effective in immobilizing several radioactive metals which are mobile in their oxidized states. These include both technetium and uranium. The main difficulty in using zero-valent iron has been its tendency to become inactive after relatively short periods of time. While it is advantageous to have the zero-valent iron particles as porous as possible in order to provide maximum surface area for reactions to take place, these pores can become clogged when the iron is oxidized. This is due to the fact that ferric oxide has a greater volume for a given mass than metallic iron. When the surfaces of the iron particles oxidize to ferric oxide, the pores become narrower and will eventually shut. In order to minimize the degradation of the chemical activity of the iron due to this process, a modification of zero-valent iron has been developed which prevents or slows this process, which decreases its effectiveness. It is called sulfur-modified iron, and it has been produced in high purity for applications in

  15. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  16. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. [United States Department of Energy (DOE) Kansas State University (KSU) Electric Vehicle (EV)

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-01-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter's report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  17. DOE responses to CDH October 1993 comments on the Remedical Action Plan for the Naturita, Colorado, Umtra Site

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This document includes the October 1993 comments provided by the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) on the Department of Energy (DOE) Preliminary Final Remedial Action Plan for the Naturita, Colorado, UMTRA Site. DOE`s responses are included after each CDH comment.

  18. Strategic planning model for achieving stakeholder involvement in environmental at DOE weapons complex sites

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G.

    1994-12-31

    Within today`s reality a public manager often needs to develop cooperative relationships among a number of individual, program, and organizational stakeholders to accomplish particular projects, programs, or policies. A DOE site manager charged with accomplishing environmental restoration and conversion at former weapons production sites is no exception. Important reasons for this include the technical and political complexity of the clean-up problem; limits on the funding, authority, and other resources available to DOE; authority, responsibilities, and interests of other stakeholders; and the ever present potential for conflict among stakeholders, and power of any one to hinder, if not halt, the clean-up process if conflicts aren`t managed and cooperative relationships established and maintained.

  19. Intelligence is as intelligence does: can additional support needs replace disability?

    PubMed

    Arnold, Samuel R C; Riches, Vivienne C; Stancliffe, Roger J

    2011-12-01

    Abstract In many developed cultures there is an assumption that IQ is intelligence. However, emerging theories of multiple intelligences, of emotional intelligence, as well as the application of IQ testing to other cultural groups, and to people with disability, raises many questions as to what IQ actually measures. Despite recent research that shows IQ testing produces a floor effect when applied to people with lower IQ, as well as research that shows the Flynn effect also applies to people with lower IQ, in practice IQ scores below a certain cut-off are still being used to determine and classify a person's intellectual disability. However, a new paradigm is emerging, almost returning to the original intent of Binet, where measurement is made of the supports the person needs. In this paper, we argue that if one extends the notions of this supports paradigm that diagnosis of intellectual or physical disability could potentially be replaced by diagnosis of additional intellectual support needs, or additional physical support needs. PMID:21992715

  20. Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. ); Natsis, M.E. ); Walker, J.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

  1. Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J.; Natsis, M.E.; Walker, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

  2. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  3. Does NASA's Constellation Architecture Offer Opportunities to Achieve Multiple Additional Goals in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Lester, Daniel F.

    2008-01-01

    Every major NASA human spaceflight program in the last four decades has been modified to achieve goals in space not incorporated within the original design goals: the Apollo Applications Program, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and International Space Station. Several groups in the US have been identifying major future science goals, the science facilities necessary to investigate them, as well as possible roles for augmented versions of elements of NASA's Constellation program. Specifically, teams in the astronomy community have been developing concepts for very capable missions to follow the James Webb Space Telescope that could take advantage of - or require - free-space operations by astronauts and/or robots. Taking as one example, the Single-Aperture Far-InfraRed (SAFIR) telescope with a approx.10+ m aperture proposed for operation in the 2020 timeframe. According to current NASA plans, the Ares V launch vehicle (or a variant) will be available about the same time, as will the capability to transport astronauts to the vicinity of the Moon via the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and associated systems. [As the lunar surface offers no advantages - and major disadvantages - for most major optical systems, the expensive system for landing and operating on the lunar surface is not required.] Although as currently conceived, SAFIR and other astronomical missions will operate at the Sun-Earth L2 location, it appears trivial to travel for servicing to the more accessible Earth-Moon L1,2 locations. Moreover, as the recent Orbital Express and Automated Transfer Vehicle missions have demonstrated, future robotic capabilities should offer capabilities that would (remotely) extend human presence far beyond the vicinity of the Earth. In addition to multiplying the value of NASA's architecture for future human spaceflight to achieve the goals multiple major stakeholders, if humans one day travel beyond the Earth-Moon system - say, to Mars - technologies and capabilities for operating

  4. Does NASA's Constellation Architecture Offer Opportunities to Achieve Multiple Additional Goals in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Daniel F.

    2008-01-01

    Every major NASA human spaceflight program in the last four decades has been modified to achieve goals in space not incorporated within the original design goals: the Apollo Applications Program, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and International Space Station. Several groups in the US have been identifying major future science goals, the science facilities necessary to investigate them, as well as possible roles for augmented versions of elements of NASA's Constellation program. Specifically, teams in the astronomy community have been developing concepts for very capable missions to follow the James Webb Space Telescope that could take advantage of - or require - free-space operations by astronauts and/or robots. Taking as one example, the Single-Aperture Far-InfraRed (SAFIR) telescope with a approx. 10+ m aperture proposed for operation in the 2020 timeframe. According to current NASA plans, the Ares V launch vehicle (or a variant) will be available about the same time, as will the capability to transport astronauts to the vicinity of the Moon via the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and associated systems. [As the lunar surface offers no advantages - and major disadvantages - for most major optical systems, the expensive system for landing and operating on the lunar surface is not required.] Although as currently conceived, SAFIR and other astronomical missions will operate at the Sun-Earth L2 location, it appears trivial to travel for servicing to the more accessible Earth-Moon L1,2 locations. Moreover. as the recent Orbital Express and Automated Transfer Vehicle missions have demonstrated, future robotic capabilities should offer capabilities that would (remotely) extend human presence far beyond the vicinity of the Earth. In addition to multiplying the value of NASA's architecture for future human spaceflight to achieve the goals multiple major stakeholders. if humans one day travel beyond the Earth-Moon system - say, to Mars - technologies and capabilities for operating

  5. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.S.

    1998-11-23

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

  6. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal...

  7. Effect of a-site cation deficiency and YSZ additions on sintering and properties of doped lanthanum manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The sintering behavior of Ca- and Sr-doped lanthanum manganite (the preferred SOFC cathode material) is highly dependent on the relative proportion of A and B site cations in the material. In general, A-site cation deficiency increases sintered density. The effect of additions of YSZ to lanthanum manganite (to expand the reactive region at the cathode/electrolyte interface and improve thermal expansion and sintering shrinkage matches) on sintering and other properties will also be reported.

  8. Does the Addition of a Second Antipsychotic Drug Improve Clozapine Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Barbui, Corrado; Signoretti, Alessandra; Mulè, Serena; Boso, Marianna; Cipriani, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    In patients with schizophrenia who do not have an optimal response to clozapine, it remains unclear if there is an evidence base to support a second antipsychotic in combination with clozapine. The present systematic review was therefore carried out to determine the efficacy of various clozapine combination strategies with antipsychotics. Relevant studies were located by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register, Medline, and Embase (up to November 2007). Only studies randomly allocating patients to clozapine plus another antipsychotic vs clozapine monotherapy were included. The search yielded 21 studies suitable for reanalysis. In 3 trials, clozapine was combined with a phenothiazine, in 8 trials with a benzamide, and in the remaining trials with risperidone. While the majority of randomized trials were not double blind, 6 studies were double-blind placebo-controlled trials. A total of 14 randomized open studies significantly favored clozapine combination strategy in terms of mean difference (random effect standardized mean difference [SMD] = −0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −1.14 to −0.46); however, data extracted from 6 randomized double-blind studies did not show a statistically significant positive effect of this combination strategy in terms of mean difference (SMD = −0.12, 95% CI = −0.57 to 0.32). In terms of percentage of patients failing to show an improvement, a total of 10 randomized open studies significantly favored clozapine combination strategy (random effect relative risk [RR] = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.42 to 0.97), but data extracted from 6 randomized double-blind studies did not show a statistically significant positive effect of this combination strategy (RR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.75 to 1.11). We conclude that the evidence base supporting a second antipsychotic in addition to clozapine in partially responsive patients with schizophrenia is weak. This weak evidence indicates modest to absent benefit. PMID:18436527

  9. Geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells, DOE Gladys McCall test site, Cameron Parish, Louisiana and DOE Willis Hulin test site, Vermillion Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana--the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  10. Site preference of ternary alloying additions to NiTi: Fe, Pt, Pd, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mosca, Hugo O.

    2004-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of Pd in NiTi (J. Alloys and Comp. (2004), in press) has been extended to examine the behavior of several other alloying additions, namely, Fe, Pt, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf in this important shape memory alloy. It was found that all elements, to a varying degree, displayed absolute preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. How- ever, the energetics of the different substitutional schemes, coupled with large scale simulations indicate that the general trend in all cases is for the ternary addition to want to form stronger ordered structures with Ti.

  11. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FOR TANK WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-03

    Radioactive wastes from one hundred seventy-seven underground storage tanks in the 200 Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State will be retrieved, treated and stored either on site or at an approved off-site repository. DOE is currently planning to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which would be treated and permanently disposed in separate facilities. A significant volume of the wastes in the Hanford tanks is currently classified as medium Curie waste, which will require separation and treatment at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Because of the specific challenges associated with treating this waste stream, DOE EM-21 funded a project to investigate the feasibility of using fractional crystallization as a supplemental pretreatment technology. The two process requirements for fractional crystallization to be successfully applied to Hanford waste include: (1) evaporation of water from the aqueous solution to enrich the activity of soluble {sup 137}Cs, resulting in a higher activity stream to be sent to the WTP, and (2) separation of the crystalline salts that are enriched in sodium, carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate and sufficiently depleted in {sup 137}Cs, to produce a second stream to be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Phase I of this project has just been completed by COGEMA/Georgia Institute of Technology. The purpose of this report is to document an independent expert review of the Phase I results with recommendations for future testing. A team of experts with significant experience at both the Hanford and Savannah River Sites was convened to conduct the review at Richland, Washington the week of November 14, 2005.

  12. Site-selective DNA hydrolysis by Ce(IV)-EDTA with the use of one oligonucleotide additive bearing two monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Komiyama, Makoto

    2005-10-01

    Two deoxyuridine derivatives each bearing a monophosphate group at the 5-position with a C3 linker, were incorporated into an oligonucleotide. By using this modified oligonucleotide, a bulge was formed at a predetermined position in a DNA substrate, and two monophosphate groups were placed at both junctions of the bulge. Upon treatment of the mixture with Ce(IV)-EDTA at pH 7.0, the phosphodiester linkages at the bulge site were selectively and efficiently hydrolyzed. The monophosphate groups introduced into the bulge site greatly accelerated site-selective DNA scission. Compared with the previously reported two-additive system, which combines two oligonucleotide additives each with a monophosphate at their termini, the present one-additive system is simpler and more convenient. Furthermore, site-selective DNA hydrolysis by using this one-additive system is successful even at high reaction temperatures (e.g., 55 degrees C). This reflects the thermodynamic stability of the duplexes formed between the substrate and the additive DNA. PMID:16196014

  13. Engineering simulator applications to emergency preparedness at DOE (Department of Energy) reactor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1984 the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has conducted twenty-five comprehensive emergency preparedness exercises at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Headquarters Operations Center and Regional Incident Response Centers using the NRC's Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), developed at the INEL, as an engineering simulator. The objective of these exercises has been to assist the NRC in upgrading its preparedness to provide technical support backup and oversight to US commercial nuclear plant licensees during emergencies such as the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident. With the current focus on Department of Energy (DOE) reactor operational safety and emergency preparedness, this capability is envisioned as a means of upgrading emergency preparedness at DOE production and test reactor sites such as the K-Reactor at Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL. These technically challenging exercises have been instrumental in enhancing the NRC's technical support capability and overall emergency preparedness and would be expected to produce similar results at DOE reactor sites. 3 refs.

  14. Management of government property in the possession of off-site contractors (DOE-PMR 109-60)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This handbook contains Part 109-60 of the DOE Property Management Regulations (DOE-PMR) (41 CFR Chapter 109). This Part 109-60 sets forth the minimum requirements to be observed by off-site contractors in establishing and maintaining control over Government property provided pursuant to a contract with DOE. The contract clauses of the DOE Procurement Regulations incorporate Part 109-60 by reference in all off-site contracts in which Government property is provided. Individual Subparts of this Part deal with contractor's responsibility; records and financial reports; identification; physical inventories; care and maintenance; utilization, disposal, and retirement; motor vehicle and aircraft management; and required reports. (RWR)

  15. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  16. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  17. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  18. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  19. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Boundary changes, amendments to the... REGULATIONS Reserve Designation and Subsequent Operation § 921.33 Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and...

  20. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  1. DOE's HAZMAT Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lelewer, S.A.; Spahn, J.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and operates the Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC) as a research and demonstration facility available on a user-fee basis to private and public sector test and training sponsors concerned with safety aspects of hazardous materials. Though initially designed to accommodate large liquefied natural gas releasers, the HSC has accommodated hazardous materials training and safety-related testing of most chemicals in commercial use. The HSC is located at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) near Mercury, Nevada. The HSC provides a unique opportunity for industry and other users to conduct hazardous materials testing and training. This is the only facility of its kind for either large- or small-scale testing of hazardous and toxic fluids under controlled conditions. It is ideally suited for test sponsors to develop verified data on release prevention, mitigation, cleanup, and environmental effects of toxic and hazardous materials. The facility site also supports structured training for hazardous spills, nkigation, and cleanup. Since 1986, the HSC has been utilized for releases to evaluate the patterns of dispersion mitigation techniques, and combustion characteristics of select materials. Use of the facility can also aid users in developing emergency planning under U.S. Public Law 99-499; the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA); and other federal, state, and international laws and regulations. The HSC Program is managed by the DOE, OffIce of Emergency Management, Nonproliferation and National Security, with the support and assistance of other divisions of DOE and the U. S. government.

  2. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  3. Tissue-specific factors additively increase the probability of the all-or-none formation of a hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, J; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-01-01

    DNase I-hypersensitive sites lack a canonical nucleosome and have binding sites for various transcription factors. To understand how the hypersensitivity is generated and maintained, we studied the chicken erythroid-specific beta(A)/epsilon globin gene enhancer, a region where both tissue-specific and ubiquitous transcription factors can bind. Constructions containing mutations of this enhancer were stably introduced into a chicken erythroid cell line. We found that the hypersensitivity was determined primarily by the erythroid factors and that their binding additively increased the accessibility. The fraction of accessible sites in clonal cell lines was quantitated using restriction endonucleases; these data implied that the formation of each hypersensitive site was an all-or-none phenomenon. Use of DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes further indicated that the size of the hypersensitive site was influenced by the binding of transcription factors which then determined the length of the nucleosome-free gap. Our data are consistent with a model in which hypersensitive sites are generated stochastically: mutations that reduce the number of bound factors reduce the probability that these factors will prevail over a nucleosome; thus, the fraction of sites in the population that are accessible is also diminished. Images PMID:8665857

  4. Seismic design spectra 200 West and East Areas DOE Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    This document presents equal hazard response spectra for the W236A project for the 200 East and West new high-level waste tanks. The hazard level is based upon WHC-SD-W236A-TI-002, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis, DOE Hanford Site, Washington. Spectral acceleration amplification is plotted with frequency (Hz) for horizontal and vertical motion and attached to this report. The vertical amplification is based upon the preliminary draft revision of Standard ASCE 4-86. The vertical spectral acceleration is equal to the horizontal at frequencies above 3.3Hz because of near-field, less than 15 km, sources.

  5. Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438

    SciTech Connect

    Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin

    2013-07-01

    Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

  6. Addition of feruloyl esterase and xylanase produced on-site improves sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Braga, Cleiton Márcio Pinto; Delabona, Priscila da Silva; Lima, Deise Juliana da Silva; Paixão, Douglas Antônio Alvaredo; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2014-10-01

    Accessory enzymes that assist biomass degradation could be used to improve the recovery of fermentable sugar for use in biorefineries. In this study, different fungal strains isolated from the Amazon rainforest were evaluated in terms of their ability to produce feruloyl esterase (FAE) and xylanase enzymes, and an assessment was made of the contributions of the enzymes in the hydrolysis of pretreated sugarcane bagasse. In the selection step, screening using plate assays was followed by shake flask submerged cultivations. After carbon source selection and cultivation in a stirred-tank bioreactor, Aspergillusoryzae P21C3 proved to be a promising strain for production of the enzymes. Supplementation of a commercial enzyme preparation with 30% (v/v) crude enzymatic complex from A. oryzae P21C3 increased the conversion of cellulose derived from pretreated sugarcane bagasse by 36%. Supplementation with FAE and xylanase enzymes produced on-site can therefore be used to improve the hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse. PMID:25151076

  7. Field evaluation of portable and central site PM samplers emphasizing additive and differential mass concentration estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu-Lin; Vanderpool, Robert; Williams, Ronald; Dimmick, Fred; Grover, Brett D.; Long, Russell; Murdoch, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) and the accompanying Federal Reference Method (FRM) for PM 10 in 1987. The EPA revised the particle standards and FRM in 1997 to include PM 2.5. In 2005, EPA proposed revisions to this NAAQS to include PM 10-2.5 but only finalized revisions with a PM 2.5 FRM and the development of a national monitoring network in 2006. Presently, no EPA designated reference or equivalent method sampler has the ability to directly measure the mass concentrations of PM 10, PM 10-2.5, and PM 2.5 simultaneously. An additive approach has been used for samplers like the dichotomous monitors to calculate PM 10 mass concentrations from independent measures of PM 10-2.5 and PM 2.5 (i.e. PM 10 = PM 10-2.5 + PM 2.5). A differential approach has been used to calculate PM 10-2.5 from identical collocated PM 10 and PM 2.5 samplers (i.e. PM 10-2.5 = PM 10-PM 2.5). Since these two approaches have been used widely for PM measurements, it is informative to evaluate their precision and comparability. EPA performed collocated tests of five different particle samplers in the Research Triangle Park area of North Carolina to evaluate the comparability and to characterize the additive and differential approaches used to determine particle mass concentrations. The intra-sampler precision of MiniVol, Omni, and dichotomous samplers was less than 8.4%. The precision of PM 10 measurements using the additive approach with dichotomous samplers was less than 3.5%. The poorest precision of the various PM 10-2.5 differential approaches was less than 15.1%. No zero or negative PM 10-2.5 concentrations were calculated using the differential approach. A coefficient of determination of 0.81 or higher was obtained for all paired comparison of PM 10-2.5. The reported test results show that concentrations calculated from both the additive and differential approaches generally agree among the portable samplers, the more

  8. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Suttora, Linda C.; Phifer, Mark

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  9. Ethanol Addition for Enhancing Denitrification at the Uranium Mill Tailing Site in Monument Valley, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; McMillan, Andrew; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, Geoff; Waugh, W. J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium mining and processing near Monument Valley, Arizona resulted in the formation of a large nitrate plume in a shallow alluvial aquifer. The results of prior field characterization studies indicate that the nitrate plume is undergoing a slow rate of attenuation via denitrification, and the results of bench-scale studies suggest that denitrification rates can potentially be increased by an order of magnitude with the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential of ethanol amendment for enhancing the natural denitrification occurring in the alluvial aquifer. Pilot tests were conducted using the single well, push-pull method and a natural-gradient test. The results showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicate the ethanol amendment effected a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Continued monitoring after completion of the pilot tests has shown that nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude lower than the initial values, indicating that the impacts of the pilot tests have been sustained for several months.

  10. Ultra wide band radar holographic imaging of buried waste at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Gribble, R.P.; Hall, T.E.; Lechelt, W.M.

    1995-04-01

    Ultra wideband linear array holography is a unique real-time imaging technique for in-situ inspection of buried waste at various DOE sites. The array can be mounted on various platforms such as crane booms, pickup trucks, ATVs, and scanned generating ``3-D`` subsurface images in real time. Inspection speeds are 0.5 to 2 meters/sec, if the image is viewed in real time, greater for off-line processing. The Ground Penetrating Holographic (GPH) system developed for inspection of DOE sites employs two 32element arrays of tapered-slot antenna operating at 5-GHz and 2.5-GHz center frequencies. The GPH system, which is mounted on a small trailer with a computer image processor, display, and power supply, is capable of imaging a wide swath (1 to 2 meters) with its linear arrays. The lower frequency array will be used at INEL (for greater depth penetration) because of high soil attenuation. Recent holographic ``3-D`` images of buried waste container lids and dielectrics obtained in Hanford sand and INEL soils at various depths graphically illustrate the unique image resolution capabilities of the system. Experimental results using the 5-GHz array will be presented showing the excellent holographic image quality of various subsurface targets in sand and INEL soil.

  11. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE operations annual site environmental report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R.J.

    1997-11-10

    Rocketdyne currently operates several facilities in the San Fernando Valley/Simi Valley area, for manufacturing, testing, and research and development (R and D). These operations include manufacturing liquid-fueled rocket engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and engines used for expendable launch vehicles used to place artificial satellites into orbit. This work includes fabrication and testing of rocket engines, lasers, and heat-transfer systems; and R and D in a wide range of high-technology fields, such as the electrical power system for the Space Station. Previously, this work also included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. This nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. The majority of this work is done for the Department of Energy (DOE). This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1996 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to DOE operations at Area IV of SSFL and at De Soto.

  12. [Detection and characterization of an additional site for binding of substrate and its analogs by inorganic pyrophosphatase].

    PubMed

    Bakuleva, N P; Kostenko, E B; Baĭkov, A A; Avaeva, S M

    1981-05-01

    Phosphate, pyrophosphate, imidodiphosphate, EDTA and tripolyphosphate increase the rate constant for dissociation of the inorganic pyrophosphatase-substrate intermediate formed after cessation of the reaction by fluoride. The effect is enhanced in the given order 19-fold, the dependence of this effect on ligand concentration being hyperbolic. The values of the dissociation constants of the enzyme-ligand complexes lie within the concentration range of 0.16-1.0 mM. At high concentrations of Na2+ added simultaneously with the ligands this effect is decreased. The value of tau 1/2 for Pi binding to the enzyme-substrate compound is 0.15 min. The data obtained suggest that pyrophosphatase contains an anion ligand binding site, differing from that of the active one. This site does not affect the hydrolytic function of pyrophosphatase, as can be evidenced from the fact that Pi (9.5 mM) does not change the rate of enzymatic cleavage of PPi. PMID:6117332

  13. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE BUILDING 100 PLUME, FORMER DOE PINELLAS SITE (YOUNG - RAINEY STAR CENTER), LARGO, FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Rossabi, J.; Amidon, M.; Riha, B.; Kaback, D.

    2010-07-30

    and/or bioaugmentation to provide a sustainable remediation system within the flow path of the plume. Additional data will be required to implement this approach and will include: (1) Better delineation of the nature and extent of contamination; (2) Demonstration the plume is currently stable or shrinking; and (3) Demonstration the full reductive dechlorination is occurring. The technical team recommends that DOE use a phased approach to identify residual contamination and to provide rapid installation of remedies. Matrices of characterization and remediation sensors, technologies, and tools were developed by the team in order to match the specific conditions and requirements of the site. The team provides a specific example of remedy that includes the incorporation of a dynamic characterization strategy moving from minimally invasive to more aggressive field techniques, the consideration of multiple complementary remediation approaches based on a spatiotemporally phased approach keyed to the different demands of different parts of the plume, and the integration and sequencing of the characterization and remediation activities.

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  15. Pacific Northwest Laboratory FY 1993 Site Maintenance Plan for maintenance of DOE nonnuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, J.D.

    1992-09-28

    This Site Maintenance Plan has been developed for Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) Nonnuclear Facilities. It is based on requirements specified by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, Change No. 4. The objective of this maintenance plan is to provide baseline information for compliance to the DOE Order 4330.4A, to identify needed improvements, and to document the planned maintenance budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 and to estimate maintenance budgets for FY 1994 and FY 1995 for all PNL facilities. Using the results of the self-assessment, PNL has selected 12 of the 36 elements of the Maintenance Program defined by DOE Order 4330.4A, Chapter I, for improvement. The elements selected for improvement are: Facility Condition Inspections; Work Request (Order) System; Formal Job Planning and Estimating; Work Performance (Time) Standards; Priority System; Maintenance Procedures and Other Work-Related Documents; Scheduling System; Post Maintenance Testing; Backlog Work Control; Equipment Repair History and Vendor Information; Work Sampling; and Identification and Control. Based upon a graded approach and current funding, those elements considered most important have been selected as goals for earliest compliance. Commitment dates for these elements have been established for compliance. The remaining elements of noncompliance will be targeted for implementation during later budget periods.

  16. DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

    2003-05-21

    Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I

  17. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

  18. A decision methodology for the evaluation of mixed low-level radioactive waste management options for DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, J.; Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Djordjevic, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    Currently, many DOE sites are developing site-specific solutions to manage their mixed low-level wastes. These site-specific MLLW programs often result in duplication of efforts between the different sites, and consequently, inefficient use of DOE system resources. A nationally integrated program for MLLW eliminates unnecessary duplication of effort, but requires a comprehensive analysis of waste management options to ensure that all site issues are addressed. A methodology for comprehensive analysis of the complete DOE MLLW system is being developed by DOE-HQ to establish an integrated and standardized solution for managing MLLW. To be effective, the comprehensive systems analysis must consider all aspects of MLLW management from cradle-to-grave (i.e. from MLLW generation to disposal). The results of the analysis will include recommendations for alternative management options for the complete DOE MLLW system based on various components such as effectiveness, cost, health and safety risks, and the probability of regulatory acceptance for an option. Because of the diverse nature of these various components and the associated difficulties in comparing between them, a decision methodology is being developed that will integrate the above components into a single evaluation scheme for performing relative comparisons between different MLLW management options. The remainder of this paper provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the various participants of the DOE MLLW Program, and discusses in detail the components involved in the development of the decision methodology for a comprehensive systems analysis.

  19. Additional disturbances as a beneficial tool for restoration of post-mining sites: a multi-taxa approach.

    PubMed

    Řehounková, Klára; Čížek, Lukáš; Řehounek, Jiří; Šebelíková, Lenka; Tropek, Robert; Lencová, Kamila; Bogusch, Petr; Marhoul, Pavel; Máca, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Open interior sands represent a highly threatened habitat in Europe. In recent times, their associated organisms have often found secondary refuges outside their natural habitats, mainly in sand pits. We investigated the effects of different restoration approaches, i.e. spontaneous succession without additional disturbances, spontaneous succession with additional disturbances caused by recreational activities, and forestry reclamation, on the diversity and conservation values of spiders, beetles, flies, bees and wasps, orthopterans and vascular plants in a large sand pit in the Czech Republic, Central Europe. Out of 406 species recorded in total, 112 were classified as open sand specialists and 71 as threatened. The sites restored through spontaneous succession with additional disturbances hosted the largest proportion of open sand specialists and threatened species. The forestry reclamations, in contrast, hosted few such species. The sites with spontaneous succession without disturbances represent a transition between these two approaches. While restoration through spontaneous succession favours biodiversity in contrast to forestry reclamation, additional disturbances are necessary to maintain early successional habitats essential for threatened species and open sand specialists. Therefore, recreational activities seem to be an economically efficient restoration tool that will also benefit biodiversity in sand pits. PMID:27053054

  20. DOE sets a course to speed cleanup of its weapon sites

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.B.; Island, A.

    1993-10-11

    Thomas P. Grumbly, the US Department of Energy's new environmental and waste czar, is on a mission to prove that it can actually correct a half-century of neglect. But he made it clear to attendees at a cleanup conference in Amelia Island, Florida, late last month that agency weapon-site managers and contractors will shoulder more of the responsibility. DOE headquarters already is shifting specific cleanup decisions to field offices, Grumbly told 400 cleanup firm executives at the annual Decisionmaker's Forum, sponsored by Weapons Complex Monitor, a publication that follows nuclear waste cleanup. To support the change, 1,000 employees will be added over the next three years to provide field offices with more cleanup expertise.

  1. Science To Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Felmy, Andrew R. ); Grate, Jay W. ); Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J. ); Meyer, Philip D. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Pfund, David M. ); Su, Yali ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Weber, William J. ); Zachara, John M. )

    2001-06-19

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, nine in fiscal year 1998, seven in fiscal year 1999, and five in fiscal year 2000. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have published final reports. The 1997 and 1998 award projects have been completed or are nearing completion. Final reports for these awards will be published, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the 1999 and 2000 grants address significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. The 1999 and 2000 EMSP awards at PNNL are focused primarily in two areas: Tank Waste Remediation, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  2. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. Year 1, fourth quarter report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-08-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter`s report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  3. SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENT MODELS AT DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Atmospheric Technologies Group develops, maintains, and operates computer-based software applications for use in emergency response consequence assessment at DOE's Savannah River Site. These applications range from straightforward, stand-alone Gaussian dispersion models run with simple meteorological input to complex computational software systems with supporting scripts that simulate highly dynamic atmospheric processes. A software quality assurance program has been developed to ensure appropriate lifecycle management of these software applications. This program was designed to meet fully the overall structure and intent of SRNL's institutional software QA programs, yet remain sufficiently practical to achieve the necessary level of control in a cost-effective manner. A general overview of this program is described.

  4. Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

  5. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.; Seliskar, C.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Del Negro, A.S.; Hubler, T.L.

    2006-06-01

    The general aim of our work funded by DOE is the design and implementation of a new sensor technology that offers the unprecedented levels of specificity needed for analysis of the complex chemical mixtures found at DOE sites nationwide. The sensor is based on a unique combination of electrochemistry, spectroscopy and selective partitioning into a film that collectively provide an extraordinary level of selectivity for the target analyte. Our goal is a reversible sensor in which the fluorescent Tc-complex formed in the film is re-oxidized to TcO4 ? and free ligand. TcO4 ? in the film would then re-equilibrate with the sample. The sensor would therefore satisfy requirements for both applications described above. Making significant progress towards this goal has required us to discover new chemistry and spectroscopy for technetium itself. Indeed, we needed to find the first technetium complexes which fluoresced in solution at room temperature ? we have made that breakthrough discovery this last year. We are now in the unique position of being able to reach our goal of a reversible sensor for Tc.

  6. Transuranic Contamination in Sediment and Groundwater at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-08-20

    A review of transuranic radionuclide contamination in sediments and groundwater at the DOE’s Hanford Site was conducted. The review focused primarily on plutonium-239/240 and americium-241; however, other transuranic nuclides were discussed as well, including neptunium-237, plutonium-238, and plutonium-241. The scope of the review included liquid process wastes intentionally disposed to constructed waste disposal facilities such as trenches and cribs, burial grounds, and unplanned releases to the ground surface. The review did not include liquid wastes disposed to tanks or solid wastes disposed to burial grounds. It is estimated that over 11,800 Ci of plutonium-239, 28,700 Ci of americium-241, and 55 Ci of neptunium-237 have been disposed as liquid waste to the near surface environment at the Hanford Site. Despite the very large quantities of transuranic contaminants disposed to the vadose zone at Hanford, only minuscule amounts have entered the groundwater. Currently, no wells onsite exceed the DOE derived concentration guide for plutonium-239/240 (30 pCi/L) or any other transuranic contaminant in filtered samples. The DOE derived concentration guide was exceeded by a small fraction in unfiltered samples from one well (299-E28-23) in recent years (35.4 and 40.4 pCi/L in FY 2006). The primary reason that disposal of these large quantities of transuranic radionuclides directly to the vadose zone at the Hanford Site has not resulted in widespread groundwater contamination is that under the typical oxidizing and neutral to slightly alkaline pH conditions of the Hanford vadose zone, transuranic radionuclides (plutonium and americium in particular) have a very low solubility and high affinity for surface adsorption to mineral surfaces common within the Hanford vadose zone. Other important factors are the fact that the vadose zone is typically very thick (hundreds of feet) and the net infiltration rate is very low due to the desert climate. In some cases where

  7. Department of Energy – Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2011-12-21

    The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environmental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

  8. EMP Attachment 1 DOE-SC PNNL Site Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Kirsten M.

    2011-11-10

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is written for the radiological environmental air surveillance program for the DOE-SC PNNL Site, Richland Washington. It provides the requirements for planning sampling events, and the requirements imposed on the analytical laboratory analyzing the air samples. The actual air sampling process is in procedure EPRP-AIR-029. The rationale for analyte selection, media, and sampling site location has been vetted through the data quality objectives (DQO) process (Barnett et al. 2010). The results from the DQO process have been reviewed and approved by the Washington State Department of Health. The DQO process (Barnett et al. 2010) identified seven specific radionuclides for analysis along with the need for gross alpha and gross beta radiological analyses. The analytes are {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 60}Co, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 233}U. The report also determined that air samples for particulates are the only sample matrix required for the monitoring program. These samples are collected on 47-mm glass-fiber filters.

  9. CLOSURE WELDING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2006-09-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) responsibility for the disposition of radioactive materials has given rise to several unique welding applications. Many of these materials require packaging into containers for either Interim or long-term storage. It is not uncommon that final container fabrication, i.e., closure welding, is performed with these materials already placed into the container. Closure welding is typically performed remote to the container, and routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE) are often times not feasible. Fluor Hanford has packaged many such materials in recent years as park of the Site's cleanup mission. In lieu of post-weld testing and NDE, the Fluor-Hanford approach has been to establish weld quality through ''upfront'' development and qualification of welding parameters, and then ensure parameter compliance during welding. This approach requires a rigor not usually afforded to typical welding development activities, and may involve statistical analysis and extensive testing, including burst, drop, sensitive leak testing, etc. This paper provides an instructive review of the development and qualification activities associated with the closure of radioactive materials containers, including a brief report on activities for closure welding research reactor, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site.

  10. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power. DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K. S.

    1998-11-23

    This .Annual Site Environmental Report for 1997 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory) (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past. these operations included development. fabrication. and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). Other activities included the operation of large scale liquid metal facilities for the testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). a government owned company operated, test facility within Area IV. .AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1981 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently. all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996.

  11. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2004-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2003 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing Rocketdyne’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2003 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  12. Social Organization in Parasitic Flatworms--Four Additional Echinostomoid Trematodes Have a Soldier Caste and One Does Not.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vedrenne, Ana E; Quintana, Anastasia C E; DeRogatis, Andrea M; Martyn, Kayla; Kuris, Armand M; Hechinger, Ryan F

    2016-02-01

    Complex societies where individuals exhibit division of labor with physical polymorphism, behavioral specialization, and caste formation have evolved several times throughout the animal kingdom. Recently, such complex sociality has been recognized in digenean trematodes; evidence is limited to 6 marine species. Hence, the extent to which a soldier caste is present throughout the Trematoda is sparsely documented, and there are no studies detailing the structure of a species lacking such a social structure. Here we examine colony structure for an additional 5 echinostomoid species, 4 of which infect the marine snail Cerithidea californica and 1 (Echinostoma liei) that infects the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata . For all species, we present redia morphology (pharynx and body size) and the distribution of individuals of different castes throughout the snail body. When morphological evidence indicated the presence of a soldier caste, we assessed behavior by measuring attack rates of the different morphs toward heterospecific trematodes. Our findings indicate that each of the 4 species from C. californica have a permanent soldier caste while E. liei does not. The observed intra- and inter-specific variation of caste structure for those species with soldiers, and the documentation of colony structure for a species explicitly lacking permanent soldiers, emphasizes the diverse nature of trematode sociality and the promise of the group to permit comparative investigations of the evolution and ecology of sociality. PMID:26560890

  13. Asymmetric Iridium-Catalyzed C-C Coupling of Chiral Diols via Site-Selective Redox-Triggered Carbonyl Addition.

    PubMed

    Shin, Inji; Krische, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyclometalated π-allyliridium C,O-benzoate complexes modified by axially chiral chelating phosphine ligands display a pronounced kinetic preference for primary alcohol dehydrogenation, enabling highly site-selective redox-triggered carbonyl additions of chiral primary-secondary 1,3-diols with exceptional levels of catalyst-directed diastereoselectivity. Unlike conventional methods for carbonyl allylation, the present redox-triggered alcohol C-H functionalizations bypass the use of protecting groups, premetalated reagents, and discrete alcohol-to-aldehyde redox reactions. PMID:26187028

  14. Movement of tagged dredged sand at thalweg disposal sites in the Upper Mississippi River. Volume 3. Additional results at Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites

    SciTech Connect

    McCown, D.L.; Paddock, R.A.

    1985-04-01

    During routine channel maintenance, hydraulically dredged sand was tagged with sand coated with fluorescent dye before being deposited as a pile in the thalweg at three sites on the Upper Mississippi River. As discussed in the first two volumes of this report, bathymetry was measured and surface sediments were sampled to study changes in the topography of the disposal pile and the downstream movement of the tagged sand. At all three sites, topographic evidence of the pile disappeared after the first period of high river flow, which was followed by redevelopment of dunes in the disposal area. The tagged sand did not migrate into nearby border areas, backwaters, or sloughs, remaining in the main channel as it moved downstream. This volume presents the results of additional surveys at the Gordon's Ferry and Whitney Island sites. At Gordon's Ferry, 25 bottom cores were taken to examine the three-dimensional distribution of tagged sand in the bottom sediments. The core analyses indicated that much of the tagged sand had been incorporated into the dune structure and that it resided primarily in the crests of the dunes.

  15. DOE's Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board: The Roles, Work, and Assessment of the Constituent Local Boards - 13587

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Catherine; Freeman, Jenny; Cantrell, Yvette

    2013-07-01

    The charter for the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) Site-Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) was approved under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) in 1994. With a unique mandate to provide public input on issues associated with the cleanup of nuclear legacy sites in the U.S., the EM SSAB comprises eight local boards, which are based at major EM sites. While each board is unique to the community in which it is located and reflects the diversity of the local population, the boards are governed by FACA, related regulations, and DOE policies that are intended to standardize agency advisory board operations. The EM SSAB local boards are made up of a diverse group of citizens who want to understand the mission and goals of the EM program and to help EM achieve those goals for the benefit of their communities. Some are quite passionate about their mission; others need to be coaxed into active participation. Maintaining productive relationships and a supportive environment for effective board operations is the challenge of board management for DOE EM and the board members themselves. DOE draws on research findings and best practices literature from academics and practitioners in the field of public involvement in its board management practices. The EM SSAB is also evaluated annually under the law to ensure that the investment of taxpayer dollars in the board is warranted in light of the contributions of the board. Further evaluation takes place at the agency and site levels in order to identify what aspects of board functioning the agency and board members find important to its success and to address areas where improvement is needed. Board contributions, compliance factors, and measurable outcomes related to board products and process areas are key to agency commitment to ongoing support of the boards and to participant satisfaction and thus continued member involvement. In addition to evaluation of these factors in improving board effectiveness

  16. Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

    1994-03-13

    For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

  17. Laparoendoscopic single site surgery in pediatric urology: does it require specialized tools?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nishant; Santomauro, Michael; Marietti, Sarah; Chiang, George

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe our experience utilizing Laparoendoscopic single site (LESS) surgery in pediatric urology. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed on LESS urologic procedures from November 2009 through March 2013. A total of 44 patients underwent 54 procedures including: nephrectomy (23), orchiopexy (14), varicocelectomy (9), orchiectomy (2), urachal cyst excision (3), and antegrade continence enema (3) (ACE). Results: Median patient age was 6.9 years old. Estimated blood loss (EBL), ranged from less than 5cc to 47cc for a bilateral nephrectomy. Operative time varied from 56 mins for varicocelectomy to a median of 360 minutes for a bilateral nephroureterectomy. Incision length ranged between 2 and 2.5cm. In our initial experience we used a commercial port. However, as we progressed, we were able to perform the majority of our procedures via adjacent fascial punctures for instrumentation at the single incision site. One patient did require conversion to an open procedure as a result of bleeding. Three complications were noted (6.8%), with two Clavien Grade 3b complications. Two patients required additional procedures at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The use of LESS applies to many pediatric urologic procedures, ideally for ablative procedures or simple reconstructive efforts. The use of adjacent fascial puncture sites for instrumentation can obviate the need for a commercial port or multiple trocars. PMID:27256182

  18. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  19. 20 CFR 30.102 - In general, how does an employee file a claim for additional impairment or wage-loss under Part E...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In general, how does an employee file a claim... an employee file a claim for additional impairment or wage-loss under Part E of EEOICPA? (a) An employee previously awarded impairment benefits by OWCP may file a claim for additional impairment...

  20. Estimation for Rock Mass Rating Distribution along Additional Excavating Tunnels in Gagok Mine as a Redeveloped Mining Site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H.; Choi, Y.; Park, H.

    2012-12-01

    In case of expanding mine galleries on redeveloping mine to gain the remaining minerals, commencing stability assessment is required because the sites could be in an unstable state in rock mechanics by occurrence of stress relaxation due to long-unattended existing galleries and other facilities. The paper presents the case study, which consider cause of errors occurrence and correct estimation result, to conduct multi-criteria indicator kriging using drilling log and electro-resistivity data for stability assessment on redeveloping mine. The study area is Gagok mine, which is one of the recent redeveloped mining sites in Korea. For suitable analyzing to the site, two correction methods were proposed that supplemented the indicator kriging method. The FIEG method was used in order to reduce the error of the results from the electro-resistivity survey influenced by infrastructures and mine galleries. In addition, the CARI method was chosen as a technique to resolve the distortions in the results from the indirect data, which were used due to external factors and decreased accuracy in statistical techniques. As a result, 73 % of the data for verifying were showed correct RMR class by estimation results and 1 % of the result were overestimated. Sensitivity of the FIEG was 3.5 %, that of the linear-CARI was 56 to 60 % and that of the logarithm-CARI was 61 to 65 %. In conclusion, the presented methods showed considerably effect increasing the accuracy of the RMR estimation, and remarkably reducing the ratio for overestimation. This paper could be used for the stability analyzing at redeveloping mines not only with increasing accuracy, but also without any further survey data or additional costs.

  1. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  2. Long-term Effects of Ethanol Addition on Denitrification At The Uranium Mill Tailing Site In Monument Valley, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, A. L.; Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, K. C.; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J. L.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, G. R.; Waugh, J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Due to mining and processing of uranium at a site near Monument Valley, AZ, an extensive nitrate plume was produced in a shallow alluvial aquifer. Two pilot tests were conducted to evaluate the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate to enhance natural denitrification. Aqueous geochemistry was characterized based upon groundwater samples collected before and after the addition of ethanol. Compound specific stable isotope analysis was also conducted. The results of the field tests showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicated that the ethanol amendment caused a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrate-nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Denitrification rate coefficients estimated for the pilot tests were approximately 50 times larger than resident-condition (non-enhanced) values obtained from prior characterization studies conducted at the site. Using the time at which nitrate concentrations began to decline for downgradient monitoring wells, and the associated inter-well distances, rough estimates of approximately 0.1-0.17 m/day were obtained for the effective reactive-front velocity. These values are within the range of mean pore-water velocities expected for the measured hydraulic conductivities and gradient. The nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude below the initial values for many months, indicating that the ethanol amendments had a long-term impact on the local subsurface environment.

  3. Preliminary results of a seismic borehole test using downhole shaped charges at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, S.M.; Michelsen, F.

    1994-02-01

    Geophysical site characterization studies can be important steps in the process of designing and monitoring remediation at hazardous waste storage facilities. Use of seismic techniques for subsurface characterization at the DOE Hanford Site has been limited. One reason is the lack of borehole velocity control, and low-velocity sediments are highly attenuative. Consequently, standard techniques to provide velocity control are not adequate. Both Vertical Seismic Profiling and reversed VSP surveys are currently being investigated to provide velocity control and for subsurface imaging capabilities. Recently a jet perforating gun was used to perforate a doubled-cased borehole in the 200 West Area. Acoustic emissions were recorded from numerous depths to obtain velocity control for a previous surface survey conducted in the same area. Both P- and S-wave data were recorded simultaneously from multiple horizons using the DAS-1 seismograph and 3-component geophones. The data were analyzed for a variety of uses besides velocity control. Signal attenuation was studied as a function of source depth and offset distance to evaluate formation absorption while vertical resolution was determined from the frequency spectrum. Preliminary results indicate that adequate P-wave velocity control can be obtained even though the near-surface sediments are very attenuative. However, we conclude that the perforating gun produces little SH energy. Preliminary velocities indicate that reflection coefficients should be great enough to use surface techniques. Results from the frequency study suggest that a swept source for both surface and borehole surveys may be necessary to obtain required resolutions. Finally, signal attenuation as a function of formation facies suggest that seismic techniques may be useful in mapping perched water zones and for long term vadose zone monitoring.

  4. CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

    2011-03-31

    RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

  5. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Lenox, Art; Blair, Lori; Amar, Ravnesh; Costa, Paul; Galvez, Lydia; Jameson, Blythe; Galvez, Lydia

    2008-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  6. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Karginov, Fedor V.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M.W.; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The lifespan of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here, we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5′-phosphate groups in mouse ES. We detect a prominent signature of Ago2-dependent cleavage events and validate several such targets. Unexpectedly, a broader class of Ago2-independent cleavage sites is also observed, indicating participation of additional nucleases in site-specific mRNA cleavage. Within this class, we identify a cohort of Drosha-dependent mRNA cleavage events that functionally regulate mRNA levels in mES cells, including one in the Dgcr8 mRNA. Together, these results highlight the underappreciated role of endonucleolytic cleavage in controlling mRNA fates in mammals. PMID:20620951

  7. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases.

    PubMed

    Karginov, Fedor V; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M W; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D; Hannon, Gregory J

    2010-06-25

    The life span of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5' phosphate groups in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We detect a prominent signature of Ago2-dependent cleavage events and validate several such targets. Unexpectedly, a broader class of Ago2-independent cleavage sites is also observed, indicating participation of additional nucleases in site-specific mRNA cleavage. Within this class, we identify a cohort of Drosha-dependent mRNA cleavage events that functionally regulate mRNA levels in mESCs, including one in the Dgcr8 mRNA. Together, these results highlight the underappreciated role of endonucleolytic cleavage in controlling mRNA fates in mammals. PMID:20620951

  8. From the Arctic to fetal life: physiological importance and structural basis of an 'additional' chloride-binding site in haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, M Cristina; Castagnola, Massimo; Bertonati, Claudia; Galtieri, Antonio; Giardina, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Haemoglobins from mammals of sub-Arctic and Arctic species, as well as fetal human Hb, are all characterized by a significantly lower Delta H of oxygenation compared with the majority of mammalian haemoglobins from temperate species (exceptions are represented by some cold-resistant species, such as cow, horse and pig). This has been interpreted as an adaptive mechanism of great importance from a physiological point of view. To date, the molecular basis of this thermodynamic characteristic is still not known. In the present study, we show that binding of extra chloride (with respect to adult human Hb) ions to Hb would significantly contribute to lowering the overall heat of oxygenation, thus providing a molecular basis for the low effect of temperature on the oxygenation-deoxygenation cycle. To this aim, the oxygen binding properties of bovine Hb, bear (Ursus arctos) Hb and horse Hb, which are representative of this series of haemoglobins, have been studied with special regard to the effect of heterotropic ligands, such as organic phosphates (namely 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and chloride. Functional results are consistent with a mechanism for ligand binding that involves an additional binding site for chloride ion. Analysis of computational chemistry results, obtained by the GRID program, further confirm the hypothesis that the reason for the lower Delta H of oxygenation is mainly due to an increase in the number of the oxygen-linked chloride-binding sites. PMID:14979874

  9. Addition of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Improves Bone Formation at an Ectopic Site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifa; Li, Zhijin; Dai, Taiqiang; Zong, Chunlin; Liu, Yanpu; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) added to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets on bone formation at an ectopic site. We isolated MSCs and ADSCs from the same rabbits. We then prepared MSC sheets for implantation with or without ADSCs subcutaneously in the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. We assessed bone formation at eight weeks after implantation by micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. In osteogenic medium, MSCs grew to form multilayer sheets containing many calcium nodules. MSC sheets without ADSCs formed bone-like tissue; although neo-bone and cartilage-like tissues were sparse and unevenly distributed by eight weeks after implantation. In comparison, MSC sheets with ADSCs promoted better bone regeneration as evidenced by the greater density of bone, increased mineral deposition, obvious formation of blood vessels, large number of interconnected ossified trabeculae and woven bone structures, and greater bone volume/total volume within the composite constructs. Our results indicate that although sheets of only MSCs have the potential to form tissue engineered bone at an ectopic site, the addition of ADSCs can significantly increase the osteogenic potential of MSC sheets. Thus, the combination of MSC sheets with ADSCs may be regarded as a promising therapeutic strategy to stimulate bone regeneration. PMID:26848656

  10. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R; Seliskar, Carl J; Bryan, Samuel A

    2012-09-18

    The general aim of our work funded by DOE is the design and implementation of a new sensor technology that offers unprecedented levels of specificity needed for analysis of the complex chemical mixtures found at DOE sites nationwide. The specific goal of this project was the development of a sensor for technetium (Tc) that is applicable to characterizing and monitoring the vadose zone and associated subsurface water at the Hanford Site and other DOE sites. The concept for the spectroelectrochemical sensor is innovative and represents a breakthrough in sensor technology. The sensor combines three modes of selectivity (electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and selective partitioning) into a single sensor to substantially improve selectivity. The sensor consists of a basic spectroelectrochemical configuration that we have developed under our previous DOE grants: a waveguide with an optically transparent electrode (OTE) that is coated with a thin chemically-selective film that preconcnetrates the analyte. The key to adapting this generic sensor to detect TcO4- and Tc complexes lies in the development of chemically-selective films that preconcentrate the analyte and, when necessary, chemically convert it into a complex with electrochemical and spectroscopic properties appropriate for sensing. Significant accomplishments were made in the general areas of synthesis and characterization of polymer films that efficiently preconcentrate the analyte, development and characterization of sensors and associated instrumentation, and synthesis and characterization of relevant Re and Tc complexes. Two new polymer films for the preconcentration step in the sensor were developed: partially sulfonated polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SSEBS) and phosphine containing polymer films. The latter was a directed polymer film synthesis that combined the proper electrostatic properties to attract TcO4- and also incorporated a suitable ligand for covalently trapping a

  11. Lessons learned during the training exercise for the entry into force of the U.S. additional protocol in the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 in anticipation of the United States bringing into force the Additional Protocol in early 2009 DOE/NNSA planned and executed training exercises in the conduct of Additional Protocol complementary access activities. Brookhaven National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory together produced the exercises designed to prepare the following types of DOE laboratories for complementary access - weapons laboratories, nuclear engineering laboratories, and science laboratories. This panel provides a forum to discuss and summarize the results and lessons learned from the 2008 exercise.

  12. Characterization of a Contaminant Inventory at DOE Sites, as a Tool for Selecting Monitoring and Remediation Technologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, T. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world’s largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. The frequency of occurrence and ranking of contaminants in groundwater plumes is one of the main criteria needed for decision-making related to planning and prioritizing the types of basic research and the development of site characterization, monitoring, and remedial approaches. Using the data from 60 DOE sites, including 221 groundwater plumes, collected in the DOE Groundwater Database (GWD), we evaluated the frequency of occurrence of specific contaminants and their associations, plume volumes, contaminant maximum concentrations, masses, and isotope activities. Contaminants detected in groundwater at 60 DOE sites and facilities can be categorized into the following eight generic contaminant groups: chlorinated hydrocarbons (chlorinated ethenes), fuels and fuel components (i.e., petroleum/fuel hydrocarbons), explosives, metals, radioactive isotopes (excluding tritium), tritium, sulfates, and nitrates. The most common are plumes containing two (29.4% of all plumes in the GWD) and three (29%) contaminant groups. The most frequent binary combinations of contaminant groups are those of mixed waste, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and tritium—35% and metals and isotopes—28% of all plumes. Our results were compared to the data from 18 DOE sites and 91 plumes, collected in 1992, to illustrate the progress in site characterization and remediation over the past decade. The analysis of contaminant inventory and plume characteristics should be helpful in establishing priorities for basic research needs, which will enable cost-effective and efficient application of new characterization, monitoring, modeling, and remediation technologies.

  13. DOE/KEURP site operator program. Year 3, Second Quarter Report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has procured two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. During calendar year 1994, the Kansas` electric vehicle program expects to purchase a minimum of four and a maximum of eleven additional electric vehicles. The G-Van was signed in order for the public to be aware that it was an electric vehicle. Financial participants` names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. The Soleq EvCorts have not been signed. In order to demonstrate the technology as feasible, the EvCorts were deliberately not signed. The goal is to generate a public perception that this vehicle is no different from any similar internal combustion engine vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged.

  14. Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

    2000-12-01

    Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

  15. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  16. Report on inspection of compliance with DOE Order 2030.4B at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this inspection was to evaluate contractor compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 2030.4B, {open_quotes}Reporting Fraud, Waste, And Abuse To The Office Of Inspector General.{close_quotes} The specific objective was to determine if the SRS management and operating (M&O) contractors were complying with the requirements in Paragraph 6.c. of DOE Order 2030.4B. These requirements are: (1) annual notification to employees of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, abuse, corruption, or mismanagement; (2) display and publish the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG) Hotline telephone number in common areas of buildings; (3) display and publish the DOE OIG Hotline number in telephone books and newsletters; and (4) notify the OIG cases referred to other law enforcement entities.

  17. 34 CFR 660.32 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application for a research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the proposed teaching, testing, and research methodology; and (2) The size, scope, and duration of the... use for an application for a research project, a survey, or a study? 660.32 Section 660.32 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a...

  18. 34 CFR 660.32 - What additional selection criteria does the Secretary use for an application for a research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the proposed teaching, testing, and research methodology; and (2) The size, scope, and duration of the... use for an application for a research project, a survey, or a study? 660.32 Section 660.32 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a...

  19. An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Socolof, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    A screening method was developed to compare the doses received via the atmospheric pathway at 15 potential DOE MLLW (mixed low-level waste) sites. Permissible waste concentrations were back calculated using the radioactivity NESHAP (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) in 40 FR 61 (DOE Order 5820.2A performance objective). Site-specific soil and meteorological data were used to determine permissible waste concentrations (PORK). For a particular radionuclide, perks for each site do not vary by more than one order of magnitude. perks of {sup 14}C are about six orders of magnitude more restrictive than perks of {sup 3}H because of differences in liquid/vapor partitioning, decay, and exposure dose. When comparing results from the atmospheric pathway to the water and intruder pathways, {sup 14}C disposal concentrations were limited by the atmospheric pathway for most arid sites; for {sup 3}H, the atmospheric pathway was not limiting at any of the sites. Results of this performance evaluation process are to be used for planning for siting of disposal facilities.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:25957835

  1. 20 CFR 655.737 - What are “exempt” H-1B nonimmigrants, and how does their employment affect the additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are âexemptâ H-1B nonimmigrants, and how does their employment affect the additional attestation obligations of H-1B-dependent employers and willful violator employers? 655.737 Section 655.737 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  2. Site environmental report for calendar year 2002. DOE operations at the Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2002 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing' s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL)). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and, subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2002 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property ( land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive w astes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes are released into the environment, and no structural debris from buildings w as transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2002.

  3. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  4. Adv. Simulation for Additive Manufacturing: 11/2014 Wkshp. Report for U.S. DOE/EERE/AMO

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, John A.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Blue, Craig A.

    2015-07-01

    The overarching question for the workshop was as following: How do we best utilize advanced modeling and high-performance computing (HPC) to address key challenges and opportunities in order to realize the full potential of additive manufacturing; and what are the key challenges of additive manufacturing to which modeling and simulation can contribute solutions, and what will it take to meet these challenges?

  5. Hydrological Tracer Studies at a DOE IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Williams, K. H.; Berman, E. S.; Conrad, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Research activities at the Department of Energy Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado, have demonstrated that uranium can successfully be removed from groundwater through stimulation of indigenous metal-reducing bacteria, such as members of the Geobacteraceae. While such removal strategies may be effective over short timescales, the large inventory of uranium sorbed to aquifer sediments contributes to a diffuse and widespread contaminant plume at the Rifle site, leading to persistent uranium contamination of groundwater. Complicating the long-term plume behavior are seasonal changes in aquifer properties (e.g. fluctuating water levels, variations in dissolved oxygen and organic carbon, etc.) that accompany snowmelt and elevated river stage in the Colorado River. As the impact of such changes on contaminant behavior at Rifle is poorly understood, development of novel methods, such as isotopic techniques, is warranted to better constrain aquifer flow properties and resolve surface water-groundwater interactions that may influence long-term uranium mobility. In addition to floodplain scale (ca. 10 hectare) studies of uranium mobility, ongoing research at Rifle is investigating coupled approaches to desorb and reductively immobilize pools of sorbed and aqueous uranium. Performed as part of the “Super 8” field experiment (2010), a variety of conservative and non-conservative chemical compounds were injected into the Rifle aquifer to assess transport properties and quantify rates of reductive immobilization of uranium under different alkalinity conditions. Conservative tracers included sodium bromide (20mM), deuterium (500‰), and O-18 (25‰), whereas reactive amendments included sodium bicarbonate (50mM) and sodium acetate (6mM); the latter two were designed to enhance desorption of uranium from sediments and stimulate the activity of uranium-reducing microorganisms, respectively. The need to introduce the reactive amendments at

  6. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2013 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2013 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. Due to the suspension of D&D activities in Area IV, no effluents were released into the atmosphere during 2013. Therefore, the potential radiation dose to the general public through airborne release was zero. Similarly, the radiation dose to an offsite member of the public (maximally exposed individual) due to direct radiation from SSFL is indistinguishable from background. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste

  7. MARSSIM vs. DOE Order 5400.5: the Final Status Survey plan at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sarah J; Stevens, Jeff

    2003-06-01

    A challenge unique to the decommissioning of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities involves the compromise between the existing and newly recommended standards for the unrestricted release of property and materials. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is currently decommissioning numerous plutonium contaminated facilities. The default DOE standard for unrestricted release, Order 5400.5, defines surface activity guidelines as averaged over a 1-square-meter area with a maximum value defined for any given 100-square-centimeter area. While the Order was initially developed to release property and materials from an operating site, it is restrictive in its use when performing Final Status Survey and, to date, no new complex wide standard has been developed. However, the RFETS stakeholders selected the MARSSIM, which provides a progressive method to demonstrate compliance with the defined "dose-based" limits for a specific site, as the governing document in developing a final survey method. The end result is a hybrid final status survey plan that incorporates the requirements of both documents. This plan represents several years of development and negotiation between the contractor, the DOE, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Rocky Flats stakeholders, and other interested parties. PMID:12792399

  8. Does chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine preoperative antisepsis reduce surgical site infection in cranial neurosurgery?

    PubMed

    Davies, B M; Patel, H C

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Surgical site infection (SSI) is a significant cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Effective preoperative antisepsis is a recognised prophylactic, with commonly used agents including chlorhexidine (CHG) and povidone-iodine (PVI). However, there is emerging evidence to suggest an additional benefit when they are used in combination. Methods We analysed data from our prospective SSI database on patients undergoing clean cranial neurosurgery between October 2011 and April 2014. We compared the case-mix adjusted odds of developing a SSI in patients undergoing skin preparation with CGH or PVI alone or in combination. Results SSIs were detected in 2.6% of 1146 cases. Antisepsis with PVI alone was performed in 654 (57%) procedures, while 276 (24%) had CHG alone and 216 (19%) CHG and PVI together. SSIs were associated with longer operating time (p<0.001) and younger age (p=0.03). Surgery type (p<0.001) and length of operation (p<0.001) were significantly different between antisepsis groups. In a binary logistic regression model, CHG and PVI was associated with a significant reduction in the likelihood of developing an SSI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.63) than either agent alone. There was no difference in SSI rates between CHG and PVI alone (AOR 0.60, 95% CI 0.24-1.5). Conclusions Combination skin preparation with CHG and PVI significantly reduced SSI rates compared to CHG or PVI alone. A prospective, randomized study validating these findings is now warranted. PMID:27055411

  9. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; McMurry, Peter H.; Smith, James N.; Pierce, Jeffery R.

    2016-07-01

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters ˜ 1 to 30-100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid-base chemistry in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the observed differing growth

  10. Nutrient addition does not enhance leaf decomposition in a Southeastern Brazilian stream (Espinhaço mountain range).

    PubMed

    Abelho, M; Moretti, M; França, J; Callisto, M

    2010-10-01

    A decomposition experiment using eucalyptus leaves was carried out in a Southeastern Brazilian mountain stream located at the transition between the Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest to test whether nutrient addition increases microbial and invertebrate colonisation and accelerates breakdown rates. The results show that none of the tested variables was significantly affected by nutrient addition, despite the average increase in ATP concentrations and invertebrate colonisation observed in the fertilised leaf bags. This could mean that breakdown in the stream was already at its maximum due to the relatively high water temperature and nutrient content, or that the breakdown rate of eucalyptus leaves was too fast to allow the detection of any effects of nutrient addition. Breakdown rates of eucalyptus leaves were much faster than the values reported in literature for most species in Brazilian Cerrado streams, suggesting that the replacement of the natural vegetation by eucalyptus may affect nutrient dynamics in the region. PMID:21085781

  11. Analysis of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of residuals from the treatment of mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.; Langkopf, B.S.; Kuehne, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has stored or expects to generate over the next five years more than 130,000 m{sup 3} of mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Before disposal, MLLW is usually treated to comply with the land disposal restrictions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Depending on the type of treatment, the original volume of MLLW and the radionuclide concentrations in the waste streams may change. These changes must be taken into account in determining the necessary disposal capacity at a site. Treatment may remove the characteristic in some waste that caused it to be classified as mixed. Treatment of some waste may, by reduction of the mass, increase the concentrations of some transuranic radionuclides sufficiently so that it becomes transuranic waste. In this report, the DOE MLLW streams were analyzed to determine after-treatment volumes and radionuclide concentrations. The waste streams were reclassified as residual MLLW or low-level or transuranic waste resulting from treatment. The volume analysis indicated that about 89,000 m{sup 3} of waste will require disposal as residual MLLW. Fifteen DOE sites were then evaluated to determine their capabilities for hosting disposal facilities for some or all of the residual MLLW. Waste streams associated with about 90% of the total residual MLLW volume are likely to present no significant issues for disposal and require little additional analysis. Future studies should focus on the remaining waste streams that are potentially problematic by examining site-specific waste acceptance criteria, alternative treatment processes, alternative waste forms for disposal, and pending changes in regulatory requirements.

  12. Does the Use of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating and Organophosphate Lubricant Additive Together Cause Excessive Tribochemical Material Removal?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, Harry M.; Luo, Huimin; Qu, Jun

    2015-08-22

    We observe unexpected wear increase on a steel surface that rubbed against diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings only when lubricated by phosphate-based antiwear additives. Contrary to the literature hypothesis of a competition between zinc dialkyldithiophosphate produced tribofilms and DLC-induced carbon transfer, here a new wear mechanism based on carbon-catalyzed tribochemical interactions supported by surface characterization is proposed

  13. Does the addition of saline infusion sonohysterography to transvaginal ultrasonography prevent unnecessary hysteroscopy in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding?

    PubMed

    Short, John; Sharp, Benjamin; Elliot, Nikki; McEwing, Rachael; McGeoch, Graham; Shand, Brett; Holland, Kieran

    2016-08-01

    This observational case series in 65 premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding evaluated whether transvaginal ultrasound followed by saline infusion sonohysterography (SIS) prevented unnecessary hysteroscopy. Although SIS indicated that hysteroscopy was unnecessary in eight women, this benefit was offset by the invasive nature of the scan, the number of endometrial abnormalities falsely detected by SIS and the cost of the additional investigation. PMID:27363343

  14. EMP Attachment 2 DOE-SC PNNL Site Data Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-12-21

    This Data Management Plan (DMP) describes the data management processes and activities under the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. The activities currently in the Plan are limited to offsite environmental surveillance of PNNL Site radiological releases to the air. The DMP provides guidance on data capture, processing and transmittal, and database configuration management. The requirements for the PNNL Site Environmental Monitoring (SEM) Database and associated records are documented in order to assure that vital data are recorded accurately, stored in a manner that retains data integrity, and are suitable for analyst to use. Protocols and procedures must ensure the data will be adequate and robust.

  15. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, William R.

    2004-12-01

    New film materials for pertechnetate: A new film material comprised of quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine) cross-linked with 1,10-diiododecane has been developed for use in the spectroelectrochemical sensor. Films were prepared in a one-pot synthesis by stirring poly(4-vinylpyridine), cross-linker and methyl iodide in 1-butanol for 1 h, after which the solution was spin-coating onto ITO-glass. Film thickness was varied either by changing the spin rate or by dilution of the original precursor solution. The thinnest film prepared was 30 nm; the thickest 930 nm. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study the dynamics of film changes on soaking in aqueous salt solution and on preconcentrating model analyte ferrocyanide. The results document that, on hydration, films expanded by almost 90% in 0.1 M KNO3, then contracted slightly when ferrocyanide solution was introduced probably due to electrostatic cross-linking. IR spectroscopy was used to determine the extent of quaternization of the film. For a polymer solution stirred for 1 h, films were about 20% quaternized. This can be increased to {approx}30% by adding more solvent to the precursor solution and stirring for an additional hour. Solubility of the partially cross-linked material was a factor that limited the quaternization process. Use of a more appropriate solvent may enable greater quaternization. A more quaternized film should preconcentrate more pertechnetate by virtue of having a higher density of charged binding sites. Film ruggedness is critical. To investigate this, films on ITO-glass were soaked in methanol and butanol overnight, in 0.1M KNO3, and in 0.1M KNO3 adjusted to pH 12 and pH 2 for 30 days. Each film was then tested as a spectroelectrochemical sensor for model analyte ferrocyanide. The results showed only the pH 2 conditioned sensor behaved abnormally. The film soaked in pH 2 electrolyte delaminated but did not dissolve. Delamination was most likely due to the acid digestion of the ITO layer of

  16. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins' active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes. PMID:25449264

  17. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; et al

    2016-07-28

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters  ∼  1 to 30–100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid–base chemistrymore » in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid–Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the

  18. Evaluation of Camellia sinensis catechins as a swine antimicrobial feed additive that does not cause antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akira; Kataoka, Shinichiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Terasaki, Toshiaki; Kiso, Masaaki; Okubo, Mitsuyuki; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial growth promoters (AGPs) have been banned and phased out because their use has been linked to the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens; however, the ban has had a marked impact on livestock production, and feed additive alternatives to AGPs are required. We focused on green tea leaves as potential alternatives to AGPs because they contain significant amounts of polyphenol catechins, which have antivirus and antimicrobial effects. We examined cross-resistance between epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is the most abundant catechin of green tea leaves, and commercially available antimicrobials in clinically problematic antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, and whether bacteria have the ability to acquire resistance by consecutive passage in sub-inhibitory concentrations of EGCG. EGCG did not display any cross-resistance with reference antimicrobials and the bacteria did not acquire EGCG resistance. Further, we examined the growth-promoting effects of dried green tea leaves on the breeding of a new Japanese breed, Tokyo-X pigs. While the mortality rates of the green tea leaf (GTL) and AGP groups were both 11.1% (one in nine piglets), the mortality rate was 50% for the control group with an additive-free diet (four in eight piglets). The rate of body weight increase in both the GTL and AGP groups was approximately the same. The growth-promoting effects of green tea leaves and AGPs were similar, and there was no possibility that the antimicrobial properties of catechins caused the same problem as AGPs. Thus, it can be concluded that green tea leaves are a safe feed additive alternative to AGPs. PMID:23138151

  19. Does addition of an electrolyte influence the rotational diffusion of nondipolar solutes in a protic ionic liquid?

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Sugosh R; Dutt, G B

    2015-05-21

    Rotational diffusion of two structurally similar nondipolar solutes, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) and 1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DPP), has been examined in ethylammonium nitrate-lithium nitrate (EAN-LiNO3) mixtures to understand the influence of added electrolyte on the local environment experienced by the solute molecules. The measured reorientation times of both DMDPP and DPP in EAN-LiNO3 mixtures fall within the broad limits set by the hydrodynamic slip and stick boundary conditions. The hydrogen bond accepting DMDPP and the hydrogen bond donating DPP experience specific interactions with the cation and anion of the ionic liquid, respectively. Addition of LiNO3 (0.1 and 0.2 mole fraction) to EAN induces only viscosity related effects on the rotational diffusion of the two nondipolar solutes. These observations suggest that the local environment experienced by DMDPP and DPP in EAN is not altered upon the addition of LiNO3. Our results are consistent with the structural details available in the literature for EAN-LiNO3 mixtures. PMID:25914928

  20. Application of EPA quality assurance procedures to a soil characterization study at the DOE Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, K.E.; Byers, G.E.; Van Remortel, R.D.; Gustafson, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The transfer, modification, and application of well formulated and tested quality assurance (QA) procedures from one project to another deserves consideration. The use of a proven QA program design could result in cost savings and the collection of data with a greater degree of confidence. To test this thesis, a QA program, originally developed for large nationwide Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs, was adapted and implemented in a site characterization study at the Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site to ensure that laboratory data satisfied pre-determined measurement quality objectives (MQOs). The QA Program was adapted from EPA programs such as the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program, and to a lesser degree, the Comprehensive Environmental Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program. The QA design adopted the batch or lot concept, in which samples are organized into groups of quality samples (non-blinds, blinds, and double-blinds), which were included in each batch to evaluate and control measurement uncertainty and to address sample preparation. Detectability was assessed using instrument detection limits and precision data for low-concentration samples. Precision was assessed using data from reference samples under a two-tiered system based on concentration ranges. Accuracy was investigated in terms of bias with respect to reference values. The results showed that QA concepts developed for previous nationwide EPA programs were successfully adapted for the site-specific DOE project.

  1. Does resilience 'buffer' against depression in prostate cancer patients? A multi-site replication study.

    PubMed

    Sharpley, C F; Bitsika, V; Wootten, A C; Christie, D R H

    2014-07-01

    Although psychological resilience has been shown to 'buffer' against depression following major stressors, no studies have reported on this relationship within the prostate cancer (PCa) population, many of whom are at elevated risk of depression, health problems and suicide. To investigate the effects of resilience upon anxiety and depression in the PCa population, postal surveys of 425 PCa patients were collected from two sites: 189 PCa patients at site 1 and 236 at site 2. Background data plus responses to depression and resilience scales were collected. Results indicated that total resilience score was a significant buffer against depression across both sites. Resilience had different underlying component factor structures across sites, but only one (common) factor significantly (inversely) predicted depression. Within that factor, only some specific items significantly predicted depression scores, suggesting a focused relationship between resilience and depression. It may be concluded that measures of resilience may be used to screen depression at-risk PCa patients. These patients might benefit from resilience training to enhance their ability to cope effectively with the stress of their diagnosis and treatment. A focus upon specific aspects of overall resilience may be of further benefit in both these processes. PMID:24506500

  2. Addition of glutamine to essential amino acids and carbohydrate does not enhance anabolism in young human males following exercise.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Sarah B; Kim, Paul L; Armstrong, David; Phillips, Stuart M

    2006-10-01

    We examined the effect of a post-exercise oral carbohydrate (CHO, 1 g.kg(-1).h(-1)) and essential amino acid (EAA, 9.25 g) solution containing glutamine (0.3 g/kg BW; GLN trial) versus an isoenergetic CHO-EAA solution without glutamine (control, CON trial) on muscle glycogen resynthesis and whole-body protein turnover following 90 min of cycling at 65% VO2 peak. Over the course of 3 h of recovery, muscle biopsies were taken to measure glycogen resynthesis and mixed muscle protein synthesis (MPS), by incorporation of [ring-2H5] phenylalanine. Infusion of [1-13C] leucine was used to measure whole-body protein turnover. Exercise resulted in a significant decrease in muscle glycogen (p < 0.05) with similar declines in each trial. Glycogen resynthesis following 3 h of recovery indicated no difference in total accumulation or rate of repletion. Leucine oxidation increased 2.5 fold (p < 0.05) during exercise, returned to resting levels immediately post-exercise,and was again elevated at 3 h post-exercise (p < 0.05). Leucine flux, an index of whole-body protein breakdown rate, was reduced during exercise, but increased to resting levels immediately post-exercise, and was further increased at 3 h post-exercise (p < 0.05), but only during the CON trial. Exercise resulted in a marked suppression of whole-body protein synthesis (50% of rest; p < 0.05), which was restored post-exercise; however, the addition of glutamine did not affect whole-body protein synthesis post-exercise. The rate of MPS was not different between trials. The addition of glutamine to a CHO + EAA beverage had no effect on post-exercise muscle glycogen resynthesis or muscle protein synthesis, but may suppress a rise in whole-body proteolysis during the later stages of recovery. PMID:17111006

  3. Addition of gut active carbohydrates to colostrum replacer does not improve passive transfer of immunoglobulin G in Holstein dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Villettaz Robichaud, M; Godden, S M; Haines, D M; Haley, D B; Pearl, D L

    2014-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supplementing a commercial colostrum replacer (CR) with gut active carbohydrates (GAC) on passive transfer of IgG in commercial dairy calves. A secondary objective was to evaluate the effect of treatment on preweaning health and growth. A total of 240 newborn Holstein dairy calves on a commercial dairy farm were enrolled in this study. Newborn heifer and bull calves were weighed and then randomly assigned to either the treated group [GAC: 30g of GAC mixed into 1.5 doses (150g of IgG) of commercial colostrum replacer; n=119] or the control group [CON: 1.5 doses (150g of IgG) of CR; n=121]. The assigned CR treatment was fed within 3.5h of birth using an esophageal tube feeder. Venous blood samples were collected at 0 and 24h of age and used to measure serum IgG (mg/mL) and serum total protein (g/dL) concentrations and to estimate the apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG (%). The 129 heifers calves enrolled (CON=60; GAC=69) were also followed until weaning to assess the effect of GAC addition on preweaning health and growth. Multivariable linear regression showed that the addition of GAC to CR did not influence passive transfer of IgG, as measured by apparent efficiency of absorption at 24h of age (CON=54.0 vs. GAC=54.3%), serum IgG (CON=20.3 vs. GAC=20.2mg/mL), and serum total protein (CON=5.69 vs. GAC=5.68g/dL). Although study sample sizes were not originally derived to evaluate health outcomes, treatment had no effect on weight gain or incidence of health events (diarrhea, pneumonia, mortality) for heifer calves between birth and 7 wk of age. PMID:25022688

  4. Environmental dose assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations.

  5. Phase Structure and Site Preference Behavior of Ternary Alloying Additions to PdTi and PtTi Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    The phasc structure and concentration dependence of the lattice parameter and energy of formation of ternary Pd-'I-X and Pt-Ti-X alloys for a large number of ternary alloying additions X (X = Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc. V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir) are investigated with an atomistic modeling approach. In addition, a detailed description of the site preference behavior of such additions showing that the elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice is provided.

  6. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.; Riedel, M.; Cochran, J.R.; Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Sathe, A.V.

    2008-07-01

    Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

  7. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  8. Generation of Broensted and Lewis acid sites on the surface of silica by addition of dopant cations

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, G.; Dumesic, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Pyridine adsorption was used to study the acidic properties of silica doped with the following cations: Sc/sup 3 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Fe/sup 2 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Al/sup 3 +/, and Ga/sup 3 +/. All samples were exposed to pyridine at 423 K and subsequently evacuated at successively higher temperatures to 723 K. Infrared spectra of the adsorbed pyridine indicated that all of these cations generated Lewis acid sites. This can be explained by the presence of coordinatively unsaturated dopant cations on the surface of silica, in accord with a model based on Pauling's electrostatic bond strength rules. The infrared frequency of the 19b band of pyridine adsorbed on these Lewis acid sites was found to increase with increasing electronegativity of the dopant cation. It is suggested that both of these quantities are related to the strength of the Lewis acid sites. Broensted acid sites were also observed by infrared spectroscopy for Sc/sup 3 +/, Al/sup 3 +/, and Ga/sup 3 +/ on silica. These dopant cations are believed to be bonded tetrahedrally on the surface of silica, generating bridging hydroxyl groups between the dopant cation and Si/sup 4 +/. As for zeolite catalysts, the proton associated with these groups and required for charge neutrality is the Broensted acid site. Finally, Broensted acid sites can also be generated on silica by highly electronegative anions, such as HPO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, which generate Broensted acidity in a different manner. 55 references.

  9. Addition of fentanyl to the ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block does not improve analgesia following cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LI-ZHONG; LIU, XIA; ZHANG, YING-FA; HU, XIAO-XIA; ZHANG, XIAO-MING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the addition of fentanyl to the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block procedure may improve analgesic duration following cesarean delivery. A total of 147 nulliparous women with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II, scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia, were enrolled in the present study. All patients underwent cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia with 10 mg bupivacaine and 10 µg fentanyl, after which the patients underwent an ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with either 0.375% ropivacaine (group TR; n=48), 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg subcutaneous fentanyl (group TRSF; n=49), or a mixture of 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg fentanyl (2.5 µg/ml; group TRF; n=50) per side. The TAP block formed part of a multimodal analgesic regimen comprising patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous fentanyl, and regular treatment with diclofenac and paracetamol. The TAP block was performed in the midaxillary line using an in-plane technique. The primary outcome was the time to the first PCA, whereas secondary outcomes were the cumulative and interval PCA consumptions, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores at rest and during movement, side effects assessed at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, and patient satisfaction with postoperative analgesia. No significant differences were observed in the median time to the first PCA among the three groups (P=0.640), which were 150 min (70–720 min) in group TR, 165 min (90–670 min) in group TRSF, and 190 min (70–680 min) in group TRF. Fentanyl consumption, VAS pain scores, side effects and patient satisfaction were similar among the three groups; however, the demand for fentanyl was significantly decreased in the TRSF and TRF groups at 2 h postoperatively (P=0.001 and 0.002, respectively), as compared with group TR. No complications attributed to the TAP block were detected. In conclusion, the results of the

  10. Ferruginous hawk nesting on the US DOE Hanford Site: Case history of a recent invasion caused by transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Newell, R.L.

    1989-04-01

    Ferruginous hawks were an uncommon nesting raptor on the US DOE Hanford Site prior to 1987, with only one or two pairs nesting each year. In 1987, four pair were found nesting on transmission towers. In 1988, seven pairs were observed nesting on the towers. This recent increase in nesting pairs may correspond to an acceptance phenomena related to age of the transmission towers. The increase may be due to an overall increase in the population of ferruginous hawks in Washington. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  12. INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER LO

    2010-02-12

    The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

  13. Does ecosystem sensitivity to precipitation at the site-level conform to regional-scale predictions?.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Kevin R; Blair, John M; Smith, Melinda D; Knapp, Alan K

    2016-03-01

    Central to understanding global C cycle dynamics is the functional relationship between precipitation and net primary production (NPP). At large spatial (regional) scales, the responsiveness of aboveground NPP (ANPP) to interannual variation in annual precipitation (AP; ANPPsens) is inversely related to site-level ANPP, coinciding with turnover of plant communities along precipitation gradients. Within ecosystems experiencing chronic alterations in water availability, plant community change will also occur with unknown consequences for ANPPsens. To examine the role plant community shifts may play in determining alterations in site-level ANPPPsens, we experimentally increased precipitation by approximately 35% for two decades in a native Central U.S. grassland. Consistent with regional models, ANPPsens decreased initially as water availability and ANPP increased. However, ANPPsens shifted back to ambient levels when mesic species increased in abundance in the plant community. Similarly, in grassland sites with distinct mesic and xeric plant communities and corresponding 50% differences in ANPP, ANPPsens did not differ over almost three decades. We conclude that responses in ANPPsens to chronic alterations in water availability within an ecosystem may not conform to regional AP-ANPP patterns, despite expected changes in ANPP and plant communities. The result is unanticipated functional resistance to climate change at the site scale. PMID:27197383

  14. Commercial WWW Site Appeal: How Does It Affect Online Food and Drink Consumers' Purchasing Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gregory K.; Manning, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on an online survey of consumer attitudes toward online storefronts marketing barbecue sauce, cheese, olive oil, potato chips, and other specialty food products. The relationship between consumer attitudes toward Web sites and the likelihood of purchase, as well as demographic factors related to online food and drink buying, are described.…

  15. 76 FR 80377 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Additional On-Site Data Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ...-performing and efficient HCV programs. The proposed data collection will take place through site visits to up... in a national study of administrative fees in the HCV program. The national study of administrative... develop a new administrative fee allocation formula for the HCV program. DATES: Comments Due Date:...

  16. 76 FR 64366 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Additional On-Site Data Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... HCV programs. The proposed data collection will take place through site visits to up to 30 PHAs and... study of administrative fees in the HCV program. The national study of administrative fees will include... administrative fee allocation formula for the HCV program. OMB Approval Number: Pending. Agency form...

  17. Tailoring Release Protocols to Individual Species and Sites: One Size Does Not Fit All

    PubMed Central

    Moseby, Katherine E.; Hill, Brydie M.; Lavery, Tyrone H.

    2014-01-01

    Reintroduction programs for threatened species often include elaborate release strategies designed to improve success, but their advantages are rarely tested scientifically. We used a set of four experiments to demonstrate that the influence of release strategies on short-term reintroduction outcomes is related to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We compared different reintroduction strategies for three mammal species in an arid environment where exotic mammalian predators were removed. Wild greater stick-nest rats selected vegetation shelter sites with greater structural density than captive-bred rats, travelled further from the release site and experienced lower rates of mortality. In comparison, there was no difference in mortality or movement between wild and captive-bred greater bilbies. Burrowing bettongs and greater bilbies were also subjected to immediate and delayed release strategies and whilst no difference was detected in bilbies, bettongs that were subjected to delayed releases lost less weight and took less time to establish burrows than those that were immediately released. Interspecific differences in treatment response were attributed to predation risk, the nature of the release site, and behavioural traits such as shelter investment and sociality. Our varied results highlight the inadequacies of review articles focusing on optimum release protocols due to their attempt to generalise across species and release sites. We provide an example of a predictive model to guide future release strategy experimentation that recognises the range of intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing reintroduction outcomes. We encourage researchers to treat programs experimentally, identify individual site and species characters that may influence release strategies and record data on movements, mortality, weight dynamics, and settling times and distances. The inherent issues of small sample size and low statistical power that plague most reintroduction

  18. Tailoring release protocols to individual species and sites: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Moseby, Katherine E; Hill, Brydie M; Lavery, Tyrone H

    2014-01-01

    Reintroduction programs for threatened species often include elaborate release strategies designed to improve success, but their advantages are rarely tested scientifically. We used a set of four experiments to demonstrate that the influence of release strategies on short-term reintroduction outcomes is related to both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We compared different reintroduction strategies for three mammal species in an arid environment where exotic mammalian predators were removed. Wild greater stick-nest rats selected vegetation shelter sites with greater structural density than captive-bred rats, travelled further from the release site and experienced lower rates of mortality. In comparison, there was no difference in mortality or movement between wild and captive-bred greater bilbies. Burrowing bettongs and greater bilbies were also subjected to immediate and delayed release strategies and whilst no difference was detected in bilbies, bettongs that were subjected to delayed releases lost less weight and took less time to establish burrows than those that were immediately released. Interspecific differences in treatment response were attributed to predation risk, the nature of the release site, and behavioural traits such as shelter investment and sociality. Our varied results highlight the inadequacies of review articles focusing on optimum release protocols due to their attempt to generalise across species and release sites. We provide an example of a predictive model to guide future release strategy experimentation that recognises the range of intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing reintroduction outcomes. We encourage researchers to treat programs experimentally, identify individual site and species characters that may influence release strategies and record data on movements, mortality, weight dynamics, and settling times and distances. The inherent issues of small sample size and low statistical power that plague most reintroduction

  19. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards -- Fiscal Year 2002 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Egorov, Oleg B.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Grate, Jay W.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Mattigod, Shas V.; McGrail, B. Peter; Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Panetta, Paul D.; Pfund, David M.; Rai, Dhanpat; Su, Yali; Sundaram, S. K.; Weber, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2002-06-11

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been awarded a total of 80 Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants since the inception of the program in 1996. The Laboratory has collaborated on an additional 14 EMSP awards with funding received through other institution. This report describes how each of the projects awarded in 1999, 2000, and 2001 addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in the individual project reports included in this document. Projects are under way in three main areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  20. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO₂ sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO₂ storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO₂ sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO₂ and brine leakage. The simulation results are also used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.

  1. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO₂ sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO₂ storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO₂ sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO₂ and brine leakage. The simulation results are alsomore » used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.« less

  2. Seismic Hazard Characterization at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS): Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Savy, J.B.

    1994-06-24

    The purpose of the Seismic Hazard Characterization project for the Savannah River Site (SRS-SHC) is to develop estimates of the seismic hazard for several locations within the SRS. Given the differences in the geology and geotechnical characteristics at each location, the estimates of the seismic hazard are to allow for the specific local conditions at each site. Characterization of seismic hazard is a critical factor for the design of new facilities as well as for the review and potential retrofit of existing facilities at SRS. The scope of the SRS seismic hazard characterization reported in this document is limited to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The goal of the project is to provide seismic hazard estimates based on a state-of-the-art method which is consistent with developments and findings of several ongoing studies which are deemed to bring improvements in the state of the seismic hazard analyses.

  3. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Shelander, D.; Dai, J.; McConnell, D.; Shedd, W.; Frye, M.; Ruppel, C.; Boswell, R.; Jones, E.; Collett, T.S.; Rose, K.; Dugan, B.; Wood, W.; Latham, T.

    2008-07-01

    In the late spring of 2008, the Chevron-led Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) expects to conduct an exploratory drilling and logging campaign to better understand gas hydrate-bearing sands in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The JIP Site Selection team selected three areas to test alternative geological models and geophysical interpretations supporting the existence of potential high gas hydrate saturations in reservoir-quality sands. The three sites are near existing drill holes which provide geological and geophysical constraints in Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system in an area characterized by seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and abundant seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets ponded sheet sands and associated channel/levee deposits within a minibasin, making this a non-structural play. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. Drilling locations have been selected at each site to 1) test geological methods and models used to infer the occurrence of gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in different settings in the northern Gulf of Mexico; 2) calibrate geophysical models used to detect gas hydrate sands, map reservoir thicknesses, and estimate the degree of gas hydrate saturation; and 3) delineate potential locations for subsequent JIP drilling and coring operations that will collect samples for comprehensive physical property, geochemical and other

  4. Does underwater flash photography affect the behaviour, movement and site persistence of seahorses?

    PubMed

    Harasti, D; Gladstone, W

    2013-11-01

    The effect of flash photography on seahorse species has never been tested. An experiment was established to test the effect of flash photography and the handling of Hippocampus whitei, a medium-sized seahorse species endemic to Australia, on their behavioural responses, movements and site persistence. A total of 24 H. whitei were utilized in the experiment with eight in each of the three treatments (flash photography, handling and control). The effect of underwater flash photography on H. whitei movements was not significant; however, the effect of handling H. whitei to take a photograph had a significant effect on their short-term behavioural responses to the photographer. Kaplan-Meier log-rank test revealed that there was no significant difference in site persistence of H. whitei from each of the three treatments and that flash photography had no long-term effects on their site persistence. It is concluded that the use of flash photography by divers is a safe and viable technique with H. whitei, particularly if photographs can be used for individual identification purposes. PMID:24131331

  5. Generic guidelines versus site-specific assessments: Does marriage make sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudet, C.L.; Keenleyside, K.A.; Smith, S.L.; Kent, R.A.; Wong, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    The maintenance, protection and restoration of a high level of environmental quality requires the availability of practical scientific tools. Environmental quality guidelines (also called criteria) are one such scientific tool that help measure progress towards these goals. These guidelines provide scientific benchmarks that can offer consistency and clarity in defining scientific measures for environmental quality that are easily understood, communicated, and implemented as the basis for management decisions. At the same time, debate exists over the use of generic guidelines versus site-specific risk assessments. It is the contention that generic and site-specific approaches are not mutually exclusive, but complementary decision-support tools and that any apparent controversy stems from an incomplete understanding of the nature and intent of generic environmental quality guidelines or from the use of guidelines in the absence of a coherent framework. The authors advocate an approach that marries the strengths of the generic and site-specific approaches and promotes consistent, scientifically-defensible decisions that support broad societal goals for environmental protection. Using Canadian environmental quality guidelines as an example, they provide an overview of the role of environmental quality guidelines in decision-making, with concrete examples of their implementation in addressing specific environmental quality issues.

  6. Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct

  7. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2012-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2011 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2011 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  8. Site Environmental Report For Calendar Year 2012. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2013-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2012 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  9. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2011-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2010 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2010 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  10. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2010-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2009 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2009 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  11. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2009-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2008 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended by the DOE. The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2008 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  12. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

    2006-04-05

    The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  13. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2005-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  14. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, Peter H.

    2006-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  15. Stabilization of multiple mixed waste streams from Oak Ridge DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, E.F.; Spence, R.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    IT was contracted to assist in designing and performing a statistically based series of treatability studies on stabilization and solidification of various waste streams from DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste streams were generated by a variety of processes used in the manufacture of nuclear weapon components and fuel. The treatability studies were designed to provide information on the effects of various quantities of stabilization reagents on the characteristics of the final waste form. Primary performance criteria were no free liquid and meet or exceed LDR leachability levels at 28-day cure. Secondary performance criteria were various implementability parameters. Characteristics monitored were unconfined compressive strength (UCS), rate of set, free liquids, metals leachability, unit weight, and radionuclide leachability. Stabilization reagents used in the study included Portland cement, fly ash, perlite, and blast furnace slag. Twenty formulations were tested for each waste stream. These formulations are statistical extreme vertices desired that was formulated by PNL. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Energy Systems) and IT were conducting parallel programs on different waste streams. A standardized set of test procedures and stabilization reagents were used by IT and Energy Systems. By design formulations were determined that failed and met all primary and secondary performance criteria. The 28-day cured waste-grout mixtures had the consistency ranging form pudding-like to soil-like to monoliths with UCS greater than 5000 psi. Generally, formulations that were monoliths with greater than 100 psi compressive strength had lower leachabilities and liquid bleed. The effect of waste chemical composition on the leachability is discussed.

  16. Prospecting for natural attenuation: Coupled geophysical-biogeochemical studies at DOE's Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Long, P. E.; Flores Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2011-12-01

    Research activities at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado (USA) are designed to integrate geochemical, biological, and hydrological studies to enhance our understanding of subsurface uranium mobility. While much of the research activities at the site have focused on stimulating subsurface microbial activity through acetate amendment, there is growing interest in the role that natural biogeochemical processes play in constraining uranium mobility in the aquifer. Such processes constitute a form of natural uranium attenuation in the subsurface and are inferred to result from elevated concentrations of natural organic matter associated with alluvial sediments. Referred to as naturally reduced zones (NRZ's), they are characterized by the presence of reduced and/or magnetic mineral phases (e.g. FeS, FeS2, and Fe3O4), elevated Fe(II), and refractory organic carbon compounds (e.g. roots, twigs, and cones). Elevated rates of microbial activity associated with NRZ's and their mineralogical makeup act to sequester uranium from groundwater at levels higher that background alluvium. Their unique composition within a matrix of relatively oxidized, low-bioactivity sediments constitutes a potential target for a variety of exploration geophysical techniques, such as induced polarization and magnetic susceptibility. Both methods have been successfully applied at the Rifle IFRC site to delineate the ubiquity and extent of NRZ's across the floodplain. Sediments recovered from drilling targets identified through the use of exploration geophysical techniques have identified elevated uranium concentrations associated with both magnetite and framboid pyrite; however, the extent to which such minerals are the direct product of in situ microbial activity remains unknown. While diverse, the microbial community composition of NRZ's suggest dominance by fermentative organisms capable of degrading lignitic carbon to low molecular weight organic

  17. Masking of CD22 by cis ligands does not prevent redistribution of CD22 to sites of cell contact.

    PubMed

    Collins, Brian E; Blixt, Ola; DeSieno, Alexis R; Bovin, Nicolai; Marth, Jamey D; Paulson, James C

    2004-04-20

    CD22, a negative regulator of B cell signaling, is a member of the siglec family that binds to alpha2-6-linked sialic acids on glycoproteins. Previous reports demonstrated that binding of multivalent sialoside probes to CD22 is blocked, or "masked," by endogenous (cis) ligands, unless they are first destroyed by sialidase treatment. These results suggest that cis ligands on B cells make CD22 functionally unavailable for binding to ligands in trans. Through immunofluorescence microscopy, however, we observed that CD22 on resting B cells redistributes to the site of contact with other B or T lymphocytes. Redistribution is mediated by interaction with trans ligands on the opposing cell because it does not occur with ligand-deficient lymphocytes from ST6GalI-null mice. Surprisingly, CD45, proposed as both a cis and trans ligand of CD22, was not required for redistribution to sites of cell contact, given that redistribution of CD22 was independent of CD45 and was observed with lymphocytes from CD45-deficient mice. Furthermore, CD45 is not required for CD22 masking as similar levels of masking were observed in the WT and null mice. Comparison of the widely used sialoside-polyacrylamide probe with a sialoside-streptavidin probe revealed that the latter bound a subset of B cells without sialidase treatment, suggesting that cis ligands differentially impacted the binding of these two probes in trans. The combined results suggest that equilibrium binding to cis ligands does not preclude binding of CD22 to ligands in trans, and allows for its redistribution to sites of contact between lymphocytes. PMID:15079087

  18. Design and construction of deinococcus radiodurans for biodegradation of organic toxins at radioactive DOE waste sites. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M.J.; Wackett, L.P.; Minton, K.W.

    1998-06-01

    'A 1992 survey of DOE waste sites indicates that about 32% of soils and 45% of groundwaters at these sites contain radionuclides and metals plus an organic toxin class. The most commonly reported combinations of these hazardous compounds being radionuclides and metals (e.g., U, Pu, Cs, Pb, Cr, As) plus chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene), fuel hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene), or polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Arochlor 1248). These wastes are some of the most hazardous pollutants and pose an increasing risk to human health as they leach into the environment. The objective of this research is to develop novel organisms, that are highly resistant to radiation and the toxic effects of metals and radionuclides, for in-situ bioremediation of organic toxins. Few organisms exist that are able to remediate such environmental organic pollutants, and among those that can, the bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas are the most characterized. Unfortunately, these bacteria are very radiation sensitive. For example, Pseudomonas spp. is even more sensitive than Escherichia coli and, thus, is not suitable as a bioremediation host in environments subjected to radiation. By contrast, D. radiodurans, a natural soil bacterium, is the most radiation resistant organism yet discovered; it is several thousand times more resistant to ionizing radiation than Pseudomonas. The sophisticated gene transfer and expression systems the authors have developed for D. radiodurans over the last eight years make this organism an ideal candidate for high-level expression of genes that degrade organic toxins, in radioactive environments. The authors ultimate aim is to develop organisms and approaches that will be useful for remediating the large variety of toxic organic compounds found in DOE waste sites that are too radioactive to support other bioremediation organisms. This report summarizes work after the first 6 months of a 3-year project.'

  19. Current challenges in personal dosimetry at the US DOE Hanford site.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, B A; McDonald, J C; Traub, R J

    2002-01-01

    An overview is presented of the dosimetry system, dose equivalent calculation methodology, and QA/QC practices used at the US Department of Energy Hanford site. It describes some of the problems encountered in accurately measuring dose equivalent quantities under a broad range of field conditions that do not necessarily correlate with laboratory calibration conditions and the approach taken to solve these problems. Personnel at Hanford are monitored with a combination of Harshaw model 8825 and 8816 thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 etched track dosemeters. Extremities are monitored using the ICN MeasuRing loaded with a Harshaw XD740 chipstrate TLD. All dosemeters employ LiF:Mg,Ti elements that are read on-site with Harshaw model 8800 and 6600 TLD readers. CR-39 dosemeters are electrochemically etched in non-commercial etch chambers and counted with an automated track counting system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Problems with over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(0.07), under-response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(3), and over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(10) in Hanford's 90Sr/90Y beta radiation fields are discussed. Approaches to measurement of the operational quantities for field conditions and algorithm solutions to the above problems are described. Methods used to calibrate the ring dosemeter for Hanford field conditions together with limitations of the ring dosemeter in measuring Hp(0.07) for extremities, particularly when covered with protective clothing, are also discussed. PMID:12382727

  20. Seismic probabilistic risk assessment for K Reactor at the DOE Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wingo, H.E.; McCann, M.W.

    1993-09-01

    The evaluation of the risk of core melt for the K Reactor indicated an improvement in the strength of the plant as the result of analyses and structural upgrades done for the reactor to satisfy requirements of the NRC USI A-46 unresolved safety issue. The evaluation for operator errors used the THERP methodology and applied this method to conditions required as the result of earthquakes. The evaluation indicated the strength of structures and equipment was stronger after the walk down and analyses were completed than before, although physical changes to the system were minimal. The net result of the re-analysis indicated the overall yearly risk of core melt frequency from earthquakes decreased from 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} per year to 7.5 {times}10{sup {minus}5}. The uncertainty analysis indicated the 95 percentile value was 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, and the five percentile value was 5.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. The seismic hazard for the site used an evaluation of the Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Hazard analysis for the plant site, with generic soils factors from the EPRI study. This hazard was determined from the two studies by comparing the predicted hazards with the historical record, and deleting those predictions that did not come close to the historical record.

  1. DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program year 5 first quarter report, July 1-- September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy` s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU now has two electric cars. Both are electric conversion vehicles from Soleq Corporation out of Chicago. KSU in conjunction with KEURP also initiated procurement for the purchase of four (4) Chevy S-10 pickup trucks. Since the supplier, GE-Spartan, canceled its effort concerning the production of vehicles other appropriate sources were sought. Today, K-State and the Kansas Utilities are working with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM), Redford, Michigan. TDM is working with Ford Motor Company and expects to become the first certified electric vehicle Quality Vehicle Modifier (QVM). Kansas State has entered into an agreement to assist TDM in supporting the infrastructure and technical manual development for these vehicles. The Soleq EVcorts have not been signed to illustrate to the public that it is an electric vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged. As soon as TDM`s Ford Ranger electric vehicles are delivered they will be used throughout the state by utility companies that are participating with K-State`s Site Operator Program.

  2. Does Transumbilical Incision Influence Surgical Site Infection Rates of the Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy and Anterior Resection?

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Tanaka, Keitaro; Asakuma, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Keisaku; Isii, Masatsugu; Hamamoto, Hiroki; Okuda, Junji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is widespread and is safe and effective for the management of patients with colorectal cancer. However, surgical site infection (SSI) remains an unresolved complication. The present study investigated the comparative effect of supraumbilical incision versus transumbilical incision (TU) on the incidence of SSI in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer. Medical records from patients with colorectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic sigmoid and rectosigmoid colon surgeries with either supraumbilical incision (n = 150) or TU (n = 150) were retrospectively reviewed. There was no difference in demographics, comorbidities, or operative variables between the two groups. The transumbilical group and the supraumbilical group were comparable with regards to overall SSI (6.0% vs 4.0%; P = 0.4062), superficial SSI (6.0% vs 3.3%; P = 0.2704), and deep SSI (0% vs 0.7%; P = 0.2385). SSI developed after laparoscopic sigmoid and rectosigmoid colon cancer surgery in 15 (5.0%) of the 300 patients. Of these superficial SSI, all wounds were in the left lower quadrant incision, and the transumbilical port sites did not become infected. Univariate analysis failed to identify any risk factors for SSI. Avoidance of the umbilicus offers no benefit with regard to SSI compared with TU. PMID:26736159

  3. 5 CFR 792.218 - Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? The bill... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? 792.218 Section 792.218...

  4. 5 CFR 792.218 - Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? The bill... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? 792.218 Section 792.218...

  5. 5 CFR 792.218 - Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does the law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? 792.218 Section 792.218 Administrative... law apply only to on-site Federal child care centers that are utilized by Federal families? The...

  6. Single-Site Low-Flow Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Lung Support Does Not Influence Hemodynamic Monitoring by Transpulmonary Thermodilution.

    PubMed

    Redwan, Bassam; Ziegeler, Stephan; Freermann, Stefan; Meemann, Thomas; Semik, Michael; Dickgerber, Nicolas; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The application of extracorporeal lung support (ECLS) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome is a well-established concept. In patients receiving ECLS therapy, hemodynamic monitoring is often required. However, less is known about the effect of ECLS on hemodynamic measurements. In the present work, the influence of single-site low-flow veno-venous ECLS (LFVV-ECLS) on hemodynamic monitoring by transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) was prospectively investigated. Five consecutive patients undergoing single-site LFVV-ECLS for severe hypercapnic respiratory failure were included in this study. For single-site LFVV-ECLS, a 22 Fr twin-port double-lumen cannula was inserted percutaneously into the right jugular vein. Hemodynamic monitoring was performed using the Pulse index Continuous Cardiac Output system. Before ECLS initiation, baseline measurements of cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance, mean arterial pressure, and extravascular lung water (EVLW) were performed. During the first 3 days of ECLS therapy, repeated hemodynamic measurements at different ECLS flow rates were performed. No significant differences were seen in hemodynamic measurements. With respect to EVLW, a significant decrease over the duration of ECLS therapy was observed. This study demonstrates that LFVV-ECLS does not interfere with TPTD. It needs to be further studied if these findings also apply to other ECLS modes. PMID:27045969

  7. Zero-valent iron for the removal of soluble uranium in simulated DOE site groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Jarabek, R.J.; Fiedor, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    Groundwater at the Bear Creek Valley Characterization Area, located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, is contaminated with regulated metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to former site activities and disposal practices. The contaminant of principle concern, from the perspective of protecting human health, is soluble uranium, which is present in some waters at concentrations up to a few parts-per-million. We present product speciation and relative reaction kinetics; for removal of soluble uranium under oxic and anoxic conditions with use of zero-valent iron. Under oxic conditions, U(VI) is rapidly and strongly sorbed to hydrous ferric oxide particulate ({open_quotes}rust{close_quotes}), whereas uranium is slowly and incompletely reduced to U(IV) under anoxic conditions.

  8. Morphology of muscle attachment sites in the modern human hand does not reflect muscle architecture.

    PubMed

    Williams-Hatala, E M; Hatala, K G; Hiles, S; Rabey, K N

    2016-01-01

    Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even whether muscle anatomy and activity regimes influence the morphologies of their entheses, especially in the hand. Using the opponens muscles from a sample of modern humans, we tested the hypothesis that aspects of hand muscle architecture that are known to be influenced by behavior correlate with the size and shape of their associated entheses. Results show no consistent relationships between these behaviorally-influenced aspects of muscle architecture and entheseal morphology. Consequently, it is likely premature to infer patterns of behavior, such as stone tool making in fossil hominins, from these same entheses. PMID:27334440

  9. Morphology of muscle attachment sites in the modern human hand does not reflect muscle architecture

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Hatala, E. M.; Hatala, K. G.; Hiles, S.; Rabey, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even whether muscle anatomy and activity regimes influence the morphologies of their entheses, especially in the hand. Using the opponens muscles from a sample of modern humans, we tested the hypothesis that aspects of hand muscle architecture that are known to be influenced by behavior correlate with the size and shape of their associated entheses. Results show no consistent relationships between these behaviorally-influenced aspects of muscle architecture and entheseal morphology. Consequently, it is likely premature to infer patterns of behavior, such as stone tool making in fossil hominins, from these same entheses. PMID:27334440

  10. Does survey method bias the description of northern goshawk nest-site structure?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daw, S.K.; DeStefano, S.; Steidl, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Past studies on the nesting habitat of northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) often relied on nests found opportunistically, either during timber-sale operations, by searching apparently 'good' goshawk habitat, or by other search methods where areas were preselected based on known forest conditions. Therefore, a bias in the characterization of habitat surrounding northern goshawk nest sites may exist toward late-forest structure (large trees, high canopy closure). This potential problem has confounded interpretation of data on nesting habitat of northern goshawks and added to uncertainty in the review process to consider the species for federal listing as threatened or endangered. Systematic survey methods, which strive for complete coverage of an area and often use broadcasts of conspecific calls, have been developed to overcome these potential biases, but no study has compared habitat characteristics around nests found opportunistically with those found systematically. We compared habitat characteristics in a 0.4-ha area around nests found systematically (n = 27) versus those found opportunistically (n = 22) on 3 national forests in eastern Oregon. We found that both density of large trees (systematic: x?? = 16.4 ?? 3.1 trees/ha; x?? ?? SE; opportunistic: x?? = 21.3 ?? 3.2; P = 0.56) and canopy closure (systematic: x?? = 72 ?? 2%; opportunistic: x?? = 70 ?? 2%; P = 0.61) were similar around nests found with either search method. Our results diminish concern that past survey methods mischaracterized northern goshawk nest-site structure. However, because northern goshawks nest in a variety of forest cover types with a wide range of structural characteristics, these results do not decrease the value of systematic survey methods in determining the most representative habitat descriptions for northern goshawks. Rigorous survey protocols allow repeatability and comparability of monitoring efforts and results over time.

  11. Does the Walker Lane extend through the Nevada test site region

    SciTech Connect

    Fridrich, C.; O'Leary, D. . Denver Federal Center)

    1993-04-01

    The southeastern terminus of the Walker Lane is poorly defined and poorly understood. Recent work in and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) suggests the presence of a structural zone that may be an extension of the Walker Lane, and that may be continuous with the Las Vegas valley shear zone farther to the southeast. Unlike the Walker Lane, large through-going strike-slip faults have not been found in the NTS zone. Instead, the strike-slip faults present are few, are relatively short, commonly consist of diffuse fault zones, are interconnected poorly if at all, and largely appear to represent zones of accommodation between domains in which extension occurred at different times and to different degrees. However, the majority of these right-slip and left-slip faults are northwest-trending and northeast-trending, respectively, suggesting that plate motions may have played a role in the creation of these accommodation zones. An obstacle to understanding the NTS zone is that major ignimbrite sheets and calderas of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SNVF) formed in this zone at the height of late Tertiary tectonic activity, possibly burying much of the structural evidence. The NTS zone could represent an intersection of the Walker Lane with another major structural feature, a significant bend in the Walker Lane, or a transtensional tear that localized accommodation structures as well as the prominent late Miocene calderas of the SNVF. Ongoing field work is aimed at determining which of these and competing interpretations is best.

  12. Current Challenges in Personal Dosimetry at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A. ); McDonald, Joseph C. ); Traub, Richard J. )

    2002-10-01

    Abstract - This paper presents an overview of the dosimetry system, dose equivalent calculation methodology, and QA/QC practices used at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site. It describes some of the problems encountered in accurately measuring dose equivalent quantities under a broad range of field conditions that do not necessarily correlate with laboratory calibration conditions and the approach taken to solve these problems. Personnel at Hanford are monitored with a combination of Harshaw model 8825 and 8816 thermoluminescent dosimeters and CR-39? track etch dosimeters. Extremities are monitored using the ICN MeasuRing loaded with a Harshaw XD740 chipstrate TLD. All dosimeters employ LiF:Mg,Ti elements that are read onsite with Harshaw model 8800 and 6600 TLD readers. CR-39? dosimeters are electrochemically etched in non-commercial etch chambers and counted with an automated track counting system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Problems with over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(0.07), under response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(3), and over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(10) in Hanford's 90Sr/90Y beta radiation fields are discussed. Approaches to measurement of the operational quantities for field conditions and algorithm solutions to the above problems are described. Methods used to calibrate the ring dosimeter for Hanford field conditions together with limitations of the ring dosimeter in measuring Hp(0.07) for extremities, particularly when covered with protective clothing, are also discussed.

  13. Reducing the risk of surgical site infections: does chlorhexidine gluconate provide a risk reduction benefit?

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Charles E; Bruden, Benjamin; Rucinski, Maria C; Henen, Cindy; Graham, Mary Beth; Lewis, Brian L

    2013-05-01

    Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) has been available as a topical antiseptic for over 50 years, having broad clinical application throughout the health care environment. Evidence-based clinical studies have shown chlorhexidine gluconate to be a safe and effective perioperative skin-prepping agent. Renewed interest has emerged for use of the antiseptic bath/shower to reduce the microbial skin burden prior to hospital admission. Recent clinical studies have documented that multiple applications of 2% or 4% CHG using a standardized protocol results in high skin surface concentrations sufficient to inhibit/kill skin colonizing flora, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A new focus for the use of CHG in surgical patients involves irrigation of the wound prior to closure with 0.05% CHG followed by saline rinse. Recent laboratory studies suggest that, following a 1-minute exposure, 0.05% CHG produces a >5-log reduction against selective health care-associated pathogens and reduces microbial adherence to the surface of implantable biomedical devices. General, orthopedic, cardiothoracic, and obstetrical surgical studies have documented the safety of selective CHG formulations in elective surgical procedures. The following discussion will address both the evidence-based literature and preliminary findings suggesting that CHG has a broad and safe range of applications when used as an adjunctive interventional strategy for reducing the risk of postoperative surgical site infections (SSI). PMID:23622749

  14. Rictor Phosphorylation on the THR-1135 Site Does Not Require Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Boulbes, Delphine; Chen, Chien-Hung; Shaikenov, Tattym; Agarwal, Nitin K.; Peterson, Timothy R.; Addona, Terri A.; Keshishian, Hasmik; Carr, Steven A.; Magnuson, Mark A.; Sabatini, David M.; Sarbassov, Dos D.

    2010-01-01

    In animal cells growth factors coordinate cell proliferation and survival by regulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Deregulation of this signaling pathway is common in a variety of human cancers. The PI3K dependent signaling kinase complex defined as mTORC2 functions as a regulatory Ser-473 kinase of Akt. We find that activation of mTORC2 by growth factor signaling is linked to the specific phosphorylation of its component rictor on Thr-1135. The phosphorylation of this site is induced by the growth factor stimulation and expression of the oncogenic forms of ras or PI3K. Rictor phosphorylation is sensitive to inhibition of PI3K, mTOR, or expression of ILK. The substitution of wild-type rictor with its specific phospho-mutants in rictor null mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not alter the growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of Akt indicating that the rictor Thr-1135 phosphorylation is not critical in regulation of the mTORC2 kinase activity. We found that this rictor phosphorylation takes place in the mTORC2-deficient cells suggesting that this modification might play a role in regulation not only mTORC2 but also the mTORC2-independent function of rictor. PMID:20501647

  15. Probing the Sudlow binding site with warfarin: how does gold nanocluster growth alter human serum albumin?

    PubMed

    Russell, B A; Mulheran, P A; Birch, D J S; Chen, Y

    2016-08-17

    The search for new fluorescent molecules is vital to the advancement of molecular imaging and sensing for the benefit of medical and biological studies. One such class of new fluorescent molecule is fluorescent gold nanoclusters encapsulated in Human Serum Albumin (HSA-AuNC). In order to use this new fluorescent molecule as a sensor or fluorescent marker in biological imaging both in vitro and in vivo it is important to understand whether/how the proteins function is changed by the synthesis and presence of the gold nanoclusters inside the protein. Natural HSA acts as the main drug carrier in the blood stream, carrying a multitude of molecules in two major binding sites (Sudlow I and II). To test the effects of gold on the ability of HSA to act as a drug carrier we employed warfarin, an anticoagulant drug, as a fluorescent probe to detect changes between natural HSA and HSA-AuNCs. AuNCs are found to inhibit the take up of warfarin by HSA. Evidence for this is found from fluorescence spectral and lifetime measurements. Interestingly, the presence of warfarin bound to HSA also inhibits the formation of gold nanoclusters within protein. This research provides valuable insight into how protein function can change upon synthesis of AuNCs and how that will affect their use as a fluorescent probe. PMID:27480626

  16. Development of site-specific synthetic accelerations for safety assessment of DOE facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Aramayo, G.A.; Carley, T.G.; Jones, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic analysis of US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities at Oak Ridge, TN, requires seismic accelerograms that have response spectra that are compatible with the site-specific design response spectra. The development of these accelerograms is accomplished by the application of the Fourier transform to compute the response spectrum of a beginning accelerogram and map it into the frequency domain. The Fourier spectrum is modified according to the difference between the computed spectra and the target spectra. The response spectrum is recomputed and compared again to the target. The modification is repeated until acceptable agreement is achieved. The modified Fourier spectrum is transformed to the time domain and filtered yielding the desired seismic time history. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    This annual report describes the environmental monitoring programs related to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) facility located in Ventura County, California during 2005. Part of the SSFL facility, known as Area IV, had been used for DOE’s activities since the 1950s. A broad range of energy related research and development (R&D) projects, including nuclear technologies projects, was conducted at the site. All the nuclear R&D operations in Area IV ceased in 1988. Current efforts are directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and closure of facilities used for liquid metal research.

  18. Appraisal and analysis of opportunities for a joint DOE/DOD energy demonstration program. Final report. [Includes possible site information

    SciTech Connect

    Ziem, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The basic objective of this study was to assess the potential for cooperative projects between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DOD) in areas concerned with the development of Total Energy (TE) Systems and to do the groundwork and liaison necessary to initiate those projects. The scope of the potential joint projects includes cooperative effort in the development and test of a variety of heat engines (prime movers) capable of utilizing coal as well as synthetic liquid fuels derived from coal and oil shale; as well as the indication of potential Military Department sites which would be suitable for the demonstration of TE systems based on a variety of such prime movers. In order to accomplish the objective of the study, it was necessary to review a large number of DOD studies and plans and to discuss the objective of the TETAS studies with a large number of Military Department people. The DOD recognizes the requirement for an assured energy supply and the need to learn how to use the synthetic fuels from coal and shale being developed by the DOE. The need to modify engine systems to adapt them to differing fuel characteristics and make those engines more flexible relative to the range of fuels they will accept is clear. What is not so clear is the fact that the DOD has a much greater opportunity to conserve energy in now inefficient facility operations than it has in mobility operations which must continue to stress mission and high performance. This report indicates guidelines for the conduct of joint projects between the DOE and the DOD which can aid both in meeting their energy objective.

  19. Susceptibility of chicken lymphoid cells to infectious bursal disease virus does not correlate with the presence of specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1996-06-01

    Pathogenic serotype 1 strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replicate efficiently in lymphoid cells of the bursa of Fabricius of chicken. Lymphoid cells in other organs are not susceptible. Apathogenic serotype 2 strains do not replicate in lymphoid bursa cells or in other lymphoid cells. Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF), however, efficiently replicate strains of either serotype. Binding studies showed that strains of both IBDV serotypes bind to lymphoid cells isolated from the bursa, thymus or spleen, indicating that restriction of IBDV replication to lymphoid B cells is not determined by the presence of specific receptor sites. The specificity of binding was demonstrated by saturation and competition experiments. These revealed the presence of different receptors: CEF had receptors common to both serotypes and specific ones for each serotype. Receptor sites common to both serotypes were also present on lymphoid cells; however, additional serotype-specific sites were only demonstrated for the apathogenic serotype 2 strain. Strains of both serotypes specifically bound to proteins with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 46 kDa, exposed on the surface of CEF and lymphoid cells. Competition experiments indicated that these proteins might represent the common receptor sites of IBDV. PMID:8683211

  20. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  1. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore » bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  2. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites. PMID:26382047

  3. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Lee, Majelle

    2005-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2004 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2004 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  4. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2006. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil

    2007-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2006 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2006 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  5. THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones

  6. Plutonium in groundwater at the 100K-Area of the U.S. DOE Hanford Site.

    PubMed

    Dai, Minhan; Buesseler, Ken O; Pike, Steven M

    2005-02-01

    We examined the concentration, size distribution, redox state and isotopic composition of plutonium (Pu) in groundwater at the 100K-Area at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Total concentrations of Pu isotopes were extremely low (10(-4) to 10(-6) pCi/kg, approximately 10(4) to 10(6) atoms/kg) but measurable for the first time in the 100K-Area wells using mass spectrometric analyses that are much more sensitive than alpha spectroscopy methods used previously. Size fractionation data from two wells suggest that 7-29% of the Pu is associated with colloids, operationally defined here as particles between 1 kDa-0.2 microm in size. These colloids were collected using a 1 kDa cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFF) system developed specifically for groundwater actinide studies to include careful controls both in the field and during processing to ensure in situ geochemical conditions are maintained and size separations can be well characterized. Pu in this colloidal fraction was exclusively in the more reduced Pu(III/IV) form, consistent with the higher affinity of Pu in the lower oxidation states for particle surfaces. While the overall concentrations of Pu were low, the Pu isotopic composition suggests at least two local sources of groundwater Pu, namely, local Hanford reactor operations at the 100K-Area and spent nuclear fuel from the N-reactor, which was stored in concrete pools at this site. Differences between this site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) are noted, since groundwater Pu at the F-Area seepage basin at SRS has been found using these same methods, to be characterized by lower colloidal abundances and higher oxidation states. This difference is not directly attributable to groundwater redox potential or geochemical conditions, but rather the physical-chemical difference in Pu sources, which at SRS appear to be dominated downstream from the seepage basins by decay of 244Cm, resulting in more oxidized forms of 240Pu. There is no clear evidence

  7. Plutonium in groundwater at the 100K-Area of the U.S. DOE Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Minhan; Buesseler, Ken O.; Pike, Steven M.

    2005-02-01

    We examined the concentration, size distribution, redox state and isotopic composition of plutonium (Pu) in groundwater at the 100K-Area at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Total concentrations of Pu isotopes were extremely low (10 -4 to 10 -6 pCi/kg, ≈10 4 to 10 6 atoms/kg) but measurable for the first time in the 100K-Area wells using mass spectrometric analyses that are much more sensitive than alpha spectroscopy methods used previously. Size fractionation data from two wells suggest that 7-29% of the Pu is associated with colloids, operationally defined here as particles between 1 kDa-0.2 μm in size. These colloids were collected using a 1 kDa cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFF) system developed specifically for groundwater actinide studies to include careful controls both in the field and during processing to ensure in situ geochemical conditions are maintained and size separations can be well characterized. Pu in this colloidal fraction was exclusively in the more reduced Pu(III/IV) form, consistent with the higher affinity of Pu in the lower oxidation states for particle surfaces. While the overall concentrations of Pu were low, the Pu isotopic composition suggests at least two local sources of groundwater Pu, namely, local Hanford reactor operations at the 100K-Area and spent nuclear fuel from the N-reactor, which was stored in concrete pools at this site. Differences between this site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) are noted, since groundwater Pu at the F-Area seepage basin at SRS has been found using these same methods, to be characterized by lower colloidal abundances and higher oxidation states. This difference is not directly attributable to groundwater redox potential or geochemical conditions, but rather the physical-chemical difference in Pu sources, which at SRS appear to be dominated downstream from the seepage basins by decay of 244Cm, resulting in more oxidized forms of 240Pu. There is no clear evidence for colloid

  8. Enrichment of H3K9me2 on Unsynapsed Chromatin in Caenorhabditis elegans Does Not Target de Novo Sites

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yiqing; Yang, Bing; Li, Yini; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2015-01-01

    Many organisms alter the chromatin state of unsynapsed chromosomes during meiotic prophase, a phenomenon hypothesized to function in maintaining germline integrity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) is detected by immunolabeling as enriched on unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. Loss of the SET domain protein, MET-2, greatly reduces H3K9me2 abundance and results in germline mortality. Here, we used him-8 mutations to disable X chromosome synapsis and performed a combination of molecular assays to map the sites of H3K9me2 accumulation, evaluate H3K9me2 abundance in germline vs. whole animals, and evaluate the impact of H3K9me2 loss on the germline transcriptome. Our data indicate that H3K9me2 is elevated broadly across the X chromosome and at defined X chromosomal sites in him-8 adults compared with controls. H3K9me2 levels are also elevated to a lesser degree at sites on synapsed chromosomes in him-8 adults compared with controls. These results suggest that MET-2 activity is elevated in him-8 mutants generally as well as targeted preferentially to the unsynapsed X. Abundance of H3K9me2 and other histone H3 modifications is low in germline chromatin compared with whole animals, which may facilitate genome reprogramming during gametogenesis. Loss of H3K9me2 has a subtle impact on the him-8 germline transcriptome, suggesting H3K9me2 may not be a major regulator of developmental gene expression in C. elegans. We hypothesize H3K9me2 may have a structural function critical for germline immortality, and a greater abundance of these marks may be required when a chromosome does not synapse. PMID:26156747

  9. Enrichment of H3K9me2 on Unsynapsed Chromatin in Caenorhabditis elegans Does Not Target de Novo Sites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiqing; Yang, Bing; Li, Yini; Xu, Xia; Maine, Eleanor M

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms alter the chromatin state of unsynapsed chromosomes during meiotic prophase, a phenomenon hypothesized to function in maintaining germline integrity. In Caenorhabditis elegans, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) is detected by immunolabeling as enriched on unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. Loss of the SET domain protein, MET-2, greatly reduces H3K9me2 abundance and results in germline mortality. Here, we used him-8 mutations to disable X chromosome synapsis and performed a combination of molecular assays to map the sites of H3K9me2 accumulation, evaluate H3K9me2 abundance in germline vs. whole animals, and evaluate the impact of H3K9me2 loss on the germline transcriptome. Our data indicate that H3K9me2 is elevated broadly across the X chromosome and at defined X chromosomal sites in him-8 adults compared with controls. H3K9me2 levels are also elevated to a lesser degree at sites on synapsed chromosomes in him-8 adults compared with controls. These results suggest that MET-2 activity is elevated in him-8 mutants generally as well as targeted preferentially to the unsynapsed X. Abundance of H3K9me2 and other histone H3 modifications is low in germline chromatin compared with whole animals, which may facilitate genome reprogramming during gametogenesis. Loss of H3K9me2 has a subtle impact on the him-8 germline transcriptome, suggesting H3K9me2 may not be a major regulator of developmental gene expression in C. elegans. We hypothesize H3K9me2 may have a structural function critical for germline immortality, and a greater abundance of these marks may be required when a chromosome does not synapse. PMID:26156747

  10. Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects. Annual report, October 1984-September 1985. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Jacobs, G.K.; Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Whatley, S.K.

    1986-05-01

    Information pertaining to the potential geochemical behavior of radionuclides at candidate sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository, which is being developed by projects within the Department of Energy (DOE), is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). During this report period, emphasis was placed on the evaluation of information pertinent to the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. Results on the sorption/solubility behavior of technetium, neptunium, and uranium in the basalt/water geochemical system are summarized and compared to the results of DOE. Also, summaries of results are reported from two geochemical modeling studies: (1) an evaluation of the information developed by DOE on the native copper deposits of Michigan as a natural analog for the emplacement of copper canisters in a repository in basalt, and (2) calculation of the solubility and speciation of radionuclides for representative groundwaters from the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada.

  11. Does the Addition of Involved Field Radiotherapy to High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Improve Outcomes for Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Flowers, Christopher; Xu Zhiheng; Esiashvili, Natia

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adding involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-two patients with relapsed/refractory HL undergoing HDCT and SCT from 1995 to 2008 were analyzed in a case-control design. Forty-six HL patients treated with IFRT within 2 months of SCT were matched to 46 HL patients who did not receive IFRT based on age, stage at relapse, timing of relapse, histology, and year of SCT. All were evaluated for response, survival, and toxicity with a median followup of 63.5 months. Results: There was a trend for better disease control in patients receiving IFRT. Specifically, 10/46 IFRT patients (22%) relapsed/progressed after SCT compared with 17/46 control patients (37%). Of the failures after IFRT, 70% were inside the radiation field, all in sites of bulky disease. In patients with nonbulky disease, IFRT also resulted in significantly improved outcomes (failure rate 6% vs. 33%, respectively). When stratified by disease bulk, the use of IFRT was found to significantly improve DFS (p = 0.032), but did not affect OS. In addition, IFRT and nonbulky disease were found to be positive prognostic indicators for DFS with hazard ratios of 0.357 (p = 0.032) and 0.383 (p = 0.034), respectively. Grade IV/V toxicities were significantly higher in the IFRT vs. non-IFRT group (28% vs. 2%; p < 0.001), observed only in patients receiving a busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Conclusion: Patients with refractory or relapsed HL undergoing HDCT and SCT have a high risk of relapse in sites of prior disease involvement, especially in sites of bulky disease. The use of IFRT is associated with a lower risk of disease progression in these sites; however bulky disease sites are still difficult to control. Toxicity risk is significant, particularly when busulfan-based conditioning is combined with IFRT, and alternative

  12. Hoxb-2 transcriptional activation in rhombomeres 3 and 5 requires an evolutionarily conserved cis-acting element in addition to the Krox-20 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vesque, C; Maconochie, M; Nonchev, S; Ariza-McNaughton, L; Kuroiwa, A; Charnay, P; Krumlauf, R

    1996-01-01

    Segmentation is a key feature of the development of the vertebrate hindbrain where it involves the generation of repetitive morphological units termed rhombomeres (r). Hox genes are likely to play an essential role in the specification of segmental identity and we have been investigating their regulation. We show here that the mouse and chicken Hoxb-2 genes are dependent for their expression in r3 and r5 on homologous enhancer elements and on binding to this enhancer of the r3/r5-specific transcriptional activator Krox-20. Among the three Krox-20 binding sites of the mouse Hoxb-2 enhancer, only the high-affinity site is absolutely necessary for activity. In contrast, we have identified an additional cis-acting element, Box1, essential for r3/r5 enhancer activity. It is conserved both in sequence and in position respective to the high-affinity Krox-20 binding site within the mouse and chicken enhancers. Furthermore, a short 44 bp sequence spanning the Box1 and Krox-20 sites can act as an r3/r5 enhancer when oligomerized. Box1 may therefore constitute a recognition sequence for another factor cooperating with Krox-20. Taken together, these data demonstrate the conservation of Hox gene regulation and of Krox-20 function during vertebrate evolution. Images PMID:8895582

  13. Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J.; Grant, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd{sup 3}. Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek`s advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation.

  14. Effects of nutrient and lime additions in mine site rehabilitation strategies on the accumulation of antimony and arsenic by native Australian plants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Susan C; Leech, Calvin D; Butler, Leo; Lisle, Leanne; Ashley, Paul M; Lockwood, Peter V

    2013-10-15

    The effects of nutrient and lime additions on antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) accumulation by native Australian and naturalised plants growing in two contaminated mine site soils (2,735 mg kg(-1) and 4,517 mg kg(-1) Sb; 826 mg kg(-1) and 1606 As mgkg(-1)) was investigated using a glasshouse pot experiment. The results indicated an increase in soil solution concentrations with nutrient addition in both soils and also with nutrient+lime addition for Sb in one soil. Metalloid concentrations in plant roots were significantly greater than concentrations in above ground plant parts. The metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts from the roots and from the soil was, however, low (ratio of leaf concentration/soil concentration≪1) for all species studied. Eucalyptus michaeliana was the most successful at colonisation with lowest metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts. Addition of nutrients and nutrients+lime to soils, in general, increased plant metalloid accumulation. Relative As accumulation was greater than that of Sb. All the plant species studied were suitable for consideration in the mine soil phytostabilisation strategies but lime additions should be limited and longer term trials also recommended. PMID:23433572

  15. Lessons Learned From The 200 West Pump And Treatment Facility Construction Project At The US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership For Energy And Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, Kent A.; Ostrom, Michael J.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.

    2012-11-14

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built in an accelerated manner with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds and has attained Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) GOLD certification, which makes it the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and LEED challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility. This paper will present the Project and LEED accomplishments, as well as Lessons Learned by CHPRC when additional ARRA funds were used to accelerate design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of the 200 West Groundwater Pump and Treatment (2W P&T) Facility to meet DOE's mission of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012.

  16. Skeletal muscle oxygen saturation does not estimate mixed venous oxygen saturation in patients with severe left heart failure and additional severe sepsis or septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Podbregar, Matej; Možina, Hugon

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Low cardiac output states such as left heart failure are characterized by preserved oxygen extraction ratio, which is in contrast to severe sepsis. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows noninvasive estimation of skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation (StO2). The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between StO2 and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) in patients with severe left heart failure with or without additional severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Sixty-five patients with severe left heart failure due to primary heart disease were divided into two groups: groups A (n = 24) and B (n = 41) included patients without and with additional severe sepsis/septic shock, respectively. Thenar muscle StO2 was measured using NIRS in the patients and in 15 healthy volunteers. Results StO2 was lower in group A than in group B and in healthy volunteers (58 ± 13%, 90 ± 7% and 84 ± 4%, respectively; P < 0.001). StO2 was higher in group B than in healthy volunteers (P = 0.02). In group A StO2 correlated with SvO2 (r = 0.689, P = 0.002), although StO2 overestimated SvO2 (bias -2.3%, precision 4.6%). In group A changes in StO2 correlated with changes in SvO2 (r = 0.836, P < 0.001; ΔSvO2 = 0.84 × ΔStO2 - 0.67). In group B important differences between these variables were observed. Plasma lactate concentrations correlated negatively with StO2 values only in group A (r = -0.522, P = 0.009; lactate = -0.104 × StO2 + 10.25). Conclusion Skeletal muscle StO2 does not estimate SvO2 in patients with severe left heart failure and additional severe sepsis or septic shock. However, in patients with severe left heart failure without additional severe sepsis or septic shock, StO2 values could be used to provide rapid, noninvasive estimation of SvO2; furthermore, the trend in StO2 may be considered a surrogate for the trend in SvO2. Trial Registration: NCT00384644 PMID:17227587

  17. Multigene phylogenetic reconstruction of the Tubulinea (Amoebozoa) corroborates four of the six major lineages, while additionally revealing that shell composition does not predict phylogeny in the Arcellinida.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Daniel J G; Grant, Jessica R; Katz, Laura A

    2013-05-01

    Tubulinea is a phylogenetically stable higher-level taxon within Amoebozoa, morphologically characterized by monoaxially streaming and cylindrical pseudopods. Contemporary phylogenetic reconstructions have largely relied on SSU rDNA, and to a lesser extent, on actin genes to reveal the relationships among these organisms. Additionally, the test (shell) forming Arcellinida, one of the most species-rich amoebozoan groups, is nested within Tubulinea and suffers from substantial under-sampling of taxa. Here, we increase taxonomic and gene sampling within the Tubulinea, characterizing molecular data for 22 taxa and six genes (SSU rDNA, actin, α- and β-tubulin, elongation factor 2 and the 14-3-3 regulatory protein). We perform concatenated phylogenetic analyses using these genes as well as approximately unbiased tests to assess evolutionary relationships within the Tubulinea. We confirm the monophyly of Tubulinea and four of the six included lineages (Echinamoeboidea, Leptomyxida, Amoebida and Poseidonida). Arcellinida and Hartmanellidae, the remaining lineages, are not monophyletic in our reconstructions, although statistical testing does not allow rejection of either group. We further investigate more fine-grained morphological evolution of previously defined groups, concluding that relationships within Arcellinida are more consistent with general test and aperture shape than with test composition. We also discuss the implications of this phylogeny for interpretations of the Precambrian fossil record of testate amoebae. PMID:23499265

  18. Understanding the effect of magnesium ion concentration on the catalytic activity of ribonuclease H through computation: Does a third metal binding site modulate endonuclease activity?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Hsun; De Vivo, Marco; Peraro, Matteo Dal; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Ribonuclease H (RNase H) belongs to the nucleotidyl-transferase (NT) superfamily and hydrolyzes the phosphodiester linkage on the RNA strand of a DNA/RNA hybrid duplex. Due to its activity in HIV reverse transcription, it represents a promising target for anti-HIV drug design. While crystallographic data have located two ions in the catalytic site, there is ongoing debate concerning just how many metal ions bound at the active site are optimal for catalysis. Indeed, experiments have shown a dependency of the catalytic activity on the Mg2+ concentration. Moreover, in RNase H the glutamate residue E188 has been shown to be essential for full enzymatic activation regardless of the Mg2+ concentration. The catalytic center is known to contain two Mg2+ ions (Nowotny et al.) and E188 is not one of the primary metal ligands. Herein, classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to study the metal-ligand coordination in RNase H at different concentration of Mg2+. Importantly, the presence of a third Mg2+ ion, bound to the second-shell ligand E188, is persistent feature of the MD simulations. Free energy calculations have identified two distinct conformations depending on the concentration of Mg2+. At standard concentration, a third Mg2+ is found in the catalytic pocket but it does not perturb the optimal RNase H active conformation. However, at higher concentration, the third Mg2+ ion heavily perturbs the nucleophilic water and thereby influences the catalytic efficiency of RNase H. In addition, the E188A mutant shows no ability to engage additional Mg2+ ions nearby the catalytic pocket. This finding likely explains the decrease in catalytic activity of E188A, and also supports the key role of E188 in localizing the third Mg2+ ion at the active site. Glutamate residues are commonly found surrounding the metal center in the endonuclease family, which suggests that this structural motif may be an important feature to enhance catalytic activity. The present MD

  19. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste: Volume 3, Site evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.

    1996-03-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussion of the results for each site.

  20. Characterization of uranium contaminated soils from DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project Site: Results of Phase 1 characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Marsh, J.D. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated Demonstration (ID) for remediation of uranium- contaminated soils has been established by the DOE Office of Technology Development. The Fernald (Feed Materials Production Center) site was selected as the DOE facility for the field demonstration. The principle objective of this ID is to evaluate and compare the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems for the removal of uranium from contaminated soils. Several leaching solutions were employed to determine their effectiveness in extracting uranium from the soil. The extractants and their means of preparation were: 0.1 N nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}): 6.25 mL of concentrated nitric acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 2% ammonium carbonate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}): 20 g of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl): 50 mL of NaOCl reagent (Cl < 6%) was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetric acid, disodium salt (EDTA): 37.224 g EDTA was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 2% citric acid monohydrate solution (H{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center dot}H{sub 2}O): 20 g of critic acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M hydroxylamine-hydrochloride (NH{sub 2}OH{center dot}HCl) in 0.01 N nitric acid: 6.95 g (NH{sub 2}OH{center dot}HCl) was dissolved and diluted to 1 L with 0.01 N HNO{sub 3}. The 0.01 N nitric acid was prepared by diluting 3 mL concentrated nitric acid to 5 L with distilled water; and the sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) method: 0.3 M sodium citrate (88 g tribasic sodium citrate, Na{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O, per liter); 1 M sodium bicarbonate (84 g NaHCO{sub 3} per liter); and 5 g sodium dithionite, Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  1. Characterization of uranium contaminated soils from DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project Site: Results of Phase 1 characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Marsh, J.D. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated Demonstration (ID) for remediation of uranium- contaminated soils has been established by the DOE Office of Technology Development. The Fernald (Feed Materials Production Center) site was selected as the DOE facility for the field demonstration. The principle objective of this ID is to evaluate and compare the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems for the removal of uranium from contaminated soils. Several leaching solutions were employed to determine their effectiveness in extracting uranium from the soil. The extractants and their means of preparation were: 0.1 N nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}]: 6.25 mL of concentrated nitric acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 2% ammonium carbonate [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}]: 20 g of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl): 50 mL of NaOCl reagent (Cl < 6%) was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetric acid, disodium salt (EDTA): 37.224 g EDTA was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 1 L; 2% citric acid monohydrate solution (H{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O): 20 g of critic acid was diluted to 1 L with distilled water; 0.1 M hydroxylamine-hydrochloride (NH{sub 2}OH{center_dot}HCl) in 0.01 N nitric acid: 6.95 g (NH{sub 2}OH{center_dot}HCl) was dissolved and diluted to 1 L with 0.01 N HNO{sub 3}. The 0.01 N nitric acid was prepared by diluting 3 mL concentrated nitric acid to 5 L with distilled water; and the sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) method: 0.3 M sodium citrate (88 g tribasic sodium citrate, Na{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, per liter); 1 M sodium bicarbonate (84 g NaHCO{sub 3} per liter); and 5 g sodium dithionite, Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  2. The DOE repository program

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, T.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by the Congress in the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) to characterize the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site as the initial candidate site for the nation's first geologic repository. Site characterization through ongoing surface-based testing has been under way since the President approved the recommendation of the Yucca Mountain site as one of three candidate sites in May 1986. A more extensive site characterization program, including construction of exploratory shafts and an underground testing facility, has been described in the consultative draft site characterization plan (SCP-CD), which was provided to the state of Nevada and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in January 1988 for review and comment. In addition, technical workshops were held with the state of Nevada, the NRC, and their contractors in February and March to discuss specific technical issues in the SCP-CD.

  3. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action.

  4. DOE 2009 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2009 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  5. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  6. DOE 2008 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  7. Kansas State University: DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 4, fourth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Kansas State University, in support of a DOE and Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program subject contract, continues to test, evaluate, demonstrate, and develop electric vehicle and infrastructure technology. K-State is operating two Soleq EVcort vehicles. During this reporting period both vehicles were brought back to full operational status after warranty service was completed by Soleq. Vehicle failures occurred due to three unrelated battery cable failures in addition to the replacement of one battery. Both vehicles are being operated on a routine basis. K-State, along with York Technical College, has established a relationship with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM) Redford, Michigan. K-State has ordered no less than four Ford Ranger electric trucks from TDM. K-State is involved in the steering committee that is monitoring and refining information to direct the design and testing of these new technology vehicles. TDM should become the first automotive manufacturer certified by one of the Big Three under their Quality Vehicle Manufacturer program. Kansas State University and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program look forward to working with TDM on their new EV program.

  8. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  9. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-09-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators’ concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: - quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; - are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; - are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and - believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites.

  10. DOE ORDER 435.1, IMPLEMENTATION AND COMPLIANCE DECLARATION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AND ACROSS THE DOE COMPLEX IN CONTRAST TO CURRENT PUSHBACK EFFORTS FROM THE ''TOP-TO-BOTTOM'' REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    GOLDSTON, WELFORD T.; SMITH, WINCHESTER IV

    2003-02-27

    DOE issued Order 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' on July 9, 1999 for immediate implementation. The requirements for Low Level Mixed, Transuranic, and High Level Waste have been completely rewritten. The entire DOE complex has been struggling with how to implement these new requirements within the one year required timeframe. This paper will chronicle the implementation strategy and actual results of the work to carry out that strategy at the Savannah River Site. DOE-SR and the site contractors worked closely together to implement each of the new requirements across the SRS, crossing many barriers and providing innovative solutions to the many problems that surfaced throughout the year. The results are that SRS declared compliance with all of the requirements of the Order within the prescribed timeframe. The challenge included all waste types in SRS facilities and programs that handle LLW, MLLW, TRU, and HLW. This paper will describe the implementation details for development of Radioactive Waste Management Basis for each facility, Identification of Wastes with No Path to Disposal, Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determinations, Low Level Waste 90-Day Staging and One Year Limits for Storage Programs, to name a few of the requirements that were addressed by the SRS 435.1 Implementation Team. This paper will trace the implementation, problems (both technical and administrative), and the current pushback efforts associated with the DOE ''Top-to-Bottom'' review.

  11. Proceedings of the eighth annual DOE low-level waste management forum: Technical Session 2, Site closure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    This volume on site closure or site stabilization and closure, centers on a number of major issues which have been identified by the contractor community as requiring resolution before the topic of site stabilization and closure can be laid to rest. All papers, seven total, in this volume have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (AT)

  12. How Does Your Site Measure Up? If Traffic Is Sparse, It's Time for a Serious Usability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minkel, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Librarians seldom give enough thought to the needs of potential Web-site visitors. Few librarians, for example, stop to consider how they can make their sites easy to use or more attractive. As a result, many sites have awful color schemes, hard-to-find navigation buttons, inappropriate font sizes, and confusing layouts. No wonder they don't…

  13. Citizen Contributions to the Closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 18 and 19 at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) - 13448

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, W.F.

    2013-07-01

    Citizen involvement in DOE's decision-making for the environmental cleanup from DOE's management of its nuclear wastes across the DOE complex has had a positive effect on the cleanup of its SRS site, characterized by an acceleration of cleanup not only for the Transuranic wastes at SRS, but also for DOE's first two closures of HLW tanks, both of which occurred at SRS. The Citizens around SRS had pushed successfully for the closures of Tanks 17 and 20 in 1997, becoming the first closures of HLW tanks under regulatory guidance in the USA. However, since then, HLW tank closures ceased due to a lawsuit, the application of new tank clean-up technology, interagency squabbling between DOE and NRC over tank closure criteria, and finally and almost fatally, from budget pressures. Despite an agreement with its regulators for the closure of Tanks 18 and 19 by the end of calendar year 2012, the outlook in Fall 2011 to close these two tanks had dimmed. It was at this point that the citizens around SRS became reengaged with tank closures, helping DOE to reach its agreed upon milestone. (authors)

  14. Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeltzer, J. S.; Millier, J. J.; Gustafson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

  15. Contracting problems at DOE's Fernald site. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, December 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This hearing is part of a continuing inquiry into the handling of nuclear waste cleanup of DOE facilities. The specific focus for this particular hearing is the way in which DOE is managing the extremely costly program of cleanup of more than 12 major facilities. The DOE approach to cleaning up the Fernald site has not gone well.

  16. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  17. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  18. Structural-functional characterization of the cathodic haemoglobin of the conger eel Conger conger: molecular modelling study of an additional phosphate-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Giardina, Bruno; Verde, Cinzia; Carratore, Vito; Olianas, Alessandra; Sollai, Luigi; Sanna, Maria T; Castagnola, Massimo; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    The protein sequence data for the alpha- and beta-chains have been deposited in the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL protein knowledgebase under the accession numbers P83479 and P83478 respectively. The Conger conger (conger eel) haemoglobin (Hb) system is made of three components, one of which, the so-called cathodic Hb, representing approx. 20% of the total pigment, has been purified and characterized from both a structural and functional point of view. Stripped Hb showed a reverse Bohr effect, high oxygen affinity and slightly low cooperativity in the absence of any effector. Addition of saturating GTP strongly influences the pH dependence of the oxygen affinity, since the reverse Bohr effect, observed under stripped conditions, is converted into a small normal Bohr effect. A further investigation of the GTP effect on oxygen affinity, carried out by fitting its titration curve, demonstrated the presence of two independent binding sites. Therefore, on the basis of the amino acid sequence of the alpha- and beta-chains, which have been determined, a computer modelling study has been performed. The data suggest that C. conger cathodic Hb may bind organic phosphates at two distinct binding sites located along the central cavity of the tetramer by hydrogen bonds and/or electrostatic interactions with amino acid residues of both chains, which have been identified. Among these residues, the two Lys-alpha(G6) (where the letter refers to the haemoglobin helix and the number to the amino acid position in the helix) appear to have a key role in the GTP movement from the external binding region to the internal central cavity of the tetrameric molecule. PMID:12646043

  19. Interplay between synchronization of multivesicular release and recruitment of additional release sites support short-term facilitation at hippocampal mossy fiber to CA3 pyramidal cells synapses.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Simon; Evstratova, Alesya; Tóth, Katalin

    2014-08-13

    Synaptic short-term plasticity is a key regulator of neuronal communication and is controlled via various mechanisms. A well established property of mossy fiber to CA3 pyramidal cell synapses is the extensive short-term facilitation during high-frequency bursts. We investigated the mechanisms governing facilitation using a combination of whole-cell electrophysiological recordings, electrical minimal stimulation, and random-access two-photon microscopy in acute mouse hippocampal slices. Two distinct presynaptic mechanisms were involved in short-term facilitation, with their relative contribution dependent on extracellular calcium concentration. The synchronization of multivesicular release was observed during trains of facilitating EPSCs recorded in 1.2 mM external Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]e). Indeed, covariance analysis revealed a gradual augmentation in quantal size during trains of EPSCs, and application of the low-affinity glutamate receptor antagonist γ-D-glutamylglycine showed an increase in cleft glutamate concentration during paired-pulse stimulation. Whereas synchronization of multivesicular release contributed to the facilitation in 1.2 mM [Ca(2+)]e, variance-mean analysis showed that recruitment of more release sites (N) was likely to account for the larger facilitation observed in 2.5 mM [Ca(2+)]e. Furthermore, this increase in N could be promoted by calcium microdomains of heterogeneous amplitudes observed in single mossy fiber boutons. Our findings suggest that the combination of multivesicular release and the recruitment of additional release sites act together to increase glutamate release during burst activity. This is supported by the compartmentalized spatial profile of calcium elevations in boutons and helps to expand the dynamic range of mossy fibers information transfer. PMID:25122902

  20. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 2: Site performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This document contains twelve papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics of this volume include: performance assessment methodology; remedial action alternatives; site selection and site characterization procedures; intruder scenarios; sensitivity analysis procedures; mathematical models for mixed waste environmental transport; and risk assessment methodology. Individual papers were processed separately for the database. (TEM)

  1. Site Development Planning Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The Handbook provides facility managers and site planners at DOE organizations responsible for planning site developments and facilities utilization a step-by-step planning checklist to ensure that planners at each site are focusing on Department-wide goals and objectives. It begins with a brief discussion of a site development-by-objectives program design to promote, recognize, and implement opportunities for improvements in site utilization through planning. Additional information is included on: assembling existing data, plans, programs, and procedures; establishing realistic objectives; identifying site problems, opportunities; and development needs; determining priorities among development needs; developing short and long-range plans; choosing the right development solutions and meeting minimum legal site restrictions; presenting the plan; implementing elements of the plan; monitoring and reporting plan status; and modifying development program plans. (MCW)

  2. THE ADDITION OF MILK OR YOGURT TO A PLANT-BASED DIET INCREASES ZINC BIOAVAILABILITY BUT DOES NOT AFFECT IRON BIOAVAILABILITY IN WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of milk and milk-based products to the diets of individuals subsisting on plant-based diets was reported to have positive effects on nutritional status and functional outcomes such as growth, morbidity, and cognition. We examined the effect of the addition of milk or yogurt on the bioav...

  3. Basic data report for drilling and hydrologic testing of drillhole DOE-2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIIP) site

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, J.W.; Beauheim, R.L.; Snyder, R.P.; Fairer, G.M.

    1987-04-01

    Drillhole DOE-2 was drilled to investigate a structural depression marked by the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado Formation. Contrary to several hypotheses, halite layers were thicker in the lower part of the Salado, not thinner as a result of any removal of halite. The upper Castile anhydrite in Drillhole DOE-2 is anomalously thick and is strongly deformed relative to the anhydrite in adjacent drillholes. In contrast, the halite was <8 ft thick and significantly thinner than usually encountered. The lower Castile anhydrite appears to be normal. The depression within the correlated marker beds in the Salado Formation in Drillhole DOE-2 is interpreted as a result of gravity-driven deformation of the underlying Castile Formation. Several stratigraphic units were hydrologically tested in Drillhole DOE-2. Testing of the unsaturated lower portion of the Dewey Lake Red Beds was unsuccessful because of exceptionally small rates of fluid intake. Drill-stem tests were conducted in five intervals in the Rustler Formation, over the Marker Bed 138-139 interval in the Salado formation, and over three sandstone members of the Bell Canyon Formation. A pumping test was conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation. Pressure-pulse tests were conducted over the entire Salado Formation. Fluid samples were collected from the Culebra Dolomite Member and from the Hays Member of the Bell Canyon Formation. 31 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and that are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 µg/L or 0.126 µmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influences plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences

  5. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone.

    PubMed

    Zachara, John M; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John; Davis, James A; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K; Freshley, Mark D; Konopka, Allan E; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P; Rockhold, Mark L; Williams, Kenneth H; Yabusaki, Steve B

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the

  6. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan E.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steve B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (< one pore volume). At the Rifle site, slow oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between

  7. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: comparing meta and mega analytical approaches for data pooling

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E.; Mandl, René C.; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T.; Hong, L. Elliot; Landman, Bennett A.; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna; Martin, Nicholas G.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Olvera, Rene L.; Peterson, Charles P.; Starr, John M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Wright, Susan N.; Bastin, Mark E.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, René S.; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Blangero, John; van ’t Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M.; Glahn, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9–85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large “mega-family”. We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  8. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: Comparing meta and megaanalytical approaches for data pooling.

    PubMed

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E; Mandl, René C; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M; Curran, Joanne E; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T; Hong, L Elliot; Landman, Bennett A; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna M; Martin, Nicholas G; McMahon, Katie L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Olvera, Rene L; Peterson, Charles P; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Toga, Arthur W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wright, Margaret J; Wright, Susan N; Bastin, Mark E; McIntosh, Andrew M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, René S; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Williamson, Douglas E; Blangero, John; van 't Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C

    2014-07-15

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9-85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large "mega-family". We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  9. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I. )

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  10. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A.; Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E.; Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T.; Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A.; Judd, B.R.; Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  11. Why Does Ga Addition to CIS Limit Its Cell Performance: The Amazing Physics of Grain-Boundaries and Killer-Defects in Chalcopyrites

    SciTech Connect

    Zunger, A.

    2005-11-01

    New theoretical studies reveal the way that grain boundaries lead to a reduction in electron-hole recombination in CIS, and how Ga addition leads to cell deterioration largely because of grain-interior (not boundary) effects.

  12. 1997 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1998-04-13

    Hanford`s missions are to safely clean up and manage the site`s legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford`s environmental management or cleanup mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infra structure, site) for other missions. Hanford`s science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford`s original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation`s defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford`s operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The cleanup activity is an immense and challenging undertaking, which includes characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues.

  13. Scoping evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Langkopf, B.S.

    1997-05-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a scoping evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of the hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Eight hazardous metals were evaluated: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. The analysis considered transport only through the groundwater pathway. The results are reported as site-specific estimates of maximum concentrations of each hazardous metal in treated mixed low-level waste that do not exceed the performance measures established for the analysis. Also reported are site-specific estimates of travel times of each hazardous metal to the point of compliance.

  14. Estimation of the limitations for surficial water addition above a potential high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fewell, M.E.; Sobolik, S.R.; Gauthier, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization includes surface-based and underground testing. Analyses have been performed to design site characterization activities with minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste, and on tests performed as part of the characterization process. One activity of site characterization is the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility, consisting of underground shafts, drifts, and ramps, and the accompanying surface pad facility and roads. The information in this report addresses the following topics: (1) a discussion of the potential effects of surface construction water on repository-performance, and on surface and underground experiments; (2) one-dimensional numerical calculations predicting the maximum allowable amount of water that may infiltrate the surface of the mountain without affecting repository performance; and (3) two-dimensional numerical calculations of the movement of that amount of surface water and how the water may affect repository performance and experiments. The results contained herein should be used with other site data and scientific/engineering judgement in determining controls on water usage at Yucca Mountain. This document contains information that has been used in preparing Appendix I of the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements document for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  15. Economic impact of accelerated cleanup on regions surrounding the U.S. DOE's major nuclear weapons sites.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, M; Solitare, L; Frisch, M; Lowrie, K

    1999-08-01

    The regional economic impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's accelerated environmental cleanup plan are estimated for the major nuclear weapons sites in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington. The analysis shows that the impact falls heavily on the three relatively rural regions around the Savannah River (SC), Hanford (WA), and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (ID) sites. A less aggressive phase-down of environmental management funds and separate funds to invest in education and infrastructure in the regions helps buffer the impacts on jobs, personal income, and gross regional product. Policy options open to the federal and state and local governments are discussed. PMID:10765427

  16. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, L.M.

    1999-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.

  17. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  18. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  19. Why Does a Large Prison Population Yield So Few Participants in a College Program Offered at Prison Sites?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, S. M. Steve

    A study was conducted to determine why such a small number (less than 2 percent) of the approximately 9,000 adult male prisoners housed in the 3 complexes of the California Institution for Men (Chino, California) in the mid-1980s were actively participating in the college program offered at the prison sites. Data were collected through interviews…

  20. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Wastes at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Denise

    2005-06-01

    We have spent this first part of the project preparing background material for conference participants and making arrangements for the conference itself. Material regarding state regulatory constraints to the use of bioremediation in the cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals at DOE sites around the country has been added to the Bioremediation Briefing paper for participants. The Steering Committee has been formulated and will hold their first meeting via phone conference on Monday, September 13, 2005. On the agenda is identification of conference participants, experts, and initial issues likely to be addressed. Human Subjects approval has been secured from the University. The ''pre-test'' has been developed and is ready to implement. The Consensus Conference will be held in Phoenix, AZ during January and February 2005; we are working with the Chamber of Commerce to find an appropriate site.

  1. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, Marisa N; Boyer, Brian D; Stevens, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}2 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-03-16

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical informatioin provided in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532.

  3. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV-519

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-02-25

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' DOE/NV--519.

  4. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-01

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

  5. Slow base excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase limits the rate of formation of AP sites and AP endonuclease 1 does not stimulate base excision.

    PubMed

    Maher, Robyn L; Vallur, Aarthy C; Feller, Joyce A; Bloom, Linda B

    2007-01-01

    The base excision repair pathway removes damaged DNA bases and resynthesizes DNA to replace the damage. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) is one of several damage-specific DNA glycosylases that recognizes and excises damaged DNA bases. AAG removes primarily damaged adenine residues. Human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes AP sites produced by DNA glycosylases and incises the phophodiester bond 5' to the damaged site. The repair process is completed by a DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. If not tightly coordinated, base excision repair could generate intermediates that are more deleterious to the cell than the initial DNA damage. The kinetics of AAG-catalyzed excision of two damaged bases, hypoxanthine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine, were measured in the presence and absence of APE1 to investigate the mechanism by which the base excision activity of AAG is coordinated with the AP incision activity of APE1. 1,N6-ethenoadenine is excised significantly slower than hypoxanthine and the rate of excision is not affected by APE1. The excision of hypoxanthine is inhibited to a small degree by accumulated product, and APE1 stimulates multiple turnovers by alleviating product inhibition. These results show that APE1 does not significantly affect the kinetics of base excision by AAG. It is likely that slow excision by AAG limits the rate of AP site formation in vivo such that AP sites are not created faster than can be processed by APE1. PMID:17018265

  6. 1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher.

  7. Povidone Iodine Ointment Application to the Vaccination Site Does Not Alter Immunoglobulin G Antibody Response to Smallpox Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Christine; Brown, Elizabeth S; Quinn, Xiaofei; Korman, Lawrence; Dyas, Beverly K; Ulrich, Robert G; Pittman, Phillip R

    2016-01-01

    U.S. military personnel deployed to high-risk areas receive the live vaccinia virus (VACV) smallpox vaccine ACAM2000. VACV shedding from the vaccination site can result in autoinoculation and contact transmission. We previously found that the application of povidone iodine ointment (PIO) to the scarification site reduced viral shedding without altering the antibody response, as measured by plaque reduction neutralization or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In this study, we used protein microarray assays to measure the amount of immunoglobulin G antibody bound to (1) ACAM2000 itself and (2) individual VACV antigens that are present within ACAM2000. We assessed antibody binding in sera from primary smallpox vaccinees who applied PIO to the scarification site beginning on day 7 (PIO group) and from those who did not apply PIO (control group). In both cohorts, the postvaccination antibody response-in terms of antibody binding, both to ACAM2000 and to 11 individual VACV antigens-was significantly greater than the prevaccination response (all p < 0.0001). The postvaccination antibody binding levels of vaccinees in the PIO group did not differ from those of control vaccinees. These findings further support the topical application of PIO, starting on day 7, to reduce the viral shedding associated with smallpox vaccination. PMID:27214505

  8. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  9. Hydraulic fracture model and diagnostics verification at GRI/DOE multi-site projects and tight gas sand program support. Final report, July 28, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over twenty years. Early production experiments included nuclear stimulations and massive hydraulic fracture treatments. This work culminated in the US Department of Energy (DOE)`s Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory designed to study the reservoir and production characteristics of low permeability sands. A key feature of MWX was an infrastructure which included several closely spaced wells that allowed detailed characterization of the reservoir through log and core analysis, and well testing. Interference and tracer tests, as well as the use of fracture diagnostics gave further information on stimulation and production characteristics. Thus, the Multiwell Experiment provided a unique opportunity for identifying the factors affecting production from tight gas sand reservoirs. The purpose of this operation was to support the gathering of field data that may be used to resolve the number of unknowns associated with measuring and modeling the dimensions of hydraulic fractures. Using the close-well infrastructure at the Multiwell Site near Rifle, Colorado, this operation focused primarily on the field design and execution of experiments. The data derived from the experiments were gathered and analyzed by DOE team contractors.

  10. Heterogeneous /sup 3/H-rauwolscine binding sites in rat complex: two alpha/sub 2/-adrenoceptor subtypes or and additional non-adrenergic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhurst, A.M.; Alexander, B.S.; Wood, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Ligand binding and isolated tissue data have provided evidence for the existence of two, tissue-specific, alpha/sub 2/-adrenoceptor in various rodent and non-rodent species. Thus, it has been proposed that the complex binding of alpha/sub 2/-antagonists to rat cortical membranes is due to the presence of both subtypes in this tissue. The authors have previously shown that the alpha/sub 2/-antagonist /sup 3/H-rauwolscine binds to two sites on rat cortical membranes: a high affinity component characterized pharmacologically as an alpha/sub 2/-binding site, and a low affinity, spiperone-sensitive, serotonergic-like component. By the use of computerized non-linear curve fitting, and the inclusion of a concentration of spiperone previously shown to selectively occlude the low affinity component of the /sup 3/H-rauwolscine saturation isotherm, they have determined the rank order of affinity at each of the two sites. Whereas the rank order of affinity at the high affinity site retains the pharmacological profile of a single, monophaisc alpha/sub 2/-binding-site, that at the low affinity component is markedly different and is similar to that at the putative 5HT subtype.

  11. Does the site of platelet sequestration predict the response to splenectomy in adult patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Navez, Julie; Hubert, Catherine; Gigot, Jean-François; Navez, Benoit; Lambert, Catherine; Jamar, François; Danse, Etienne; Lannoy, Valérie; Jabbour, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy is the only potentially curative treatment for chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in adults. However, one-third of the patients relapse without predictive factors identified. We evaluate the predictive value of the site of platelet sequestration on the response to splenectomy in patients with ITP. Eighty-two consecutive patients with ITP treated by splenectomy between 1992 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Platelet sequestration site was studied by (111)Indium-oxinate-labeled platelets in 93% of patients. Response to splenectomy was defined at last follow-up as: complete response (CR) for platelet count (PC) ≥100 × 10(9)/L, response (R) for PC≥30 × 10(9)/L and <100 × 10(9)/L with absence of bleeding, no response (NR) for PC<30 × 10(3)/L or significant bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy was performed in 81 patients (conversion rate of 16%), and open approach in one patient. Median follow-up was 57 months (range, 1-235). Platelet sequestration study was performed in 93% of patients: 50 patients (61%) exhibited splenic sequestration, 9 (11%) hepatic sequestration and 14 patients (17%) mixed sequestration. CR was obtained in 72% of patients, R in 25% and NR in 4% (two with splenic sequestration, one with hepatic sequestration). Preoperative PC, age at diagnosis, hepatic sequestration and male gender were significant for predicting CR in univariate analysis, but only age (HR = 1.025 by one-year increase, 95% CI [1.004-1.047], p = 0.020) and pre-operative PC (HR = 0.112 for > 100 versus <=100, 95% CI [0.025-0.493], p = 0.004) were significant predictors of recurrence-free survival in multivariate analysis. Response to splenectomy was independent of the site of platelet sequestration in patients with ITP. Pre-operative platelet sequestration study in these patients cannot be recommended. PMID:25275667

  12. 1995 Annual report on waste generation and waste mainization progress as required by DOE order 5400.1, Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Betsch, M.D.

    1996-09-24

    While waste generation numbers are important, the true measure of success is waste minimized. Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition as pollution prevention, as they have become part of a culture of best management practices. As an example, the success of the excess and reuse program, both informal and formal, documents the Wmin/P2 culture that exists in the pollution prevention representatives and employees at the facilities.

  13. A 6-Year-Long Manipulation with Soil Warming and Canopy Nitrogen Additions does not Affect Xylem Phenology and Cell Production of Mature Black Spruce

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Madjelia C. E.; Rossi, Sergio; Walsh, Denis; Morin, Hubert; Houle, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The predicted climate warming and increased atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition are expected to have dramatic impacts on plant growth. However, the extent of these effects and their interactions remains unclear for boreal forest trees. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the effects of increased soil temperature and nitrogen (N) depositions on stem intra-annual growth of two mature stands of black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP] in Québec, QC, Canada. During 2008–2013, the soil around mature trees was warmed up by 4°C with heating cables during the growing season and precipitations containing three times the current inorganic N concentration were added by frequent canopy applications. Xylem phenology and cell production were monitored weekly from April to October. The 6-year-long experiment performed in two sites at different altitude showed no substantial effect of warming and N-depositions on xylem phenological phases of cell enlargement, wall thickening and lignification. Cell production, in terms of number of tracheids along the radius, also did not differ significantly and followed the same patterns in control and treated trees. These findings allowed the hypothesis of a medium-term effect of soil warming and N depositions on the growth of mature black spruce to be rejected. PMID:26617610

  14. A 6-Year-Long Manipulation with Soil Warming and Canopy Nitrogen Additions does not Affect Xylem Phenology and Cell Production of Mature Black Spruce.

    PubMed

    Dao, Madjelia C E; Rossi, Sergio; Walsh, Denis; Morin, Hubert; Houle, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The predicted climate warming and increased atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition are expected to have dramatic impacts on plant growth. However, the extent of these effects and their interactions remains unclear for boreal forest trees. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the effects of increased soil temperature and nitrogen (N) depositions on stem intra-annual growth of two mature stands of black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP] in Québec, QC, Canada. During 2008-2013, the soil around mature trees was warmed up by 4°C with heating cables during the growing season and precipitations containing three times the current inorganic N concentration were added by frequent canopy applications. Xylem phenology and cell production were monitored weekly from April to October. The 6-year-long experiment performed in two sites at different altitude showed no substantial effect of warming and N-depositions on xylem phenological phases of cell enlargement, wall thickening and lignification. Cell production, in terms of number of tracheids along the radius, also did not differ significantly and followed the same patterns in control and treated trees. These findings allowed the hypothesis of a medium-term effect of soil warming and N depositions on the growth of mature black spruce to be rejected. PMID:26617610

  15. Does homeobox-related "positional" genomic information contribute to implantation of metastatic cancer cells at non-random sites?

    PubMed

    Anderson, K M; Darweesh, M; Jajah, A; Tsui, P; Guinan, P; Rubenstein, M

    2007-01-01

    Reasons for the lodgment of metastases from several types of solid cancer at apparently non-random sites have not been established. Recently, a group of genes expressed in human fibroblasts obtained from different anatomic locations was implicated in "positional" genomic information. Essentially, a Cartesian coordinate system identifying fibroblasts originally resident at anterior or more posterior, proximal or distal and dermal or non-dermal (heart, lung, etc.) locations was proposed. The determinants used for these identifications included HOX genes, central to embryonic segmental development, some of which are expressed in differentiated, post-embryonic cells. To the extent that HOX or other homeobox genes are expressed in ectodermal, mesodermal or endodermally-derived, malignantly transformed cells, they might contribute "positional" information to nidation of specific malignant clones at non-random sites. As understood in the past, interdiction of HOX or homeobox-related gene expression might reduce the probability of cancer cell implantation or alter their destinations in complex ways. Ideally, by interfering with HOX or other homeobox gene-related expression of antigenic determinants potentially contributing to their "homing" and nidation, reduced implantation of circulating cancer cells could render them more susceptible to systemic chemotherapy or immunotherapy, as demonstrated in mice. Furthermore, HOX or other homeobox genes or their products could provide novel intra- or extracellular targets for therapy. PMID:17695497

  16. Review of PV module performance at DOE/MIT Lincoln Laboratory test sites during the period 1977 to 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S E; Themelis, M P

    1982-01-01

    During the years 1977 to 1982, over 11,000 photovoltaic (PV) modules have been placed at experimental PV power generating systems in a number of field test sites in the United States. Prominent among these are a 100-kW system at Natural Bridges National Monument in Utah, a 25-kWp system at Mead, Nebraska, and a 15-kW system at Bryan, Ohio. Through a program of periodic surveillance, measurements, and inspections at the aforementioned sites, electrically failed modules were located, removed and analyzed during this six-year period. The principal causes of failure were: (1) cells cracked due to weathering or internal module stresses, (2) failed solder joints, (3) interconnects not soldered to rear sides of cells at assembly, (4) cells or interconnects electrically shorted to metallic substrates, and (5) broken or split interconnects. Details and photographs of many of the different types of failures are presented and some of the analysis techniques used to locate the failures are described.

  17. Kinesio Taping Does Not Provide Additional Benefits in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain Who Receive Exercise and Manual Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Added, Marco Aurélio Nemitalla; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Salomão, Evelyn Cassia; de Medeiros, Flávia Cordeiro; Costa, Lucíola da Cunha Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Many clinical practice guidelines endorse both manual therapy and exercise as effective treatment options for patients with low back pain. To optimize the effects of the treatments recommended by the guidelines, a new intervention known as Kinesio Taping is being widely used in these patients. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain when added to a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy. Methods One hundred forty-eight patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain were randomly allocated to receive 10 (twice weekly) sessions of physical therapy, consisting of exercise and manual therapy, or the same treatment with the addition of Kinesio Taping applied to the lower back. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and disability (5 weeks after randomization) and the secondary outcomes were pain intensity, disability (3 months and 6 months after randomization), global perceived effect, and satisfaction with care (5 weeks after treatment). Data were collected by a blinded assessor. Results No between-group differences were observed in the primary outcomes of pain intensity (mean difference, -0.01 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.88, 0.85) or disability (mean difference, 1.14 points; 95% CI: -0.85, 3.13) at 5 weeks' follow-up. In addition, no between-group differences were observed for any of the other outcomes evaluated, except for disability 6 months after randomization (mean difference, 2.01 points; 95% CI: 0.03, 4.00) in favor of the control group. Conclusion Patients who received a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy did not get additional benefit from the use of Kinesio Taping. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Prospectively registered May 28, 2013 at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01866332). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):506-513. Epub 6 Jun 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016

  18. Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Li Baoqing; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

  19. Does the addition of a second daily session of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to intratympanic steroid influence the outcomes of sudden hearing loss?

    PubMed

    Attanasio, G; Covelli, E; Cagnoni, L; Masci, E; Ferraro, D; Mancini, P; Alessandri, E; Cartocci, G; Filipo, R; Rocco, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether, in addition to intratympanic steroid therapy, additional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) sessions per day (twice a day for 5 days) is more useful than one session per day for 10 days in patients affected by severe and profound idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). A total of 55 patients affected by unilateral severe and profound ISSNHL were recruited. Two protocols were adopted. In the first, 27 patients (13 with profound and 14 with severe hearing loss) underwent one session of HBOT per day for 10 days, 6 days a week. An HBOT session comprised a period of 14 minutes air compression followed by 90 min at 2.4 atm absolute (ATA) followed by a decompression period of 15 min in oxygen. Patients breathed 100% oxygen through an appropriate mask checked for leaks. Patients were given 0.4 ml of 62.5 mg/ml of intratympanic prednisolone during the first three days of the protocol. In the second protocol, 28 patients (10 with profound and 18 with severe hearing loss) received 10 sessions of HBOT, twice a day for five days, 2.4 ATA 90 min 100% oxygen. The intratympanic injections of prednisolone were given between the two sessions of HBOT during the first three days of the protocol. Since there were no significant differences in hearing outcomes between the two protocols, the present study shows that the protocol of two sessions of HBOT per day is a valid treatment and equally effective as the one HBOT session per day, but with shorter treatment time. PMID:26824214

  20. UPDATE/ADDITIONS TO CURRENT OUST PUBLICATION: "HOW TO EVALUATE ALTERNATIVE CLEANUP TECHNOLOGIES FOR UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK SITES: A GUIDE FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN REVIEWERS"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This guidance manual is comprised of several chapters, each of which describes in detail alternative cleanup technologies for underground storage tank sites. Each chapter provides diagrams and tables to aide in determining whether a particular technology may be applicable for cl...

  1. STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138

    SciTech Connect

    Burket, P

    2009-02-24

    This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

  2. Methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage sites. Semiannual progress report, April 1, 1988--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden, C.T.; Benson, S.B.; Osborne, T.R.; Revis, N.W.

    1988-12-31

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a persistent environmental contaminant whose chemical stability and hydrophobicity have made it difficult to remove from contaminated groundwater. PCE is also toxic and has been implicated as a carcinogen. This study was aimed at assessing methods for biological degradation of PCE. As a part of the study, the authors have characterized possible products of the degradation of PCE, and have determined the effects of detergents and solvents on the water solubility of PCE and on the toxic effects of PCE on bacteria. The authors have also isolated PCE-resistant microorganisms from monitoring wells at Y-12. To date all of the PCE-resistant bacteria isolated from the monitoring wells have been of the genus Bacillus. One of these isolates appears to be able to degrade PCE, as indicated by the disappearance of PCE from cultures of growing cells. The organism does not grow on PCE as the sole carbon source, so degradation of the solvent must occur by cometabolism.

  3. Does canopy mean nitrogen concentration explain variation in canopy light use efficiency across 14 contrasting forest sites?

    PubMed

    Peltoniemi, Mikko; Pulkkinen, Minna; Kolari, Pasi; Duursma, Remko A; Montagnani, Leonardo; Wharton, Sonia; Lagergren, Fredrik; Takagi, Kentaro; Verbeeck, Hans; Christensen, Torben; Vesala, Timo; Falk, Matthias; Loustau, Denis; Mäkelä, Annikki

    2012-02-01

    The maximum light use efficiency (LUE = gross primary production (GPP)/absorbed photosynthetic photon flux density (aPPFD)) of plant canopies has been reported to vary spatially and some of this variation has previously been attributed to plant species differences. The canopy nitrogen concentration [N] can potentially explain some of this spatial variation. However, the current paradigm of the N-effect on photosynthesis is largely based on the relationship between photosynthetic capacity (A(max)) and [N], i.e., the effects of [N] on photosynthesis rates appear under high PPFD. A maximum LUE-[N] relationship, if it existed, would influence photosynthesis in the whole range of PPFD. We estimated maximum LUE for 14 eddy-covariance forest sites, examined its [N] dependency and investigated how the [N]-maximum LUE dependency could be incorporated into a GPP model. In the model, maximum LUE corresponds to LUE under optimal environmental conditions before light saturation takes place (the slope of GPP vs. PPFD under low PPFD). Maximum LUE was higher in deciduous/mixed than in coniferous sites, and correlated significantly with canopy mean [N]. Correlations between maximum LUE and canopy [N] existed regardless of daily PPFD, although we expected the correlation to disappear under low PPFD when LUE was also highest. Despite these correlations, including [N] in the model of GPP only marginally decreased the root mean squared error. Our results suggest that maximum LUE correlates linearly with canopy [N], but that a larger body of data is required before we can include this relationship into a GPP model. Gross primary production will therefore positively correlate with [N] already at low PPFD, and not only at high PPFD as is suggested by the prevailing paradigm of leaf-level A(max)-[N] relationships. This finding has consequences for modelling GPP driven by temporal changes or spatial variation in canopy [N]. PMID:22323526

  4. Yerba mate enhances probiotic bacteria growth in vitro but as a feed additive does not reduce Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Francisco; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Pendleton, Sean; Andino, Ana; Zhang, Nan; Yard, Carrie; Crilly, Nate; Harte, Federico; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is a tea known to have beneficial effects on human health and antimicrobial activity against some foodborne pathogens. Thus, the application of yerba mate as a feed additive for broiler chickens to reduce Salmonella colonization was evaluated. The first in vitro evaluation was conducted by suspending Salmonella Enteritidis and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in yerba mate extract. The in vivo evaluations were conducted using preventative and horizontal transmission experiments. In all experiments, day-of-hatch chicks were treated with one of the following 1) no treatment (control); 2) ground yerba mate in feed; 3) probiotic treatment (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Pediococcus; 9:1 administered once on day of hatch by gavage); or 4) both yerba mate and probiotic treatments. At d 3, all chicks were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis (preventative experiment) or 5 of 20 chicks (horizontal transmission experiment). At d 10, all birds were euthanized, weighed, and cecal contents enumerated for Salmonella. For the in vitro evaluation, antimicrobial activity was observed against Salmonella and the same treatment enhanced growth of LAB. For in vivo evaluations, none of the yerba mate treatments significantly reduced Salmonella Enteritidis colonization, whereas the probiotic treatment significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the horizontal transmission experiment. Yerba mate decreased chicken BW and decreased the performance of the probiotic treatment when used in combination. In conclusion, yerba mate had antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens and enhanced the growth of LAB in vitro, but in vivo yerba mate did not decrease Salmonella Enteritidis colonization. PMID:24570466

  5. Does addition of `mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone.

  6. Multiparametric PET/CT-perfusion does not add significant additional information for initial staging in lung cancer compared with standard PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of CT-perfusion (CTP), 18F-FDG-PET/CT and histological parameters, and the possible added value of CTP to FDG-PET/CT in the initial staging of lung cancer. Methods Fifty-four consecutive patients (median age 65 years, 15 females, 39 males) with suspected lung cancer were evaluated prospectively by CT-perfusion scan and 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan. Overall, 46 tumors were identified. CTP parameters blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and mean transit time (MTT) of the tumor tissue were calculated. Intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was assessed quantitatively. Differences in CTP parameters concerning tumor type, location, PET positivity of lymph nodes, TNM status, and UICC stage were analyzed. Spearman correlation analyses between CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, PETvol, and TLG), MVD, tumor size, and tumor stage were performed. Results The mean BF (mL/100 mL min-1), BV (mL/100 mL), and MTT (s) was 35.5, 8.4, and 14.2, respectively. The BF and BV were lower in tumors with PET-positive lymph nodes (p = 0.02). However, the CTP values were not significantly different among the N stages. The CTP values were not different, depending on tumor size and location. No significant correlation was found between CTP parameters and MVD. Conclusions Overall, the CTP information showed only little additional information for the initial staging compared with standard FDG-PET/CT. Low perfusion in lung tumors might possibly be associated with metabolically active regional lymph nodes. Apart from that, both CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameter sets may reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms in lung cancer. PMID:24450990

  7. Fixation method does not affect restoration of rotation center in hip replacements: A single-site retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aseptic loosening is one of the greatest problems in hip replacement surgery. The rotation center of the hip is believed to influence the longevity of fixation. The aim of this study was to compare the influence of cemented and cementless cup fixation techniques on the position of the center of rotation because cemented cup fixation requires the removal of more bone for solid fixation than the cementless technique. Methods We retrospectively compared pre- and post-operative positions of the hip rotation center in 25 and 68 patients who underwent artificial hip replacements in our department in 2007 using cemented or cementless cup fixation, respectively, with digital radiographic image analysis. Results The mean horizontal and vertical distances between the rotation center and the acetabular teardrop were compared in radiographic images taken pre- and post-operatively. The mean horizontal difference was −2.63 mm (range: -11.00 mm to 10.46 mm, standard deviation 4.23 mm) for patients who underwent cementless fixation, and −2.84 mm (range: -10.87 to 5.30 mm, standard deviation 4.59 mm) for patients who underwent cemented fixation. The mean vertical difference was 0.60 mm (range: -20.15 mm to 10.00 mm, standard deviation 3.93 mm) and 0.41 mm (range: -9.26 mm to 6.54 mm, standard deviation 3.58 mm) for the cementless and cemented fixation groups, respectively. The two fixation techniques had no significant difference on the position of the hip rotation center in the 93 patients in this study. Conclusions The hip rotation center was similarly restored using either the cemented or cementless fixation techniques in this patient cohort, indicating that the fixation technique itself does not interfere with the position of the center of rotation. To completely answer this question further studies with more patients are needed. PMID:22686355

  8. cis-Acting sequences in addition to donor and acceptor sites are required for template switching during synthesis of plus-strand DNA for duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Havert, M B; Loeb, D D

    1997-01-01

    A characteristic of all hepadnaviruses is the relaxed-circular conformation of the DNA genome within an infectious virion. Synthesis of the relaxed-circular genome by reverse transcription requires three template switches. These template switches, as for the template switches or strand transfers of other reverse-transcribing genetic elements, require repeated sequences (the donor and acceptor sites) between which a complementary strand of nucleic acid is transferred. The mechanism for each of the template switches in hepadnaviruses is poorly understood. To determine whether sequences other than the donor and acceptor sites are involved in the template switches of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a series of molecular clones which express viral genomes bearing deletion mutations were analyzed. We found that three regions of the DHBV genome, which are distinct from the donor and acceptor sites, are required for the synthesis of relaxed-circular DNA. One region, located near the 3' end of the minus-strand template, is required for the template switch that circularizes the genome. The other two regions, located in the middle of the genome and near DR2, appear to be required for plus-strand primer translocation. We speculate that these cis-acting sequences may play a role in the organization of the minus-strand DNA template within the capsid particle so that it supports efficient template switching during plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:9188603

  9. Kansas State University (KSU), DOE EV Site Operator Program. First quarter report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. The G-Van has been signed in order for the public to be aware that this is an electric drive vehicle. Financial participant`s names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. This vehicle is available for short term loan to interested utilities and companies. When other vehicles are obtained, the G-Van will be maintained on K-State`s campus.

  10. Does Disposing of Construction and Demolition Debris in Unlined Landfills Impact Groundwater Quality? Evidence from 91 Landfill Sites in Florida.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jon T; Jain, Pradeep; Smith, Justin; Townsend, Timothy G; Tolaymat, Thabet M

    2015-08-01

    More than 1,500 construction and demolition debris (CDD) landfills operate in the United States (U.S.), and U.S. federal regulations do not require containment features such as low-permeability liners and leachate collection systems for these facilities. Here we evaluate groundwater quality from samples collected in groundwater monitoring networks at 91 unlined, permitted CDD landfills in Florida, U.S. A total of 460,504 groundwater sample results were analyzed, with a median of 10 years of quarterly or semiannual monitoring data per site including more than 400 different chemical constituents. Downgradient concentrations of total dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, iron, ammonia-nitrogen, and aluminum were greater than upgradient concentrations (p < 0.05). At downgradient wells where sulfate concentrations were greater than 150 mg/L (approximately 10% of the maximum dissolved sulfate concentration in water, which suggests the presence of leachate from the landfill), iron and arsenic were detected in 91% and 43% of samples, with median concentrations of 1,900 μg/L and 11 μg/L, respectively. These results show that although health-based standards can be exceeded at unlined CDD landfills, the magnitude of detected chemical concentrations is generally small and reflective of leached minerals from components (wood, concrete, and gypsum drywall) that comprise the bulk of discarded CDD by mass. PMID:26130423

  11. Methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage sites. Semiannual progress report, November 1, 1985--March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.; Revis, N.

    1986-12-31

    This progress report contains an account of recent research efforts carried out at the Oak Ridge Research Institute, to raise antibodies in New Zealand White Rabbits which are specific for various strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria. It is then intended to use the antibodies, in a subsequent phase of the project, to develop one or more ELISAs, which would be used to analyze, both in the laboratory and in the field, the numbers and extent of dispersion of these microorganisms at acid mine drainage sites. This is important because it is the metabolic consequences of unrestricted dissemination of these bacteria which are responsible in large measure for the environmentally damaging acid run-off. Efforts to control the proliferation of these microorganisms have been relatively unfocused up to the present, because of the lack of suitably discriminating methods of assaying the effects of treatment. In this report, the authors describe the work carried out in the first section of the project, which has been concerned with the raising of the antibodies to the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans cultures. They given an account of how the various cultures were grown, how they were treated before being injected into rabbits, the injection protocol, how the animals were bled, and how the formation of IgG and its degree of specificity was assessed. Finally, they describe how large quantities of the various IgG fractions were prepared, and how and where they were stored.

  12. Increasing addition of autochthonous to allochthonous carbon in nutrient-rich aquatic systems stimulates carbon consumption but does not alter bacterial community composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attermeyer, K.; Hornick, T.; Kayler, Z. E.; Bahr, A.; Zwirnmann, E.; Grossart, H.-P.; Premke, K.

    2013-08-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations - mainly of terrestrial origin - are increasing worldwide in inland waters. The biodegradability of the DOC varies depending on quantity and chemical quality. Heterotrophic bacteria are the main consumers of DOC and thus determine DOC temporal dynamics and availability for higher trophic levels. It is therefore crucial to understand the processes controlling the bacterial turnover of additional allochthonous and autochthonous DOC in aquatic systems. Our aim was to study bacterial carbon (C) turnover with respect to DOC quantity and chemical quality using both allochthonous and autochthonous DOC sources. We incubated a natural bacterial community with allochthonous C (13C-labeled beech leachate) and increased concentrations and pulses (intermittent occurrence of organic matter input) of autochthonous C (algae lysate). We then determined bacterial carbon consumption, activities, and community composition together with the carbon flow through bacteria using stable C isotopes. The chemical analysis of single sources revealed differences in aromaticity and fractions of low and high molecular weight substances (LMWS and HMWS, respectively) between allochthonous and autochthonous C sources. In parallel to these differences in chemical composition, we observed a higher availability of allochthonous C as evidenced by increased DOC consumption and bacterial growth efficiencies (BGE) when solely allochthonous C was provided. In treatments with mixed sources, rising concentrations of added autochthonous DOC resulted in a further, significant increase in bacterial DOC consumption from 52 to 68% when nutrients were not limiting. This rise was accompanied by a decrease in the humic substances (HS) fraction and an increase in bacterial biomass. Stable C isotope analyses of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and respired dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) supported a preferential assimilation of autochthonous C and respiration of the

  13. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    CD Carlson; SQ Bennett

    2000-07-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  15. Development of an In-Situ Microsensor for the Measurements of Chromium and Uranium in Groundwater at DOE Sites - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.

    2000-10-01

    The goal of this program is to develop, optimize and deploy a silicon-based micromachined stripping analyzer for field monitoring trace levels of chromium and uranium. Such system will integrate the sample-handling steps and necessary chemical reactions (using a flow-injection operation) with the actual adsorptive stripping measurement on a small planar chip. Besides the drastic reduction in the size of the analytical system, such miniaturization should lead to increased speed, minimal reagent consumption and disposal, higher sensitivity and improved precision, and would thus revolutionize the way by which toxic metals are being monitored. The new electrochemical devices should have an enormous impact upon pollution control and prevention, as they should lead to a substantially more effective and economic monitoring of priority metal pollutants. The project combined fundamental and practical aspects of electroanalysis and microsystems to meet the monitoring and sensing needs of DOE sites.

  16. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Clark D.; Bennett, Sheila Q.

    2000-07-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998 and seven in fiscal year 1999.(a) All of the fiscal year 1996 awards have been completed and the Principal Investigators are writing final reports, so their summaries will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  17. Does the addition of losartan improve the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors in patients with anterior myocardial infarction? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Di, P; Bucca, V; Scalzo, S; Cannizzaro, S; Giubilato, A; Paterna, S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To verify the efficacy of the combination of captopril (75 mg day) and losartan (25 mg/day) in early postinfarction phases of reperfused anterior acute myocardial infarction.
DESIGN AND PATIENTS—99 patients, hospitalised for suspected anterior acute myocardial infarction within four hours from the onset of symptoms, were randomised into two groups: group A included 50 patients who received captopril 75 mg/day and placebo; group B included 49 patients who received captopril 75 mg/day within three days of admission plus losartan 12.5 mg, as a first dose, and 25 mg/day successively. An additional 23 patients with anterior acute myocardial infarction received losartan 25 mg alone and acted as controls (group C) to check the effects of losartan on plasma angiotensin II (AII) concentrations. Noradrenaline (norepinephrine) (NA) and AII plasma concentrations were measured on the third and 10th day after admission in 93 patients (35 from group A, 35 from group B, and 23 from group C). 90 days after admission patients underwent echocardiography to determine end systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF).
RESULTS—Patients in groups A and B were similar with regard to age, sex, creatine kinase peak, EF, ESV, and risk factors. Group B (captopril plus losartan) patients showed a significant reduction in mean (SD) systolic blood pressure within the group (basal 128 (10) mm Hg; 10 days after admission 105 (9) mm Hg, p < 0.001), and in comparison with group A (captopril) patients (basal 127 (11) mm Hg; 10 days after admission 116 (10) mm Hg, p < 0.001). Diastolic blood pressure was also lower in group B patients versus group A (66 (11) v 77 (11) mm Hg). Group C (losartan) patients also showed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (131 (13) mm Hg down to 121 (12) mm Hg, p < 0.001). Neither NA nor AII plasma concentrations in groups A and B differed significantly in basal samples (NA 673 (138) v 675

  18. The site of an immune-selected point mutation in the transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 does not constitute the neutralization epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C; Reitz, M S; Aldrich, K; Klasse, P J; Blomberg, J; Gallo, R C; Robert-Guroff, M

    1990-01-01

    We previously reported the in vitro generation of a neutralization-resistant variant of the molecularly cloned isolate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HXB2D. The molecular basis for the resistance was shown to be a point mutation in the env gene, causing the substitution of threonine for alanine at position 582 of gp41. Here, we show the variant to be resistant to syncytium inhibition as well as to neutralization by the immune-selecting serum. Moreover, 30% of HIV-positive human sera able to neutralize the parental virus have significantly decreased ability to neutralize the variant. As the A-to-T substitution thus has general relevance to the interaction of HIV-1 with the host immune system, we investigated further the biologic and immunologic bases for the altered properties. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the 582 region failed to compete in infectivity, neutralization, or syncytium inhibition assays and did not elicit neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, human antibodies, affinity purified on synthetic peptide resins, bound to gp41 and peptides from the 582 region but did not possess neutralizing antibody activity. Some viral constructs in which the AVERY sequence in the 582 region was altered by site-directed mutagenesis were not infectious, indicating that the primary structure in this region is crucial for viral infectivity. Constructs predicted to possess a local secondary structure similar to that of the variant nevertheless behaved like the parental virus and remained neutralization sensitive. These results suggest that the requirements for neutralization resistance in this region are very precise. Our results with synthetic peptides show that the 582 region does not by itself constitute a neutralization epitope. Moreover, the degree of flexibility in amino acid substitution which allows maintenance of neutralization sensitivity suggests that position 582 does not form part of a noncontiguous neutralization epitope. The basis for

  19. Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT. PMID:24106562

  20. Improvements in NOAA SURFRAD and ISIS sites for near real-time solar irradiance for verification of NWP solar forecasts for the DOE NOAA Solar Forecast Improvement Project (SFIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, K. O.; McComiskey, A. C.; Long, C. N.; Marquis, M.; Olson, J. B.; James, E.; Benjamin, S.; Clack, C.

    2015-12-01

    The DOE-NOAA Solar Forecasting Improvement Project's (SFIP) main goal is to improve solar forecasting and thereby increase penetration of solar renewable energy on the electric grid. NOAA's ISIS and SURFRAD network is part of this initiative by providing high quality solar irradiance measurements for verification of improvements in solar forecasting for the short-term, day ahead, and ramp events. There are 14 ISIS and SURFRAD stations across the continental United States. We will give an overview of recent improvements in the networks for this project. The NOAA SURFRAD team has three main components: 1) In addition to the existing stations, two mobile SURFRAD stations have been built and deployed for 1 year each at two separate solar utility plants. 2) NOAA SURFRAD/ISIS will update the communications at their sites to provide near real-time data for verification activities at the 14 sites. 3) Global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal solar irradiance (DNI), and aerosol optical depth at various spatial and temporal averaging will be compared to forecasts from the 3-km High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) and an advanced version of the 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) models. We will explore statistical correlations between in-coming and out-going shortwave radiation and longwave radiation at the surface for specific meteorological regimes and how well these are captured by NWP models.

  1. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  2. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2007 report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2007-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The annual DOEOccupational Radiation Exposure 2007 Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and ALARA process requirements. In addition the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  3. Negotiating equity for management of DOE wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, S.A.

    1994-09-01

    One important factor frustrating optimal management of Department of Energy (DOE)-complex wastes is the inability to use licensed and permitted facilities systematically. Achieving the goal of optimal use of DOE`s waste management facilities is politically problematic for two reasons. First, no locale wants to bear a disproportionate burden from DOE wastes. Second, the burden imposed by additional wastes transported from one site to another is difficult to characterize. To develop a viable framework for equitably distributing these burdens while achieving efficient use of all DOE waste management facilities, several implementation and equity issues must be addressed and resolved. This paper discusses stakeholder and equity issues and proposes a framework for joint research and action that could facilitate equity negotiations among stakeholder and move toward a more optimal use of DOE`s waste management capabilities.

  4. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  5. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM OXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Berg, J.; Veirs, D.

    2012-07-02

    The HB-Line (HBL) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is designed to produce high-purity plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) which is suitable for future use in production of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) requires PuO{sub 2} feed to be packaged per the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) to comply with the facility's safety basis. The stabilization conditions imposed by DOE-STD-3013 for PuO{sub 2} (i.e., 950 C for 2 hours) preclude use of the HBL PuO{sub 2} in direct fuel fabrication and reduce the value of the HBL product as MFFF feedstock. Consequently, HBL initiated a technical evaluation to define acceptable operating conditions for production of high-purity PuO{sub 2} that fulfills the DOE-STD-3013 criteria for safe storage. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that within the defined operating conditions, the HBL process will be equivalent for meeting the requirements of the DOE-STD-3013 stabilization process for plutonium-bearing materials from the DOE complex. The proposed 3013 equivalency reduces the prescribed stabilization temperature for high-purity PuO{sub 2} from oxalate precipitation processes from 950 C to 640 C and places a limit of 60% on the relative humidity (RH) at the lowest material temperature. The equivalency is limited to material produced using the HBL established flow sheet, for example, nitric acid anion exchange and Pu(IV) direct strike oxalate precipitation with stabilization at a minimum temperature of 640 C for four hours (h). The product purity must meet the MFFF acceptance criteria of 23,600 {micro}g/g Pu (i.e., 2.1 wt %) total impurities and chloride content less than 250 {micro}g/g of Pu. All other stabilization and packaging criteria identified by DOE-STD-3013-2012 or earlier revisions of the standard apply. Based on the evaluation of test data discussed in this document, the expert judgment of the authors supports packaging the HBL product under a 3013

  6. Evaluation of MODIS-Derived Cloud Fraction Using Surface Observations at Low-, Mid- and High Latitude DOE ARM sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhao, Chuanfeng

    2016-04-01

    Clouds play essential roles in the Earth's energy and water cycle, and Cloud Fraction (CF) is one of the most important cloud parameters. The CF from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been widely used, whereas the time representation of these instantaneous CF values is not clear. In this study, we evaluate MODIS-derived CF by using continuous, day-and-night radar/lidar CF from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product and the total sky cover (TSC) day-time CF datasets. Inter-comparisons between MODIS and surface CFs for time period from 2000 to 2011 are performed for three climate regimes as represented by the ARM sites of Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea (PNG) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). We first choose both the TSC and ARSCL CFs averaged over 1 hour around the two passing time of satellite, which are around 10:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time. Then two kind of analyses have been done. One is the spatial variation analysis and the other is temporal variation analysis. For the spatial variation analysis, we compare the 1-hour averaged cloud fractions from TSC and ARSCL around 10:30 AM and 1:30 PM with the instantaneous cloud fractions from MODIS but with different spatial resolution. By obtaining the RMS errors and ratio of average values of CFs for these inter-comparisons, the optimal CF-matching spatial resolutions for MODIS regarding to TSC and ARSCL are obtained which are both 30 km radius of circle. We also find that the optimal matching spatial resolution increases when the ground observation average time increases. For the temporal analysis, we first analyze the diurnal variation of the cloud fraction based on the surface CFs from TSC and ARSCL from which we can see the daily representation of cloud fraction observed at 10:30 AM and 1:30 PM. Then we make a statistical comparison of daily and monthly cloud fraction between using all time observation and

  7. Additional enhancer copies, with intact cdx binding sites, anteriorize Hoxa-7/lacZ expression in mouse embryos: evidence in keeping with an instructional cdx gradient.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Cockley, Adam; Drage, Deborah

    2004-09-01

    Expression of a Hoxa-7/lacZ reporter construct in transgenic mouse embryos is shifted anteriorly when the upstream enhancer is multimerized. The shift occurs in spinal ganglia, neurectoderm and in both paraxial and lateral plate mesoderms. Much of the multimer effect is inhibited by destruction of a single caudal (cdx) binding motif in the additional copies of the enhancer. These observations are in agreement with earlier enhancer multimerization analyses made for Hoxb-8 (Charite et al., 1998). Our findings therefore provide further evidence that the anterior limit of a Hox gene's expression domain is normally dependent upon and is determined by, the dosage of transcription factor(s) which bind to its enhancer element(s) and that these factors may be, or must include, the cdx proteins. We consider these findings in terms of both instructional (morphogen-like) gradient and timing models for the establishment of Hox gene expression domains. Enhancer multimerization results in an earlier onset of Hoxa-7/lacZ activity in the embryo. In neurectoderm at 8.7 days and in mesoderm at 10.5 days, the anterior boundaries of expression are located posterior to those seen at some earlier stages of development. We discuss how these findings are in keeping with a model where Hox expression boundaries become set along instructional cdx gradients, formed by cdx decay in cells moving away from the primitive streak region. PMID:15470633

  8. Perspective of Using the Results of Monitoring and Modeling of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant's Cooling Pond as Analogue for the US DOE Contaminated Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Voitsekhovich, O. V.; Bugay, D.; Skalskjj, A.; Shestopalov, V. M.; Zheleznyak, M.; Kashparov, V. A.; Antropov, A. S.; Kireev, S. I.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Ivanov, Y.; Oskolkov, B.; Marra, J.; Jannik, T.; Farfan, E.; Monken-Fernandes, H.; Hinton, T.; Smith, J.; Onishi, Y.; Konoplev, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although there are many contaminated sites that may be suitable candidates for providing analogue information for the development and testing of environmental modeling and risk assessment approaches, of particular scientific and practical interests is the feasibility study of planned decommissioning and remediation of the highly contaminated Chernobyl Cooling Pond (CP), located within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ). The presence of the CP has caused an artificially high groundwater table within the ChEZ. After the planned cessation of water pumping from the Pripyat River to the CP, substantial areas of sediments, containing 137Cs, 90Sr, and hot particles with U, Pu, and Am. will be exposed to the atmosphere, and the groundwater level is expected to decline by as much as 7 m. The areal extent of the exposed zone, the dissolution rate, mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides will vary over time, depending on the dynamics of seepage losses from the pond and climatic conditions. The objective of the presentation is to discuss hydrological and geochemical processes, a conceptual model, and the results and perspectives of numerical modeling of coupled surface water-groundwater flow and transport, including the parameter estimation and uncertainty evaluation for various decommissioning and remediation options of the CP. In particular, the results of 1D, 2D, and 3D simulations of radionuclide transport in surface water and groundwater will be discussed, along with the evaluation of Kd parameters from the results of field monitoring and modeling of seasonal variations of 137Cs concentrations in pond water and sediments. It will be shown that the results of field monitoring and modeling of the Chernobyl CP can be used as analogue for several US DOE sites to improve scientific and practical understanding of subsurface hydrological and geochemical processes, as well as to obtain a better understanding of processes affecting natural attenuation of radionuclides in

  9. Overlapping Repressor Binding Sites Result in Additive Regulation of Escherichia coli FadH by FadR and ArcA▿

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli fadH encodes a 2,4-dienoyl reductase that plays an auxiliary role in β-oxidation of certain unsaturated fatty acids. In the 2 decades since its discovery, FadH biochemistry has been studied extensively. However, the genetic regulation of FadH has been explored only partially. Here we report mapping of the fadH promoter and document its complex regulation by three independent regulators, the fatty acid degradation FadR repressor, the oxygen-responsive ArcA-ArcB two-component system, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein-cyclic AMP (CRP-cAMP) complex. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that FadR binds to the fadH promoter region and that this binding can be specifically reversed by long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters. In vivo data combining transcriptional lacZ fusion and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses indicated that fadH is strongly repressed by FadR, in agreement with induction of fadH by long-chain fatty acids. Inactivation of arcA increased fadH transcription by >3-fold under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, fadH expression was increased 8- to 10-fold under anaerobic conditions upon deletion of both the fadR and the arcA gene, indicating that anaerobic expression is additively repressed by FadR and ArcA-ArcB. Unlike fadM, a newly reported member of the E. coli fad regulon that encodes another auxiliary β-oxidation enzyme, fadH was activated by the CRP-cAMP complex in a manner similar to those of the prototypical fad genes. In the absence of the CRP-cAMP complex, repression of fadH expression by both FadR and ArcA-ArcB was very weak, suggesting a possible interplay with other DNA binding proteins. PMID:20622065

  10. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation. PMID:25938608

  11. Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian David; Stevens, Rebecca C; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, M Analisa; Valente, John N; Valente, John U; Jo, Jae H; Sellen, Joana

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak

  12. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  13. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  14. Modeling the Active Sites in Metalloenzymes 5. The Heterolytic Bond Cleavage of H2 in the [NiFe] Hydrogenase of DesulfoWibrio gigas by a Nucleophilic Addition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Hall, Michael B.

    2001-11-19

    The H2 activation catalyzed by an Fe(II)-Ni(III) model of the [NiFe] hydrogenase of DesulfoVibrio gigas has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) calculations on the neutral and anionic active site complexes, [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)(SH2)]0 and [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)2]-. The results suggest that the reaction proceeds by a nucleophilic addition mechanism that cleaves the H-H bond heterolytically. The terminal cysteine residue Cys530 in the [NiFe] hydrogenase active site of the D. gigas enzyme plays a crucial role in the catalytic process by accepting the proton. The active site is constructed to provide access by this cysteine residue, and this role explains the change in activity observed when this cysteine is replaced by a selenocysteine. Furthermore, the optimized geometry of the transition state in the model bears a striking resemblance to the geometry of the active site as determined by X-ray crystallography.

  15. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  16. Environmental Assessment for the off-site commercial cleaning of lead and asbestos contaminated laundry from the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts of off-site commercial cleaning of lead and asbestos contaminated laundry generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action constitutes an addition to the already-implemented action of sending controlled and routine SRS laundry to an off-site commercial facility for cleaning. This already-implemented action was evaluated in a previous EA (i.e., DOE/EA-0990; DOE, 1994) prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  17. Lessons Learned from the 200 West Pump and Treatment Facility Construction Project at the US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility - 13113

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, Kent A.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.; Ostrom, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built to an accelerated schedule with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility to meet DOE's mission objective of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012. The project team's successful integration of the project's core values and green energy technology throughout design, procurement, construction, and start-up of this complex, first-of-its-kind Bio Process facility resulted in successful achievement of DOE's mission objective, as well as attainment of LEED GOLD certification (Figure 1), which makes this Bio Process facility the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award. (authors)

  18. Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Jung, Adam J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

  19. The distribution alloying elements in alnico 8 and 9 magnets: Site preference of ternary Ti, Fe, Co, and Ni additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al, and Ni3Al based intermetallic phases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Újfalussy, B.; Stocks, G. M.

    2014-11-07

    Recently, interest in alnico magnetic alloys has been rekindled due to their potential to substitute for rare-earth based permanent magnets provided modest improvements in their coercivity can be achieved without loss of saturation magnetization. Recent experimental studies have indicated that atomic and magnetic structure of the two phases (one AlNi-based, the other FeCo-based) that comprise these spinodally decomposed alloy is not as simple as previously thought. A key issue that arises is the distribution of Fe, Co and Ti within the AlNi-based matrix phase. In our paper we report the results of first-principles calculations of the site preference of ternarymore » alloying additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al and Ni3Al alloys, as models for the aluminide phase. For compound compositions that are Al rich, which corresponds to experimental situation, Ti and Fe are found to occupy the sites, while Co and Ni prefer the sites of the DO3 lattice. Finally, an important finding is that the magnetic moments of transition metals in Fe3Al and Co3Al are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas the Ni3Al were found to be nonmagnetic unless the Fe or Co are added as a ternary element.« less

  20. Intensification of antiretroviral therapy through addition of enfuvirtide in naive HIV-1-infected patients with severe immunosuppression does not improve immunological response: results of a randomized multicenter trial (ANRS 130 Apollo).

    PubMed

    Joly, Véronique; Fagard, Catherine; Grondin, Carine; Descamps, Diane; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Charpentier, Charlotte; Colin de Verdiere, Nathalie; Tabuteau, Sophie; Raffi, François; Cabie, André; Chene, Geneviève; Yeni, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    We studied whether addition of enfuvirtide (ENF) to a background combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) would improve the CD4 cell count response at week 24 in naive patients with advanced HIV disease. ANRS 130 Apollo is a randomized study, conducted in naive HIV-1-infected patients, either asymptomatic with CD4 counts of <100/mm(3) or stage B/C disease with CD4 counts of <200/mm(3). Patients received tenofovir-emtricitabine with lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV/r) or efavirenz and were randomized to receive ENF for 24 weeks (ENF arm) or not (control arm). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with CD4 counts of ≥ 200/mm(3) at week 24. A total of 195 patients were randomized: 73% had stage C disease, 78% were male, the mean age was 44 years, the median CD4 count was 30/mm(3), and the median HIV-1 RNA load was 5.4 log(10) copies/ml. Eighty-one percent of patients received LPV/r. One patient was lost to follow-up, and eight discontinued the study (four in each arm). The proportions of patients with CD4 counts of ≥ 200/mm(3) at week 24 were 34% and 38% in the ENF and control arms, respectively (P = 0.53). The proportions of patients with HIV-1 RNA loads of <50 copies/ml were 74% and 58% at week 24 in the ENF and control arms, respectively (P < 0.02), and the proportion reached 79% in both arms at week 48. Twenty (20%) and 12 patients (13%) in the ENF and control arms, respectively, experienced at least one AIDS event during follow-up (P = 0.17). Although inducing a more rapid virological response, addition of ENF to a standard cART does not improve the immunological outcome in naive HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression. PMID:23165467

  1. Intensification of Antiretroviral Therapy through Addition of Enfuvirtide in Naive HIV-1-Infected Patients with Severe Immunosuppression Does Not Improve Immunological Response: Results of a Randomized Multicenter Trial (ANRS 130 Apollo)

    PubMed Central

    Fagard, Catherine; Grondin, Carine; Descamps, Diane; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Charpentier, Charlotte; Colin de Verdiere, Nathalie; Tabuteau, Sophie; Raffi, François; Cabie, André; Chene, Geneviève; Yeni, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We studied whether addition of enfuvirtide (ENF) to a background combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) would improve the CD4 cell count response at week 24 in naive patients with advanced HIV disease. ANRS 130 Apollo is a randomized study, conducted in naive HIV-1-infected patients, either asymptomatic with CD4 counts of <100/mm3 or stage B/C disease with CD4 counts of <200/mm3. Patients received tenofovir-emtricitabine with lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV/r) or efavirenz and were randomized to receive ENF for 24 weeks (ENF arm) or not (control arm). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with CD4 counts of ≥200/mm3 at week 24. A total of 195 patients were randomized: 73% had stage C disease, 78% were male, the mean age was 44 years, the median CD4 count was 30/mm3, and the median HIV-1 RNA load was 5.4 log10 copies/ml. Eighty-one percent of patients received LPV/r. One patient was lost to follow-up, and eight discontinued the study (four in each arm). The proportions of patients with CD4 counts of ≥200/mm3 at week 24 were 34% and 38% in the ENF and control arms, respectively (P = 0.53). The proportions of patients with HIV-1 RNA loads of <50 copies/ml were 74% and 58% at week 24 in the ENF and control arms, respectively (P < 0.02), and the proportion reached 79% in both arms at week 48. Twenty (20%) and 12 patients (13%) in the ENF and control arms, respectively, experienced at least one AIDS event during follow-up (P = 0.17). Although inducing a more rapid virological response, addition of ENF to a standard cART does not improve the immunological outcome in naive HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression. PMID:23165467

  2. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Christopher; Kothari, Vijendra; Starr, Ken; Gillespie, Joey; Widdop, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS and M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS and M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS and M. Over the life of the FUSRAP program from 1974 to the present, DOE's primary mission and responsibility has been to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment. In fulfilling this mission, the DOE program includes the following key elements: eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS and M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close communication stakeholders as well as state and federal regulators. DOE

  3. In vitro pharmacological evaluation of the radiolabeled C-terminal substance P analogue Lys-Phe-Phe-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2: Does a specific binding site exist?

    PubMed

    Tomczyszyn, Aleksandra; Csibrany, Balazs; Keresztes, Attila; Mallareddy, Jayapal Reddy; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Misicka, Aleksandra; Toth, Geza; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we report the synthesis, radiolabeling and comprehensive pharmacological evaluation of a C-terminally truncated tachykinin derivative, 3H-KFFGLM-NH2. The C-terminal fragments of endogenous tachykinins are pharmacophores responsible for interaction with the tachykinin receptors NK1, NK2 and NK3. The N-terminal fragments are responsible for modulation of receptor selectivity and interactions with other receptor systems. To evaluate and separate the function of an NK-pharmacophore from the activity of its parent neurokinin, KFFGLM-NH2 was synthesized in both tritiated and unlabeled forms. It has been proposed that the obtained NK-binding profiles of specific reference ligands and KFFGLM-NH2 differentiate monomeric and dimeric forms of NK receptors. We hypothesize that dimers of NK receptors could be specific receptor(s) for C-terminal fragments of all neurokinins as well as their C-terminal fragments, including H-KFFGLM-NH2. Dissociation of dimers into monomers opens access to additional allosteric binding sites. Fully elongated undecapeptide substance P interacts with both the "tachykinin pocket" and the "allosteric pocket" on the monomeric NK1 receptor, resulting in high and selective activation. However, C-terminal hexapeptide fragment analogues, recognizing only the "tachykinin pocket", may have less specific interactions with all tachykinin receptors in both monomeric and dimeric forms. PMID:25574743

  4. A Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Estimating Remediation-induced Biogeochemical Transformations Using Spectral Induced Polarization Data: Development and Application to the Contaminated DOE Rifle (CO) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S. S.; Williams, K. H.; Tuglus, C.; Flores-Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although in-situ bioremediation is often considered as a key approach for subsurface environmental remediation, monitoring induced biogeochemical processes, needed to evaluate the efficacy of the treatments, is challenging over field relevant scales. In this study, we develop a hierarchical Bayesian model that builds on our previous framework for estimating biogeochemical transformations using geochemical and geophysical data obtained from laboratory column experiments. The new Bayesian model treats the induced biogeochemical transformations as both spatial and temporal (rather than just temporal) processes and combines time-lapse borehole ‘point’ geochemical measurements with inverted surface- or crosshole-based spectral induced polarization (SIP) data. This model consists of three levels of statistical sub-models: (1) data model (or likelihood function), which provides links between the biogeochemical end-products and geophysical attributes, (2) process model, which describes the spatial and temporal variability of biogeochemical properties in the disturbed subsurface systems, and (3) parameter model, which describes the prior distributions of various parameters and initial conditions. The joint posterior probability distribution is explored using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling methods to obtain the spatial and temporal distribution of the hidden parameters. We apply the developed Bayesian model to the datasets collected from the uranium-contaminated DOE Rifle site for estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of remediation-induced end products. The datasets consist of time-lapse wellbore aqueous geochemical parameters (including Fe(II), sulfate, sulfide, acetate, uranium, chloride, and bromide concentrations) and surface SIP data collected over 13 frequencies (ranging from 0.065Hz to 256Hz). We first perform statistical analysis on the multivariate data to identify possible patterns (or ‘diagnostic signatures’) of bioremediation, and then we

  5. Results of chemical decontamination of DOE`s uranium-enrichment scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The CORPEX{reg_sign} Nuclear Decontamination Processes were used to decontaminate representative scrap metal specimens obtained from the existing scrap metal piles located at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. In September 1995, under contract to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, MELE Associates, Inc. performed the on-site decontamination demonstration. The decontamination demonstration proved that significant amounts of the existing DOE scrap metal can be decontaminated to levels where the scrap metal could be economically released by DOE for beneficial reuse. This simple and environmentally friendly process can be used as an alternative, or in addition to, smelting radiologically contaminated scrap metal.

  6. Work plan for mercury treatability study in upper east fork Popular Creek at DOE`s Y-12 Site in support of the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluent program (RMPE)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    Over the past ten years the Department of Energy Y-12 Site`s Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluents (RMPE) project has carried out an aggressive investigative program of identifying sources of mercury which are influencing the levels of mercury in Upper East Fork Popular Creek (UEFPC) and exiting the site at Station 17. The driver for these activities has been and continues to be the site`s National Pollution Discharge Elimination Permit (NPDES). This permit establishes certain remedial actions, the schedule for these actions and requires that the mercury in the creek be equal to or less than 5 grams per day by December 31, 1998 and the concentration in the creek be equal to or less than 0.12 {mu} grams per liter on the last day of the permit, April 27, 2000.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 500: Test Cell A Septic System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, DOE/NV--528 UPDATED WITH TECHNICAL CHANGE No.1

    SciTech Connect

    ITLV

    1998-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) addresses one of three leachfield systems associated with Test Cell A, which is located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (see Leachfield Work Plan Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 500 is comprised of the Test Cell A Septic System (CAS 25-04-05) and the associated leachfield system presented in Figure 1-1 (FFACO, 1996). The leachfield is located 60 meters (m) (200 feet [ft]) southeast of the Building 3124 gate, and approximately 45 m (150 ft) southwest of Building 3116 at Test Cell A. Test Cell A operated during the 1960s to support nuclear rocket reactor testing as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) (SNPO, 1970). Various operations within Buildings 3113B (Mechanical Equipment Room), 3115 (Helium Compressor Station), 3116 (Pump House), a water tank drain and overflow, a ''yard and equipment drain system'' outside of Building 3116, and a trailer have resulted in potentially hazardous effluent releases to the leachfield system (DOE, 1988a). The leachfield system components include discharge lines, manways, a septic tank, an outfall line, a diversion chamber, and a 15 by 30 m (50 by 100 ft) leachfield (see Leachfield Work Plan Figure 3-1 for explanation of terminology). In addition, engineering drawings show an outfall system that may or may not be connected to the CAU 500 leachfield. In general, effluent contributed to the leachfield was sanitary wastewater associated with floor drains, toilet and lavatory facilities in Building 3113B and floor drains in the remaining source buildings. The surface and subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system, outfall, and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) generated by support activities associated with Test Cell A reactor testing operations.

  8. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, H.B.; Daly, K.S.; Rinne, C.A.; Seiler, S.W.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (HSDP) provides an overview of land use, infrastructure, and facility requirements to support US Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site. The HSDP`s primary purpose is to inform senior managers and interested parties of development activities and issues that require a commitment of resources to support the Hanford Site. The HSDP provides an existing and future land use plan for the Hanford Site. The HSDP is updated annually in accordance with DOE Order 4320.1B, Site Development Planning, to reflect the mission and overall site development process. Further details about Hanford Site development are defined in individual area development plans.

  9. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste. Volume 2: Technical basis and discussion of results

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.; Hospelhorn, M.B.

    1996-03-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 first describes the screening process used to determine the sites to be considered in the PEs. This volume then provides the technical details of the methodology for conducting the performance evaluations. It also provides a comparison and analysis of the overall results for all sites that were evaluated. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussions of the results for each site.

  10. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E; d'Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site's 1963-66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex's start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence. PMID:26154139

  11. Direct targeted glycation of the free sulfhydryl group of cysteine residue (Cys-34) of BSA. Mapping of the glycation sites of the anti-tumor Thomsen-Friedenreich neoglycoconjugate vaccine prepared by Michael addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Demian, Wael L L; Kottari, Naresh; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Randell, Edward; Roy, René; Banoub, Joseph H

    2014-12-01

    We present in this manuscript the characterization of the exact glycation sites of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen-BSA vaccine (TF antigen:BSA) prepared using a Michael addition reaction between the saccharide antigen as an electrophilic acceptor and the nucleophilic thiol and L-Lysine ε-amino groups of BSA using different ligation conditions. Matrix laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the neoglycoconjugates prepared with TF antigen:protein ratios of 2:1 and 8:1, allowed to observe, respectively, the protonated molecules for each neoglycoconjugates: [M + H](+) at m/z 67,599 and 70,905. The measurements of these molecular weights allowed us to confirm exactly the carbohydrate:protein ratios of these two synthetic vaccines. These were found to be closely formed by a TF antigen:BSA ratios of 2:1 and 8:1, respectively. Trypsin digestion and liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allowed us to identify the series of released glycopeptide and peptide fragments. De novo sequencing affected by low-energy collision dissociation tandem mass spectrometry was then employed to unravel the precise glycation sites of these neoglycoconjugate vaccines. Finally, we identified, respectively, three diagnostic and characteristic glycated peptides for the synthetic glycoconjugate possessing a TF antigen:BSA ratio 2:1, whereas we have identified for the synthetic glycoconjugate having a TF:BSA ratio 8:1 a series of 14 glycated peptides. The net increase in the occupancy sites of these neoglycoconjugates was caused by the large number of glycoforms produced during the chemical ligation of the synthetic carbohydrate antigen onto the protein carrier. PMID:25476939

  12. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  13. Site Rehabilitation Completion Report with No Further Action Proposal for the Northeast Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Joe; Tabor, Charles; Survochak, Scott

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this Site Rehabilitation Completion Report is to present the post-active-remediation monitoring results for the Northeast Site and to propose No Further Action with Controls. This document includes information required by Chapter 62-780.750(4)(d), 62-780.750(6), and 62-780.600(8)(a)27 Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.). The Closure Monitoring Plan for the Northeast Site and 4.5 Acre Site (DOE 2009a) describes the approach for post-active-remediation monitoring. The Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center (STAR Center) is a former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility constructed in the mid-1950s. The 99-acre STAR Center is located in Largo, Florida. The Northeast Site is located in the northeast corner of the STAR Center. The Northeast Site meets all the requirements for an RMO II closure—No Further Action with Controls. DOE is nearing completion of a restrictive covenant for the Northeast Site. DOE has completed post-active-remediation monitoring at the Northeast Site as of September 2012. No additional monitoring will be conducted.

  14. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  15. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation (PE) to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 1 is an executive summary both of the PE methodology and of the results obtained from the PEs. While this volume briefly reviews the scope and method of analyses, its main objective is to emphasize the important insights and conclusions derived from the conduct of the PEs. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussions of the results for each site.

  16. Environmental assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of commercial low level nuclear waste across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This environmental assessment investigates the potential environmental and safety effects which could result from the land transport of low level radioactive wastes across the Savannah River Plant. Chem-Nuclear Systems operates a low level radioactive waste burial facility adjacent to the Savannah River Plant and is seeking permission from the DOE to transport the waste across Savannah River Plant.

  17. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and

  18. Preserving DOE's Research Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Virginia H.; Parr, Patricia D.

    1998-01-01

    Seven sites are designated as Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Parks and serve as irreplaceable outdoor laboratories for scientific research and education. The DOE has recommended the disposal of nearly one- quarter of the research park land holdings. Offers suggestions for developing a plan for protecting the…

  19. A guide to CERCLA site assessment. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Pocket Guide is a condensed version of information provided in three EPA documents: Guidance for Performing Preliminary Assessments Under CERCLA, Guidance for Performing Site Inspections Under CERCLA, and Hazard Ranking System Guidance Manual. Additionally the guide provides a DOE perspective on site assessment issues and information on the Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket as well as data sources for DOE site assessments. The guide is intended to present this information in a simple, portable, and direct manner that will allow the user to effectively focus on those aspects of the site assessment process of interest. The guide is not intended as a substitute for the three EPA guidance documents mentioned previously. DOE investigators should be thoroughly familiar with the EPA guidance before conducting site assessments. Use this pocketguide as an overview of procedures and requirements and as a field guide.

  20. Lessons Learned from the 200 West Pump and Treatment Facility Construction Project at the US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, Kent A.; Ostrom, Michael J.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.

    2013-01-11

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built to an accelerated schedule with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility to meet DOE’s mission objective of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012. The project team’s successful integration of the project’s core values and green energy technology throughout design, procurement, construction, and start-up of this complex, first-of-its-kind Bio Process facility resulted in successful achievement of DOE’s mission objective, as well as attainment of LEED GOLD certification, which makes this Bio Process facility the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award.

  1. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

  2. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Christopher; Kothari, Vijendra; Starr, Ken; Gillespie, Joey; Widdop, Michael; none,

    2012-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS&M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS&M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS&M.

  3. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport®) Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

    PubMed Central

    Huynh Le Maux, Amélie; Pignol, Bernadette; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA) was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI). Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC). AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder. PMID:26694464

  4. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m[sup 3] of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  5. Determinations of TSD facility acceptability under the CERCLA Off-Site Rule

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    On September 22, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the ``Off-Site Rule`` to implement section 121(d)(3) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA {section}121(d)(3) requires that wastes generated as a result of remediation activities taken under CERCLA authority and transferred off-site be managed only at facilities that comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In 1994, the DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (OEPA), RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413) published a CERCLA Information Brief titled ``The Off-Site Rule`` which describes the content of the Off-Site Rule and clarifies some of its implications for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. Additionally, EH-413 published the Guide on Selecting Compliant Off-Site Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities which provides a regulatory roadmap for accomplishing off-site transfers of environmental restoration and process hazardous waste at DOE facilities in a manner compliant with the Off-Site Rule and other relevant Federal regulations. Those guidance documents concentrate primarily on DOE`s perspective as a hazardous waste generator. The purpose of this Information Brief is to address the implications of the Off-Site Rule for DOE-owned hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities that accept CERCLA remediation wastes from off-site locations.

  6. Year Four, 104th Congress, 3rd quarter report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995. DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Kansas State University is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations an opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions.

  7. Does a University Teacher Need to Change e-Learning Beliefs and Practices When Using a Social Networking Site? A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    While much of the e-learning development at universities in the past 15 years has been on institutionally supported Learning Management Systems (LMSs), alternative educational technologies are being taken up following the rapid growth in emerging technologies, including social networking sites (SNSs). While teachers may choose educational…

  8. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  9. U.S. DOE Geopressured/Geothermal Program: Final report on well plug and abandonment operations and well site restoration, Louisiana and Texas wells

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-30

    Some of the critical operations conducted during the plugging and abandonment of the three producing wells of the U.S. DOE GEOPRESSURED/GEOTHERL PROGRAM were witnessed by D-O-R Engineering personnel. All operations witnessed by D-O-R personnel were in compliance with the respective state regulations and were conducted as per D-O-R's recommendations to the Department of Energy and their prime contractor, EG&G Idaho. It is our belief that competent cement plugs were left in all three wells. The following describes the work actually witnessed by D-O-R personnel.

  10. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM DIOXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J. M.; Livingston, R. R.; Berg, J. M.; Veirs, D. K.

    2013-02-06

    This report documents the technical basis for determining that stabilizing highpurity PuO{sub 2} derived from oxalate precipitation at the SRS HB-Line facility at a minimum of 625 {degree}C for at least four hours in an oxidizing atmosphere is equivalent to stabilizing at a minimum of 950 {degree}C for at least two hours as regards meeting the objectives of stabilization defined by DOE-STD-3013 if the material is handled in a way to prevent excessive absorption of water.

  11. Yucca Mountain site characterization project: Site atlas 1997. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting site characterization studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if the site is suitable for an underground repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Site Atlas is a tool used to cartographically display some of the Geographic Information System (GIS) data in the form of thematic map products. Essentially, the Site Atlas is a compilation of map products that are designed to illustrate the location and extent of site characterization studies. Additionally, the Site Atlas provides maps showing project administrative boundaries and basemaps in the vicinity of the project. The data are current through September 1997. The Atlas is divided into two parts: Part 1 contains GIS maps and supporting characteristic data for geology; stratigraphy; tectonics; volcanism; hydrology; geochemistry; environmental issues; paleontology; repository design; YMP boreholes, trenches, pits, pavements, and exposures; basemap features; and surface-based testing activities, and Part 2 contains 1:6,000- and 1:12,000-scale orthophotography basemaps and orthophotography-based hypsography maps (topographic data). This data is shown at a 50% reduction. The maps and orthophotographs in this Site Atlas are provided to YMP participants as an informational source only and are not for making precise measurements. The Quality Assurance Requirements and Description statement on each map identifies the quality status of the thematic data presented. The Site Atlas is not a comprehensive guide; it does not include all scientific features or studies undertaken for the YMP. The features presented are a small subset of the total work being conducted for the project.

  12. RpoS proteolysis is regulated by a mechanism that does not require the SprE (RssB) response regulator phosphorylation site.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Celeste N; Ruiz, Natividad; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2004-11-01

    In Escherichia coli the response regulator SprE (RssB) facilitates degradation of the sigma factor RpoS by delivering it to the ClpXP protease. This process is regulated: RpoS is degraded in logarithmic phase but becomes stable upon carbon starvation, resulting in its accumulation. Because SprE contains a CheY domain with a conserved phosphorylation site (D58), the prevailing model posits that this control is mediated by phosphorylation. To test this model, we mutated the conserved response regulator phosphorylation site (D58A) of the chromosomal allele of sprE and monitored RpoS levels in response to carbon starvation. Though phosphorylation contributed to the SprE basal activity, we found that RpoS proteolysis was still regulated upon carbon starvation. Furthermore, our results indicate that phosphorylation of wild-type SprE occurs by a mechanism that is independent of acetyl phosphate. PMID:15489452

  13. Total System Performance Assessment - Analyses for Disposal of Commercial and DOE Waste Inventories at Yucca Mountain - Input to Final Environmental Impact Statement and Site Suitability Evaluation, Rev. 00

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2001-09-17

    This Letter Report presents the results of calculations to assess long-term performance of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), high-level radioactive waste (HLW), and Greater Than Class C (GTCC) radioactive waste and DOE Special Performance Assessment Required (SPAR) radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in Nye County Nevada with respect to the 10,000-year performance period specified in 40 CFR Part 197.30 (66 FR 32074 [DIRS 155216], p. 32134) with regard to radiation-protection standards. The EPA Final Rule 40 CFR Part 197 has three separate standards, individual-protection, human-intrusion, and groundwater-protection standards, all with a compliance timeframe of 10,000 years. These calculations evaluate the dose to receptors for each of these standards. Further, this Letter Report includes the results of simulations to the 1,000,000-year performance period described in 40 CFR Part 197.35 (66 FR 32074 [DIRS 155216], p. 32135) which calls for the calculation of the peak dose to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) that would occur after 10,000 years and within the period of geological stability. In accordance with TSPA-SR the ''period of geologic stability'' is from zero to 1,000,000 years after repository closure. The calculations also present the 5th and 95th percentiles, and the mean and median of the set of probabilistic simulations used to evaluate various disposal scenarios.

  14. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  15. Characterization recommendations for waste sites at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Gordon, D.E.; Johnson, W.F.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.; Nichols, R.L.; Shedrow, C.B.

    1987-11-01

    One hundred and sixty six disposal facilities that received or may have received waste materials resulting from operations at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) have been identified. These waste range from innocuous solid and liquid materials (e.g., wood piles) to process effluents that contain hazardous and/or radioactive constituents. The waste sites have been grouped into 45 categories according the the type of waste materials they received. Waste sites are located with SRP coordinates, a local Department of Energy (DOE) grid system whose grid north is 36 degrees 22 minutes west of true north. DOE policy is to close all waste sites at SRP in a manner consistent with protecting human health and environment and complying with applicable environmental regulations (DOE 1984). A uniform, explicit characterization program for SRP waste sites will provide a sound technical basis for developing closure plans. Several elements are summarized in the following individual sections including (1) a review of the history, geohydrology, and available characterization data for each waste site and (2) recommendations for additional characterization necessary to prepare a reasonable closure plan. Many waste sites have been fully characterized, while others have not been investigated at all. The approach used in this report is to evaluate available groundwater quality and site history data. For example, groundwater data are compared to review criteria to help determine what additional information is required. The review criteria are based on regulatory and DOE guidelines for acceptable concentrations of constituents in groundwater and soil.

  16. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  17. Does the "sleeping Dragon" Really Sleep?: the Case for Continuous Long-Term Monitoring at a Gulf of Mexico Cold Seep Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. M.; Lapham, L.; Farr, N.; Lutken, C.; MacDonald, I. R.; Macelloni, L.; Riedel, M.; Sleeper, K.; Chanton, J.

    2011-12-01

    Continuous porewater monitoring indicates that the methane flux away from exposed hydrate mounds can vary considerably over time. Recently, we retrieved a Pore Fluid Array instrument pack from a hydrate outcrop adjacent to a NEPTUNE Canada observatory node. The sampler was designed to continuously collect and store sediment pore fluids over the course of 9 months. On analysis, we observed a 35mM variation in methane concentrations corresponding with an abrupt shift in current direction at the site. Video and resistivity data have led to previous speculation that hydrate growth and dissolution/dissociation may be seasonally variable. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that the persistence of hydrate outcrops may be extremely dynamic, driven by fluctuations in physical conditions on short time scales. Short-term monitoring in the Gulf of Mexico within Mississippi Canyon lease block 118 (MC118), a known hydrate-bearing site, indicates that physical conditions even at these depths (~540-890m) may be highly variable. Pressure can vary within hours, and recorded temperature changes of ~1.5°C have been associated with passing storms. Moreover, increased particle abundance was observed at the site in 2007 suggesting that organic matter flux to the sediments may vary on the scale of months to years. These inputs have the potential to alter the chemical environment surrounding the hydrate, thereby affecting dissolution rates. Continuous, long-term observations of physical conditions at MC118 could provide information about the potential for natural perturbations to impact hydrate dynamics on the scale of weeks or even days necessary for assessing the long-term persistence of hydrate outcrops. Sleeping Dragon is a massive hydrate outcrop at MC118 that has been monitored since 2006. Three years ago, researchers returning to the site found it visibly diminished relative to previous observations. This apparent shift toward net dissolution of the mound may have been

  18. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  19. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  20. FINAL REPORT. ENHANCEMENTS TO AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE VERY EARLY TIME ELECTROMAGNETIC (VETEM) PROTOTYPE INSTRUMENT AND APPLICATIONS TO SHALLOW SUBSURFACE IMAGING AT SITES IN THE DOE COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The central aim of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) EMSP project was to improve the state-of-the-art of electromagnetic imaging of the shallow (0 to about 5 m)subsurface through electrically conductive soils. In addition, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of the new ...

  1. 10 CFR 72.96 - Siting limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... approved for site characterization for a HLW repository. This limitation shall apply until such time as DOE... site within which there is a candidate site for a HLW repository. This limitation shall apply until such time as DOE decides that such candidate site is no longer a candidate site under consideration...

  2. An assessment and evaluation for recycle/reuse of contaminated process and metallurgical equipment at the DOE Rocky Flats Plant Site -- Building 865. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    An economic analysis of the potential advantages of alternatives for recycling and reusing equipment now stored in Building 865 at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado has been conducted. The inventory considered in this analysis consists primarily of metallurgical and process equipment used before January 1992, during development and production of nuclear weapons components at the site. The economic analysis consists of a thorough building inventory and cost comparisons for four equipment dispositions alternatives. The first is a baseline option of disposal at a Low Level Waste (LLW) landfill. The three alternatives investigated are metal recycling, reuse with the government sector, and release for unrestricted use. This report provides item-by-item estimates of value, disposal cost, and decontamination cost. The economic evaluation methods documented here, the simple cost comparisons presented, and the data provided as a supplement, should provide a foundation for D&D decisions for Building 865, as well as for similar D&D tasks at RFP and at other sites.

  3. Correct implementation of the Argonne Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) process for preremedial site investigations.

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. C.; Cook, S.; Sedivy, R.; Walker, J. L.

    1997-12-12

    The Argonne Expedited Site Characterization (ANL ESC) methodology, developed by Argonne National Laboratory and popularly known as ESC, is an effective, cost- and time-saving approach for technically successful preremedial site characterizations. The major objective of the ANL ESC is to determine whether a site containing contamination requires remediation. The methodology is equivalent to a CERCLA RI/FS or a RCRA RFI/CMS investigation. The ANL ESC methodology is an interactive, integrated process emphasizing the use of existing data, multiple complementary characterization methods, and on-site decision making to optimize site investigations. The ANL ESC is the basis for the expedited site characterization standard of the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials). The methodology has been registered under the service mark QuickSite{trademark} to offer both clients and providers a mechanism for ensuring that they receive the ANL ESC methodology developed by Argonne. The ANL ESC is a flexible process and is neither site nor contaminant dependent. It can be tailored to fit the unique characteristics that distinguish one site from the next, in contrast to the traditional approach of making all sites conform to the same rigid, inflexible investigation regimen. The ANL ESC has been applied successfully to remedial site investigations of landfills with multiple contaminants in the southwestern US for the Department of Interior (DOI), to former grain storage facilities in the Midwest for the Commodity Credit Corporation of the Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), to weapons production facilities in Texas for the Department of Energy (DOE), and to closing and active military bases in several locations for the Department of Defense (DOD). The process can be applied both at sites that have seen little investigation and at sites that have undergone numerous previous site characterizations without reaching closure. In the latter case (e.g., at many DOE and DOD sites

  4. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, E.W.

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an Integrated Program Plan (IPP) to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. The IPP describes the actions that DOE plans to implement at its various sites to convert excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The baseline IPP was issued as DOE`s Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (IP), which was transmitted to the DNFSB on February 28, 1995. The IPP is being further developed to include complex-wide requirements for research and development and a long-range facility requirements section. The planned additions to the baseline IPP are being developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrates facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focuses on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 and to provide a basis for formulating planned additions to the IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs will be periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations.

  5. Report of an investigation into deterioration of the Plutonium Fuel Form Fabrication Facility (PuFF) at the DOE Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This investigations of the Savannah River Site's Plutonium Fuel Form fabrication facility located in Building 235-F was initiated in April 1991. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether, as has been alleged, operation of the facility's argon inert gas system was terminated with the knowledge that continued inoperability of the argon system would cause accelerated corrosion damage to the equipment in the plutonium 238 processing cells. The investigation quickly established that the decision to discontinue operation of the argon system, by not repairing it, was merely one of the measures, and not the most important one, which led to the current deteriorated state of the facility. As a result, the scope of the investigation was broadened to more identify and assess those factors which contributed to the facility's current condition. This document discusses the backgrounds, results, and recommendations of this investigation.

  6. A 10-Year Climatology of Cloud Cover and Vertical Distribution Derived from Both Surface and GOES Observations Over the DOE ARM SGP Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xi, Baike; Dong, Xiquan; Minnis, P.; Khaiyer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of a decade of ARM radar-lidar and GOES observations at the SGP site reveal that 0.5 and 4-hr averages of the surface cloud fraction correspond closely to 0.5deg and 2.5deg averages of GOES cloudiness, respectively. The long-term averaged surface and GOES cloud fractions agree to within 0.5%. Cloud frequency increases and cloud amount decreases as the temporal and spatial averaging scales increase. Clouds occurred most often during winter and spring. Single-layered clouds account for 61.5% of the total cloud frequency. There are distinct bimodal vertical distributions of clouds with a lower peak around 1 km and an upper one that varies from 7.5 to 10.8 km between winter and summer, respectively. The frequency of occurrence for nighttime GOES high-cloud tops agree well with the surface observations, but are underestimated during the day.

  7. Lack of conventional oxygen-linked proton and anion binding sites does not impair allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in dwarf caiman hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Storz, Jay F.; Gorr, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other vertebrate hemoglobins (Hbs) whose high intrinsic O2 affinities are reduced by red cell allosteric effectors (mainly protons, CO2, organic phosphates, and chloride ions), crocodilian Hbs exhibit low sensitivity to organic phosphates and high sensitivity to bicarbonate (HCO3−), which is believed to augment Hb-O2 unloading during diving and postprandial alkaline tides when blood HCO3− levels and metabolic rates increase. Examination of α- and β-globin amino acid sequences of dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus) revealed a unique combination of substitutions at key effector binding sites compared with other vertebrate and crocodilian Hbs: β82Lys→Gln, β143His→Val, and β146His→Tyr. These substitutions delete positive charges and, along with other distinctive changes in residue charge and polarity, may be expected to disrupt allosteric regulation of Hb-O2 affinity. Strikingly, however, P. palpebrosus Hb shows a strong Bohr effect, and marked deoxygenation-linked binding of organic phosphates (ATP and DPG) and CO2 as carbamate (contrasting with HCO3− binding in other crocodilians). Unlike other Hbs, it polymerizes to large complexes in the oxygenated state. The highly unusual properties of P. palpebrosus Hb align with a high content of His residues (potential sites for oxygenation-linked proton binding) and distinctive surface Cys residues that may form intermolecular disulfide bridges upon polymerization. On the basis of its singular properties, P. palpebrosus Hb provides a unique opportunity for studies on structure-function coupling and the evolution of compensatory mechanisms for maintaining tissue O2 delivery in Hbs that lack conventional effector-binding residues. PMID:23720132

  8. Lack of conventional oxygen-linked proton and anion binding sites does not impair allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in dwarf caiman hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roy E; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Storz, Jay F; Gorr, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to other vertebrate hemoglobins (Hbs) whose high intrinsic O2 affinities are reduced by red cell allosteric effectors (mainly protons, CO2, organic phosphates, and chloride ions), crocodilian Hbs exhibit low sensitivity to organic phosphates and high sensitivity to bicarbonate (HCO3(-)), which is believed to augment Hb-O2 unloading during diving and postprandial alkaline tides when blood HCO3(-) levels and metabolic rates increase. Examination of α- and β-globin amino acid sequences of dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus) revealed a unique combination of substitutions at key effector binding sites compared with other vertebrate and crocodilian Hbs: β82Lys→Gln, β143His→Val, and β146His→Tyr. These substitutions delete positive charges and, along with other distinctive changes in residue charge and polarity, may be expected to disrupt allosteric regulation of Hb-O2 affinity. Strikingly, however, P. palpebrosus Hb shows a strong Bohr effect, and marked deoxygenation-linked binding of organic phosphates (ATP and DPG) and CO2 as carbamate (contrasting with HCO3(-) binding in other crocodilians). Unlike other Hbs, it polymerizes to large complexes in the oxygenated state. The highly unusual properties of P. palpebrosus Hb align with a high content of His residues (potential sites for oxygenation-linked proton binding) and distinctive surface Cys residues that may form intermolecular disulfide bridges upon polymerization. On the basis of its singular properties, P. palpebrosus Hb provides a unique opportunity for studies on structure-function coupling and the evolution of compensatory mechanisms for maintaining tissue O2 delivery in Hbs that lack conventional effector-binding residues. PMID:23720132

  9. Pure oxygen ventilation during general anaesthesia does not result in increased postoperative respiratory morbidity but decreases surgical site infection. An observational clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Suksompong, Sirilak; Weiler, Jürgen; Zander, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pure oxygen ventilation during anaesthesia is debatable, as it may lead to development of atelectasis. Rationale of the study was to demonstrate the harmlessness of ventilation with pure oxygen. Methods. This is a single-centre, one-department observational trial. Prospectively collected routine-data of 76,784 patients undergoing general, gynaecological, orthopaedic, and vascular surgery during 1995–2009 were retrospectively analysed. Postoperative hypoxia, unplanned ICU-admission, surgical site infection (SSI), postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and hospital mortality were continuously recorded. During 1996 the anaesthetic ventilation for all patients was changed from 30% oxygen plus 70% nitrous oxide to 100% oxygen in low-flow mode. Therefore, in order to minimize the potential of confounding due to a variety of treatments being used, we directly compared years 1995 (30% oxygen) and 1997 (100%), whereas the period 1998 to 2009 is simply described. Results. Comparing 1995 to 1997 pure oxygen ventilation led to a decreased incidence of postoperative hypoxic events (4.3 to 3.0%; p < 0.0001) and hospital mortality (2.1 to 1.6%; p = 0.088) as well as SSI (8.0 to 5.0%; p < 0.0001) and PONV (21.6 to 17.5%; p < 0.0001). There was no effect on unplanned ICU-admission (1.1 to 0.9; p = 0.18). Conclusions. The observed effects may be partly due to pure oxygen ventilation, abandonment of nitrous oxide, and application of low-flow anesthesia. Pure oxygen ventilation during general anaesthesia is harmless, as long as certain standards are adhered to. It makes anaesthesia simpler and safer and may reduce clinical morbidity, such as postoperative hypoxia and surgical site infection. PMID:25320681

  10. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of 90Strontium & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ferris, F. Grant; Cosgrove, Donna M.; Colwell, Rick S.

    2004-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as 90Sr are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., 90Sr) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  11. An enthalpic basis of additivity in biphenyl hydroxamic acid ligands for stromelysin-1

    PubMed Central

    Wilfong, Erin M.; Du, Yu; Toone, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Fragment based drug discovery remains a successful tool for pharmaceutical lead discovery. Although based upon the principle of thermodynamic additivity, the underlying thermodynamic basis is poorly understood. A thermodynamic additivity analysis was performed using stromelysin-1 and a series of biphenyl hydroxamate ligands identified through fragment additivity. Our studies suggest that, in this instance, additivity arises from enthalpic effects, while interaction entropies are unfavorable; this thermodynamic behavior is masked by proton transfer. Evaluation of the changes in constant pressure heat capacities during binding suggest that solvent exclusion from the binding site does not account for the dramatic affinity enhancements observed. PMID:22985855

  12. Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    This Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually pursuant to DOE Order 5400.1 to summarize environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance status. The report also highlights significant environmental programs and efforts. More detailed environmental compliance, monitoring, surveillance, and study reports may be of value; therefore, to the extent practical, these additional reports have been referenced in the text. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  13. The chronic infusion of nicotine into the developing chick embryo does not alter the density of (-)-[3H]nicotine-binding sites or vestibular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roll, R. L.; Jones, T. A.; Benowitz, N. L.; Morley, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    (-)-Nicotine (1.2 mg/day) or saline was infused into chick embryos (Gallus domesticus) for 10 days beginning 12 h beyond the eight day of incubation (E8 + 12 h). Twelve h beyond the eighteenth day of incubation (E18 + 12 h), the eggs were opened to access the embryos and subcutaneous skull electrodes placed. Short latency vestibular response thresholds and input/output functions were determined to assess neurophysiological consequences of chronic nicotine administration. Samples of serum and extraembryonic (amniotic and albumen) fluid were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine the levels of nicotine and its major metabolite, cotinine. The brains were removed and divided into diencephalon and mesencephalon and the density of (-)-[3H]nicotine binding sites in each brain area was measured. Nicotine and cotinine were found in the serum and extraembryonic fluid, but nicotinic receptors were not up-regulated in the brains of animals infused with nicotine in comparison to controls. Vestibular response thresholds also did not differ between nicotine-treated and control animals.

  14. Insertion of a multibasic cleavage site in the haemagglutinin of human influenza H3N2 virus does not increase pathogenicity in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Munster, Vincent J.; de Wit, Emmie; Herfst, Sander; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2011-01-01

    A multibasic cleavage site (MBCS) in the haemagglutinin (HA) protein of influenza A virus is a key determinant of pathogenicity in chickens, and distinguishes highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses from low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAI). An MBCS has only been detected in viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes. Here we investigated the phenotype of a human H3N2 virus with an MBCS in HA. Insertion of an MBCS in the H3N2 virus resulted in cleavage of HA and efficient replication in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells in the absence of exogenous trypsin in vitro, similar to HPAI H5N1 virus. However, studies in ferrets demonstrated that insertion of the MBCS into HA did not result in increased virus shedding, cellular host range, systemic replication or pathogenicity, as compared with wild-type virus. This study indicates that acquisition of an MBCS alone is insufficient to increase pathogenicity of a prototypical seasonal human H3N2 virus. PMID:21346026

  15. Observation and Responses to Post-Closure Instances of Localized Instability and Subsidence at the DOE Legacy Management Rocky Flats Site, Colorado-13052

    SciTech Connect

    DiSalvo, Rick; Darr, Bob; Boylan, John; Surovchak, Scott

    2013-07-01

    The former Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado began operations as part of the nation's nuclear weapons complex in the early 1950's. By the 1980's the associated heavily industrialized area covered approximately 1.2 km{sup 2} (300 acres) and was surrounded by an approximately 25.3 km{sup 2} (6,245 acre) security buffer zone. The federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priority List in 1989. To complete closure, all buildings and other structures that composed the Rocky Flats industrial complex were removed from the surface, but remnants remain in the subsurface. Contouring and grading to return the surface to approximate conditions that were present prior to the plant's construction was completed in 2005. A goal of the final land configuration was to provide long-term surface and subsurface land stability. Several instances of localized surface subsidence or instability have occurred since the final configuration. The localized nature and the relatively small areas of observed subsidence and instability indicate that, overall, the final configuration is performing well, but responses to these occurrences and the observations that followed may be useful in planning for the closure and designing the final land configuration and post-closure monitoring at other sites. (authors)

  16. How does the selection of landscape classification schemes affect the spatial pattern of natural landscapes? An assessment on a coastal wetland site in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, V; Veronico, G; Sciandrello, S; Blonda, P

    2016-06-01

    It is widely known that thematic resolution affects spatial pattern and landscape metrics performances. In literature, data dealing with this issue usually refer to a specific class scheme with its thematic levels. In this paper, the effects of different land cover (LC) and habitat classification schemes on the spatial pattern of a coastal landscape were compared. One of the largest components of the Mediterranean wetland system was considered as the study site, and different schemes widely used in the EU were selected and harmonized with a common thematic resolution, suitable for habitat discrimination and monitoring. For each scheme, a thematic map was produced and, for each map, 28 landscape metrics were calculated. The landscape composition, already in terms of number of classes, class area, and number of patches, changes significantly among different classification schemes. Landscape complexity varies according to the class scheme considered and its underlying semantics, depending on how the different types aggregate or split when changing class scheme. Results confirm that the selection of a specific class scheme affects the spatial pattern of the derived landscapes and consequently the landscape metrics, especially at class level. Moreover, among the classification schemes considered, EUNIS seems to be the best choice for a comprehensive representation of both natural and anthropogenic classes. PMID:27194232

  17. Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects: Report for April 1986--September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; O`Kelley, G.D.; Land, J.F.

    1988-07-01

    During this report period, all experiments were conducted with tuff from the proposed high-level nuclear waste site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Batch sorption ratio determinations were conducted for strontium, cesium, uranium, and technetium onto samples of tuff using real and synthetic groundwater J-13. There were no significant differences in sorption ratios in experiments with real and synthetic groundwater. Columns were tested by determination of elution curves in J-13 containing tritium and technetium as the TcO{sub 4}/sup {minus}/ ion. For strontium and cesium, fairly good correlation between values of the sorption ratio obtained by the two methods was observed. Little technetium sorption was observed with either method. The elution peaks obtained with neptunium and uranium were asymmetrical and the shapes were often complex, observations which suggest irreversibilities in the sorption reaction. Synthetic groundwater J-13 was slowly dripped onto a slab of tuff maintained at 95--100{degree}C, and the result was a thin encrustation of solids on the slab as the water evaporated. Fresh J-13 groundwater was then allowed to contact the encrustation in a vessel maintained at 90{degree}C. The principal result of the experiment was a significant loss of calcium and magnesium from the fresh J-13 groundwater. 13 refs. 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Development of the chemical stabilization and solidification process for the treatment of radioactive raffinate sludges at the DOE Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.M.; Kakaria, V. [Morrison Knudsen Corp., Boise, ID . Environmental Enger, J.

    1996-12-31

    Chemical Solidification and Stabilization (CSS) is the mixing of chemical reagents with waste to solidify and chemically stabilize the contaminated material. The resulting product is resistant to leaching of certain contaminants. CSS treatment using Class C fly ash and Portland cement was chosen as the most feasible method for treatment of the chemically and radioactively contaminated sludge (raffinate) contained in raffinate pits on the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) located outside of St. Louis, Missouri. Due to the uniqueness of the material, substantial bench-scale testing was performed on the raffinate to better understand its properties. Similarly, due to mixed results in the application of CSS treatment to radioactive materials, a pilot-scale testing facility was built to verify bench testing results and to establish and quantify design parameters for the full-scale CSS production facility. This paper discusses the development of the pilot-scale testing facility, the testing plan, and the results of the testing activities. Particular attention has been given to the applicability of the CSS treatment method and to the value of pilot-scale testing.

  19. Does Facebook promote self-interest? Enactment of indiscriminate one-to-many communication on online social networking sites decreases prosocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Wen-Bin; Chen, Szu-Wei; Liao, Da-Chi

    2014-02-01

    Abstract Communication tools on social networking sites (SNSs) provide users with an efficient way to distribute information to the public and/or their friends simultaneously. In this article, we show that this kind of indiscriminate one-to-many (i.e., monologue) communication, in which the diverse interests of recipients are not considered, may induce a tendency toward egocentrism that interferes with other-oriented concerns, resulting in a reduced inclination to display prosocial behavior. In Experiment 1, participants induced to post a public communication subsequently allocated less money to anonymous strangers in the dictator game than did control participants. In Experiment 2, participants directing a post about participation in an experiment to their Facebook friends volunteered to help code fewer data sheets than did controls. Moreover, an egocentric state was shown to mediate the relationship between indiscriminate one-to-many communication and helping behavior. We provide the first demonstration that indiscriminate one-to-many communication on online social networks may be associated with a tendency toward self-interest. Our results suggest that the prevalence of monologue communication on SNSs may induce an egocentric tendency that undermines the likelihood of prosocial behavior. PMID:24102570

  20. Congress targets DOE plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Calling the Department of Energy's management of the nation's crippled nuclear weapons production complex “a 35-year secret chemical war waged against people living near DOE's sites,” Representative Thomas Luken (D-OH) opened a congressional hearing on February 23 with an appeal to DOE Secretary-designate James Watkins to release secret health records of workers at the plants. In testimony that followed, Comptroller General Charles Bowsher told a subcommittee of the House Energy and Commerce Committee that President Bush's new budget does not go far enough on the long and costly road of cleaning up and modernizing the contaminated and aging facilities. The renovation is expected to cost up to $155 billion.By next month, 11 of the 17 installations that make up the DOE complex will be on the EPA's Superfund list of the nation's most contaminated waste sites. Some o f the DOE facilities, including the Rocky Flats plant in Denver, Colo., the Hanford Reservation in eastern Washington, and the Savannah River plant in South Carolina, are among the most polluted sites ever identified by EPA. The principal function of the facilities, the production of tritium and plutonium for nuclear weapons, has stopped, creating what DOE has characterized as a looming national security crisis.