Science.gov

Sample records for additional electron donor

  1. Chemostat Studies of TCE-Dehalogenating Anaerobic Consortia under Excess and Limited Electron Donor Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.; Green, J.; Mayer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two cultures - the Victoria Strain (VS) and the Evanite Strain (EV), enriched with the organohalide respiring bacteria Dehalococcoides mccartyi - were grown in chemostats for more than 4 years at a mean cell residence time of 50 days. The slow doubling rate represents growth likely experienced in the subsurface. The chemostats were fed formate as an electron donor and trichloroethene (TCE) as the terminal electron acceptor. Under excess formate conditions, stable operation was observed with respect to TCE transformation, steady-state hydrogen (H2) concentrations (40 nM), and the structure of the dehalogenating community. Both cultures completely transformed TCE to ethene, with minor amounts of vinyl chloride (VC) observed, along with acetate formation. When formate was limited, TCE was transformed incompletely to ethene (40-60%) and VC (60- 40%), and H2 concentrations ranged from 1 to 3 nM. The acetate concentration dropped below detection. Batch kinetic studies of TCE transformation with chemostat harvested cells found transformation rates of c-DCE and VC were greatly reduced when the cells were grown with limited formate. Upon increasing formate addition to the chemostats, from limited to excess, essentially complete transformation of TCE to ethene was achieved. The increase in formate was associated with an increase in H2 concentration and the production of acetate. Results of batch kinetic tests showed increases in transformation rates for TCE and c-DCE by factors of 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, while VC rates increased by factors of 33 to 500, over a six month period. Molecular analysis of chemostat samples is being performed to quantify the changes in copy numbers of reductase genes and to determine whether shifts in the strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi where responsible for the observed rate increases. The results demonstrate the importance of electron donor supply for successful in-situ remediation.

  2. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  3. Field evidence for co-metabolism of trichloroethene stimulated by addition of electron donor to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Mark E; Brodie, Eoin L; Radtke, Corey W; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E; Lee, M Hope; Swift, Dana L; Colwell, Frederick S

    2010-06-15

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH(4) in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta(13)C of the CH(4) increases from -56 per thousand in the source area to -13 per thousand with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 per thousand to -13 per thousand, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH(4)-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with (13)C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE. PMID:20476753

  4. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  5. Quantum Computing in Silicon with Donor Electron Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Extremely long electron and nuclear spin coherence times have recently been demonstrated in isotopically pure Si-28 making silicon one of the most promising semiconductor materials for spin based quantum information. The two level spin state of single electrons bound to shallow phosphorus donors in silicon in particular provide well defined, reproducible qubits and represent a promising system for a scalable quantum computer in silicon. An important challenge in these systems is the realisation of an architecture, where we can position donors within a crystalline environment with approx. 20-50nm separation, individually address each donor, manipulate the electron spins using ESR techniques and read-out their spin states. We have developed a unique fabrication strategy for a scalable quantum computer in silicon using scanning tunneling microscope hydrogen lithography to precisely position individual P donors in a Si crystal aligned with nanoscale precision to local control gates necessary to initialize, manipulate, and read-out the spin states. During this talk I will focus on demonstrating electronic transport characteristics and single-shot spin read-out of precisely-positioned P donors in Si. Additionally I will report on our recent progress in performing single spin rotations by locally applying oscillating magnetic fields and initial characterization of transport devices with two and three single donors. The challenges of scaling up to practical 2D architectures will also be discussed.

  6. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance of a donor in aluminum nitride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. M.; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.; Slack, G. A.; Schujman, S. B.; Schowalter, L. J.

    2006-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra are obtained from a donor in aluminum nitride (AlN) crystals. Although observed in as-grown crystals, exposure to x rays significantly increases the concentration of this center. ENDOR identifies a strong hyperfine interaction with one aluminum neighbor along the c axis and weaker equivalent hyperfine interactions with three additional aluminum neighbors in the basal plane. These aluminum interactions indicate that the responsible center is a deep donor at a nitrogen site. The observed paramagnetic defect is either a neutral oxygen substituting for nitrogen (ON0) or a neutral nitrogen vacancy (VN0).

  8. Few electron quantum dot coupling to donor implanted electron spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Martin; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Neilson, Erik; Gamble, John; Muller, Richard; Jacobson, Toby; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Donor-based Si qubits are receiving increased interest because of recent demonstrations of high fidelity electron or nuclear spin qubits and their coupling. Quantum dot (QD) mediated interactions between donors are of interest for future coupling of two donors. We present experiment and modeling of a polysilicon/Si MOS QD, charge-sensed by a neighboring many electron QD, capable of coupling to one or two donor implanted electron spins (D) while tuned to the few electron regime. The unique design employs two neighboring gated wire FETs and self-aligned implants, which supports many configurations of implanted donors. We can access the (0,1) ⇔(1,0) transition between the D and QD, as well as the resonance condition between the few electron QD and two donors ((0,N,1) ⇔(0,N +1,0) ⇔(1,N,0)). We characterize capacitances and tunnel rate behavior combined with semi-classical and full configuration interaction simulations to study the energy landscape and kinetics of D-QD transitions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Electron shuttling in phosphorus donor qubit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Muller, Richard P.; Witzel, Wayne M.; Montano, Ines; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2014-03-01

    Phosphorus donors in silicon are a promising qubit architecture, due in large part to their long nuclear coherence times and the recent development of atomically precise fabrication methods. Here, we investigate issues related to implementing qubits with phosphorus donors in silicon, employing an effective mass theory that non-phenomenologically takes into account inter-valley coupling. We estimate the significant sources of decoherence and control errors in this system to compute the fidelity of primitive gates and gate timescales. We include the effects of valley repopulation during the process of shuttling an electron between a donor and nearby interface or between neighboring donors, evaluating the control requirements for ensuring adiabaticity with respect to the valley sector. This work was supported in part by the LDRD program at Sandia National Labs, a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp, for the U.S. DOE NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Polymerization Initiated by Organic Electron Donors.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Julie; Rollet, Marion; Clément, Jean-Louis; Canard, Gabriel; Terme, Thierry; Gigmes, Didier; Vanelle, Patrice

    2016-05-10

    Polymerization reactions with organic electron donors (OED) as initiators are presented herein. The metal-free polymerization of various activated alkene and cyclic ester monomers was performed in short reaction times, under mild conditions, with small amounts of organic reducing agents, and without the need for co-initiators or activation by photochemical, electrochemical, or other methods. Hence, OED initiators enabled the development of an efficient, rapid, room-temperature process that meets the technical standards expected for industrial processes, such as energy savings, cost-effectiveness and safety. Mechanistic investigations support an electron-transfer initiation pathway that leads to the reduction of the monomer. PMID:27061743

  11. Discovery and Development of Organic Super-Electron-Donors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Based on simple ideas of electron-rich alkenes, exemplified by tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethene, TDAE, and on additional driving force associated with aromatization, families of very powerful neutral organic super-electron-donors (SEDs) have been developed. In the ground state, they carry out metal-free reductions of a range of functional groups. Iodoarenes are reduced either to aryl radicals or, with stronger donors, to aryl anions. Reduction to aryl radicals allows the initiation of very efficient transition-metal-free coupling of haloarenes to arenes. The donors also reduce alkyl halides, arenesulfonamides, triflates, and triflamdes, Weinreb amides, and acyloin derivatives. Under photoactivation at 365 nm, they are even more powerful and reductively cleave aryl chlorides. They reduce unactivated benzenes to the corresponding radical anions and display original selectivities in preferentially reducing benzenes over malonates or cyanoacetates. Additionally, they reductively cleave ArC–X, ArX–C (X = N or O) and ArC–C bonds, provided that the two resulting fragments are somewhat stabilized. PMID:24605904

  12. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons.

    PubMed

    Brizhik, L S; Piette, B M A G; Zakrzewski, W J

    2014-11-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dissipation. Upon reaching the end, the electron can either bounce back and move in the opposite direction or, for suitable parameter values of the system, tunnel to the acceptor. We estimate the energy efficiency of the donor-acceptor electron transport depending on the parameter values. Our calculations show that the soliton mechanism works for the parameter values of polypeptide macromolecules and conjugated polymers. We also investigate the donor-acceptor electron transport in thermalized molecular chains. PMID:25493866

  13. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizhik, L. S.; Piette, B. M. A. G.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2014-11-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dissipation. Upon reaching the end, the electron can either bounce back and move in the opposite direction or, for suitable parameter values of the system, tunnel to the acceptor. We estimate the energy efficiency of the donor-acceptor electron transport depending on the parameter values. Our calculations show that the soliton mechanism works for the parameter values of polypeptide macromolecules and conjugated polymers. We also investigate the donor-acceptor electron transport in thermalized molecular chains.

  14. Remote Electronic Effects by Ether Protecting Groups Fine-Tune Glycosyl Donor Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Heuckendorff, Mads; Poulsen, Lulu Teressa; Jensen, Henrik H

    2016-06-17

    It was established that para-substituted benzyl ether protecting groups affect the reactivity of glycosyl donors of the thioglycoside type with the N-iodosuccinimide/triflic acid promoter system. Having electron donating p-methoxybenzyl ether (PMB) groups increased the reactivity of the donor in comparison to having electron withdrawing p-chloro (PClB) or p-cyanobenzyl ether (PCNB) protecting groups, which decreased the reactivity of the glycosyl donor relative to the parent benzyl ether (Bn) protected glycosyl donor. These findings were used to perform the first armed-disarmed coupling between two benzylated glucosyl donors by tuning their reactivity. In addition, the present work describes a highly efficient palladium catalyzed multiple cyanation and methoxylation of p-chlorobenzyl protected thioglycosides. The results of this paper regarding both the different electron withdrawing properties of various benzyl ethers and the efficient and multiple protecting group transformations are applicable in general organic chemistry and not restricted to carbohydrate chemistry. PMID:27224456

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance of a donor in aluminum nitride crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Sean; Giles, Nancy; Halliburton, Larry; Slack, Glen; Schujman, Sandra; Schowalter, Leo

    2006-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) have been used to characterize a dominant donor in single crystals of aluminum nitride (AlN). A broad EPR signal, with g (parallel) = 2.002 and g (perpendicular) = 2.006, is observed in the as-grown crystals. Exposure to x-rays (i.e., ionizing radiation) increases the concentration of this center by a factor of five to ten (depending on sample), thus indicating that most of these centers are initially present in the crystals in a nonparamagnetic charge state. ENDOR identifies a strong hyperfine interaction with one aluminum neighbor along the c axis (described by A (parallel) = 111.30 MHz, A (perpendicular) = 54.19 MHz, and P = 0.289 MHz) and weaker equivalent hyperfine interactions with three additional aluminum neighbors in the basal plane. These aluminum interactions indicate that the responsible center is a deep donor at a nitrogen site. The observed paramagnetic defect is either a neutral oxygen substituting for nitrogen or a neutral nitrogen vacancy. This work was supported at West Virginia University by the National Science Foundation (Grant DMR-0508140). One of the authors (SME) received support from the WV EPSCoR STEM fellowship program.

  16. The role of electron donors generated from UV photolysis for accelerating pyridine biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yingxia; Zhang, Yongming; Yan, Ning; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-09-01

    Employing an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor (ICBBR), we evaluated the mechanisms by which photolysis accelerated the biodegradation and mineralization of pyridine (C5 H5 N), a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compound. We tested the hypothesis that pyridine oxidation is accelerated because a key photolysis intermediate, succinate, is as electron donor that promotes the initial mono-oxygenation of pyridine. Experimentally, longer photolysis time generated more electron-donor products (succinate), which stimulated faster pyridine biodegradation. This pattern was confirmed by directly adding succinate, and the stimulation effect occurred similarly with addition of the same equivalents of acetate and formate. Succinate, whether generated by UV photolysis or added directly, also accelerated mono-oxygenation of the first biodegradation intermediate, 2-hydroxyl pyridine (2HP). 2HP and pyridine were mutually inhibitory in that their mono-oxygenations competed for internal electron donor; thus, the addition of any readily biodegradable donor accelerated both mono-oxygenation steps, as well as mineralization. PMID:25854706

  17. Stark Tuning of Donor Electron Spins of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Forrest R.; Tyryshkin, Alexei M.; Sabouret, Guillaume; Bokor, Jeff; Schenkel, Thomas; Lyon, Stephen A.

    2006-03-23

    We report Stark shift measurements for {sup 121}Sb donor electron spins in silicon using pulsed electron spin resonance. Interdigitated metal gates on top of a Sb-implanted {sup 28}Si epi-layer are used to apply electric fields. Two Stark effects are resolved: a decrease of the hyperfine coupling between electron and nuclear spins of the donor and a decrease in electron Zeeman g-factor. The hyperfine term prevails at X-band magnetic fields of 0.35T, while the g-factor term is expected to dominate at higher magnetic fields. A significant linear Stark effect is also resolved presumably arising from strain.

  18. Stark tuning of donor electron spins in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, F.R.; Tyryshkin, A.M.; Sabouret, G.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.; Lyon, S.A.

    2006-03-12

    We report Stark shift measurements for 121Sb donor electronspins in silicon using pulsed electron spin resonance. Interdigitatedmetal gates on top of a Sb-implanted 28Si epi-layer are used to applyelectric fields. Two Stark effects are resolved: a decrease of thehyperfine coupling between electron and nuclear spins of the donor and adecrease in electron Zeeman g-factor. The hyperfine term prevails atX-band magnetic fields of 0.35T, while the g-factor term is expected todominate at higher magnetic fields. A significant linear Stark effect isalso resolved presumably arising from strain.

  19. Low aqueous solubility electron donors for the reduction of nitroaromatics in anaerobic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Robin; Steiof, Martin; Zhang, Chunlong; Hughes, Joseph B.

    1999-02-01

    Studies are presented investigating the ability to enhance aryl nitro-reduction processes in sediments through electron donor addition. In particular, high molecular weight (starch and guar gum) and/or low aqueous solubility electron donors (oleic acid) were studied, since they should be less prone to diffusive loss to the water column after addition to contaminated areas. For comparison, complimentary studies were conducted with water-soluble electron donors (acetate and dextrose). The ability to enhance activity was measured by methane production and reduction of either nitrobenzene or 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene to aniline or dinitroaniline. The results demonstrate that all electron donors resulted in increased methane production after a lag phase. The highest level of methane production and the shortest lag phase in uncontaminated sediment microcosms was observed in acetate-fed systems. Sorption studies of all electron donors showed that starch was partitioning the least into the water phase. In microcosms containing nitrobenzene, trinitrobenzene and acetate, methane production did not occur and nitro-reduction was not observed. Conversely, the addition of dextrose or starch yielded methane production and aryl nitro-reduction with each contaminant tested. Neither nitrobenzene nor trinitrobenzene was significantly reduced in HgCl 2-killed controls. From these studies, it appears that starch may be well suited for applications of in-place, anaerobic sediment bioremediation.

  20. Ultrafast electron transfer via a bridge-extended donor orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstorfer, R.; Gundlach, L.; Felber, S.; Storck, W.; Eichberger, R.; Zimmermann, C.; Willig, F.

    Electron transfer from the excited aromatic donor perylene to TiO2 occurred with 10 fs time constant via the conjugated -CH=CH- bridge unit compared to 57 fs in the presence of the saturated -CH2-CH2- bridge unit.

  1. Electron donor preference of a reductive dechlorinating consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium was developed by the USGS and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for use in bioaugmentation applications. The consortium had the capacity to completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1.1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. A suite of electron donors with characteristics useful for bioaugmentation applications was tested. The electron donors included lactate (the donor used during WBC-2 development), ethanol, chitin (Chitorem???), hydrogen releasing compound (HRC???), emulsified vegetable oil (Newman Zone???), and hydrogen gas. Ethanol, lactate, and chitin were particularly effective with respect to stimulating, supporting, and sustaining reductive dechlorination of the broad suite of chemicals that WBC-2 biodegraded. Chitorem??? was the most effective "slow release" electron donor tested. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  2. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian; Dery, Hanan

    2015-06-01

    At low temperatures, electrons in semiconductors are bound to shallow donor impurity ions, neutralizing their charge in equilibrium. Inelastic scattering of other externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions within the manifold of these localized states. Promotion of the bound electron into highly spin-orbit-mixed excited states drives a strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interactions, reminiscent of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process where exchange occurs with valence band hole states. Through low-temperature experiments with silicon spin transport devices and complementary theory, we reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold.

  3. Fullerene derivatives as electron donor for organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Taojun; Wang, Xiao-Feng E-mail: ziruo@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Sano, Takeshi; Kido, Junji; Hong, Ziruo E-mail: ziruo@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Yang, Yang

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrated the performance of unconventional, all-fullerene-based, planar heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells using fullerene derivatives indene-C{sub 60} bisadduct (ICBA) and phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester as the electron donors with fullerene C{sub 70} as the electron acceptor. Two different charge generation processes, including charge generation in the fullerene bulk and exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface, have been found to exist in such all-fullerene-based PHJ cells and the contribution to the total photocurrent from each process is strongly dependent on the thickness of fullerene donor. The optimized 5 nm ICBA/40 nm C{sub 70} PHJ cell gives clear external quantum efficiency responses for the long-wavelength photons corresponding to the dissociation of strongly bound Frenkel excitons, which is hardly observed in fullerene-based single layer reference devices. This approach using fullerene as a donor material provides further possibilities for developing high performance OPV cells.

  4. Tuning the Electron Acceptor in Phthalocyanine-Based Electron Donor-Acceptor Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Michael; Jiménez, Ángel J; Marcos, M Luisa; Caballero, Esmeralda; Rodríguez-Morgade, M Salomé; Guldi, Dirk M; Torres, Tomás

    2015-12-21

    Zinc phthalocyanines (ZnPc) have been attached to the peri-position of a perylenemonoimide (PMI) and a perylenemonoanhydride (PMA), affording electron donor-acceptor conjugates 1 and 2, respectively. In addition, a perylene-monoimide-monoanhydride (PMIMA) has been connected to a ZnPc through its imido position to yield the ZnPc-PMIMA conjugate 10. The three conjugates have been studied for photoinduced electron transfer. For ZnPc-PMIMA 10, electron transfer occurs upon both ZnPc and PMIMA excitation, giving rise to a long-lived (340 ps) charge-separated state. For ZnPc-PMI 1 and ZnPc-PMA 2, stabilization of the radical ion pair states by using polar media is necessary. In THF, photoexcitation of either ZnPc or PMI/PMA produces charge-separated states with lifetimes of 375 and 163 ps, respectively. PMID:26593778

  5. Electronic structure of the primary electron donor of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutants : high field EPR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, N. S.; Poluektov, O. G.; Bylina, E. J.; Norris, J. R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-09-01

    High-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) has been employed to investigate the primary electron donor electronic structure of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs). In these mutants the amino acid substitution His(M200)Leu or His(L173)Leu eliminates a ligand to the primary electron donor, resulting in the loss of a magnesium in one of the constituent bacteriochlorophylls (BChl). Thus, the native BChl/BChl homodimer primary donor is converted into a BChl/bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) heterodimer. The heterodimer primary donor radical in chemically oxidized RCs exhibits a broadened EPR line indicating a highly asymmetric distribution of the unpaired electron over both dimer constituents. Observed triplet state EPR signals confirm localization of the excitation on the BChl half of the heterodimer primary donor. Theoretical simulation of the triplet EPR lineshapes clearly shows that, in the case of mutants, triplet states are formed by an intersystem crossing mechanism in contrast to the radical pair mechanism in wild type RCs. Photooxidation of the mutant RCs results in formation of a BPhe anion radical within the heterodimer pair. The accumulation of an intradimer BPhe anion is caused by the substantial loss of interaction between constituents of the heterodimer primary donor along with an increase in the reduction potential of the heterodimer primary donor D/D{sup +} couple. This allows oxidation of the cytochrome even at cryogenic temperatures and reduction of each constituent of the heterodimer primary donor individually. Despite a low yield of primary donor radicals, the enhancement of the semiquinone-iron pair EPR signals in these mutants indicates the presence of kinetically viable electron donors.

  6. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  7. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  8. The electron transfer complex between nitrous oxide reductase and its electron donors.

    PubMed

    Dell'acqua, Simone; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2011-12-01

    Identifying redox partners and the interaction surfaces is crucial for fully understanding electron flow in a respiratory chain. In this study, we focused on the interaction of nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), which catalyzes the final step in bacterial denitrification, with its physiological electron donor, either a c-type cytochrome or a type 1 copper protein. The comparison between the interaction of N(2)OR from three different microorganisms, Pseudomonas nautica, Paracoccus denitrificans, and Achromobacter cycloclastes, with their physiological electron donors was performed through the analysis of the primary sequence alignment, electrostatic surface, and molecular docking simulations, using the bimolecular complex generation with global evaluation and ranking algorithm. The docking results were analyzed taking into account the experimental data, since the interaction is suggested to have either a hydrophobic nature, in the case of P. nautica N(2)OR, or an electrostatic nature, in the case of P. denitrificans N(2)OR and A. cycloclastes N(2)OR. A set of well-conserved residues on the N(2)OR surface were identified as being part of the electron transfer pathway from the redox partner to N(2)OR (Ala495, Asp519, Val524, His566 and Leu568 numbered according to the P. nautica N(2)OR sequence). Moreover, we built a model for Wolinella succinogenes N(2)OR, an enzyme that has an additional c-type-heme-containing domain. The structures of the N(2)OR domain and the c-type-heme-containing domain were modeled and the full-length structure was obtained by molecular docking simulation of these two domains. The orientation of the c-type-heme-containing domain relative to the N(2)OR domain is similar to that found in the other electron transfer complexes. PMID:21739254

  9. Evaluation of sustainable electron donors for nitrate removal in different water media.

    PubMed

    Fowdar, Harsha S; Hatt, Belinda E; Breen, Peter; Cook, Perran L M; Deletic, Ana

    2015-11-15

    An external electron donor is usually included in wastewater and groundwater treatment systems to enhance nitrate removal through denitrification. The choice of electron donor is critical for both satisfactory denitrification rates and sustainable long-term performance. Electron donors that are waste products are preferred to pure organic chemicals. Different electron donors have been used to treat different water types and little is known as to whether there are any electron donors that are suitable for multiple applications. Seven different carbon rich waste products, including liquid and solid electron donors, were studied in comparison to pure acetate. Batch-scale tests were used to measure their ability to reduce nitrate concentrations in a pure nutrient solution, light greywater, secondary-treated wastewater and tertiary-treated wastewater. The tested electron donors removed oxidised nitrogen (NOx) at varying rates, ranging from 48 mg N/L/d (acetate) to 0.3 mg N/L/d (hardwood). The concentrations of transient nitrite accumulation also varied across the electron donors. The different water types had an influence on NOx removal rates, the extent of which was dependent on the type of electron donor. Overall, the highest rates were recorded in light greywater, followed by the pure nutrient solution and the two partially treated wastewaters. Cotton wool and rice hulls were found to be promising electron donors with good NOx removal rates, lower leachable nutrients and had the least variation in performance across water types. PMID:26379204

  10. Nuclear-driven electron spin rotations in a coupled silicon quantum dot and single donor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Rudolph, Martin; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    Single donors in silicon are very good qubits. However, a central challenge is to couple them to one another. To achieve this, many proposals rely on using a nearby quantum dot (QD) to mediate an interaction. In this work, we demonstrate the coherent coupling of electron spins between a single 31P donor and an enriched 28Si metal-oxide-semiconductor few-electron QD. We show that the electron-nuclear spin interaction can drive coherent rotations between singlet and triplet electron spin states. Moreover, we are able to tune electrically the exchange interaction between the QD and donor electrons. The combination of single-nucleus-driven rotations and voltage-tunable exchange provides all elements for future all-electrical control of a spin qubit, and requires only a single dot and no additional magnetic field gradients. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Rationally designed donor-acceptor scheme based molecules for applications in opto-electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Subash Sundar, T; Sen, R; Johari, P

    2016-04-01

    Several donor (D)-acceptor (A) based molecules are rationally designed by adopting three different schemes in which the conjugation length, strength of the donor and acceptor moieties, and planarity of the molecules are varied. These variations are made by introducing a π-conjugated linkage unit, terminating the ends of the moieties by different electron donating and accepting functional groups, and fusing the donor and acceptor moieties, respectively. Our DFT and TDDFT based calculations reveal that using the above-mentioned design schemes, the electronic and optical properties of the D-A based molecules can be largely tuned. While introduction of a linkage and fusing of moieties enhance the π-π interaction, addition of electron donating groups (-CH3, -OH, and -NH2) and electron accepting groups (-CF3, -CN, -NO2, and -NH3(+)) varies the strength of the donor and acceptor moieties. These factors lead to modulation of the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and facilitate the engineering of the HOMO-LUMO gap and the optical gap over a wide range of ∼0.7-3.7 eV. Moreover, on the basis of calculated ionization potential and reorganization energy, most of the investigated molecules are predicted to be air stable and to exhibit high electron mobility, with the possibility of the presence of ambipolar characteristics in a few of them. The results of our calculations not only demonstrate the examined molecules to be the potential materials for organic opto-electronic devices, but also establish an understanding of the composition-structure-property correlation, which will provide guidelines for designing and synthesizing new materials of choice. PMID:26972386

  12. Hydrogen as an electron donor for dechlorination of tetrachloroethene by an anaerobic mixed culture.

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, T D; Gossett, J M; Zinder, S H

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen served as an electron donor in the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene to vinyl chloride and ethene over periods of 14 to 40 days in anaerobic enrichment cultures; however, sustained dechlorination for more extended periods required the addition of filtered supernatant from a methanol-fed culture. This result suggests a nutritional dependency of hydrogen-utilizing dechlorinators on the metabolic products of other organisms in the more diverse, methanol-fed system. Vancomycin, an inhibitor of cell wall synthesis in eubacteria, was found to inhibit acetogenesis when added at 100 mg/liter to both methanol-fed and hydrogen-fed cultures. The effect of vancomycin on dechlorination was more complex. Methanol could not sustain dechlorination when vancomycin inhibited acetogenesis, while hydrogen could. These results are consistent with a model in which hydrogen is the electron donor directly used for dechlorination by organisms resistant to vancomycin and with the hypothesis that the role of acetogens in methanol-fed cultures is to metabolize a portion of the methanol to hydrogen. Methanol and other substrates shown to support dechlorination in pure and mixed cultures may merely serve as precursors for the formation of an intermediate hydrogen pool. This hypothesis suggests that, for bioremediation of high levels of tetrachloroethene, electron donors that cause the production of a large hydrogen pool should be selected or methods that directly use H2 should be devised. PMID:1482184

  13. Autotrophic denitrification of nitrate and nitrite using thiosulfate as an electron donor.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jinwook; Amin, Khurram; Kim, Seungjin; Yoon, Seungjoon; Kwon, Kiwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine the possibility of autotrophic denitritation using thiosulfate as an electron donor, compare the kinetics of autotrophic denitrification and denitritation, and to study the effects of pH and sulfur/nitrogen (S/N) ratio on the denitrification rate of nitrite. Both nitrate and nitrite were removed by autotrophic denitrification using thiosulfate as an electron donor at concentrations up to 800 mg-N/L. Denitrification required a S/N ratio of 5.1 for complete denitrification, but denitritation was complete at a S/N ratio of 2.5, which indicated an electron donor cost savings of 50%. Also, pH during denitrification decreased but increased with nitrite, implying additional alkalinity savings. Finally, the highest specific substrate utilization rate of nitrite was slightly higher than that of nitrate reduction, and biomass yield for denitrification was relatively higher than that of denitritation, showing less sludge production and resulting in lower sludge handling costs. PMID:24755301

  14. Hybrid optical-electrical detection of donor electron spins with bound excitons in silicon.

    PubMed

    Lo, C C; Urdampilleta, M; Ross, P; Gonzalez-Zalba, M F; Mansir, J; Lyon, S A; Thewalt, M L W; Morton, J J L

    2015-05-01

    Electrical detection of spins is an essential tool for understanding the dynamics of spins, with applications ranging from optoelectronics and spintronics, to quantum information processing. For electron spins bound to donors in silicon, bulk electrically detected magnetic resonance has relied on coupling to spin readout partners such as paramagnetic defects or conduction electrons, which fundamentally limits spin coherence times. Here we demonstrate electrical detection of donor electron spin resonance in an ensemble by transport through a silicon device, using optically driven donor-bound exciton transitions. We measure electron spin Rabi oscillations, and obtain long electron spin coherence times, limited only by the donor concentration. We also experimentally address critical issues such as non-resonant excitation, strain, and electric fields, laying the foundations for realizing a single-spin readout method with relaxed magnetic field and temperature requirements compared with spin-dependent tunnelling, enabling donor-based technologies such as quantum sensing. PMID:25799326

  15. Hybrid optical-electrical detection of donor electron spins with bound excitons in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C.; Urdampilleta, M.; Ross, P.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.; Mansir, J.; Lyon, S. A.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Morton, J. J. L.

    2015-05-01

    Electrical detection of spins is an essential tool for understanding the dynamics of spins, with applications ranging from optoelectronics and spintronics, to quantum information processing. For electron spins bound to donors in silicon, bulk electrically detected magnetic resonance has relied on coupling to spin readout partners such as paramagnetic defects or conduction electrons, which fundamentally limits spin coherence times. Here we demonstrate electrical detection of donor electron spin resonance in an ensemble by transport through a silicon device, using optically driven donor-bound exciton transitions. We measure electron spin Rabi oscillations, and obtain long electron spin coherence times, limited only by the donor concentration. We also experimentally address critical issues such as non-resonant excitation, strain, and electric fields, laying the foundations for realizing a single-spin readout method with relaxed magnetic field and temperature requirements compared with spin-dependent tunnelling, enabling donor-based technologies such as quantum sensing.

  16. Solid phase electron donors control denitrification in groundwater at agricultural sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C. T.; Liao, L.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Increased concentrations of nitrate in groundwater caused by agricultural use of chemical and organic fertilizers are a concern because of possible risks to environmental and human health. At many sites, these problems are mitigated by natural attenuation of nitrate as a result of microbially mediated denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas. Recent studies have clarified the factors affecting the rates and extents of denitrification in groundwater in agricultural areas. Intensive studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey to study agricultural chemicals in California, Nebraska, Washington, and Maryland using laboratory analyses, field measurements, and flow and transport modeling for monitoring well transects (0.5 to 2.5 km in length) and vertical profiles (0 to 50 m in depth). Groundwater analyses included major ion chemistry, dissolved gases, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, and atmospheric age-tracers. Sediments were analyzed for concentrations of potential electron donors for denitrification, including reduced iron and sulfur, and organic carbon. Geochemical data and mass balance calculations indicated that solid-phase electron donors were an important factor controlling denitrification at these sites. To examine the generality of this result, a mathematical model of vertical flux of water, oxygen, and nitrate was developed and applied at these study sites along with 2 new study sites in Iowa and Mississippi and 8 additional sites from previous studies in Nebraska, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Maryland (2 sites), and New York. Model results confirmed the importance of solid phase electron donors. The normalized reaction rates on an electron flux basis tended to increase with depth from the shallow oxygen reduction zone to the underlying nitrate reduction zone. The pattern of higher rates at depth is consistent with a reaction rate controlled by solid phase donors that are depleted under oxidizing conditions near the surface and in

  17. Photoinduced electron tunneling between randomly dispersed donors and acceptors in frozen glasses and other rigid matrices.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-14

    In fluid solution un-tethered donors and acceptors can diffuse freely, and consequently the donor-acceptor distance is usually not fixed on the timescale of an electron transfer event. When attempting to investigate the influence of driving-force changes or donor-acceptor distance variations on electron transfer rates this can be a problem. In rigid matrices diffusion is suppressed, and it becomes possible to investigate fixed-distance electron transfer. This method represents an attractive alternative to investigate rigid rod-like donor-bridge-acceptor molecules which have to be made in elaborate syntheses. This perspective focuses specifically on the distance dependence of photoinduced electron transfer which occurs via tunneling of charge carriers through rigid matrices over distances between 1 and 33 Å. Some key aspects of the theoretical models commonly used for analyzing kinetic data of electron tunneling through rigid matrices are recapitulated. New findings from this rather mature field of research are emphasized. PMID:23722299

  18. Ubisemiquinone is the electron donor for superoxide formation by complex III of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1985-03-01

    Much evidence indicates that superoxide is generated from O2 in a cyanide-sensitive reaction involving a reduced component of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, particularly when antimycin A is present. Although it is generally believed that ubisemiquinone is the electron donor to O2, little experimental evidence supporting this view has been reported. Experiments with succinate as electron donor in the presence of antimycin A in intact rat heart mitochondria, which contain much superoxide dismutase but little catalase, showed that myxothiazol, which inhibits reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur center, prevented formation of hydrogen peroxide, determined spectrophotometrically as the H2O2-peroxidase complex. Similarly, depletion of the mitochondria of their cytochrome c also inhibited formation of H2O2, which was restored by addition of cytochrome c. These observations indicate that factors preventing the formation of ubisemiquinone also prevent H2O2 formation. They also exclude ubiquinol, which remains reduced under these conditions, as the reductant of O2. Since cytochrome b also remains fully reduced when myxothiazol is added to succinate- and antimycin A-supplemented mitochondria, reduced cytochrome b may also be excluded as the reductant of O2. These observations, which are consistent with the Q-cycle reactions, by exclusion of other possibilities leave ubisemiquinone as the only reduced electron carrier in complex III capable of reducing O2 to O2-. PMID:2983613

  19. Enhanced photoproduction of hydrogen peroxide by humic substances in the presence of phenol electron donors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Simon, Kelli A; Andrew, Andrea A; Del Vecchio, Rossana; Blough, Neil V

    2014-11-01

    Addition of a series of phenol electron donors to solutions of humic substances (HS) enhanced substantially the initial rates of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) photoproduction (RH2O2), with enhancement factors (EF) ranging from a low of ∼3 for 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP) to a high of ∼15 for 3,4-dimethoxyphenol (DMOP). The substantial inhibition of the enhanced RH2O2 following borohydride reduction of the HS, as well as the dependence of RH2O2 on phenol and dioxygen concentrations are consistent with a mechanism in which the phenols react with the triplet excited states of (aromatic) ketones within the HS to form initially a phenoxy and ketyl radical. The ketyl radical then reacts rapidly with dioxygen to regenerate the ketone and form superoxide (O2-), which subsequently dismutates to H2O2. However, as was previously noted for the photosensitized loss of TMP, the incomplete inhibition of the enhanced RH2O2 following borohydride reduction suggests that there may remain another pool of oxidizing triplets. The results demonstrate that H2O2 can be generated through an additional pathway in the presence of sufficiently high concentrations of appropriate electron donors through reaction with the excited triplet states of aromatic ketones and possibly of other species such as quinones. However, in some cases, the much lower ratio of H2O2 produced to phenol consumed suggests that secondary reactions could alter this ratio significantly. PMID:25288017

  20. Electron donors and co-contaminants affect microbial community composition and activity in perchlorate degradation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangyu; Xie, Yuxuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Although microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a promising and effective method, our knowledge on the changes in microbial communities during ClO4(-) degradation is limited, especially when different electron donors are supplied and/or other contaminants are present. Here, we examined the effects of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate and ammonium as co-contaminants on ClO4(-) degradation by anaerobic microcosms using six treatments. The process of degradation was divided into the lag stage (SI) and the accelerated stage (SII). Quantitative PCR was used to quantify four genes: pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase), cld (encoding chlorite dismutase), nirS (encoding copper and cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), and 16S rRNA. While the degradation of ClO4(-) with acetate, nitrate, and ammonia system (PNA) was the fastest with the highest abundance of the four genes, it was the slowest in the autotrophic system (HYP). The pcrA gene accumulated in SI and played a key role in initiating the accelerated degradation of ClO4(-) when its abundance reached a peak. Degradation in SII was primarily maintained by the cld gene. Acetate inhibited the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), but its effect was weakened by nitrate (NO3(-)), which promoted the growth of PRB in SI, and therefore, accelerated the ClO4(-) degradation rate. In addition, ammonia (NH4(+)), as nitrogen sources, accelerated the growth of PRB. The bacterial communities' structure and diversity were significantly affected by electron donors and co-contaminants. Under heterotrophic conditions, both ammonia and nitrate promoted Azospira as the most dominant genera, a fact that might significantly influence the rate of ClO4(-) natural attenuation by degradation. PMID:25382499

  1. Coherent spin dynamics of donor bound electrons in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, Carey; O'Leary, Shannon; Prineas, John; Wang, Hailin

    2011-08-01

    We report experimental studies of coherent spin dynamics of donor-bound electrons in high-purity GaAs by using transient differential transmission. The donor-bound exciton transitions, which are not visible in the linear absorption spectrum, are spectrally resolved in the nonlinear differential transmission spectra. The spin beats in the transient differential transmission response, arising from electron spin precession in an external magnetic field, are investigated with the pump and probe coupling to various donor-bound exciton transitions. The spectral dependence of the spin beats provides important information on the polarization selection rule for the underlying donor-bound exciton transitions. The polarization selection rules deduced from these experiments indicate that contributions from higher-energy donor-bound exciton transitions can severely limit the effectiveness of optical spin control using mechanisms such as polarization-dependent optical Stark shifts.

  2. Carotenoid Excited State Kinetics in Bacterial RCs with the Primary Electron Donor Oxidized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Su; Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W.

    Carotenoid singlet excited state kinetics in wild type reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides was investigated using ultrafast laser spectroscopy under conditions where the primary electron donor is either neutral or oxidized.

  3. Electronic structure of oxygen thermal donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J.; Ourmazd, A.

    1985-03-01

    The electrical activity of oxygen-related thermal donors in the model of Ourmazd, Bourret, and Schröter is shown to derive from the shallow, doubly occupied pπ state of a divalent silicon at the center of a cluster of five or more oxygens.

  4. Temperature and donor concentration dependence of the conduction electron Lande g-factor in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, Anton A.; Ezhevskii, Alexander A.; Soukhorukov, Andrey V.; Guseinov, Davud V.; Popkov, Sergey A.; Burdov, Vladimir A.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature and donor concentration dependence of the conduction electron g-factor in silicon has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. We performed electron spin resonance experiments on Si samples doped with different densities of phosphorus and lithium. Theoretical consideration is based on the renormalization of the electron energy in a weak magnetic field by the interaction with possible perturbing agents, such as phonons and impurity centers. In the second-order perturbation theory interaction of the electron subsystem with the lattice vibrations as well as ionized donors results in decreasing the conduction electron g-factor, which becomes almost linear function both of temperature and impurity concentration.

  5. Microbial perchlorate reduction with elemental sulfur and other inorganic electron donors.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiumin; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A; Byrnes, David J; Bentley, Harold; Bentley, Richard

    2008-03-01

    ClO(4)(-) has recently been recognized as a widespread contaminant of surface and ground water. This research investigated chemolithotrophic perchlorate reduction by bacteria in soils and sludges utilizing inorganic electron-donating substrates such as hydrogen, elemental iron, and elemental sulfur. The bioassays were performed in anaerobic serum bottles with various inocula from anaerobic or aerobic environments. All the tested sludge inocula were capable of reducing perchlorate with H2 as electron donor. Aerobic activated sludge was evaluated further and it supported perchlorate reduction with Fe(0) and S(0) additions under anaerobic conditions. Heat-killed sludge did not convert ClO(4)(-), confirming the reactions were biologically catalyzed. ClO(4)(-) (3mM) was almost completely removed by the first sampling time on d 8 with H2 (> or = 0.37mMd(-1)), after 22d with S(0) (0.18mM d(-1)) and 84% removed after 37d with Fe(0) additions (0.085mMd(-1)). Perchlorate-reduction occurred at a much faster rate (1.12mMd(-1)), when using an enrichment culture developed from the activated sludge with S(0) as an electron donor. The enrichment culture also utilized S(2-) and S(2)O(3)(2-) as electron-donating substrates to support ClO(4)(-) reduction. The mixed cultures also catalyzed the disproportionation of S(0) to S(2-) and SO(4)(2-). Evidence is presented demonstrating that S(0) was directly utilized by microorganisms to support perchlorate-reduction. In all the experiments, ClO(4)(-) was stoichiometrically converted to chloride. The study demonstrates that microorganisms present in wastewater sludges can readily use a variety of inorganic compounds to support perchlorate reduction. PMID:17988714

  6. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  7. Tuning Optical and Electron Donor Properties by Peripheral Thio-Aryl Substitution of Subphthalocyanine: A New Series of Donor-Acceptor Hybrids for Photoinduced Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Kc, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-09-01

    Subphthalocyanine (SubPc), a unique ring-reduced member of the common phthalocyanines family, although known for its higher absorptivity, reveals narrow absorption with peak maxima around 570 nm thus limiting its utility in light-energy-harvesting applications. In the present study, by peripheral thio-aryl substitution of SubPc macrocycle, the spectral properties have been modulated to extend the absorption and emission well into the visible/near-IR region. Additionally, for α-ring-substituted derivatives, facile oxidation of SubPc was witnessed, thus making these derivatives better electron donors. Next, the preparation of donor-acceptor dyads containing the well-known electron acceptor C60 connected to the central boron atom of SubPc was accomplished by making use of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Control experiments and free-energy calculations using the redox and spectral data suggested that the observed fluorescence quenching of SubPc in these dyads is due to electron transfer. Accordingly, transient spectral studies performed both in polar and nonpolar solvents conclusively proved electron transfer to be the quenching mechanism in these dyads. The measured rate constants by fitting kinetic data revealed efficient charge separation and charge recombination processes, suggesting that these dyads could be useful materials for the construction of light-to-electricity or light-to-fuel production devices. PMID:27515576

  8. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  9. The roles of methanogens and acetogens in dechlorination of trichloroethene using different electron donors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Pan, Ya-Wei; Wu, Wen-Qi; Meng, Shao-Hua; Zhou, Chen; Tang, Youneng; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, He-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of methanogens and acetogens on the function and structure of microbial communities doing reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) by adding four distinct electron donors: lactate, a fermentable organic; acetate, a non-fermentable organic; methanol, a fermentable 1-C (carbon) organic; and hydrogen gas (H2), the direct electron donor for reductive dechlorination by Dehalococcoides. The fermentable electron donors had faster dechlorination rates, more complete dechlorination, and higher bacterial abundances than the non-fermentable electron donors during short-term tests. Phylotypes of Dehalococcoides were relatively abundant (≥9%) for the cultures fed with fermentable electron donors but accounted for only ~1-2% of the reads for the cultures fed by the non-fermentable electron donors. Routing electrons to methanogenesis and a low ratio of Dehalococcoides/methanogenesis (Dhc/mcrA) were associated with slow and incomplete reductive dechlorination with methanol and H2. When fermentable substrates were applied as electron donors, a Dhc/mcrA ratio ≥6.4 was essential to achieve fast and complete dechlorination of TCE to ethene. When methanogenesis was suppressed using 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), achieving complete dechlorination of TCE to ethane required a minimum abundance of the mcrA gene. Methanobacterium appeared to be important for maintaining a high dechlorination rate, probably by providing Dehalococcoides with cofactors other than vitamin B12. Furthermore, the presence of homoacetogens also was important to maintain a high dechlorination rate, because they provided acetate as Dehalococcoides's obligatory carbon source and possibly cofactors. PMID:26233753

  10. Isolation of Acetogenic Bacteria That Induce Biocorrosion by Utilizing Metallic Iron as the Sole Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion. PMID:25304512

  11. The impacts of electronic state hybridization on the binding energy of single phosphorus donor electrons in extremely downscaled silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    The Anh, Le Manoharan, Muruganathan; Moraru, Daniel; Tabe, Michiharu; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-08-14

    We present the density functional theory calculations of the binding energy of the Phosphorus (P) donor electrons in extremely downscaled single P-doped Silicon (Si) nanorods. In past studies, the binding energy of donor electrons was evaluated for the Si nanostructures as the difference between the ionization energy for the single P-doped Si nanostructures and the electron affinity for the un-doped Si nanostructures. This definition does not take into account the strong interaction of donor electron states and Si electron states explicitly at the conductive states and results in a monotonous increase in the binding energy by reducing the nanostructure's dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to evaluate the binding energy of donor electrons by combining the projected density of states (PDOS) analysis and three-dimensional analysis of associated electron wavefunctions. This enables us to clarify a gradual change of the spatial distribution of the 3D electron wavefunctions (3DWFs) from the donor electron ground state, which is fully localized around the P donor site to the first conductive state, which spreads over the outer Si nanorods contributing to current conduction. We found that the energy of the first conductive state is capped near the top of the atomistic effective potential at the donor site with respect to the surrounding Si atoms in nanorods smaller than about 27 a{sub 0}. This results in the binding energy of approximately 1.5 eV, which is virtually independent on the nanorod's dimensions. This fact signifies a good tolerance of the binding energy, which governs the operating temperature of the single dopant-based transistors in practice. We also conducted the computationally heavy transmission calculations of the single P-doped Si nanorods connected to the source and drain electrodes. The calculated transmission spectra are discussed in comparison with the atomistic effective potential distributions and the PDOS-3DWFs method.

  12. The impacts of electronic state hybridization on the binding energy of single phosphorus donor electrons in extremely downscaled silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Anh, Le; Moraru, Daniel; Manoharan, Muruganathan; Tabe, Michiharu; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    We present the density functional theory calculations of the binding energy of the Phosphorus (P) donor electrons in extremely downscaled single P-doped Silicon (Si) nanorods. In past studies, the binding energy of donor electrons was evaluated for the Si nanostructures as the difference between the ionization energy for the single P-doped Si nanostructures and the electron affinity for the un-doped Si nanostructures. This definition does not take into account the strong interaction of donor electron states and Si electron states explicitly at the conductive states and results in a monotonous increase in the binding energy by reducing the nanostructure's dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to evaluate the binding energy of donor electrons by combining the projected density of states (PDOS) analysis and three-dimensional analysis of associated electron wavefunctions. This enables us to clarify a gradual change of the spatial distribution of the 3D electron wavefunctions (3DWFs) from the donor electron ground state, which is fully localized around the P donor site to the first conductive state, which spreads over the outer Si nanorods contributing to current conduction. We found that the energy of the first conductive state is capped near the top of the atomistic effective potential at the donor site with respect to the surrounding Si atoms in nanorods smaller than about 27 a0. This results in the binding energy of approximately 1.5 eV, which is virtually independent on the nanorod's dimensions. This fact signifies a good tolerance of the binding energy, which governs the operating temperature of the single dopant-based transistors in practice. We also conducted the computationally heavy transmission calculations of the single P-doped Si nanorods connected to the source and drain electrodes. The calculated transmission spectra are discussed in comparison with the atomistic effective potential distributions and the PDOS-3DWFs method.

  13. A hybrid electron donor comprising cyclopentadithiophene and dithiafulvenyl for dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Sorohhov, Gleb; Yi, Chenyi; Grätzel, Michael; Decurtins, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new photosensitizers featured with a cyanoacrylic acid electron acceptor (A) and a hybrid electron donor (D) of cyclopentadithiophene and dithiafulvenyl, either directly linked or separated by a phenyl ring, were synthesized and characterized. Both of them undergo two reversible oxidations and strongly absorb in the visible spectral region due to a photo-induced intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) transition. To a great extent, the electronic interaction between the D and A units is affected by the presence of a phenyl spacer. Without a phenyl ring, the D unit appears more difficult to oxidize due to a strong electron-withdrawing effect of the A moiety. In sharp contrast, the insertion of the phenyl ring between the D and A units leads to a broken π-conjugation and therefore, the oxidation potentials remain almost unchanged compared to those of an analogue without the A group, suggesting that the electronic coupling between D and A units is relatively weak. As a consequence, the lowest-energy absorption band shows a slight hypsochromic shift upon the addition of the phenyl spacer, indicative of an increased HOMO–LUMO gap. In turn, the direct linkage of D and A units leads to an effective π-conjugation, thus substantially lowering the HOMO–LUMO gap. Moreover, the application in dye-sensitized solar cells was investigated, showing that the power conversion efficiency increases by the insertion of the phenyl unit. PMID:26199660

  14. Femtosecond electron injection from optically populated donor states into the conduction band of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstorfer, Ralph; Toeben, Lars; Gundlach, Lars; Felber, Silke; Galoppini, Elena; Wei, Qian; Eichberger, Rainer; Storck, Winfried; Zimmermann, Carsten; Willig, Frank

    2003-12-01

    Unoccupied donor states can be populated via light absorption at the surface of semiconductor in the range of the conduction band levels. Hot electrons are injected from such donor states into the conduction band of a semiconductor on a femtosecond time scale. Such donor states can have rather different physical properties, e.g. unoccupied surface bands formed via reconstruction of the clean surface of a semiconductor in contact with ultra high vacuum or chromophores in molecules that are anchored at the surface of the semiconductor. The energy levels of the donor states with respect to the bands in the semiconductor can be determined with UPS and fs-2PPE. Experimental data on the energetics and dynamics of electron injection are presented for the two different cases of donor states mentioned above. The influence of vibrational wavepackets on electron injection is discussed for the case of a molecular donor state. Energy loss of the hot electrons injected into the semiconductor is measured with energy and time resolution employing femtosecond two-photon-photoemission.

  15. The role of exogenous electron donors for accelerating 2,4,6-trichlorophenol biotransformation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ning; Li, Rongjie; Xu, Hua; Li, Ling; Yang, Lihui; Zhang, Yongming; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-06-01

    2,4,6-Trichlorophenol (TCP) is a biologically recalcitrant compound, but its biodegradation via reductive dechlorination can be accelerated by adding an exogenous electron donor. In this work, acetate and formate were evaluated for their ability to accelerate TCP reductive dechlorination, as well to accelerate mono-oxygenation of TCP's reduction product, phenol. Acetate and formate accelerated TCP reductive dechlorination, and the impact was proportional to the number of electron equivalents released by oxidation of the donor: 8 e(-) equivalents per mol for acetate, compared to 2 e(-) eq per mol for formate. The acceleration phenomenon was similar for phenol mono-oxygenation, and this increased the rate of TCP mineralization. Compared to endogenous electron equivalents generated by phenol mineralization, the impact of exogenous electron donor was stronger on a per-equivalent basis. PMID:27084768

  16. Phonon induced two-electron relaxation in two donor qubits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsueh, Yuling; Tankasala, Archana; Wang, Yu; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle; Rahman, Rajib

    An atomistic method of calculating two-electron spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) is presented for two donor qubits in silicon. The singlet-triplet two-electron states are calculated from full-configuration interaction (FCI) method with one-electron basis states obtained from the tight-binding Hamiltonian including spin-orbit interaction. The FCI solution enables the investigation of various regimes of donor separations, including very closely separated donor pairs in which rearrangement of excited bonding and anti-bonding states change the wavefunction symmetries. Hyperfine mixing from the nuclear spins is included perturbatively into the two-electron states. To calculate the T1 times, the electron-phonon Hamiltonian is evaluated from the strain-dependent tight-binding Hamiltonian. The results show how the T1 times in donor qubits vary with magnetic field and donor separation for each of the three triplets. Moreover, the variation of T1 with the electric field controlled exchange coupling is also investigated.

  17. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  18. On the cascade capture of electrons at donors in GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.

    2015-09-15

    The impact parameter for the cascade capture of electrons at a charged donor in a GaAs quantum well is calculated. A simple approximate analytical expression for the impact parameter is suggested. The temperature dependence of the impact parameter for the case of electron scattering by the piezoelectric potential of acoustic phonons is determined.

  19. 2010 Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference, August 8 - 13, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Meyer

    2010-08-18

    The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions (GRC EDAI) presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer Processes and Energy Conversion. The fundamental concepts underpinning the field of electron transfer and charge transport phenomena are understood, but fascinating experimental discoveries and novel applications based on charge transfer processes are expanding the discipline. Simultaneously, global challenges for development of viable and economical alternative energy resources, on which many researchers in the field focus their efforts, are now the subject of daily news headlines. Enduring themes of this conference relate to photosynthesis, both natural and artificial, and solar energy conversion. More recent developments include molecular electronics, optical switches, and nanoscale charge transport structures of both natural (biological) and man-made origin. The GRC EDAI is one of the major international meetings advancing this field, and is one of the few scientific meetings where fundamental research in solar energy conversion has a leading voice. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices. In addition to disseminating the latest advances in the field of electron transfer processes, the conference is an excellent forum for scientists from different disciplines to meet and initiate new directions; for scientists from different countries to make contacts; for young scientists to network and establish personal contacts with other young scientists and with established scientists who, otherwise, might not have the time to meet young people. The EDAI GRC also features an interactive atmosphere with lively poster sessions, a few of which are selected for oral presentations.

  20. Carbon Monoxide as an Electron Donor for the Biological Reduction of Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Parshina, Sofiya N.; Sipma, Jan; Henstra, Anne Meint; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are able to use carbon monoxide (CO) as a carbon source and electron donor for biological sulphate reduction. These strains exhibit variable resistance to CO toxicity. The most resistant SRB can grow and use CO as an electron donor at concentrations up to 100%, whereas others are already severely inhibited at CO concentrations as low as 1-2%. Here, the utilization, inhibition characteristics, and enzymology of CO metabolism as well as the current state of genomics of CO-oxidizing SRB are reviewed. Carboxydotrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria can be applied for biological sulphate reduction with synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) as an electron donor. PMID:20628586

  1. Acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules with varied crystallinity: processing additive-induced nanofibril in blend film for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Chen, Yujin; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Huifang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yaowen; Yang, Xiaoming; Ma, Changqi; Chen, Liwei; Zhu, Xiulin; Tu, Yingfeng

    2013-09-01

    A series of acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules (SMs) with varied crystallinity were successfully synthesized. The processing additive can induce the SMs to self-organize as nanofibrils with higher crystallinity and controlled scales of nanofibrils, which have significant influence on the photovoltaic performance.A series of acceptor-donor-acceptor-based small molecules (SMs) with varied crystallinity were successfully synthesized. The processing additive can induce the SMs to self-organize as nanofibrils with higher crystallinity and controlled scales of nanofibrils, which have significant influence on the photovoltaic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic process and characterizations of SMs; TGA, electrochemical properties, molecular orbital surfaces of SMs; AFM images of SM:PC71BM blend films; EQE curves; optical, electrochemical properties and photovoltaic parameters. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03048b

  2. Modulation of electronic and self-assembly properties of a donor-acceptor-donor-based molecular materials via atomistic approach.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Joydeep; Swathi, K; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Narayan, K S; Patil, Satish

    2015-01-14

    The performance of molecular materials in optoelectronic devices critically depends upon their electronic properties and solid-state structure. In this report, we have synthesized sulfur and selenium based (T4BT and T4BSe) donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) organic derivatives in order to understand the structure-property correlation in organic semiconductors by selectively tuning the chalcogen atom. The photophysical properties exhibit a significant alteration upon varying a single atom in the molecular structure. A joint theoretical and experimental investigation suggests that replacing sulfur with selenium significantly reduces the band gap and molar absorption coefficient because of lower electronegativity and ionization potential of selenium. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis showed differences in their solid-state packing and intermolecular interactions. Subsequently, difference in the solid-state packing results variation in self-assembly. Micorstructural changes within these materials are correlated to their electrical resistance variation, investigated by conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) measurements. These results provide useful guidelines to understand the fundamental properties of D-A-D materials prepared by atomistic modulation. PMID:25532139

  3. Pushing the Limits of Neutral Organic Electron Donors: A Tetra(iminophosphorano)-Substituted Bispyridinylidene

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Samuel S; Doni, Eswararao; Traboulsee, Kyle T; Coulthard, Graeme; Murphy, John A; Dyker, C Adam

    2015-01-01

    A new ground-state organic electron donor has been prepared that features four strongly π-donating iminophosphorano substituents on a bispyridinylidene skeleton. Cyclic voltammetry reveals a record redox potential of −1.70 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) for the couple involving the neutral organic donor and its dication. This highly reducing organic compound can be isolated (44 %) or more conveniently generated in situ by a deprotonation reaction involving its readily prepared pyridinium ion precursor. This donor is able to reduce a variety of aryl halides, and, owing to its redox potential, was found to be the first organic donor to be effective in the thermally induced reductive S–N bond cleavage of N,N-dialkylsulfonamides, and reductive hydrodecyanation of malonitriles. PMID:26213345

  4. Cage electron-hydroxyl complex state as electron donor in mayenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraishi, M.; Kojima, K. M.; Miyazaki, M.; Yamauchi, I.; Okabe, H.; Koda, A.; Kadono, R.; Matsuishi, S.; Hosono, H.

    2016-03-01

    It is inferred from the chemical shift of muon spin rotation (μ SR ) spectra that muons implanted in pristine (fully oxidized) mayenite, [Ca12Al14O32] 2 +[□5O2 -] (C12A7, with □ referring to the vacant cage), are bound to O2 - at the cage center to form OMu- (where Mu represents muonium, a muonic analog of the H atom). However, an isolated negatively charged state (Mu-, an analog of H-) becomes dominant when the compound approaches the state of electride [Ca12Al14O32] 2 +[□42 e-] as a result of the reduction process. Moreover, the OMu- state in the pristine specimen exhibits depolarization of paramagnetic origin at low temperatures (below ˜30 K), indicating that OMu- accompanies a loosely bound electron in the cage that can be thermally activated. This suggests that interstitial muons (and hence H) forming a "cage electron-hydroxyl" complex can serve as electron donors in C12A7.

  5. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-16

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature. PMID:26871255

  6. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  7. Treatability study for Hill AFB`s Operable Unit-1: Enhanced microaerobic dechlorination using various electron donors. MasMajor report

    SciTech Connect

    Breed, P.G.

    1999-05-13

    A treatability study of the microaerobic biodegradation of cis-dichloroethene (c-DCE) was completed using a series of eight continuously operated columns filled with contaminated soils from Hill Air Force Base`s Operable Unit 1. Columns were supplied groundwater from the site, vitamins and yeast, and an electron donor solution containing one of the following donors: n-butyric acid, benzoic acid, lactic acid, propionic acid, n-propanol, or toluene. Concentrations of c-DCE varied over six months and ranged from 2736 micrograms/L to 30 micrograms/L. Though attempted as an anaerobic study, the ability to continuously eliminate oxygen from an active system proved difficult and columns operated as microaerobic systems. In all columns the degradation of c-DCE was observed, however, the removal efficiencies determined by comparing the influent and effluent concentrations were highly inconsistent throughout the experiment. By comparing the background columns to the columns supplied electron donors, it does not appear the addition of vitamins or electron donors enhance the indigenous microorganism`s ability to remove c-DCE. While c-DCE removal within the background column averaged 17%, the vitamin amended control column averaged only 7% c-DCE removal within the column and the electron donor supplied columns averaged between 7% removal and 5% apparent production. Of the electron donors supporting c-DCE removal, benzoic acid demonstrated 7% removal followed closely by propionic acid and n-propanol, both showing 5% c-DCE removal.

  8. Photocurrent generation through electron-exciton interaction at the organic semiconductor donor/acceptor interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qiaoming; Lei, Yanlian; Zhu, Furong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Guoxi; Xiong, Zuhong; Song, Qunliang

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we report our effort to understand the photocurrent generation that is contributed via electron-exciton interaction at the donor/acceptor interface in organic solar cells (OSCs). Donor/acceptor bi-layer heterojunction OSCs, of the indium tin oxide/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60)/molybdenum oxide/Al type, were employed to study the mechanism of photocurrent generation due to the electron-exciton interaction, where CuPc and C60 are the donor and the acceptor, respectively. It is shown that the electron-exciton interaction and the exciton dissociation processes co-exist at the CuPc/C60 interface in OSCs. Compared to conventional donor/acceptor bi-layer OSCs, the cells with the above configuration enable holes to be extracted at the C60 side while electrons can be collected at the CuPc side, resulting in a photocurrent in the reverse direction. The photocurrent thus observed is contributed to primarily by the charge carriers that are generated by the electron-exciton interaction at the CuPc/C60 interface, while charges derived from the exciton dissociation process also exist at the same interface. The mechanism of photocurrent generation due to electron-exciton interaction in the OSCs is further investigated, and it is manifested by the transient photovoltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency measurements. PMID:24002235

  9. Enhanced microscopic nonlinear optical properties of novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiang; Pan, Lin; Jia, Kun; Tang, Xianzhong

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups, containing either styryl or azobenzene based π-conjugated bridge structures, were synthesized and their chemical structures, molecular configuration, microscopic optical properties as well as thermal properties were systematically characterized. The experimental results indicated that eight times increasing of second-order molecular hyperpolarizability as well as 50-100 nm blue shift of maximum absorption band for azobenzene based chromophore were observed by introducing Y-type dual electron donor groups, which was derived from the highly efficient 'total charge transfer' in this kind of chromophore as confirmed by the density functional theory calculation.

  10. Electron spin coherence of phosphorus donors in silicon: Effect of environmental nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Eisuke; Tyryshkin, Alexei M.; Lyon, Stephen A.; Tojo, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Akira; Itoh, Kohei M.; Morton, John J. L.; Witzel, Wayne M.; Ager, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Isoya, Junichi; Thewalt, Mike L. W.

    2010-09-15

    We report electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments of phosphorus donors in isotopically controlled silicon single crystals. By varying the concentration of the {sup 29}Si isotope, f, from 0.075% to 99.2%, we systematically study the effect of the environmental nuclear spins on the donor-electron spin. We find excellent agreement between experiment and theory for decoherence times due to nuclear-induced spectral diffusion, clarifying that the nuclear-induced decoherence is dominant in the range of f studied. We also observe that the EPR linewidth shows a transition from the square-root dependence to the linear dependence on f, in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  11. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    In the Bir-Aronov-Pikus depolarization process affecting conduction electrons in p-type cubic semiconductors, spin relaxation is driven by exchange with short-lived valence band hole states. We have identified an analogous spin relaxation mechanism in nominally undoped silicon at low temperatures, when many electrons are bound to dilute dopant ion potentials. Inelastic scattering with externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions into highly spin-orbit-mixed bound excited states, driving strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interaction. We reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold, where conventional charge and spin transport are restored. Based upon: Lan Qing, Jing Li, Ian Appelbaum, and Hanan Dery, Phys Rev. B 91, 241405(R) (2015). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  12. Autotrophic antimonate bio-reduction using hydrogen as the electron donor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Yu; Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Luo, Shan-Shan; Wang, Qing-Ying; Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ran; Yang, Xiaoe; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb), a toxic metalloid, is soluble as antimonate (Sb(V)). While bio-reduction of Sb(V) is an effective Sb-removal approach, its bio-reduction has been coupled to oxidation of only organic electron donors. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of autotrophic microbial Sb(V) reduction using hydrogen gas (H2) as the electron donor without extra organic carbon source. SEM and EDS analysis confirmed the production of the mineral precipitate Sb2O3. When H2 was utilized as the electron donor, the consortium was able to fully reduce 650 μM of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in 10 days, a rate comparable to the culture using lactate as the electron donor. The H2-fed culture directed a much larger fraction of it donor electrons to Sb(V) reduction than did the lactate-fed culture. While 98% of the electrons from H2 were used to reduce Sb(V) by the H2-fed culture, only 12% of the electrons from lactate was used to reduce Sb(V) by the lactate-fed culture. The rest of the electrons from lactate went to acetate and propionate through fermentation, to methane through methanogenesis, and to biomass synthesis. High-throughput sequencing confirmed that the microbial community for the lactate-fed culture was much more diverse than that for the H2-fed culture, which was dominated by a short rod-shaped phylotype of Rhizobium (α-Protobacteria) that may have been active in Sb(V) reduction. PMID:26519630

  13. Electronic and Chemical Properties of Donor, Acceptor Centers in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Telychko, Mykola; Mutombo, Pingo; Merino, Pablo; Hapala, Prokop; Ondráček, Martin; Bocquet, François C; Sforzini, Jessica; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Vondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Švec, Martin

    2015-09-22

    Chemical doping is one of the most suitable ways of tuning the electronic properties of graphene and a promising candidate for a band gap opening. In this work we report a reliable and tunable method for preparation of high-quality boron and nitrogen co-doped graphene on silicon carbide substrate. We combine experimental (dAFM, STM, XPS, NEXAFS) and theoretical (total energy DFT and simulated STM) studies to analyze the structural, chemical, and electronic properties of the single-atom substitutional dopants in graphene. We show that chemical identification of boron and nitrogen substitutional defects can be achieved in the STM channel due to the quantum interference effect, arising due to the specific electronic structure of nitrogen dopant sites. Chemical reactivity of single boron and nitrogen dopants is analyzed using force-distance spectroscopy by means of dAFM. PMID:26256407

  14. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  15. Computational design of co-polymer electron donors for bulk heterojunction photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yongwoo; Liu, Jiakai; Lin, Xi

    2014-03-01

    In this work, our recently developed adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian is used to systematically explore the optoelectronic properties of thousands of pi-conjugated structures. New physical insights on the structure-property relationship are extracted and transformed into practical guiding rules in the donor materials design. For the power-efficient copolymer structures, we find that the energy variation of frontier orbitals can be controlled either independently or collectively, depending on their specific donor or acceptor structures. In particular, we find that having five-membered conjugated carbon rings in the acceptor units is essential to break the electron-hole charge conjugation symmetry, so that the LUMO levels of the copolymer can be reduced dramatically while holding the HOMO energy levels in the donor units constant. On the other hand, by incorporating heteroatoms into the donors units, we can vary the HOMO levels of the copolymers independently. Effects of introducing various side groups (-R, -O, -CO, -COO, and thiophene) on the primitive donor and acceptor structures are investigated and their results are discussed in details. Finally, unexpected localized states are found, for the first time, in our calculations for a few special co-polymer structures. These localized states, with electrons localized on one end of the copolymer chain and holes on the other end, contain large dipole moments and therefore may be treated as a new design dimension when these copolymers are placed in polar and non-polar solvent environments.

  16. Theoretical study of the interaction of electron donor and acceptor molecules with monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. J.; Yang, W. H.; Wu, Y. P.; Lin, W.; Zhu, H. L.

    2015-07-01

    With the aim of understanding recent experimental data concerning molecular doping in WS2-based FET gas sensors, we have investigated the interaction of NH3 and H2O molecules with monolayer WS2, by means of first-principles calculations. The structural relaxations and total energy calculations are performed to determine the preferential binding configurations and it is found that both NH3 and H2O molecules are physisorbed on monolayer WS2. The Bader analysis combined with the plane-averaged differential charge density results indicate that NH3 acts as the electron donor, while H2O acts as the electron acceptor, leading to n- and p-type doping of WS2, respectively. The charge transfer mechanism is discussed in light of the mixing of the molecular highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with the underlying WS2 orbitals. In addition, the modification of the work function is found to be almost linearly dependent on the total charge transfer. The modification of the work function and the carrier concentration can be obtained by tuning the molecule coverages, without destroying the band structure of monolayer WS2. The electrical sensitivities to the gas adsorption make WS2 a gas sensor that promises wide-ranging applications.

  17. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  18. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently.

  19. Expanding the Diet for DIET: Electron Donors Supporting Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer (DIET) in Defined Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Mu, Bo-Zhong; Lovley, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been recognized as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for syntrophic growth, but previous studies on DIET with defined co-cultures have only documented DIET with ethanol as the electron donor in the absence of conductive materials. Co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized propanol, butanol, propionate, and butyrate with the reduction of fumarate to succinate. G. metallireducens utilized each of these substrates whereas only electrons available from DIET supported G. sulfurreducens respiration. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and a strain of G. sulfurreducens that could not metabolize acetate oxidized acetate with fumarate as the electron acceptor, demonstrating that acetate can also be syntrophically metabolized via DIET. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and Methanosaeta harundinacea previously shown to syntrophically convert ethanol to methane via DIET metabolized propanol or butanol as the sole electron donor, but not propionate or butyrate. The stoichiometric accumulation of propionate or butyrate in the propanol- or butanol-fed cultures demonstrated that M. harundinaceae could conserve energy to support growth solely from electrons derived from DIET. Co-cultures of G. metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri could also incompletely metabolize propanol and butanol and did not metabolize propionate or butyrate as sole electron donors. These results expand the range of substrates that are known to be syntrophically metabolized through DIET, but suggest that claims of propionate and butyrate metabolism via DIET in mixed microbial communities warrant further validation. PMID:26973614

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer across fixed distances in chlorophyll donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G.; Svec, W.A.

    1987-06-01

    The primary events of photosynthesis are a series of rapid, unidirectional electron transfer events between donors and acceptors that are positioned in the reaction center protein at precise spatial orientations and distances relative to one another. Recent work suggests that electron transfer rates depend on distance and free energy of reaction in porphyrin-quinone models in which the distance and orientation of the donor relative to the acceptor is highly restricted. Spacer molecules were developed which were used to link chlorophyll donors with either chlorophyll or quinone acceptors to produce models in which the donor-acceptor distance is well-defined. Recent theoretical studies and photochemical hole-burning experiments have suggested that the actual primary event of photosynthesis is the production of an intramolecular charge transfer state involving the two bacteriochlorophyll molecules of the special pair dimer. This possibility was explored with symmetric, fixed distance chlorophyll dimer. The chlorophyll macrocycles share a common vinyl group at the 2-position. This linkage serves to increase the degree of electronic coupling between the macrocycles. This dimer exhibits a remarkable decrease in fluorescence quantum yield as the dielectric constant of the medium in which it is dissolved increases. This decrease is accompanied by a proportional decrease in the lowest excited singlet state lifetime as measured by picosecond fluorescence and absorption. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Biocatalytic photosynthesis with water as an electron donor.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jungki; Nam, Dong Heon; Lee, Sahng Ha; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-09-15

    Efficient harvesting of unlimited solar energy and its conversion into valuable chemicals is one of the ultimate goals of scientists. With the ever-increasing concerns about sustainable growth and environmental issues, numerous efforts have been made to develop artificial photosynthetic process for the production of fuels and fine chemicals, thus mimicking natural photosynthesis. Despite the research progress made over the decades, the technology is still in its infancy because of the difficulties in kinetic coupling of whole photocatalytic cycles. Herein, we report a new type of artificial photosynthesis system that can avoid such problems by integrally coupling biocatalytic redox reactions with photocatalytic water splitting. We found that photocatalytic water splitting can be efficiently coupled with biocatalytic redox reactions by using tetracobalt polyoxometalate and Rh-based organometallic compound as hole and electron scavengers, respectively, for photoexcited [Ru(bpy)3](2+). Based on these results, we could successfully photosynthesize a model chiral compound (L-glutamate) using a model redox enzyme (glutamate dehydrogenase) upon in situ photoregeneration of cofactors. PMID:25088448

  2. Additional evidence implicating Triticum searsii as the B-genome donor to wheat.

    PubMed

    Nath, J; Hanzel, J J; Thompson, J P; McNay, J W

    1984-02-01

    In vitro DNA:DNA hybridizations and hydroxyapatite thermal-elution chromatography were employed to identify the diploid wheat species ancestral to the B genome of Triticum turgidum. 3H-T. turgidum DNA was hybridized to the unlabeled DNAs of T. urartu, T. speltoides, T. sharonensis, T. bicorne, T. longissimum, and T. searsii. 3H-Labeled DNAs of T. monococcum and a synthetic tetraploid AADD were hybridized with unlabeled DNAs of T. urartu and T. searsii to determine the relationship of the A genome of polyploid wheat and T. urartu. The heteroduplex thermal stabilities indicated that T. searsii was most closely related to the B genome of T. turgidum (AB) and that the genome of T. urartu and the A genome have a great deal of base-sequence homology. Thus, it appears that T. searsii is the B-genome donor to polyploid wheat or a major chromosome donor if the B genome is polyphyletic in origin. PMID:6712588

  3. Synthesis and photophysical properties of new catenated electron donor-acceptor materials with magnesium and free base porphyrins as donors and C60 as the acceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Sabrina V.; Guldi, Dirk M.; Megiatto, Jackson D., Jr.; Schuster, David I.

    2014-12-01

    A new series of nanoscale electron donor-acceptor systems with [2]catenane architectures has been synthesized, incorporating magnesium porphyrin (MgP) or free base porphyrin (H2P) as electron donor and C60 as electron acceptor, surrounding a central tetrahedral Cu(i)-1,10-phenanthroline (phen) complex. Model catenated compounds incorporating only one or none of these photoactive moieties were also prepared. The synthesis involved the use of Sauvage's metal template protocol in combination with the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (``click chemistry''), as in other recent reports from our laboratories. Ground state electron interactions between the individual constituents was probed using electrochemistry and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, while events occurring following photoexcitation in tetrahydrofuran (under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions) at various wavelengths were followed by means of time-resolved transient absorption and emission spectroscopies on the femtosecond and nanosecond time scales, respectively, complemented by measurements of quantum yields for generation of singlet oxygen. From similar studies with model catenates containing one or neither of the chromophores, the events following photoexcitation could be elucidated. The results were compared with those previously reported for analogous catenates based on zinc porphyrin (ZnP). It was determined that a series of energy transfer (EnT) and electron transfer (ET) processes take place in the present catenates, ultimately generating long-distance charge separated (CS) states involving oxidized porphyrin and reduced C60 moieties, with lifetimes ranging from 400 to 1060 nanoseconds. Shorter lived short-distance CS states possessing oxidized copper complexes and reduced C60, with lifetimes ranging from 15 to 60 ns, were formed en route to the long-distance CS states. The dynamics of the ET processes were analyzed in terms of their thermodynamic driving forces. It was clear that

  4. Electron-Donor-Acceptor (EDA) Complexes Of Aromatic Hydrocarbons With Organic Acceptors In Solution And In The Solid State. A Quantitative FT-IR Investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, Paolo; Giorgini, Elisabetta; Tosi, Giorgio; Zampini, Angela

    1989-12-01

    Liquid phase FT-IR investigation on π-π Electron-Donor-Acceptor (EDA) complexes between arenes and organic acceptors leads to values of formation constants that are in good agreement with the ones from other techniques (UV-Vis and NMR). In addition solid state FT-IR and UV-Vis determinations on the complexes are also reported and discussed.

  5. Color- and morphology-controlled self-assembly of new electron-donor-substituted aggregation-induced emission compounds.

    PubMed

    Niu, Caixia; Zhao, Liu; Fang, Tao; Deng, Xuebin; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jiaxin; Na, Na; Han, Jingsa; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-11

    Four electron-donor-substituted aggregation-induced emission (AIE) compounds, N,N'-bis(4-methoxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OMe), N,N'-bis(4-methylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-Me), N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD), and N,N'-bis(4-hydroxylsalicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (BSPD-OH), are designed and synthesized. They are all found to exhibit controlled self-assembly behaviors and good thermal properties. By changing the terminal electron-donor groups, they are controlled to self-assemble into three emission colors (green, yellow, and orange) and four morphologies (microblocks, microparticles, microrods, and nanowires) in THF/water mixtures. Their self-assembled structures were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescent microscopy images, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) techniques. In addition, the emission colors of BSPD-OH can be successfully controlled to three colors (green → yellow → orange) through simply changing the water fraction (fw). Their thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) results indicate that their thermal decomposition temperatures (Td, corresponding to 5% weight loss) range from 282 to 319 °C. Their differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data show that BSPD-OH bears a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 118 °C. The good Td and Tg values will ensure them to be luminogens for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The theoretical calculations and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of BSPD-OMe and BSPD suggest that the stronger electron donor substituent can twist the molecular conformation, decrease the degree of π conjugation, increase the energy gap, and then induce the emission colors' blue shift and morphology variation. The results are meaningful in controlling the emission colors and self-assembly shapes of these derivatives, and they also provide a novel but facile way to get color-tunable AIE luminogens for OLEDs. PMID

  6. New artificial electron donors for in vitro assay of nitrate reductase isolated from cultured tobacco cells and other organisms.

    PubMed

    Hoarau, J; Hirel, B; Nato, A

    1986-04-01

    The capacity of bromphenol blue and its analogs to act as electron donors for measurement of in vitro nitrate reductase activity from tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum var Techné SP 25 strain) was determined. Competitive inhibition was demonstrated to occur between NADH, the natural electron donor, and bromphenol blue, the artificial electron donor, suggesting that both donors bind to a similar active site on the enzyme. NADH-dependent or bromphenol blue-dependent nitrate reductase activity was carried out by a similar molecular weight protein exhibiting similar antigenic sites. Following ammonium sulfate precipitation, sucrose density gradient and two chromatographic steps, nitrate reductase activity from tobacco cells was purified near homogeneity using bromphenol blue as an electron donor in the absence of measurable NADH-dependent activity. The enzyme is composed of two identical subunits of 83 kilodaltons < Momega < 94 kilodaltons. PMID:16664746

  7. Effects of different electron donor feeding patterns on TCE reductive dechlorination performance.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakis, I; Antoniou, K; Mamais, D; Pantazidou, M

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates how the feeding pattern of e(-) donors might affect the efficiency of enhanced in situ bioremediation in TCE-contaminated aquifers. A series of lab-scale batch experiments were conducted using butyrate or hydrogen gas (H2) as e(-) donor and a TCE-dechlorinating microbial consortium dominated by Dehalococcoides spp. The results of these experiments demonstrate that butyrate is similarly efficient for TCE dechlorination whether it is injected once or in doses. Moreover, the present work indicates that the addition of butyrate in great excess cannot be avoided, since it most likely provide, even indirectly, significant part of the H2 required. Furthermore, methanogenesis appears to be the major ultimate e(-) accepting process in all experiments, regardless the e(-) donor used and the feeding pattern. Finally, the timing of injection of H2 seems to significantly affect dechlorination performance, since the injection during the early stages improves VC-to-ETH dechlorination and reduce methanogenic activity. PMID:25613854

  8. Electron transport in DNA initiated by diaminonaphthalene donors alternatively bound by non-covalent and covalent association.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Neil P; Rokita, Steven E

    2014-02-21

    Covalent conjugation is typically used to fix a potential charge donor to a chosen site for studying either hole or excess electron transport in duplex DNA. A model system based on oligonucleotides containing an abasic site and (Br)dU was previously developed to provide a rapid method of screening new donors without the need of synthetic chemistry. While this strategy is effective for discovering important lead compounds, it is not appropriate for establishing extensive correlations between molecular structure and donor efficiency as demonstrated with a series of closely related electron donors based on diaminonaphthalene. The non-covalent system accurately identified the ability of the donors to reduce a distal (Br)dU in DNA, but their varying efficiencies were not recapitulated when attached covalently to an equivalent sequence of DNA. Reduction within the covalent system was not sensitive to the strong donor potentials as consistent with charge recombination dominating the net migration of charge. PMID:24398596

  9. Stereochemical Properties of Multidentate Nitrogen Donor Ligands and Their Copper Complexes by Electronic CD and DFT.

    PubMed

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-07-01

    UV-Vis and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy, complemented with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the structural diversities of three multidentate nitrogen donor ligands and two associated copper complexes in solution directly. The three chiral salen ligands all consist of trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine as a chiral scaffold and also of pyridine rings as chromophores, differing only in the linking groups between the two functional groups mentioned above. Very different ECD intensities and somewhat different ECD patterns were observed for these ligands and satisfactorily interpreted theoretically. For the geometry optimization and spectral simulation of the open-shell metal complexes, the LANL2DZ basis set with effective core potential for the Cu and Cl atoms and pure cc-pVTZ for the rest of the atoms was utilized. The performance of the same calculations with the polarization functions (f,g) from the cc-pVTZ basis added to the LANL2DZ basis was compared. While the three ligands exhibit different conformational flexibility, the associated copper complexes show great rigidity imposed by the metal-ligand coordination, taking on a single structure in each case. In addition, dispersion interactions were shown to change the conformational stability ordering of the ligands noticeably and to exert considerable influence on the simulated UV-Vis and ECD spectra. Chirality 28:545-555, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349956

  10. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-11-07

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10{sup -6} that is below the error threshold of 10{sup -4} required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  11. Implanted bismuth donors in 28-Si: Process development and electron spin resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, C. D.; Lo, C. C.; Lang, V.; George, R. E.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Bokor, J.; Lyon, S. A.; Morton, J. J. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2012-02-01

    Spins of donor atoms in silicon are excellent qubit candidates. Isotope engineered substrates provide a nuclear spin free host environment, resulting in long spin coherence times [1,2]. The capability of swapping quantum information between electron and nuclear spins can enable quantum communication and gate operation via the electron spin and quantum memory via the nuclear spin [2]. Spin properties of donor qubit candidates in silicon have been studied mostly for phosphorous and antimony [1-3]. Bismuth donors in silicon exhibit a zero field splitting of 7.4 GHz and have attracted attention as potential nuclear spin memory and spin qubit candidates [4,5] that could be coupled to superconducting resonators [4,6]. We report on progress in the formation of bismuth doped 28-Si epi layers by ion implantation, electrical dopant activation and their study via pulsed electron spin resonance measurements showing narrow linewidths and good coherence times. [4pt] [1] A. M. Tyryshkin, et al. arXiv: 1105.3772 [2] J. J. L. Morton, et al. Nature (2008) [3] T. Schenkel, et al APL 2006; F. R. Bradbury, et al. PRL (2006) [4] R. E. George, et al. PRL (2010) [5] G. W. Morley, et al. Nat Mat (2010) [6] M. Hatridge, et al. PRB (2011), R. Vijay, et al. APL (2010) This work was supported by NSA (100000080295) and DOE (DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  12. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  13. Impact of Electron Donor selection on In-situ Biosequestration of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, S.; Zhong, H.; Abel, E. J.; Field, J.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ biosequestration, wherein electron-donating substrates are injected to promote microbial-associated sequestration of contaminants, is one promising enhanced-attenuation technique for remediation of groundwater containing arsenic, uranium, selenium, and similar constituents. A pilot-scale test of in-situ biosequestration for uranium in groundwater is in process at a former uranium mining site in Monument Valley, Arizona. Complementary bench experiments were conducted to examine the impact of different electron donors on the effectiveness of biosequestration. Aqueous and sediment samples were collected before and after the injection for monitoring changes in sediment properties, mineral geochemical composition, microbial community composition, and microbial activity.

  14. New extended {pi}-electron donors. Tetrathiafulvalene systems with heterocyclic spacer groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.K.; Jensen, F.; Becher, J.

    1992-06-17

    Nine new heterocyclic {pi}-electron donors 10a-c, 11a-c, and 12a-c based upon the well-known TTF (tetrathiafulvalene) system, but incorporating a pyrrole, thiophene, or furan ring between the 1,3-thiole rings, have been synthesized. The compounds show two single-electron reversible oxidation waves in cyclic voltammetry. Some TCNQ complexes and conductivity measurements are reported, indicating the new compounds to be good candidates for {open_quotes}organic metals{close_quotes}. The influence of the central conjugated system on redox properties is discussed using MNDO-PM3 calculations. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurova, N. V. Burdov, V. A.

    2013-12-15

    The results of ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of Si nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P) are reported. It is shown that phosphorus introduces much more significant distortions into the electronic structure of the nanocrystal than lithium, which is due to the stronger central cell potential of the phosphorus ion. It is found that the Li-induced splitting of the ground state in the conduction band of the nanocrystal into the singlet, doublet, and triplet retains its inverse structure typical for bulk silicon.

  16. Effect of donor orientation on ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer in coumarin-amine systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Nath, S; Bhasikuttan, A C; Kumbhakar, M; Mohanty, J; Sarkar, S K; Mukherjee, T; Pal, H

    2008-09-21

    Effect of donor amine orientation on nondiffusive ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in coumarin-amine systems has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion measurements. Intermolecular ET from different aromatic and aliphatic amines used as donor solvents to the excited coumarin-151 (C151) acceptor occurs with ultrafast rates such that the shortest fluorescence lifetime component (tau(1)) is the measure of the fastest ET rate (tau(1)=tau(ET) (fast)=(k(ET) (fast))(-1)), assigned to the C151-amine contact pairs in which amine donors are properly oriented with respect to C151 to maximize the acceptor-donor electronic coupling (V(el)). It is interestingly observed that as the amine solvents are diluted by suitable diluents (either keeping solvent dielectric constant similar or with increasing dielectric constant), the tau(1) remains almost in the similar range as long as the amine dilution does not cross a certain critical limit, which in terms of the amine mole fraction (x(A)) is found to be approximately 0.4 for aromatic amines and approximately 0.8 for aliphatic amines. Beyond these dilutions in the two respective cases of the amine systems, the tau(1) values are seen to increase very sharply. The large difference in the critical x(A) values involving aromatic and aliphatic amine donors has been rationalized in terms of the largely different orientational restrictions for the ET reactions as imposed by the aliphatic (n-type) and aromatic (pi-type) nature of the amine donors [A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008)]. Since the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the n-type aliphatic amines is mostly centralized at the amino nitrogen, only some specific orientations of these amines with respect to the close-contact acceptor dye [also of pi-character; A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008) and E. W. Castner et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2869 (2000)] can give suitable V(el) and thus

  17. Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1988-01-01

    Polymers with conjugated backbones, both polyacetylene and polyaromatic heterocyclic types, are doped with electron-donor agents to increase their electrical conductivity. The electron-donor agents are either electride dopants made in the presence of lithium or dopants derived from alkalides made in the presence of lithium. The dopants also contain a metal such as cesium and a trapping agent such as a crown ether.

  18. Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, R.; Aldissi, M.

    1984-07-27

    Polymers with conjugated backbones, both polyacetylene and polyaromatic heterocyclic types, are doped with electron-donor agents to increase their electrical conductivity. The electron-donor agents are either electride dopants made in the presence of lithium or dopants derived from alkalides made in the presence of lithium. The dopants also contain a metal such as cesium and a trapping agent such as a crown ether.

  19. The Tetrathiafulvalene-based Donor-acceptor Diads for Molecular Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepichka, Dmitrii F.; Bryce, Martin R.; Ho, Gregory; Heath, James R.; Pearson, Christopher; Petty, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    The challenge of covalent linking a strong electron donor (as tetrathiafulvalene, TTF) to a strong acceptor (as tetracyanoquinodimethane, TCNQ) was laid down by Aviram and Ratner, who proposed that a single donor-sigma-acceptor molecule could rectify an electric current. Although numerous organic compounds have been tested in metal-molecule-metal junctions, they had substantially higher HOMO-LUMO gap (Eg >0.5 eV) and, in most cases, high dipole moment due to conjugated character of the linker. Those molecules re-orient in the electric field limiting the device stability. Recently, we have pioneered the synthesis of DsigmaA molecules with the HOMO-LUMO gap 0.17-0.3 eV, including the original TTF-TCNQ.* We will present the intriguing electronic properties of these compounds, including the conformational control of the Eg and the thermoexcited electron transfer. The compounds form high-quality LB films, suitable for molecular electronics applications. In Si-molecule-Ti junctions, the rectification ratio increases as molecules align perpendicularly to the surface, and the device stability override significantly the related system based on D-pi-A molecules. * Perepichka, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 4635.

  20. Collapse of electrons to a donor cluster in SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han; Reich, Konstantin; Shklovskii, Boris

    It is known that when a nucleus has charge Ze where Z > 137 , electrons collapse onto the nucleus resulting in a net charge Zn < Z . This effect is due to the relativistic dispersion law. Here a similar effect is found for a donor cluster in SrTiO3 (STO), but with a different origin (see Phys. Rev. B 92, 035204 (2015)). At low temperatures, STO has an enormously large dielectric constant and the nonlinear dielectric response becomes dominant when the electric field is still small. This leads to the collapse of electrons into a charged spherical donor cluster with radius R when its total charge number Z exceeds a critical value Zc ~= R / a where a is the lattice constant. The net charge Zn e grows with Z until Z exceeds Z* ~=(R / a) 9 / 7 . After this point, the charge of the compact core Zn remains ~=Z* , while the rest Z* electrons form a sparse Thomas-Fermi electron atmosphere around it. We show that the thermal ionization of such two-scale atoms easily strips the outer atmosphere while the inner core remains preserved. We extend our results to the case of long cylindrical clusters. We discuss how our predictions can be tested by measuring conductivity of chain of discs of charge on the STO surface.

  1. Easy Access to NO2 -Containing Donor-Acceptor-Acceptor Electron Donors for High Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Hao-Chun; Yang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Chia-Hsun; Lee, Jiun-Haw; Chang, Jung-Hung; Wu, Chih-I; Chiu, Tien-Lung; Lin, Chi-Feng; Chung, Chin-Lung; Wong, Ken-Tsung

    2016-06-22

    Two donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A)-type molecules incorporating nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBO) as the A-A block and ditolylamine as the D block bridged through a phenylene (PNBO) and a thiophene (TNBO) spacer were synthesized in a one-step coupling reaction. Their electronic, photophysical, and thermal properties; crystallographic analysis; and theoretical calculations were studied to establish a clear structure-property relationship. The results indicate that the quinoidal character of the thiophene bridge strongly governs the structural features and crystal packings (herringbone vs. brickwork) and thus the physical properties of the compounds. PNBO and TNBO were utilized as electron donors combined with C70 as the electron acceptor in the active layer of vacuum-processed bulk heterojunction small-molecule organic solar cells (SMOSCs). The power conversion efficiency of both PNBO- and TNBO-based OSCs exceeded 5 %. The ease of accessibility of PNBO and TNBO demonstrates the potential for simple and economical synthesis of electron donors in vacuum-processed SMOSCs. PMID:27213296

  2. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydride donors: new prospects for efficient multi-electron reduction.

    PubMed

    McSkimming, Alex; Colbran, Stephen B

    2013-06-21

    In biological reduction processes the dihydronicotinamides NAD(P)H often transfer hydride to an unsaturated substrate bound within an enzyme active site. In many cases, metal ions in the active site bind, polarize and thereby activate the substrate to direct attack by hydride from NAD(P)H cofactor. This review looks more widely at the metal coordination chemistry of organic donors of hydride ion--organo-hydrides--such as dihydronicotinamides, other dihydropyridines including Hantzsch's ester and dihydroacridine derivatives, those derived from five-membered heterocycles including the benzimidazolines and benzoxazolines, and all-aliphatic hydride donors such as hexadiene and hexadienyl anion derivatives. The hydride donor properties--hydricities--of organo-hydrides and how these are affected by metal ions are discussed. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydrides is critically surveyed and the use of metal-organo-hydride systems in electrochemically-, photochemically- and chemically-driven reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic (e.g. carbon dioxide) substrates is highlighted. The sustainable electrocatalytic, photochemical or chemical regeneration of organo-hydrides such as NAD(P)H, including for driving enzyme-catalysed reactions, is summarised and opportunities for development are indicated. Finally, new prospects are identified for metal-organo-hydride systems as catalysts for organic transformations involving 'hydride-borrowing' and for sustainable multi-electron reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic substrates directly driven by electricity or light or by renewable reductants such as formate/formic acid. PMID:23507957

  3. Engineering the donor selectivity of D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase for biocatalytic asymmetric cross-aldol additions of glycolaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Szekrenyi, Anna; Soler, Anna; Garrabou, Xavier; Guérard-Hélaine, Christine; Parella, Teodor; Joglar, Jesús; Lemaire, Marielle; Bujons, Jordi; Clapés, Pere

    2014-09-22

    D-Fructose-6-phosphate aldolase (FSA) is a unique catalyst for asymmetric cross-aldol additions of glycolaldehyde. A combination of a structure-guided approach of saturation mutagenesis, site-directed mutagenesis, and computational modeling was applied to construct a set of FSA variants that improved the catalytic efficiency towards glycolaldehyde dimerization up to 1800-fold. A combination of mutations in positions L107, A129, and A165 provided a toolbox of FSA variants that expand the synthetic possibilities towards the preparation of aldose-like carbohydrate compounds. The new FSA variants were applied as highly efficient catalysts for cross-aldol additions of glycolaldehyde to N-carbobenzyloxyaminoaldehydes to furnish between 80-98 % aldol adduct under optimized reaction conditions. Donor competition experiments showed high selectivity for glycolaldehyde relative to dihydroxyacetone or hydroxyacetone. These results demonstrate the exceptional malleability of the active site in FSA, which can be remodeled to accept a wide spectrum of donor and acceptor substrates with high efficiency and selectivity. PMID:25146467

  4. Triazole bridges as versatile linkers in electron donor-acceptor conjugates

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Schuster, David I.; Fazio, Michael A; Lee, Olivia P.; Haley, Christopher K.; Ortiz, Angy L.; Echegoyen, Luis; Clark, Timothy; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic triazoles have been frequently used as π-conjugated linkers in intramolecular electron transfer processes. To gain a deeper understanding of the electron mediating function of triazoles, we have synthesized a family of new triazole-based electron donor-acceptor conjugates. We have connected porphyrins and fullerenes through a central triazole moiety – (ZnP-Tri-C60) – each with a single change in their connection through the linker. An extensive photophysical and computational investigation reveals that the electron transfer dynamics – charge separation and charge recombination – in the different ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates reflect a significant influence of the connectivity at the triazole linker. Except for m4m-ZnP-Tri-C60 17, the conjugates exhibit through-bond electron transfer with varying rate constants. Since the through-bond distance is nearly equal in the ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates, the variation in charge separation and charge recombination dynamics is mainly associated with the electronic properties of the conjugates, including orbital energies, electron affinity, and the energies of the excited states. The changes of the electronic couplings are, in turn, a consequence of the different connectivity patterns at the triazole moieties. PMID:21702513

  5. Spin relaxation of conduction electrons by inelastic scattering with neutral donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2015-03-01

    At low temperatures in n-doped semiconductors, a significant fraction of shallow donor sites are occupied by electrons, neutralizing the impurity core charge in equilibrium. Inelastic scattering by externally-injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions within the manifold of these localized states. Promotion into highly spin-mixed excited states results in spin relaxation that couples strongly to the conduction electrons by exchange interaction. Through experiments with silicon spin transport devices and complementary theory, we reveal the consequences of this previously unknown depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold and into the ``deep inelastic'' regime. This work is supported by NSF under Contracts ECCS-1231570 and ECCS-1231855, by DTRA under Contract HDTRA1-13-1-0013, and by ONR under Contract N000141410317.

  6. Donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Pagona, Georgia; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor-acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor-acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed. PMID:25247140

  7. Influence of different electron donors and acceptors on dehalorespiration of tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritse, J.; Drzyzga, O.; Kloetstra, G.; Keijmel, M.; Wiersum, L.P.; Hutson, R.; Collins, M.D.; Gottschal, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethane (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 {micro}m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35 C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H{sub 2}, format, L-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except format and H{sub 2}) are oxidized to acetate and CO{sub 2}. when L-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumate or nitrate.

  8. Aquifer denitrification and in situ mesocosms: Modeling electron donor contributions and measuring rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, Scott F.; Schuh, William M.; Tesfay, Tedros; Spencer, Eben J.

    2012-04-01

    SummaryIn situ denitrification rates were measured in a shallow unconfined glaciofluvial aquifer that had undergone large-scale nitrate contamination. Denitrification rates and isotopic enrichment factors, ɛ, were measured using three tracer tests in two aquifer in situ mesocosms (ISMs). Denitrification rates were also measured using a mass balance method using water samples from multiport samplers. First-order kinetic rates (k) best described the denitrification rates measured. ISM kinetic rates ranged from 0.00049/d to 0.0031/d and ɛ values ranged from -4.86‰ to -9.34‰; a linear relationship between k and ɛ values showed greater fractionation (more negative ɛ values) associated with higher rates. For the mass balance method, k values ranged from 0.0028/d to 0.0041/d. Combined mineralogical analysis, water quality data from the ISMs, and geochemical models using PHREEQC indicated that contributions of major electron donors to denitrification were 43-92% by organic carbon, 4-18% by pyrite, and 2-43% by non-pyritic ferrous iron, depending on the sample date and the type of amphibole used as the electron donor for ferrous iron. ISMs show promise as a tool for hydrogeochemical investigations. They are large enough to allow long-term sampling of aquifer denitrification tracer tests (>2 years), they may be used, with the modeling methodology shown herein, to estimate relative e- donor contributions, and they limit the influence of advection and mechanical dispersion on the amended water within the chamber.

  9. Efficient photoinduced orthogonal energy and electron transfer reactions via phospholipid membrane-bound donors and acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, P.J.; Armitage, B.; Roosa, P.; O'Brien, D.F. )

    1994-10-05

    A three component, liposome-bound photochemical molecular device (PMD) consisting of energy and electron transfer reactions is described. Bilayer membrane surface-associated dyes, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)-phenyl]-21H,2 3H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate salt and N,N[prime]-bis[(3-trimethylammonio)propyl]thiadicarbocya nine tribromide, are the energy donor and acceptor, respectively, in a blue light stimulated energy transfer reaction along the vesicle surface. The electronically excited cyanine is quenched by electron transfer from the phospholipid membrane bound triphenylbenzyl borate anion, which is located in the lipid bilayer interior. The PMD exhibits sequential reactions following electronic excitation with the novel feature that the steps proceed with orthogonal orientation: energy transfer occurs parallel to the membrane surface, and electron transfer occurs perpendicular to the surface. Photobleaching and fluorescence quenching experiments verify the transfer reactions, and Stern-Volmer analysis was used to estimate the reaction rate constants. At the highest concentrations examined of energy and electron acceptor ca. 60% of the photoexcited porphyrins were quenched by energy transfer to the cyanine. 56 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Characterization of U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments with slow-degrading electron donor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Earles, J.; Phillips, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C.; Criddle, C. S.; Jardine, P. M.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    In order to select sustainable, high efficiency and cost effective electron donor source, oleate and emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) were tested uranium (VI) reduction in comparison with ethanol in microcosms using uranium contaminated sediments and groundwater from the US DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site. The effect of initial sulfate concentration on U(VI) reduction was also tested. Both oleate and EVO were effective electron donor sources for U(VI) reduction. Accumulation of acetate as a major product and the removal of aqueous U(VI) were observed and were associated with sulfate reduction. Both oleate and EVO supported U(VI) reduction but at slower rates with a comparable but slightly lower extent of reduction than ethanol. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The extent of U(VI) reduction in solid phase was negatively influenced by aqueous calcium concentration. The majority of electrons of the three substrates were consumed by sulfate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and methanogenesis. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 versus 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase. At the higher initial sulfate concentration more U(VI) was reduced and fewer electrons were used in methanogenesis. Analysis of bacterial and archeal populations using 16S rRNA gene libraries showed a significant increase in Deltaproteobacteria after biostimulation. The microbial community structures developed with oleate and EVO were significantly distinct from those developed with ethanol. Bacteria similar to Desulforegula spp. was predominant for oleate and EVO degradation but were not observed in ethanol-amended microcosms. Known U(VI)-reducing bacteria in the microcosms amended with the three electron donor sources included iron(III) reducing Geobacter spp. but in lower abundances than sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio spp. The

  11. Spectral Fine Tuning of Cyanine Dyes: Electron Donor-Acceptor Substituted Analogues of Thiazole Orange†

    PubMed Central

    Rastede, Elizabeth E.; Tanha, Matteus; Yaron, David; Watkins, Simon C.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Armitage, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of electron donor and acceptor groups at strategic locations on a fluorogenic cyanine dye allows fine-tuning of the absorption and emission spectra while preserving the ability of the dye to bind to biomolecular hosts such as double-stranded DNA and a single-chain antibody fragment originally selected for binding to the parent unsubstituted dye, thiazole orange (TO). The observed spectral shifts are consistent with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and reflect electron density localization on the quinoline half of TO in the LUMO. A dye bearing donating methoxy and withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups on the benzothiazole and quinoline rings, respectively, shifts the absorption spectrum to sufficiently longer wavelengths to allow excitation at green wavelengths as opposed to the parent dye, which is optimally excited in the blue. PMID:26171668

  12. Spectral fine tuning of cyanine dyes: electron donor-acceptor substituted analogues of thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Rastede, Elizabeth E; Tanha, Matteus; Yaron, David; Watkins, Simon C; Waggoner, Alan S; Armitage, Bruce A

    2015-09-26

    The introduction of electron donor and acceptor groups at strategic locations on a fluorogenic cyanine dye allows fine-tuning of the absorption and emission spectra while preserving the ability of the dye to bind to biomolecular hosts such as double-stranded DNA and a single-chain antibody fragment originally selected for binding to the parent unsubstituted dye, thiazole orange (TO). The observed spectral shifts are consistent with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and reflect electron density localization on the quinoline half of TO in the LUMO. A dye bearing donating methoxy and withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups on the benzothiazole and quinoline rings, respectively, shifts the absorption spectrum to sufficiently longer wavelengths to allow excitation at green wavelengths as opposed to the parent dye, which is optimally excited in the blue. PMID:26171668

  13. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence evidence in non-bonding transition electron donor-acceptor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marghad, Ikbal; Clochard, M. C.; Ollier, N.; Wade, Travis L.; Aymes-Chodur, C.; Renaud, C.; Zissis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The exhibition of thermally activated delayed fluorescence on triazine derivative by the introduction of a nonbonding part is demonstrated. Two molecules containing triazine core as acceptor and carbazole part as donor has been synthesized and characterized. One of these molecules bears an additional nonbonding part by the means of a phenoxy group. The results indicated that the molecule bearing the nonbonding molecular part (phenoxy) exhibit thermally activated delayed fluorescence while not on molecule free of non-bonding group. The results are supported by, photoluminescence, spectral analysis time-resolved fluorescence and time-dependent density functional estimation

  14. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R

    2016-04-14

    We study the electronic structure of C60 fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C60-pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C60 fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex. PMID:27083718

  15. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.

    2016-04-01

    We study the electronic structure of C60 fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C60-pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C60 fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex.

  16. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivities of Iminosulfane- and Phosphane-Stabilized Carbones Exhibiting Four-Electron Donor Ability.

    PubMed

    Morosaki, Tomohito; Wang, Wei-Wei; Nagase, Shigeru; Fujii, Takayoshi

    2015-10-19

    Iminosulfane(phosphane)carbon(0) derivatives (iSPCs; Ar3 P→C←SPh2 (NMe); Ar=Ph (1), 4-MeOC6 H4 (2), 4-(Me2 N)C6 H4 (3)) have been successfully synthesized and the molecular structure of 3 characterized. Carbone 3 is the first thermally and hydrolytically stable carbone stabilized by phosphorus and sulfur ligands. DFT calculations reveal the electronic structures of 1-3, which have two lone pairs of electrons at the carbon center. First and second proton affinity values are theoretically calculated to be in the range of 286.8-301.1 and 189.6-208.3 kcal mol(-1) , respectively. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the HOMO energy levels follow the order of 3>2>1 and the HOMO of 3 is at a higher energy than those of bis(chalcogenane)carbon(0) (BChCs). The reactivities of these lone pairs of electrons are demonstrated by the C-diaurated and C-proton-aurated complexes. These results are the first experimental evidence of phosphorus- and sulfur-stabilized carbones behaving as four-electron donors. In addition, the reaction of hydrochloric salts of the carbones with Ag2 O gives the corresponding Ag(I) complexes. The resulting silver(I) carbone complexes can be used as carbone transfer agents. This synthetic protocol can also be used for moisture-sensitive carbone species. PMID:26471447

  17. Understanding the charge-transfer phenomena between prototypical electron-donors and acceptors: TTF-TCNQ as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changwon; Atalla, Viktor; Smith, Sean; Yoon, Mina

    2014-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the charge transfer between the conventional electron donor and acceptor molecules is independent of their relative configurations and electrons are always transferred from the molecule with the lower ionization potential, the electron-donor, to the high electron affinity molecule, the electron-acceptor. Conventional first-principles density functional theory (DFT) supports this conclusion. However, the computational results are dominated by a term in the DFT exchange-correlation functional, which often results in qualitatively and quantitatively wrong conclusion due to an artifact. In our study of prototypical electron donor-acceptor molecules, TTF-TCNQ, we show that the conventional electronic picture is not valid and the relative orientation between TTF and TCNQ is equally important as the electronic structure of the individual molecules. Our results show that the current understanding of the donor-acceptor interaction and charge transfer mechanism has to be modified. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Efficient end-capping synthesis of neutral donor-acceptor [2]rotaxanes under additive-free and mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Domoto, Yuya; Sase, Shohei; Goto, Kei

    2014-11-24

    Efficient end-capping synthesis of neutral donor-acceptor (D-A) [2]rotaxanes without loading any catalysts or activating agents was achieved by utilizing high reactivity of a pentacoordinated hydrosilane toward salicylic acid derivatives. As components of [2]rotaxanes, an electron-deficient naphthalenediimide-containing axle with a salicylic acid terminus and several electron-rich bis(naphthocrown) ether macrocycles were employed. End-capping reactions with the pentacoordinated hydrosilane underwent smoothly even at low temperature to afford the corresponding [2]rotaxanes in good yields. A [2]rotaxane containing bis-1,5-(dinaphtho)-38-crown-10 ether as a wheel molecule was synthesized and isolated in 84% yield by the end-capping at -10 °C, presenting the highest yield ever reported for the end-capping synthesis of a neutral D-A [2]rotaxane. It was found that the yields of the [2]rotaxanes in the end-capping reactions were almost parallel to the formation ratios of the corresponding pseudo[2]rotaxanes estimated by utilizing model systems. These results indicate that the end-capping reaction using the pentacoordinated hydrosilane proceeded without perturbing the threading process, and most of the pseudo[2]rotaxanes underwent efficient end-capping reaction even at low temperature. PMID:25284148

  19. Sub-additivity in Electron Emission from GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunkow, Evan; Clayburn, Nathan; Becker, Maria; Jones, Eric; Batelaan, Herman; Gay, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    When two spatially-overlapped laser pulses (775 nm center wavelength, 75 fs duration) are incident on an untreated <100> GaAs crystal surface, the electron emission rate depends on the temporal separation between the two pulses. We have shown that for delays between 0.2 and 1000ps, the emission rate is ``sub-additive'', i.e., is lower than when the beams have separation >> 1 ns. We believe the cause of this sub-additivity is an increase in reflectance and transmittance due to electrons occupying the excited state of the GaAs. We are now able to manipulate the magnitude of the sub-additivity by changing the number of electrons that are in the excited state. Sub-additivity is not observed with tungsten tip surfaces which have no excited state. Funded by NSF PHY-1505794, EPSCoR IIIA-1430519, and NSF 1306565 (HB).

  20. Influence of Electron Donor Type and Concentration on Microbial Population Structure During Uranium Reduction and Remobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, R. A.; Brodie, E. L.; Kim, Y.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Desantis, T. Z.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Firestone, M. K.

    2007-12-01

    Enhanced reductive precipitation of U(VI) through stimulation of indigenous microorganisms is an attractive, low- cost strategy for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwaters and sediments. The rate of organic carbon (OC) supply determines not only the amount of electron donor available for bioreduction of U(VI), but also affects the resulting concentration of aqueous (bi)carbonate generated by microbial respiration. Increased (bi)carbonate concentrations drive aqueous U(VI) concentrations to higher levels and make U(IV) oxidation under reducing conditions favorable. We designed a long-term column study to investigate the effects of different OC forms and supply rates on the stability of bioreduced U and on the structure and dynamics of the microbial communities. OC was supplied as acetate or lactate at four different concentrations and columns were sampled at three time points. In the columns receiving high OC supply the time points correspond to a phases of net U-reduction, U(IV) reoxidation and U(VI) remobilization, and stable levels of U mobilization. DNA was extracted from column sediments, 16S rRNA genes were amplified and the communities analyzed using a high-density phylogenetic microarray (PhyloChip). Lactate and acetate supplied at equivalent rates had a similar impact on uranium mobility with higher OC resulting in re-oxidation of U(IV) after an initial period of U(VI) reduction. Similarly, organic carbon (OC) supply rate, not OC form, had the largest impact on microbial community structure. The diversity (richness) of bacterial and archaeal communities increased over time with those receiving lactate having higher initial richness. Known U-reducing bacteria were present in all columns and time points, however the dynamics of these organisms varied with both organic carbon supply rate and form. This data demonstrates that the initial rate of electron donor supply during heavy metal remediation strongly impacts microbial community development

  1. Tuning the Electronic Coupling and Electron Transfer in Mo2 Donor-Acceptor Systems by Variation of the Bridge Conformation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mei Ting; Meng, Miao; Tan, Ying Ning; Cheng, Tao; Liu, Chun Y

    2016-02-24

    Assembling two quadruply bonded dimolybdenum units [Mo2 (DAniF)3 ](+) (DAniF=N,N'-di(p-anisyl)formamidinate) with 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate and its thiolated derivatives produced three complexes [{Mo2 (DAniF)3 }2 (μ-1,4-O2 CC10 H6 CO2 )], [{Mo2 (DAniF)3 }2 (μ-1,4-OSCC10 H6 COS)], and [{Mo2 (DAniF)3 }2 (μ-1,4-S2 CC10 H6 CS2 )]. In the X-ray structures, the naphthalene bridge deviates from the plane defined by the two Mo-Mo bond vectors with the torsion angle increasing as the chelating atoms of the bridging ligand vary from O to S. The mixed-valent species exhibit intervalence transition absorption bands with high energy and very low intensity. In comparison with the data for the phenylene analogues, the optically determined electronic coupling matrix elements (Hab =258-345 cm(-1) ) are lowered by a factor of two or more, and the electron-transfer rate constants (ket ≈10(11)  s(-1) ) are reduced by about one order of magnitude. These results show that, when the electron-transporting ability of the bridge and electron-donating (electron-accepting) ability of the donor (acceptor) are both variable, the former plays a dominant role in controlling the intramolecular electron transfer. DFT calculations revealed that increasing the torsion angle enlarges the HOMO-LUMO energy gap by elevating the (bridging) ligand-based LUMO energy. Therefore, our experimental results and theoretical analyses verify the superexchange mechanism for electronic coupling and electron transfer. PMID:26807909

  2. Dissimilatory arsenate reduction with sulfide as electron donor: Experiments with Mono Lake water and isolation of strain MLMS-1, a chemoautotrophic arsenate respirer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoeft, S.E.; Kulp, T.R.; Stolz, J.F.; Hollibaugh, J.T.; Oremland, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    Anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, can biologically reduce added arsenate without any addition of electron donors. Of the possible in situ inorganic electron donors present, only sulfide was sufficiently abundant to drive this reaction. We tested the ability of sulfide to serve as an electron donor for arsenate reduction in experiments with lake water. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite occurred simultaneously with the removal of sulfide. No loss of sulfide occurred in controls without arsenate or in sterilized samples containing both arsenate and sulfide. The rate of arsenate reduction in lake water was dependent on the amount of available arsenate. We enriched for a bacterium that could achieve growth with sulfide and arsenate in a defined, mineral medium and purified it by serial dilution. The isolate, strain MLMS-1, is a gram-negative, motile curved rod that grows by oxidizing sulfide to sulfate while reducing arsenate to arsenite. Chemoautotrophy was confirmed by the incorporation of H14CO3- into dark-incubated cells, but preliminary gene probing tests with primers for ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase did not yield PCR-amplified products. Alignment of 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain MLMS-1 was in the ??-Proteobacteria, located near sulfate reducers like Desulfobulbus sp. (88 to 90% similarity) but more closely related (97%) to unidentified sequences amplified previously from Mono Lake. However, strain MLMS-1 does not grow with sulfate as its electron acceptor.

  3. Stibinidene and Bismuthinidene as Two-Electron Donors for Transition Metals (Co and Mn).

    PubMed

    Vránová, Iva; Alonso, Mercedes; Jambor, Roman; Růžička, Aleš; Erben, Milan; Dostál, Libor

    2016-05-23

    The reaction of stibinidene and bismuthinidene ArM [where Ar=C6 H3 -2,6-(CH=NtBu)2 ; M=Sb (1), Bi (2)] with transition metal (TM) carbonyls Co2 (CO)8 and Mn2 (CO)10 produced unprecedented ionic complexes [(ArM)2 Co(CO)3 ](+) [Co(CO)4 ](-) and [(ArM)2 Mn(CO)4 ](+) [Mn(CO)5 ](-) [where M=Sb (3, 5), Bi (4, 6)]. The pnictinidenes 1 and 2 behaved as two-electron donors in this set of compounds. Besides the M→TM bonds, the topological analysis also revealed a number of secondary interactions contributing to the stabilization of cationic parts of titled complexes. PMID:26994732

  4. An unconventional halogen bond with carbene as an electron donor: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingzhong; Wang, Yilei; Liu, Zhenbo; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Gong, Baoan; Sun, Jiazhong

    2009-02-01

    An unconventional halogen bond has been proved to exist in H2C-BrH complex. The halogen bond energy of H2C-BrH complex is calculated at four levels of theory [MP2, MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)]. The result shows that the carbene is a better electron donor. The substitution effect is prominent in this interaction. For example, the interaction energy in H2C-BrCN complex is increased by more than 300% relative to H2C-BrH complex. The analyses of NBO, AIM, and energy components were used to unveil the nature of the interaction. The results show that this novel halogen bond has similar characteristics to hydrogen bonds.

  5. Effect of electron donors on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by a marine Desulfovibrio sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Donovan, Katie; Templer, Stefanie P.; Bosak, Tanja

    2011-08-01

    Sulfur isotope effects produced by microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction are used to reconstruct the coupled cycling of carbon and sulfur through geologic time, to constrain the evolution of sulfur-based metabolisms, and to track the oxygenation of Earth's surface. In this study, we investigate how the coupling of carbon and sulfur metabolisms in batch and continuous cultures of a recently isolated marine sulfate reducing bacterium DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio sp ., influences the fractionation of sulfur isotopes. DMSS-1 grown in batch culture on seven different electron donors (ethanol, glycerol, fructose, glucose, lactate, malate and pyruvate) fractionates 34S/ 32S ratio from 6‰ to 44‰, demonstrating that the fractionations by an actively growing culture of a single incomplete oxidizing sulfate reducing microbe can span almost the entire range of previously reported values in defined cultures. The magnitude of isotope effect correlates well with cell specific sulfate reduction rates (from 0.7 to 26.1 fmol/cell/day). DMSS-1 grown on lactate in continuous culture produces a larger isotope effect (21-37‰) than the lactate-grown batch culture (6‰), indicating that the isotope effect also depends on the supply rate of the electron donor and microbial growth rate. The largest isotope effect in continuous culture is accompanied by measurable changes in cell length and cellular yield that suggest starvation. The use of multiple sulfur isotopes in the model of metabolic fluxes of sulfur shows that the loss of sulfate from the cell and the intracellular reoxidation of reduced sulfur species contribute to the increase in isotope effects in a correlated manner. Isotope fractionations produced during sulfate reduction in the pure culture of DMSS-1 expand the previously reported range of triple sulfur isotope effects ( 32S, 33S, and 34S) by marine sulfate reducing bacteria, implying that microbial sulfur disproportionation may have a smaller 33S isotopic fingerprint

  6. Complete perchlorate reduction using methane as the sole electron donor and carbon source.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ran; Wen, Li-Lian; Meng, Fan; Zhang, Yin; Lai, Chun-Yu; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zhao, He-Ping; Zheng, Ping

    2015-02-17

    Using a CH4-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR), we studied perchlorate (ClO4(-)) reduction by a biofilm performing anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (ANMO-D). We focused on the effects of nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) surface loadings on ClO4(-) reduction and on the biofilm community's mechanism for ClO4(-) reduction. The ANMO-D biofilm reduced up to 5 mg/L of ClO4(-) to a nondetectable level using CH4 as the only electron donor and carbon source when CH4 delivery was not limiting; NO3(-) was completely reduced as well when its surface loading was ≤ 0.32 g N/m(2)-d. When CH4 delivery was limiting, NO3(-) inhibited ClO4(-) reduction by competing for the scarce electron donor. NO2(-) inhibited ClO4(-) reduction when its surface loading was ≥ 0.10 g N/m(2)-d, probably because of cellular toxicity. Although Archaea were present through all stages, Bacteria dominated the ClO4(-)-reducing ANMO-D biofilm, and gene copies of the particulate methane mono-oxygenase (pMMO) correlated to the increase of respiratory gene copies. These pieces of evidence support that ClO4(-) reduction by the MBfR biofilm involved chlorite (ClO2(-)) dismutation to generate the O2 needed as a cosubstrate for the mono-oxygenation of CH4. PMID:25594559

  7. Donor ionization in size controlled silicon nanocrystals: The transition from defect passivation to free electron generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, I. F.; Papachristodoulou, N.; Halsall, M. P.; Hylton, N. P.; Hulko, O.; Knights, A. P.; Yang, P.; Gwilliam, R. M.; Shah, M.; Kenyon, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the photoluminescence spectra of silicon and phosphorus co-implanted silica thin films on (100) silicon substrates as a function of isothermal annealing time. The rapid phase segregation, formation, and growth dynamics of intrinsic silicon nanocrystals are observed, in the first 600 s of rapid thermal processing, using dark field mode X-TEM. For short annealing times, when the nanocrystal size distribution exhibits a relatively small mean diameter, formation in the presence of phosphorus yields an increase in the luminescence intensity and a blue shift in the emission peak compared with intrinsic nanocrystals. As the mean size increases with annealing time, this enhancement rapidly diminishes and the peak energy shifts further to the red than the intrinsic nanocrystals. These results indicate the existence of competing pathways for the donor electron, which depends strongly on the nanocrystal size. In samples containing a large density of relatively small nanocrystals, the tendency of phosphorus to accumulate at the nanocrystal-oxide interface means that ionization results in a passivation of dangling bond (Pb-centre) type defects, through a charge compensation mechanism. As the size distribution evolves with isothermal annealing, the density of large nanocrystals increases at the expense of smaller nanocrystals, through an Ostwald ripening mechanism, and the majority of phosphorus atoms occupy substitutional lattice sites within the nanocrystals. As a consequence of the smaller band-gap, ionization of phosphorus donors at these sites increases the free carrier concentration and opens up an efficient, non-radiative de-excitation route for photo-generated electrons via Auger recombination. This effect is exacerbated by an enhanced diffusion in phosphorus doped glasses, which accelerates silicon nanocrystal growth.

  8. Dependence on membrane components of methanogenesis from methyl-CoM with formaldehyde or molecular hydrogen as electron donors.

    PubMed

    Deppenmeier, U; Blaut, M; Gottschalk, G

    1989-12-01

    Methane formation from 2-(methylthio)-ethanesulfonate (methyl-CoM) and H2 by the soluble fraction from the methanogenic bacterium strain Gö1 was stimulated up to tenfold by the addition of the membrane fraction. This stimulation was observed with membranes from various methanogenic species belonging to different phylogenetic families, but not with membranes from Escherichia coli or Acetobacterium woodii. Treatment of the membranes with strong oxidants, i.e. O2 and K3[Fe(CN)6], or with SH reagents, i.e. Ag+, p-chloromercuribenzoate or iodoacetamide, caused an irreversible decrease or loss in stimulatory activity, as did heat treatment at temperatures above 78 degrees C. Methanogenesis from methyl-CoM with formaldehyde instead of H2 as electron donor depended similarly on the membrane fraction. With membranes, 1 mol HCHO was oxidized to 1 mol CO2 and allowed the formation of 2 mol CH4 from 2 mol CH3-CoM. Without membranes, per mol of HCHO oxidized 1 mol H2 was formed and 1 mol CH4 was produced from CH3-CoM; the rate was 10-20% of that in the presence of membranes. When methyl-CoM was replaced by an artificial electron acceptor system consisting of methylviologen and metronidazole, the formaldehyde-oxidizing activity was no longer stimulated by the membrane fraction. These results demonstrate for the first time an essential function of membrane components in methanogenic electron transfer. PMID:2513188

  9. The Nature of the Donor Motif in Acceptor-Bridge-Donor Dyes as an Influence in the Electron Photo-Injection Mechanism in DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Ximena; Schott-Verdugo, Stephan; Rodriguez-Serrano, Angela; Schott, Eduardo

    2016-03-10

    The combination and balance of acceptor(A)-bridge-donor(D) architecture of molecules confer suitable attributes and/or properties to act as efficient light-harvesting and sensitizers in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). An important process in a DSSC performance is the electron photoinjection (PI) mechanism which can take place either via type I (indirect), that consists in injecting from the excited state of the dye to the semiconductor, or type II (direct), where the PI is from the ground state of the dye to the semiconductor upon photoexcitation. Here, we present a computational study about the role of the donor motif in the PI mechanisms displayed from a family of 11 A-bridge-D structured dyes to a (TiO2)15 anatase cluster. To this end, different donor motifs (D1-D11) were evaluated while the A and bridge motifs remained the same. All the computations were carried out within the DFT framework, using the B3LYP, PW91, PBE, M06L and CAM-B3LYP functionals. The 6-31G(d) basis set was employed for nonmetallic atoms and the LANL2DZ pseudopotential for Ti atoms. The solvation effects were incorporated using the polarized continuum model (PCM) for acetonitrile. As benchmark systems, alizarin and naphthalenediol dyes were analyzed, as they are known to undergo Type I and Type II PI pathways in DSSCs, respectively. Donors in the studied family of dyes could influence to drive Type I or II PI since it was found that D2 could show some Type II PI route, showing a new absorption band, although with CAM-B3LYP this shows a very low oscillator strength, while the remaining dyes behave according to Type I photoinjectors. Finally, the photovoltaic parameters that govern the light absorption process were evaluated, as the use of these criteria could be applied to predict the efficiency of the studied dyes in DSSCs devices. PMID:26900717

  10. Theory and computational modeling: Medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling in electron transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Feldberg, S.W.; Smalley, J.F.

    1998-03-01

    The continuing goal is to convert the rapidly accumulating mechanistic information about electron transfer (et) kinetics (often representable in terms of simple rate constants) into precise tools for fine-tuned control of the kinetics and for design of molecular-based systems which meet specified et characteristics. The present treatment will be limited to the kinetic framework defined by the assumption of transition state theory (TST). The primary objective of this paper is to report recent advances in the theoretical formulation, calculation, and analysis of energetics and electronic coupling pertinent to et in complex molecular aggregates. The control of et kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, both system energetics (especially reorganization energies (E{sub r}) and free energy changes ({Delta}G{sup 0})) and electronic coupling of local D and A sites, which for thermal processes is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate (i.e., the transition state). The authors first discuss TST rate constant models, emphasizing genetic features, but also noting some special features arising when metal electrodes are involved. They then turn to a consideration of detailed aspects of medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling. With these theoretical tools in hand, they examine the results of recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry and electrostatics, together with detailed analysis of the numerical results and comparison with recent electrochemical kinetic data.

  11. An artificial electron donor supported catalytic cycle of Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P450{sub cam}

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Swati . E-mail: swati@scripps.edu; Murugan, Rajamanickam; Mitra, Samaresh

    2005-09-23

    Putidaredoxin (PdX), the physiological effector of cytochrome P450{sub cam} (P450{sub cam}), serves to gate electron transfer into oxy-P450{sub cam} during the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. Redox-linked structural changes in PdX are necessary for the effective P450{sub cam} turnover reaction. PdX is believed to be difficult to be replaced by an artificial electron donor in the reaction pathway of P450{sub cam}. We demonstrate that the catalytic cycle of wild-type P450{sub cam} can be supported in the presence of an artificial reductant, potassium ferrocyanide. Upon rapid mixing of ferrocyanide ion with P450{sub cam}, we observed an intermediate with spectral features characteristic of compound I. The rate constant for the formation of compound I in the presence of ferrocyanide supported reaction cycle was found to be comparable to the ones observed for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} supported compound I formation in wild-type P450{sub cam}, but was much lower than those observed for classical peroxidases. The results presented in this paper form the first kinetic analysis of this intermediate for an artificial electron-driven P450{sub cam} catalytic pathway in solution.

  12. Self-assembly properties of semiconducting donor-acceptor-donor bithienyl derivatives of tetrazine and thiadiazole-effect of the electron accepting central ring.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Joanna; Knor, Marek; Jaroch, Tomasz; Maranda-Niedbala, Agnieszka; Kurach, Ewa; Kotwica, Kamil; Nowakowski, Robert; Djurado, David; Pecaut, Jacques; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Pron, Adam

    2013-11-26

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study the effect of the electron-accepting unit and the alkyl substituent's position on the type and extent of 2D supramolecular organization of penta-ring donor-acceptor-donor (DAD) semiconductors, consisting of either tetrazine or thiadiazole central acceptor ring symmetrically attached to two bithienyl groups. Microscopic observations of monomolecular layers on HOPG of four alkyl derivatives of the studied adsorbates indicate significant differences in their 2D organizations. Ordered monolayers of thiadiazole derivatives are relatively loose and, independent of the position of alkyl substituents, characterized by large intermolecular separation of acceptor units in the adjacent molecules located in the face-to-face configuration. The 2D supramolecular architecture in both derivatives of thiadiazole is very sensitive to the alkyl substituent's position. Significantly different behavior is observed for derivatives of tetrazine (which is a stronger electron acceptor). Stronger intermolecular DA interactions in these adsorbates generate an intermolecular shift in the monolayer, which is a dominant factor determining the 2D structural organization. As a consequence of this molecular arrangement, tetrazine groups (A segments) face thiophene rings (D segments) of the neighboring molecules. Monolayers of tetrazine derivatives are therefore much more densely packed and characterized by similar π-stacking of molecules independently of the position of alkyl substituents. Moreover, a comparative study of 3D supramolecular organization, deduced from the X-ray diffraction patterns, is also presented clearly confirming the polymorphism of the studied adsorbates. PMID:24228736

  13. Analysis of electron donors in photosystems in oxygenic photosynthesis by photo-CIDNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Najdanova, M; Janssen, G J; de Groot, H J M; Matysik, J; Alia, A

    2015-11-01

    Both photosystem I and photosystem II are considerably similar in molecular architecture but they operate at very different electrochemical potentials. The origin of the different redox properties of these RCs is not yet clear. In recent years, insight was gained into the electronic structure of photosynthetic cofactors through the application of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) with magic-angle spinning NMR (MAS NMR). Non-Boltzmann populated nuclear spin states of the radical pair lead to strongly enhanced signal intensities that allow one to observe the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect from both photosystem I and II from isolated reaction center of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and duckweed (Spirodela oligorrhiza) and from the intact cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis by (13)C and (15)N MAS NMR. This review provides an overview on the photo-CIDNP MAS NMR studies performed on PSI and PSII that provide important ingredients toward reconstruction of the electronic structures of the donors in PSI and PSII. PMID:26282679

  14. Electronic Structure of Hydrogen Donors in Semiconductors and Insulators Probed by Muon Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Koichiro; Ito, Takashi U.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators plays a crucial role in their electric conductivity. Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts have been made to establish this hypothesis in the last decade, and the muon spin rotation technique has played a pioneering role. Positive muons implanted into such low-carrier systems often form a muonium (an analogue of hydrogen, the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Although its dynamical aspect may be different from the heavier hydrogen, the electronic structure of the muonium is expected to be identical to that of hydrogen after a small correction of the reduced mass (˜0.4%). Since the discovery of a shallow muonium in CdS, its properties have been intensively studied in many semiconductors and insulators, and then it was interpreted as a possible origin of n-type conductivity under the context of a classical shallow donor model. In this article, we will describe the principle of muonium experiments and survey recent achievements in this field.

  15. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer in donor-bridge-nanoparticle acceptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengye; Snoeberger, Robert C; Issac, Abey; Stockwell, David; Batista, Victor S; Lian, Tianquan

    2010-11-18

    Photoinduced interfacial electron transfer (IET) in sulforhodamine B (SRhB)-aminosilane-Tin oxide (SnO(2)) nanoparticle donor-bridge-acceptor complexes has been studied on a single molecule and ensemble average level. On both SnO(2) and ZrO(2), the sum of single molecule fluorescence decays agree with the ensemble average results, suggesting complete sampling of molecules under single molecule conditions. Shorter fluorescence lifetime on SnO(2) than on ZrO(2) is observed and attributed to IET from SRhB to SnO(2). Single molecule lifetimes fluctuate with time and vary among different molecules, suggesting both static and dynamic IET heterogeneity in this system. Computational modeling of the complexes shows a distribution of molecular conformation, leading to a distribution of electronic coupling strengths and ET rates. It is likely that the conversion between these conformations led to the fluctuation of ET rate and fluorescence lifetime on the single molecule level. PMID:20225886

  16. FdhTU-modulated formate dehydrogenase expression and electron donor availability enhance recovery of Campylobacter jejuni following host cell infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni fdhTU reveals a role in formate dehydrogenase activity and implications for electron donor requirements during the pathogen-host cell interaction. Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne bacterial pathogen which colonizes the intestinal tract and causes severe gastroent...

  17. Tuning the electronic coupling in a low-bandgap donor-acceptor copolymer via the placement of side-chains

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhumer, Philipp M.; Huang, Ya-Shih; Massip, Sylvain; Albert-Seifried, Sebastian; Greenham, Neil C.; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Friend, Richard H.; James, David T.; Kim, Ji-Seon; Tu Guoli; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.; Beljonne, David; Cornil, Jerome

    2011-03-21

    We present a spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of the effect of the presence and position of hexyl side-chains in the novel low-bandgap alternating donor-acceptor copolymer poly[bis-N,N-(4-octylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1, 4-phenylenediamine-alt-5,5'-4',7',-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole] (T8TBT). We use electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopic measurements supported by calculations of chain conformation, electronic transitions, and Raman modes. Using these tools, we find that sterically demanding side-chain configurations induce twisting in the electronic acceptor unit and reduce the electronic interaction with the donor. This leads to a blue-shifted and weakened (partial) charge-transfer absorption band together with a higher photoluminescence efficiency. On the other hand, sterically relaxed side-chain configurations promote coupling between donor and acceptor units and exhibit enhanced absorption at the expense of luminescence efficiency. The possibility of tuning the donor-acceptor character of conjugated polymers by varying the placement of side-chains has very important ramifications for light emitting diode, Laser, display, and photovoltaic device optimization.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes Scott A: Cell Surface Charge, Hydrophobicity, and Electron Donor and Acceptor Characteristics under Different Environmental Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Briandet, Romain; Meylheuc, Thierry; Maher, Catherine; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie Noëlle

    1999-01-01

    We determined the variations in the surface physicochemical properties of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A cells that occurred under various environmental conditions. The surface charges, the hydrophobicities, and the electron donor and acceptor characteristics of L. monocytogenes Scott A cells were compared after the organism was grown in different growth media and at different temperatures; to do this, we used microelectrophoresis and the microbial adhesion to solvents method. Supplementing the growth media with glucose or lactic acid affected the electrical, hydrophobic, and electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells, whereas the growth temperature (37, 20, 15, or 8°C) primarily affected the electrical and electron donor and acceptor properties. The nonlinear effects of the growth temperature on the physicochemical properties of the cells were similar for cells cultivated in two different growth media, but bacteria cultivated in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 6 g of yeast extract per liter (TSYE) were slightly more hydrophobic than cells cultivated in brain heart infusion medium (P < 0.05). Adhesion experiments conducted with L. monocytogenes Scott A cells cultivated in TSYE at 37, 20, 15, and 8°C and then suspended in a sodium chloride solution (1.5 × 10−1 or 1.5 × 10−3 M NaCl) confirmed that the cell surface charge and the electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells had an influence on their attachment to stainless steel. PMID:10583984

  19. Magnetic field enhanced electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes based on electron donor-acceptor exciplex blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniya, Sangita; Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; McLaughlin, Ryan; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    2016-03-01

    A useful process for light harvesting from injected electron-hole pairs in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) is the transfer from triplet excitons (T) to singlet excitons (S) via reverse intersystem crossing (RISC). This process adds a delayed electro-luminescence (EL) emission component that is known as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). We have studied electron donor (D)/acceptor(A) blends that form an exciplex manifold in which the energy difference, ΔEST between the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) levels is relatively small (<100 meV), and thus allows RISC at ambient temperature. We found that the EL emission in OLED based on the exciplex blend is enhanced up to 40% by applying a relatively weak magnetic field of 50 mT at ambient. Moreover the MEL response is activated with activation energy similar that of the EL emission. This suggests that the large magneto-EL originates from an additional spin-mixing channel between singlet and triplet states of the generated exciplexes, which is due to TADF. We will report on the MEL dependencies on the temperature, bias voltage, and D-A materials for optimum OLED performance. Supported by SAMSUNG Global Research Outreach (GRO) program, and also by the NSF-Material Science & Engineering Center (MRSEC) program at the University of Utah (DMR-1121252).

  20. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, D.; Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E.; Pöppl, A.; Lančok, J.; Mokhov, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present the detailed study of the spin kinetics of the nitrogen (N) donor electrons in 6H SiC wafers grown by the Lely method and by the sublimation "sandwich method" (SSM) with a donor concentration of about 1017 cm-3 at T = 10-40 K. The donor electrons of the N donors substituting quasi-cubic "k1" and "k2" sites (Nk1,k2) in both types of the samples revealed the similar temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1), which was described by the direct one-phonon and two-phonon processes induced by the acoustic phonons proportional to T and to T9, respectively. The character of the temperature dependence of the T1-1 for the donor electrons of N substituting hexagonal ("h") site (Nh) in both types of 6H SiC samples indicates that the donor electrons relax through the fast-relaxing centers by means of the cross-relaxation process. The observed enhancement of the phase memory relaxation rate (Tm-1) with the temperature increase for the Nh donors in both types of the samples, as well as for the Nk1,k2 donors in Lely grown 6H SiC, was explained by the growth of the free electron concentration with the temperature increase and their exchange scattering at the N donor centers. The observed significant shortening of the phase memory relaxation time Tm for the Nk1,k2 donors in the SSM grown sample with the temperature lowering is caused by hopping motion of the electrons between the occupied and unoccupied states of the N donors at Nh and Nk1,k2 sites. The impact of the N donor pairs, triads, distant donor pairs formed in n-type 6H SiC wafers on the spin relaxation times was discussed.

  1. High-Fidelity Rapid Initialization and Read-Out of an Electron Spin via the Single Donor D- Charge State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, T. F.; Weber, B.; House, M. G.; Büch, H.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity electron spin read-out of a precision placed single donor in silicon via spin selective tunneling to either the D+ or D- charge state of the donor. By performing read-out at the stable two electron D0↔D- charge transition we can increase the tunnel rates to a nearby single electron transistor charge sensor by nearly 2 orders of magnitude, allowing faster qubit read-out (1 ms) with minimum loss in read-out fidelity (98.4%) compared to read-out at the D+↔D0 transition (99.6%). Furthermore, we show that read-out via the D- charge state can be used to rapidly initialize the electron spin qubit in its ground state with a fidelity of FI=99.8 %.

  2. 5' modification of duplex DNA with a ruthenium electron donor-acceptor pair using solid-phase DNA synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Natia L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Incorporation of metalated nucleosides into DNA through covalent modification is crucial to measurement of thermal electron-transfer rates and the dependence of these rates with structure, distance, and position. Here, we report the first synthesis of an electron donor-acceptor pair of 5' metallonucleosides and their subsequent incorporation into oligonucleotides using solid-phase DNA synthesis techniques. Large-scale syntheses of metal-containing oligonucleotides are achieved using 5' modified phosporamidites containing [Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (acac is acetylacetonato; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (3) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (4). Duplexes formed with the metal-containing oligonucleotides exhibit thermal stability comparable to the corresponding unmetalated duplexes (T(m) of modified duplex = 49 degrees C vs T(m) of unmodified duplex = 47 degrees C). Electrochemical (3, E(1/2) = -0.04 V vs NHE; 4, E(1/2) = 1.12 V vs NHE), absorption (3, lambda(max) = 568, 369 nm; 4, lambda(max) = 480 nm), and emission (4, lambda(max) = 720 nm, tau = 55 ns, Phi = 1.2 x 10(-)(4)) data for the ruthenium-modified nucleosides and oligonucleotides indicate that incorporation into an oligonucleotide does not perturb the electronic properties of the ruthenium complex or the DNA significantly. In addition, the absence of any change in the emission properties upon metalated duplex formation suggests that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+)[Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) pair will provide a valuable probe for DNA-mediated electron-transfer studies.

  3. Remarkable Dependence of the Final Charge Separation Efficiency on the Donor-Acceptor Interaction in Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Yamada, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Masanori; Furube, Akihiro; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Miura, Taku; Kobori, Yasuhiro; Jono, Ryota; Yamashita, Koichi; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2016-01-11

    The unprecedented dependence of final charge separation efficiency as a function of donor-acceptor interaction in covalently-linked molecules with a rectilinear rigid oligo-p-xylene bridge has been observed. Optimization of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling remarkably inhibits the undesirable rapid decay of the singlet charge-separated state to the ground state, yielding the final long-lived, triplet charge-separated state with circa 100% efficiency. This finding is extremely useful for the rational design of artificial photosynthesis and organic photovoltaic cells toward efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:26610285

  4. Tailorable acceptor C(60-n)B(n) and donor C(60-m)N(m) pairs for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui-Hua; Bryant, Garnett W; Zhao, Jijun; Smith, Vedene H; Di Carlo, Aldo; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2003-05-23

    Our first-principles calculations demonstrate that C(60-n)B(n) and C(60-m)N(m) can be engineered as the acceptors and donors, respectively, needed for molecular electronics by properly controlling the dopant number n and m in C60. We show that acceptor C48B12 and donor C48N12 are promising components for molecular rectifiers, carbon nanotube-based n-p-n (p-n-p) transistors, and p-n junctions. PMID:12785911

  5. Probing the donor side of photosystem II in spinach chloroplasts and algae using electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Boska, M.D.

    1985-11-01

    this work concerns electron transfer reactions in photosystem II (PS II). Investigations carried out in this work examine the redox reaction rates in PS II using EPR. In Tris-washed PS II preparations from spinach, it is observed that the oxidation kinetics of S II/sub f/, the EPR signal formed by Z/sup +/ after deactivation of oxygen evolution, mirror the reduction kinetics of P680/sup +/ seen by EPR in samples poised at a variety of pH's. These data agree with previous data on the optically measured reduction kinetics of P680/sup +/. The oxidation kinetics of S II/sub vf/, the EPR transient seen from Z/sup +/ in samples active in O/sub 2/ evolving samples, were instrument limited (t/sub 1/2/ less than 4 ..mu..s) and thus could not be directly measured. These results taken together support a model where Z donates electrons directly to P680/sup +/. The examination of the oxidation and reduction kinetics of S II in monovalent and divalent salt-washed PS II preparations from spinach correlated most of the change of Z oxidation and re-reduction kinetics seen upon Tris-treatment with the loss of a 33 kDa polypeptide associated with the donor side of PS II. These data coupled with observations of stead-state light-induced amplitude changes in S II give evidence for the existance of an electron carrier between the water-splitting enzyme and Z. Observation of S II amplitude and kinetics in highly resolved PS II protein complexes from Synechoccus sp., consisting of either a 5 polypeptide PS II core complex (E-1) or a 4 polypeptide PS II core complex (CP2b), localize Z and P680 within the 4 polypeptide complex. 187 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Fresh look at electron-transfer mechanisms via the donor/acceptor bindings in the critical encounter complex.

    PubMed

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Kochi, Jay K

    2008-05-01

    Seminal insights provided by the iconic R. S. Mulliken and his "charge-transfer" theory, H. Taube and his "outer/inner-sphere" mechanisms, R. A. Marcus and his "two-state non-adiabatic" theory, and N. S. Hush and his "intervalence" theory are each separately woven into the rich panoramic tapestry constituting chemical research into electron-transfer dynamics, and its mechanistic dominance for the past half century and more. In this Account, we illustrate how the simultaneous melding of all four key concepts allows sharp focus on the charge-transfer character of the critical encounter complex to evoke the latent facet of traditional electron-transfer mechanisms. To this end, we exploit the intervalence (electronic) transition that invariably accompanies the diffusive encounter of electron-rich organic donors (D) with electron-poor acceptors (A) as the experimental harbinger of the collision complex, which is then actually isolated and X-ray crystallographically established as loosely bound pi-stacked pairs of various aromatic and olefinic donor/acceptor dyads with uniform interplanar separations of r(DA) = 3.1 +/- 0.2 A. These X-ray structures, together with the spectral measurements of their intervalence transitions, lead to the pair of important electron-transfer parameters, H(DA) (electronic coupling element) versus lambdaT (reorganization energy), the ratio of which generally defines the odd-electron mobility within such an encounter complex in terms of the resonance stabilization of the donor/acceptor assembly [D, A] as opposed to the reorganization-energy penalty required for its interconversion to the electron-transfer state [D(+*), A(-*)]. We recognize the resonance-stabilization energy relative to the intrinsic activation barrier as the mechanistic binding factor, Q = 2H(DA)/lambdaT, to represent the quantitative measure of the highly variable continuum of inner-sphere/outer-sphere interactions that are possible within various types of precursor complexes

  7. Denitrification potential in stream sediments impacted by acid mine drainage: effects of pH, various electron donors, and iron.

    PubMed

    Baeseman, J L; Smith, R L; Silverstein, J

    2006-02-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates thousands of kilometers of stream in the western United States. At the same time, nitrogen loading to many mountain watersheds is increasing because of atmospheric deposition of nitrate and increased human use. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in acidic, heavy-metal-laden streams; however, it has been reported that one key process, denitrification, is inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the capacity for denitrification in acidified streams. Denitrification potential was assessed in sediments from several Colorado AMD-impacted streams, ranging from pH 2.60 to 4.54, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediment. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without a lag period, indicating that denitrification enzymes were expressed and functional in these systems. First-order denitrification potential rate constants varied from 0.046 to 2.964 day(-1). The pH of the microcosm water increased between 0.23 and 1.49 pH units during denitrification. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of initial pH, various electron donors, and iron (added as ferrous and ferric iron). Decreasing initial pH decreased denitrification; however, increasing pH had little effect on denitrification rates. The addition of ferric and ferrous iron decreased observed denitrification potential rate constants. The addition of glucose and natural organic matter stimulated denitrification potential. The addition of hydrogen had little effect, however, and denitrification activity in the microcosms decreased after acetate addition. These results suggest that denitrification can occur in AMD streams, and if stimulated within the environment, denitrification might reduce acidity. PMID:16463131

  8. Denitrification potential in stream sediments impacted by acid mine drainage: Effects of pH, various electron donors, and iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baeseman, J.L.; Smith, R.L.; Silverstein, J.

    2006-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates thousands of kilometers of stream in the western United States. At the same time, nitrogen loading to many mountain watersheds is increasing because of atmospheric deposition of nitrate and increased human use. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in acidic, heavy-metal-laden streams; however, it has been reported that one key process, denitrification, is inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the capacity for denitrification in acidified streams. Denitrification potential was assessed in sediments from several Colorado AMD-impacted streams, ranging from pH 2.60 to 4.54, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediment. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without a lag period, indicating that denitrification enzymes were expressed and functional in these systems. First-order denitrification potential rate constants varied from 0.046 to 2.964 day-1. The pH of the microcosm water increased between 0.23 and 1.49 pH units during denitrification. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of initial pH, various electron donors, and iron (added as ferrous and ferric iron). Decreasing initial pH decreased denitrification; however, increasing pH had little effect on denitrification rates. The addition of ferric and ferrous iron decreased observed denitrification potential rate constants. The addition of glucose and natural organic matter stimulated denitrification potential. The addition of hydrogen had little effect, however, and denitrification activity in the microcosms decreased after acetate addition. These results suggest that denitrification can occur in AMD streams, and if stimulated within the environment, denitrification might reduce acidity. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  9. Mathematical modeling of autotrophic denitrification (AD) process with sulphide as electron donor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guihua; Yin, Fengjun; Chen, Shaohua; Xu, Yuanjian; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-03-15

    Autotrophic denitrification (AD) plays a critical role in nitrate removal from organic carbon-deficient wastewaters with a high level of nitrogen oxides. However, the AD process is not included in the current denitrification models, which limits the application of AD technology for wastewater treatment. In this work, a kinetic model for AD process involved 4 processes and 5 components with 9 parameters is established to describe the sulphide biooxidation and nitrite removal process. In this model, 4 oxidation-reduction reactions using sulphide as electronic donor in the AD process are taken into account. The model parameters are optimized by fitting data from the experiments with different combinations of sulphide, sulphur, sulphate, nitrate and nitrite at various concentrations. Model calibration and validation results demonstrate that the developed model is able to reasonably describe the removal rates of nitrate, nitrite, sulphide and sulphur in the AD process. The model simulation results also show that the sulphur term (η(S)) in the kinetic equations of nitrate, nitrite, sulphur and sulphate remains constant, rather than being controlled by its own concentration. Furthermore, with this model the products of sulphide biooxidation in the AD process, sulphur and sulphate, and their concentrations can be accurately predicted. Therefore, this model provides a strategy to control the sulphate concentration below the discharge limits or recover sulphur as the main end product from sulphide biooxidation. PMID:26799712

  10. Optical modeling of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells based on squarine dye as electron donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitova, S.; Stoyanova, D.; Dikova, J.; Kandinska, M.; Vasilev, A.; Angelova, S.

    2014-12-01

    The potentiality of a squarine dye (Sq1) for using as electron donor component in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ) has been studied from the optical point of view. The soluble n-type fullerene, (6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61MB) was chosen as acceptor. Optical modelling based on transfer matrix method was carried out to predict and improve photovoltaic performance of a BHJ device with blended Sq1/PC61MB active layer. The dependence of the absorption and the calculated maximum short circuit photocurrent (Jscmax) on the thickness of the active layer (dact), was investigated for two weight ratios of Sq1 and PC61MB. Thus, the optimal dact was calculated to be about 100 nm, which provides an efficient overlapping of the total absorption with solar spectrum in the range between 580 and 900 nm. Besides, it is found that the insertion of ZnO or C60 spacer layer shifts Jscmax peak to lower dact and significantly enhances Jscmax for active layers with dact < 50 nm, which is mainly due to improved light absorption by a factor of 5 to 10. Simultaneously, for dact <100 nm the optical effect of inserted PEDOT:PSS hole transporting layer is negligible.

  11. Microbial selenite reduction with organic carbon and electrode as sole electron donor by a bacterium isolated from domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Khanh; Park, Younghyun; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2016-07-01

    Selenium is said to be multifaceted element because it is essential at a low concentration but very toxic at an elevated level. For the purpose of screening a potential microorganism for selenite bioremediation, we isolated a bacterium, named strain THL1, which could perform both heterotrophic selenite reduction, using organic carbons such as acetate, lactate, propionate, and butyrate as electron donors under microaerobic condition, and electrotrophic selenite reduction, using an electrode polarized at -0.3V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode) as the sole electron donor under anaerobic condition. This bacterium determined to be a new strain of the genus Cronobacter, could remove selenite with an efficiency of up to 100%. This study is the first demonstration on a pure culture could take up electrons from an electrode to perform selenite reduction. The selenium nanoparticles produced by microbial selenite reduction might be considered for recovery and use in the nanotechnology industry. PMID:27099943

  12. Addition of alcohols and hydrocarbons to fullerenes by photosensitized electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lem, G.; Schuster, D.I.; Courtney, S.H.; Lu, Q.; Wilson, S.R. )

    1995-01-11

    We report the formation of C[sub 60] radical cations by photosensitized electron transfer and the capture of the cation by nucleophiles such as alcohols to yield alkoxy-substituted fullerenes. In addition, we report selective trapping of the radical cation by reactive hydrogen donors to produce alkyl-substituted fullerenes. The finding that fullerene radical cations in the vapor phase are unreactive toward alcohols was rationalized in terms of resistance to formation of product in which the previously highly delocalized positive charge becomes strongly localized upon the oxygen atom of the nucleophile. This inhibition is not the case in solution, probably because of solvation effects. We expect to utilize these novel reactions of fullerenes to add other types of nucleophiles (such as cyanide) and hydrogen donors (such as thiols) to C[sub 60], thus opening a wider window for functionalization of fullerenes for synthetic purposes. These studies once again demonstrate the value of using the crown ether-methanofullerene (1) to conveniently follow the progress of new chemical reactions of C[sub 60] in solution by ESI-MS. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Effect of electron-donor ancillary ligands on the heteroleptic ruthenium complexes: synthesis, characterization, and application in high-performance dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Chao; Kong, Fan-Tai; Liu, Xue-Peng; Guo, Fu-Ling; Zhou, Li; Ding, Yong; Li, Zhao-Qian; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2016-04-20

    Three heteroleptic ruthenium complexes, , and , with sulfur- or oxygen-containing electron-donor, phenylpyridine-based ancillary ligands, are synthesized. The influence of the different electron donors-the acyclic electron donors methylthio and methoxyl, and the cyclic electron donor methylenedioxy-on the photophysical and electrochemical behavior in dye sensitizers and photovoltaic performance in DSSCs are investigated. Compared to the conventional dye , all the dyes demonstrate superior performance in the form of molar absorptivity, photocurrent density (JSC) and conversion efficiency (η). The DSSCs based on and , with only a two-atom change in the acyclic electron donor, exhibit analogous photovoltaic performance (9.28% for and 9.32% for ). The highest photocurrent density (19.06 mA cm(-2)) and conversion efficiency (9.74%) are recorded for , which contains the cyclic electron donor. Transient absorption (TAS) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements are carried out to investigate the sensitizers' regeneration and the behavior of excited electron decay kinetics. Furthermore, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is operated to explain the charge recombination and the electron lifetime. These consequences reveal substantial dependences on the different configurations of the electron-donor ancillary ligands. PMID:27053153

  14. Estimation of electronic coupling in π-stacked donor-bridge-acceptor systems: Correction of the two-state model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-02-01

    Comparison of donor-acceptor electronic couplings calculated within two-state and three-state models suggests that the two-state treatment can provide unreliable estimates of Vda because of neglecting the multistate effects. We show that in most cases accurate values of the electronic coupling in a π stack, where donor and acceptor are separated by a bridging unit, can be obtained as Ṽda=(E2-E1)μ12/Rda+(2E3-E1-E2)2μ13μ23/Rda2, where E1, E2, and E3 are adiabatic energies of the ground, charge-transfer, and bridge states, respectively, μij is the transition dipole moments between the states i and j, and Rda is the distance between the planes of donor and acceptor. In this expression based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush approach, the first term corresponds to the coupling derived within a two-state model, whereas the second term is the superexchange correction accounting for the bridge effect. The formula is extended to bridges consisting of several subunits. The influence of the donor-acceptor energy mismatch on the excess charge distribution, adiabatic dipole and transition moments, and electronic couplings is examined. A diagnostic is developed to determine whether the two-state approach can be applied. Based on numerical results, we showed that the superexchange correction considerably improves estimates of the donor-acceptor coupling derived within a two-state approach. In most cases when the two-state scheme fails, the formula gives reliable results which are in good agreement (within 5%) with the data of the three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush model.

  15. Microscopic simulations of electronic excitations in donor-acceptor heterojunctions of small-molecule based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeier, Bjoern

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental processes involving electronic excitations govern the functionality of molecular materials in which the dynamics of excitons and charges is determined by an interplay of molecular electronic structure and morphological order. To understand, e.g., charge separation and recombination at donor-acceptor heterojunctions in organic solar cells, knowledge about the microscopic details influencing these dynamics in the bulk and across the interface is required. For a set of prototypical heterojunctions of small-molecule donor materials with C60, we employ a hybrid QM/MM approach linking density-functional and many-body Green's functions theory and analyze the charged and neutral electronic excitations therein. We pay special attention the spatially-resolved electron/hole transport levels, as well as the relative energies of Frenkel and charge-transfer excitations at the interface. Finally, we link the molecular architecture of the donor material, its orientation on the fullerene substrate as well as mesoscale order to the solar cell performance.

  16. Denitrification in Streams Impacted by Acid Mine Drainage: Effects of Iron, pH, and Potential Electron Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeseman, J. L.; Smith, R. L.; Silverstein, J.

    2003-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates between 8,000 and 16,000 km of streams on U.S. Forest Service land in the Western United States and more than 7,000 km of stream in the Eastern U.S. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in these acidic, heavy metal laden streams, however, denitrification can be inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to examine AMD sediments for bacteria capable of denitrification. The process of denitrification is known to increase pH, which may be particularly important in acidic environments. Denitrification potential was assessed in AMD sediments from several Colorado AMD impacted streams ranging from pH 2.6 to 4.91, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediments. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without any lag period, indicating that denitrification was actively occurring in these environments. Rates varied from 0.33 to 2.52 umoles NO3-N/ g-sediment/ day depending on the site. The pH of the microcosms increased between 0.23 to 1.49 pH units in 5 days, depending on the site. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of iron concentrations (Fe2+ and Fe3+), initial pH conditions, and several potential electron donors. Addition of iron above ambient concentrations seemed to have little effect on denitrification rates, whereas rates increased with increasing initial pH. The addition of carbon and hydrogen stimulated denitrification rates, which in turn increased the rise in pH. These results suggest that not only is denitrification possible in AMD streams, it may also be a useful remediation option, if suitable methods can be found to stimulate activity.

  17. Prospects for three-electron donor boronyl (BO) ligands and dioxodiborene (B2O2) ligands as bridging groups in binuclear iron carbonyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce

    2012-08-20

    Recent experimental work (2010) on (Cy(3)P)(2)Pt(BO)Br indicates that the oxygen atom of the boronyl (BO) ligand is more basic than that in the ubiquitous CO ligand. This suggests that bridging BO ligands in unsaturated binuclear metal carbonyl derivatives should readily function as three-electron donor bridging ligands involving both the oxygen and the boron atoms. In this connection, density functional theory shows that three of the four lowest energy singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) structures have such a bridging η(2)-μ-BO group as well as a formal Fe-Fe single bond. In addition, all four of the lowest energy singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(6) structures have two bridging η(2)-μ-BO groups and formal Fe-Fe single bonds. Other Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(n) (n = 7, 6) structures are found in which the two BO groups have coupled to form a bridging dioxodiborene (B(2)O(2)) ligand with B-B bonding distances of ~1.84 Å. All of these Fe(2)(μ-B(2)O(2))(CO)(n) structures have long Fe···Fe distances indicating a lack of direct iron-iron bonding. One of the singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) structures has such a bridging dioxodiborene ligand with cis stereochemistry functioning as a six-electron donor to the pair of iron atoms. In addition, the lowest energy triplet structures for both Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) and Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(6) have bridging dioxodiborene ligands with trans stereochemistry functioning as a four-electron donor to the pair of iron atoms. PMID:22862812

  18. High-Affinity Proton Donors Promote Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer by Samarium Diiodide.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-05-10

    The relationship between proton-donor affinity for Sm(II) ions and the reduction of two substrates (anthracene and benzyl chloride) was examined. A combination of spectroscopic, thermochemical, and kinetic studies show that only those proton donors that coordinate or chelate strongly to Sm(II) promote anthracene reduction through a PCET process. These studies demonstrate that the combination of Sm(II) ions and water does not provide a unique reagent system for formal hydrogen atom transfer to substrates. PMID:27061351

  19. Enhanced reduction of an azo dye using henna plant biomass as a solid-phase electron donor, carbon source, and redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingang; Chu, Shushan; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Yi; Xie, Zhengmiao

    2014-06-01

    The multiple effects of henna plant biomass as a source of carbon, electron donor, and redox mediator (RM) on the enhanced bio-reduction of Orange II (AO7) were investigated. The results indicated that the maximum AO7 reduction rate in the culture with henna powder was ∼6-fold that in the sludge control culture lacking henna. On the one hand, AO7 reduction can be advantageously enhanced by the release of available electron donors; on the other hand, the associated lawsone can act as a fixed RM and play a potential role in shuttling electrons from the released electron donors to the final electron acceptor, AO7. The soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) during each experiment and the FTIR spectra suggested that the weakened AO7 reduction along with the retention of henna powder might not be attributed to the lack of fixed lawsone but rather to the insufficiency of electron donors. PMID:24759768

  20. Electron transport behaviors through donor-induced quantum dot array in heavily n-doped junctionless nanowire transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Liuhong; Han, Weihua Wang, Hao; Hong, Wenting; Lyu, Qifeng; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Fuhua

    2015-01-21

    We investigated single electron tunneling through a phosphorus donor-induced quantum dot array in heavily n-doped junctionless nanowire transistor. Seven subpeaks splitting in current oscillations are clearly observed due to the coupling of quantum dot array under the bias voltage below 1.0 mV at the temperature of 6 K. The conduction system can be well described by a two-band Hubbard model. The activation energy of phosphorus donors is tuned by the gate voltage to be 7.0 meV for the lower Hubbard band and 4.4 meV for the upper Hubbard band due to the localization effects below threshold voltage. The evolution of electron behaviors in the quantum dots is identified by adjusting the gate voltage from quantum-dot regime to one-dimensional regime.

  1. Electron transport behaviors through donor-induced quantum dot array in heavily n-doped junctionless nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liuhong; Han, Weihua; Wang, Hao; Hong, Wenting; Lyu, Qifeng; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Fuhua

    2015-01-01

    We investigated single electron tunneling through a phosphorus donor-induced quantum dot array in heavily n-doped junctionless nanowire transistor. Seven subpeaks splitting in current oscillations are clearly observed due to the coupling of quantum dot array under the bias voltage below 1.0 mV at the temperature of 6 K. The conduction system can be well described by a two-band Hubbard model. The activation energy of phosphorus donors is tuned by the gate voltage to be 7.0 meV for the lower Hubbard band and 4.4 meV for the upper Hubbard band due to the localization effects below threshold voltage. The evolution of electron behaviors in the quantum dots is identified by adjusting the gate voltage from quantum-dot regime to one-dimensional regime.

  2. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%. PMID:23437664

  3. Enhanced Alcaligenes faecalis Denitrification Rate with Electrodes as the Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Yu, Ping; Zeng, Cuiping; Ding, Hongrui; Wang, Changqiu

    2015-01-01

    The utilization by Alcaligenes faecalis of electrodes as the electron donor for denitrification was investigated in this study. The denitrification rate of A. faecalis with a poised potential was greatly enhanced compared with that of the controls without poised potentials. For nitrate reduction, although A. faecalis could not reduce nitrate, at three poised potentials of +0.06, −0.06, and −0.15 V (versus normal hydrogen electrode [NHE]), the nitrate was partially reduced with −0.15- and −0.06-V potentials at rates of 17.3 and 28.5 mg/liter/day, respectively. The percentages of reduction for −0.15 and −0.06 V were 52.4 and 30.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, for nitrite reduction, the poised potentials greatly enhanced the nitrite reduction. The nitrite reduction rates for three poised potentials (−0.06, −0.15, and −0.30 V) were 1.98, 4.37, and 3.91 mg/liter/h, respectively. When the potentials were cut off, the nitrite reduction rate was maintained for 1.5 h (from 2.3 to 2.25 mg/liter/h) and then greatly decreased, and the reduction rate (0.38 mg/liter/h) was about 1/6 compared with the rate (2.3 mg/liter/h) when potential was on. Then the potentials resumed, but the reduction rate did not resume and was only 2 times higher than the rate when the potential was off. PMID:26048940

  4. Enhanced Alcaligenes faecalis Denitrification Rate with Electrodes as the Electron Donor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Yu, Ping; Zeng, Cuiping; Ding, Hongrui; Li, Yan; Wang, Changqiu; Lu, Anhuai

    2015-08-15

    The utilization by Alcaligenes faecalis of electrodes as the electron donor for denitrification was investigated in this study. The denitrification rate of A. faecalis with a poised potential was greatly enhanced compared with that of the controls without poised potentials. For nitrate reduction, although A. faecalis could not reduce nitrate, at three poised potentials of +0.06, -0.06, and -0.15 V (versus normal hydrogen electrode [NHE]), the nitrate was partially reduced with -0.15- and -0.06-V potentials at rates of 17.3 and 28.5 mg/liter/day, respectively. The percentages of reduction for -0.15 and -0.06 V were 52.4 and 30.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, for nitrite reduction, the poised potentials greatly enhanced the nitrite reduction. The nitrite reduction rates for three poised potentials (-0.06, -0.15, and -0.30 V) were 1.98, 4.37, and 3.91 mg/liter/h, respectively. When the potentials were cut off, the nitrite reduction rate was maintained for 1.5 h (from 2.3 to 2.25 mg/liter/h) and then greatly decreased, and the reduction rate (0.38 mg/liter/h) was about 1/6 compared with the rate (2.3 mg/liter/h) when potential was on. Then the potentials resumed, but the reduction rate did not resume and was only 2 times higher than the rate when the potential was off. PMID:26048940

  5. 9-fluorenemethanol: an internal electron donor to fine tune olefin polymerization activity.

    PubMed

    Gnanakumar, Edwin S; Rao Chokkapu, Eswara; Kunjir, Shrikant; Ajithkumar, T G; Rajamohanan, P R; Chakraborty, Debashis; Gopinath, Chinnakonda S

    2014-06-28

    A new MgCl2 based molecular adduct has been synthesized with 9-fluorenemethanol (9FM) as a novel internal electron donor (IED), along with ethanol (EtOH) (MgCl2·n9FM·xEtOH). The above molecular adduct has been subjected to a variety of structural, spectroscopic and morphological characterization techniques. The results of the solid state (13)C CPMAS NMR technique suggests the coordination of 9FM to MgCl2. Observation of a low angle diffraction peak at 2θ = 5.7° (d = 15.5 Å) underscores the coordination of 9FM along the z-axis, and ethanol in the molecular adduct. Active Ziegler-Natta catalysts were prepared by two different synthesis methods; the conventional method to obtain a high surface area active catalyst, and other one with 9FM as an integral part of the active catalyst in order to study the influence of 9FM as an IED over the active sites. The active catalysts were also characterized thoroughly with different analytical tools. The XRD results show (003) facets of δ-MgCl2 (α-MgCl2) for the conventional (non-conventional) titanated catalyst. Results of the ethylene polymerization activity study reveals that the conventionally prepared highly porous active catalyst shows 1.7-2.5 times higher activity than the non-conventional prepared catalyst; however, the latter shows a low molecular weight distribution and confirms the role of the Lewis base as an IED. PMID:24810354

  6. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyszka, K.; Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Tabe, M.; Jabłoński, R.

    2015-06-28

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots.

  7. A combined FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy investigation of layered double hydroxide as an effective electron donor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Wei, Feng; Liang, Ying; Zhou, Jizhi; Xi, Yunfei; Qian, Guangren; Frost, Ray

    2016-02-01

    A novel method has been presented to characterize electron transfer in layered double hydroxides (LDHs) utilizing an investigation combing FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy. At room temperature, electron could transfer to interlayer Fe(3+) through monodentate ligand cyanide, and resulted in a reduction of 40% Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). When the environmental temperature increased from 25 to 300°C, reduction of Fe(3+) and Ni(2+) increased to 94% and 42%. Furthermore, electron also transferred to interlayer cation through multidentate ligand EDTA. As a result, LDHs has been proven to be an effective electron donor, and FTIR was a feasible tool in characterizing this property by monitoring the valence state of cations. It was also concluded that octahedral units with OH(-) groups in LDH layer functioned as electron donor centers. Driving force for electron transfer is attributed to the charge density difference between cation layer and probe anion. These results could help to explain the mechanism of various applications of LDHs in catalysis and photocatalysis. PMID:26490800

  8. A combined FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy investigation of layered double hydroxide as an effective electron donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Wei, Feng; Liang, Ying; Zhou, Jizhi; Xi, Yunfei; Qian, Guangren; Frost, Ray

    2016-02-01

    A novel method has been presented to characterize electron transfer in layered double hydroxides (LDHs) utilizing an investigation combing FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy. At room temperature, electron could transfer to interlayer Fe3 + through monodentate ligand cyanide, and resulted in a reduction of 40% Fe3 + to Fe2 +. When the environmental temperature increased from 25 to 300 °C, reduction of Fe3 + and Ni2 + increased to 94% and 42%. Furthermore, electron also transferred to interlayer cation through multidentate ligand EDTA. As a result, LDHs has been proven to be an effective electron donor, and FTIR was a feasible tool in characterizing this property by monitoring the valence state of cations. It was also concluded that octahedral units with OH- groups in LDH layer functioned as electron donor centers. Driving force for electron transfer is attributed to the charge density difference between cation layer and probe anion. These results could help to explain the mechanism of various applications of LDHs in catalysis and photocatalysis.

  9. Assembly of an Axially Chiral Dynamic Redox System with a Perfluorobiphenyl Skeleton into Dumbbell- or Tripod-type Electron Donors.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, Hitomi; Katoono, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kenshu; Suzuki, Takanori

    2016-02-12

    The incorporation of F atoms endows a diethenylbiphenyl-based electron donor with configurational stability and SN Ar reactivity. The former enables the dynamic redox pair of (Rax)-1/(Rax ,R,R)-1(2+) to exhibit drastic UV/Vis and CD spectral changes upon electrolysis, whereas the latter makes it possible for (Rax)-1 to serve as a useful chiral synthon for the production of larger assemblies [(Rax ,Rax)-2 d,p,m and (Rax ,Rax ,Rax)-3] containing two or three dyrex units. These dyads and triad also exhibit a clean electrochiroptical response with isosbestic points owing to one-wave multi-electron transfer. PMID:26748461

  10. Donor-Acceptor-Type Semiconducting Polymers Consisting of Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Electron-Acceptor Units for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Park, Jong Baek; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We synthesized two fused pentacyclic donor-acceptor structures, where the two different outer electron rich thiophene (DTPBT) and electron poor benzene (ICTh) moieties are covalently bonded to the central electron-deficient benzothiadiazole core by two nitrogen bridges. These new electron-acceptor DTPBT and ICTh building blocks were copolymerized with fluorene, as the electron donor group, via Suzuki coupling polymerization, to produce two new alternating copolymers, PFDTPBT and PFICTh, respectively. The average molecular weights of the synthesized polymers were determined by GPC. The number-average molecular weights of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were 19,000 (PDI = 2.5) and 20,000 (PDI = 4.0), respectively. The optical bandgap energies of the polymers were measured from their absorption onsets to be 2.15 and 2.55 eV, depending on the polymer structure. The HOMO energy levels of the polymers were determined, by measuring the oxidation onsets of the polymer films by cyclic voltammetry. The measured HOMO energy levels of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were -5.10 and -5.57 eV, respectively. When the polymers were blended with PC71BM, as the active layer for bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic devices, power conversion efficiencies were 2.08% and 0.34%, respectively, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) conditions. PMID:26726610

  11. Metal-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots: effects of nanoparticles and molecular electron donors and acceptors on the photofading kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Khamael M.; Šiller, Lidija; Horrocks, Benjamin R.

    2015-04-01

    Alkyl-capped silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) show enhanced luminescence when drop cast as films on glass slides in mixtures with Ag or Au nanoparticles or the electron donor ferrocene (Fc). Metal enhancement of quantum dot photoluminescence (PL) is known to arise from a combination of the intense near-field associated with the surface plasmon of the metal on the rate of absorption and the decrease in the lifetime of the excited state. Here we present evidence that an additional factor is also involved: electron transfer from the metal to the quantum dot. Under CW irradiation with an argon ion laser at 488 nm, SiQDs undergo a reversible photofading of the PL as the particles photoionize. A steady-state condition is established by the competition between photoionization and electron-hole recombination. The fading of the initial PL I0 to the steady-state value {{I}∞ } can be modelled by a simple first order decay with a lognormal distribution of rates, which reflects the heterogeneity of the sample. In the presence of Ag and Au nanoparticles, the modal rate constants of photofading increase by factors of up to 4-fold and the ratio {{I}0}/{{I}∞ } decreases by factors up to 5-fold; this is consistent with an increase in the rate of electron-hole recombination facilitated by the metal nanoparticles acting as sources of electrons. Further support for this interpretation comes from the enhancement in PL observed in photofading experiments with films of SiQDs mixed with Fc; this compound is a well-known one-electron donor, but shows no plasmon band which complicates the estimation of PL enhancement with Ag NPs.

  12. 2004 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Conference - August 8-13, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    GUILFORD JONES BOSTON UNIVERSITY PHOTONICS CENTER 8 ST. MARY'S ST BOSTON, MA 02215

    2005-09-14

    The 2004 Gordon Conference on Donor/Acceptor Interactions will take place at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island on August 8-13, 2004. The conference will be devoted to the consequences of charge interaction and charge motion in molecular and materials systems.

  13. Photo-induced alternating copolymerization of N-substituted maleimides and electron donor olefins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, S.; Sundell, P. E.; Shimose, M.; Clark, S.; Miller, C.; Morel, F.; Decker, C.; Hoyle, C. E.

    1997-08-01

    Photo-initiated free radical polymerization of donor/acceptor type monomers have gained considerable interest due to the possibility of formulating UV curable non-acrylate systems. Recently, we described a photoinitiator free system based on donor/acceptor combinations [1-7]. Photoinitiator free nonacrylate based compositions will of course attain an enhanced interest and importance because of a broader selection of raw materials and combinations thereof, potential outdoor use, lower costs of formulations, improved odour, no formation of benzaldehyde, less extractables and so on. Recent developments of the direct photolysis of these acceptors and complexes, and their potential use in practical "UV curing" will be outlined. By a selective combination of A and D type monomers, a direct photolysis of the ground state complex (CTC) or the excitation of the acceptor, followed by the formation of an exciplex, will initiate a free radical copolymerization. A second route of direct initiation is based on inter- or intra-molecular H-abstraction from an excited state acceptor or exciplex. This paper will focus on the photochemistry as it relates to initiation of polymerization depending on acceptor and donor strength of the monomer system. Inherently different reactivities in air and nitrogen of donors and acceptors are compared to photoinitiator containing acrylates. Furthermore, the ratio of homo and alternating copolymerization as well as the 2 + 2 cycloaddition will be discussed.

  14. Additive cardioprotection by pharmacological postconditioning with hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide donors in mouse heart: S-sulfhydration vs. S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junhui; Aponte, Angel M; Menazza, Sara; Gucek, Marjan; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a gaseous signalling molecule, has been found to play important roles in postconditioning (PostC)-induced cardioprotection. Similar to nitric oxide (NO)-mediated protein S-nitrosylation (SNO), recent studies suggest that H2S could regulate protein function through another redox-based post-translational modification on protein cysteine residue(s), i.e. S-sulfhydration (SSH). In this study, we examined whether there are changes in protein SSH associated with cardioprotection induced by treatment with H2S on reperfusion. In addition, we also examined whether there is cross talk between H2S and NO. Compared with control, treatment on reperfusion with NaHS (H2S donor, 100 µmol/L) significantly reduced post-ischaemic contractile dysfunction and infarct size. A comparable cardioprotective effect could be also achieved by reperfusion treatment with SNAP (NO donor, 10 µmol/L). Interestingly, simultaneous reperfusion with both donors had an additive protective effect. In addition, C-PTIO (NO scavenger, 20 µmol/L) eliminated the protection induced by NaHS and also the additive protection by SNAP + NaHS together. Using a modified biotin switch method, we observed a small increase in SSH following NaHS treatment on reperfusion. We also found that NaHS treatment on reperfusion increases SNO to a level comparable to that with SNAP treatment. In addition, there was an additive increase in SNO but not SSH when SNAP and NaHS were added together at reperfusion. Thus, part of the benefit of NaHS is an increase in SNO, and the magnitude of the protective effect is related to the magnitude of the increase in SNO. PMID:26907390

  15. Field-scale application of spent sulfidic caustic as a source of alternative electron donor for autotrophic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeung-Jin; Choi, Gi-Choong; Byun, Im-Gyu; Park, Tae-Joo; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Biological reuse of spent sulfidic caustic (SSC) originating from oil refineries is a promising method for the petrochemical industry because of low handling cost. SSC typically contains high concentrations of sulfur, with the most dominant sulfur compounds being sulfide (S(2-)). SSC is also characterized by a high pH and elevated alkalinity up to 5-15% by weight. Because of these characteristics, SSC can be used for denitrification of NO3(-)-N in the biological nitrogen removal process as both the electron donor and buffering agent in sulfur-utilizing autotrophic denitrification. In this study, two kinds of SSC (SSC I, SSC II) produced from two petrochemical companies were used for autotrophic denitrification in a field-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration in this process was about 10.5 mg/L without any external carbon sources and the nitrification efficiency was low, about 93.0%, because of alkalinity deficiency in the influent. The injection of SSC I, but not SSC II, promoted nitrification efficiency, which was attributed to the difference in the NaOH/S ratio between SSC I and II. SSC was injected based on sulfide concentration of SSC required to denitrify NO3(-)-N in the WWTP. SSC I had higher NaOH/S than SSC II and thus could supply more alkalinity for nitrification than SSC II. On the other hand, additional TN removal of about 9.0% was achieved with the injection of both SSCs. However, denitrification efficiency was not proportionally increased with increasing SSC injection because of NO3(-)-N deficiency in the anoxic tank due to the limited capacity of the recycling pump. For the same reason, sulfate concentration, which is the end product of sulfur-utilizing autotrophic denitrificaiton in the effluent, was also not increased with increasing SSC injection. PMID:23863444

  16. Effect of Electron Donor and Solution Chemistry on Products of Dissimilatory Reduction of Technetium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Wildung, R. E.; Gorby, Y. A.; Krupka, K. M.; Hess, N. J.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; McKinley, J. P.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    To help provide a fundamental basis for use of microbial dissimilatory reduction processes in separating or immobilizing 99Tc in waste or groundwaters, the effects of electron donor and the presence of the bicarbonate ion on the rate and extent of pertechnetate ion [Tc(VII)O4−] enzymatic reduction by the subsurface metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 were determined, and the forms of aqueous and solid-phase reduction products were evaluated through a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and thermodynamic calculations. When H2 served as the electron donor, dissolved Tc(VII) was rapidly reduced to amorphous Tc(IV) hydrous oxide, which was largely associated with the cell in unbuffered 0.85% NaCl and with extracellular particulates (0.2 to 0.001 μm) in bicarbonate buffer. Cell-associated Tc was present principally in the periplasm and outside the outer membrane. The reduction rate was much lower when lactate was the electron donor, with extracellular Tc(IV) hydrous oxide the dominant solid-phase reduction product, but in bicarbonate systems much less Tc(IV) was associated directly with the cell and solid-phase Tc(IV) carbonate may have been present. In the presence of carbonate, soluble (<0.001 μm) electronegative, Tc(IV) carbonate complexes were also formed that exceeded Tc(VII)O4− in electrophoretic mobility. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the dominant reduced Tc species identified in the experiments would be stable over a range of Eh and pH conditions typical of natural waters. Thus, carbonate complexes may represent an important pathway for Tc transport in anaerobic subsurface environments, where it has generally been assumed that Tc mobility is controlled by low-solubility Tc(IV) hydrous oxide and adsorptive, aqueous Tc(IV) hydrolysis products. PMID:10831424

  17. Syntheses of D-A-A Type Small Molecular Donor Materials Having Various Electron Accepting Moiety for Organic Photovoltaic Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahyeon; Park, Sangman; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Changjin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2016-03-01

    Small molecular donor, DTDCTB achieved a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) value of 6.6 ± 0.2% in vacuum-deposited planar mixed heterojunction (PMHJ) structure. However, the same material just recorded PCE of 0.34% in solution processed small molecule based bulk heterjunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells. For the improvement of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), In this study, we designed and synthesized several D-A-A (donor-acceptor-acceptor) type molecular electron donating materials. Ditolylaminothienyl moiety as an electron donating group connected to 1,2,5-benzothiadiazole as a conjugated electron accepting unit, simultaneously with an electron accepting terminal group such as cyano alkyl acetate and N-alkyl rhodanine. The thermal, photophysical, and electrochemical properties of prepared small molecules were investigated by DSC, UV/Vis spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltametry, respectively. As a result, 0.89% of PCE can be obtained from OPV using a mixture of DTATBTER and PCBM as an active layer with a Voc of 0.87 V, a Jsc of 3.20 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 31.9%. PMID:27455734

  18. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    SciTech Connect

    Kapilashrami, M.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Fadley, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-10-14

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO=VBM{sub CIGS} – VBM{sub diamond}=0.3 eV±0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV±0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  19. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilashrami, M.; Conti, G.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Fadley, C. S.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO = VBMCIGS - VBMdiamond = 0.3 eV ± 0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV ± 0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  20. Electronic Structure, Donor and Acceptor Transitions, and Magnetism of 3d Impurities in In2O3 and ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Raebiger, H.; Lany, S,; Zunger, A.

    2009-01-01

    3d transition impurities in wide-gap oxides may function as donor/acceptor defects to modify carrier concentrations, and as magnetic elements to induce collective magnetism. Previous first-principles calculations have been crippled by the LDA error, where the occupation of the 3d-induced levels is incorrect due to spurious charge spilling into the misrepresented host conduction band, and have only considered magnetism and carrier doping separately. We employ a band-structure-corrected theory, and present simultaneously the chemical trends for electronic properties, carrier doping, and magnetism along the series of 3d{sup 1}-3d{sup 8} transition-metal impurities in the representative wide-gap oxide hosts In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO. We find that most 3d impurities in In{sub 2}O{sub 3} are amphoteric, whereas in ZnO, the early 3d's (Sc, Ti, and V) are shallow donors, and only the late 3d's (Co and Ni) have acceptor transitions. Long-range ferromagnetic interactions emerge due to partial filling of 3d resonances inside the conduction band and, in general, require electron doping from additional sources.

  1. Bimolecular electron transfer reactions in coumarin amine systems: Donor acceptor orientational effect on diffusion-controlled reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, A. K.; Nath, S.; Kumbhakar, M.; Maity, D. K.; Senthilkumar, S.; Pal, H.

    2008-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions between excited coumarin dyes and different aliphatic amine (AlA) and aromatic amine (ArA) donors have been investigated in acetonitrile solution using steady-state (SS) and time-resolved (TR) fluorescence quenching measurements. No ground state complex or emissive exciplex formation has been indicated in these systems. SS and TR measurements give similar quenching constants ( kq) for each of the coumarin-amine pairs, suggesting dynamic nature of interaction in these systems. On correlating kq values with the free energy changes (Δ G0) of the ET reactions show the typical Rehm-Weller type of behavior as expected for bimolecular ET reactions under diffusive condition, where kq increases with -Δ G0 at the lower exergonicity (-Δ G0) region but ultimately saturate to a diffusion-limited value (kqDC) at the higher exergonicity region. It is, however, interestingly observed that the kqDC values vary largely depending on the type of the amines used. Thus, kqDC is much higher with ArAs than AlAs. Similarly, the kqDC for cyclic monoamine 1-azabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (ABCO) is distinctly lower and that for cyclic diamine 1,4-diazabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (DABCO) is distinctly higher than the kqDC value obtained for other noncyclic AlAs. These differences in the kqDC values have been rationalized on the basis of the differences in the orientational restrictions involved in the ET reactions with different types of amines. As understood, n-type donors (AlAs) introduce large orientational restriction and thus significantly reduces the ET efficiency in comparison to the π-type donors (ArAs). Structural constrains are inferred to be the reason for the differences in the kqDC values involving ABCO, DABCO donors in comparison to other noncyclic AlAs. Supportive evidence for the orientational restrictions involving different types of amines donors has also been obtained from DFT based quantum chemical calculations on the molecular orbitals of

  2. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers.

    PubMed

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J; Fierro, José Luis G; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-21

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices. PMID:27305145

  3. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations. PMID:27231856

  4. Electrically detected double electron-electron resonance: exchange interaction of ?P donors and P? defects at the Si/SiO? interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckert, Max; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Kuenzl, Markus; Huebl, Hans; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2013-10-01

    We study the coupling of P? dangling bond defects at the Si/SiO2 interface and 31P donors in an epitaxial layer directly underneath using electrically detected double electron-electron resonance (EDDEER). An exponential decay of the EDDEER signal is observed, which is attributed to a broad distribution of exchange coupling strengths J/2π from 25 kHz to 3 MHz. Comparison of the experimental data with a numerical simulation of the exchange coupling shows that this range of coupling strengths corresponds to 31P-P? distances ranging from 14 nm to 20 nm.

  5. Investigation of the low-affinity oxidation site for exogenous electron donors in the Mn-depleted photosystem II complexes.

    PubMed

    Kurashov, V N; Lovyagina, E R; Shkolnikov, D Yu; Solntsev, M K; Mamedov, M D; Semin, B K

    2009-12-01

    In the manganese-depleted photosystem II (PSII[-Mn]) preparations, oxidation of exogenous electron donors is carried out through the high-affinity (HA) and the low-affinity (LA) sites. This paper investigates the LA oxidation site in the PSII(-Mn) preparations where the HA, Mn-binding site was blocked with ferric cations [[11] B.K. Semin, M.L. Ghirardi, M. Seibert, Blocking of electron donation by Mn(II) to Y(Z)(*) following incubation of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes with Fe(II) in the light, Biochemistry 41 (2002) 5854-5864.]. In blocked (PSII[-Mn,+Fe]) preparations electron donation by Mn(II) cations to Y(Z)(*) was not detected at Mn(II) concentration 10 microM (corresponds to K(m) for Mn(II) oxidation at the HA site), but detected at Mn concentration 100 microM (corresponds to K(m) for the LA site) by fluorescence measurements. Comparison of pH-dependencies of electron donation by Mn(II) through the HA and the LA sites revealed the similar pK(a) equal to 6.8. Comparison of K(m) for diphenylcarbazide (DPC) oxidation at the LA site and K(d) for A(T) thermoluminescence band suppression by DPC in PSII(-Mn,+Fe) samples suggests that there is relationship between the LA site and A(T) band formation. The role of D1-His190 as an oxidant of exogenous electron donors at the LA site is discussed. In contrast to electrogenic electron transfer from Mn(II) at the HA site to Y(Z)(*), photovoltage due to Mn(II) oxidation in iron-blocked PSII(-Mn) core particles was not detected. PMID:19616503

  6. Noninnocence of Indigo: Dehydroindigo Anions as Bridging Electron-Donor Ligands in Diruthenium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prasenjit; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Paretzki, Alexa; Beyer, Katharina; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-03-21

    Complexes of singly or doubly deprotonated indigo (H2Ind) with one or two [Ru(pap)2](2+) fragments (pap = 2-phenylazopyridine) have been characterized experimentally [molecular structure, voltammetry, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and UV-vis-near-IR spectroelectrochemistry] and by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The compound [Ru(pap)2(HInd(-))]ClO4 ([1]ClO4) was found to contain an intramolecular NH---O hydrogen bond, whereas [{Ru(pap)2}2(μ-Ind(2-))](ClO4)2 ([2](ClO4)2), isolated as the meso diastereoisomer with near-IR absorptions at 1162 and 991 nm, contains two metals bridged at 6.354 Å distance by the bischelating indigo dianion. The spectroelectrochemical study of multiple reversible reduction and oxidation processes of 2(n) (n = 4+, 3+, 2+, 1+, 0, 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-) reveals the stepwise addition of electrons to the terminal π-accepting pap ligands, whereas the oxidations occur predominantly at the anionic indigo ligand, producing an EPR-identified indigo radical intermediate and revealing the suitability of deprotonated indigo as a σ- and π-donating bischelating bridge. PMID:26931407

  7. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  8. Donor-linked di(perylene bisimide)s: arrays exhibiting fast electron transfer for photosynthesis mimics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yishi; Zhen, Yonggang; Wang, Zhaohui; Fu, Hongbing

    2013-02-28

    The first example of donor-linked di(perylene bisimide)s is reported. UV-vis absorption spectra of these newly synthesized dyads showed intense absorption across the entire visible region, demonstrating their excellent light-harvesting activities. The severe fluorescence quenching event probed by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and the free-energy calculations suggested the possibility of electron transfer (ET) in these arrays upon photoexcitation. Further femtosecond transient absorption spectra clarified that the fluorescence quenching was due to fast intramolecular ET. The rate of the charge separation (CS) was found to be as high as 10(12) s(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2). It was suggested that the large ET driving forces, strong donor-acceptor electronic coupling, and relatively small reorganization energy of diPBI accounted for the rapid ET process in a synergic manner. The fate of the generated radical ion pair depended on the solvent used. Rapid charge recombination to ground state occurred for the dyads in polar CH(2)Cl(2) and for diPBI-TPA in nonpolar toluene. However, sufficient (3)diPBI* population was attained via efficient spin-orbit coupled intersystem crossing from the charge-separated state for diPBI-PdTPP in toluene. These photophysical properties are interpreted as the cooperation between thermodynamic feasibility and kinetic manipulation. PMID:23391220

  9. Effects Of Radiation On Electronics-Additional References

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Bibliography abstracts summarizing literature on effects of radiation on new electronic devices. This and second volume cover years 1984 and 1985. Third volume, covers 1982 and 1983 (previously published).

  10. Effect of Spacer Connecting the Secondary Electron Donor Phenothiazine in Subphthalocyanine-Fullerene Conjugates in Promoting Electron Transfer Followed by Hole Shift Process.

    PubMed

    Kc, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-04-20

    Sequential electron/hole transfer between energetically well-positioned entities of photosynthetic reaction center models is one of the commonly employed mechanisms to generate long-lived charge-separated states. A wealth of information, applicable towards light energy harvesting and building optoelectronic devices, has been acquired from such studies. In the present study, we report on the effect of spacer (direct or via phenoxy linkage) connecting the hole shifting agent, phenothiazine (PTZ), on photoinduced charge stabilization in subphthalocyanine-fullerene donor-acceptor conjugates. In these conjugates, the subphthalocyanine (SubPc) and fullerene (C60 ) served as primary electron donor and acceptor, respectively, while the phenothiazine entities act as hole shifting agents. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by optical absorption and emission, computational, and electrochemical methods. The redox potentials measured using differential pulse voltammetry were used to estimate free-energy changes for charge separation, hole migration, and charge recombination processes. Using femto- and nanosecond transient absorption techniques, evidence for charge separation, and kinetics of charge separation and recombination were obtained in polar benzonitrile and nonpolar toluene solvents. In the conjugate where the phenothiazine entities are directly linked to SubPc, evidence for sequential electron transfer followed by hole shift leading to long-lived charge separated state was weak, primarily due to the delocalization of HOMO on both SubPc and PTZ entities. However, in case of the conjugate where the PTZ and SubPc are linked via phenoxy spacers, sequential electron transfer/hole shift was observed leading to the formation of long-lived charge-separated states. The present study brings out the importance of the spacer group connecting the hole shifting agent in model donor-acceptor conjugates to generate long-lived charge-separated states. PMID:27037628

  11. Intramolecular electron transfer in fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads

    SciTech Connect

    Guldi, D.M.; Maggini, M.; Scorrano, G.; Prato, M.

    1997-02-05

    A systematic steady-state fluorescence and time-resolved flash photolytic investigation of a series of covalently linked fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads is reported as a function of the nature of the spacer between the donor site (ferrocene) and acceptor site (fullerene) and the dielectric constant of the medium. The fluorescence of the investigated dyads 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in methylcyclohexane at 77 K were substantially quenched, relative to N-methylfulleropyrrolidine 1, indicating intramolecular quenching of the fullerene excited singlet state. Excitation of N-methylfulleropyrrolidine revealed the immediate formation of the excited singlet state, with {lambda}{sub max} around 886 nm. A rapid intersystem crossing ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 1.2 ps ) to the excited triplet state was observed with characteristic absorption around 705 nm. Picosecond resolved photolysis of dyads 2-6 in toluene showed light-induced formation of the excited singlet state which undergoes rapid intramolecular quenching. Nanosecond-resolved photolysis of dyads 3 and 4 in degassed benzonitrile revealed long-lived charge separated states with characteristic fullerene radical-anion bands at {lambda}{sub max} = 1055 nm. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Mechanistic basis of electron transfer to cytochromes p450 by natural redox partners and artificial donor constructs.

    PubMed

    Hlavica, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) are hemoproteins catalyzing oxidative biotransformation of a vast array of natural and xenobiotic compounds. Reducing equivalents required for dioxygen cleavage and substrate hydroxylation originate from different redox partners including diflavin reductases, flavodoxins, ferredoxins and phthalate dioxygenase reductase (PDR)-type proteins. Accordingly, circumstantial analysis of structural and physicochemical features governing donor-acceptor recognition and electron transfer poses an intriguing challenge. Thus, conformational flexibility reflected by togging between closed and open states of solvent exposed patches on the redox components was shown to be instrumental to steered electron transmission. Here, the membrane-interactive tails of the P450 enzymes and donor proteins were recognized to be crucial to proper orientation toward each other of surface sites on the redox modules steering functional coupling. Also, mobile electron shuttling may come into play. While charge-pairing mechanisms are of primary importance in attraction and complexation of the redox partners, hydrophobic and van der Waals cohesion forces play a minor role in docking events. Due to catalytic plasticity of P450 enzymes, there is considerable promise in biotechnological applications. Here, deeper insight into the mechanistic basis of the redox machinery will permit optimization of redox processes via directed evolution and DNA shuffling. Thus, creation of hybrid systems by fusion of the modified heme domain of P450s with proteinaceous electron carriers helps obviate the tedious reconstitution procedure and induces novel activities. Also, P450-based amperometric biosensors may open new vistas in pharmaceutical and clinical implementation and environmental monitoring. PMID:26002739

  13. Electronic and optical properties of novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds for applications in blue-emitting organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legaspi, Christian M.; Stubbs, Regan E.; Yaron, David J.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Kemboi, Abraham; Picker, Jesse; Fossum, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have received a significant attention over the past decade due to their energy-saving potential. We have recently synthesized two novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds and analyzed their optical properties to determine their suitability for use as blue emitters in OLEDs. These compounds show remarkable photo-stability and high quantum yields in the blue region of the spectrum. In addition, they have highly solvatochromic emission. In non-polar solvents, bright, blue-shifted (λmax ≈ 398 nm), and highly structured emission is seen. With increasing solvent dielectric constant, the emission becomes weaker, red-shifted (λmax ≈ 507 nm), and broad. We aim to determine the underlying cause of these changes. Electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple excited states with comparable oscillator strength. These states are of interest because there are several with charge-transfer (CT) character, and others centered on the donor moiety. We theorize that CT states play a role in the observed changes in emission lineshape and may promote charge mobility for electrofluorescence in OLEDs. In the future, we plan to use Stark spectroscopy to analyze the polarity of excited states and transient absorption spectroscopy to observe the dynamics in the excited state.

  14. 2008 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference-August 3-8, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Forbes and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2009-09-19

    The conference presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer and Transport in Molecular and Nano-scale Systems. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices.

  15. Quantum dynamics of charge carriers in donor-bridge-acceptor molecular segments with applications to molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, Taposh Kumar

    1998-11-01

    The theory of electron transfer (ET) is important toward understanding the physics and process technology of electronic devices at the atomic and molecular scale. Computer simulation of ID model Hamiltonians has proven to be an effective method to study the ET processes in molecular electronic devices. In this thesis, we present our findings on electron transfer rate (ETR) in model molecular quantum wire (MQW) and donor-bridge-acceptor (DBA) molecular chain systems as our ID electron systems. In this thesis, we show that our trigonometric imaging method (TIM) is an excellent approach to calculating ETR both in MQW and DBA chain systems. First, we report the results on ETR using exact formulas for MQW and DBA chain systems without any nonlinear interactions and find that these results are the same as those obtained by TIM. We introduce a graphical approach to get time derivatives as necessary data for TIM to study the nonlinear effects, electron-phonon (e-p) and electron-electron (e-e) interactions, on ETR in a MQW. We show that time derivatives obtained by the graphical approach are the same as those obtained exactly in the case of e-p interactions. We conclusively report using both the exact and TIM results that e-p interactions enhance ETR in a MQW. Our research on nonlinear interactions also shows that temperature enhances ETR in a model MQW. Using TIM, we report that e-e interactions have virtually no effect on ETR in a MQW, where the data for TIM are obtained by the graphical approach.

  16. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Boyanov, Maxim I; Brulc, Jennifer M; Johnston, Eric R; Kemner, Kenneth M; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  17. Electron Donor Substances and Iron Oxides Stimulate Anaerobic Dechlorination of DDT in a Slurry System with Hydragric Acrisols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Ying; Cade-Menun, Barbara J; Xu, Xiang-Hua; Fan, Jian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The interactive effects between electron donor substances and iron (Fe) oxides have significant influence on electron transfer and the growth of Fe-reducing bacteria, which may affect the reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in soils. To evaluate the roles of volatile fatty acids and Fe(III) oxide in accelerating the reductive dechlorination of DDT in Hydragric Acrisols, a batch anaerobic incubation experiment was conducted in a slurry system with the following seven treatments: sterile soil, control (DDT-contaminated soil), lactic acid, propionic acid, goethite, lactic acid + goethite, and propionic acid + goethite. Results showed that after 20 d of incubation, DDT residues for these treatments decreased by 34, 65, 77, 81, 77, 90, and 92% of the initial quantities, respectively, with 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane as the dominant metabolite. The application of lactic acid had no significant effect on DDT dechlorination in the first 8 d while the methanogenesis rate increased quickly but accelerated DDT dechlorination after Day 8 while the methanogenesis rate decreased and Fe(II) contents increased. The application of propionic acid enhanced DDT dechlorination rates throughout the incubation. The amendment by goethite stimulated microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides to generate Fe(II), which was an efficient electron donor, thus accelerating DDT dechlorination significantly in the early incubation period. A synergetic interaction that accelerated DDT dechlorination, either between lactic acid and goethite or between propionic acid and goethite, was obtained. The results will be of great significance to develop efficient in situ remediation technology of DDT-contaminated soil. PMID:26828189

  18. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Man Jae; O’Loughlin, Edward J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Eric R.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  19. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Yao, Fubing; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-15

    Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H2) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150-800μg/L bromate to below 10μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10mA and the HRT was less than 6h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12μg/Lh when the electric current was 10mA and HRT was 12h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H2 on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H2 as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate. PMID:26775102

  20. In situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) in Groundwater and Sediments with Edible Oil as the Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Mehlhorn, T.; Zhang, G.; Earles, J.; Lowe, K.; Phillips, J.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C. W.; Brooks, S. C.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P.

    2009-12-01

    In situ bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer was conducted at the US DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, in Oak Ridge, TN. Edible oil was tested as a slow-release electron donor for microbially mediated U (VI) reduction. Uranium contaminated sediments from the site were used in laboratory microcosm tests to study the feasibility of using this electron donor under anaerobic, ambient temperature conditions. Parallel microcosms were established using ethanol as electron donor for comparison. The tests also examined the impact of sulfate concentrations on U (VI) reduction. The oil was degraded by indigenous microorganisms with acetate as a major product but at a much slower rate than ethanol. The rapid removal of U (VI) from the aqueous phase occurred concurrently with acetate production and sulfate reduction. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 vs. 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase, but more U(VI) was reduced with higher initial sulfate level. Finally, the bioreaction in microcosms progressed to methanogenesis. Subsequently, a field test with the edible oil was conducted in a highly permeable gravelly layer (hydraulic conductivity 0.076 cm/sec). Groundwater at the site contained 5-6 μM U; 1.0-1.2 mM sulfate; 3-4 mM Ca; pH 6.8. Diluted emulsified oil (20% solution) was injected into three injection wells within 2 hrs. Geochemical analysis of site groundwater demonstrated the sequential reduction of nitrate, Mn, Fe(III) and sulfate. Transient accumulation of acetate was observed as an intermediate in the oil degradation. Reduction and removal of uranium from groundwater was observed in all wells connected to the injection wells after 2-4 weeks. Uranium concentrations in groundwater were reduced to below 0.126 μM (EPA drinking water standard), at some well locations. Rebound of U in groundwater was

  1. The impact of active layer nanomorphology on the efficiency of organic solar cells based on a squaraine dye electron donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanova, D.; Kitova, S.; Dikova, J.; Kandinska, M.; Vasilev, A.; Zhivkov, I.; Kovalenko, A.

    2016-03-01

    The possibilities were studied of improving the photovoltaic performance of solution processed BHJ solar cells by solvent vapor annealing (SVA) of the active layers, based on a squaraine dye Sq1 as a donor and the fullerene derivative PCBM as an acceptor. For this purpose, the optical properties were determined of as-deposited and of annealed with tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapors for different duration Sq1/PCMB layers, as well as the efficiency of cells built on their basis. A considerable change was established in the absorption spectra of treated for only a few seconds films and a twofold increase of the power conversion efficiency after 6 sec SVA. The results obtained are explained in terms of solvent vapor induced phase separation and formation of squaraine dye small aggregates in the blend nanostructure. The assumption made was confirmed by morphological investigation of as-deposited and of annealed Sq1/PCBM blended layers. On this basis, the impact of the active layer nanomorphology on the efficiency of solar cells based on squariane dye as electron donor is discussed.

  2. Electron and hole polaron accumulation in low-bandgap ambipolar donor-acceptor polymer transistors imaged by infrared microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, O.; Mueller, A. S.; Stinson, H. T.; Yuen, J. D.; Heeger, A. J.; Basov, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    A resurgence in the use of the donor-acceptor approach in synthesizing conjugated polymers has resulted in a family of high-mobility ambipolar systems with exceptionally narrow energy bandgaps below 1 eV. The ability to transport both electrons and holes is critical for device applications such as organic light-emitting diodes and transistors. Infrared spectroscopy offers direct access to the low-energy excitations associated with injected charge carriers. Here we use a diffraction-limited IR microscope to probe the spectroscopic signatures of electron and hole injection in the conduction channel of an organic field-effect transistor based on an ambipolar DA polymer polydiketopyrrolopyrrole-benzobisthiadiazole. We observe distinct polaronic absorptions for both electrons and holes and spatially map the carrier distribution from the source to drain electrodes for both unipolar and ambipolar biasing regimes. For ambipolar device configurations, we observe the spatial evolution of hole-induced to electron-induced polaron absorptions throughout the transport path. Our work provides a platform for combined transport and infrared studies of organic semiconductors on micron length scales relevant to functional devices.

  3. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  4. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Charge Stabilization in Donor-Acceptor Dyads Capable of Harvesting Near-Infrared Light.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Venugopal; Gobeze, Habtom B; D'Souza, Francis

    2015-08-01

    To harvest energy from the near-infrared (near-IR) and infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, which constitutes nearly 70 % of the solar radiation, there is a great demand for near-IR and IR light-absorbing sensitizers that are capable of undergoing ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer when connected to a suitable electron acceptor. Towards achieving this goal, in the present study, we report multistep syntheses of dyads derived from structurally modified BF2-chelated azadipyrromethene (ADP; to extend absorption and emission into the near-IR region) and fullerene as electron-donor and electron-acceptor entities, respectively. The newly synthesized dyads were fully characterized based on optical absorbance, fluorescence, geometry optimization, and electrochemical studies. The established energy level diagram revealed the possibility of electron transfer either from the singlet excited near-IR sensitizer or singlet excited fullerene. Femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption studies were performed to gather evidence of excited state electron transfer and to evaluate the kinetics of charge separation and charge recombination processes. These studies revealed the occurrence of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer leading to charge stabilization in the dyads, and populating the triplet states of ADP, benzanulated-ADP and benzanulated thiophene-ADP in the respective dyads, and triplet state of C60 in the case of BF2 -chelated dipyrromethene derived dyad during charge recombination. The present findings reveal that these sensitizers are suitable for harvesting light energy from the near-IR region of the solar spectrum and for building fast-responding optoelectronic devices operating under near-IR radiation input. PMID:26130432

  5. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  6. Temperature dependent electron spin echo studies of polarons in donor- and acceptor-doped poly(p-phenylene): Structural studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.; Joseph, J.; Tang, J.; Bowman, M.K.; Van Brakel, G.H.; Norris, J.R.

    1986-06-06

    Electron spin echo (ESE) measurements of donor-doped (Li, Na, K and Cs) and acceptor-doped (AsF/sub 5/) poly(p-phenylene), PPP, and fully deuterated PPP samples predict a temperature independent EPR linewidth equal to less than 0.65 gauss that decreases with increasing conductivity. In contrast, EPR linewidths either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, are dependent on dopant and always exhibit a linewidth either equal to or larger than that predicted from ESE measurements. Deuteration studies indicate that rapid spin exchange is present. Analysis of these results suggest that an exchange exists between isolated radicals in equilibrium with polarons and bipolarons with the equilibrium in favor of bipolarons at 4 K.

  7. An ultrafast spectroscopic and quantum mechanical investigation of multiple emissions in push-pull pyridinium derivatives bearing different electron donors.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, B; Benassi, E; Cesaretti, A; Fortuna, C G; Spalletti, A; Barone, V; Elisei, F

    2015-08-28

    A joint experimental and theoretical approach, involving state-of-the-art femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion measurements and quantum mechanical computations including vibronic effects, was employed to get a deep insight into the excited state dynamics of two cationic dipolar chromophores (Donor-π-Acceptor(+)) where the electron deficient portion is a N-methyl pyridinium and the electron donor a trimethoxyphenyl or a pyrene, respectively. The ultrafast spectroscopic investigation, and the time resolved area normalised emission spectra in particular, revealed a peculiar multiple emissive behaviour and allowed the distinct emitting states to be remarkably distinguished from solvation dynamics, occurring in water in a similar timescale. The two and three emissions experimentally detected for the trimethoxyphenyl and pyrene derivatives, respectively, were associated with specific local emissive minima in the potential energy surface of S1 on the ground of quantum-mechanical calculations. A low polar and planar Locally Excited (LE) state together with a highly polar and Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) state is identified to be responsible for the dual emission of the trimethoxyphenyl compound. Interestingly, the more complex photobehaviour of the pyrenyl derivative was explained considering the contribution to the fluorescence coming not only from the LE and TICT states but also from a nearly Planar Intramolecular Charge Transfer (PICT) state, with both the TICT and the PICT generated from LE by progressive torsion around the quasi-single bond between the methylpyridinium and the ethene bridge. These findings point to an interconversion between rotamers for the pyrene compound taking place in its excited state against the Non-equilibrated Excited Rotamers (NEER) principle. PMID:26213993

  8. Tuning the Electronic Structure of Fe(II) Polypyridines via Donor Atom and Ligand Scaffold Modifications: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David N; Bondarev, Alexey; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Jakubikova, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Fe(II) polypyridines are an important class of pseudo-octahedral metal complexes known for their potential applications in molecular electronic switches, data storage and display devices, sensors, and dye-sensitized solar cells. Fe(II) polypyridines have a d(6) electronic configuration and pseudo-octahedral geometry and can therefore possess either a high-spin (quintet) or a low-spin (singlet) ground state. In this study, we investigate a series of complexes based on [Fe(tpy)2](2+) (tpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine) and [Fe(dcpp)2](2+) (dcpp = 2,6-bis(2-carboxypyridyl)pyridine). The ligand field strength in these complexes is systematically tuned by replacing the central pyridine with five-membered (N-heterocyclic carbene, pyrrole, furan) or six-membered (aryl, thiazine-1,1-dioxide, 4-pyrone) moieties. To determine the impact of ligand substitutions on the relative energies of metal-centered states, the singlet, triplet, and quintet states of the Fe(II) complexes were optimized in water (PCM) using density functional theory at the B3LYP+D2 level with 6-311G* (nonmetals) and SDD (Fe) basis sets. It was found that the dcpp ligand scaffold allows for a more ideal octahedral coordination environment in comparison to the tpy ligand scaffold. The presence of six-membered central rings also allows for a more ideally octahedral coordination environment relative to five-membered central rings, regardless of the ligand scaffold. We find that the ligand field strength in the Fe(II) polypyridines can be tuned by altering the donor atom identity, with C donor atoms providing the strongest ligand field. PMID:26295275

  9. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  10. Synthesis, electronic structure and catalytic activity of ruthenium-iodo-carbonyl complexes with thioether containing NNS donor ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Subrata; Jana, Mahendra Sekhar; Biswas, Sujan; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The ruthenium carbonyl complexes 1 and 2 with redox noninnocent NNS donor ligand, 1-methyl-2-{(o-thiomethyl)phenylazo}imidazole (L) have been synthesized and characterized by various analytical and spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR) techniques. The complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible one electron Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation couple at 1.11 V for 1 and 0.76 V for 2 along with two successive one electron ligand reductions. Catalytic activity of the compounds has been investigated to the oxidation of PhCH2OH to PhCHO, 2-butanol (C4H9OH) to 2-butanone, 1-phenylethanol (PhC2H4OH) to acetophenone, cyclopentanol (C5H9OH) to cyclopentanone, cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone, cycloheptanol to cycloheptanone and cycloctanol to cycloctanone using N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMO) as oxidant. The catalytic efficiency of 2 is greater than complex 1 and well correlate with the metal oxidation potential. DFT, NBO and TDDFT calculations in DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d)/lanL2TZ(f) method are employed to interpret the structural and electronic features of the complexes.

  11. Laser-driven electron acceleration in a plasma channel with an additional electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    We examine the electron acceleration in a two-dimensional plasma channel under the action of a laser field and an additional static electric field. We propose to design an appropriate additional electric field (its direction and location), in order to launch the electron onto an energetic trajectory. We find that the electron acceleration strongly depends on the coupled effects of the laser polarization, the direction, and location of the additional electric field. The additional electric field affects the electron dynamics by changing the dephasing rate. Particularly, a suitably designed additional electric field leads to a considerable energy gain from the laser pulse after the interaction with the additional electric field. The electron energy gain from the laser with the additional electric field can be much higher than that without the additional electric field. This engineering provides a possible means for producing high energetic electrons.

  12. Revealing the Effect of Additives with Different Solubility on the Morphology and the Donor Crystalline Structures of Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiao; Zhao, Suling; Xu, Zheng; Qiao, Bo; Huang, Di; Zhao, Ling; Li, Yang; Zhu, Youqin; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-20

    The impact of two kinds of additives, such as 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT), 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), diphenylether (DPE), and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN), on the performance of poly[(5,6-difluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,7-diyl)-alt-(3,3‴-di(2-octyldodecyl)2,2';5',2″;5″,2‴-quaterthiophen-5,5‴-diyl)] (PffBT4T-2OD):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) based polymer solar cell are investigated. The polymer solar cells (PSCs) of PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM by using CN show a more improved PCE of 10.23%. The solubility difference of PffBT4T-2OD in DIO and CN creates the fine transformation in phase separation and favorable nanoscale morphology. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) data clearly shows molecular stacking and orientation of the active layer. Interestingly, DIO and CN have different functions on the effect of the molecular orientation. These interesting studies provide important guidance to optimize and control complicated molecular orientations and nanoscale morphology of PffBT4T-2OD based thick films for the application in PSCs. PMID:27328855

  13. Werner Complexes with ω-Dimethylaminoalkyl Substituted Ethylenediamine Ligands: Bifunctional Hydrogen-Bond-Donor Catalysts for Highly Enantioselective Michael Additions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subrata K; Ganzmann, Carola; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai; Gladysz, John A

    2016-03-18

    The racemic carbonate complex [Co(en)2 O2 CO](+) Cl(-) (en=1,2-ethylenediamine) and (S)-[H3 NCH((CH2 )n NHMe2 )CH2 NH3 ](3+) 3 Cl(-) (n=1-4) react (water, charcoal, 100 °C) to give [Co(en)2 ((S)-H2 NCH((CH2 )n NHMe2 )CH2 NH2 )](4+) 4 Cl(-) (3 a-d H(4+) 4 Cl(-) ) as a mixture of Λ/Δ diastereomers that separate on chiral-phase Sephadex columns. These are treated with NaOH/Na(+) BArf (-) (BArf =B(3,5-C6 H3 (CF3 )2 )4 ) to give lipophilic Λ- and Δ-3 a-d(3+) 3 BArf (-) , which are screened as catalysts (10 mol %) for additions of dialkyl malonates to nitroalkenes. Optimal results are obtained with Λ-3 c(3+) 3 BArf (-) (CH2 Cl2 , -35 °C; 98-82 % yields and 99-93 % ee for six β-arylnitroethenes). The monofunctional catalysts Λ- and Δ-[Co(en)3 ](3+) 3 BArf (-) give enantioselectivities of <10 % ee with equal loadings of Et3 N. The crystal structure of Δ-3 a H(4+) 4 Cl(-) provides a starting point for speculation regarding transition-state assemblies. PMID:26918320

  14. Charge separation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutant reaction centers with increased midpoint potential of the primary electron donor.

    PubMed

    Khmelnitskiy, A Yu; Khatypov, R A; Khristin, A M; Leonova, M M; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Primary charge separation dynamics in four mutant reaction centers (RCs) of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides with increased midpoint potential of the primary electron donor P (M160LH, L131LH, M197FH, and M160LH + L131LH + M197FH) have been studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. The decay of the excited singlet state in the wild-type and mutant RCs is complex and has two main exponential components, which indicates heterogeneity of electron transfer rates or the presence of reverse electron transfer reactions. The radical anion band of monomeric bacteriochlorophyll B(A) at 1020 nm was first observed in transient absorbance difference spectra of single mutants. This band remains visible, although with somewhat reduced amplitude, even at delays up to tens of picoseconds when stimulated emission is absent and the reaction centers are in the P(+)H(A)(-) state. The presence of this band in this time period indicates the existence of thermodynamic equilibrium between the P(+)B(A)(-)H(A) and P(+)B(A)H(A)(-) states. The data give grounds for assuming that the value of the energy difference between the states P*, P(+)B(A)(-)H(A), and P(+)B(A)H(A)(-) at early times is of the same order of magnitude as the energy kT at room temperature. Besides, monomeric bacteriochlorophyll B(A) is found to be an immediate electron acceptor in the single mutant RCs, where electron transfer is hampered due to increased energy of the P(+)B(A)(-) state with respect to P*. PMID:23379560

  15. Photo-initiated multi-step electron transfer in donor-acceptor systems using a novel bi-functionalized perylene chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, Scott M.; Smeigh, Amanda L.; Karlen, Steven D.; Young, Ryan M.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-06-01

    The excited state and redox properties of a new bi-functional perylene redox chromophore, 2,3-dihydro-1-azabenzo[cd]perylene (DABP), are described. Perylene has been widely used in electron donor-acceptor molecules in fields ranging from artificial photosynthesis to molecular spintronics. However, attaching multiple redox components to perylene to carry out multi-step electron transfer reactions often produces hard to separate regioisomers, which complicate data analysis. The use of DABP provides a strategy to retain the electronic properties of perylene, yet eliminate regioisomers. Ultrafast photo-initiated single- and two-step electron transfer reactions in three linear electron donor-acceptor systems incorporating DABP are described to illustrate its utility.

  16. Halogen bonding. The role of the polarizability of the electron-pair donor.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; Sosa, Gladis L; Peruchena, Nélida M; Alkorta, Ibon

    2016-03-14

    The nature of F-BrX-R interactions (with X = F, Cl, Br, I and R = -H, -F) has been investigated through theoretical calculation of molecular potential electrostatic (MEP), molecular polarizability, atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis and energetic decomposition analysis (EDA). A detailed analysis of the MEPs reveals that considering only the static electrostatic interactions is not sufficient to explain the nature of these interactions. The molecular polarizabilities of X-R molecules suggest that the deformation capacity of the electronic cloud of the lone pairs of the X atom plays an important role in the stability of these complexes. The topological analysis of the L(r) = -¼∇(2)ρ(r) function and the detailed analysis of the atomic quadrupole moments reveal that the BrX interactions are electrostatic in nature. The electron acceptor Br atom causes a polarization of the electronic cloud (electronic induction) on the valence shell of the X atom. Finally, the electrostatic forces and charge transfer play an important role not only in the stabilization of the complex, but also in the determination of the molecular geometry of equilibrium. The dispersive and polarization forces do not influence the equilibrium molecular geometry. PMID:26900007

  17. Radioactinide Additions to the Electronic Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Gehrke; J.R. Davidson; P.J. Taylor; R.G. Helmer; J.W. Mandler

    2001-05-01

    With the completion of a CD ROM version of the original R. L. HEATH''s Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogue, it became obvious that a number of radionuclides are missing which are important to various fields of nuclear science and technology. With a large amount of transuranic waste awaiting permanent disposal across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and the need for its assay in order to dispose of it, it was decided that the addition of the radioactinides encountered in transuranic waste should be the first priority. In response to this need, the spectra of 233U, 235U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am and 243Am have been acquired with modern Ge detectors, and prepared for graphics presentation along with the parent and progeny decay chains and decay schemes. The associated tables of -ray energies and emission probabilities have been downloaded from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data file (ENSDF) database. This information is being incorporated into the Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center Web Site at http://id.inel.gov/gamma

  18. An economic analysis of microbial reduction of sulfur dioxide with anaerobically digested sewage biosolids as electron donor

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraj, P.T.; Sublette, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    A concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is produced by regeneration of the sorbent in certain new regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. It has been previously proposed that this SO{sub 2} can be converted to elemental sulfur for disposal or byproduct recovery using a microbial/Claus process. In this process, two-thirds of the SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream would be contacted with a mixed culture containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) where SO{sub 2} would act as an electron acceptor with reduction to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). This H{sub 2}S could then be recombined with the remaining SO{sub 2} and sent to a Claus unit to produce elemental sulfur. The Claus process is well known in the natural gas industry. Glucose and heat/alkali pretreated municipal sewage sludge have been shown to act as ultimate electron donors and carbon sources for SO{sub 2}-reducing cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. Sublette and Gwozdz performed an economic analysis of this microbial SO{sub 2} reduction process comparing the microbial process with conventional catalytic SO{sub 2} hydrogenation with H{sub 2} generation from methane. The design basis was a regenerator off-gas from a copper oxide, flue gas desulfurization process applied to a 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant burning 3.5 wt% sulfur coal. All economics were based on an ultimate product gas of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} in a 2:1 ratio appropriate for feed to a Claus reactor. The fixed capital investments for the two processes were essentially equivalent. However, the annual operating costs for the microbial process were much higher than the conventional process primarily because of the high cost of raw materials, namely DE95 corn hydrolysate, which served as the electron donor and carbon source for the SO{sub 2}-reducing culture. 7 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  20. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  1. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  2. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  3. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  4. Photon-gated persistent spectral hole burning by electron transfer from a doped donor to an acceptor branched to a host polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Nishi, T.; Shimada, T.; Hiratsuka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Two-color photon-gated persistent spectral hole burning (PSHB) via donor-acceptor electron transfer is reported in systems where the acceptor, 10-chloroanthracene, was intentionally branched to a side chain of the poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) host polymer while the donor, metal-free tetraphenylporphine, was dispersed in the polymer. The systems, which had an acceptor concentration of up to 10-1 M, were prepared without aggregation of the acceptor. Spectral holes were burnt in the Qx(0,0) absorption band of the donor when the systems were simultaneously irradiated with a frequency-selective excitation (duration: 500 ps; energy: 200 nJ/cm2) and a gating excitation (wavelength: 514.5 nm; duration: 33 ms; energy: 14 μJ/cm2). The difference absorption spectrum between the unburned absorption spectrum and one recorded after photon-gated PSHB has confirmed that the hole formation mechanism is donor-acceptor electron transfer from a photoexcited donor to a ground-state branched acceptor. The thermal stability of burnt holes measured with a temperature cycling experiment increased when the acceptor was branched into PMMA. The effect of acceptor branching on the PSHB characteristics is discussed with reference to those for an acceptor-doped system.

  5. Excitation and electron transfer from selectively excited primary donor chlorophyll (P700) in a photosystem I reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Yoshihara, Keitaro; Ikegami, Isamu

    1997-01-23

    The primary processes in a photosystem I reaction center were studied by fluorescence up-conversion with a subpicosecond time resolution at room temperature. The samples were P700(primary donor chlorophyll)-enriched particles which retained {approx}14 chlorophylls per P700. Upon selective excitation of P700 at 701 nm at {approx}5{degree}C, anisotropy of the fluorescence at 749 nm decayed from {approx}0.3 to {approx}0.15 with a time constant of 1 ps. The dynamic depolarization is attributed to electronic excitation equilibration between P700 and the surrounding chlorophylls. In the isotropic fluorescence kinetics, at least two decaying components of 2.2 ps ({approx}35%) and 15 ps ({approx}55%) were found. The fast and slow components indicate the charge separation before and after full equilibration of excitation energy, respectively. A kinetic model calculation based on the above results suggests that the intrinsic rate constant of the primary electron transfer from P700{sup *} is > 0.25 ps{sup -1}. 51 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification corresponding to different electron donors and microbial profiling in anoxic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Bai, Yaohui; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-15

    Sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrifying anoxic fluidized bed membrane bioreactors (AnFB-MBR) were developed for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated groundwater with minimized sulfate production. The nitrate removal rates obtained in the methanol- and ethanol-fed mixotrophic denitrifying AnFB-MBRs reached 1.44-3.84 g NO3 -N/L reactor d at a hydraulic retention time of 0.5 h, which were significantly superior to those reported in packed bed reactors. Compared to methanol, ethanol was found to be a more effective external carbon source for sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification due to lower sulfate and total organic carbon concentrations in the effluent. Using pyrosequencing, the phylotypes of primary microbial groups in the reactor, including sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifiers, methanol- or ethanol-supported heterotrophic denitrifiers, were investigated in response to changes in electron donors. Principal component and heatmap analyses indicated that selection of electron donating substrates largely determined the microbial community structure. The abundance of Thiobacillus decreased from 45.1% in the sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying reactor to 12.0% and 14.2% in sulfur-based methanol- and ethanol-fed mixotrophic denitrifying bioreactors, respectively. Heterotrophic Methyloversatilis and Thauera bacteria became more dominant in the mixotrophic denitrifying bioreactors, which were possibly responsible for the observed methanol- and ethanol-associated denitrification. PMID:26364226

  7. Monomeric chlorophyll a enol: evidence for its possible role as the primary electron donor in photosystem I of plant photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Norris, J.R.; Shipman, L.L.; Lin, C.P.; Svec, W.A.

    1981-05-01

    The chlorophyll a (Chl a) special-pair model of the primary donor of photosystem I (P700) does not account in a completely adequate fashion for the magnetic resonance properties observed for P700/sup +/. Enolization of the Chl a ring V ..beta..-keto ester results in a very different ..pi.. electronic structure. The ESR spectrum of the cation radical consists of a single 6.1-G gaussian line that is line narrowed relative to that of Chl a/sup +/ in a manner similar to P700/sup +/. Electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy resolves only a 3.5-MHz hyperfine splitting for the 3-methyl group. The remaining splittings are all less than 3.5 MHz. Application of the special-pair model to the (/sup 13/C)P700/sup +/ second-moment data yields a 100% error. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations on ethyl chlorophyllide a enol cation bear out the ESR and ENDOR data. We conclude that a monomeric Chl a enol model provides a better description of the magnetic resonance parameters and oxidation potential of P700 than a Chl-a special-pair model.

  8. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complexes of a meso-phenol BODIPY dye with chloranils and fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Animesh; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Mula, Soumyaditya; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-02-01

    UV-Vis spectral investigations of electron donor-acceptor complexes of laser dye 2,6-Diethyl-4,4-difluoro-1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-8-(4‧-hydroxyphenyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indecene (1c) with chloranils and fullerenes are reported in toluene medium. Well defined charge transfer (CT) absorption bands have been located in the visible region. Oscillator strengths, transition dipole and resonance energies of the CT complexes have been estimated. Vertical ionization potential of 1c has been determined utilizing Mulliken's equation. A possible mechanism for the interaction between electronic subsystems of chloranils, [60]- and [70]fullerenes with three different BODIPY dyes (1a, 1b and 1c shown in Fig. 1) have been discussed in comparing the parameters like degree of charge transfer and binding constant in nonpolar toluene. Comparison of 1c complexes is done with DFT/B3LYP/6-31G optimized gas phase geometries.

  9. Electron donor concentrations in sediments and sediment properties at the agricultural chemicals team research site near New Providence, Iowa, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maharjan, Bijesh; Korom, Scott F.; Smith, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of electron donors in aquifer sediments are important to the understanding of the fate and transport of redox-sensitive constituents in groundwater, such as nitrate. For a study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 50 sediment samples were collected from below the water table from 11 boreholes at the U.S. Geological Survey Agricultural Chemicals Team research site near New Providence, Iowa, during 2006-07. All samples were analyzed for gravel, sand (coarse, medium, and fine), silt, clay, Munsell soil color, inorganic carbon content, and for the following electron donors: organic carbon, ferrous iron, and inorganic sulfide. A subset of 14 sediment samples also was analyzed for organic sulfur, but all of these samples had concentrations less than the method detection limit; therefore, the presence of this potential electron donor was not considered further. X-ray diffraction analyses provided important semi-quantitative information of well-crystallized dominant minerals within the sediments that might be contributing electron donors.

  10. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  11. Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Waleed A; Al-Akraa, Mahmoud M

    2005-07-01

    With the number of patients presently awaiting renal transplantation exceeding the number of cadaveric organs available, there is an increasing reliance on live renal donation. Of the 11,869 renal transplants performed in 2002 in the US, 52.6% were living donors from the United Network for Organ Sharing Registry. Renal allografts from living donors provide: superior immediate long-term function; require less waiting time and are more cost-effective than those from cadaveric donors. However, anticipation of postoperative pain and temporary occupational disability may dissuade many potential donors. Additionally, some recipients hesitate to accept a living donor kidney due to suffering that would be endured by the donor. It is a unique medical situation when a young, completely healthy donor undergoes a major surgical procedure to provide an organ for transplantation. It is mandatory to offer a surgical technique, which is safe and with minimal complications. It is also obvious for any organ transplantation, that the integrity of the organ remain intact, thus, enabling its successful transplantation into the recipient. An acceptably short ischemia time and adequate lengths of ureter and renal vasculature are favored. Many centers are performing laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy in an effort to ease convalescence of renal donors. This may encourage the consideration of live donation by recipients and potential donors. PMID:16047050

  12. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e-)4 (Ru/C12A7:e-), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e- markedly enhances N2 dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e- to store hydrogen reversibly.

  13. An Effort to Increase Organ Donor Registration Through Intergroup Competition and Electronic Word of Mouth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sandi W; Hitt, Rose; Park, Hee Sun; Walther, Joseph; Liang, Yuhua Jake; Hsieh, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The effort to increase Web organ donation registrations in Michigan by enhancing 2 types of university campaigns with social media strategies informed by social identity theory is the focus of this research. The two campaigns focused on either ingroup or rivalry outgroup social identification, and each was enhanced with individually focused social media in the first year of the campaign and with electronic word of mouth in Year 2 of the campaign. Results indicated that individually focused social media such as Facebook ads worked well in rivalry campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) but not in ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations decreased significantly over baseline when ads were introduced in the first year of each type of campaign). Electronic word-of-mouth strategies worked well in both ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) and rivalry campaigns (in which registrations rose almost eight times over baseline, when strategies were introduced in the second year of each type of campaign). PMID:26735448

  14. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca(24)Al(28)O(64)](4+)(e(-))(4) (Ru/C12A7:e(-)), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e(-) markedly enhances N(2) dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e(-) to store hydrogen reversibly. PMID:23089869

  15. Photoreduction of indigo dyes by electron donors. One- and two-electron-transfer reactions as a consequence of excited-state quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Schanze, K.S.; Lee, L.Y.C.; Giannotti, C.; Whitten, D.G.

    1986-05-14

    The indigoid dyes, thioindigo (TI), N,N'-diacetylindigo, (NDI) and oxalylindigo (OI), all undergo reduction upon irradiation of the dyes in the presence of electron donors such as triethylamine (TEA) or N-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide (BNAH). Product analysis by NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry has shown that the products for TI and NDI are the formal H/sub 2/ adducts TIH/sub 2/ and NDIH/sub 2/; the product for OI has been shown to be the semireduced radical OIH which is readily detected by its characteristic ESR spectrum. Mechanistic studies have been carried out for the visible-light-induced reduction of the three dyes.

  16. Correlation of Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction Reaction Efficiencies for Aryl Radicals with their Vertical Electron Affinities and the Vertical Ionization Energies of the Hydrogen Atom Donors

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linhong; Nash, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The factors that control the reactivities of aryl radicals toward hydrogen-atom donors were studied by using a dual-cell Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT – ICR). Hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies for two substrates, cyclohexane and isopropanol, were measured for twenty-three structurally different, positively-charged aryl radicals, which included dehydrobenzenes, dehydronaphthalenes, dehydropyridines, and dehydro(iso)quinolines. A logarithmic correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) vertical electron affinities (EA) of the aryl radicals. Transition state energies calculated for three of the aryl radicals with isopropanol were found to correlate linearly with their (calculated) EAs. No correlation was found between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the (calculated) enthalpy changes for the reactions. Measurement of the reaction efficiencies for the reactions of several different hydrogen-atom donors with a few selected aryl radicals revealed a logarithmic correlation between the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiencies and the vertical ionization energies (IE) of the hydrogen-atom donors, but not the lowest homolytic X – H (X = heavy atom) bond dissociation energies of the hydrogen-atom donors. Examination of the hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions of twenty-nine different aryl radicals and eighteen different hydrogen-atom donors showed that the reaction efficiency increases (logarithmically) as the difference between the IE of the hydrogen-atom donor and the EA of the aryl radical decreases. This dependence is likely to result from the increasing polarization, and concomitant stabilization, of the transition state as the energy difference between the neutral and ionic reactants decreases. Thus, the hydrogen-atom abstraction reaction efficiency for an aryl radical can be “tuned” by structural changes that influence either

  17. The electronic structure and second-order nonlinear optical properties of donor-acceptor acetylenes - A detailed investigation of structure-property relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Graham, Eva; Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Perry, Joseph W.; Cheng, L.-T.; Perry, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of donor-acceptor acetylene compounds was synthesized in which systematic changes in both the conjugation length and the donor-acceptor strength were made. The effect of these structural changes on the spectroscopic and electronic properties of the molecules and, ultimately, on the measured second-order molecular hyperpolarizabilities (beta) was investigated. It was found that increases in the donor-acceptor strength resulted in increases in the magnitude of beta. For this class of molecules, the increase is dominated by the energy of the intramolecular charge-transfer transition, while factors such as the ground to excited-state dipole moment change and the transition-moment integral are much less important. Increasing the conjugation length from one to two acetylene linkers did not result in an increase in the value of beta; however, beta increased sharply in going from two acetylenes to three. This increase is attributed to the superposition of several nearly isoenergetic excited states.

  18. Anaerobic in situ biodegradation of TNT using whey as an electron donor: a case study.

    PubMed

    Innemanová, Petra; Velebová, Radka; Filipová, Alena; Čvančarová, Monika; Pokorný, Petr; Němeček, Jan; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-12-25

    Contamination by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), an explosive extensively used by the military, represents a serious environmental problem. In this study, whey has been selected as the most technologically and economically suitable primary substrate for anaerobic in situ biodegradation of TNT. Under laboratory conditions, various additions of whey, molasses, acetate and activated sludge as an inoculant were tested and the process was monitored using numerous chemical analyses including phospholipid fatty acid analysis. The addition of whey resulted in the removal of more than 90% of the TNT in real contaminated soil (7 mg kg(-1) and 12 mg kg(-1) of TNT). The final bioremediation strategy was suggested on the basis of the laboratory results and tested under real conditions at a TNT contaminated site in the Czech Republic. During the pilot test, three repeated injections of whey suspension into the sandy aquifer were performed over a 10-month period. In total, approximately 5m(3) of whey were used. A substantial decrease in the TNT groundwater concentration from the original levels (equalling 1.49 mg l(-1) to 8.58 mg l(-1)) was observed in most of the injection wells, while the concentrations of the TNT biotransformation products were found to be elevated. Pilot-scale application results showed that the anoxic and/or anaerobic conditions in the aquifer were sufficient for TNT bio-reduction by autochthonous microorganisms. Whey application was not accompanied by undesirable effects such as a substantial decrease in the pH or clogging of the wells. The results of the study document the suitability of application of whey to bioremediate TNT contaminated sites in situ. PMID:25882606

  19. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making. PMID:24919733

  20. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Pannonibacter phragmitetus LSSE-09 stimulated with external electron donors under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Luo, Mingfang; Li, Wangliang; Wei, Xuetuan; Xie, Keng; Liu, Lijun; Jiang, Chengying; Liu, Huizhou

    2011-01-30

    A novel Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strain LSSE-09, identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus, was isolated from industrial sludge. It has strong aerobic and anaerobic Cr (VI)-reduction potential under alkaline conditions. At 37 °C and pH 9.0, growing cells of strain LSSE-09 could completely reduce 100 and 1000 mg L(-1) Cr (VI)-Cr (III) within 9 and 24h, respectively under aerobic condition. Resting cells showed higher anaerobic reduction potential with the rate of 1.46 mg g(-1)((dry weight))min(-1), comparing with their aerobic reduction rate, 0.21 mg g(-1)min(-1). External electron donors, such as lactate, acetate, formate, pyruvate, citrate and glucose could highly increase the reduction rate, especially for aerobic reduction. The presence of 3000 mg L(-1) acetate enhanced anaerobic and aerobic Cr (VI)-reduction rates up to 9.47 mg g(-1)min(-1) and 4.42 mg g(-1)min(-1), respectively, which were 5 and 20 times faster than those without it. Strain LSSE-09 retained high activities over six batch cycles and NO(3)(-) and SO(4)(2-) had slightly negative effects on Cr (VI)-reduction rates. The results suggest that strain LSSE-09 has potential application for Cr (VI) detoxification in alkaline wastewater. PMID:21041020

  1. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  2. An ESEEM study of the oxidized electron donor of plant photosystem II: Evidence that D ? is a neutral tyrosine radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelo, R. G.; Hoff, A. J.; Dikanov, S. A.; Tyryshkin, A. M.

    1989-09-01

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) has been performed on the tyrosyl radical D ? in photosystem II of plants and algae. This radical was investigated in PS II-enriched subchloroplast particles, and in perdeuterated and 15N-substituted Chlorella vulgaris algae. From the ESEEM analysis in the time and frequency domain, two proton hyperfine interactions were determined. One of these protons has hyperfine parameters aiso=27.2 MHz, T11=-3.1 MHz and T22/ T11=0.5. The second proton, which is easily exchangeable by deuterium, has parameters aiso=±1.6 MHz, T11=∓8.4 MHz and T22/ T11=1. The hyperfine parameters of the first proton are characteristic of a β-methylene proton, whereas those of the second indicate that it is a proton hydrogen bonded to the tyrosyl oxygen. We conclude that the oxidized tyrosyl donor is a neutral hydrogen-bonded radical.

  3. Electron and donor-impurity-related Raman scattering and Raman gain in triangular quantum dots under an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiutiunnyk, Anton; Akimov, Volodymyr; Tulupenko, Viktor; Mora-Ramos, Miguel E.; Kasapoglu, Esin; Morales, Alvaro L.; Duque, Carlos Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The differential cross-section of electron Raman scattering and the Raman gain are calculated and analysed in the case of prismatic quantum dots with equilateral triangle base shape. The study takes into account their dependencies on the size of the triangle, the influence of externally applied electric field as well as the presence of an ionized donor center located at the triangle's orthocenter. The calculations are made within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations, with a diagonalization scheme being applied to obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the x- y Hamiltonian. The incident and secondary (scattered) radiation have been considered linearly-polarized along the y-direction, coinciding with the direction of the applied electric field. For the case with an impurity center, Raman scattering with the intermediate state energy below the initial state one has been found to show maximum differential cross-section more than by an order of magnitude bigger than that resulting from the scheme with lower intermediate state energy. The Raman gain has maximum magnitude around 35 nm dot size and electric field of 40 kV/cm for the case without impurity and at maximum considered values of the input parameters for the case with impurity. Values of Raman gain of the order of up to 104cm-1 are predicted in both cases.

  4. An Inexpensive Co-Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Composite with Electron Donor-Acceptor Character for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shufang; Lu, Jun; Yan, Dongpeng; Qin, Yumei; Li, Hailong; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the inexpensive 4,4-diaminostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DAS) and 4,4-dinitro-stilbene-2,2- disulfonate (DNS) anions with arbitrary molar ratios were successfully co-intercalated into Zn2Al-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite exhibited the broad UV-visible light absorption and fluorescence quenching, which was a direct indication of photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between the intercalated DAS (donor) and DNS (acceptor) anions. This was confirmed by the matched HOMO/LUMO energy levels alignment of the intercalated DAS and DNS anions, which was also compatible for water splitting. The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite was fabricated as the photoanode and Pt as the cathode. Under the UV-visible light illumination, the enhanced photo-generated current (4.67 mA/cm2 at 0.8 V vs. SCE) was generated in the external circuit, and the photoelectrochemical water split was realized. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical water splitting performance had excellent crystalline, electrochemical and optical stability. Therefore, this novel inorganic/organic hybrid photoanode exhibited potential application prospect in photoelectrochemical water splitting.

  5. An Inexpensive Co-Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Composite with Electron Donor-Acceptor Character for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shufang; Lu, Jun; Yan, Dongpeng; Qin, Yumei; Li, Hailong; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the inexpensive 4,4-diaminostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DAS) and 4,4-dinitro-stilbene-2,2- disulfonate (DNS) anions with arbitrary molar ratios were successfully co-intercalated into Zn2Al-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite exhibited the broad UV-visible light absorption and fluorescence quenching, which was a direct indication of photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between the intercalated DAS (donor) and DNS (acceptor) anions. This was confirmed by the matched HOMO/LUMO energy levels alignment of the intercalated DAS and DNS anions, which was also compatible for water splitting. The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite was fabricated as the photoanode and Pt as the cathode. Under the UV-visible light illumination, the enhanced photo-generated current (4.67 mA/cm2 at 0.8 V vs. SCE) was generated in the external circuit, and the photoelectrochemical water split was realized. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical water splitting performance had excellent crystalline, electrochemical and optical stability. Therefore, this novel inorganic/organic hybrid photoanode exhibited potential application prospect in photoelectrochemical water splitting. PMID:26174201

  6. Electron donor-acceptor interaction of 3,4-dimethylaniline with 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Magadum, Subash R.; Budni, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    The electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction between 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinone (DCNQ) and 3,4-dimethylaniline (3,4-DMA) is studied in chloroform, dichloromethane and 1:1 (v/v) mixture of chloroform and dichloromethane. The rate of formation of the product was measured as a function of time using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The formation constant ( K) and molar extinction coefficient ( ɛ) values for the formation of EDA complex were evaluated in the temperature range of 20-35 °C. The pseudo-first-order rate constant ( k1) and the second-order rate constant ( k2) for the disappearance of EDA complex and for the formation of product were evaluated. The activation parameters (Δ H#, Δ S# and Δ G#) of the reaction were determined by temperature dependence of rate constants using the Arrhenius plots. The effect of relative permittivity of the medium on the reaction is discussed. The observed results indicate that formation of final product proceeds through initial formation of EDA complex as an intermediate. The product of the reaction was purified by column chromatography method and identified as 3-( N-3,4-dimethyl-phenylamino)-2-cyano-1,4-naphthoquinone by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of kinetic, analytical and spectroscopic results, a plausible mechanism for the formation of EDA complex and its transformation into product is proposed.

  7. Heme-copper terminal oxidase using both cytochrome c and ubiquinol as electron donors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ye; Meyer, Björn; Sokolova, Lucie; Zwicker, Klaus; Karas, Michael; Brutschy, Bernd; Peng, Guohong; Michel, Hartmut

    2012-02-28

    The cytochrome c oxidase Cox2 has been purified from native membranes of the hyperthermophilic eubacterium Aquifex aeolicus. It is a cytochrome ba(3) oxidase belonging to the family B of the heme-copper containing terminal oxidases. It consists of three subunits, subunit I (CoxA2, 63.9 kDa), subunit II (CoxB2, 16.8 kDa), and an additional subunit IIa of 5.2 kDa. Surprisingly it is able to oxidize both reduced cytochrome c and ubiquinol in a cyanide sensitive manner. Cox2 is part of a respiratory chain supercomplex. This supercomplex contains the fully assembled cytochrome bc(1) complex and Cox2. Although direct ubiquinol oxidation by Cox2 conserves less energy than ubiquinol oxidation by the cytochrome bc(1) complex followed by cytochrome c oxidation by a cytochrome c oxidase, ubiquinol oxidation by Cox2 is of advantage when all ubiquinone would be completely reduced to ubiquinol, e.g., by the sulfidequinone oxidoreductase, because the cytochrome bc(1) complex requires the presence of ubiquinone to function according to the Q-cycle mechanism. In the case that all ubiquinone has been reduced to ubiquinol its reoxidation by Cox2 will enable the cytochrome bc(1) complex to resume working. PMID:22334648

  8. Electron Transfer within Self-Assembling Cyclic Tetramers Using Chlorophyll-Based Donor-Acceptor Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Victoria L; Smeigh, Amanda L; Kim, Chul Hoon; Co, Dick T; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2012-05-09

    The synthesis and photoinduced charge transfer properties of a series of Chl-based donor-acceptor triad building blocks that self-assemble into cyclic tetramers are reported. Chlorophyll a was converted into zinc methyl 3-ethylpyrochlorophyllide a (Chl) and then further modified at its 20-position to covalently attach a pyromellitimide (PI) acceptor bearing a pyridine ligand and one or two naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) (NDI) secondary electron acceptors to give Chl-PI-NDI and Chl-PI-NDI2. The pyridine ligand within each ambident triad enables intermolecular Chl metal-ligand coordination in dry toluene, which results in the formation of cyclic tetramers in solution, as determined using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering at a synchrotron source. Femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of the monomers in toluene-1% pyridine and the cyclic tetramers in toluene shows that the selective photoexcitation of Chl results in intramolecular electron transfer from 1*Chl to PI to form Chl+.-PI-.-NDI and Chl+.-PI-.-NDI2. This initial charge separation is followed by a rapid charge shift from PI-. to NDI and subsequent charge recombination of Chl+.-PI-NDI-. and Chl+.-PI-(NDI)NDI-. on a 5-30 ns time scale. Charge recombination in the Chl-PI-NDI2 cyclic tetramer (τCR = 30 ± 1 ns in toluene) is slower by a factor of 3 relative to the monomeric building blocks (τCR = 10 ± 1 ns in toluene-1% pyridine). This indicates that the self-assembly of these building blocks into the cyclic tetramers alters their structures in a way that lengthens their charge separation lifetimes, which is an advantageous strategy for artificial photosynthetic systems.

  9. Potential benefits of triethylamine as n-electron donor in the estimation of forskolin by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gajula; Ram Reddy, A.

    2016-02-01

    Diterpenoid forskolin was isolated from Coleus forskolii. The electronic absorption and emission studies of forskolin were investigated in various solvents with an aim to improve its detection limits. The two chromophores present in the diterpenoid are not conjugated leading to the poor absorption and emission of UV light. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were solvent specific. In the presence of a monodentate ligand, triethylamine the detection of forskolin is improved by 3.63 times in ethanol with the fluorescence method and 3.36 times in DMSO by the absorption spectral method. The longer wavelength absorption maximum is blue shifted while the lower energy fluorescence maximum is red shifted in the presence of triethylamine. From the wavelength of fluorescence maxima of the exciplex formed between excited forskolin and triethylamine it is concluded that the order of reactivity of hydroxyl groups in the excited state forskolin is in the reverse order to that of the order of the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in its ground state.

  10. Syntheses of new imidazole ligand series and evaluation of 1-, 2- and 4,5-imidazole substituent electronic and steric effects on N-donor strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eseola, Abiodun O.; Sun, Wen-Hua; Li, Wen; Woods, Joseph A. O.

    2010-12-01

    A series of new imidazole based heterocycles (5-(4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)furan-2-yl)methyl acetate ( Him-dp), (5-(1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazol-2-yl)furan-2-yl)methyl acetate ( HIm-pt), (5-(1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolin-2-yl)furan-2-yl)methyl acetate ( HIm-phen), 2-(2-nitrophenyl)-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazole ( HIm-n), 1-methyl-2-(2-nitrophenyl)-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazole ( MeIm-n), N-(2-(1-ethyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)phenyl)benzamide ( EtIm-ba) and 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(8-(1-ethyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-1,4-dihydroquinolin-2-yl)phenol ( EtIm-q) were synthesized and studied for the dependence of their azole donor characteristics on substituent factors by means of experimentally determined ionization constant data (derived as p Kas), spectroscopic analyses and calculated properties of their DFT optimized molecular geometries performed at the B3LYP/6-311 + G * level. Results showed that the lowest donor strength recorded for HIm-pt (p Ka = 2.67 ± 0.07) could be traced to the extensive electronic conjugation of the azole π-electrons with 4,5- and 2-substituents. On the other hand, the strongest imidazole donor strength in the series was obtained from EtIm-q (p Ka = 4.61 ± 0.04) for which the substituents possessed negligible π-overlap with the azole ring. The experimental results and theoretical calculations lead to conclusions that effective conjugation between the imidazole ring and substituent aromatic groups is accountable for significant withdrawal of charge densities on the imidazole N-donor atom and vice versa. Furthermore, observed donor strengths in the series suggest that electronic inductive effects of the substituents provided lesser impact on donor strength modification of imidazole base and that alkylation of 1-imidazole position did not yield the anticipated push of electron density in favour of the N-donor atom. It is anticipated that the results should promote the understanding of azole-containing bio-macromolecular species

  11. Motivations for Giving of Alumni Donors, Lapsed Donors and Non-Donors: Implications for Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugano, Emilio Kariuki

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive and causal comparative study sought to identify motivations for alumni donor acquisition and retention in Christian institutions of higher learning. To meet this objective, motivations for alumni donors, lapsed donors, and non-donors were analyzed and compared. Data was collected through an electronic survey of a stratified sample…

  12. Synthesis, spectrophotometric, structural and thermal studies of the charge transfer complex of p-phenylenediamine, as an electron donor with π acceptor 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2010-08-01

    The interaction between p-phenylenediamine (PPD) as a donor with the π acceptor 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (DNB) has been investigated spectrophotometrically in methanol at room temperature. CT complex formed as a result of transfer of lone pair of electrons and exhibits well resolved charge transfer bands in the regions where neither donor nor acceptor have any absorption. The stoichiometry of the charge transfer complex (CTC) was found to be 1:1. The solid state CTC has also been synthesized, and has been characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR spectra, 1H NMR spectroscopy and electronic absorption. The thermal stability of CT complex was studies using TGA and DTA analyses techniques. On the basis of the studies, the structure of CT complex is [(PPD)(DNB)], and a general mechanism for its formation is proposed. The formation constant and other physical parameters of the CT complex were determined by the Benesi-Hildebrand equation.

  13. High performance weak donor-acceptor polymers in thin film transistors: effect of the acceptor on electronic properties, ambipolar conductivity, mobility, and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Jonathan D; Fan, Jian; Seifter, Jason; Lim, Bogyu; Hufschmid, Ryan; Heeger, Alan J; Wudl, Fred

    2011-12-28

    We have studied the electronic, physical, and transistor properties of a family of donor-acceptor polymers consisting of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) coupled with different accepting companion units in order to determine the effects of donor-acceptor interaction. Using the electronically neutral benzene (B), the weakly accepting benzothiadiazole (BT), and the strongly accepting benzobisthiadiazole (BBT), the accepting strength of the companion unit was systematically modulated. All polymers exhibited excellent transistor performance, with mobilities above 0.1 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1), even exceeding 1 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) for one of the BBT-containing polymers. We find that the BBT is the strongest acceptor, enabling the BBT-containing polymers to be strongly ambipolar. The BBT moiety also strengthens interchain interactions, which provides higher thermal stability and performance for transistors with BBT-containing polymers as the active layer. PMID:22043809

  14. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  15. Metal-Free Reductive Cleavage of C–N and S–N Bonds by Photoactivated Electron Transfer from a Neutral Organic Donor**

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Steven; Doni, Eswararao; Tuttle, Tell; Murphy, John A

    2014-01-01

    A photoactivated neutral organic super electron donor cleaves challenging arenesulfonamides derived from dialkylamines at room temperature. It also cleaves a) ArC–NR and b) ArN–C bonds. This study also highlights the assistance given to these cleavage reactions by the groups attached to N in (a) and to C in (b), by lowering LUMO energies and by stabilizing the products of fragmentation. PMID:24311295

  16. Factoring the contribution of through-space and through-bond interactions to rates of photoinduced electron transfer in donor- spacer-acceptor molecules using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gosztola, D.; Wang, Bing; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1996-06-01

    Contributions from through-space and through-bond interactions to the electronic coupling matrix elements for photoinduced charge separation and recombination in linked donor-spacer-acceptor molecules were studied. The molecules consisted of a 4-piperidinyl-naphthalene-1,8-dicarboximide electron donor and a N-(n-octyl)pyromellitimide electron acceptor attached to the 1,5- and 1,8-positions of either anthracene or dibenzobicyclo(2.2.2)octatriene spacers.

  17. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, E. N.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-01

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  18. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  19. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy losses in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-28

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. We found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  20. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  1. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a frictionmore » term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.« less

  2. Effects of the acceptor unit in dyes with acceptor-bridge-donor architecture on the electron photo-injection mechanism and aggregation in DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Ximena; Claveria-Cadiz, Francisca; Arias-Olivares, David; Rodriguez-Serrano, Angela; Inostroza, Natalia; Schott, Eduardo

    2016-09-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are devices that convert light to electrical energy. Nowadays, researchers have focused on the understanding of the performance of dyes in solar cells. In this way, new efficient dyes have been obtained which can act as efficient light-harvesting compounds where the combination and the balance of acceptor(A)-bridge-donor(D) architectures confer suitable attributes and properties to the dye. Herein, we have carried out a DFT study on the optical and electronic properties of eight different A motifs and their influence on the electron photo-injection (PI) mechanisms through type I (indirect) or type II (direct) pathways in A-bridge-D dyes in DSSCs. The models consisted of thiophene as a bridge and triphenylamine as a D anchored to a TiO2 anatase cluster. All geometry optimizations were calculated using the B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and BHandHLYP functionals combined with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O and S and the LANL2DZ pseudopotential for Ti atoms. Most of the A dyes display optoelectronic properties consistent with a type-I (indirect) mechanism except for the A5 dye where the results suggest a type-II (direct) PI pathway. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out in order to describe the formation of dye dimers and analyze the stability of the aggregates due to intermolecular interactions. The observed trends indicate that dyes with A2 and A5 anchoring groups have less tendency to dimerize due to weaker intermolecular interactions resulting in less stable dimer complexes. Specifically, we found that the A motif influences the PI by a dye and the dimerization profiles. PMID:27530076

  3. Ion acceleration enhanced by additional neutralizing electrons in a magnetically expanding double layer plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-15

    Electrons neutralizing an ion beam are additionally supplied to a magnetically expanding double layer (DL) plasma from the downstream side of the DL. The rf power and the argon gas pressure are maintained at 200 W and 55 mPa, respectively, and the source magnetic field is varied in the range of about 70-550 G. It is observed that the ion beam energy corresponding to the DL potential drop increases up to 30 eV with an increase in the magnetic field when supplying the additional electrons, while it saturates at 20 eV for the case of the absence of the additional electrons. The supplied electrons are believed to be an energy source for the DL such that increasing the magnetic field is able to increase the potential drop beyond the limit found in the absence of the supplied electrons.

  4. Atomic electron affinities and the role of symmetry between electron addition and subtraction in a corrected Koopmans approach.

    PubMed

    Teale, A M; De Proft, F; Geerlings, P; Tozer, D J

    2014-07-28

    The essential aspects of zero-temperature grand-canonical ensemble density-functional theory are reviewed in the context of spin-density-functional theory and are used to highlight the assumption of symmetry between electron addition and subtraction that underlies the corrected Koopmans approach of Tozer and De Proft (TDP) for computing electron affinities. The issue of symmetry is then investigated in a systematic study of atomic electron affinities, comparing TDP affinities with those from a conventional Koopmans evaluation and electronic energy differences. Although it cannot compete with affinities determined from energy differences, the TDP expression yields results that are a significant improvement over those from the conventional Koopmans expression. Key insight into the results from both expressions is provided by an analysis of plots of the electronic energy as a function of the number of electrons, which highlight the extent of symmetry between addition and subtraction. The accuracy of the TDP affinities is closely related to the nature of the orbitals involved in the electron addition and subtraction, being particularly poor in cases where there is a change in principal quantum number, but relatively accurate within a single manifold of orbitals. The analysis is then extended to a consideration of the ground state Mulliken electronegativity and chemical hardness. The findings further emphasize the key role of symmetry in determining the quality of the results. PMID:24406854

  5. Pressure dependence of donor excitation spectra in AlSb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.; McCluskey, M.D.; Haller, E.E.

    2002-01-16

    We have investigated the behavior of ground to bound excited-state electronic transitions of Se and Te donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. Using broadband far-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, we observe qualitatively different behaviors of the electronic transition energies of the two donors. While the pressure derivative of the Te transition energy is small and constant, as might be expected for a shallow donor, the pressure derivatives of the Se transition energies are quadratic and large at low pressures, indicating that Se is actually a deep donor. In addition, at pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, we observe evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the selenium electronic transitions and a two-phonon mode.

  6. Effective treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated leachate using a novel Pd-bionanocatalyst: Impact of electron donor and aqueous geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Coker, Victoria S.; Parry, Stephen A.; Thomas, Russell A.P.; Kalin, Robert; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium catalysts offer the potential for the effective treatment of a variety of priority reducible pollutants in natural waters. In this study, microbially synthesized magnetite nanoparticles were functionalized with Pd(0), creating a highly reactive, magnetically recoverable, nano-scale catalyst (Pd-BnM). This was then investigated for the treatment of model Cr(VI) contaminated solutions at a range of pH values, and also alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated leachates from chromite ore processing residue (COPR); a contaminant issue of global concern. The sample of COPR used in this study was obtained from a site in Glasgow, UK, where extensive Cr(VI) contamination has been reported. In initial experiments Pd-BnM was supplied with H2 gas or formate as electron donors, and Cr(VI) removal from model synthetic solutions was quantified at various pH values (2–12). Effective removal was noted at neutral to environmentally relevant alkaline (pH 12) pH values, while the use of formate as an electron donor resulted in loss of performance under acidic conditions (pH 2). Reaction kinetics were then assessed with increasing Pd-BnM loading in both model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions and the COPR leachate. When formate was used as the electron donor for Pd-BnM, to treat COPR leachate, there was significant inhibition of Cr(VI) removal. In contrast, a promotion of reaction rate, was observed when H2 was employed. Upon sustained reaction with model Cr(VI) solutions, in the presence of excess electron donor (formate or H2), appreciable quantities of Cr(VI) were removed before eventual inactivation of the catalyst. Faster onset of inactivation was reported in the COPR leachates, removing 4% and 64% of Cr(VI) observed from model Cr(VI) solutions, when formate and H2 were used as electron donors, respectively. XAS, TEM-EDX and XPS analysis of the catalysts that had been inactivated in the model solution, showed that the surface had an extensive covering of reduced Cr(III), most likely as a Cr

  7. Quadrupolar effects on nuclear spins of neutral arsenic donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Pflüger, Moritz P. D.; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2016-04-01

    We present electrically detected electron nuclear double resonance measurements of the nuclear spins of ionized and neutral arsenic donors in strained silicon. In addition to a reduction of the hyperfine coupling, we find significant quadrupole interactions of the nuclear spin of the neutral donors of the order of 10 kHz. By comparing these to the quadrupole shifts due to crystal fields measured for the ionized donors, we identify the effect of the additional electron on the electric field gradient at the nucleus. This extra component is expected to be caused by the coupling to electric field gradients created due to changes in the electron wave function under strain.

  8. An alternate photosynthetic electron donor system for PSI supports light dependent nitrogen fixation in a non-heterocystous cyanobacterium, Plectonema boryanum.

    PubMed

    Misra, Hari S; Khairnar, Nivedita P; Mahajan, Suresh K

    2003-01-01

    Plectonema boryanum exhibits temporal separation of photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation under diazotrophic conditions. During nitrogen fixation, the photosynthetic electron transport chain becomes impaired, which leads to the uncoupling of the PSII and PSI activities. A 30-40% increase in PSI activity and continuous generation of ATP through light-dependent processes seem to support the nitrogen fixation. The use of an artificial electron carrier that shuttles electrons between the plastoquinone pool and plastocyanin, bypassing cytochrome b/f complex, enhanced the photosynthetic electron transport activity five to six fold during nitrogen fixation. Measuring of full photosynthetic electron transport activity using methyl voilogen as a terminal acceptor revealed that the photosynthetic electron transport components beyond plastocyanin might be functional. Further, glycolate can act as a source of electrons for PSI for the nitrogen fixing cells, which have residual PSII activity. Under conditions when PSI becomes largely independent of PSII and glycolate provides electrons for PSI activity, the light-dependent nitrogen fixation also was stimulated by glycolate. These results suggest that during nitrogen fixation, when the photosynthetic electron transport from PSII is inhibited at the level of cytochrome b/f complex, an alternate electron donor system for PSI may be required for the cells to carry out light dependent nitrogen fixation. PMID:12685043

  9. Vinylogous tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) {pi}-electron donors and derived radical cations: ESR spectroscopic, magnetic, and X-ray structural studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, M.R.; Moore, A.J.; Tanner, B.K.

    1996-06-01

    The properties of new 2,2`-ethanediylidene(1,3-diethile) derivatives 5, 6 and 8-11 are reported. Cyclic voltammetric studies establish that they are efficient donor molecules, with the extended conjugation resulting in stabilization of dications, relative to tetrathiafulvalene TTF (1). Radical cations are generated by oxidation of the neutral compounds with trifluoroacetic acid or anhydrous silver perchlorate in dichloromethane, and their ESR and proton ENDOR spectra are reported. The bulk of the spin population resides in the central S{sub 2} {double_bond}C-C{double_bond}CS{sub 2} part of the {pi}-system. The X-ray crystal structure of donor 6 reveals that the 2,2`-ethanediylidene(1,3-dithiole) framework is planar. Donor 6 forms a crystalline 1:1 charge-transfer complex with TCNQ, the X-ray crystal structure of which shows a mixed stack structure. A solution of this complex in acetonitrile exhibits ESR spectra of both radical ions, 6{sup {lg_bullet}}{sup +} and TCNQ{sup {lg_bullet}}{sup +}. Static susceptibility data are reported for TCNQ complexes of some of these donors. 20 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Spectroscopic properties and electronic structure of five- and six-coordinate iron(II) porphyrin NO complexes: Effect of the axial N-donor ligand.

    PubMed

    Praneeth, V K K; Näther, Christian; Peters, Gerhard; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, the differences in the spectroscopic properties and electronic structures of five- and six-coordinate iron(II) porphyrin NO complexes are explored using [Fe(TPP)(NO)] (1; TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) and [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] (2; MI = 1-methylimidazole) type systems. Binding of N-donor ligands in axial position trans to NO to five-coordinate complexes of type 1 is investigated using UV-vis absorption and 1H NMR spectroscopies. This way, the corresponding binding constants Keq are determined and the 1H NMR spectra of 1 and 2 are assigned for the first time. In addition, 1H NMR allows for the determination of the degree of denitrosylation in solutions of 1 with excess base. The influence of the axial ligand on the properties of the coordinated NO is then investigated. Vibrational spectra (IR and Raman) of 1 and 2 are presented and assigned using isotope substitution and normal-coordinate analysis. Obtained force constants are 12.53 (N-O) and 2.98 mdyn/A (Fe-NO) for 1 compared to 11.55 (N-O) and 2.55 mdyn/A (Fe-NO) for 2. Together with the NMR results, this provides experimental evidence that binding of the trans ligand weakens the Fe-NO bond. The principal bonding schemes of 1 and 2 are very similar. In both cases, the Fe-N-O subunit is strongly bent. Donation from the singly occupied pi* orbital of NO into d(z2) of iron(II) leads to the formation of an Fe-NO sigma bond. In addition, a medium-strong pi back-bond is present in these complexes. The most important difference in the electronic structures of 1 and 2 occurs for the Fe-NO sigma bond, which is distinctively stronger for 1 in agreement with the experimental force constants. The increased sigma donation from NO in 1 also leads to a significant transfer of spin density from NO to iron, as has been shown by magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy in a preceding Communication (Praneeth, V. K. K.; Neese, F.; Lehnert, N. Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 2570-2572). This is confirmed by the 1H NMR results

  11. In Situ Generation of Electron Donor to Assist Signal Amplification on Porphyrin-Sensitized Titanium Dioxide Nanostructures for Ultrasensitive Photoelectrochemical Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian; Qiu, Zhenli; Zhuang, Junyang; Xu, Mingdi; Tang, Dianping

    2015-10-28

    An ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay protocol for quantitative detection of low-abundant proteins at a low potential was designed by utilizing porphyrin-sensitized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures. Experimental results demonstrated that the water-soluble 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfophenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (TSPP) could be bound onto titanium dioxide via the sulfonic group. TSPP-sensitized TiO2 nanostructures exhibited better photoelectrochemical responses and stability in comparison with TiO2 nanoparticles alone under continuous illumination. Using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a model analyte, a typical PEC immunosensor by using TSPP-TiO2 as the affinity support of anti-CEA capture antibody (Ab1) to facilitate the improvement of photocurrent response was developed. Bioconjugates of secondary antibody and glucose oxidase with gold nanoparticles (Ab2/GOx-AuNPs) was introduced by an antigen-antibody immunoreaction. AuNP acted as a powerful scaffold to bind with bioactive molecules, while GOx catalyzed glucose to in situ generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The generated H2O2 as a sacrificial electron donor could be oxidized by the photogenerated holes to assist the signal amplification at a low potential under light excitation, thus eliminating interference from other species coexisting in the samples. Under optimal conditions, the PEC immunosensor showed a good linear relationship ranging from 0.02 to 40 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 6 pg mL(-1) CEA. The precision, reproducibility, and specificity were acceptable. In addition, the method accuracy was also evaluated for quantitatively monitoring human serum samples, giving results matching with the referenced CEA ELISA kit. PMID:26451956

  12. Ligand structure, conformational dynamics, and excited-state electron delocalization for control of photoinduced electron transfer rates in synthetic donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Meylemans, Heather A; Lei, Chi-Fong; Damrauer, Niels H

    2008-05-19

    Synthesis, ground-, and excited-state properties are reported for two new electron donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) molecules and two new photophysical model complexes. The D-B-A molecules are [Ru(bpy)2(bpy-phi-MV)](PF6)4 (3) and [Ru(tmb)2(bpy-phi-MV)](PF6)4 (4), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, tmb is 4,4',5,5'-tetramethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, MV is methyl viologen, and phi is a phenylene spacer. Their model complexes are [Ru(bpy)2(p-tol-bpy)](PF6)2 (1) and [Ru(tmb)2(p-tol-bpy)](PF6)2 (2), where p-tolyl-bpy is 4-(p-tolyl)-2,2'-bipyridine. Photophysical characterization of 1 and 2 indicates that 2.17 eV and 2.12 eV are stored in their respective (3)MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) excited state. These values along with electrochemical measurements show that photoinduced electron transfer (D*-B-A-->D (+)-B-A(-)) is favorable in 3 and 4 with DeltaG degrees(ET)=-0.52 eV and -0.62 eV, respectively. The driving force for the reverse process (D(+)-B-A(-) --> D-B-A) is also reported: DeltaG degrees(BET)=-1.7 eV for 3 and -1.5 eV for 4. Transient absorption (TA) spectra for 3 and 4 in 298 K acetonitrile provide evidence that reduced methyl viologen is observable at 50 ps following excitation. Detailed TA kinetics confirm this, and the data are fit to a model to determine both forward (k(ET)) and back (k(BET)) electron transfer rate constants: k(ET)=2.6 x 10(10) s(-1) for 3 and 2.8 x 10(10) s(-1) for 4; k(BET)=0.62 x 10(10) s(-1) for 3 and 1.37 x 10(10) s(-1) for 4. The similar rate constants k ET for 3 and 4 despite a 100 meV driving force (DeltaG degrees(ET)) increase suggests that forward electron transfer in these molecules in room temperature acetonitrile is nearly barrierless as predicted by the Marcus theory. The reduction in electron transfer reorganization energy necessary for this barrierless reactivity is attributed to excited-state electron delocalization in the (3)MLCT excited states of 3 and 4, an effect that is made possible by excited-state conformational

  13. cis-Acting sequences in addition to donor and acceptor sites are required for template switching during synthesis of plus-strand DNA for duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Havert, M B; Loeb, D D

    1997-01-01

    A characteristic of all hepadnaviruses is the relaxed-circular conformation of the DNA genome within an infectious virion. Synthesis of the relaxed-circular genome by reverse transcription requires three template switches. These template switches, as for the template switches or strand transfers of other reverse-transcribing genetic elements, require repeated sequences (the donor and acceptor sites) between which a complementary strand of nucleic acid is transferred. The mechanism for each of the template switches in hepadnaviruses is poorly understood. To determine whether sequences other than the donor and acceptor sites are involved in the template switches of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a series of molecular clones which express viral genomes bearing deletion mutations were analyzed. We found that three regions of the DHBV genome, which are distinct from the donor and acceptor sites, are required for the synthesis of relaxed-circular DNA. One region, located near the 3' end of the minus-strand template, is required for the template switch that circularizes the genome. The other two regions, located in the middle of the genome and near DR2, appear to be required for plus-strand primer translocation. We speculate that these cis-acting sequences may play a role in the organization of the minus-strand DNA template within the capsid particle so that it supports efficient template switching during plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:9188603

  14. Photocurrent enhancement in nonpolar liquids by the addition of electron scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, G.A.; Lee, K.; Tweeten, D.W.; Lipsky, S.

    1988-07-14

    The photocurrent from anthracene, triphenylamine, and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine excited above their ionization thresholds in liquid n-pentane or n-hexane is found to be enhanced by the addition of low concentrations (/approx lt/0.02 M) of the electron scavengers perfluoromethylcyclohexane or perfluorodecalin. The enhancement is not observed in solvents of higher electron mobility (e.g.,. cyclohexane, isooctane, etc.) or for scavengers of lower electron affinity (e.g., n-perfluorohexane). For the solute naphthalene, no enhancement is observed under any conditions. The effects of excitation energy and applied electric field strength are reported.

  15. Mixed-Color Multiphoton Transitions as Additional Quantum Channels for Electron Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wayne; Becker, Maria; Beck, Joshua; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate mixed-color electron photoemission from tungsten nanotips. In the experiment, second-harmonic photons were introduced to modify the multiphoton emission process. A twofold increase in quantum efficiency results from the opening up of an additional three-photon quantum channel. The super-additive photoelectron signal can be controlled by input power, field polarization, and pulse overlap. The results of our study provide new prospects for quantum photonics, multiphoton microscopy, and spin-polarized electron sources. We acknowledge supports from NSF, Grant Number 1306565, 1430519. NSF Grant Number 1306565, 1430519.

  16. Spectral investigations of multiple charge transfer complex of p-nitrophenol as an electron acceptor with donor p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, A.; Khan, I. M.; Ahmad, A.

    2011-10-01

    The convincing evidence have been given that both the interactions π-π and π-π* (between p-nitrophenol ( p-NTP) and p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde ( p-DAB)) are simultaneously involved. This has been established by using IR spectrometry. Association constant K evaluated by the method of Foster under the condition [A]0 = [D]0 with apply in this equation, [A]0/ A = 1/ Kɛλ[D]0 + 2/ɛλ, where [A]0 is the initial concentration of acceptor equal to [D]0, A is the absorbance of the complex at λ, K is the association constant, and ɛλ is the molar absorptivity of the complex at λ. In the IR spectral studies of several related organic compounds, one comes to the conclusion that p-NTP shows a broad band centred at 1600 cm-1 and to nitro asymmetric stretching vibrations. In the complex while the 1500 cm-1 band remains without shift, the broad band localized at 1600 cm-1 shift to 1610 cm-1. A shift of 10 cm-1 shows weak interactions. Studies on molecular complexes of organ metallic donors and acceptors are of very recent origin. Though alkyl donors have been extensively studied, very few studies have appeared on aryl donors.

  17. Reduction of electron accumulation at InN(0001) surfaces via saturation of surface states by potassium and oxygen as donor- or acceptor-type adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhardt, A.; Reiß, S.; Krischok, S. Himmerlich, M.

    2014-01-28

    The influence of selected donor- and acceptor-type adsorbates on the electronic properties of InN(0001) surfaces is investigated implementing in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The changes in work function, surface band alignment, and chemical bond configurations are characterized during deposition of potassium and exposure to oxygen. Although an expected opponent charge transfer characteristic is observed with potassium donating its free electron to InN, while dissociated oxygen species extract partial charge from the substrate, a reduction of the surface electron accumulation occurs in both cases. This observation can be explained by adsorbate-induced saturation of free dangling bonds at the InN resulting in the disappearance of surface states, which initially pin the Fermi level and induce downward band bending.

  18. Catchment topography and distribution of electron donors for denitrification control stream NO3- concentration in the Lake Hachiro watershed, Akita, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, A.; Funaki, Y.; Sudo, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hidaka, S.

    2012-12-01

    Topography and distribution of electron donors for denitrification in a catchment can control stream NO3- concentration. We examined the linkages between topography, distribution of electron donors and the importance of denitrification as a nitrate removal mechanism in headwater streams in the Lake Hachiro watershed (LHW) at Akita prefecture, Japan. Study sites are 35 headwater streams (0.07-16.9 km2) in the LHW. Streamwater in each catchment was sampled nine times for two years. Stream sediments which can represent a surface soil and geology in a catchment were collected from a top 5 cm of a streambed for a measurement of denitrification potential (DP) and electron donors (water soluble organic carbon, WESOC; easily oxidizable sulfide, EOS). Dissolved nitrous oxide (dN2O) concentration in streamwater was also measured. Topographic index (TI) in each catchment was calculated using 10 m-grid digital elevation model using GIS. Stream NO3- concentrations among catchments had a large spatial variability ranging from 0.06 to 0.52 mg N L-1 and were negatively correlated with TI significantly (r = 0.56, p < 0.01, n = 35), indicated NO3- was removed in a gentle-slope catchment. Sediment DP and dN2O concentration were positively correlated with TI, supporting that denitrification was a dominant mechanism of NO3- removal in such catchments. The WSOC content in the sediment, the primary predictor of denitrification rates, increased with TI and affected sediment DP, significantly. Stream NO3- concentrations tended to decrease with increasing of stream SO42- concentrations and log(EOS) contents in the sediments, indicating sulfur denitrification could occur in the catchments, although the distribution of log(EOS) was independent of TI. Multiple regression analysis showed TI, sediment DP, and log(EOS) content in the sediment affected concentration of stream NO3- significantly. This study demonstrated that catchment's topography and distribution of electron donors evaluated from

  19. A Continuous Flow Column Study of the Anaerobic Transformation of a CAH Mixture of Tetrachloroethene and Carbon Tetrachloride Using Formate as an Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M. F.; Kim, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Many groundwater sites are contaminated with mixtures of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) that represent a challenge when biological remediation processes are being considered. This is especially challenging when high concentrations of CAHs are present.Trichloromethane (CF), for example, has been observed to inhibit and potentially exert toxicity on reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). Results will be presented from a continuous flow column study where the simultaneous transformation of PCE and carbon tetrachloride (CT) was achieved. The column was packed with a quartz sand and bioaugmented with the Evanite Culture (EV) that is capable of transforming PCE to ethene. The column was fed a synthetic groundwater that was amended with PCE to achieve an influent concentration near its solubility limit (0.10 mM) and formate (1.5 mM) that reacts to produce hydrogen as the ultimate electron donor. The column was operated for over 1600 days prior to the addition of CT. During this period PCE was transformed mainly to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) and minor amounts of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and TCE. The transformation extent achieved based on the column effluent concentrations ranged from about 50% ETH, 30% VC, and 20 cis-DCE up to 80% ETH and 20% VC. When the column was fed sulfate, it was completely transformed via sulfate reduction. Ferrous iron production from ferric iron reduction was observed early in the study. Acetate was also formed as a result of homoacetogenesis from hydrogen utilization. CT addition (0.015 mM) was started at 1600 days while PCE addition was continued. During the first 25 days of CT addition, CT concentrations gradually increased to 50% of the injection concentration and chloromethane (CM) and CF were observed as transformation products. CT concentrations then decreased with over 98% transformation achieved.CM was removed to below the detection limit and CF concentration decreases to

  20. Different Effect of the Additional Electron-Withdrawing Cyano Group in Different Conjugation Bridge: The Adjusted Molecular Energy Levels and Largely Improved Photovoltaic Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyang; Fang, Manman; Hou, Yingqin; Tang, Runli; Yang, Yizhou; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-18

    Four organic sensitizers (LI-68-LI-71) bearing various conjugated bridges were designed and synthesized, in which the only difference between LI-68 and LI-69 (or LI-70 and LI-71) was the absence/presence of the CN group as the auxiliary electron acceptor. Interestingly, compared to the reference dye of LI-68, LI-69 bearing the additional CN group exhibited the bad performance with the decreased Jsc and Voc values. However, once one thiophene moiety near the anchor group was replaced by pyrrole with the electron-rich property, the resultant LI-71 exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency increase by about 3 folds from 2.75% (LI-69) to 7.95% (LI-71), displaying the synergistic effect of the two moieties (CN and pyrrole). Computational analysis disclosed that pyrrole as the auxiliary electron donor (D') in the conjugated bridge can compensate for the lower negative charge in the electron acceptor, which was caused by the CN group as the electron trap, leading to the more efficient electron injection and better photovoltaic performance. PMID:27101840

  1. The effect of additives on charge decay in electron-beam charged polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, J; Motz, T; Sessler, G M; Zhang, X; Behrendt, N; von Salis-Soglio, C; Erhard, D P; Altstädt, V; Schmidt, H-W

    2009-03-01

    The charge decay in isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films of 50 µm thickness, containing three kinds of additives, namely a trisamide, a bisamide and a fluorinated compound, with concentrations in the range 0.004-1 wt% was studied. Compression molding was used to produce the films. The samples were either surface-charged by a corona method or volume-charged by mono-energetic electron beams of different energies, having penetration depths up to 6 µm. In all cases, surface potentials of about 200 V were chosen. After charging the films, the decay of the surface potential was studied either by an isothermal discharge method at 90 °C or by thermally stimulated discharge measurements. The results show a dependence of the decay rate on the kind of additive used, on additive concentration and on the energy of the injected charges. In particular, for samples with fluorinated additives, the stability of the surface potential decreases markedly with increasing electron energy, while such a dependence is very weak for samples containing the bisamide additive and does not exist at all for samples with the trisamide additive. These observations are tentatively explained by the radiation-induced generation of relatively mobile negative ions originating from the bisamide and fluorinated additives.

  2. Electronic energy and electron transfer processes in photoexcited donor-acceptor dyad and triad molecular systems based on triphenylene and perylene diimide units.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Woo, J H; Kim, E; Xiao, Y; Su, X; Mazur, L M; Attias, A-J; Fages, F; Cregut, O; Barsella, A; Mathevet, F; Mager, L; Wu, J W; D'Aléo, A; Ribierre, J-C

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the photophysical properties of organic donor-acceptor dyad and triad molecular systems based on triphenylene and perylene diimide units linked by a non-conjugated flexible bridge in solution using complementary optical spectroscopy techniques. When these molecules are diluted in dichloromethane solution, energy transfer from the triphenylene to the perylene diimide excited moieties is evidenced by time-resolved fluorescence measurements resulting in a quenching of the emission from the triphenylene moieties. Simultaneously, another quenching process that affects the emission from both donor and acceptor units is observed. Solution ultrafast transient absorption measurements provide evidence of photo-induced charge transfer from either the donor or the acceptor depending upon the excitation. Overall, the analysis of the detailed time-resolved spectroscopic measurements carried out in the dyad and triad systems as well as in the triphenylene and perylene diimide units alone provides useful information both to better understand the relations between energy and charge transfer processes with molecular structures, and for the design of future functional dyad and triad architectures based on donor and acceptor moieties for organic optoelectronic applications. PMID:26911420

  3. Self-Assembly of Electron Donor-Acceptor-Based Carbazole Derivatives: Novel Fluorescent Organic Nanoprobes for Both One- and Two-Photon Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Wencheng; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Li, King Fai; Chen, Rui; Adachi, Chihaya; Chen, Zhan; Rogach, Andrey L; Zhu, Guangyu; Yu, Peter K N; Zhang, Wenjun; Cheah, Kok Wai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-05-11

    In this study, we report fluorescent organic nanoprobes with intense blue, green, and orange-red emissions prepared by self-assembling three carbazole derivatives into nanorods/nanoparticles. The three compounds consist of two or four electron-donating carbazole groups linked to a central dicyanobenzene electron acceptor. Steric hindrance from the carbazole groups leads to noncoplanar 3D molecular structures favorable to fluorescence in the solid state, while the donor-acceptor structures endow the molecules with good two-photon excited emission properties. The fluorescent organic nanoprobes exhibit good water dispersibility, low cytotoxicity, superior resistance against photodegradation and photobleaching. Both one- and two-photon fluorescent imaging were shown in the A549 cell line. Two-photon fluorescence imaging with the fluorescent probes was demonstrated to be more effective in visualizing and distinguishing cellular details compared to conventional one-photon fluorescence imaging. PMID:27097920

  4. Rational design of aggregation-induced emission luminogen with weak electron donor-acceptor interaction to achieve highly efficient undoped bilayer OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Jiang, Yibin; Nie, Han; Hu, Rongrong; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Huang, Fei; Qin, Anjun; Zhao, Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-10-01

    In this work, two tailored luminogens (TPE-NB and TPE-PNPB) consisting of tetraphenylethene (TPE), diphenylamino, and dimesitylboryl as a π-conjugated linkage, electron donor, and electron acceptor, respectively, are synthesized and characterized. Their thermal stabilities, photophysical properties, solvachromism, fluorescence decays, electronic structures, electrochemical behaviors, and electroluminescence (EL) properties are investigated systematically, and the impacts of electron donor-acceptor (D-A) interaction on optoelectronic properties are discussed. Due to the presence of a TPE unit, both luminogens show aggregation-induced emission, but strong D-A interaction causes a decrease in emission efficiency and red-shifts in photoluminescence and EL emissions. The luminogen, TPE-PNPB, with a weak D-A interaction fluoresces strongly in solid film with a high fluorescence quantum yield of 94%. The trilayer OLED [ITO/NPB (60 nm)/TPE-PNPB (20 nm)/TPBi (40 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (100 nm)] utilizing TPE-PNPB as a light emitter shows a peak luminance of 49 993 cd m(-2) and high EL efficiencies up to 15.7 cd A(-1), 12.9 lm W(-1), and 5.12%. The bilayer OLED [ITO/TPE-PNPB (80 nm)/TPBi (40 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (100 nm)] adopting TPE-PNPB as a light emitter and hole transporter simultaneously affords even better EL efficiencies of 16.2 cd A(-1), 14.4 lm W(-1), and 5.35% in ambient air, revealing that TPE-PNPB is an eximious p-type light emitter. PMID:25254940

  5. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    List III, Frederick Alyious; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E; Sames, William J

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  6. Influence of modifying additives on the electronic state of supported palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestryakov, A. N.; Lunin, V. V.; Fuentes, S.; Bogdanchikova, N.; Barrera, A.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of modifying additives of Ce, Zr, La and Cs oxides on the electronic state of palladium supported on γ-Al 2O 3 has been studied by IR-spectroscopy of adsorbed CO, diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and H 2 chemisorption. The modified supports have been prepared using impregnation, coprecipitation and sol-gel methods. It is established that Ce and Zr oxide additives increase the effective charge of palladium ions whereas La and Cs oxides lower it. The effect of metal-support interaction is stronger in samples prepared by sol-gel than by coprecipitation

  7. Documented deaths of hepatic lobe donors for living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Trotter, James F; Adam, Rene; Lo, Chung Mau; Kenison, Jeremy

    2006-10-01

    The actual risk of death in hepatic lobe donors for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is unknown because of the lack of a comprehensive database. In the absence of a definitive estimate of the risk of donor death, the medical literature has become replete with anecdotal reports of donor deaths, many of which cannot be substantiated. Because donor death is one of the most important outcomes of LDLT, we performed a comprehensive survey of the medical and lay literature to provide a referenced source of worldwide donor deaths. We reviewed all published articles from the medical literature on LDLT and searched the lay literature for donor deaths from 1989 to February 2006. We classified each death as "definitely," "possibly," or "unlikely" related to donor surgery. We identified 19 donor deaths (and one additional donor in a chronic vegetative state). Thirteen deaths and the vegetative donor were "definitely," 2 were "possibly," and 4 were "unlikely" related to donor surgery. The estimated rate of donor death "definitely" related to donor surgery is 0.15%. The rate of donor death which is "definitely" or "possibly" related to the donor surgery is 0.20%. This analysis provides a source document of all identifiable living liver donor deaths, provides a better estimate of donor death rate, and may provide an impetus for centers with unreported deaths to submit these outcomes to the liver transplantation community. PMID:16952175

  8. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 and protons using water as an electron donor over potassium tantalate nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kimfung; Handoko, Albertus D.; Khraisheh, Majeda; Tang, Junwang

    2014-07-01

    amounts of CH4 is produced from CO2 photoreduction. Upon addition of a silver cocatalyst on KTO, the reduction selectivity has been controlled to favour CO2 photoreduction, and the CO2 to CO yield has been doubled compared to bare KTaO3. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Borosilicate glass transmittance spectrum and whole XRD pattern fitting (LeBail) results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01490a

  9. Mechanism of inner-sphere electron transfer via charge-transfer (precursor) complexes. Redox energetics of aromatic donors with the nitrosonium acceptor.

    PubMed

    Rosokha, S V; Kochi, J K

    2001-09-19

    Spontaneous formation of colored (1:1) complexes of various aromatic donors (ArH) with the nitrosonium acceptor (NO+) is accompanied by the appearance of two new (charge-transfer) absorption bands in the UV-vis spectrum. IR spectral and X-ray crystallographic analyses of the [ArH,NO+] complexes reveal their inner-sphere character by the ArH/NO+ separation that is substantially less than the van der Waals contact and by the significant enlargement of the aromatic chromophore. The reversible interchange between such an inner-sphere complex [ArH,NO+] and the redox product (ArH+.+ NO.) is quantitatively assessed for the first time to establish it as the critical intermediate in the overall electron-transfer process. Theoretical formulation of the NO+ binding to ArH is examined by LCAO-MO methodology sufficient to allow the unambiguous assignment of the pair of diagnostic (UV-vis) spectral bands. The MO treatment also provides quantitative insight into the high degree of charge-transfer extant in these inner-sphere complexes as a function of the HOMO-LUMO gap for the donor/acceptor pair. The relative stabilization of [ArH,NO+] is traced directly to the variation in the electronic coupling element H(AB), which is found to be substantially larger than the reorganization energy (lambda/2). In Sutin's development of Marcus-Hush theory, this inequality characterizes a completely delocalized Class III complex (which occupies a single potential well) according to the Robin-Day classification. The mechanistic relevance of such an unusual (precursor) complex to the inner-sphere mechanism for organic electron transfer is discussed. PMID:11552806

  10. Electronic and Spatial Structures of Water-Soluble Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-Containing Ligands Underlying Their Ability to Act as Nitric Oxide and Nitrosonium Ion Donors

    PubMed Central

    Vanin, Anatoly F.; Burbaev, Dosymzhan Sh.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of mononuclear dinitrosyl iron commplexes (M-DNICs) with thiolate ligands to act as NO donors and to trigger S-nitrosation of thiols can be explain only in the paradigm of the model of the [Fe+(NO+)2] core ({Fe(NO)2}7 according to the Enemark-Feltham classification). Similarly, the {(RS−)2Fe+(NO+)2}+ structure describing the distribution of unpaired electron density in M-DNIC corresponds to the low-spin (S = 1/2) state with a d7 electron configuration of the iron atom and predominant localization of the unpaired electron on MO(dz2) and the square planar structure of M-DNIC. On the other side, the formation of molecular orbitals of M-DNIC including orbitals of the iron atom, thiolate and nitrosyl ligands results in a transfer of electron density from sulfur atoms to the iron atom and nitrosyl ligands. Under these conditions, the positive charge on the nitrosyl ligands diminishes appreciably, the interaction of the ligands with hydroxyl ions or with thiols slows down and the hydrolysis of nitrosyl ligands and the S-nitrosating effect of the latter are not manifested. Most probably, the S-nitrosating effect of nitrosyl ligands is a result of weak binding of thiolate ligands to the iron atom under conditions favoring destabilization of M-DNIC. PMID:22505886

  11. Charge transport and exciton dissociation in organic solar cells consisting of dipolar donors mixed with C70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Olga L.; Liu, Xiao; Amonoo, Jojo A.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.; Green, Peter F.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate dipolar donor materials mixed with a C70 acceptor in an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. Dipolar donors that have donor-acceptor-acceptor (d-a-a') structure result in high conductivity pathways due to close coupling between neighboring molecules in the mixed films. We analyze the charge transfer properties of the dipolar donor:C70 mixtures and corresponding neat donors using a combination of time-resolved electroluminescence from intermolecular polaron pair states and conductive tip atomic force microscopy, from which we infer that dimers of the d-a-a' donors tend to form a continuous network of nanocrystalline clusters within the blends. Additional insights are provided by quantum-mechanical calculations of hole transfer coupling and hopping rates between donor molecules using nearest-neighbor donor packing motifs taken from crystal structural data. The approximation using only nearest-neighbor interactions leads to good agreement between donor hole hopping rates and the conductive properties of the donor:C70 blends. This represents a significant simplification from requiring details of the nano- and mesoscale morphologies of thin films to estimate their electronic characteristics. Using these dipolar donors, we obtain a maximum power conversion efficiency of 9.6 ±0.5 % under 1 sun, AM1.5G simulated illumination for an OPV comprised of an active layer containing a dipolar donor mixed with C70.

  12. Syntheses and spectroscopic and quadratic nonlinear optical properties of extended dipolar complexes with ruthenium(II) ammine electron donor and N-methylpyridinium acceptor groups.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Jones, Lathe A; Harris, James A; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Asselberghs, Inge; Clays, Koen; Persoons, André; Garín, Javier; Orduna, Jesús

    2004-03-31

    In this paper, we describe the extremely unusual optical properties of Ru(II)-based electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polyene and some closely related chromophores. For three different polyene series, the intense, visible d-->pi* metal-to-ligand charge-transfer bands unexpectedly blue-shift as the number of E-ethylene units (n) increases from 1 to 3, and the static first hyperpolarizabilities beta(0) determined via hyper-Rayleigh scattering and Stark spectroscopy maximize at n = 2, in marked contrast to other known D-A polyenes in which beta(0) increases steadily with n. Time-dependent density-functional theory and finite field calculations verify these empirical trends, which arise from the orbital structures of the complexes. This study illustrates that transition metal-based nonlinear optical chromophores can show very different behavior when compared with their more thoroughly studied purely organic counterparts. PMID:15038742

  13. Infrared and Raman analyses of the halogen-bonded non-covalent adducts formed by α,ω-diiodoperfluoroalkanes with DABCO and other electron donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, M. T.; Metrangolo, P.; Navarrini, W.; Radice, S.; Resnati, G.; Zerbi, G.

    2000-06-01

    An attractive intermolecular interaction which has been called "halogen bonding" exists between the nitrogen, sulfur, or oxygen atoms present in HC motifs and the iodine atom of PFC residues. The "halogen bonding" is strong enough to overcome the low affinity existing between PFC and HC compounds, driving their self-assembly into supramolecular architectures. The non-covalent co-polymer formed by 1,2-diiodotetrafluoroethane with diazabicyclooctane has been prepared and characterised by FT-IR and -Raman spectroscopies. We propose the changes shown by the vibrational spectra of single PFC and HC components when involved in halogen bonded co-polymers as diagnostic probes of the interaction and as tools to rank the electron-donor ability of differently heteroatom substituted hydrocarbons.

  14. Ab initio MO based lattice energy for molecular crystals: packing structure of electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex H 3N-BF 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tohru; Nagayoshi, Kanade; Kitaura, Kazuo

    2003-03-01

    A computational procedure is proposed for calculating the lattice energy of molecular crystals using the ab initio MO method. Our method does not require any adjustable parameters and provides a general description for various molecular crystals including electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complexes. Using the method, the packing structure of H 3N-BF 3 crystal was optimized at the HF/3-21 + G level and the lattice energy was calculated at the MP2/6-311 + G * level. The calculation reproduced the experimental lattice constants with reasonable accuracy. Moreover, the structural feature of the H 3N-BF 3 crystal was discussed based on the molecular interactions in the crystal.

  15. Effects of acceptor-donor complexes on electronic structure properties in co-doped TiO2: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cai, L. L.; Yuan, X. B.; Hu, G. C.; Ren, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the doping effects induced by impurity complexes on the electronic structures of anatase TiO2 based on the density functional theory. Mono-doping and co-doping effects are discussed separately. The results show that the impurity doping can make the band-edges shift. The induced defect levels in the band gaps by impurity doping reduce the band gap predominantly. The compensated acceptor-donor pairs in the co-doped TiO2 will improve the photoelectrochemical activity. From the calculations, it is also found that (S+Zr)-co-doped TiO2 has the ideal band gap and band edge, at the same time, the binding energy is higher than other systems, so (S+Zr)-co-doping in TiO2 is more promise in photoelectrochemical experiments.

  16. Use of poly-beta-hydroxy-butyrate as a slow-release electron donor for the microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE.

    PubMed

    Aulenta, F; Fuoco, M; Canosa, A; Petrangeli Papini, M; Majone, M

    2008-01-01

    In situ anaerobic reductive dechlorination, using slow-release electron donors, is emerging as an effective and sustainable (low-cost and low-maintenance) technology to remediate aquifers contaminated by chloroethenes. In the present study, we investigated the use of poly-beta-hydroxy-butyrate (PHB), a fully biodegradable polymer, as a slow-release source of hydrogen and acetate for the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE). Results of this study indicated that TCE dechlorination in PHB-amended microcosms was 2.3-times higher than in non-amended controls. This higher activity was explained by a higher H(2) level in PHB-amended microcosms. As usual, acetate was the major sink (approximately 90%) of reducing equivalents available from PHB degradation, whereas no acetotrophic dechlorination was observed. PMID:18413954

  17. Enantioselective Intramolecular C-H Insertion of Donor and Donor/Donor Carbenes by a Nondiazo Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dong; Ma, Jun; Luo, Kui; Fu, Hongguang; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Shifa

    2016-07-11

    The first enantioselective intramolecular C-H insertion and cyclopropanation reactions of donor- and donor/donor-carbenes by a nondiazo approach are reported. The reactions were conducted in a one-pot manner without slow addition and provided the desired dihydroindole, dihydrobenzofuran, tetrahydrofuran, and tetrahydropyrrole derivatives with up to 99 % ee and 100 % atom efficiency. PMID:27265896

  18. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  19. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers

    PubMed Central

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  20. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cholesterol Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum requires electron input at multiple steps and utilizes both NADH and NADPH as the electron source. Four enzymes catalyzing five steps in the pathway require electron input: squalene monooxygenase, lanosterol demethylase, sterol 4α-methyl oxidase, and sterol C5-desaturase. The electron-donor proteins for these enzymes include cytochrome P450 reductase and the cytochrome b5 pathway. Here I review the evidence for electron donor protein requirements with these enzymes, the evidence for additional electron donor pathways, and the effect of deletion of these redox enzymes on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. PMID:26344922

  1. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... for blood transfusions side effects associated with allergic reactions to the anesthesia death The best source of information about risks and expected donor outcomes is your transplant team. In addition, it’s important to take an active role in ...

  2. Proton and Electron Additions to Iron (II) Dinitrogen Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, Zachariah M.; Chen, Shentan; Labios, Liezel AN; Bullock, R. Morris; Walter, Eric D.; Tyson, Elizabeth L.; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-03-10

    We describe a single site cis-(H)FeII-N2 complex, generated by the protonation of an iron-carbon bond of a "reduced" iron complex, that models key aspects of proposed protonated intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase. The influence on N2 binding from the addition of protons to the pendant amine sites in the second coordination sphere is described. Furthermore, the addition of electrons to the protonated complexes results in H2 loss. The mechanism of H2 loss is explored to draw a parallel to the origin of H2 loss (homolytic or heterolytic) and the nature of N2 coordination in intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase.

  3. Next Generation Orthopaedic Implants by Additive Manufacturing Using Electron Beam Melting

    PubMed Central

    Murr, Lawrence E.; Gaytan, Sara M.; Martinez, Edwin; Medina, Frank; Wicker, Ryan B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some examples of knee and hip implant components containing porous structures and fabricated in monolithic forms utilizing electron beam melting (EBM). In addition, utilizing stiffness or relative stiffness versus relative density design plots for open-cellular structures (mesh and foam components) of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy fabricated by EBM, it is demonstrated that stiffness-compatible implants can be fabricated for optimal stress shielding for bone regimes as well as bone cell ingrowth. Implications for the fabrication of patient-specific, monolithic, multifunctional orthopaedic implants using EBM are described along with microstructures and mechanical properties characteristic of both Ti-6Al-4V and Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy prototypes, including both solid and open-cellular prototypes manufactured by additive manufacturing (AM) using EBM. PMID:22956957

  4. N Photo-CIDNP MAS NMR To Reveal Functional Heterogeneity in Electron Donor of Different Plant Organisms.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Geertje J; Roy, Esha; Matysik, Jörg; Alia, A

    2012-02-01

    In plants and cyanobacteria, two light-driven electron pumps, photosystems I and II (PSI, PSII), facilitate electron transfer from water to carbon dioxide with quantum efficiency close to unity. While similar in structure and function, the reaction centers of PSI and PSII operate at widely different potentials with PSI being the strongest reducing agent known in living nature. Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) in magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provides direct excess to the heart of large photosynthetic complexes (A. Diller, Alia, E. Roy, P. Gast, H.J. van Gorkom, J. Zaanen, H.J.M. de Groot, C. Glaubitz, J. Matysik, Photosynth. Res. 84, 303-308, 2005; Alia, E. Roy, P. Gast, H.J. van Gorkom, H.J.M. de Groot, G. Jeschke, J. Matysik, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 12819-12826, 2004). By combining the dramatic signal increase obtained from the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect with (15)N isotope labeling of PSI, we were able to map the electron spin density in the active cofactors of PSI and study primary charge separation at atomic level. We compare data obtained from two different PSI proteins, one from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and other from the aquatic plant duckweed (Spirodella oligorrhiza). Results demonstrate a large flexibility of the PSI in terms of its electronic architecture while their electronic ground states are strictly conserved. PMID:22303078

  5. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  6. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  7. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  8. Theoretical studies on two-dimensional nonlinear optical chromophores with pyrazinyl cores and organic or ruthenium(II) ammine electron donors.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Pilkington, Rachel A

    2014-03-27

    Density functional theory calculations have been carried out on twelve cationic, 2D nonlinear optical chromophores with pyrazinylbis(pyridinium) electron acceptors. These species contain either 4-(methoxy/dimethylamino)phenyl or pyridyl-coordinated {Ru(II)(NH3)5}(2+)/trans-{Ru(II)(NH3)4(py)}(2+) (py = pyridine) electron donor groups. The results are compared with data obtained by using experimental techniques including hyper-Rayleigh scattering and Stark (electroabsorption) spectroscopy previously (Coe, B. J.; et al. Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 10718; J. Org. Chem. 2010, 75, 8550). The B3LYP/6-311G(d) level of theory models the visible absorption spectra in MeCN for the -NMe2 derivatives relatively well, whereas CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d) gives better results for the -OMe-substituted species. These spectra are dominated by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) bands. Static first hyperpolarizabilities β0 are computed also at the B3LYP/6-311G(d) level. The overall extent of prediction of trends in the ICT bands and β0 responses is partial, with the main discrepancies relating to the progression from one to two electron donor groups. The experimental data show that this structural change red-shifts the ICT bands and increases β0 significantly, but only the second trend is reproduced to some extent by the calculations. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the Ru complexes in MeCN are modeled relatively well with B3LYP and the LANL2DZ/6-311G(d) mixed basis set, including 100 excited states. However, again, some degree of disagreement between theory and experiment is evident, even when a larger basis set like def2-TZVP is used for Ru. In particular, substantial red shifts are predicted on adding a third metal center, whereas the measured spectra show corresponding small blue shifts. The experimental trend of the total β0 value increasing on moving from one to two Ru centers is predicted in the gas phase, but not in MeCN. For both classes of chromophore, the β(xxx) tensor component

  9. Synthesis, and spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazole as an electron donor with π-acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol in different polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyan, Lal; Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2015-07-01

    The charge transfer (CT) complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazole (DMI) as an electron donor with π acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol (DNN) has been studied spectrophotometrically in different solvents like chloroform, acetonitrile, methanol, methylene chloride, etc. at room temperature. The CT complex which is formed through the transfer of lone pair electrons from DMI to DNN exhibits well resolved CT bands and the regions of these bands were remarkably different from those of the donor and acceptor. The stoichiometry of the CT complex was found to be 1:1 by a straight-line method between donor and acceptor with maximum absorption bands. The novel CT complex has been characterized by FTIR, TGA-DTA, powder XRD, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. The Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been used to determine the formation constant (KCT), molar extinction coefficient (εCT), standard gibbs free energy (ΔG°) and other physical parameters of the CT complex. The formation constant recorded higher values and molar extinction coefficient recorded lower values in chloroform compared with methylene chloride, methanol and acetonitrile, confirming the strong interaction between the molecular orbital's of donor and acceptor in the ground state in less polar solvent. This CT complex has been studied by absorption spectra of donor 1,2-dimethylimidazole (DMI) and acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol (DNN) by using the spectrophotometric technique in various solvents at room temperature.

  10. Spectrophotometric and thermal studies on the charge - Transfer complexes of 4-(aminomethyl) piperidine as donor with σ- and π-electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Adel; El-Ghossein, Nada; AlQaradawi, Siham Y.

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic characteristics of the solid charge-transfer molecular complexes (CT) formed in the reaction of the electron donor 4-(aminomethyl) piperidine (4AMP) with the σ-acceptor iodine and the π-acceptors 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ), 2,4,4,6-tetrabromo-2,5-cyclohexadienone (TBCHD) and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) have been studied in chloroform at 25 °C. These were investigated through electronic, infrared spectra and thermal analysis as well as elemental analysis. The results show that the formed solid CT-complexes have the formulas [I3-, [(4AMP)(DDQ)2] and [(4AMP)(TBCHD)] while in the case of 4AMP-TCNQ reaction, a short-lived CT complex is formed followed by rapid N-substitution by TCNQ forming the final reaction product 7,7,8-tricyano-8-aminomethylpiperidinylquinodimethane [TCAMPQDM] in full agreement with the known reaction stoichiometries in solution as well as the elemental measurements and the thermal analysis confirmed the structure of the obtained compounds. The formation constant kCT, molar extinction coefficient εCT, free energy change ΔG0 and CT energy ECT have been calculated for the CT-complexes [I3-, [(4AMP)(DDQ)2] and [(4AMP)(TBCHD)].

  11. Electron donor properties of claus catalysts--1. Influence of NaOH on the catalytic activity of silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, Z.; George, Z.M.

    1980-05-01

    ESR spectroscopy showed that SO/sub 2/ adsorbed on silica gel impregnated with NaOH formed the SO/sub 2//sup -/ anion radical. With increasing NaOH concentration, the SO/sub 2/ adsorption and the activity for the reaction of H/sub 2/S with SO/sub 2/ (Claus reaction) went through a maximum at 1.0-1.4% NaOH. The SO/sub 2/ anion radical apparently formed by electron transfer from the catalyst surface and was a reaction intermediate which reacted rapidly with H/sub 2/S. The NaOH catalyst had similar stability and activity as commercial alumina catalyst in five-day tests under Claus conditions.

  12. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  13. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  14. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  15. Electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cells performance in donor/acceptor copolymers and fullerene: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Basabe, Y.; Borges, B. G. A. L.; Rocco, M. L. M. E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br; Marchiori, C. F. N.; Yamamoto, N. A. D.; Koehler, M.; Roman, L. S. E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br; Macedo, A. G.

    2014-04-07

    By combining experimental and theoretical approaches, the electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cell performance in donor/acceptor copolymer poly[2,7-(9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-dibenzosilole)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl) benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PSiF-DBT) films and blended with 6,6.-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (PSiF-DBT:PCBM) were investigated. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical PSiF-DBT UV-Vis absorption spectrum is observed and the main molecular orbitals contributing to the spectrum were determined using DFT single point calculations. Non-coplanar configuration was determined by geometric optimization calculation in isolated PSiF-DBT pentamer and corroborated by angular variation of the sulphur 1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. Edge-on and plane-on molecular orientations were obtained for thiophene and benzothiadiazole units, respectively. A power conversion efficiency up to 1.58%, open circuit voltage of 0.51 V, short circuit current of 8.71 mA/cm{sup 2} and a fill factor of 35% was obtained using blended PSiF-DBT:PCBM as active layer in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Ultrafast electron dynamics in the low-femtosecond regime was evaluated by resonant Auger spectroscopy using the core-hole clock methodology around sulphur 1s absorption edge. Electron delocalization times for PSiF-DBT and PSiF-DBT:PCBM polymeric films were derived for selected excitation energies corresponding to the main transitions in the sulphur 1s NEXAFS spectra. The mixture of PSiF-DBT with PCBM improves the charge transfer process involving the π* molecular orbital of the thiophene units.

  16. Ab initio and density functional theoretical design and screening of model crown ether based ligand (host) for extraction of lithium metal ion (guest): effect of donor and electronic induction.

    PubMed

    Boda, Anil; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Rao, Hanmanth; Ghosh, Sandip K

    2012-08-01

    The structures, energetic and thermodynamic parameters of model crown ethers with different donor, cavity and electron donating/ withdrawing functional group have been determined with ab initio MP2 and density functional theory in gas and solvent phase. The calculated values of binding energy/ enthalpy for lithium ion complexation are marginally higher for hard donor based aza and oxa crown compared to soft donor based thia and phospha crown. The calculated values of binding enthalpy for lithium metal ion with 12C4 at MP2 level of theory is in good agreement with the available experimental result. The binding energy is altered due to the inductive effect imparted by the electron donating/ withdrawing group in crown ether, which is well correlated with the values of electron transfer. The role of entropy for extraction of hydrated lithium metal ion by different donor and functional group based ligand has been demonstrated. The HOMO-LUMO gap is decreased and dipole moment of the ligand is increased from gas phase to organic phase because of the dielectric constant of the solvent. The gas phase binding energy is reduced in solvent phase as the solvent molecules weaken the metal-ligand binding. The theoretical values of extraction energy for LiCl salt from aqueous solution in different organic solvent is validated by the experimental trend. The study presented here should contribute to the design of model host ligand and screening of solvent for metal ion recognition and thus can contribute in planning the experiments. PMID:22318713

  17. Photodynamic therapy with decacationic [60]fullerene monoadducts: effect of a light absorbing electron-donor antenna and micellar formulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Rui; Wang, Min; Huang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Avci, Pinar; Chiang, Long Y; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and anticancer photodynamic properties of two new decacationic fullerene (LC14) and red light-harvesting antenna-fullerene conjugated monoadduct (LC15) derivatives. The antenna of LC15 was attached covalently to C60> with distance of only <3.0 Ǻ to facilitate ultrafast intramolecular photoinduced-electron-transfer (for type-I photochemistry) and photon absorption at longer wavelengths. Because LC15 was hydrophobic we compared formulation in CremophorEL micelles with direct dilution from dimethylacetamide. LC14 produced more 1O2 than LC15, while LC15 produced much more HO· than LC14 as measured by specific fluorescent probes. When delivered by DMA, LC14 killed more HeLa cells than LC15 when excited by UVA light, while LC15 killed more cells when excited by white light consistent with the antenna effect. However LC15 was more effective than LC14 when delivered by micelles regardless of the excitation light. Micellar delivery produced earlier apoptosis and damage to the endoplasmic reticulum as well as to lysosomes and mitochondria. PMID:24333585

  18. Enhancement of p-Type Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Performance by Supramolecular Assembly of Electron Donor and Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Haining; Oscarsson, Johan; Gabrielsson, Erik; Eriksson, Susanna K.; Lindblad, Rebecka; Xu, Bo; Hao, Yan; Boschloo, Gerrit; Johansson, Erik M. J.; Gardner, James M.; Hagfeldt, Anders; Rensmo, Håkan; Sun, Licheng

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular interactions based on porphyrin and fullerene derivatives were successfully adopted to improve the photovoltaic performance of p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements suggest a change in binding configuration of ZnTCPP after co-sensitization with C60PPy, which could be ascribed to supramolecular interaction between ZnTCPP and C60PPy. The performance of the ZnTCPP/C60PPy-based p-type DSC has been increased by a factor of 4 in comparison with the DSC with the ZnTCPP alone. At 560 nm, the IPCE value of DSCs based on ZnTCPP/C60PPy was a factor of 10 greater than that generated by ZnTCPP-based DSCs. The influence of different electrolytes on charge extraction and electron lifetime was investigated and showed that the enhanced Voc from the Co2+/3+(dtbp)3-based device is due to the positive EF shift of NiO. PMID:24603319

  19. Photobehavior of the geometrical isomers of two 1,4-distyrylbenzene analogues with side groups of different electron donor/acceptor character.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, S; Galiazzo, G; Mazzucato, U; Spalletti, A

    2010-10-14

    The photobehavior of two 1,4-distyrylbenzene analogues where the central benzene ring is asymmetrically substituted with a pyrid-4-ylethenyl group at one side and thien-2-ylethenyl or a p-nitrostyryl group at the other side, has been studied in two solvents at room temperature. The four geometrical isomers (EE, ZE, EZ, and ZZ) of each compound were separated by the combined use of HPLC and spectrophotometric techniques. The radiative/reactive competition in their excited state relaxation was particularly examined: the diabatic/adiabatic contributions were estimated and a reasonable interpretation of the photoisomerization mechanism was proposed. The role of the conformational isomers was also investigated by measured and computed spectral data. Since the different electron donor/acceptor character of the side groups of these molecules can induce charge transfer phenomena that can affect the relaxation pathways of their excited states, the photobehavior was compared in inert and polar solvents to clarify the role of the intramolecular charge transfer. The latter was found to affect markedly the relaxation properties and to induce interesting fluorosolvatochromic effects, particularly in the p-nitro derivative. The participation of the triplet state in the reaction mechanism of the latter was also investigated by flash photolysis and sensitized experiments. PMID:20857985

  20. Photoelectrochemical biosensing platform for microRNA detection based on in situ producing electron donor from apoferritin-encapsulated ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huanshun; Wang, Mo; Zhou, Yunlei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Bing; Wang, Guihua; Ai, Shiyun

    2014-03-15

    A novel signal "on" type of photoelectrochemical biosensor for microRNA-21 hybridization detection was fabricated, where Bi2S3 nanorods were used as photoactive material with a maximum adsorption at 450 nm visible light, hairpin-structure DNA as detecting probe, streptavidin as signal capturing unit and biotin functionalized ascorbic acid loaded apoferritin as signal amplification unit. Hybridization between the probe and the target microRNA-21 was confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the biosensor after electron donor of ascorbic acid was introduced into the detection buffer by digesting the apoferritin by trypsase, indicating that this method could be used fProd. Type: FTPor quantitative measurements, and the discrimination of the complementary from mismatched microRNA-21. Under the optimal detection conditions, the photoelectrochemical biosensor displayed a linear range of 1-5000 fM and a low detection limit of 0.35 fM for microRNA-21 determination. Moreover, the down-regulated expression of microRNA-21 in poultry cells and tissues infecting with avian leukosis viruses was confirmed by directly detecting microRNA-21 in extracted total RNA. This proposed strategy may open a new avenue for the applications of photoelectrochemical biosensor for oligonucleotides detection using visible light irradiation, which could largely reduce the destructive effect of UV light on biomolecules. PMID:24140833

  1. Denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri coupled with CO2 reduction by Sporomusa ovata with hydrogen as an electron donor assisted by solid-phase humin.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Zhang, Dongdong; Katayama, Arata

    2016-09-01

    A co-culture system comprising an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa ovata DSMZ2662, and a denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri JCM20778, enabled denitrification using H2 as the sole external electron donor and CO2 as the sole external carbon source. Acetate produced by S. ovata supported the heterotrophic denitrification of P. stutzeri. A nitrogen balance study showed the reduction of nitrate to nitrogen gas without the accumulation of nitrite and nitrous oxide in the co-culture system. S. ovata did not show nitrate reduction to ammonium in the co-culture system. Significant proportions of the consumed H2 were utilized for denitrification: 79.9 ± 4.6% in the co-culture system containing solid-phase humin and 62.9±11.1% in the humin-free co-culture system. The higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen in the humin-containing system was attributed to the higher denitrification activity of P. stutzeri under the acetate deficient conditions. The nitrogen removal rate of the humin-containing co-culture system reached 0.19 kg NO3(-)-N·m(-3)·d(-1). Stable denitrification activity for 61 days of successive sub-culturing suggested the robustness of this co-culture system. This study provides a novel strategy for the in situ enhancement of microbial denitrification. PMID:26975755

  2. The solution structure of the soluble form of the lipid-modified azurin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the electron donor of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Cláudia S; Saraiva, Ivo H; Carreira, Cíntia; Devreese, Bart; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonizes the genitourinary track, and in these environments, especially in the female host, the bacteria are subjected to low levels of oxygen, and reactive oxygen and nitrosyl species. Here, the biochemical characterization of N. gonorrhoeae Laz is presented, as well as, the solution structure of its soluble domain determined by NMR. N. gonorrhoeae Laz is a type 1 copper protein of the azurin-family based on its spectroscopic properties and structure, with a redox potential of 277±5 mV, at pH7.0, that behaves as a monomer in solution. The globular Laz soluble domain adopts the Greek-key motif, with the copper center located at one end of the β-barrel coordinated by Gly48, His49, Cys113, His118 and Met122, in a distorted trigonal geometry. The edge of the His118 imidazole ring is water exposed, in a surface that is proposed to be involved in the interaction with its redox partners. The heterologously expressed Laz was shown to be a competent electron donor to N. gonorrhoeae cytochrome c peroxidase. This is an evidence for its involvement in the mechanism of protection against hydrogen peroxide generated by neighboring lactobacilli in the host environment. PMID:26589091

  3. (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties: a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Yisilamu, Yilihamu; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Tomura, Masaaki; Funaki, Takashi; Sugihara, Hideki; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2014-10-01

    (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties were synthesized as a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system. These new compounds exhibited long-wavelength absorptions in the UV/Vis spectra, and reversible oxidation and reduction waves in cyclic voltammetry experiments. Their amphoteric redox properties are based on their resonance hybrid forms, in which a positive charge is delocalized on the triphenylamine moieties and a negative charge is localized on the boron atoms. Molecular orbital (MO) calculations indicate that their HOMO and LUMO energies vary with the number of phenylene rings connected to the difluoroboron-chelating ring. This is useful for optimizing the HOMO and LUMO levels to an iodine redox (I(-)/I3(-)) potential and a titanium dioxide conduction band, respectively. Dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated by using these compounds as dye sensitizers exhibited solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies of 2.7-4.4 % under AM 1.5 solar light. PMID:25170797

  4. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  5. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lloyd, Peter D; Lowe, Larry E; Ulrich, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  6. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis.

    PubMed

    Hensen, B; Kalb, N; Blok, M S; Dréau, A E; Reiserer, A; Vermeulen, R F L; Schouten, R N; Markham, M; Twitchen, D J; Goodenough, K; Elkouss, D; Wehner, S; Taminiau, T H; Hanson, R

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682-686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  7. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hensen, B.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M. S.; Dréau, A. E.; Reiserer, A.; Vermeulen, R. F. L.; Schouten, R. N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.; Taminiau, T. H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  8. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage media for permanent records? 1236.28 Section 1236.28 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC...

  9. A Second [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin from Sphingomonas sp. Strain RW1 Can Function as an Electron Donor for the Dioxin Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Armengaud, Jean; Gaillard, Jacques; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2000-01-01

    The first step in the degradation of dibenzofuran and dibenzo-p-dioxin by Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 is carried out by dioxin dioxygenase (DxnA1A2), a ring-dihydroxylating enzyme. An open reading frame (fdx3) that could potentially specify a new ferredoxin has been identified downstream of dxnA1A2, a two-cistron gene (J. Armengaud, B. Happe, and K. N. Timmis, J. Bacteriol. 180:3954–3966, 1998). In the present study, we report a biochemical analysis of Fdx3 produced in Escherichia coli. This third ferredoxin thus far identified in Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1 contained a putidaredoxin-type [2Fe-2S] cluster which was characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The midpoint redox potential of this ferredoxin (E′0 = −247 ± 10 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode at pH 8.0) is similar to that exhibited by Fdx1 (−245 mV), a homologous ferredoxin previously characterized in Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1. In in vitro assays, Fdx3 can be reduced by RedA2 (a reductase similar to class I cytochrome P-450 reductases), previously isolated from Sphingomonas sp. strain RW1. RedA2 exhibits a Km value of 3.2 ± 0.3 μM for Fdx3. In vivo coexpression of fdx3 and redA2 with dxnA1A2 confirmed that Fdx3 can serve as an electron donor for the dioxin dioxygenase. PMID:10735867

  10. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (< 960°C). A novel approach was developed and demonstrated for controlling the temperature of cool down, thus providing a technique for in situ heat treatment of material. This technique was used to produce material with hardness of 478+/-7 HV with no post-processing, which exceeds the hardness of peak-aged Inconel 718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM

  11. [Influence of the interaction between iron oxide and electron donor substances on 1,1,1-trichloro- 2, 2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane ( DDT) reductive dechlorination in hydragric acrisols].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Ying; Xu, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Zhuang; Yao, Tong-Yan

    2014-11-01

    The interaction between iron oxide and electron donor substance have significant influences on electron transfer and the growth of iron-reducing bacteria, which may affect the reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated organic compounds in soil. Anaerobic soil incubation experiment was conducted to study the effect and its mechanism of iron oxide (goethite), electron donor substances (butyrate and ethanol), and their interaction on DDT reductive dechlorination in Hydragric Acrisols. Results showed that after 6 weeks of anaerobic incubation, the extractable residues of DDT were between 1.29% and 2.01% of initial DDT amounts in soils, which was attributed to the dechlorinated degradation of DDT and formation of bound residues of DDT and its dechlorinated products. The main product of DDT anaerobic dechlorination was 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chloro-phenyl) ethane (DDD). During the prophase of incubation, the application of butyrate or ethanol led to the decreased pH and increased Eh for reaction system, thus inhibited DDT dechlorination. The applications of only goethite or goethite and electron donor substances resulted in the increased soil pH, decreased soil Eh and increased Fe( II ) contents, thus accelerated DDT dechlorination. There was no significant interaction between butyrate and iron oxide on DDT dechlorination, whereas there was antagonistic action between ethanol and iron oxide on DDT dechlorination. The results will be of great significance for developing efficient and in-situ remediation technology of DDT contaminated soil. PMID:25639109

  12. Phosphite radicals and their reactions. Examples of redox, substitution, and addition reactions. [Gamma rays and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1980-08-21

    Phosphite radicals HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/-, which exist in an acid-base equilibrium with pK = 5.75, are shown to take part in various types of reactions. In the absence of scavengers, they disappear mainly by second-order disproportionation and combination; a first-order contribution to the decay is also indicated. HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/- are good reductants toward electron acceptors such as tetranitromethane. In this reaction phosphate and C(NO/sub 2/)/sub 3/- are formed. Phosphite radicals can, however, also act as good oxidants, e.g., toward thiols and thiolate ions. These reactions lead to the formation of RS. radicals which were identified either directly, as in the case of penicillamine, through the optical absorption of PenS. or more indirectly through equilibration of RS. with RS- to the optically absorbing RSSR-. disulfide radical anion. A homolytic substitution reaction (S/sub H/2) occurs in the reaction of the phosphite radicals with aliphatic disulfides, yielding RS. radicals and phosphate thioester RSPO/sub 3//sup 2/-. Lipoic acid, as an example of a cyclic disulfide, is reduced to the corresponding RSSR-. radical anion and also undergoes the S/sub H/2 reaction with about equal probability. An addition reaction is observed between phosphite radicals and molecular oxygen. The resulting peroxo phosphate radicals establish an acid-base equilibrium HPO/sub 5//sup -/. reversible PO/sub 5//sup 2 -/. + H+ with a pK = 3.4. Absolute rate constants were determined for all reactions discussed.

  13. The effect of permodified cyclodextrins encapsulation on the photophysical properties of a polyfluorene with randomly distributed electron-donor and rotaxane electron-acceptor units

    PubMed Central

    Resmerita, Ana-Maria; Aubert, Pierre-Henri; Farcas, Flavian; Stoica, Iuliana; Airinei, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the synthesis as well as the optical, electrochemical and morphological properties of two polyrotaxanes (4a and 4b), which consist of electron-accepting 9,9-dicyanomethylenefluorene 1 as an inclusion complex in persilylated β- or γ-cyclodextrin (TMS-β-CD, TMS-γ-CD) (1a, 1b) and methyltriphenylamine as an electron-donating molecule. They are statistically distributed into the conjugated chains of 9,9-dioctylfluorene 3 and compared with those of the corresponding non-rotaxane 4 counterpart. Rotaxane formation results in improvements of the solubility, the thermal stability, and the photophysical properties. Polyrotaxanes 4a and 4b exhibited slightly red-shifted absorption bands with respect to the non-rotaxane 4 counterpart. The fluorescence lifetimes of polyrotaxanes follow a mono-exponential decay with a value of τ = 1.14 ns compared with the non-rotaxane, where a bi-exponential decay composed of a main component with a relative short time of τ1 = 0.88 (57.08%) and a minor component with a longer lifetime of τ2 = 1.56 ns (42.92%) were determined. The optical and electrochemical band gaps (ΔE g) as well as the ionization potential and electronic affinity characterized by smaller values compared to the values of any of the constituents. AFM reveals that the film surface of 4a and 4b displays a granular morphology with a lower dispersity supported by a smaller roughness exponent compared with the non-rotaxane counterpart. PMID:25246973

  14. B4H4 and B4(CH3)4 as Unique Electron Donors in Hydrogen-Bonded and Halogen-Bonded Complexes.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-07-21

    Ab initio MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations have been carried out on B4H4 and B4(CH3)4 to investigate the base properties of these molecules with Td symmetry. Each face of the tetrahedral structure of B4H4 and B4(CH3)4 is stabilized by a two-electron, three-center B-B-B bond. The face uses these two electrons to act uniquely as an electron-pair donor for the formation of stable hydrogen-bonded and halogen-bonded complexes with C3v symmetry. The hydrogen-bonded complexes are B4H4:HY and B4(CH3)4:HY, with HY = HNC, HF, HCl, HCN, and HCCH; the halogen-bonded complexes are B4H4:ClY and B4(CH3)4:ClY, with ClY = ClF, ClCl, ClNC, ClCN, ClCCH, and ClH. The absolute values of the binding energies of the hydrogen-bonded complexes B4(CH3)4:HY and of the halogen-bonded complexes B4(CH3)4:ClY are significantly greater than the binding energies of the corresponding complexes with B4H4. The binding energies of each series correlate with the distance from the hydrogen-bonded H atom or halogen-bonded Cl atom to the centroid of the interacting face. Charge transfer stabilizes all complexes and occurs from the B2-B3-B4 orbital of the face to the antibonding H-X orbital of HY in hydrogen-bonded complexes and to the antibonding Cl-X orbital of ClY in halogen-bonded complexes, with X being the atom of Y that is directly bonded to either H or Cl. For fixed HY, EOM-CCSD spin-spin coupling constants J(X-B1) are greater than J(X-Bn) for complexes B4H4:HY, even though the X-B1 distances are longer. B1 and Bn are the atoms at the apex and in the interacting face, respectively. Similarly, for complexes B4H4:ClY, J(Cl-B1) is greater than J(Cl-Bn). In the halogen-bonded complexes, both coupling constants correlate with the corresponding distances. PMID:27399838

  15. Donor deactivation in silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björk, Mikael T.; Schmid, Heinz; Knoch, Joachim; Riel, Heike; Riess, Walter

    2009-02-01

    The operation of electronic devices relies on the density of free charge carriers available in the semiconductor; in most semiconductor devices this density is controlled by the addition of doping atoms. As dimensions are scaled down to achieve economic and performance benefits, the presence of interfaces and materials adjacent to the semiconductor will become more important and will eventually completely determine the electronic properties of the device. To sustain further improvements in performance, novel field-effect transistor architectures, such as FinFETs and nanowire field-effect transistors, have been proposed as replacements for the planar devices used today, and also for applications in biosensing and power generation. The successful operation of such devices will depend on our ability to precisely control the location and number of active impurity atoms in the host semiconductor during the fabrication process. Here, we demonstrate that the free carrier density in semiconductor nanowires is dependent on the size of the nanowires. By measuring the electrical conduction of doped silicon nanowires as a function of nanowire radius, temperature and dielectric surrounding, we show that the donor ionization energy increases with decreasing nanowire radius, and that it profoundly modifies the attainable free carrier density at values of the radius much larger than those at which quantum and dopant surface segregation effects set in. At a nanowire radius of 15 nm the carrier density is already 50% lower than in bulk silicon due to the dielectric mismatch between the conducting channel and its surroundings.

  16. Near-interfacial thermal donor generation during processing of (100)Si/low-κ Si-oxycarbide insulator structures revealed by electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stesmans, A.; Iacovo, S.; Nguyen, S.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Baklanov, M. R.; Urbanowicz, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    A low-temperature multifrequency electron spin resonance (ESR) study has been carried out on Cz-(110)Si/insulator structures with organosilicate films of low dielectric constant κ grown at 300 °C using the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method (PECVD). After subjection to a short-term UV-irradiation-assisted thermal curing treatment at 430 °C to remove the organic component from the low-κ film and obtain optimal porosity, the NL8 ESR spectrum of C2v symmetry is observed, characterized by g1 (//[100] = 1.999 83(8), g2(//[011] = 1.992 74(8), g3 = (//[1\\bar{1}0]) = 2.001 15(8). Based on previous insight, this reveals the generation in the c-Si substrate of singly ionized thermal double donor (TDD) defects with a core containing oxygen atoms. Remarkably, the generation is found to be highly nonuniform, and the defect density depth profile shows an exponential-like decay (decay length ˜3.8 μm) from the oxide/Si interface inward the Si substrate, thus exposing the defect formation as an interface-administered effect. Upon analysis, the strain induced by interfacial stress in the c-Si beneath the interface is suggested as the major driving component in the enhancement of TDD formation during thermal treatment, suggesting that substantial stress is involved with PECVD organosilicate low-κ glasses. The result represents a different and affirmative illustration of the influence of strain on TDD formation. Based on the principal g values, the observed TDD is closest to the NL81 type, the one formed first in bulk c-Si through oxygen agglomeration during short-term thermal treatment.

  17. Quantifying the Electron Donor and Acceptor Abilities of the Ketimide Ligands in M(N═C(t)Bu2)4 (M = V, Nb, Ta).

    PubMed

    Damon, Peter L; Liss, Cameron J; Lewis, Richard A; Morochnik, Simona; Szpunar, David E; Telser, Joshua; Hayton, Trevor W

    2015-10-19

    Addition of 4 equiv of Li(N═C(t)Bu2) to VCl3 in THF, followed by addition of 0.5 equiv of I2, generates the homoleptic V(IV) ketimide complex, V(N═C(t)Bu2)4 (1), in 42% yield. Similarly, reaction of 4 equiv of Li(N═C(t)Bu2) with NbCl4(THF)2 in THF affords the homoleptic Nb(IV) ketimide complex, Nb(N═C(t)Bu2)4 (2), in 55% yield. Seeking to extend the series to the tantalum congener, a new Ta(IV) starting material, TaCl4(TMEDA) (3), was prepared via reduction of TaCl5 with Et3SiH, followed by addition of TMEDA. Reaction of 3 with 4 equiv of Li(N═C(t)Bu2) in THF results in the isolation of a Ta(V) ketimide complex, Ta(Cl)(N═C(t)Bu2)4 (5), which can be isolated in 32% yield. Reaction of 5 with Tl(OTf) yields Ta(OTf)(N═C(t)Bu2)4 (6) in 44% yield. Subsequent reduction of 6 with Cp*2Co in toluene generates the homoleptic Ta(IV) congener Ta(N═C(t)Bu2)4 (7), although the yields are poor. All three homoleptic group 5 ketimide complexes exhibit squashed tetrahedral geometries in the solid state, as determined by X-ray crystallography. This geometry leads to a d(x(2)-y(2))(1) ((2)B1 in D(2d)) ground state, as supported by DFT calculations. EPR spectroscopic analysis of 1 and 2, performed at X- and Q-band frequencies (∼9 and 35 GHz, respectively), further supports the (2)B1 ground-state assignment, whereas comparison of 1, 2, and 7 with related group 5 tetra(aryl), tetra(amido), and tetra(alkoxo) complexes shows a higher M-L covalency in the ketimide-metal interaction. In addition, a ligand field analysis of 1 and 2 demonstrates that the ketimide ligand is both a strong π-donor and strong π-acceptor, an unusual combination found in very few organometallic ligands. PMID:26419513

  18. Quantifying the electron donor and acceptor ability of the ketimide ligands in M(N=CtBu2)4 (M = V, Nb, Ta)

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Peter L.; Liss, Cameron J.; Lewis, Richard A.; Morochnik, Simona; Szpunar, David E.; Telser, Joshua; Hayton, Trevor W.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) to VCl3 in THF, followed by addition of 0.5 equiv I2, generates the homoleptic V(IV) ketimide complex, V(N=CtBu2)4 (1), in 42% yield. Similarly, reaction of 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) with NbCl4(THF)2 in THF affords the homoleptic Nb(IV) ketimide complex, Nb(N=CtBu2)4 (2), in 55% yield. Seeking to extend the series to the tantalum congener, a new Ta(IV) starting material, TaCl4(TMEDA) (3), was prepared via reduction of TaCl5 with Et3SiH, followed by addition of TMEDA. Reaction of 3 with 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) in THF results in a isolation of a Ta(V) ketimide complex, Ta(Cl)(N=CtBu2)4 (5), which can be isolated in 32% yield. Reaction of 5 with Tl(OTf) yields Ta(OTf)(N=CtBu2)4 (6) in 44% yield. Subsequent reduction of 6 with Cp*2Co in toluene generates the homoleptic Ta(IV) congener Ta(N=CtBu2)4 (7), although the yields are poor. All three homoleptic Group 5 ketimide complexes exhibit squashed tetrahedral geometries in the solid state, as determined by X-ray crystallography. This geometry leads to a dx2−y21 (2B1 in D2d) ground state, as supported by DFT calculations. EPR spectroscopic analysis of 1 and 2, performed at X- and Q-band frequencies (~9 and 35 GHz, respectively), further supports the 2B1 ground state assignment, while comparison of 1, 2, and 7 with related Group 5 tetra(aryl), tetra(amido) and tetra(alkoxo) complexes shows a higher M-L covalency in the ketimide-metal interaction. In addition, a ligand field analysis of 1 and 2 demonstrates that the ketimide ligand is both a strong π-donor and strong π-acceptor, an unusual combination found in very few organometallic ligands. PMID:26419513

  19. Triplet energy transfer between the primary donor and carotenoids in Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporated with spheroidene analogs having different extents of pi-electron conjugation.

    PubMed

    Farhoosh, R; Chynwat, V; Gebhard, R; Lugtenburg, J; Frank, H A

    1997-07-01

    Three carotenoids, spheroidene, 3,4-dihydrospheroidene and 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene, having 8, 9 and 10 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds, respectively, were incorporated into Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers. The extents of binding were found to be 95 +/- 5% for spheroidene, 65 +/- 5% for 3,4-dihydrospheroidene and 60 +/- 10% for 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. The dynamics of the triplet states of the primary donor and carotenoid were measured at room temperature by flash absorption spectroscopy. The carotenoid, spheroidene, was observed to quench the primary donor triplet state. The triplet state of spheroidene that was formed subsequently decayed to the ground state with a lifetime of 7.0 +/- 0.5 microseconds. The primary donor triplet lifetime in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers lacking carotenoids was 60 +/- 5 microseconds. Quenching of the primary donor triplet state by the carotenoid was not observed in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers containing 3,4-dihydrospheroidene nor in the R-26.1 reaction centers containing 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. Triplet-state electron paramagnetic resonance was also carried out on the samples. The experiments revealed carotenoid triple-state signals in the Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporated with spheroidene, indicating that the primary donor triplet is quenched by the carotenoid. No carotenoid signals were observed from Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1 reaction centers incorporating 3,4-dihydrospheroidene nor in reaction centers incorporating 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene. Circular dichroism, steady-state absorbance band shifts accompanying the primary photochemistry in the reaction center and singlet energy transfer from the carotenoid to the primary donor confirm that the carotenoids are bound in the reaction centers and interacting with the primary donor. These studies provide a systematic approach to exploring the effects of carotenoid structure and excited

  20. Aromatic fumaronitrile core-based donor-linker-acceptor-linker-donor (D-pi-A-pi-D) compounds: synthesis and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Krishna; Adhikari, Ravi M; Kinstle, Thomas H

    2010-04-01

    A new class of aromatic fumaronitrile core-based compounds with different donors and linkers has been synthesized and well characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 have indole and 2-phenylindole groups as electron donors, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 have a diphenylamino group as the electron donor, and compound 5 has a 3,6-di-tert-butylcarbazole group as an electron donor. These compounds absorb in the blue-to-green region and emit in the blue-to-red region depending on the electron donor, linker, and solvents. The quantum yields of fluorescence of these compounds in solution are measured and found to be moderate, but in solid states, they are high. These compounds display strong emission solvatochromism that is reflected by a large shift in their fluorescence emission maxima on changing the solvents. This change is accompanied by a successive decrease in fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence lifetimes of these compounds are measured in different solvent and found to vary from <1 to 7 ns. Optical switching of these compounds with solvents, concentration, and excitation energy have been studied. The correlation between the functional group and optical properties has been established to some extent. The ability of these compounds to function as colorimetric and luminescence pH sensors is demonstrated with color changes and luminescence switching upon the addition of trifluoroacetic acid. The potentiality of these compounds for application in optoelectronics has been optically assessed. PMID:20235549

  1. Donor Tag Game

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cross chapter closest to you. Can't Donate Blood? A financial donation can also help save lives. Donate Now Find ... Donation Student Donors Donation Process Eligibility Blood FAQs Blood Donor Community Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics ...

  2. Additive Manufacturing Modeling and Simulation A Literature Review for Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seufzer, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is coming into industrial use and has several desirable attributes. Control of the deposition remains a complex challenge, and so this literature review was initiated to capture current modeling efforts in the field of additive manufacturing. This paper summarizes about 10 years of modeling and simulation related to both welding and additive manufacturing. The goals were to learn who is doing what in modeling and simulation, to summarize various approaches taken to create models, and to identify research gaps. Later sections in the report summarize implications for closed-loop-control of the process, implications for local research efforts, and implications for local modeling efforts.

  3. 21 CFR 660.31 - Suitability of the donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.31 Suitability of the donor. Donors of peripheral blood for Reagent Red Blood Cells shall meet...

  4. 21 CFR 660.31 - Suitability of the donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.31 Suitability of the donor. Donors of peripheral blood for Reagent Red Blood Cells shall meet...

  5. 21 CFR 640.12 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.12 Suitability of donor. The source blood for Red Blood Cells shall be obtained from a donor who meets the criteria for...

  6. 21 CFR 640.12 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.12 Suitability of donor. The source blood for Red Blood Cells shall be obtained from a donor who meets the criteria for...

  7. 21 CFR 640.12 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.12 Suitability of donor. The source blood for Red Blood Cells shall be obtained from a donor who meets the criteria for...

  8. 21 CFR 640.12 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.12 Suitability of donor. The source blood for Red Blood Cells shall be obtained from a donor who meets the criteria for...

  9. 21 CFR 660.31 - Suitability of the donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.31 Suitability of the donor. Donors of peripheral blood for Reagent Red Blood Cells shall meet...

  10. 21 CFR 660.31 - Suitability of the donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.31 Suitability of the donor. Donors of peripheral blood for Reagent Red Blood Cells shall meet...

  11. Significant Influences of Elaborately Modulating Electron Donors on Light Absorption and Multichannel Charge-Transfer Dynamics for 4-(Benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-ylethynyl)benzoic Acid Dyes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erfeng; Yao, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yiqiang; Shao, Guosheng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-20

    4-(Benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-ylethynyl)benzoic acid (BTEBA) as a promising electron acceptor has been used in the highly efficient organic dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) recently. Because of its strong electron-deficient character, BTEBA could bring forth a remarkable decline in the energy level of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and further reduce the energy gap of dye molecules significantly. In this contribution, two metal-free organic dyes WEF1 and WEF2 were synthesized by simply combining BTEBA with two slightly tailored electron-releasing moieties: 4-hexylphenyl substituted indaceno[1,2-b:5,6-b']dithiophene (IDT) and cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophene[2',1':4,5]thieno[2,3-d]thiophene (CPDTDT), which were screened rationally from an electron-donor pool via computational simulation. With respect to those of WEF1, WEF2-sensitized solar cells demonstrate a far better short-circuit photocurrent density (JSC) and open-circuit photovoltage (VOC), resulting in a ∼50% improved power conversion efficiency of 10.0% under irradiance of 100 mW cm(-2) AM1.5G sunlight. We resorted to theoretical calculations, electrical measurements, steady-state, and time-resolved spectroscopic methods to shed light on the fatal influences of elaborately modulating electron donors on light absorption, interfacial energetics, and multichannel charge-transfer dynamics. PMID:27331621

  12. UV-B-induced inhibition of photosystem II electron transport studied by EPR and chlorophyll fluorescence. Impairment of donor and acceptor side components.

    PubMed

    Vass, I; Sass, L; Spetea, C; Bakou, A; Ghanotakis, D F; Petrouleas, V

    1996-07-01

    Inhibition of photosystem II electron transport by UV-B radiation has been studied in isolated spinach photosystem II membrane particles using low-temperature EPR spectroscopy and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. UV-B irradiation results in the rapid inhibition of oxygen evolution and the decline of variable chlorophyll fluorescence. These effects are accompanied by the loss of the multiline EPR signal arising from the S2 state of the water-oxidizing complex and the induction of Signal IIfast originating from stabilized Try-Z+. The EPR signals from the QA-Fe2+ acceptor complex, Tyr-D+, and the oxidized non-heme iron (Fe3+) are also decreased during the course of UV-B irradiation, but at a significantly slower rate than oxygen evolution and the multiline signal. The decrease of the Fe3+ signal at high g values (g = 8.06, g = 5.6) is accompanied by the induction of another EPR signal at g = 4.26 that arises most likely from the same Fe3+ ion in a modified ligand environment. UV-B irradiation also affects cytochrome b-559. The g = 2.94 EPR signal that arises from the dark- oxidized form is enhanced, whereas the light inducible g = 3.04 signal that arises from the photo-oxidizable population of cytochrome b-559 is diminished. UV-B irradiation also induces the degradation of the D1 reaction center protein. The rate of the D1 protein loss is slower than the inhibition of oxygen evolution and of the multiline signal but follows closely the loss of Signal IIslow, the QA-Fe2+ and the Fe3+ EPR signals, as well as the release of protein-bound manganese. It is concluded from the results that UV-B radiation affects photosystem II redox components at both the donor and acceptor side. The primary damage occurs at the water-oxidizing complex. Modification and/or inactivation of tyrosine-D, cytochrome b-559, and the QAFe2+ acceptor complex are subsequent events that coincide more closely with the UV-B-induced damage to the protein structure of the photosystem II reaction

  13. Modeling Groundwater-Quality Data from In-Situ Mesocosms Using PHREEQC to Provide Insights into the Electron Donors Involved in Denitrification in the Karlsruhe Aquifer, ND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, S. F.; Tesfay, T.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater nitrate concentrations in the Karlsruhe aquifer in north-central North Dakota increased in the mid-1990s. In response, state regulators developed a remediation plan that included research into the natural denitrifying capabilities of the aquifer, including the analysis of aquifer sediment samples and the installation of a pair of in-situ mesocosms (ISMs) below the water table to study denitrification reactions. Sediment analysis showed concentrations of the potential electron donors ferrous iron, inorganic sulfide, and organic carbon (OC). X-ray diffraction showed the dominant minerals are quartz, plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, calcite, and dolomite, with lesser amounts of ferrous-iron silicates (chlorite, hornblende, biotite) and pyrite. In the ISMs tracer tests were initiated by pumping groundwater from them, amending it with sodium nitrate and sodium bromide (Br was used as a tracer for nitrate), and pumping the amended water back into the ISMs. The large size of the ISMs (> 180 L of aquifer sediments) allowed large samples (> 1 L) to be taken from the ISMs about every two months for over two years. Samples were analyzed for major ions and saturation indices [SI = log (ion activity product/equilibrium constant)] computed. Any loss of nitrate beyond that attributable to dilution, based on the Br tracer, was considered denitrified. Major sulfate minerals were undersaturated in the ISMs; therefore, any increase in sulfate was attributed to the oxidation of pyrite. PHREEQC was used to determine if the remaining nitate lost to denitrification could be explained best by a reaction with ferrous-iron silicate (as grunerite), organic carbon (as CH2O), or a 50/50 stoichiometric mix of both. After each simulation, the modeled groundwater was “equilibrated” with quartz, albite, anorthite, calcite, dolomite, chlorite, and magnesite, such that the modeled groundwater and the actual groundwater had the same SI values for these minerals. Simulated

  14. Thermal Imaging for Assessment of Electron-Beam Free Form Fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) Additive Manufacturing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Hafley, Robert A.; Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Brewer, Amy R.; Martin, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing field where 3-dimensional parts can be produced layer by layer. NASA s electron beam free-form fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) technology is being evaluated to manufacture metallic parts in a space environment. The benefits of EBF(sup 3) technology are weight savings to support space missions, rapid prototyping in a zero gravity environment, and improved vehicle readiness. The EBF(sup 3) system is composed of 3 main components: electron beam gun, multi-axis position system, and metallic wire feeder. The electron beam is used to melt the wire and the multi-axis positioning system is used to build the part layer by layer. To insure a quality weld, a near infrared (NIR) camera is used to image the melt pool and solidification areas. This paper describes the calibration and application of a NIR camera for temperature measurement. In addition, image processing techniques are presented for weld assessment metrics.

  15. Becoming a Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Organ and Gender. > U.S. Waiting List Candidate Data HOW TO BECOME A DONOR The most important thing to do is to sign up as an organ and tissue donor in your state's donor registry. To cover all bases, it's also helpful to: Designate your decision on ...

  16. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  17. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Karas’, V. I. Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  18. One-step versus stepwise mechanism in protonated amino acid-promoted electron-transfer reduction of a quinone by electron donors and two-electron reduction by a dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analogue. Interplay between electron transfer and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Junpei; Yamada, Shunsuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2008-04-30

    Semiquinone radical anion of 1-(p-tolylsulfinyl)-2,5-benzoquinone (TolSQ(*-)) forms a strong hydrogen bond with protonated histidine (TolSQ(*-)/His x 2 H(+)), which was successfully detected by electron spin resonance. Strong hydrogen bonding between TolSQ(*-) and His x 2 H(+) results in acceleration of electron transfer (ET) from ferrocenes [R2Fc, R = C5H5, C5H4(n-Bu), C5H4Me] to TolSQ, when the one-electron reduction potential of TolSQ is largely shifted to the positive direction in the presence of His x 2 H(+). The rates of His x 2 H(+)-promoted ET from R2Fc to TolSQ exhibit deuterium kinetic isotope effects due to partial dissociation of the N-H bond in His x 2 H(+) at the transition state, when His x 2 H(+) is replaced by the deuterated compound (His x 2 D(+)-d6). The observed deuterium kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD) decreases continuously with increasing the driving force of ET to approach kH/kD = 1.0. On the other hand, His x 2 H(+) also promotes a hydride reduction of TolSQ by an NADH analogue, 9,10-dihydro-10-methylacridine (AcrH2). The hydride reduction proceeds via the one-step hydride-transfer pathway. In such a case, a large deuterium kinetic isotope effect is observed in the rate of the hydride transfer, when AcrH2 is replaced by the dideuterated compound (AcrD2). In sharp contrast to this, no deuterium kinetic isotope effect is observed, when His x 2 H(+) is replaced by His x 2 D(+)-d6. On the other hand, direct protonation of TolSQ and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) also results in efficient reductions of TolSQH(+) and PQH(+) by AcrH2, respectively. In this case, however, the hydride-transfer reactions occur via the ET pathway, that is, ET from AcrH2 to TolSQH(+) and PQH(+) occurs in preference to direct hydride transfer from AcrH2 to TolSQH(+) and PQH(+), respectively. The AcrH2(*+) produced by the ET oxidation of AcrH2 by TolSQH(+) and PQH(+) was directly detected by using a stopped-flow technique. PMID:18386924

  19. Donor corneal tissue evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saini, J S; Reddy, M K; Sharma, S; Wagh, S

    1996-03-01

    Proper evaluation of donor cornea is critical to the success of corneal transplantation. Attention must be paid to the cause of death and ocular condition as several general and ocular diseases constitute contraindications for donor corneal usage. Death to enucleation time should be noted. Gross examination and slit lamp biomicroscopy are mandatory for the evaluation of the donor eye while specular microscopy adds another useful dimension to information regarding donor cornea. This article provides a comprehensive review of all the aspects of donor corneal evaluation as practised today worldwide. PMID:8828299

  20. Donor-Appended N,C-Chelate Organoboron Compounds: Influence of Donor Strength on Photochromic Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mellerup, Soren K; Yuan, Kang; Nguyen, Carmen; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Suning

    2016-08-22

    Recently, four-coordinated N,C-chelate organoboron compounds have been found to show many interesting photochemical transformations depending on the nature of their chelating framework. As such, the effect of substitution on the chelate ligand has been well-established and understood, but the impact of the aryl groups attached to the boron atom remains less clear. To investigate the effect of enhanced charge-transfer character, a series of new N,C-chelate organoboron compounds with donor-functionalized aryl groups have been synthesized and characterized using NMR, UV/Vis, and electrochemical methods. These compounds were found to possess bright and tunable charge-transfer luminescence which is dependent on the donor strength of the amino substituent. In addition, some of these compounds undergo photochromic switching, producing dark isomers of various colors. This work establishes that donor-functionalization of the aryl groups in N,C-chelate boron compounds is an effective strategy for tuning both the photophysical and photochemical properties of such systems. The new findings also help elucidate the influence of electronic structure on the photoreactivity of N,C-chelate organoboron compounds which appears to be as important as steric crowding around the boron atom. PMID:27460971

  1. The impact of the donors' and recipients' medical complications on living kidney donors' mental health.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Lotte; Laging, Mirjam; Timman, Reinier; Zuidema, Willij C; Beck, Denise K; IJzermans, Jan N M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Busschbach, Jan J V; Weimar, Willem; Massey, Emma K

    2016-05-01

    A minority of living kidney donors (between 5-25%) have poor psychological outcomes after donation. There is mixed evidence on the influence of medical complications on these outcomes. We examined whether medical complications among donors and recipients predicted changes in donors' mental health (psychological symptoms and well-being) between predonation and 1 year postdonation. One-hundred and forty-five donors completed questionnaires on mental health predonation and 3 and 12 months postdonation. Number of recipient rehospitalizations and donor complications (none; minor; or severe) were obtained from medical records at 3 and 12 months after surgery. Multilevel regression analyses were used to examine the association between medical complications and changes in donors' mental health over time after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. We found that donor complications (P = 0.003) and recipient rehospitalizations (P = 0.001) predicted an increase in donors' psychological symptoms over time. Recipient rehospitalizations also predicted a decrease in well-being (P = 0.005) over time; however, this relationship became weaker over time. We conclude that medical complications experienced by either the donor or recipient is a risk factor for deterioration in donors' mental health after living kidney donation. Professionals should monitor donors who experience medical complications and offer additional psychological support when needed. PMID:26895841

  2. Effects of different additives with assistance of microwave heating for heavy metal stabilization in electronic industry sludge.

    PubMed

    Jothiramalingam, R; Lo, Shang-Lien; Chen, Ching-lung

    2010-01-01

    Electronic industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan is normally passed through an acid-extraction process to reclaim most of the copper ions, the remaining residue may still need to be treated by various stabilization technologies using suitable additives. Cement solidification is used as the common method to stabilize the industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan. However, this method has the disadvantage of an increase in waste volume. In the present study selective additives such as sodium sulfide, barium manganate and different phase of alumina were tested as a possible alternate additive to stabilize the heavy metal ion in the treated solid waste sludge via microwave heating treatment. The effects of additive amount, power of microwave irradiation and reaction time have been studied. Heavy metal leaching capacity is determined by using standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test and elemental content in the leachate is analyzed by inductively coupled plasma analysis. Sodium sulfide is effectively stabilizing the leaching copper ion with high selectivity in the presence of microwave irradiation and finally stabilized in the form of copper sulfide, which is a significant reaction to stabilize the copper ion leaching in the waste sludge. Complete stabilization of heavy metal ion and copper ion content (<5mgL(-1)) in industrial sludge is achieved by heating the microwave treated barium manganate and alumina additives by adopting suitable reaction conditions. Hybrid microwave and conventional heating process with minor amount of additive providing the efficient heavy metal stabilization for treated electronic industry waste sludge. PMID:19945139

  3. Ultrafast transient absorption studies on photosystem I reaction centers from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. 2: mutations near the P700 reaction center chlorophylls provide new insight into the nature of the primary electron donor.

    PubMed

    Holzwarth, Alfred R; Müller, Marc G; Niklas, Jens; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2006-01-15

    donor P700", are not oxidized in the first electron transfer process, but rather only in the secondary electron transfer step. We thus propose a new electron transfer mechanism for Photosystem I where the accessory Chl(s) function as the primary electron donor(s) and the A0 Chl(s) are the primary electron acceptor(s). This new mechanism also resolves in a straightforward manner the difficulty with the previous mechanism, where an electron would have to overcome a distance of approximately 14 A in <1 ps in a single step. If interpreted within a scheme of single-sided electron transfer, our data suggest that the B-branch is the active branch, although parallel A-branch activity cannot be excluded. All the mutations do affect to a varying extent the energy difference between the reaction center excited state RC* and the first radical pair and thus affect the rate constant of charge recombination. It is interesting to note that the new mechanism proposed is in fact analogous to the electron transfer mechanism in Photosystem II, where the accessory Chl also plays the role of the primary electron donor, rather than the special Chl pair P680 (Prokhorenko, V. and A. R. Holzwarth. 2000. J. Phys. Chem. B. 104:11563-11578). PMID:16258055

  4. The Effect of Donor Group Rigidification on the Electronic and Optical Properties of Arylamine-Based Metal-Free Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Liezel L; Balanay, Mannix P; Kim, Dong Hee

    2016-07-28

    One of the most significant aspects in the development of dye-sensitized solar cells is the exploration and design of high-efficiency and low-cost dyes. This paper reports the theoretical design of various triphenylamine analogues, wherein the central nitrogen moiety establishes an sp(2)-hybridization, which endows a significant participation in the charge-transfer properties. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT methodologies were utilized to investigate the geometry, electronic structure, photochemical properties, and electrochemical properties of these dyes. Different exchange-correlation functionals were initially evaluated to establish a proper methodology for calculating the excited-state energy of the reference dye, known as DIA3. Consequently, TD-LC-ωPBE with a damping parameter of 0.175 Bohr(-1) best correlates with the experimental value. Four new dyes, namely, Dhk1, Dhk2, Dhk3, and Dhk4, were designed by modifying the rigidity of the donor moiety. According to the results, altering the type and position of binding in the donor group leads to distinct planarity of the dyes, which significantly affects their properties. The designed Dhk4 dye showed more red-shifted and broadened absorption spectra owing to the enhanced coplanarity between its donor and π-bridge moiety, which brings an advantage for its potential use as sensitizer for photovoltaic applications. PMID:27388927

  5. Lung donor selection criteria

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant. PMID:25132970

  6. Lung donor selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant. PMID:25132970

  7. Determination of the Path Loss from Passenger Electronic Devices to Radio Altimeter with Additional EMI Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüür, J.; Nunes, R. R.

    2012-05-01

    Emitters of current and future wireless ultra wideband technology (UWB) inside the cabin should not interfere with any aircraft system. Especially the radio altimeter (RA) system using antennas mounted outside the fuselage is potentially sensitive to UWB devices in the frequency range between 4.1 and 4.8 GHz. The measurement of the interference path loss (IPL) to the RA is therefore of interest and is presented for different aircraft. The need of a high dynamic setup with low parasitic coupling in the IPL measurement is stressed. In addition, electromagnetic interference (EMI) tests with different transmitted signals are made, showing that the susceptibility of the RA system actually increases with UWB modulation.

  8. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements. PMID:27440174

  9. 21 CFR 640.63 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.63 Suitability of donor. (a) Method of determining. The suitability of a donor for Source Plasma shall be determined by a qualified... year. (2)(i) A donor who is to be immunized for the production of high-titer plasma shall be...

  10. 21 CFR 640.63 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.63 Suitability of donor. (a) Method of determining. The suitability of a donor for Source Plasma shall be determined by a qualified... year. (2)(i) A donor who is to be immunized for the production of high-titer plasma shall be...

  11. 21 CFR 640.63 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.63 Suitability of donor. (a) Method of determining. The suitability of a donor for Source Plasma shall be determined by a qualified... year. (2)(i) A donor who is to be immunized for the production of high-titer plasma shall be...

  12. 21 CFR 640.63 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.63 Suitability of donor. (a) Method of determining. The suitability of a donor for Source Plasma shall be determined by a qualified... year. (2)(i) A donor who is to be immunized for the production of high-titer plasma shall be...

  13. 21 CFR 640.63 - Suitability of donor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.63 Suitability of donor. (a) Method of determining. The suitability of a donor for Source Plasma shall be determined by a qualified... year. (2)(i) A donor who is to be immunized for the production of high-titer plasma shall be...

  14. Utilization of Deceased Donor Kidneys to Initiate Living Donor Chains.

    PubMed

    Melcher, M L; Roberts, J P; Leichtman, A B; Roth, A E; Rees, M A

    2016-05-01

    We propose that some deceased donor (DD) kidneys be allocated to initiate nonsimultaneous extended altruistic donor chains of living donor (LD) kidney transplants to address, in part, the huge disparity between patients on the DD kidney waitlist and available donors. The use of DD kidneys for this purpose would benefit waitlisted candidates in that most patients enrolled in kidney paired donation (KPD) systems are also waitlisted for a DD kidney transplant, and receiving a kidney through the mechanism of KPD will decrease pressure on the DD pool. In addition, a LD kidney usually provides survival potential equal or superior to that of DD kidneys. If KPD chains that are initiated by a DD can end in a donation of an LD kidney to a candidate on the DD waitlist, the quality of the kidney allocated to a waitlisted patient is likely to be improved. We hypothesize that a pilot program would show a positive impact on patients of all ethnicities and blood types. PMID:26833680

  15. Novel microstructural growth in the surface of Inconel 625 by the addition of SiC under electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M.; Ali, G.; Ahmed, Ejaz; Haq, M. A.; Akhter, J. I.

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam melting is being used to modify the microstructure of the surfaces of materials due to its ability to cause localized melting and supercooling of the melt. This article presents an experimental study on the surface modification of Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 625) reinforced with SiC ceramic particles under electron beam melting. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have been applied to characterize the resulted microstructure. The results revealed growth of novel structures like wire, rod, tubular, pyramid, bamboo and tweezers type morphologies in the modified surface. In addition to that fibrous like structure was also observed. Formation of thin carbon sheet has been found at the regions of decomposed SiC. Electron beam modified surface of Inconel 625 alloy has been hardened twice as compared to the as-received samples. Surface hardening effect may be attributed to both the formation of the novel structures as well as the introduction of Si and C atom in the lattice of Inconel 625 alloy.

  16. Electronic structure of p-type perylene monoimide-based donor-acceptor dyes on the nickel oxide (100) surface: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Kontkanen, O V; Niskanen, M; Hukka, T I; Rantala, T T

    2016-05-25

    A p-type dye-sensitized solar cell, where the dye injects a hole into the semiconductor, could be combined with a typical Grätzel cell to create an efficient tandem device. However, the current p-type devices suffer from low efficiency. Here, geometries and electronic structures of four perylenemonoimide-based dyes () both as free and adsorbed on the NiO(100) semiconductor surface have been investigated to gain a better understanding of the p-type devices. In particular, the electronic transitions relevant to charge transfer between the dye and the surface have been identified. Excitations have been evaluated using the time-dependent DFT calculations, and the roles of frontier orbitals and band edges in transitions have been assessed. The adsorbed dyes can adopt either upright or slightly tilted geometries depending on the structure of the anchoring group and the binding mode of the dye. The adsorption slightly lowers the NiO band gap, from 4.06 eV to 3.90-3.96 eV, depending on the surface-adsorbate system and the band gaps of the dye molecules by 0.1-0.2 eV. Additionally, the adsorption mode of dye moves the LUMO+1 level down by 0.5 eV. The effective mass of charge carrier holes is significantly smaller at the NiO surface than in the bulk indicating the importance of surface conductivity. We also found that the potential drop, i.e. the driving force for charge transfer from NiO to the dye molecule, depends on the adsorption mode of . PMID:27224900

  17. NO x and PAHs removal from industrial flue gas by using electron beam technology with alcohol addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Sun, Yong-Xia; Licki, J.; Bułka, S.; Kubica, K.; Zimek, Z.

    2003-06-01

    The removal of NO x and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from flue gas was investigated, as a preliminary test, with alcohol addition by using electron beam irradiation in EPS Kawęczyn. The experimental conditions were the followings: flue gas flow rate 5000 nm 3/h; humidity 4-5%; inlet concentrations of SO 2 and NO x, which were emitted from power station, were 192 and 106 ppm, respectively; ammonia addition was 2.75 m 3/h; alcohol addition was 600 l/h. It was found that below 6 kGy applied doses the NO x removal efficiency increased by 10% in the presence of alcohol as compared to the absence of alcohol; on the other hand, the NO x removal efficiency decreased at doses higher than 10 kGy. In order to understand the behavior of these aromatic hydrocarbons under electron irradiation, unirradiated samples (i.e. as emitted from the coal combustion process, called inlet) and irradiated samples (called outlet) were collected by using a condense bottle connected with an XAD-2 adsorbent and an active carbon adsorbent and were then analyzed by a GC-MS. It was found that using 8 kGy absorbed dose the concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons of small aromatic rings (<3, except acenaphthylene) were reduced, but the concentration of these hydrocarbons of large aromatic rings (⩾4) were increased. A possible mechanism is proposed.

  18. Rich Donors, Poor Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The shifting ideological winds of foreign aid donors have driven their policy towards governments in poor countries. Donors supported state-led development policies in poor countries from the 1940s to the 1970s; market and private-sector driven reforms during the 1980s and 1990s; and returned their attention to the state with an emphasis on…

  19. Donor Telomere Length SAA

    Cancer.gov

    A new NCI study has found that, among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received a hematopoietic cell transplant from an unrelated donor, those whose donor white blood cells had longer telomeres had higher survival rates five-years after transplant

  20. Donor selection and management.

    PubMed

    Snell, Gregory I; Paraskeva, Miranda; Westall, Glen P

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews recent developments in the selection, assessment, and management of the potential lung donor, which aim to increase donor organ use. The scarcity of suitable donor organs continues to limit lung transplantation, but the situation is changing. An expanded donor pool, including the now widespread use of donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs; the use of extended donor lungs; and the ability of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) to evaluate and improve donor lungs are key initiatives. These strategies have substantially lifted donor lung utilization rates from historically low levels of less than 15% to rates greater than 50%. Indeed, since 2004 there has been an accelerated year-on-year increase in the number of lungs transplanted globally. Intermediate-term studies are now confirming that long-term outcomes are not being significantly compromised and that more individuals with terminal, symptomatic lung disease are being transplanted. It is now quite clear that many of the historical factors used to define a lung as "extended" do not actually produce significantly inferior outcomes. There has been a dramatic increase in research and clinical interest in donor lung assessment, management, and novel therapeutic strategies. The lessons learned are now being applied widely beyond the lung as researchers aim to increase availability and optimize other solid organs for transplantation. PMID:23821510

  1. Laser and electron-beam powder-bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs.

    PubMed

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, allows the direct fabrication of functional parts with complex shapes from digital models. In this review, the current progress of two AM processes suitable for metallic orthopaedic implant applications, namely selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design for reduction of stress-shielding in implants are discussed. Additive manufactured biomaterials such as 316L stainless steel, titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) are highlighted. Limitations and future potential of such technologies are also explored. PMID:26488900

  2. Carbon related donor bound exciton transitions in ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadbeigi, F.; Kumar, E. Senthil; Alagha, S.; Anderson, I.; Watkins, S. P.

    2014-08-07

    Several shallow donor bound exciton photoluminescence (PL) transitions are reported in ZnO nanowires doped with carbon. The emission energies are in the range of 3360.8–3361.9 meV, close to previously reported emission lines due to excitons bound to donor point defects, such as Ga, Al, In, and H. The addition of small amounts of hydrogen during growth results in a strong enhancement of the PL of these carbon related emission lines, yet PL and annealing measurements indicate no appreciable bulk hydrogen. The observation of two electron satellites for these emission lines enables the determination of the donor binding energies. The dependence of exciton localization energy on donor binding energy departs somewhat from the usual linear relationship observed for group III donors, indicating a qualitatively different central cell potential, as one would expect for a complex. Emission lines due to excitons bound to ionized donors associated with these defects are also observed. The dependence of the PL emission intensities on temperature and growth conditions demonstrates that the lines are due to distinct complexes and not merely excited states of each other.

  3. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source. PMID:26783836

  4. Expanding the live kidney donor pool: ethical considerations regarding altruistic donors, paired and pooled programs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shaneel Rajendra; Chadha, Priyanka; Papalois, Vassilios

    2011-06-01

    In renal transplant, there is a well-known deficiency in organ supply relative to demand. Live donation provides superior results when compared with deceased donation including a better rate of graft success and fewer immunologic complications. This deficiency in organs leads to significant morbidity and mortality rates. Alternative avenues have been extensively explored that may expand the live donor pool. They include altruistic donation as well as paired and pooled exchange programs. Altruistic donation is a truly selfless act from a donor unknown to the recipient. Kidney paired donation involves 2 incompatible donor-recipient pairs swapping donors to produce compatibility. Pooled donation involves at least 2 pairs, and can take the form of domino chains in which altruistic input sets up a chain of transplants, in which each recipient's incompatible donor makes a donation for the next recipient. Despite application of these various methods, there lie extensive ethical issues surrounding them. Misconceptions frequently occur; for instance, the perceived benefit that donating an organ to a loved one is greater for a related donor than for an altruistic one. Additionally, it is frequently believed that immunologic incompatibility offers coerced donors liberation from surgery, and that overcoming these barriers by introducing exchange programs provides vulnerable donors less protection. This article explores these and other complex ethical issues surrounding the various methods of expanding the donor pool. The authors offer opinions that challenge the ethical issues and attempt to overcome those views that hinder progress in the field. PMID:21649566

  5. Efficient Organic Light-Emitting Diode through Triplet Exciton Reharvesting by Employing Blended Electron Donor and Acceptor as the Emissive Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Cai, Chao; Li, King Fai; Tam, Hoi Lam; Chan, Kin Long; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2015-11-18

    A blended bimolecular exciplex formation was demonstrated between two individual donor and acceptor molecules, which are tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine (TCTA) and 2,4,6-tris(3'-(pyridin-3-yl)biphenyl-3-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (Tm3PyBPZ). The photoluminescence spectrum of the exciplex in the solid state showed an emission with a peak around 514 nm (∼2.49 eV). By applying this exciplex as an emitting layer, a highly efficient all-fluorescent organic lighting emitting diode with maximum efficiencies of 13.1% and 53.4 lm/W can be realized under an extremely low turn-on voltage of only 2.4 V. The thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) process is believed to be responsible for the excellent device performance. PMID:26529382

  6. The willed body donor interview project: medical student and donor expectations.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Michael; Holman, Alexis; Mueller, Dean A; Gruppen, Larry D; Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The Anatomical Donations Program at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) has begun a multiphase project wherein interviews of donors will be recorded and later shown to medical students who participate in the anatomical dissection course. The first phase of this project included surveys of both current UMMS medical students and donors concerning their perceptions of such a program. A five-question survey administered via Qualtrics software was electronically mailed to all current medical students at UMMS, and a survey was mailed to registered and potential donors requesting information from the UMMS on anatomical donations. A total of 224 medical student responses (response rate 33%) and 54 donor responses (response rate 27%) were received. Seventy-four percent of students and 81% of donors reported they would participate in this program if it existed. Students and donors supported the implementation of this program for varying reasons, though many felt strongly they would not want to participate in a donor interview program. These qualitative results support those of previous studies that show a majority of students desire a closer personal relationship with the donor, and these are the first results to be reported on donor perceptions of a donor interview program. Although many students and donors are in favor of instituting this program, others feel strongly that such an experience could be traumatic. The causes of these differing reactions need to be further explored, and the opinions of those who object to this study will be respected by maintaining voluntary participation in future phases of this study. PMID:23109299

  7. Effect of Powder Reuse Times on Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Qian, M.; Liu, N.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, G. Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-03-01

    An advantage of the powder-bed-based metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes is that the powder can be reused. The powder reuse or recycling times directly affect the affordability of the additively manufactured parts, especially for the AM of titanium parts. This study examines the influence of powder reuse times on the characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V powder, including powder composition, particle size distribution (PSD), apparent density, tap density, flowability, and particle morphology. In addition, tensile samples were manufactured and evaluated with respect to powder reuse times and sample locations in the powder bed. The following findings were made from reusing the same batch of powder 21 times for AM by selective electron beam melting: (i) the oxygen (O) content increased progressively with increasing reuse times but both the Al content and the V content remained generally stable (a small decrease only); (ii) the powder became less spherical with increasing reuse times and some particles showed noticeable distortion and rough surfaces after being reused 16 times; (iii) the PSD became narrower and few satellite particles were observed after 11 times of reuse; (iv) reused powder showed improved flowability; and (v) reused powder showed no measurable undesired influence on the AM process and the samples exhibited highly consistent tensile properties, irrespective of their locations in the powder bed. The implications of these findings were discussed.

  8. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species. PMID:27070292

  9. Oocyte cryopreservation for donor egg banking.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Ana; Remohí, José; Chang, Ching-Chien; Nagy, Zsolt Peter

    2011-09-01

    . In the present manuscript, the current experience with oocyte donation using cryopreservation technology is reviewed. The outcomes of two recently established donor egg cryobanks at Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad in Spain and Reproductive Biology Associates in the USA (involving a large number of cases) demonstrate that egg cryo-survival is high and that fertilization, embryo development, implantation and pregnancy rates are similar to those reported after fresh egg donation. It also provides additional advantages of being more efficient, more economical, easier for both donors and recipients and potentially also safer, because eggs can now be quarantined for 6 months (or longer) to retest for infectious diseases in the donors. It is the opinion of the authors, based on several advantages associated with the use of donor egg cryobanking, that in the future there will be fewer traditional egg donations and increasingly more cryo-egg donations. PMID:21767989

  10. Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the scar. The bulges can usually be fixed with surgery. During your medical exam, ask the ... to find out if the donor's blood type matches the recipient’s blood type. Next, the transplant team ...

  11. D-A-D-π-D-A-D type diketopyrrolopyrrole based small molecule electron donors for bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yuvraj; Misra, Rajneesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Sharma, Ganesh D

    2016-06-22

    Two organic small molecules based on diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) units having a D-A-D-π-D-A-D structure denoted as and were synthesized. Their optical and electrochemical properties relevant to organic solar cells were investigated. The wider optical absorption coverage from 450-800 nm, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) (-5.23 eV and -5.34 eV for and , respectively) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (-3.47 and -3.45 eV for and , respectively) make these small molecules suitable as donors for bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. The bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells based on an active layer consists of a blend of these small molecules as donors and PC71BM as an acceptor with an optimized weight ratio of 1 : 2 cast from chloroform (CF) showed overall power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 1.98% (with Jsc = 5.38 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.84 V and FF = 0.42) and 1.85% (with Jsc = 4.56 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.96 V and FF = 0.42) for and respectively. The relatively high Voc value based on the based device has been attributed to the deeper HOMO of compared to . The optimized  : PC71BM (1 : 2) and  : PC71BM (1 : 2) active layers were subjected to two step annealing (TSA), i.e. thermal annealing and subsequent solvent vapor annealing and the corresponding BHJ organic solar cells showed a PCE of 5.28% (Jsc = 11.53 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.79 V and FF = 0.58) and 5.52% (Jsc = 10.84 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.91 V and FF = 0.56), respectively. The enhancement in PCE is mainly due to the improvement in Jsc and FF, related to light absorption in an active layer, a better nanoscale morphology, and an increase in the crystalline nature of the active layer and balanced charge transport, induced by the TSA treatment. PMID:27292157

  12. Benzofurocarbazole and benzothienocarbazole as donors for improved quantum efficiency in blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Ryun; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Jeon, Sang Kyu; Lee, Chil Won; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-05-11

    Benzofurocarbazole and benzothienocarbazole were used as electron donors of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters and the performances of the TADF devices were examined. The benzofurocarbazole and benzothienocarbazole donor moieties were better than carbazole as the electron donors of the TADF emitters. PMID:25869643

  13. Photochemically induced intramolecular six-electron reductive elimination and oxidative addition of nitric oxide by the nitridoosmate(VIII) anion.

    PubMed

    Thornley, Wyatt A; Bitterwolf, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    UV photolysis of the nitridoosmate(VIII) anion, OsO3 N(-) , in low-temperature frozen matrices results in nitrogen-oxygen bond formation to give the Os(II) nitrosyl complex OsO2 (NO)(-) . Photolysis of the Os(II) nitrosyl product with visible wavelengths results in reversion to the parent Os(VIII) complex. Formally a six-electron reductive elimination and oxidative addition, respectively, this represents the first reported example of such an intramolecular transformation. DFT modelling of this reaction proceeds through a step-wise mechanism taking place through a side-on nitroxyl Os(VI) intermediate, OsO2 (η(2) -NO)(-) . PMID:25537499

  14. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Deger, S; Giessing, M; Roigas, J; Wille, A H; Lein, M; Schönberger, B; Loening, S A

    2005-01-01

    Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy (LDN) has removed disincentives of potential donors and may bear the potential to increase kidney donation. Multiple modifications have been made to abbreviate the learning curve while at the same time guarantee the highest possible level of medical quality for donor and recipient. We reviewed the literature for the evolution of the different LDN techniques and their impact on donor, graft and operating surgeon, including the subtleties of different surgical accesses, vessel handling and organ extraction. We performed a literature search (PubMed, DIMDI, medline) to evaluate the development of the LDN techniques from 1995 to 2003. Today more than 200 centres worldwide perform LDN. Hand-assistance has led to a spread of LDN. Studies comparing open and hand-assisted LDN show a reduction of operating and warm ischaemia times for the hand-assisted LDN. Different surgical access sites (trans- or retroperitoneal), different vessel dissection approaches, donor organ delivery techniques, delivery sites and variations of hand-assistance techniques reflect the evolution of LDN. Proper techniques and their combination for the consecutive surgical steps minimize both warm ischaemia time and operating time while offering the donor a safe minimally invasive laparoscopic procedure. LDN has breathed new life into the moribund field of living kidney donation. Within a few years LDN could become the standard approach in living kidney donation. Surgeons working in this field must be trained thoroughly and well acquainted with the subtleties of the different LDN techniques and their respective advantages and disadvantages. PMID:16754618

  15. Live-donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Juan P; Davis, Eric; Edye, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Six decades after its first implementation, kidney transplantation remains the optimal therapy for end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis. Despite the incontrovertible mortality reduction and cost-effectiveness of kidney transplantation, the greatest remaining barrier to treatment of end-stage renal disease is organ availability. Although the waiting list of patients who stand to benefit from kidney transplantation grows at a rate proportional to the overall population and proliferation of diabetes and hypertension, the pool of deceased-donor organs available for transplantation experiences minimal to no growth. Because the kidney is uniquely suited as a paired organ, the transplant community's answer to this shortage is living donation of a healthy volunteer's kidney to a recipient with end-stage renal disease. This review details the history and evolution of living-donor kidney transplantation in the United States as well as advances the next decade promises. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy has overcome many of the obstacles to living donation in terms of donor morbidity and volunteerism. Known donor risks in terms of surgical and medical morbidity are reviewed, as well as the ongoing efforts to delineate and mitigate donor risk in the context of accumulating recipient morbidity while on the waiting list. PMID:22678857

  16. Ab initio molecular orbital study of substituent effects in vaska type complexes (trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X): Electron affinities, ionization potentials, carbonyl stretch frequencies, and the thermodynamics of H{sub 2} dissociative addition

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Hasanayn, F.; Goldman, A.S.; Krogh-Jespersen, K.

    1994-10-26

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations are used to study substituent effects in Vaska-type complexes, trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (1-X) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, CN, H, CH{sub 3}, SiH{sub 3}, OH, and SH; L = PH{sub 3}). Both the electron affinity and the ionization potential of 1-X are computed to increase upon descending the halogen series of complexes, which indicates, surprisingly, that the complexes with more electronegative halogens are more difficult to reduce and easier to oxidize. The computed electron affinity trend is consistent with the half-wave reduction potential trend known for 1-X (L = PPh{sub 3}; X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Computed carbonyl stretch frequencies for 1-X are greater than experimental values (L = PPh{sub 3}), but observed trends are well reproduced. The redox and spectroscopic trends are discussed in terms of the substituent effects on the electronic structure of 1-X, particularly as revealed in the molecular orbital energy level diagrams of these complexes. The reaction energy for H{sub 2} addition to 1-X, leading to the cis,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (2-X) product, has been computed. After electron correlation effects are included (MP4(SDTQ)), the reaction enthalpy computed for 1-CI is {minus}18.4 kcal/mol (L = PH{sub 3}) as compared to a reported experimental value of {minus}14 kcal/mol (L = PPh{sub 3}). Compared with available experimental data, the electronic effects of L(L = PH{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, or AsH{sub 3}) and X on the thermodynamics of the H{sub 2} addition reaction are accurately reproduced by the model calculations at all levels of theory (HF and MPn). Formation of the hypothetical products cis,trans- and trans,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X(2-X and 3-X) (X = BH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, and PH{sub 2}) is used to demonstrate that {pi}-acceptor substituents promote the H{sub 2} addition reaction to 1-X while {pi}-donor substituents disfavor addition.

  17. Complications in 100 living-liver donors.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, H P; Thistlewaite, J R; Loss, G E; Fisher, J S; Cronin, D C; Siegel, C T; Newell, K A; Bruce, D S; Woodle, E S; Brady, L; Kelly, S; Boone, P; Oswald, K; Millis, J M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A review of 100 living-liver donors was performed to evaluate the perisurgical complications of the procedure and thus to help quantify the risks to the donor. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Despite the advantages of living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), the procedure has received criticism for the risk it imposes on healthy persons. A paucity of data exists regarding the complications and relative safety of the procedure. METHODS: One hundred LDLTs performed between November 1989 and November 1996 were reviewed. Donor data were obtained by chart review, anesthesia records, and the computerized hospital data base. Patient variables were compared by Fisher's exact test and the Student's t test. RESULTS: There were 57 women and 43 men with a median age of 29. Donors were divided into two groups: group A (first 50 donors), and group B (last 50 donors). There were 91 left lateral segments and 9 left lobes. There were no deaths. Fourteen major complications occurred in 13 patients; 9 occurred in group A and 5 in group B. Biliary complications consisted of five bile duct injuries (group A = 4, group B = 1) and two cut edge bile leaks. Complications were more common in left lobe resections (55%) than in left lateral segment grafts (10%). Minor complications occurred in 20% of patients. A significant reduction in overall complications (major and minor) was observed between the groups (group A, n = 24 [45%] vs. group B, n = 10 [20%]). In addition, surgical time and hospital stay were both significantly reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Although the procedure is safe, many LDLT donors have a perisurgical complication. Surgical experience and technical modifications have resulted in a significant reduction in these complications, however. To minimize the risks for these healthy donors, LDLT should be performed at institutions with extensive experience. PMID:9712567

  18. Photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in a bridged C{sub 60}. (Acceptor)-Aniline (donor) system. Photophysical properties of the first `active` fullerene diad

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.; Zwier, J.M.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    1995-04-12

    A covalently functionalized fullerene comprising an electron donating aniline group coupled to the fullerene unit by a saturated heterocyclic bridge is shown to undergo a photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer process that causes quenching of the fluorescence of the adduct and strong decrease triplet population in polar solvents. VIS-absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K, triplet-triplet absorption, time resolved fluorescence and redox potentials of the fullerene adduct are presented. Analysis of the solvent dependence of the energetics of the intramolecular electron transfer is given and is in good agreement with the experimental results. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. On the origin of the substantial stabilisation of the electron-donor 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4-carboxyclic acid···I2 and DABCO···I2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Palanisamy; Sedlak, Robert; Hobza, Pavel

    2014-04-14

    The stabilisation energies of the crystal structures of 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4-carboxyclic acid···I2 and DABCO···I2 complexes determined by the CCSD(T)/CBS method are very large and exceed 8 and 15 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The DFT-D method (B97-D3/def2-QZVP) strongly overestimates these stabilisation energies, which support the well-known fact that the DFT-D method is not very applicable to the study of charge-transfer complexes. On the other hand, the M06-2X/def2-QZVP method provides surprisingly reliable energies. A DFT-SAPT analysis has shown that a substantial stabilisation of these complexes arises from the charge-transfer energy included in the induction energy and that the respective induction energy is much larger than that of other non-covalently bound complexes. The total stabilisation energies of the complexes mentioned as well as of those where iodine has been replaced by lighter halogens (Br2 and Cl2) or by hetero systems (IF, ICH3, N2) correlate well with the magnitude of the σ-hole (Vs,max value) as well as with the LUMO energy. The nature of the stabilisation of all complexes between both electron donors and X2 (X = I, Br, Cl, N) systems is explained by the magnitude of the σ-hole but surprisingly also by the values of the electric quadrupole moment of these systems. Evidently, the nature of the stabilisation of halogen-bonded complexes between electron donors and systems where the first non-zero electric multipole moment is the quadrupole moment can be explained not only by the recently introduced concept of the σ-hole but also by the classical concept of electric quadrupole moments. PMID:24584418

  20. Charge transfer in Fe-doped GaN: The role of the donor

    SciTech Connect

    Sunay, Ustun; Dashdorj, J.; Zvanut, M. E.; Harrison, J. G.; Leach, J. H.; Udwary, K.

    2014-02-21

    Several nitride-based device structures would benefit from the availability of high quality, large-area, freestanding semi-insulating GaN substrates. Due to the intrinsic n-type nature of GaN, however, the incorporation of compensating centers such as Fe is necessary to achieve the high resistivity required. We are using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to explore charge transfer in 450 um thick GaN:Fe plates to understand the basic mechanisms related to compensation so that the material may be optimized for device applications. The results suggest that the simple model based on one shallow donor and a single Fe level is insufficient to describe compensation. Rather, the observation of the neutral donor and Fe3+ indicates that either the two species are spatially segregated or additional compensating and donor defects must be present.

  1. Structure–Property Relationship Study of Substitution Effects on Isoindigo-Based Model Compounds as Electron Donors in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of isoindigo-based derivatives to investigate how chemical structure modification at both the 6,6′- and 5,5′-positions of the core with electron-rich and electron-poor moieties affect photophysical and redox properties as well as their solid-state organization. Our studies reveal that 6,6′-substitution on the isoindigo core results in a stronger intramolecular charge transfer band due to strong electronic coupling between the 6,6′-substituent and the core, whereas 5,5′-substitution induces a weaker CT band that is more sensitive to the electronic nature of the substituents. In the solid state, 6,6′-derivatives generally form J-aggregates, whereas 5,5′-derivatives form H-aggregates. With only two branched ethylhexyl side chains, the 6,6′-derivatives form organized lamellar structures in the solid state. The incorporation of electron-rich benzothiophene, BT, substituents further enhances ordering, likely because of strong intermolecular donor–acceptor interactions between the BT substituent and the electron-poor isoindigo core on neighboring compounds. Collectively, the enhanced photophysical properties and solid-state organization of the 6,6′-benzothiophene substituted isoindigo derivative compared to the other isoindigo derivatives examined in this study resulted in solar cells with higher power conversion efficiencies when blended with a fullerene derivative. PMID:25089728

  2. Distinctive Characteristics of Educational Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell N., III.

    2008-01-01

    Examining the charitable behavior of 56,663 US households, this paper evaluates the distinctive characteristics of educational donors as compared with donors to noneducational charitable organizations and with nondonors. In general, educational donors had significantly greater income, wealth, and education than other donors. Educational donors…

  3. Hydroxyl ion addition to one-electron oxidized thymine: Unimolecular interconversion of C5 to C6 OH-adducts

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Heizer, Alicia N.; Palmer, Brian J.; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, addition of OH− to one-electron oxidized thymidine (dThd) and thymine nucleotides in basic aqueous glasses is investigated. At pHs ca. 9–10 where the thymine base is largely deprotonated at N3, one-electron oxidation of the thymine base by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K results in formation of a neutral thyminyl radical, T(−H)•. Assignment to T(−H)• is confirmed by employing 15N substituted 5'-TMP. At pH ≥ ca. 11.5, formation of the 5-hydroxythymin-6-yl radical, T(5OH)•, is identified as a metastable intermediate produced by OH− addition to T(−H)• at C5 at ca. 155 K. Upon further annealing to ca. 170 K, T(5OH)• readily converts to the 6-hydroxythymin-5-yl radical, T(6OH)•. One-electron oxidation of N3-methyl-thymidine (N3-Me-dThd) by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K produces the cation radical (N3-Me-dThd•+) for which we find a pH dependent competition between deprotonation from the methyl group at C5 and addition of OH− to C5. At pH 7 the 5-methyl deprotonated species is found; however, at pH ca. 9, N3-Me-dThd•+ produces T(5OH)• that on annealing up to 180 K forms T(6OH)•. Through use of deuterium substitution at C5' and on the thymine base, i.e., specifically employing [5',5”-D,D]-5'-dThd, [5',5”-D,D]-5'-TMP, [CD3]-dThd and [CD3,6D]-dThd, we find unequivocal evidence for T(5OH)• formation and its conversion to T(6OH)•. The addition of OH− to the C5 position in T(−H)• and N3-Me-dThd•+ is governed by spin and charge localization. DFT calculations predict that the conversion of the “reducing” T(5OH)• to the “oxidizing” T(6OH)• occurs by a unimolecular OH group transfer from C5 to C6 in the thymine base. The T(5OH)• to T(6OH)• conversion is found to occur more readily for deprotonated dThd and its nucleotides than for N3-Me-dThd. In agreement, calculations predict that the deprotonated thymine base has a lower energy barrier (ca. 6 kcal/mol) for OH transfer than its corresponding N3-protonated thymine

  4. Systems of donor transfer.

    PubMed

    de Charro, F T; Akveld, H E; Hessing, D J

    1993-10-01

    The development of medical knowledge has resulted in a demand in society for donor organs, but the recruitment of donor organs for transplantation is difficult. This paper aims to provide some general insights into the complex interaction processes involved. A laissez-faire policy, in which market forces are relied on, is not acceptable from an ethical and legal point of view in most western European countries. Especially at the demand side of the exchange of donor organs, commercialism is to be opposed. We judge the use of commercial incentives at the supply side less unacceptable in theory but not feasible in western European countries. Since market forces are deemed unacceptable as instruments for coordinating demand and supply of donor organs, donor procurement has to be considered as a collective good, and therefore governments are faced with the responsibility of making sure that alternative interaction and distribution mechanisms function. The role of organ procurement agencies (OPAs) in societal interaction concerning postmortem organ donation is described using a two-dimensional conceptualisation scheme. Medical aspects of living organ donation are described. An international comparative description of legal systems to regulate living organ donation in western European countries completes this survey. PMID:10129766

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a highly strained donor-acceptor nanohoop.

    PubMed

    Van Raden, J M; Darzi, E R; Zakharov, L N; Jasti, R

    2016-06-15

    A highly-strained, nitrogen-doped cycloparaphenylene (CPP), aza[6]CPP, was synthesized and then converted to a donor-acceptor nanohoop, N-methylaza[6]CPP, via alkylation of the nitrogen center. The energy levels of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for both molecules were then probed by cyclic voltammetry (CV), which revealed that the donor-acceptor nanohoop had a significantly lower LUMO energy relative to [6]CPP and aza[6]CPP. Density functional theory (DFT) revealed that the donor-acceptor nanohoop underwent a redistribution of the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) density such that a significant portion of the LUMO density resided upon the electron-deficient nitrogen-containing ring. This localization of LUMO density caused a large lowering in the LUMO energy of nearly a full electron volt, while the HOMO energy was less affected due to a large centralization of the FMO on the electron-rich phenylene backbone. This ultimately resulted in a net lowering of the HOMO-LUMO energy gap which was observed both experimentally and computationally. In addition, N-methylaza[6]CPP has a significantly lower energy LUMO than N-methylaza[8]CPP, illustrating that the FMO levels of donor-acceptor nanohoops can be tuned by adjusting the hoop size. PMID:26881906

  6. DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS OF NITROGEN*

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, J. E.; Szent-Györgyi, A.

    1969-01-01

    The nitrogen atoms of organic molecules readily enter into donor-acceptor interactions, giving off an electron from their lone pair. Under favorable conditions the acceptor can form free radicals. S and O atoms behave likewise but less intensely. PMID:4306047

  7. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  8. Managing finances of shipping living donor kidneys for donor exchanges.

    PubMed

    Mast, D A; Vaughan, W; Busque, S; Veale, J L; Roberts, J P; Straube, B M; Flores, N; Canari, C; Levy, E; Tietjen, A; Hil, G; Melcher, M L

    2011-09-01

    Kidney donor exchanges enable recipients with immunologically incompatible donors to receive compatible living donor grafts; however, the financial management of these exchanges, especially when an organ is shipped, is complex and thus has the potential to impede the broader implementation of donor exchange programs. Representatives from transplant centers that utilize the National Kidney Registry database to facilitate donor exchange transplants developed a financial model applicable to paired donor exchanges and donor chain transplants. The first tenet of the model is to eliminate financial liability to the donor. Thereafter, it accounts for the donor evaluation, donor nephrectomy hospital costs, donor nephrectomy physician fees, organ transport, donor complications and recipient inpatient services. Billing between hospitals is based on Medicare cost report defined costs rather than charges. We believe that this model complies with current federal regulations and effectively captures costs of the donor and recipient services. It could be considered as a financial paradigm for the United Network for Organ Sharing managed donor exchange program. PMID:21831153

  9. Effect of oxidant addition on the elimination of 2-naphthalenesulfonate in aqueous solutions by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhuraiji, Turki S.; Karpel Vel Leitner, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Aromatic sulfonated compounds and naphthalene derivatives are major chemical compounds used in the industry. Electron beam irradiation of aqueous solutions of 2-naphthalenesulfonate (90 μM) was investigated under various experimental conditions. The results obtained demonstrate that the 2-NS concentration decreased dramatically on increasing the absorbed dose in the range 0-1000 Gy. The effectiveness of the radiolytic system was demonstrably enhanced by the addition of oxidants (S2O82- or H2O2). 2-NS removal was higher with S2O82- than with H2O2. For the EB, EB/H2O2, and EB/S2O82- systems, the absorbed doses for 90% elimination of 2-NS (D90) were 700, 480, and 274 Gy, respectively. 2-NS is poorly mineralized by EB but more than 35% mineralization was reached for 15 kGy when oxidants (820 μM S2O82- or 935 μM H2O2) were added. In all systems, the mineralization yield was markedly higher when air (i.e. dissolved oxygen increase) was introduced between successive doses. For 50% 2-NS removal, seven sulfonated transformation products were identified using LC/MS analyses. For the highest absorbed doses the sulfonate group in 2-NS was converted to sulfate ions in the radiolytic systems.

  10. Thermographic in-situ process monitoring of the electron-beam melting technology used in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Lowe, Larry E.; Ulrich, Joe B.

    2013-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  11. Electron-impact total ionization cross sections of DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and an additivity principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model [W.M. Huo, Phys. Rev. A64, 042719-1 (2001)l is used to study the total ionization cross sections of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone by electron impact. Calculations using neutral fragments found that the total ionization cross sections of C3' - and C5', -deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3' - and C5" -deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. The result implies that certain properties of the-DNA, like the total singly ionization cross section, are localized properties and a building-up or additivity principle may apply. This allows us to obtain accurate properties of larger molecular systems built up from the results of smaller subsystem fragments. Calculations are underway using a negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone with a metal counter-ion.

  12. 77 FR 12226 - Sadex Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of... use of electron beam and x- ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed...

  13. Involvement of histidine 190 on the D1 protein in electron/proton transfer reactions on the donor side of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Mamedov, F; Sayre, R T; Styring, S

    1998-10-01

    Flash-induced chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics from photosystem II in thylakoids from the dark-grown wild type and two site-directed mutants of the D1 protein His190 residue (D1-H190) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been characterized. Induction of the chlorophyll fluorescence on the first flash, reflecting electron transport from YZ to P680(+), exhibited a strong pH dependence with a pK of 7.6 in the dark-grown wild type which lacks the Mn cluster. The chlorophyll fluorescence decay, measured in the presence of DCMU, which reflects recombination between QA- and YZox, was also pH-dependent with a similar pK of 7.5. These results indicate participation by the same base, which is suggested to be D1-H190, in oxidation and reduction of YZ in forward electron transfer and recombination pathways, respectively. This hypothesis was tested in the D1-H190 mutants. Induction of chlorophyll fluorescence in these H190 mutants has been observed to be inefficient due to slow electron transfer from YZ to P680(+) [Roffey, R. A., et al. (1994) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1185, 257-270]. We show that this reaction is pH-dependent, with a pK of 8. 1, and at pH >/=9, the fluorescence induction is efficient in the H190 mutants, suggesting direct titration of YZ. The efficient oxidation of YZ ( approximately 70% at pH 9.0) at high pH was confirmed by kinetic EPR measurements. In contrast to the wild type, the H190 mutants show little or no observable fluorescence decay. Our data suggest that H190 is an essential component in the electron transfer reactions in photosystem II and acts as a proton acceptor upon YZ oxidation. In the H190 mutants, this reaction is inefficient and YZ oxidation only occurs at elevated pHs when YZ itself probably is deprotonated. We also propose that H190 is able to return a proton to YZox during electron recombination from QA- in a reaction which does not take place in the D1-H190 mutants. PMID:9760263

  14. Polyfluorophore Excimers and Exciplexes as FRET Donors in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Yin Nah; Kool, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    We describe studies aimed at testing whether oligomeric exciplex- and excimer fluorophores conjugated to DNA have the potential to act as donors for energy transfer by the Förster mechanism. Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are composed of stacked, electronically interacting fluorophores replacing the bases on a DNA scaffold. The monomer chromophores in the twenty tetramer-length ODFs studied here include pyrene (Y), benzopyrene (B), perylene (E), dimethylaminostilbene (D), and a nonfluorescent spacer (S); these are conjugated in varied combinations at the 3’ end of a 14mer DNA probe sequence. In the absence of an acceptor chromophore, many of the ODF-DNAs show broad, unstructured long-wavelength emission peaks characteristic of excimer and exciplex excited states, similar to what has been observed for unconjugated ODFs. Although such delocalized excited states have been widely studied, we know of no prior report of their use in FRET. We tested the ability of the twenty ODFs to donate energy to Cy5 and TAMRA dyes conjugated to a complementary strand of DNA, with these acceptors oriented either at the near or far end of the ODF-conjugated probes. Results showed that a number of the ODF fluorophores exhibited relatively efficient energy transfer characteristic of the Förster mechanism, as judged by drops in donor emission quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime, accompanied by increases in intensity of acceptor emission bands. Excimer/exciplex bands in the donors were selectively quenched while shorter-wavelength monomer emission stayed relatively constant, consistent with the notion that the delocalized excited states, rather than individual fluorophores, are the donors. Interestingly, only specific sequences of ODFs were able to act as donors, while others did not, even though their emission wavelengths were similar. The new FRET donors possess large Stokes shifts, which can be beneficial for multiple applications. In addition, all ODFs can be excited at a single

  15. Attitudes towards disclosure and relationship to donor offspring among a national cohort of identity-release oocyte and sperm donors

    PubMed Central

    Lampic, C.; Skoog Svanberg, A.; Sydsjö, G.

    2014-01-01

    higher level of involvement with potential donor offspring compared with oocyte donors (P = 0.005). Few donors reported a need for more counselling regarding the consequences of their donation. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION While the multicentre study design strengthens external validity, attrition induced a risk of selection bias. In addition, the use of study-specific instruments that have not been psychometrically tested is a limitation. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The positive attitudes towards disclosure to offspring of female and male identity-release donors are in line with previous reports of anonymous and known donors. While our results on donors' general positive or neutral attitudes towards future contact with potential donor offspring are reassuring, a subset of donors with negative attitudes towards such contact warrants concern and suggests a need for counselling on long-term consequences of donating gametes. STUDY FUNDING The ‘Swedish study on gamete donation’ was funded by the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and the Regional Research Council in Uppsala-Örebro. There are no conflicts of interest to declare. PMID:25030191

  16. Hyperfine Stark effect of shallow donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, Giuseppe; Wolfowicz, Gary; Urdampilleta, Matias; Thewalt, Mike L. W.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V.; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Morton, John J. L.; Bhatt, R. N.; Lyon, S. A.; Lovett, Brendon W.

    2014-11-01

    We present a complete theoretical treatment of Stark effects in bulk doped silicon, whose predictions are supported by experimental measurements. A multivalley effective mass theory, dealing nonperturbatively with valley-orbit interactions induced by a donor-dependent central cell potential, allows us to obtain a very reliable picture of the donor wave function within a relatively simple framework. Variational optimization of the 1 s donor binding energies calculated with a new trial wave function, in a pseudopotential with two fitting parameters, allows an accurate match of the experimentally determined donor energy levels, while the correct limiting behavior for the electronic density, both close to and far from each impurity nucleus, is captured by fitting the measured contact hyperfine coupling between the donor nuclear and electron spin. We go on to include an external uniform electric field in order to model Stark physics: with no extra ad hoc parameters, variational minimization of the complete donor ground energy allows a quantitative description of the field-induced reduction of electronic density at each impurity nucleus. Detailed comparisons with experimental values for the shifts of the contact hyperfine coupling reveal very close agreement for all the donors measured (P, As, Sb, and Bi). Finally, we estimate field ionization thresholds for the donor ground states, thus setting upper limits to the gate manipulation times for single qubit operations in Kane-like architectures: the Si:Bi system is shown to allow for A gates as fast as ≈10 MHz.

  17. Dialing for Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    When times get tough, grown children often turn to their parents for help--for some extra cash, even somewhere to stay. For colleges and universities, that role is filled by alumni donors. In 2011, with education budgets slashed across the country, giving accounted for 6.5 percent of college expenditures, according to the Council for Aid to…

  18. Tuning the Rainbow: Systematic Modulation of Donor-Acceptor Systems through Donor Substituents and Solvent.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christopher B; van der Salm, Holly; Shillito, Georgina E; Lucas, Nigel T; Gordon, Keith C

    2016-09-01

    A series of donor-acceptor compounds is reported in which the energy of the triarylamine donor is systematically tuned through para substitution with electron-donating methoxy and electron-withdrawing cyano groups. The acceptor units investigated are benzothiadiazole (btd), dipyridophenazine (dppz), and its [ReCl(CO)3(dppz)] complex. The effect of modulating donor energy on the electronic and photophysical properties is investigated using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, DFT calculations, electrochemistry, electronic absorption and emission spectroscopies, ground state and resonance Raman spectroscopy, and transient absorption spectroscopy. Qualitative correlations between the donor energy and the properties of interest are obtained using Hammett σ(+) constants. Methoxy and cyano groups are shown to destabilize and stabilize, respectively, the frontier molecular orbitals, with the HOMO affected more significantly than the LUMO, narrowing the HOMO-LUMO band gap as the substituent becomes more electron-donating-observable as a bathochromic shift in low-energy charge-transfer absorption bands. Charge-transfer emission bands are also dependent on the electron-donating/withdrawing nature of the substituent, and in combination with the highly solvatochromic nature of charge-transfer states, emission can be tuned to span the entire visible region. PMID:27500590

  19. Electron capture of dopants in two-photonic ionization in a poly(methyl methacrylate) solid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Akira; Sakai, Wataru; Nakano, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Masahide

    1992-10-29

    Behavior of the electron produced by two-photonic excitation of an aromatic donor in a poly(methyl methacrylate) solid was studied by the addition of the electron scavengers to the system. According to the Perrin type analysis for the two-photonically ejected electron, the capture radii (R{sub c}) of the scavengers examined were estimated to be from 8 to 40 {Angstrom}. For the two-photonically ejected electrons, R{sub c} is a capture radius for thermalized electrons. In this case the parent electron donor is not necessarily within this radius. On the other hand, for the fluorescence quenching, the distance between the donor and acceptor is within the static quenching radius (R{sub q}) of the donor. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Tissue banking: relationship with blood donor and organ donor card status.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Kenneth D; Fitzpatrick, Patricia E; Sheehan, John D

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationships among altruistic health acts may serve to aid therapeutic research advances. In this paper, we report on the links between two such behaviours-donating blood and carrying an organ donor card-and willingness to donate urological tissue to a tissue bank. Reasons for the differential willingness to do so are examined in this paper. A systematic sample of 259 new and returning attendees at a tertiary urology referral clinic in Ireland completed a self-report questionnaire in an outpatient setting. In addition to demographic details, details of known diagnosis of malignancy and family history of cancer; attitudes to tissue donation for research purposes were gauged using a 5-point Likert scale. Both blood donors and organ donor card carriers were more likely to be willing to donate tissue for research purposes. Blood donors were more likely want to know their overall results in comparison to nonblood donors and want their samples to be used for nonprofit research. Our hypothesis that being a blood donor would be a better predictor to donate urological tissue than being an organ donor card carrier borne out by the trends reported above. PMID:22567418

  1. Catalysis via homolytic substitutions with C-O and Ti-O bonds: oxidative additions and reductive eliminations in single electron steps.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Fleckhaus, André; Lafont, Manuel Alejandre; Okkel, Andreas; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Anoop, Anakuthil; Neese, Frank

    2009-11-25

    In a combined theoretical and experimental study, an efficient catalytic reaction featuring epoxide opening and tetrahydrofuran formation through homolytic substitution reactions at C-O and Ti-O bonds was devised. The performance of these two key steps of the catalytic cycle was studied and could be adjusted by modifying the electronic properties of the catalysts through introduction of electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents to the titanocene catalysts. By regarding both steps as single electron versions of oxidative addition and reductive elimination, a mechanism-based platform for the design of catalysts and reagents for electron transfer reactions evolved that opens broad perspectives for further investigations. PMID:19919150

  2. Understanding donors' motivations: a study of unrelated bone marrow donors.

    PubMed

    Switzer, G E; Dew, M A; Butterworth, V A; Simmons, R G; Schimmel, M

    1997-07-01

    Medical advances in bone marrow transplantation techniques and immunosuppressive medications have dramatically increased the number of such transplants performed each year, and consequently, the demand for bone marrow from unrelated donors. Although physiological aspects of bone marrow donation have been thoroughly investigated, very few studies have examined psychosocial factors that may impact individuals' donation decisions and outcomes. To examine one particular set of donor psychosocial issues, this study investigated motives for bone marrow donation among 343 unrelated bone marrow donors who donated through the National Marrow Donor Program. Six distinct types of donor motives were identified from open-ended questionnaire responses. Donors most frequently reported motives reflecting some awareness of both the costs (to themselves) and potential benefits (to themselves and the recipient) of donation. A desire to act in accordance with social or religious precepts, expected positive feelings about donating, empathy for the recipient, and the simple desire to help another person were also commonly cited reasons for donating. Among a series of donor background characteristics, donors' gender was the variable most strongly associated with motive type; women were most likely to cite expected positive feelings, empathy, and the desire to help someone. Central study findings indicated that donor motives predicted donors reactions to donation even after the effects of donor background characteristics (including gender) were controlled. Donors who reported exchange motives (weighing costs and benefits) and donors who reported simple (or idealized) helping motives experienced the donation as less positive in terms of higher predonation ambivalence and negative postdonation psychological reactions than did remaining donors. Donors who reported positive feeling and empathy motives had the most positive donation reactions in terms of lower ambivalence, and feeling like

  3. NADH:Cytochrome b5 Reductase and Cytochrome b5 Can Act as Sole Electron Donors to Human Cytochrome P450 1A1-Mediated Oxidation and DNA Adduct Formation by Benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after activation by cytochrome P450 (P450). Here, we investigated whether NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) in the presence of cytochrome b5 can act as sole electron donor to human P450 1A1 during BaP oxidation and replace the canonical NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) system. We also studied the efficiencies of the coenzymes of these reductases, NADPH as a coenzyme of POR, and NADH as a coenzyme of CBR, to mediate BaP oxidation. Two systems containing human P450 1A1 were utilized: human recombinant P450 1A1 expressed with POR, CBR, epoxide hydrolase, and cytochrome b5 in Supersomes and human recombinant P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR and/or with CBR and cytochrome b5 in liposomes. BaP-9,10-dihydrodiol, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-9-ol, BaP-3-ol, a metabolite of unknown structure, and two BaP-DNA adducts were generated by the P450 1A1-Supersomes system, both in the presence of NADPH and in the presence of NADH. The major BaP-DNA adduct detected by 32P-postlabeling was characterized as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP (assigned adduct 1), while the minor adduct is probably a guanine adduct derived from 9-hydroxy-BaP-4,5-epoxide (assigned adduct 2). BaP-3-ol as the major metabolite, BaP-9-ol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, an unknown metabolite, and adduct 2 were observed in the system using P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR plus NADPH. When P450 1A1 was reconstituted with CBR and cytochrome b5 plus NADH, BaP-3-ol was the predominant metabolite too, and an adduct 2 was also generated. Our results demonstrate that the NADH/cytochrome b5/CBR system can act as the sole electron donor both for the first and second reduction of P450 1A1 during the oxidation of BaP in vitro. They suggest that NADH-dependent CBR can replace NADPH-dependent POR in the P450 1A1-catalyzed metabolism of BaP. PMID:27404282

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer double fragmentation. An oxygen-mediated radical chain process in the cofragmentation of aminopinacol donors with organic halides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Farahat, M.S.; Gan, H.; Whitten, D.G.; Farid, S. |

    1995-06-14

    We reprot an investigation in which excited states of amino pinacols 1-3 are reacted with the halides CCl{sub 4}, benzyl bromide, and p-cyanobenzyl bromide. Interesting results from this study include the finding that low-to-moderate quantum efficiencies for reaction are observed when the reactions are carried out under degassed conditions, indicating that the halide radical anions must survive long enough within the initial ion pair formed in the quenching step to undergo considerable return electron transfer. More strikingly we find that for certain pinacol-halide combinations reaction in aerared solutions leads to much higher efficiencies, which can be attributed to a chain reaction involving oxygen capture of a primary radical product. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical risks and long term complications: Long-Term Organ Specific Donor Complications Kidney Hypertension Kidney failure Proteinuria Lung Intra- ... Vancouver Forum on the care of the live organ donor: lung, liver, pancreas, and intestine data and medical ...

  6. Consequences of dietary methyl donor supplements: Is more always better?

    PubMed

    Shorter, Kimberly R; Felder, Michael R; Vrana, Paul B

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are now recognized to play roles in disease etiology. Several diseases increasing in frequency are associated with altered DNA methylation. DNA methylation is accomplished through metabolism of methyl donors such as folate, vitamin B12, methionine, betaine (trimethylglycine), and choline. Increased intake of these compounds correlates with decreased neural tube defects, although this mechanism is not well understood. Consumption of these methyl donor pathway components has increased in recent years due to fortification of grains and high supplemental levels of these compounds (e.g. vitamins, energy drinks). Additionally, people with mutations in one of the enzymes that assists in the methyl donor pathway (5-MTHFR) are directed to consume higher amounts of methyl donors to compensate. Recent evidence suggests that high levels of methyl donor intake may also have detrimental effects. Individualized medicine may be necessary to determine the appropriate amounts of methyl donors to be consumed, particularly in women of child bearing age. PMID:25841986

  7. Donor commitment and patient needs.

    PubMed

    Bakken, R; van Walraven, A-M; Egeland, T

    2004-01-01

    The article discusses views and recommendations of the World Marrow Donor Association concerning ethical issues related to the donation of hematopoietic stem cell products with respect to recruitment, evaluation, workup, and follow-up of unrelated donors. Particular emphasis is placed upon commitment of individual donors, in particular, with respect to the needs of patients to find HLA-matched donors, who may be asked to donate stem cell and other cell products more than once for given patients. PMID:14628078

  8. 21 CFR 640.31 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suitability of donors. 640.31 Section 640.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.31 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 640.66 - Immunization of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Immunization of donors. 640.66 Section 640.66 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.66 Immunization of donors....

  10. 21 CFR 640.31 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.31 Section 640.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.31 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 640.66 - Immunization of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunization of donors. 640.66 Section 640.66 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.66 Immunization of donors....

  12. 21 CFR 640.66 - Immunization of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Immunization of donors. 640.66 Section 640.66 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.66 Immunization of donors....

  13. 21 CFR 640.31 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.31 Section 640.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.31 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  14. 21 CFR 640.66 - Immunization of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunization of donors. 640.66 Section 640.66 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.66 Immunization of donors....

  15. 21 CFR 640.31 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.31 Section 640.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.31 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  16. 21 CFR 640.21 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.21 Section 640.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.21 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 640.21 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.21 Section 640.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.21 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  18. 21 CFR 640.21 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.21 Section 640.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.21 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  19. 21 CFR 640.21 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Suitability of donors. 640.21 Section 640.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.21 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 640.21 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.21 Section 640.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Platelets § 640.21 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  1. 21 CFR 640.31 - Suitability of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suitability of donors. 640.31 Section 640.31 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma § 640.31 Suitability of donors. (a)...

  2. 21 CFR 640.66 - Immunization of donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunization of donors. 640.66 Section 640.66 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.66 Immunization of donors....

  3. Studying the issues in the additive manufacturing of dental implants by Electron Beam MeltingRTM (EBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi

    The ability of additive manufacturing (AM) processes to produce complex geometries is resulting in their rapid acceptance by a number of industries. This unique capability could be used for the optimization of the design of functional components that could find an application in different industries such as aerospace, automotive, energy, medical, and implants. However, there are still some challenges confronting this technology such as surface finish, residual stress, dimensional tolerance, processing speed, and anisotropy in microstructure and mechanical properties. Any of the mentioned issues could be influenced by the thermal history of a 3D printed component during the layer-by-layer manufacturing. Therefore, an understanding of the thermal cycling during the AM process is essential. In recent years, significant advances have been achieved in the design, manufacturing, and materials used for dental implants. However, there are still some differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant that might decrease patient satisfaction. One of the differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant is in its modulus of elasticity, which could result in an issue known as bone atrophy. The second important difference between a dental implant and a natural tooth is the fact that a natural tooth is surrounded by a periodontal ligament that allows the tooth to move in three directions. However, the periodontal ligament is destroyed during the extraction of a natural tooth. In the absence of the periodontal ligament, the biting force is directly transferred to the jawbone, resulting in discomfort for the patient. Also, the implant cannot be incorporated with the surrounding natural tooth and form a bridge. In this study, the application of a lattice structure for the manufacturing of a biocompatible dental implant is investigated. Three different lattice structures with different unit cell sizes were experimentally and numerically analyzed. The mechanical

  4. Why Minority Donors Are Needed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Search Register with your state as an Organ Donor Home Why Donate Becoming a Donor About Donation & ... Why Donate RELATED INFORMATION Minority Focused Grantee Publications Organ Donation Process Enrolling as a Donor Trying to Save a Life Testing for Brain ...

  5. Characteristics and nature of the intermolecular interactions in boron-bonded complexes with carbene as electron donor: an ab initio, SAPT and QTAIM study.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Mehdi D

    2012-05-01

    We report geometries, stabilization energies, symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses of a series of carbene-BX(3) complexes, where X = H, OH, NH(2), CH(3), CN, NC, F, Cl, and Br. The stabilization energies were calculated at HF, B3LYP, MP2, MP4 and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory using optimized geometries of all the complexes obtained from B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ. Quantitatively, all the complexes indicate the presence of B-C(carbene) interaction due to the short B-C(carbene) distances. Inspection of stabilization energies reveals that the interaction energies increase in the order NH(2) > OH > CH(3) > F > H > Cl > Br > NC > CN, which is the opposite trend shown in the binding distances. Considering the SAPT results, it is found that electrostatic effects account for about 50% of the overall attraction of the studied complexes. By comparison, the induction components of these interactions represent about 40% of the total attractive forces. Despite falling in a region of charge depletion with nabla(2)ρ(BCP) >0, the B-C(carbene) bond critical points (BCPs) are characterized by a reasonably large value of the electron density (ρ(BCP)) and H(BCP) <0, indicating that the potential energy overcomes the kinetic energy density at BCP and the B-C(carbene) bond is a polar covalent bond. PMID:21877151

  6. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... storage media containing permanent and unscheduled records within the following temperature and relative humidity ranges: (1) Temperature—62° to 68 °F. (2) Relative humidity—35% to 45%. (b) Electronic...

  7. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... storage media containing permanent and unscheduled records within the following temperature and relative humidity ranges: (1) Temperature—62° to 68 °F. (2) Relative humidity—35% to 45%. (b) Electronic...

  8. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... storage media containing permanent and unscheduled records within the following temperature and relative humidity ranges: (1) Temperature—62° to 68 °F. (2) Relative humidity—35% to 45%. (b) Electronic...

  9. Feasibility of a two-step culture method to improve the CO2-fixing efficiency of nonphotosynthetic microbial community and simultaneously decrease the spontaneous oxidative precipitates from mixed electron donors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiajun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shiping; Le, Yiquan; Fu, Xiaohua

    2014-08-01

    When compared with H2, mixed electron donors (MED), comprising S(2-), S2O3 (2-), and NO2 (-), could generally improve the CO2-fixing efficiency of nonphotosynthetic microbial communities (NPMCs). However, a large amount of abiotic precipitates combined with bacteria produced during culture may be unfavorable for the recycling and reuse of bacteria. The main component of the abiotic precipitates is S(0), which influences the enrichment and reuse of bacteria but is not conducive for CO2 fixation in the subsequent step. In this study, a two-step culture method (TSCM), employing H2 and MED, respectively, was verified to be feasible for improving the CO2-fixing efficiency of NPMCs in the second step. In the TSCM, the net-fixed CO2 increased to 854 mg/L and abiotic precipitates were not produced in the medium. Sequence analysis of 16 s rDNA from NPMC indicated the presence of microbial symbioses in the NPMC, supporting the possible applications of TSCM. PMID:24980751

  10. Optimum Compromise Between Optical Absorption and Electrical Property of the Planar Multi-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells Based with New Thiazol Derivative, the (2-THIOXO-3-N-(2-METHOXYPHENYL) THIAZOLIDIN-4-ONE), as Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, A. Lakhdar; Khelil, A.; Bernède, J. C.; Mouchaal, Y.; Djafri, A.; Toubal, K.; Hellal, N.; Cattin, L.

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis of a new thiazol derivative, the (2-thioxo-3-N-(2-methoxyphenyl) thiazolidin-4-one) (called TH-2) is described. After characterization of the TH-2, the cyclic voltammetry study coupled with optical absorbance measurements show that its LUMO and HOMO are -3.5 and -5.5 respectively. Then the TH-2 is used as electron donor (ED) in organic solar cells (OSCs). The anode buffer layer being CuI the devices are based on the planar heterojunction TH-2/fullerene. Homogeneous amorphous films of TH-2 are obtained when it is deposited onto CuI. For an optimum TH-2 thickness of 20 nm, a power conversion efficiency of 0.42% is obtained. Then, in order to broaden the absorption range of the OSCs, it is coupled with the tetraphenyl-dibenzoperiflanthene, whose band structure matches the band structure of TH-2. Such new multilayer structure allows achieving a power conversion efficiency of 0.49%.

  11. Synthesis, spectral investigations, antimicrobial activity and DNA-binding studies of novel charge transfer complex of 1,10-phenanthroline as an electron donor with π-acceptor p-Nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2010-08-01

    Proton or charge transfer (CT) complex of donor, 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) with π-acceptor, p-Nitrophenol (PNP) has been studied spectrophotometrically in methanol at room temperature. The binding of the CT complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA has been investigated by fluorescence spectrum, to establish the ability of the CT complex of its interaction with DNA. Stern-Volmer quenching constant ( Ksv) has also been calculated. The formation constant ( KCT), molar extinction coefficient ( ɛCT), free energy (Δ Go) and stoichiometric ratio of the CT complex have been determined by Benesi-Hildebrand equation. The stoichiometry was found to be 1:1. The CT complex was screened for its pharmacology as antibacterial and antifungal activity against various bacterial and fungal strains, showing excellent antibacterial and antifungal activity. The newly synthesized CT complex has been characterized by FTIR spectra, elemental analysis, 1H NMR, electronic absorption spectra. TGA-DTA studies were also carried out to check the stability of CT complex.

  12. Confidentiality and American semen donors.

    PubMed

    Karow, A M

    1993-01-01

    Most American donor insemination programs include a policy of complete confidentiality concerning the donor of the semen. This is the result of a long legal tradition of American constitutional law. However, some slight abridgement of this body of legal decisions might be very much in the best interests of children arising from donor insemination, and even--in most cases, in fact--the donors themselves. With regard to the children, the factors involved are both those of genetic counseling, should the need arise, and psychological development. Of course, as at present, the donor must be relieved of all responsibility, both legal and financial. PMID:8348162

  13. Working with previously anonymous gamete donors and donor-conceived adults: recent practice experiences of running the DNA-based voluntary information exchange and contact register, UK DonorLink.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Marilyn; Gunter, Christine; Tidy, Christine; Atherton, Freda

    2013-03-01

    This article describes recent practice experiences with donor conceived adults, donors, non-donor-conceived adult children of donors using the voluntary DNA-based register, UK DonorLink. It highlights additional complexities faced when using DNA rather than paper records for searching, in particular from the risk of false positives, low chances of success and potential inclusion of biological parents' DNA. Professionals' experiences in supporting those being "linked" suggest challenges as well as rewards. Registration carries the potential to be therapeutic for donor-conceived adults and donors and to enhance their political awareness regardless of links being made. Registrants value both peer and professional support, providing the latter can respond flexibly and be delivered by staff experienced in intermediary work. Given that the majority of those affected by donor conception internationally come from anonymous donation systems, these findings are highly pertinent and argue the need for political and moral debate about such service provision. PMID:23009055

  14. Blood Donor Management in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jingxing; Liu, Zhong; Stevens, Lori; Sadler, Andrew; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite a steady increase in total blood collections and voluntary non-remunerated blood donors, China continues to have many challenges with its blood donation system. The country's donation rate remains low at 9%o, with over 60% of donors being first-time donors. Generally there is a lack of adequate public awareness about blood donation. The conservative donor selection criteria, the relatively long donation interval, and the small donation volume have further limited blood supply. To ensure a sufficient and safe blood supply that meets the increasing clinical need for blood products, there is an urgent need to strengthen the country's blood donor management. This comprehensive effort should include educating and motivating more individuals especially from the rural areas to be involved in blood donation, developing rational and evidence-based selection criteria for donor eligibility, designing a donor follow-up mechanism to encourage more future donations, assessing the current donor testing strategy, improving donor service and care, building regional and national shared donor deferral database, and enhancing the transparency of the blood donation system to gain more trust from the general public. The purpose of the review is to provide an overview of the key process of and challenges with the blood donor management system in China. PMID:25254023

  15. Blood donor management in china.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jingxing; Liu, Zhong; Stevens, Lori; Sadler, Andrew; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Despite a steady increase in total blood collections and voluntary non-remunerated blood donors, China continues to have many challenges with its blood donation system. The country's donation rate remains low at 9%o, with over 60% of donors being first-time donors. Generally there is a lack of adequate public awareness about blood donation. The conservative donor selection criteria, the relatively long donation interval, and the small donation volume have further limited blood supply. To ensure a sufficient and safe blood supply that meets the increasing clinical need for blood products, there is an urgent need to strengthen the country's blood donor management. This comprehensive effort should include educating and motivating more individuals especially from the rural areas to be involved in blood donation, developing rational and evidence-based selection criteria for donor eligibility, designing a donor follow-up mechanism to encourage more future donations, assessing the current donor testing strategy, improving donor service and care, building regional and national shared donor deferral database, and enhancing the transparency of the blood donation system to gain more trust from the general public. The purpose of the review is to provide an overview of the key process of and challenges with the blood donor management system in China. PMID:25254023

  16. Light-triggered assembly-disassembly of an ordered donor-acceptor π-stack using a photoresponsive dimethyldihydropyrene π-switch.

    PubMed

    Krishna, V Siva Rama; Samanta, Mousumi; Pal, Suman; Anurag, N P; Bandyopadhyay, Subhajit

    2016-06-28

    Self-organization of donor and acceptor π-systems forms alternate D-A stacks of the donor and acceptor molecules. Using a photochromic π-switch as a donor and an electron deficient acceptor dye such stacks were formed. Photomodulation of the donor unit with visible light led to a photoisomerized state having a non-planar structure with reduced donor ability, thereby causing destruction of the alternate D-A π-stacks. The formation and destruction of the stacks were studied by various spectroscopy methods. Both the stacks and the depleted stacks were studied by DLS and SEM experiments. The regeneration of the stacks occurred in solution with the reversal of the photoisomerization process with ultraviolet light. Computational and differential scanning calorimetric studies validated the thermodynamics of the formation of the stacks. This work presents a reversible assembly-disassembly of a donor-acceptor π system devoid of additional auxiliary non-covalent bonding motifs in the donor and acceptor molecules. PMID:26899505

  17. Attosecond pulse carrier-envelope phase effects on ionized electron momentum and energy distributions: roles of frequency, intensity and an additional IR pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang-You; Pronin, Evgeny A.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    The effects of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of a few-cycle attosecond pulse on ionized electron momentum and energy spectra are analyzed, both with and without an additional few-cycle IR pulse. In the absence of an IR pulse, the CEP-induced asymmetries in the ionized electron momentum distributions are shown to vary as the 3/2 power of the attosecond pulse intensity. These asymmetries are also found to satisfy an approximate scaling law involving the frequency and intensity of the attosecond pulse. In the presence of even a very weak IR pulse (having an intensity of the order of 1011 1012 W cm-2), the attosecond pulse CEP-induced asymmetries in the ionized electron momentum distributions are found to be significantly augmented. In addition, for higher IR laser intensities, we observe for low electron energies peaks separated by the IR photon energy in one electron momentum direction along the laser polarization axis; in the opposite direction, we find structured peaks that are spaced by twice the IR photon energy. Possible physical mechanisms for such asymmetric, low-energy structures in the ionized electron momentum distribution are proposed. Our results are based on single-active-electron solutions of the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schrödinger equation including atomic potentials appropriate for the H and He atoms.

  18. Separate, dedicated care teams for living organ donors.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Brenda; Gordon, Debra

    2003-06-01

    Living donation is an increasingly common option offered to patients in most transplant programs. Staff involved in the education, assessment, and care of this patient group is faced with increasingly complicated assessments both medically and psychologically. Supporting arguments for dedicated care teams for living organ donors include the large number of transplantations performed using living donors, the continued need to promote living organ donation, and the growing complexity of both medical and psychological factors in donor assessments. In addition, there is a need to implement the standards proposed by the 2000 Consensus Group, as well as to develop a body of evidence-based research related both to short- and long-term issues for this patient group. The ethical issues related to simultaneous involvement with both donors and recipients, and a need to ensure confidentiality are additional supporting arguments for the need to provide separate care providers for donors and recipients. PMID:12841513

  19. Investigation of the oxidation states of Cu additive in colored borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Cheng, Shaodong; Li, Chao; Zhong, Jiasong; Ma, Chuansheng; Wang, Zhao; Xiang, Weidong

    2014-12-01

    Three optically transparent colorful (red, green, and blue) glasses were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Nano-sized precipitates were found in scanning electron microscopy images. The precipitates were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The measured lattice parameters of these precipitates were found to fit the metallic copper in red glass but deviate from single valenced Cu oxides in green and blue glasses. The chemistry of these nano-sized particles was confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By fitting the EELS spectra obtained from the precipitates with the linear combination of reference spectra from Cu reference compounds, the oxidation states of Cu in the precipitates have been derived. First principle calculations suggested that the Cu nano-particles, which are in the similar oxidation states as our measurement, would show green color in the visible light range.

  20. Investigation of the oxidation states of Cu additive in colored borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Guang Cheng, Shaodong; Li, Chao; Ma, Chuansheng; Zhong, Jiasong; Xiang, Weidong; Wang, Zhao

    2014-12-14

    Three optically transparent colorful (red, green, and blue) glasses were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Nano-sized precipitates were found in scanning electron microscopy images. The precipitates were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The measured lattice parameters of these precipitates were found to fit the metallic copper in red glass but deviate from single valenced Cu oxides in green and blue glasses. The chemistry of these nano-sized particles was confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By fitting the EELS spectra obtained from the precipitates with the linear combination of reference spectra from Cu reference compounds, the oxidation states of Cu in the precipitates have been derived. First principle calculations suggested that the Cu nano-particles, which are in the similar oxidation states as our measurement, would show green color in the visible light range.

  1. Addition of water, methanol, and ammonia to Al3O3- clusters: Reaction products, transition states, and electron detachment energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-García, Alfredo; Martínez, Ana; Ortiz, J. V.

    2005-06-01

    Products of reactions between the book and kite isomers of Al3O3- and three important molecules are studied with electronic structure calculations. Dissociative adsorption of H2O or CH3OH is highly exothermic and proton-transfer barriers between anion-molecule complexes and the products of these reactions are low. For NH3, the reaction energies are less exothermic and the corresponding barriers are higher. Depending on experimental conditions, Al3O3- (NH3) coordination complexes or products of dissociative adsorption may be prepared. Vertical electron detachment energies of stable anions are predicted with ab initio electron propagator calculations and are in close agreement with experiments on Al3O3- and its products with H2O and CH3OH. Changes in the localization properties of two Al-centered Dyson orbitals account for the differences between the photoelectron spectra of Al3O3- and those of the product anions.

  2. Donor biopsy in living donor liver transplantation: is it still relevant in a developing country?

    PubMed

    Dorwal, P; Gautam, D; Sharma, D; Singh, D R; Raina, V

    2015-04-01

    Liver transplantation is an important modality of treatment for end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy evaluation has been an important aspect of the donor evaluation protocol. With the advent of newer modalities of donor evaluation such as high resolution CT scan, fibroscan and NMR spectroscopy, the relevance of the liver biopsy appears to be diminishing. We investigated the usefulness of donor liver biopsy evaluation in patients who had been cleared by radiological investigations. We evaluated 184 donor liver biopsies performed over a one-year period and found that 18% showed >5% steatosis and around 40% showed portal inflammation, which was, however, minimal to mild. Fibrosis was detected in 10 cases (5.4%), 7 being in stage 1 and 3 in stage 2. Donors with these findings were not considered for transplantation. We conclude that the liver biopsy still continues to be relevant especially in a developing country and does add additional information to the diagnostic work-up of a liver donor. PMID:25890612

  3. Defect Donor and Acceptor in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Look, D.C.; Reynolds, D.C.; Hemsky, J.W.; Sizelove, J.R.; Jones, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    High-energy (0.7{endash}1MeV) electron irradiation in GaN grown on sapphire produces shallow donors and deep or shallow acceptors at equal rates, 1{plus_minus}0.2 cm{sup {minus}1}. The data, in conjunction with theory, are consistent only with the shallow donor being the N vacancy, and the acceptor the N interstitial. The N-vacancy donor energy is 64{plus_minus}10 meV, much larger than the value of 18meV found for the residual donor (probably Si) in this material. The Hall-effect measurements also reveal a degenerate n -type layer at the GaN/sapphire interface which must be accounted for to get the proper donor activation energy. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Involvement of molecular oxygen in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted photosystem II membranes.

    PubMed

    Khorobrykh, A A; Klimov, V V

    2015-12-01

    It has been shown by Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry (Moscow) 67:683-688, 2002); Yanykin et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1797:516-523, 2010); Khorobrykh et al. (Biochemistry 50:10658-10665, 2011) that Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membrane fragments are characterized by an enhanced oxygen photoconsumption on the donor side of PSII which is accompanied with hydroperoxide formation and it was suggested that the events are related to the oxidative photoinhibition of PSII. Experimental confirmation of this suggestion is presented in this work. The degree of photoinhibition was determined by the loss of the capability of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+) or sodium ascorbate) to the reactivation of electron transport [measured by the light-induced changes of chlorophyll fluorescence yield (∆F)] in Mn-depleted PSII membranes. The transition from anaerobic conditions to aerobic ones significantly activated photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes both in the absence and in the presence of exogenous electron acceptor, ferricyanide. The photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes was suppressed upon the addition of exogenous electron donors (Mn(2+), diphenylcarbazide, and ferrocyanide). The addition of superoxide dismutase did not affect the photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. It is concluded that the interaction of molecular oxygen (rather than superoxide anion radical formed on the acceptor side of PSII) with the oxidized components of the donor side of PSII reflects the involvement of O2 in the donor-side photoinhibition of Mn-depleted PSII membranes. PMID:25862644

  5. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-free. (c) For additional guidance on the maintenance and storage of CDs and DVDS, agencies may consult... retention. This test should verify that the magnetic computer tape media are free of permanent errors and...

  6. Evaluation of the donor ability of coal liquefaction solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Bockrath, B.C.; Noceti, R.P.

    1981-03-29

    A test was devised to evaluate the donor ability of coal liquefaction solvents. This test embodies the main features of the free radical mechanism of coal liquefaction. Benzyl radicals generated by the thermolysis of a convenient precursor at relatively low temperatures behave like the free radicals generated by the thermolysis of coal at liquefaction temperatures. As precursors for this test, dibenzyldiazene and dibenzylmercury were selected. When benzyl radicals are generated in a donor solvent, the relative amounts of toluene and bibenzyl produced reflect the relative ability of the solvent to donate hydrogen and to prevent recombination. A variable amount of benzyl radical is also lost, which presumably represents that amount which adds to or combines with the solvent. Experimental evidences have shown that an additional mode of action of donor solvent is that of free radical scavenger by combination and addition reactions. Accordingly, three indices were devised to compare donor solvents: the donor, the scavenger, and combined index. The three solvent indices were determined for the decomposition of dibenzylmercury for several solvent mixtures made from different amounts of tetralin (solvent) in t-butyl benzene. The data show that the donor index increases with increasing tetralin concentration. A series of model compounds were evaluated using dibenzyldiazene as the source of benzyl radical, and results are tabulated. Another table is presented which show the donor indices obtained for several coal-derived liquefaction solvents. Taken together, these data indicate that there is good qualitative agreement between liquefaction performance and the donor index of solvents.

  7. Taking a Step Forward in Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy: Transvaginal Retrieval of Donor's Kidney.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying Hao; Lim, Yu Ming Joel; Ng, Ying Woo; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2016-09-01

    Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy has been broadly recognized as the gold standard for kidney procurement used in kidney transplantation where it is not uncommon for donors to experience discomfort and aesthetic dissatisfaction over larger incision site. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is a surgical approach that allows scarless intraabdominal operations through natural orifices, such as the vagina. In this case report, we describe the first case of transvaginal retrieval of donor's kidney at the National University Hospital, Singapore. A 51-year-old Malay lady with no significant medical history volunteered to a living-related kidney donor. Perioperative antibiotics were administered. A 12 mm Excel port was placed over the left iliac fossa with camera insertion. Two additional ports were inserted over the left rectus sheath edge and left costal margin under direct vision. An additional 5 mm port at the left loin was placed for lateral retraction. A vaginal probe was then inserted to facilitate posterior colpotomy and transection of the left uterosacral ligament. Pneumoperitoneum was subsequently maintained with a LiNA McCartney(®) Tube. A 15 mm Endocatch(®) bag was inserted for retrieval of the kidney. The left kidney was placed in the Endocatch bag after transection of the hilar vessels where the kidney was retrieved vaginally with ease. Colpotomy was closed vaginally using Vicryl-0 continuous suture. Total blood loss was noted as 50 mL with warm ischemia time being 7 minutes and the entire retrieval taking totally 20 minutes. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the donor was discharged stable 3 days postoperation. The transplanted kidney retained normal graft function. Colpotomy retrieval for donor nephrectomy presents an innovative method for specimen retrieval with minimal disruption of donor anatomy. Doing away with laparotomy for kidney retrieval has indeed shown a reduction in recovery time, reduced postoperative pain, and

  8. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  9. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  10. Efficient Synthesis and Photosensitizer Performance of Nonplanar Organic Donor-Acceptor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuping; Michinobu, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Norifusa; Ashizawa, Minoru; Han, Liyuan

    2015-08-01

    Nonplanar organic donor-acceptor molecules bearing a carboxylic acid group were synthesized by the formal [2+2] cycloaddition-retroelectrocyclization reaction between aniline-substituted alkynes and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) or 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). This reaction offers an atom-economic one-step approach to donor-acceptor chromophores in satisfactory high yields. The resulting donor-acceptor molecules were characterized by conventional analytical techniques. In addition, the nonplanarity and intermolecular interactions were investigated by X-ray crystallography. The energy levels and intramolecular charge-transfer (CT), evaluated by UV-Vis-near IR spectroscopy and electrochemistry, suggested that there is a linear correlation between the optical and electrochemical band gaps. Based on these structural and electronic analyses, the photosensitizer performances of the donor-acceptor molecules in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were initially investigated using TiO2 or SnO2 electrodes. Although the power conversion efficiencies were limited, the incident-photon-to-current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) spectra indicated a better photocurrent generation for the devices on SnO2 as compared to those on TiO2. PMID:26369162

  11. Multi-valley effective mass treatment of donor-dot tunneling in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frees, Adam; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Gamble, John King; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Muller, Richard P.; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Many cutting-edge experiments in silicon-based devices for quantum information processing involve the tunneling of an individual electron from a donor atom within the material to the interface of the heterostructure. Understanding how this tunneling process varies among different realistic devices is therefore of great interest. Using a multi-valley effective mass approximation method, we find the tunnel coupling, adiabatic min-gap, and ionizing electric field strength between a phosphorous donor in silicon and a nearby quantum dot at a Si/SiO2 interface. Additionally, we calculate these quantities for a phosphorous donor in strained silicon and a Si/SiGe interface. We consider how these properties change as a function of relative position between the donor and the dot. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellowship Program, which is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Pre-transplant Evaluation of Donor Urinary Biomarkers can Predict Reduced Graft Function After Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Yonggu; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Lee, Sik; Park, Suk Joo; Park, Jae Berm; Han, Miyeon; Lim, Hye Jin; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recipient biomarkers are reported to predict graft dysfunction, but these are not useful in decision making for the acceptance or allocation of deceased donor kidneys; thus, it is necessary to develop donor biomarkers predictive of graft dysfunction. To address this issue, we prospectively enrolled 94 deceased donors and their 109 recipients who underwent transplantation between 2010 and 2013 at 4 Korean transplantation centers. We investigated the predictive values of donor urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) for reduced graft function (RGF). We also developed a prediction model of RGF using these donor biomarkers. RGF was defined as delayed or slow graft function. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to generate a prediction model, which was internally validated using a bootstrapping method. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of biomarkers with 1-year graft function. Notably, donor urinary NGAL levels were associated with donor AKI (P = 0.014), and donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP were predictive for RGF, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.758 and 0.704 for NGAL and L-FABP, respectively. The best-fit model including donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine conveyed a better predictive value for RGF than donor serum creatinine alone (P = 0.02). In addition, we generated a scoring method to predict RGF based on donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine levels. Diagnostic performance of the RGF prediction score (AUROC 0.808) was significantly better than that of the DGF calculator (AUROC 0.627) and the kidney donor profile index (AUROC 0.606). Donor urinary L-FABP levels were also predictive of 1-year graft function (P = 0.005). Collectively, these findings suggest donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP to be useful biomarkers for RGF, and support

  13. Pre-transplant Evaluation of Donor Urinary Biomarkers can Predict Reduced Graft Function After Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Yonggu; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Lee, Sik; Park, Suk Joo; Park, Jae Berm; Han, Miyeon; Lim, Hye Jin; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-03-01

    Several recipient biomarkers are reported to predict graft dysfunction, but these are not useful in decision making for the acceptance or allocation of deceased donor kidneys; thus, it is necessary to develop donor biomarkers predictive of graft dysfunction. To address this issue, we prospectively enrolled 94 deceased donors and their 109 recipients who underwent transplantation between 2010 and 2013 at 4 Korean transplantation centers. We investigated the predictive values of donor urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) for reduced graft function (RGF). We also developed a prediction model of RGF using these donor biomarkers. RGF was defined as delayed or slow graft function. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to generate a prediction model, which was internally validated using a bootstrapping method. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of biomarkers with 1-year graft function. Notably, donor urinary NGAL levels were associated with donor AKI (P = 0.014), and donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP were predictive for RGF, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.758 and 0.704 for NGAL and L-FABP, respectively. The best-fit model including donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine conveyed a better predictive value for RGF than donor serum creatinine alone (P = 0.02). In addition, we generated a scoring method to predict RGF based on donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine levels. Diagnostic performance of the RGF prediction score (AUROC 0.808) was significantly better than that of the DGF calculator (AUROC 0.627) and the kidney donor profile index (AUROC 0.606). Donor urinary L-FABP levels were also predictive of 1-year graft function (P = 0.005). Collectively, these findings suggest donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP to be useful biomarkers for RGF, and support the use of

  14. An Additional Approach to Model Current Followers and Amplifiers with Electronically Controllable Parameters from Commercially Available ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotner, R.; Kartci, A.; Jerabek, J.; Herencsar, N.; Dostal, T.; Vrba, K.

    2012-12-01

    Several behavioral models of current active elements for experimental purposes are introduced in this paper. These models are based on commercially available devices. They are suitable for experimental tests of current- and mixed-mode filters, oscillators, and other circuits (employing current-mode active elements) frequently used in analog signal processing without necessity of onchip fabrication of proper active element. Several methods of electronic control of intrinsic resistance in the proposed behavioral models are discussed. All predictions and theoretical assumptions are supported by simulations and experiments. This contribution helps to find a cheaper and more effective way to preliminary laboratory tests without expensive on-chip fabrication of special active elements.

  15. Polarization of human donor corneas.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Ferrari, Stefano; Salvalaio, Gianni; Elbadawy, Hossein; Ponzin, Diego; Lipari, Eugenio

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the de-orientation effect of DSAEK grafts by observing the cross patterns and polarization power of human donor corneas using a polarizing device (Lumaxis(®)). Forty human donor corneas were placed in small petri-plates with epithelial side facing up. Polarizing power (arbitrary unit) and crosses were monitored and recorded by the software. The tissue was marked at 'Superior' position to ensure that the base and the polarizer are in alignment with each other after the cut. The anterior lamellar cut was performed using microkeratome. The lenticule was placed back in the same position as marked to mimic the alignment. The tissue was further rotated by 45° ensuring that the base of the cornea and the polarizer were in alignment. The polarization power and 'crosses' were identified at each step. The average of forty corneas from pre-cut to post-45° angular change showed statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in terms of polarizing power. The cross-shaped pattern deformed and lost the sharpness towards 45° angle. However, multiple variances in terms of 'cross-patterns' were observed throughout the study. Lumaxis(®) was able to determine the worst quality tissue in terms of polarization (no black zone and crosses). Despite the quality of cross pattern which can be used as an additional objective parameter to evaluate the optical properties of the corneal tissue, this preliminary study needs to be further justified in terms of clinical relevance whether polarization changes with oriented or de-oriented grafts have any effects and consequences on the visual acuity. PMID:26920874

  16. The effect of Ni addition on the structure of Pt–Sn/C nanoparticles by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Seden; Pronier, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • A typical Pt/SnO{sub 2} core–shell structure is present in Pt–Sn. • The most of SnO{sub 2} species are likely clustered in Pt–Sn. • SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles prefer to locate close to Pt–Sn–Ni nanoclusters. • Main crystallographic structures are either cubic Pt or PtSn{sub 2}. - Abstract: Carbon supported bimetallic Pt–Sn and trimetallic Pt–Sn–Ni nanoparticles were synthesized by Bönnemann's colloidal precursor method and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) techniques. HR-TEM and EDX results demonstrated that SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles tend to form clusters in Pt–Sn/C; however, the presence of Ni in the Pt–Sn/C gives rise to an induced interaction between SnO{sub 2} and Pt nanoparticles. Electron diffraction patterns of Pt–Sn–Ni/C showed that either cubic Pt or PtSn{sub 2} structures are present. From the selected area EDX analysis, it was found that both of these structures contain Sn. This suggests that Pt–Sn–Ni/C nanoparticles may be partially covered by Sn-richer PtSn{sub 2} alloyed structure.

  17. Organ Donor FAQ's: Who Can Be a Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... citizens have been organ donors. Can non-resident aliens donate and receive organs? Non-resident aliens can both donate and receive organs in the ... the 12,375 organ donors were non-resident aliens. In this same year, 259 (1%) of the ...

  18. Recruitment of prospective donors: what do they expect from a homepage of a blood transfusion service?

    PubMed

    Moog, R; Fourné, K

    2007-08-01

    In times of shrinking donor population, the recruitment of donors is of utmost importance. Recruitment can be done by personal communication, advertisement/information, classical mass media (newspaper, radio, TV) or new computerized media. The aim of this study was to gain information about the donors' demands of an Internet presentation of a blood transfusion service. Between October and December 2004 inclusive, prospective donors were asked to complete a survey about the impact of Internet information for blood donors. The survey contained questions measuring demographics, education and motivation for blood donation. In addition, the survey included questions that measured Internet access, duration of online time and donors' demands for an Internet presentation of a blood transfusion service. Donors were asked to tick a box with predefined answers. In cases where no options were applied, donors were requested to specify their answers. One hundred and fourteen prospective donors (71 female, 43 male) with a median age of 25 years (range 18-57 years) completed the survey. Most donors (57.9%) were 18-30 years old. Forty-two (36.8%) of the surveyed donors were repeat donors, whereas 72 (63.2%) were first-time donors. The majority of donors were informed about blood donation from relatives or friends (70.7% repeat donors and 67.7% first-time donors). Most of them had Internet access (85.7% repeat donors and 90.3% first-time donors). Exclusive use of private access was more often reported in repeat donors (77.8%), whereas both private and professional access was more frequently used in first-time donors (32.3%). Most donors used the Internet access daily, followed by weekly and monthly use. Multiple answers were given about the importance of desired information about the topic 'blood donation'. Both first-time and repeat donors wanted to be informed about organizational details of blood donation such as opening times, eligibility criteria, donation process and the kind

  19. Living-donor kidney transplantation: a review of the current practices for the live donor.

    PubMed

    Davis, Connie L; Delmonico, Francis L

    2005-07-01

    The first successful living-donor kidney transplant was performed 50 yr ago. Since then, in a relatively brief period of medical history, living kidney transplantation has become the preferred treatment for those with ESRD. Organ replacement from either a live or a deceased donor is preferable to dialysis therapy because transplantation provides a better quality of life and improved survival. The advantages of live versus deceased donor transplantation now are readily apparent as it affords earlier transplantation and the best long-term survival. Live kidney donation has also been fostered by the technical advance of laparoscopic nephrectomy and immunologic maneuvers that can overcome biologic obstacles such as HLA disparity and ABO or cross-match incompatibility. Congressional legislation has provided an important model to remove financial disincentives to being a live donor. Federal employees now are afforded paid leave and coverage for travel expenses. Candidates for renal transplantation are aware of these developments, and they have become less hesitant to ask family members, spouses, or friends to become live kidney donors. Living donation as practiced for the past 50 yr has been safe with minimal immediate and long-term risk for the donor. However, the future experience may not be the same as our society is becoming increasingly obese and developing associated health problems. In this environment, predicting medical futures is less precise than in the past. Even so, isolated abnormalities such as obesity and in some instances hypertension are no longer considered absolute contraindications to donation. These and other medical risks bring additional responsibility in such circumstances to track the unknown consequences of a live-donor nephrectomy. PMID:15930096

  20. Highly E-Selective and Enantioselective Michael Addition to Electron-Deficient Internal Alkynes Under Chiral Iminophosphorane Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Uraguchi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kohei; Ooi, Takashi

    2015-08-17

    A highly E-selective and enantioselective conjugate addition of 2-benzyloxythiazol-5(4H)-ones to β-substituted alkynyl N-acyl pyrazoles is achieved under the catalysis of a P-spiro chiral iminophosphorane. Simultaneous control of the newly generated central chirality and olefin geometry is possible with a wide array of the alkynyl Michael acceptors possessing different aromatic and aliphatic β-substituents, as well as the various α-amino acid-derived thiazolone nucleophiles. This protocol provides access to structurally diverse, optically active α-amino acids bearing a geometrically defined trisubstituted olefinic component at the α-position. PMID:26138611

  1. Donor Preferences and Charitable Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stephanie Roderick

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to learn more of the differences that may exist between the two most powerful groups of donors today, baby boomers (40-58 years old) and mature donors (59 and older), in an effort to help organizations improve fundraising efforts. Questions about the importance of organizational efficiency, program outcomes, and the desire for…

  2. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  3. Identification of photoluminescence bands in AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs PHEMT heterostructures with donor-acceptor-doped barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyaev, D. V. Zhuravlev, K. S.; Bakarov, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.

    2015-02-15

    The photoluminescence of AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistor heterostructures with donor-acceptor-doped AlGaAs barriers is studied. It is found that the introduction of additional p{sup +}-doped AlGaAs layers into the design brings about the appearance of new bands in the photoluminescence spectra. These bands are identified as resulting from transitions (i) in donor-acceptor pairs in doped AlGaAs layers and (ii) between the conduction subband and acceptor levels in the undoped InGaAs quantum well.

  4. Transport Measurements on Si Nanostructures with Counted Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Garratt, Elias; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Donor based spin qubits are a promising platform for quantum computing. Single qubits using timed implant of donors have been demonstrated.1 Extending this to multiple qubits requires precise control over the placement and number of donors. Such control can be achieved by using a combination of low-energy heavy-ion implants (to reduce depth straggle), electron-beam lithography (to define position), focused ion beam (to localize implants to one lithographic site) and counting the number of implants with a single ion detector.2 We report transport measurements on MOS quantum dots implanted with 5, 10 and 20 Sb donors using the approach described above. A donor charge transition is identified by a charge offset in the transport characteristics. Correlation between the number of donors and the charge offsets is studied. These results are necessary first steps towards fabricating donor nanostructures for two qubit interactions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1J. J. Pla et al., Nature 496, 334 (2013) 2J. A. Seamons et al., APL 93, 043124 (2008).

  5. Electric-field control of a hydrogenic donor's spin in a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Amrit; Pryor, Craig E.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2009-03-01

    The orbital wave function of an electron bound to a single donor in a semiconductor can be modulated by an applied AC electric field, which affects the electron spin dynamics via the spin-orbit interaction. Numerical calculations of the spin dynamics of a single hydrogenic donor (Si) using a real-space multi-band k.p formalism show that in addition to breaking the high symmetry of the hydrogenic donor state, the g-tensor has a strong nonlinear dependence on the applied fields. By explicitly integrating the time dependent Schr"odinger equation it is seen that Rabi oscillations can be obtained for electric fields modulated at sub-harmonics of the Larmor frequency. The Rabi frequencies obtained from sub-harmonic modulation depend on the magnitudes of the AC and DC components of the electric field. For a purely AC field, the highest Rabi frequency is obtained when E is driven at the 2nd sub-harmonic of the Larmor frequency. Apart from suggesting ways to measure g-tensor anisotropies and nonlinearities, these results also suggest the possibility of direct frequency domain measurements of Rabi frequencies.

  6. The Lombardy Rare Donor Programme

    PubMed Central

    Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Paccapelo, Cinzia; Manera, Maria Cristina; Rebulla, Paolo; Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Marconi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2005, the government of Lombardy, an Italian region with an ethnically varied population of approximately 9.8 million inhabitants including 250,000 blood donors, founded the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme, a regional network of 15 blood transfusion departments coordinated by the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory of the Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan. During 2005 to 2012, Lombardy funded LORD-P with 14.1 million euros. Materials and methods During 2005–2012 the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme members developed a registry of blood donors and a bank of red blood cell units with either rare blood group phenotypes or IgA deficiency. To do this, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory performed extensive serological and molecular red blood cell typing in 59,738 group O or A, Rh CCDee, ccdee, ccDEE, ccDee, K− or k− donors aged 18–55 with a record of two or more blood donations, including both Caucasians and ethnic minorities. In parallel, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory implemented a 24/7 service of consultation, testing and distribution of rare units for anticipated or emergent transfusion needs in patients developing complex red blood cell alloimmunisation and lacking local compatible red blood cell or showing IgA deficiency. Results Red blood cell typing identified 8,747, 538 and 33 donors rare for a combination of common antigens, negative for high-frequency antigens and with a rare Rh phenotype, respectively. In June 2012, the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme frozen inventory included 1,157 red blood cell units. From March 2010 to June 2012 one IgA-deficient donor was detected among 1,941 screened donors and IgA deficiency was confirmed in four previously identified donors. From 2005 to June 2012, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory provided 281 complex red blood cell alloimmunisation consultations and distributed 8,008 Lombardy Rare Donor Programme red blood cell units within and outside the region

  7. [Altruism and the donor].

    PubMed

    Langlois, A

    1991-08-01

    On December 20, 1988, the government of France passed a law to protect people who voluntarily participate in biomedical research. This article makes extensive reference to a major study, titled From Biology to Ethics, by Jean Bernard, a well-respected authority in the field of bioethics. The author looks at models proposed by Bernard, as examples for health volunteers, in particular, the blood donor and the self-experimenter. To set the tone of the article, she recalls the concept of altruism, as first proposed by Auguste Comte, then makes a linkage between his philosophy and Bernard's point of view. By trial and error, in their discussions, various ethics committees and the French State Council have agreed upon what constitutes fair compensation under the law. Unlike their Canadian counterparts, medical researchers in France have free access to volunteers who are not in perfect health--e.g., the elderly, people suffering from kidney deficiency, cirrhosis of the liver, etc.--but these "experimental subjects" receive no monetary compensation. Thus, healthy and less-than-healthy volunteers do not receive equal treatment under the law. This inequity, added to the fear of what amounts to a tax on the human body and the difficulty of ensuring just compensation, is giving rise to a great deal of uncertainty. PMID:1878857

  8. Spatially resolving valley quantum interference of a donor in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, J.; Mol, J. A.; Rahman, R.; Klimeck, G.; Simmons, M. Y.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.; Rogge, S.

    2014-06-01

    Electron and nuclear spins of donor ensembles in isotopically pure silicon experience a vacuum-like environment, giving them extraordinary coherence. However, in contrast to a real vacuum, electrons in silicon occupy quantum superpositions of valleys in momentum space. Addressable single-qubit and two-qubit operations in silicon require that qubits are placed near interfaces, modifying the valley degrees of freedom associated with these quantum superpositions and strongly influencing qubit relaxation and exchange processes. Yet to date, spectroscopic measurements have only probed wavefunctions indirectly, preventing direct experimental access to valley population, donor position and environment. Here we directly probe the probability density of single quantum states of individual subsurface donors, in real space and reciprocal space, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. We directly observe quantum mechanical valley interference patterns associated with linear superpositions of valleys in the donor ground state. The valley population is found to be within 5% of a bulk donor when 2.85 ± 0.45 nm from the interface, indicating that valley-perturbation-induced enhancement of spin relaxation will be negligible for depths greater than 3 nm. The observed valley interference will render two-qubit exchange gates sensitive to atomic-scale variations in positions of subsurface donors. Moreover, these results will also be of interest for emerging schemes proposing to encode information directly in valley polarization.

  9. Successful use of the "unacceptable" heart donor.

    PubMed

    Menkis, A H; Novick, R J; Kostuk, W J; Pflugfelder, P W; Powell, A M; Thomson, D; McKenzie, F N

    1991-01-01

    Chronic shortage of donor organs has heightened interest in new strategies for increasing donor availability. Unacceptable hearts for transplant have previously been characterized by donor age greater than 40 years, more than 20% donor/recipient weight mismatch, ischemic time more than 4 hours, and the presence of coronary artery disease. A series of 185 consecutive orthotopic heart transplants were retrospectively examined. A significant number of donor hearts used were unacceptable by one or more of the above criteria. Our current approach is to match donors to recipients using a wide range of criteria. Donors are now accepted from any location in North America. We have accepted donors more than 55 years of age and donors weighing less than 50% of the recipient's body weight. Because of the chronic shortage of donor organs, donor criteria have been effectively liberalized, thereby increasing the donor pool without compromising the overall results of heart transplantation. PMID:2007168

  10. Thermal cracking with hydrogen donor diluent

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Varghese, P.; Whitehurst, D.D.

    1983-07-26

    An improved hydrogen donor for hydrogen donor diluent cracking is provided by extraction with naphtha from the cracked product and hydrogenation by hydrogen transfer from a lower boiling hydrogen donor such as tetralin.

  11. Adult living donor liver imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Larry; Yeh, Benjamin M.; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Roberts, John P.; Wang, Zhen J.

    2016-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is increasingly used for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. The three most commonly harvested grafts for LDLT are left lateral segment, left lobe, and right lobe grafts. The left lateral segment graft, which includes Couinaud’s segments II and III, is usually used for pediatric recipients or small size recipients. Most of the adult recipients need either a left or a right lobe graft. Whether a left or right lobe graft should be harvested from the donors depends on estimated graft and donor remnant liver volume, as well as biliary and vascular anatomy. Detailed preoperative assessment of the potential donor liver volumetrics, biliary and vascular anatomy, and liver parenchyma is vital to minimize risks to the donors and maximize benefits to the recipients. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are currently the imaging modalities of choice in the preoperative evaluation of potential donors. This review provides an overview of key surgical considerations in LDLT that the radiologists must be aware of, and imaging findings on CT and MRI that the radiologists must convey to the surgeons when evaluating potential donors for LDLT. PMID:26912106

  12. Adult living donor liver imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Larry; Yeh, Benjamin M; Westphalen, Antonio C; Roberts, John P; Wang, Zhen J

    2016-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is increasingly used for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. The three most commonly harvested grafts for LDLT are left lateral segment, left lobe, and right lobe grafts. The left lateral segment graft, which includes Couinaud's segments II and III, is usually used for pediatric recipients or small size recipients. Most of the adult recipients need either a left or a right lobe graft. Whether a left or right lobe graft should be harvested from the donors depends on estimated graft and donor remnant liver volume, as well as biliary and vascular anatomy. Detailed preoperative assessment of the potential donor liver volumetrics, biliary and vascular anatomy, and liver parenchyma is vital to minimize risks to the donors and maximize benefits to the recipients. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are currently the imaging modalities of choice in the preoperative evaluation of potential donors. This review provides an overview of key surgical considerations in LDLT that the radiologists must be aware of, and imaging findings on CT and MRI that the radiologists must convey to the surgeons when evaluating potential donors for LDLT. PMID:26912106

  13. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them. PMID:25936672

  14. Assessment of the Electronic Factors Determining the Thermodynamics of "Oxidative Addition" of C-H and N-H Bonds to Ir(I) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Y; Choliy, Yuriy; Haibach, Michael C; Hartwig, John F; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2016-01-13

    A study of electronic factors governing the thermodynamics of C-H and N-H bond addition to Ir(I) complexes was conducted. DFT calculations were performed on an extensive series of trans-(PH3)2IrXL complexes (L = NH3 and CO; X = various monodentate ligands) to parametrize the relative σ- and π-donating/withdrawing properties of the various ligands, X. Computed energies of oxidative addition of methane to a series of three- and four-coordinate Ir(I) complexes bearing an ancillary ligand, X, were correlated with the resulting (σ(X), π(X)) parameter set. Regression analysis indicates that the thermodynamics of addition of methane to trans-(PH3)2IrX are generally strongly disfavored by increased σ-donation from the ligand X, in contradiction to widely held views on oxidative addition. The trend for oxidative addition of methane to four-coordinate Ir(I) was closely related to that observed for the three-coordinate complexes, albeit slightly more complicated. The computational analysis was found to be consistent with the rates of reductive elimination of benzene from a series of isoelectronic Ir(III) phenyl hydride complexes, measured experimentally in this work and previously reported. Extending the analysis of ancillary ligand energetic effects to the oxidative addition of ammonia to three-coordinate Ir(I) complexes leads to the conclusion that increasing σ-donation by X also disfavors oxidative addition of N-H bonds to trans-(PH3)2IrX. However, coordination of NH3 to the Ir(I) center is disfavored even more strongly by increasing σ-donation by X, which explains why the few documented examples of H-NH2 oxidative addition to transition metals involve complexes with strongly σ-donating ligands situated trans to the site of addition. An orbital-based rationale for the observed results is presented. PMID:26652221

  15. Effects of the addition of alcohols, cryoprotective agents, and salts on the photoionization yield of chlorophyll a in frozen vesicle solutions with and without electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hiff, T.; Kevan, L. )

    1989-04-20

    The photoionization yield of chlorophyll a (Chla) in rapidly frozen vesicles with and without potassium ferricyanide (FC) or tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ) has been studied versus several structural variations of phospholipid vesicles, including the addition of medium chain length alcohols, the effect of added salts (metal chlorides), the presence of a double bond in the alkyl tail of the surfactant, and the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide or glycerol which tend to enhance vesicular structure retention upon freezing. Variations in the photoionization yield versus these structural parameters are discussed in terms of distance variations between Chla and electron acceptors, loss of integrity of the vesicle structure, and differences in the degree of hydration of the headgroups of the surfactant molecules. Electron spin echo (ESE) deuterium modulation associated with a 5-doxylstearic acid spin probe interacting with deuterated water probes the degree of water interaction at the vesicle interface. The ESE data support a correlation between the degree of interface hydration and the photoionization yield for vesicles containing Chla and FC as an electron acceptor. Parallel ESE studies of 5-doxylstearic acid spin probes in anionic and cationic surfactant vesicles reveal changes in the interface hydration if the surfactant counterion is changed; this can be roughly correlated to the Chla photoionization yields.

  16. How to Motivate Whole Blood Donors to Become Plasma Donors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of interventions to recruit new plasma donors among whole blood donors. A sample of 924 donors was randomized to one of three conditions: control; information only by nurse; and information plus self-positive image message by nurse (SPI). Participants in the control condition only received a leaflet describing the plasma donation procedure. In the two experimental conditions the leaflet was explained face-to-face by a nurse. The dependent variables were the proportion of new plasma donors and the number of donations at six months. Overall, 141 (15.3%) new plasma donors were recruited at six months. There were higher proportions of new plasma donors in the two experimental conditions compared to the control condition (P < .001); the two experimental conditions did not differ. Also, compared to the control condition, those in the experimental conditions (all Ps < .001) gave plasma more often (information only by nurse:  d = .26; SPI: d = .32); the SPI intervention significantly outperformed (P < .05) the information only by nurse condition. The results suggest that references to feelings of SPI such as feeling good and being proud and that giving plasma is a rewarding personal experience favor a higher frequency of plasma donation. PMID:25530909

  17. Functionalisation of graphene by edge-halogenation and radical addition using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon models: edge electron density-binding energy relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amarjeet; Mishra, P. C.

    2015-04-01

    Structures and properties of functionalised graphene were investigated using several derivatives of some small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) taken as finite size models employing unrestricted density functional theory. The functionalisation reactions included fluorination or chlorination of all the edge carbon sites, addition of H, F or Cl atom, OH or OOH group at the different sites and addition of OH or OOH group at the different sites of the edge-halogenated PAHs. σ-inductive effects of fluorine and chlorine in the edge-fluorinated and edge-chlorinated PAHs, respectively, were found to affect electron density and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distributions significantly. σ-holes were located at the MEP surfaces along the CH and CCl bonds of the unmodified and edge-chlorinated PAHs, respectively. The H and F atoms and the OH group were found to add to all the carbon sites of PAHs exothermically, while addition of the Cl atom and the OOH group was found to be exothermic at a few carbon sites and endothermic at the other carbon sites. Enhanced electron densities at the edge carbon sites of the PAHs and binding energies of adducts of H and F atoms and the OH group at these sites were found to be linearly correlated.

  18. Electric field control of donor pair diatomic molecules in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baena, Alejandra; Saraiva, Andre; Calderón, María J.; Koiller, Belita

    2015-03-01

    Single donors are well-established building blocks for engineering electronic properties of semiconductors, acting effectively as giant hydrogen atoms. Donor pairs, analogous to effective hydrogen molecules, were recently investigated in the strongly interacting regime in silicon. In this regime, electric field control renders timid results. Pairs that are more distant are more susceptible to external fields, and may harbour single electron charge control. Theoretically, the molecular quantum mechanics analogy between a donor pair and the H2 molecule in vacuum is not as straightforward as it may seem. A detailed understanding of the electronic structure of these molecular systems is a current challenge. We analyze the lowest energy states within effective mass theory, including central cell corrected donor potential effects and the conduction band multiplicity in Si. The spectrum of ionized donor pairs and its response to an external electric field will be presented. We contemplate possible advantages of heteropolar diatomic molecules, e.g, Sb -As pairs, as more efficient elements for such devices and applications.

  19. Singlet-triplet donor-quantum-dot qubit in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Electron spins bound to phosphorus (P) donors in silicon (Si) are promising qubits due to their high fidelities, but donor-donor coupling is challenging. We propose an alternative two-electron singlet-triplet quantum-dot (QD) and donor (D) hybrid qubit. A QD is formed at a MOS 28-Si interface and is tunnel-coupled to implanted P. The proposed two-axis system is defined by the exchange and contact hyperfine interactions. We demonstrate that a few electron QD can be formed and tuned to interact with a donor. We investigate the spin filling of the QD-D system through charge-sensed (CS) magnetospectroscopy and identify spin-up loading consistent with a singlet-triplet splitting of ~100 μeV near a QD-D anti-crossing. We also demonstrate an enhanced CS readout contrast and time window due to the restricted relaxation path of the D through the QD. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Mechanisms of radical formation in beef and chicken meat during high pressure processing evaluated by electron spin resonance detection and the addition of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Bolumar, Tomas; Andersen, Mogens L; Orlien, Vibeke

    2014-05-01

    The generation of radicals during high pressure (HP) processing of beef loin and chicken breast was studied by spin trapping and electron spin resonance detection. The pressurization resulted in a higher level of spin adducts in the beef loin than in the chicken breast. It was shown that radicals were formed in the sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fractions as well as in the non-soluble protein fraction due to the HP treatment, indicating that other radicals than iron-derived radicals were formed, and most likely protein-derived radicals. The addition of iron as well as the natural antioxidants caffeic acid, rosemary extract, and ascorbic acid resulted in an increased formation of radicals during the HP treatment, whereas addition of ethylendiamintetraacetic acid (EDTA) reduced the radical formation. This suggests that iron-species (protein-bound or free) catalyses the formation of radicals when meat systems are submitted to HP. PMID:24360471