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Sample records for additional electrostatic interactions

  1. Silicon addition to hydroxyapatite increases nanoscale electrostatic, van der Waals, and adhesive interactions.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Jennifer; Dean, Delphine; Patel, Nelesh; Botelho, Claudia; Best, Serena; Santos, José D; Lopes, Maria A; Bonfield, William; Ortiz, Christine

    2006-08-01

    The normal intersurface forces between nanosized probe tips functionalized with COO(-)-terminated alkanethiol self-assembling monolayers and dense, polycrystalline silicon-substituted synthetic hydroxyapatite (SiHA) and phase pure hydroxyapatite (HA) were measured via a nanomechanical technique called chemically specific high-resolution force spectroscopy. A significantly larger van der Waals interaction was observed for the SiHA compared to HA; Hamaker constants (A) were found to be A(SiHA) = 35 +/- 27 zJ and A(HA) = 13 +/- 12 zJ. Using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek approximation, which assumes linear additivity of the electrostatic double layer and van der Waals components, and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann surface charge model for electrostatic double-layer forces, the surface charge per unit area, sigma (C/m(2)), was calculated as a function of position for specific nanosized areas within individual grains. SiHA was observed to be more negatively charged than HA with sigma(SiHA) = -0.024 +/- 0.013 C/m(2), two times greater than sigma(HA) = -0.011 +/- 0.006 C/m(2). Additionally, SiHA was found to have increased surface adhesion (0.7 +/- 0.3 nN) compared to HA (0.5 +/- 0.3 nN). The characterization of the nanoscale variations in surface forces of SiHA and HA will enable an improved understanding of the initial stages of bone-biomaterial bonding.

  2. Catalytic enantioselective addition of organoboron reagents to fluoroketones controlled by electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyunga; Silverio, Daniel L.; Torker, Sebastian; Robbins, Daniel W.; Haeffner, Fredrik; van der Mei, Farid W.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2016-08-01

    Organofluorine compounds are central to modern chemistry, and broadly applicable transformations that generate them efficiently and enantioselectively are in much demand. Here we introduce efficient catalytic methods for the addition of allyl and allenyl organoboron reagents to fluorine-substituted ketones. These reactions are facilitated by readily and inexpensively available catalysts and deliver versatile and otherwise difficult-to-access tertiary homoallylic alcohols in up to 98% yield and >99:1 enantiomeric ratio. Utility is highlighted by a concise enantioselective approach to the synthesis of the antiparasitic drug fluralaner (Bravecto, presently sold as the racemate). Different forms of ammonium-organofluorine interactions play a key role in the control of enantioselectivity. The greater understanding of various non-bonding interactions afforded by these studies should facilitate the future development of transformations that involve fluoroorganic entities.

  3. Catalytic enantioselective addition of organoboron reagents to fluoroketones controlled by electrostatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, KyungA; Silverio, Daniel L.; Torker, Sebastian; Robbins, Daniel W.; Haeffner, Fredrik; van der Mei, Farid W.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2016-01-01

    Organofluorine compounds are central to modern chemistry, and broadly applicable transformations that generate them efficiently and enantioselectively are in much demand. Here we introduce efficient catalytic methods for additions of allyl and allenyl organoboron reagents to fluorine-substituted ketones. These reactions are facilitated by readily and inexpensively available catalysts and deliver versatile and otherwise difficult-to-access tertiary homoallylic alcohols in up to 98% yield and >99:1 enantiomeric ratio. Utility is highlighted by a concise enantioselective approach to synthesis of anti-parasitic drug Bravecto™ (presently sold as the racemate). Different forms of ammonium-organofluorine interactions play a key role in controlling enantioselectivity. The greater understanding of various non-bonding interactions afforded by these studies should facilitate future development of transformations involving fluoro-organic entities. PMID:27442282

  4. Electrostatic interactions in molecular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painelli, Anna; Terenziani, Francesca

    2004-03-01

    Non-additive collective behavior appears in molecular materials as a result of intermolecular interactions. We present a model for interacting polar and polarizable molecules that applies to different supramolecular architectures of donor-π-acceptor molecules. We follow a bottom-up modeling strategy: the detailed analysis of spectroscopic data of solvated molecules leads to the definition of a simple two-state model for the molecular units. Classical electrostatic interactions are then introduced to model molecular clusters. The molecular properties are strickingly affected by supramolecular interactions, as demonstrated by spectroscopic studies. Brand new phenomena, like phase transitions and multielectron transfer, with no counterpart at the molecular level are observed as direct consequences of electrostatic intermolecular interactions.

  5. Arbitrary order permanent Cartesian multipolar electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, H. A.; Todorov, I. T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a concerted effort to implement advanced classical potential energy surfaces by adding higher order multipoles to fixed point charge electrostatics in a bid to increase the accuracy of simulations of condensed phase systems. One major hurdle is the unwieldy nature of the expressions which in part has limited developers mostly to including only dipoles and quadrupoles. In this paper, we present a generalization of the Cartesian formulation of electrostatic multipolar interactions that enables the specification of an arbitrary order of multipoles. Specifically, we derive formulas for arbitrary order implementation of the particle mesh Ewald method and give a closed form formula for the stress tensor in the reciprocal space. In addition, we provide recurrence relations for common electrostatic potentials employed in molecular simulations, which allows for the generalization to arbitrary order and guarantees a computational cost that scales as O(p3) for Cartesian multipole interactions of order p.

  6. Efficient optimization of electrostatic interactions between biomolecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Bardhan, J. P.; Altman, M. D.; White, J. K.; Tidor, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; MIT

    2007-01-01

    We present a PDE-constrained approach to optimizing the electrostatic interactions between two biomolecules. These interactions play important roles in the determination of binding affinity and specificity, and are therefore of significant interest when designing a ligand molecule to bind tightly to a receptor. Using a popular continuum model and physically reasonable assumptions, the electrostatic component of the binding free energy is a convex, quadratic function of the ligand charge distribution. Traditional optimization methods require exhaustive pre-computation, and the expense has precluded a full exploration of the promise of electrostatic optimization in biomolecule analysis and design. In this paper we describe an approach in which the electrostatic simulations and optimization problem are solved simultaneously; unlike many PDE- constrained optimization frameworks, the proposed method does not incorporate the PDE as a set of equality constraints. This co-optimization approach can be used by itself to solve unconstrained problems or those with linear equality constraints, or in conjunction with primal-dual interior point methods to solve problems with inequality constraints. Model problems demonstrate that the co-optimization method is computationally efficient and can be used to solve realistic problems.

  7. Brownian dynamics simulation of electrostatically interacting proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E.; Krushelnitsky, A. G.; Fedotov, V. D.

    Brownian dynamics simulation software has been developed to study the dynamics of proteins as a whole in solution. The proteins were modelled as spheres with point dipoles embedded in the centre of sphere. A set of Brownian dynamics simulations at different values of the dipole moments, protein concentration and translational diffusion coefficient was performed to investigate the influence of interprotein electrostatic interactions on dynamic protein behaviour in solution. It was shown that these interactions led to the slowing down of protein rotation and a complex non-exponential shape of the rotational correlation function. Analysis of the correlation functions was performed within the frame of the model of electrostatic interprotein interactions advanced earlier on the basis of NMR and dielectric spectroscopy data. This model assumes that, due to electrostatic interactions, protein Brownian rotation becomes anisotropic. The lifetime of this anisotropy is controlled mainly by translational diffusion of proteins. Thus, the correlation function can be decomposed into two components corresponding to anisotropic Brownian rotation and an isotropic motion of an external electric field vector produced by the surrounding proteins.

  8. Electrostatic interactions in hirudin-thrombin binding.

    PubMed

    Sharp, K A

    1996-08-30

    Hirudin is a good anticoagulant owing to potent inhibition of the serine protease thrombin. An aspartate- and glutamate-rich portion of hirudin plays an important part in its tight binding to thrombin through a ladder of salt bridges, and these residues have previously been mutated to asparagine or glutamine. Detailed calculations of the electrostatic contribution to changes in binding from these mutations have been performed using the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann method which include charge--charge interactions, solvation interactions, the residual electrostatic interaction of mutant residues, pKa shifts, and ionic strength. Single mutant effects on binding energy were close to experimental values, except for the D55N mutant whose effect is overestimated, perhaps because of displacement of a bound chloride ion from the site where it binds. Multiple mutation values were generally overestimated. The effect of pKa shifts upon the binding is significant for one hirudin residue E58, but this appears to be due to a poor salt bridge with thrombin caused by crystal contacts. Electrostatic interaction between the acidic residues is unfavorable. However, analysis of experimental multiple mutation/single mutation data shows apparently negative interactions between these residues, from which it is concluded that structural changes can occur in the complex to relieve an unfavorable interaction when more than one acidic residue is mutated. In all cases, there is a loss in stability of the complex from mutations due to loss of favorable charge--charge interactions with thrombin, but this is largely compensated for by reduced unfavorable desolvation interactions, and by residual polar interactions in the Asn/Gln mutants.

  9. Electrostatic antenna space environment interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.

    1981-01-01

    The interactions of the electrostatic antenna with the space environment in both low Earth orbit and geosynchronous orbit are investigated. It is concluded that the electrostatically controlled membrane mirror is a viable concept for space applications. However, great care must be taken to enclose the high voltage electrodes in a Faraday cage structure to separate the high voltage region from the ambient plasma. For this reason, metallized cloth is not acceptable as a membrane material. Conventional spacecraft charging at geosynchronous orbit should not be a problem provided ancillary structures (such as booms) are given nonnegligible conductivity and adequate grounding. Power loss due to plasma electrons entering the high field region is a potentially serious problem. In low earth orbit any opening whatever in the Faraday cage is likely to produce an unacceptable power drain.

  10. Electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Hans-Jüurgen

    1991-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy, the stylus experiences an electrostatic force when imaging in aqueous medium above a charged surface. This force has been calculated numerically with continuum theory for a silicon nitrite or silicon oxide stylus. For comparison, the Van der Waals force was also calculated. In contrast to the Van der Waals attraction, the electrostatic force is repulsive. At a distance of 0.5 nm the electrostatic force is typically 10-12-10-10 N and thus comparable in strength to the Van der Waals force. The electrostatic force increases with increasing surface charge density and decreases roughly exponentially with distance. It can be reduced by imaging in high salt concentrations. Below surface potentials of ≈50 mV, a simple analytical approximation of the electrostatic force is described. PMID:19431803

  11. Electrostatic charge interactions in ordered powder mixes.

    PubMed

    Staniforth, J N; Rees, J E

    1982-02-01

    A method is described for measuring the electrostatic charge generated in powders following contact with a plane substrate. The method uses a Faraday well connected to an electrometer and allows the specific charge of powders to be determined. Of the various drugs and excipients studied, most charged electronegatively following contact with glass surfaces, but became electropositive after contact with polyethylene surfaces. The charge interactions of drug and excipient powders modified the behaviour of ordered mixes formed in similar conditions to those of charge measurement. Powders with like charges formed less stable ordered mixes than those in which drug and excipient particles carried opposite charges. Following triboelectrification in an air cyclone constructed of brass, powders had charges at least 100 times greater than those formed after contact with glass surfaces. Optimization of the triboelectric charging conditions allowed ordered mixes to be prepared in which a maximum electronegative charge was applied to the excipient whilst the drug was given a maximum electropositive charge. Studies of segregation/stability showed that ordered mixes subjected to triboelectrification were less prone to segregation than uncharged powders.

  12. Electrostatic Levitation for Studies of Additive Manufactured Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Tramel, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is a unique facility for investigators studying high temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified. Electrostatic levitation minimizes gravitational effects and allows materials to be studied without contact with a container or instrumentation. The lab also has a high temperature emissivity measurement system, which provides normal spectral and normal total emissivity measurements at use temperature. The ESL lab has been instrumental in many pioneering materials investigations of thermophysical properties, e.g., creep measurements, solidification, triggered nucleation, and emissivity at high temperatures. Research in the ESL lab has already led to the development of advanced high temperature materials for aerospace applications, coatings for rocket nozzles, improved medical and industrial optics, metallic glasses, ablatives for reentry vehicles, and materials with memory. Modeling of additive manufacturing materials processing is necessary for the study of their resulting materials properties. In addition, the modeling of the selective laser melting processes and its materials property predictions are also underway. Unfortunately, there is very little data for the properties of these materials, especially of the materials in the liquid state. Some method to measure thermophysical properties of additive manufacturing materials is necessary. The ESL lab is ideal for these studies. The lab can provide surface tension and viscosity of molten materials, density measurements, emissivity measurements, and even creep strength measurements. The ESL lab can also determine melting temperature, surface temperatures, and phase transition temperatures of additive manufactured materials. This presentation will provide background on the ESL lab and its capabilities, provide an approach to using the ESL

  13. Local and macroscopic electrostatic interactions in single α-helices

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emily G.; Bartlett, Gail J.; Crump, Matthew P.; Sessions, Richard B.; Linden, Noah; Faul, Charl F. J.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2015-01-01

    The non-covalent forces that stabilise protein structures are not fully understood. One way to address this is to study equilibria between unfolded states and α-helices in peptides. For these, electrostatic forces are believed to contribute, including interactions between: side chains; the backbone and side chains; and side chains and the helix macrodipole. Here we probe these experimentally using designed peptides. We find that both terminal backbone-side chain and certain side chain-side chain interactions (i.e., local effects between proximal charges, or interatomic contacts) contribute much more to helix stability than side chain-helix macrodipole electrostatics, which are believed to operate at larger distances. This has implications for current descriptions of helix stability, understanding protein folding, and the refinement of force fields for biomolecular modelling and simulations. In addition, it sheds light on the stability of rod-like structures formed by single α-helices that are common in natural proteins including non-muscle myosins. PMID:25664692

  14. Electrostatic interaction between colloidal particles trapped at an electrolyte interface.

    PubMed

    Majee, Arghya; Bier, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2014-04-28

    The electrostatic interaction between colloidal particles trapped at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions is studied in the limit of small inter-particle distances. Within an appropriate model analytic expressions for the electrostatic potential as well as for the surface and line interaction energies are obtained. They demonstrate that the widely used superposition approximation, which is commonly applied to large distances between the colloidal particles, fails qualitatively at small distances, and is quantitatively unreliable even at large distances. Our results contribute to an improved description of the interaction between colloidal particles trapped at fluid interfaces.

  15. Electrostatic interaction of two charged macroparticles in an equilibrium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Pal', A. F.; Starostin, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    This article is a critical review of publications devoted to studying the electrostatic interaction of two charged macroparticles in an equilibrium plasma. It is shown from an analysis of the force of interaction based on the Maxwell stress tensor that two macroparticles with identical charges in the Poisson-Boltzmann model always repel each other both in isothermal and nonisothermal plasmas. At distances between macroparticles for which the Boltzmann exponents can be linearized, the interaction between macroparticles is completely described by the Debye-Hückel model. The correction to free energy due to the electrostatic interaction in the system of two macroparticles is determined by integrating the correction to the internal energy and by direct calculation of the correction for entropy. It is shown that the free energy coincides with the Yukawa potential. The coincidence of the interaction energy obtained by integrating the force of interaction with the free energy leads to the conclusion about the potential nature of the force of interaction between two macroparticles in an equilibrium plasma. The effect of the outer boundary on the electrostatic interaction force is analyzed; it is shown that the type of interaction depends on the choice of the boundary conditions at the outer boundary. It is also shown that the accumulation of space charge near the outer boundary can lead to the attraction of similarly charged particles at distances comparable with the radius of the outer boundary.

  16. Electrostatic interaction of two charged macroparticles in an equilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.

    2015-11-15

    This article is a critical review of publications devoted to studying the electrostatic interaction of two charged macroparticles in an equilibrium plasma. It is shown from an analysis of the force of interaction based on the Maxwell stress tensor that two macroparticles with identical charges in the Poisson–Boltzmann model always repel each other both in isothermal and nonisothermal plasmas. At distances between macroparticles for which the Boltzmann exponents can be linearized, the interaction between macroparticles is completely described by the Debye–Hückel model. The correction to free energy due to the electrostatic interaction in the system of two macroparticles is determined by integrating the correction to the internal energy and by direct calculation of the correction for entropy. It is shown that the free energy coincides with the Yukawa potential. The coincidence of the interaction energy obtained by integrating the force of interaction with the free energy leads to the conclusion about the potential nature of the force of interaction between two macroparticles in an equilibrium plasma. The effect of the outer boundary on the electrostatic interaction force is analyzed; it is shown that the type of interaction depends on the choice of the boundary conditions at the outer boundary. It is also shown that the accumulation of space charge near the outer boundary can lead to the attraction of similarly charged particles at distances comparable with the radius of the outer boundary.

  17. Electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles in an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ivan N.; Filippov, Anatoly V.; Stace, Anthony J.; Besley, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Theory is developed to address a significant problem of how two charged dielectric particles interact in the presence of a polarizable medium that is a dilute solution of a strong electrolyte. The electrostatic force is defined by characteristic parameters for the interacting particles (charge, radius, and dielectric constant) and for the medium (permittivity and Debye length), and is expressed in the form of a converging infinite series. The limiting case of weak screening and large inter-particle separation is considered, which corresponds to small (macro)ions that carry constant charge. The theory yields a solution in the limit of monopole and dipole terms that agrees exactly with existing analytical expressions, which are generally used to describe ion-ion and ion-molecular interactions in a medium. Results from the theory are compared with DLVO theory and with experimental measurements for the electrostatic force between two PMMA particles contained in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane) with an added charge control agent.

  18. Electrostatic selectivity in protein-nanoparticle interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaimin; Xu, Yisheng; Rana, Subinoy; Miranda, Oscar R; Dubin, Paul L; Rotello, Vincent M; Sun, Lianhong; Guo, Xuhong

    2011-07-11

    The binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) to TTMA (a cationic gold nanoparticle coupled to 3,6,9,12-tetraoxatricosan-1-aminium, 23-mercapto-N,N,N-trimethyl) was studied by high-resolution turbidimetry (to observe a critical pH for binding), dynamic light scattering (to monitor particle growth), and isothermal titration calorimetry (to measure binding energetics), all as a function of pH and ionic strength. Distinctively higher affinities observed for BLG versus BSA, despite the lower pI of the latter, were explained in terms of their different charge anisotropies, namely, the negative charge patch of BLG. To confirm this effect, we studied two isoforms of BLG that differ in only two amino acids. Significantly stronger binding to BLGA could be attributed to the presence of the additional aspartates in the negative charge domain for the BLG dimer, best portrayed in DelPhi. This selectivity decreases at low ionic strength, at which both isoforms bind well below pI. Selectivity increases with ionic strength for BLG versus BSA, which binds above pI. This result points to the diminished role of long-range repulsions for binding above pI. Dynamic light scattering reveals a tendency for higher-order aggregation for TTMA-BSA at pH above the pI of BSA, due to its ability to bridge nanoparticles. In contrast, soluble BLG-TTMA complexes were stable over a range of pH because the charge anisotropy of this protein at makes it unable to bridge nanoparticles. Finally, isothermal titration calorimetry shows endoenthalpic binding for all proteins: the higher affinity of TTMA for BLGA versus BLGB comes from a difference in the dominant entropy term.

  19. Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.; Wallace, Michael J.

    2015-12-04

    Quantum mechanics should be able to generate the basic properties of a particle. One of the most basic properties are charge and the associated electrostatic electric field. Electrostatic force is a fundamental characteristics of a charged fermion and should have its nature described by the fermion’s structure. To produce the particle properties require two spaces that define both their dynamics and their base structure. Relativity and the conservation of energy dictate how these two separate spaces are connected and the differential equations that describe behavior within these two spaces. The main static characteristic of an elementary fermion are mass and charge. Mass represents a scale measure of the fermion and it appears that charge results from the detailed structure of the fermion, which must merge into the electric field description of Maxwell. Coulomb’s law is a good approximation for large distances, but it is a poor approximation at dimension on the order of a particle’s Compton wavelength. The relativistic description of the fermion in its own frame of reference contains the information required for producing the electrostatic field over all space without a singularity as a source. With this description it is possible to understand the first order correction to the ionization energy of hydrogen. The role of nuclear effects on ionization energies can now be better defined for nuclei heavier than hydrogen.

  20. Triclinic nematic colloidal crystals from competing elastic and electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Mundoor, Haridas; Senyuk, Bohdan; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2016-04-01

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles can enable the generation of composites with predesigned properties, but reproducing the structural diversity of atomic and molecular crystals remains a challenge. We combined anisotropic elastic and weakly screened electrostatic interactions to guide both orientational and triclinic positional self-ordering of inorganic nanocrystals in a nematic fluid host. The lattice periodicity of these low-symmetry colloidal crystals is more than an order of magnitude larger than the nanoparticle size. The orientations of the nanocrystals, as well as the crystallographic axes of the ensuing triclinic colloidal crystals, are coupled to the uniform alignment direction of the nematic host, which can be readily controlled on large scales. We examine colloidal pair and many-body interactions and show how triclinic crystals with orientational ordering of the semiconductor nanorods emerge from competing long-range elastic and electrostatic forces.

  1. Inductive and Electrostatic Acceleration in Relativistic Jet-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.; Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

    2005-07-13

    We report on the observation of rapid particle acceleration in numerical simulations of relativistic jet-plasma interactions and discuss the underlying mechanisms. The dynamics of a charge-neutral, narrow, electron-positron jet propagating through an unmagnetized electron-ion plasma was investigated using a three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell computer code. The interaction excited magnetic filamentation as well as electrostatic (longitudinal) plasma instabilities. In some cases, the longitudinal electric fields generated inductively and electrostatically reached the cold plasma wave-breaking limit, and the longitudinal momentum of about half the positrons increased by 50% with a maximum gain exceeding a factor of two. The results are relevant to understanding the micro-physics at the interface region of an astrophysical jet with the interstellar plasma, for example, the edge of a wide jet or the jet-termination point.

  2. Electrostatic Interaction of Long DNA Molecules with Solid State Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingquan; Samuilov, Vladimir; Sokolov, Jonathan; Rafailovich, Miriam; Chu, Ben

    2004-03-01

    At low buffer concentration the electric charge of DNA molecules creates a strong electrostatic interaction and, as a result, a number of phenomena, such as the electro-hydrodynamic instability, partial adsorption at the buffer-semiconductor interface and stretching of DNA with the electric field. Long DNA molecules at the silicon substrate?buffer solution interface are very interesting objects for the electrical transport [1,2] and the mechanical properties, like entropic elasticity, studies. The system (DNA-substrate-electric field in the buffer solution) is very complicated. Due to the strong electrostatic interaction of DNA with the substrate, the image charge is generated, and the physical adsorption takes place. We have studied the S. Pombe genomic DNA of the order of 5 Mbp. Within a surface DNA is entropically partially recoiled due to electrostatic adsorption at a few points. While varying the direction of the low electric field the direction of the electroosmotic flow is changing and stretching the parts of DNA between the adsorption points. If the electric field is high enough, DNA is de-trapped and forms a compact coil. This behavior could be considered as an inverse mechanism of entropy trapping due to confined constrictions. In the case of the surface, DNA is recoiled and trapped in the stretched configuration in the deep energetic barrier by Si surface due to the strong electrostatic interaction. If the energy of the field is enough to overcome the barrier, DNA is detached. The Si surface could be considered as an analog of the entropic recoiling nanostructure. [1]. N. Pernodet, V. Samuilov, K. Shin, J. Sokolov, M.H. Rafailovich, D. Gersappe, B. Chu. DNA Electrophoresis on a Flat Surface, Physical Review Letters, 85 (2000) 5651-5654. [2] Y.-S. Seo, V.A. Samuilov, J. Sokolov, M. Rafailovich, B. Tinland, J. Kim, B. Chu. DNA separation at a liquid-solid interface, Electrophoresis, 23 (2002) 2618-2625.

  3. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  4. Stacking and Electrostatic Interactions Drive the Stereoselectivity of Silylium-Ion Asymmetric Counteranion-Directed Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Trevor J; Wheeler, Steven E

    2016-12-19

    Computational analysis shows that the enantioselectivity of asymmetric Lewis-acid organocatalysis of the Diels-Alder cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene to cinnamates arises from stacking interactions that favor the addition of the diene to the more hindered face of the dienophile, while electrostatic interactions control the diastereoselectivity by selectively stabilizing the endo transition state. These results not only explain the stereoselectivity of these silylium-ion-ACDC reactions but should also guide the development of more effective ion-pairing asymmetric organocatalysts.

  5. Optimizing molecular electrostatic interactions: Binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik

    The design of molecules that bind tightly and specifically to designated target molecules is an important goal in many fields of molecular science. While the shape of the molecule to be designed is a relatively well defined problem with an intuitive answer, determination of the distribution of electrostatic charge that it should have in order to possess high affinity and/or specificity for a target is a subtle problem involving a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred due to the removal of solvent from the interacting surfaces of the reactants, and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. In this thesis, a theoretical formalism based on a continuum electrostatic approximation is developed in which charge distributions leading to optimal affinity and/or high specificity may be obtained. Methods for obtaining these charge distributions are developed in detail and analytical solutions are obtained in several special cases (where the molecules are shaped as infinite membranes, spheres, and spheroids). Their existence and non-uniqueness are also shown, and it is proven that the resulting optimized electrostatic binding free energies are favorable (negative) in many cases of physical interest. Affinity and specificity optimization is then applied to the chorismate mutase family of enzymes, including the catalytic antibody 1F7. It is shown that affinity optimization can be used to suggest better molecular inhibitors and that specificity optimization can be used to help elucidate molecular function and possibly aid in the creation of improved haptens. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  6. Electrostatic interactions in charged nanoslits within an explicit solvent theory.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2015-11-18

    Within a dipolar Poisson-Boltzmann theory including electrostatic correlations, we consider the effect of explicit solvent structure on solvent and ion partition confined to charged nanopores. We develop a relaxation scheme for the solution of this highly non-linear integro-differential equation for the electrostatic potential. The scheme is an extension of the approach previously introduced for simple planes (Buyukdagli and Blossey 2014 J. Chem. Phys. 140 234903) to nanoslit geometry. We show that the reduced dielectric response of solvent molecules at the membrane walls gives rise to an electric field significantly stronger than the field of the classical Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This peculiarity associated with non-local electrostatic interactions results in turn in an interfacial counterion adsorption layer absent in continuum theories. The observation of this enhanced counterion affinity in the very close vicinity of the interface may have important impacts on nanofluidic transport through charged nanopores. Our results indicate the quantitative inaccuracy of solvent implicit nanofiltration theories in predicting the ionic selectivity of membrane nanopores.

  7. Electrostatic interactions in charged nanoslits within an explicit solvent theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2015-11-01

    Within a dipolar Poisson-Boltzmann theory including electrostatic correlations, we consider the effect of explicit solvent structure on solvent and ion partition confined to charged nanopores. We develop a relaxation scheme for the solution of this highly non-linear integro-differential equation for the electrostatic potential. The scheme is an extension of the approach previously introduced for simple planes (Buyukdagli and Blossey 2014 J. Chem. Phys. 140 234903) to nanoslit geometry. We show that the reduced dielectric response of solvent molecules at the membrane walls gives rise to an electric field significantly stronger than the field of the classical Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This peculiarity associated with non-local electrostatic interactions results in turn in an interfacial counterion adsorption layer absent in continuum theories. The observation of this enhanced counterion affinity in the very close vicinity of the interface may have important impacts on nanofluidic transport through charged nanopores. Our results indicate the quantitative inaccuracy of solvent implicit nanofiltration theories in predicting the ionic selectivity of membrane nanopores.

  8. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this gap by conducting a county-level cross-sectional analysis of interactions between Environmental Quality Index (EQI) domain indices on preterm birth in the Unites States from 2000-2005.METHODS: The EQI, a county-level index constructed for the 2000-2005 time period, was constructed from five domain-specific indices (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic) using principal component analyses. County-level preterm birth rates (n=3141) were estimated using live births from the National Center for Health Statistics. Linear regression was used to estimate prevalence differences (PD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing worse environmental quality to the better quality for each model for a) each individual domain main effect b) the interaction contrast and c) the two main effects plus interaction effect (i.e. the “net effect”) to show departure from additive interaction for the all U.S counties. Analyses were also performed for subgroupings by four urban/rural strata. RESULTS: We found the suggestion of antagonistic interactions but no synergism, along with several purely additive (i.e., no interaction) associations. In the non-stratified model, we observed antagonistic interac

  9. Role of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions in gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Stewart, Katherine M E; Penlidis, Alexander

    2014-09-06

    Geckos, which are capable of walking on walls and hanging from ceilings with the help of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical fibrils (setae) on their toe pads, have become the main prototype in the design and fabrication of fibrillar dry adhesives. As the unique fibrillar feature of the toe pads of geckos allows them to develop an intimate contact with the substrate the animal is walking on or clinging to, it is expected that the toe setae exchange significant numbers of electric charges with the contacted substrate via the contact electrification (CE) phenomenon. Even so, the possibility of the occurrence of CE and the contribution of the resulting electrostatic interactions to the dry adhesion of geckos have been overlooked for several decades. In this study, by measuring the magnitude of the electric charges, together with the adhesion forces, that gecko foot pads develop in contact with different materials, we have clarified for the first time that CE does contribute effectively to gecko adhesion. More importantly, we have demonstrated that it is the CE-driven electrostatic interactions which dictate the strength of gecko adhesion, and not the van der Waals or capillary forces which are conventionally considered as the main source of gecko adhesion.

  10. Electrostatic interactions as governing the fouling in protein microfiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouammou, M.; Tijani, N.; Calvo, J. I.; Palacio, L.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2005-03-01

    The influence of pH and electrostatic interactions on the fouling mechanism during protein dead-end microfiltration (MF) has been investigated for two charged membranes. Polyethersulfone acidic membranes (ICE-450), being negatively charged, and basic ones (SB-6407), these positively charged, both from Pall Co., have been used in the investigations. BSA and Lysozyme solutions at different pH values (3.0, 5.0, 7.0, 8.5 and 10.0) were microfiltered through the membranes at a constant applied transmembrane pressure. Results have been analysed in terms of usual blocking filtration laws and a substantial change in the fouling behaviour has been observed when solution pH and/or membrane charge as the pressure was changed, this change being clearly related with the specific membrane-protein and protein-protein interactions.

  11. Linear and nonlinear interactions of an electron beam with oblique whistler and electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Matsumoto, H.; Omura, Y.

    1993-12-01

    Both linear and nonlinear interactions between oblique whistler, electrostatic, quasi-upper hybrid mode waves and an electron beam are studied by linear analyses and electromagnetic particle simulations. In addition to a background cold plasma, we assumed a hot electron beam drifting along a static magnetic field. Growth rates of the oblique whistler, oblique electrostatic, and quasi-upper hybrid instabilities were first calculated. We found that there are four kinds of unstable mode waves for parallel and oblique propagations. They are the electromagnetic whistler mode wave (WW1), the electrostatic whistler mode wave (WW2), the electrostatic mode wave (ESW), and the quasi-upper hybrid mode wave (UHW). A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the satellite observations of whistler mode chorus and accompanied electrostatic waves, whose amplitudes are sometimes modulated at the chorus frequency.

  12. Role of the multipolar electrostatic interaction energy components in strong and weak cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Kadlubanski, Pawel; Calderón-Mojica, Katherine; Rodriguez, Weyshla A; Majumdar, D; Roszak, Szczepan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-08-22

    Density functional and Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) calculations have been carried out on various model cation-π complexes formed through the interactions of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and NH4(+) cations with benzene, p-methylphenol, and 3-methylindole. Partial hydration of the metal cations was also considered in these model studies to monitor the effect of hydration of cations in cation-π interactions. The binding energies of these complexes were computed from the fully optimized structures using coupled cluster calculations including triple excitations (CCSD(T)) and Gaussian-G4-MP2 (G4MP2) techniques. An analysis of the charge sharing between the donor (the π-systems) and the acceptors (the cations) together with the partitioning of total interaction energies revealed that the strong and weak cation-π interactions have similar electrostatic interaction properties. Further decomposition of such electrostatic terms into their multipolar components showed the importance of the charge-dipole, charge-quadrupole, and charge-octopole terms in shaping the electrostatic forces in such interactions. The computed vibrational spectra of the complexes were analyzed for the specific cation-π interaction modes and have been shown to contain the signature of higher order electrostatic interaction energy components (quadrupole and octopole) in such interactions.

  13. Role of intermolecular interaction in crystal packing: A competition between halogen bond and electrostatic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng-Yuan; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Shun-Guan; Cheng, Guang-Bin

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the competition between halogen bond and electrostatic interaction and their influence on the crystal packing, four novel solvates of 1,3,5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TCTNB) and 1,3,5-tribromo-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TBTNB) were synthesized while the intermolecular forces and the contribution of each interaction were analyzed quantitatively. The electrostatic interaction is the main link between TCTNB, TBTNB and 1,4-dioxane respectively, while π-π interaction dominates in these two solvates of TCTNB/1,4-dimethylbenzene (PX) and TCTNB/mesitylene. The solvate interaction changes and varieties were illuminated by Hirshfeld surface analysis, and the group contributions were illustrated respectively. Molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPs) with density functional theory (DFT) calculation was performed to compare the relative strength of electrostatic interaction and halogen bond. The result shows that MEPs can be used as a descriptor for determining the most possible intermolecular interaction under certain circumstances. The study presented here may provide the guidance for the design and synthesis of the complex with desired properties.

  14. Cartilage-targeting drug delivery: can electrostatic interactions help?

    PubMed

    Bajpayee, Ambika G; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2017-03-01

    Current intra-articular drug delivery methods do not guarantee sufficient drug penetration into cartilage tissue to reach cell and matrix targets at the concentrations necessary to elicit the desired biological response. Here, we provide our perspective on the utilization of charge-charge (electrostatic) interactions to enhance drug penetration and transport into cartilage, and to enable sustained binding of drugs within the tissue's highly negatively charged extracellular matrix. By coupling drugs to positively charged nanocarriers that have optimal size and charge, cartilage can be converted from a drug barrier into a drug reservoir for sustained intra-tissue delivery. Alternatively, a wide variety of drugs themselves can be made cartilage-penetrating by functionalizing them with specialized positively charged protein domains. Finally, we emphasize that appropriate animal models, with cartilage thickness similar to that of humans, must be used for the study of drug transport and retention in cartilage.

  15. The role of electrostatic interactions in protease surface diffusion and the consequence for interfacial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2010-12-21

    This study examines the influence of electrostatic interactions on enzyme surface diffusion and the contribution of diffusion to interfacial biocatalysis. Surface diffusion, adsorption, and reaction were investigated on an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer substrate over a range of solution ionic strength values. Interfacial charge of the enzyme and substrate surface was maintained by performing the measurements at a fixed pH; therefore, electrostatic interactions were manipulated by changing the ionic strength. The interfacial processes were investigated using a combination of techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy. We used an enzyme charge ladder with a net charge ranging from -2 to +4 with respect to the parent to systematically probe the contribution of electrostatics in interfacial enzyme biocatalysis on a charged substrate. The correlation between reaction rate and adsorption was determined for each charge variant within the ladder, each of which displayed a maximum rate at an intermediate surface concentration. Both the maximum reaction rate and adsorption value at which this maximum rate occurs increased in magnitude for the more positive variants. In addition, the specific enzyme activity increased as the level of adsorption decreased, and for the lowest adsorption values, the specific enzyme activity was enhanced compared to the trend at higher surface concentrations. At a fixed level of adsorption, the specific enzyme activity increased with positive enzyme charge; however, this effect offers diminishing returns as the enzyme becomes more highly charged. We examined the effect of electrostatic interactions on surface diffusion. As the binding affinity was reduced by increasing the solution ionic strength, thus weakening electrostatic interaction, the rate of surface diffusion increased considerably. The enhancement in specific activity achieved at

  16. Electrostatic sensor for identifying interactions between peptides and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Fitchen, Nicola; O'Shea, Paul; Williams, Paul; Hardie, Kim R

    2003-11-01

    The use of the membrane probe fluorescein phosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) to investigate membrane binding is well established. However, until now, its use has been restricted to studies involving peptides and eukaryotic membranes. This useful tool has been developed to interrogate peptide:prokaryotic membrane interactions by introducing novel methodology to incorporate FPE into the membranes of UV killed, whole bacterial cells. The electrostatic potential of the membrane in the immediate vicinity of the probe affects the protonation state of the xanthene ring system in the fluorescein head group, which is held close to the membrane surface. When altered, e.g. by peptide binding and insertion, a change in fluorescence results, which can be measured spectrophotometrically. Applicability of this technique to bacterial surface interactions was confirmed by production of a binding curve for both a synthetic peptide and a 37kDa protein. Future investigations are anticipated to utilize this technology to characterize interactions of other toxins plus antimicrobial peptides such as lactoferricin and defensins with their target membranes.

  17. Generation of electrostatic shocks and turbulence through the interaction of conics with the background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottelette, R.; Treumann, R.; Bauer, O. H.; Lebreton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results, obtained during the PORCUPINE experiment and dealing with the interaction of an artificial ion conic with the background auroral plasma, are presented. In addition, these results are compared to the measurements performed by the S3-3 satellite when natural ion conics are present. This comparison shows that the physical processes associated with the neutralization of conical ion distributions and with their interaction with the background plasma induce the same kind of electrostatic shocks and turbulence as those recorded by S3-3.

  18. Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-10

    Michelle L. Pantoya, Michael A. Daniels Se. TASK NUMBER Sf. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...of composite energetic materials using carbon nanotube additives Kade H. Poper a, Eric S. Collins a, Michelle L. Pantoya a, *, Michael A. Daniels b a...Thermochim. Acta 451 (1 2) (2006). [2] Chelsea Weir, Michelle L. Pantoya, Michael Daniels , Electrostatic discharge sensitivity and electrical conductivity

  19. Nonlinear interaction between two electrostatic harmonics in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verheest, F.; Lewak, G. J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of harmonic and subharmonic generation of electrostatic waves in a general collisionless plasma is treated using coupled-mode theory based on two time scales. A novel feature is that one of the two interacting waves may be a negative-energy wave. Since the model describing the medium need not be specified, only a general linear and nonlinear conductivity or an equivalent description is required. Just by invoking wave-energy conservation, the coupled-mode equations are obtained in such a way that unequivocal conclusions can be drawn. When both waves have positive energy, they exchange part of it in a periodic fashion, provided that both have some energy initially. If initially all the energy is in the fundamental, all of it will eventually end up (irreversibly) in the second harmonic. If all the energy is in the harmonic initially, no generation of the fundamental (or subharmonic) will take place. If one of the two waves is a negative-energy wave, an explosive instability develops, regardless of initial values. For comparable conditions, the instability time depends on whether the negative-energy wave is in the fundamental or in the upper harmonic.

  20. Changing shape of elastic shells via electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Thomas, Creighton; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2014-03-01

    Shape plays a key role in the design of synthetic structures such as biomimetic red blood cells, metallic nanocontainers and colloidal building blocks for self-assembly. It is therefore crucial to enhance our current capabilities to synthesize membranes of desired shapes with precision and provide a simple procedure to induce shape modifications. We show that Coulomb interactions can be used as a tool for designing and manipulating shapes of soft elastic shells at the nanoscale. We investigate the minimal-energy conformations of charged, elastic nanoshells subject to the constraint of fixed total volume for a wide range of electrostatic and elastic parameters. We find that the shape of the shell changes when we decrease the electrolyte concentration in the surrounding environment or increase the total charge on the shell surface. We obtain a variety of smooth shapes that include ellipsoids, discs, and bowls. A discussion on the possible origins of these shapes and related procedures to induce shape deformations is also provided. We thank U.S. Department of Energy Award DEFG02-08ER46539 and the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Award No. FA9550-10-1-0167 for financial support.

  1. Asymmetric electrostatic and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interaction forces between mica surfaces and silicone polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Rapp, Michael; Jones, Louis C; Roiter, Yuri; Koenig, Peter H; Gizaw, Yonas; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-11-26

    We have synthesized model hydrophobic silicone thin films on gold surfaces by a two-step covalent grafting procedure. An amino-functionalized gold surface reacts with monoepoxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via a click reaction, resulting in a covalently attached nanoscale thin film of PDMS, and the click chemistry synthesis route provides great selectivity, reproducibility, and stability in the resulting model hydrophobic silicone thin films. The asymmetric interaction forces between the PDMS thin films and mica surfaces were measured with the surface forces apparatus in aqueous sodium chloride solutions. At an acidic pH of 3, attractive interactions are measured, resulting in instabilities during both approach (jump-in) and separation (jump-out from adhesive contact). Quantitative analysis of the results indicates that the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory alone, i.e., the combination of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attraction, cannot fully describe the measured forces and that the additional measured adhesion is likely due to hydrophobic interactions. The surface interactions are highly pH-dependent, and a basic pH of 10 results in fully repulsive interactions at all distances, due to repulsive electrostatic and steric-hydration interactions, indicating that the PDMS is negatively charged at high pH. We describe an interaction potential with a parameter, known as the Hydra parameter, that can account for the extra attraction (low pH) due to hydrophobicity as well as the extra repulsion (high pH) due to hydrophilic (steric-hydration) interactions. The interaction potential is general and provides a quantitative measure of interfacial hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity for any set of interacting surfaces in aqueous solution.

  2. Additional application of the NASCAP code. Volume 2: SEPS, ion thruster neutralization and electrostatic antenna model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Cassidy, J. J.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.; Schnuelle, G. W.; Stannard, P. R.; Steen, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    The interactions of spacecraft systems with the surrounding plasma environment were studied analytically for three cases of current interest: calculating the impact of spacecraft generated plasmas on the main power system of a baseline solar electric propulsion stage (SEPS), modeling the physics of the neutralization of an ion thruster beam by a plasma bridge, and examining the physical and electrical effects of orbital ambient plasmas on the operation of an electrostatically controlled membrane mirror. In order to perform these studies, the NASA charging analyzer program (NASCAP) was used as well as several other computer models and analytical estimates. The main result of the SEPS study was to show how charge exchange ion expansion can create a conducting channel between the thrusters and the solar arrays. A fluid-like model was able to predict plasma potentials and temperatures measured near the main beam of an ion thruster and in the vicinity of a hollow cathode neutralizer. Power losses due to plasma currents were shown to be substantial for several proposed electrostatic antenna designs.

  3. Addition of Electrostatic Forces to EDEM with Applications to Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos; Curry, David

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carryout experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM Tm, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. In this paper we will present overview of the theoretical calculations and experimental data and their comparison to the results of the DEM simulations. We will also discuss current plans to revise the DEM software with advanced electrodynamic and mechanical algorithms.

  4. Electrostatic interaction between nonuniformly charged colloids: experimental and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Derot, Claire; Porcar, Lionel; Lee, YongJin; Pincus, Phillip A; Jho, YongSeok; In, Martin

    2015-02-10

    The influence of the surface charge distribution on the interaction between nanosized particles in water is reported. The distribution of charges at the surface of initially neutral microemulsion droplets has been modulated by additions of various oligomeric cationic surfactants. The osmotic compressibility of the doped microemulsions was measured by light and small-angle neutrons scattering and reveals that the overall effective interaction induced by the ionic groups is repulsive. However, particular charge distributions decrease the osmotic compressibility much less than others. Independent measurements of the activity of the bromide counterions with specific electrodes evidence a significant decrease in the effective charge, which, however, cannot account for the osmotic compressibility in the framework of the primitive model. The q dependence of the structure factor reveals an attractive contribution over a short distance. Numerical studies assign this attractive contribution to the overlap of hydration shells that are extended as a result of the charge localization.

  5. Generalized image charge solvation model for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shaozhong; Xue, Changfeng; Baumketner, Andriy; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2013-07-01

    This paper extends the image charge solvation model (ICSM) [Y. Lin, A. Baumketner, S. Deng, Z. Xu, D. Jacobs, W. Cai, An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 154103], a hybrid explicit/implicit method to treat electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of biomolecules formulated for spherical cavities, to prolate spheroidal and triaxial ellipsoidal cavities, designed to better accommodate non-spherical solutes in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to the utilization of a general truncated octahedron as the MD simulation box, central to the proposed extension is an image approximation method to compute the reaction field for a point charge placed inside such a non-spherical cavity by using a single image charge located outside the cavity. The resulting generalized image charge solvation model (GICSM) is tested in simulations of liquid water, and the results are analyzed in comparison with those obtained from the ICSM simulations as a reference. We find that, for improved computational efficiency due to smaller simulation cells and consequently a less number of explicit solvent molecules, the generalized model can still faithfully reproduce known static and dynamic properties of liquid water at least for systems considered in the present paper, indicating its great potential to become an accurate but more efficient alternative to the ICSM when bio-macromolecules of irregular shapes are to be simulated.

  6. A highly accurate and efficient algorithm for electrostatic interactions of charged particles confined by parallel metallic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Samare; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Nedaaee Oskoee, Ehsan

    2016-09-01

    We present an accurate and efficient algorithm to calculate the electrostatic interaction of charged point particles with partially periodic boundary conditions that are confined along the non-periodic direction by two parallel metallic plates. The method preserves the original boundary conditions, leading to an exact solution of the problem. In addition, the scaling complexity is quasilinear O ( N ln ( N ) ) , where N is the number of particles in the simulation box. Based on the superposition principle in electrostatics, the problem is split into two electrostatic problems where each can be calculated by the appropriate Poisson solver. The method is applied to NaCl ultra-thin films where its dielectric response with respect to an external bias voltage is investigated. Furthermore, the total charge induced on the metallic boundaries can be calculated to an arbitrary precision.

  7. Microstructure of sheared monosized colloidal suspensions resulting from hydrodynamic and electrostatic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Bu; Gilchrist, James F.

    2014-05-28

    Hydrodynamic and near-particle interactions in sheared suspensions are communicated through suspension microstructure to produce a wide variety of rheological behaviors. To characterize this microstructure, the individual positions of monosized silica particles flowing through a microchannel are obtained with near simulation-level detail. The pair distribution functions of the microstructure at moderate to high Péclet number shear rates are very similar to previous numerical studies. Viscometric functions calculated based on the detailed microstructure obtained through this technique show qualitative agreement with computational results. These results elucidate the origins of shear-thickening of suspensions at high shear rates. While efforts are taken to screen electrostatic interactions to study hydrodynamic and Brownian interactions, the role of electrostatic interaction between particles is also investigated by reducing suspension ionic strength. These non-hydrodynamic electrostatic interactions result in a loss of anisotropy that generally agrees with previous findings of “soft” particle systems.

  8. Microstructure of sheared monosized colloidal suspensions resulting from hydrodynamic and electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bu; Gilchrist, James F

    2014-05-28

    Hydrodynamic and near-particle interactions in sheared suspensions are communicated through suspension microstructure to produce a wide variety of rheological behaviors. To characterize this microstructure, the individual positions of monosized silica particles flowing through a microchannel are obtained with near simulation-level detail. The pair distribution functions of the microstructure at moderate to high Péclet number shear rates are very similar to previous numerical studies. Viscometric functions calculated based on the detailed microstructure obtained through this technique show qualitative agreement with computational results. These results elucidate the origins of shear-thickening of suspensions at high shear rates. While efforts are taken to screen electrostatic interactions to study hydrodynamic and Brownian interactions, the role of electrostatic interaction between particles is also investigated by reducing suspension ionic strength. These non-hydrodynamic electrostatic interactions result in a loss of anisotropy that generally agrees with previous findings of "soft" particle systems.

  9. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Samuel D.; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-01

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry.

  10. Carbon Nanotube/Conductive Additive/Space Durable Polymer Nanocomposite Films for Electrostatic Charge Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Connell, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Thin film membranes of space environmentally stable polymeric materials possessing low color/solar absorptivity (alpha) are of interest for potential applications on Gossamer spacecraft. In addition to these properties, sufficient electrical conductivity is required in order to dissipate electrostatic charge (ESC) build-up brought about by the charged orbital environment. One approach to achieve sufficient electrical conductivity for ESC mitigation is the incorporation of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). However, when the SWNTs are dispersed throughout the polymer matrix, the nanocomposite films tend to be significantly darker than the pristine material resulting in a higher alpha. The incorporation of conductive additives in combination with a decreased loading level of SWNTs is one approach for improving alpha while retaining conductivity. Taken individually, the low loading level of conductive additives and SWNTs is insufficient in achieving the percolation level necessary for electrical conductivity. When added simultaneously to the film, conductivity is achieved through a synergistic effect. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films will be presented.

  11. On the proper calculation of electrostatic interactions in solid-supported bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, In-Chul; Wallqvist, Anders

    2011-02-01

    Modeling systems that are not inherently isotropic, e.g., extended bilayers, using molecular simulation techniques poses a potential problem. Since these methods rely on a finite number of atoms and molecules to describe the system, periodic boundary conditions are implemented to avoid edge effects and capture long-range electrostatic interactions. Systems consisting of a solvated bilayer adsorbed on a solid surface and exposed to an air/vacuum interface occur in many experimental settings and present some unique challenges in this respect. Here, we investigated the effects of implementing different electrostatic boundary conditions on the structural and electrostatic properties of a quartz/water/vacuum interface and a similar quartz-supported hydrated lipid bilayer exposed to vacuum. Since these interfacial systems have a net polarization, implementing the standard Ewald summation with the conducting boundary condition for the electrostatic long-range interactions introduced an artificial periodicity in the out-of-plane dimension. In particular, abnormal orientational polarizations of water were observed with the conducting boundary condition. Implementing the Ewald summation technique with the planar vacuum boundary condition and calculating electrostatic properties compatible with the implemented electrostatic boundary condition removed these inconsistencies. This formulation is generally applicable to similar interfacial systems in bulk solution.

  12. Simulation of the electrostatic charging of Philae on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and of its interaction with the dusts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S. L. G.; Sarrailh, P.; Matéo-Vélez, J.-C.; Forest, J.; Jeanty-Ruard, B.; Cipriani, F.

    2015-12-01

    ROSETTA's probe Philae landed on a dust covered soil. This dust may be ejected from the ground through many mechanisms (other than spacecraft landing) : micro-meteorite impacts, electrostatic charging and soil outgassing. In any cases, the dust grains charge electrostatically in the ambient plasma and this charge impacts the dust interaction with the spacecraft, which is itself differentially charged due to its partial exposure to the solar UV light. Using the DUST addition to the Spacecraft-Plasma Interaction Software (SPIS) routinely used to compute the charge state of the spacecraft surfaces, we simulate the electrostatic charging of Philae as well as its dust environment. SPIS-DUST allows one to compute the electrostatic charging of the dust grains on the ground and in the plasma, and to model their ejection and their recollection by the probe. We simulated one cometary day of the Philae environment at different distances from the sun to observe the variation of the dust collection with Philae's local time.

  13. The electrostatic interaction of an external charged system with a metal surface: a simplified density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scivetti, Iván; Persson, Mats

    2013-09-01

    As a first step to meet the challenge to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of charged states of atoms and molecules adsorbed on ultrathin insulating films supported by a metallic substrate using density functional theory (DFT), we have developed a simplified new DFT scheme that only describes the electrostatic interaction of an external charged system with a metal surface. This purely electrostatic interaction is obtained from the assumption that the electron densities of the two fragments (charged system and metal surface) are non-overlapping and by neglecting non-local exchange-correlation effects such as the van der Waals interactions between the two fragments. In addition, the response of the metal surface to the electrostatic potential from the charged system is treated to linear order, whereas the charged system is treated fully within DFT. In particular, we consider the classical perfect conductor model for the metal response, although our formalism is not limited to this approximation. To test the computational implementation of this new scheme, we have considered the case of a Na+ cation interacting with a perfect conductor. The application of this new methodology to realistic problems involving charged systems adsorbed on insulating films supported by a metal surface are deferred to a separate following publication.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopic determination of local solvent electric field, solute-solvent electrostatic interaction energy, and their fluctuation amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hochan; Lee, Gayeon; Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2012-01-12

    IR probes have been extensively used to monitor local electrostatic and solvation dynamics. Particularly, their vibrational frequencies are highly sensitive to local solvent electric field around an IR probe. Here, we show that the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts can be inversely used to determine local electric potential distribution and solute-solvent electrostatic interaction energy. In addition, the upper limits of their fluctuation amplitudes are estimated by using the vibrational bandwidths. Applying this method to fully deuterated N-methylacetamide (NMA) in D(2)O and examining the solvatochromic effects on the amide I' and II' mode frequencies, we found that the solvent electric potential difference between O(═C) and D(-N) atoms of the peptide bond is about 5.4 V, and thus, the approximate solvent electric field produced by surrounding water molecules on the NMA is 172 MV/cm on average if the molecular geometry is taken into account. The solute-solvent electrostatic interaction energy is estimated to be -137 kJ/mol, by considering electric dipole-electric field interaction. Furthermore, their root-mean-square fluctuation amplitudes are as large as 1.6 V, 52 MV/cm, and 41 kJ/mol, respectively. We found that the water electric potential on a peptide bond is spatially nonhomogeneous and that the fluctuation in the electrostatic peptide-water interaction energy is about 10 times larger than the thermal energy at room temperature. This indicates that the peptide-solvent interactions are indeed important for the activation of chemical reactions in aqueous solution.

  15. Role of electrostatic interactions in the assembly of empty spherical viral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiber, Antonio; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2007-12-01

    We examine the role of electrostatic interactions in the assembly of empty spherical viral capsids. The charges on the protein subunits that make the viral capsid mutually interact and are expected to yield electrostatic repulsion acting against the assembly of capsids. Thus, attractive protein-protein interactions of nonelectrostatic origin must act to enable the capsid formation. We investigate whether the interplay of repulsive electrostatic and attractive interactions between the protein subunits can result in the formation of spherical viral capsids of a preferred radius. For this to be the case, we find that the attractive interactions must depend on the angle between the neighboring protein subunits (i.e., on the mean curvature of the viral capsid) so that a particular angle(s) is (are) preferred energywise. Our results for the electrostatic contributions to energetics of viral capsids nicely correlate with recent experimental determinations of the energetics of protein-protein contacts in the hepatitis B virus [P. Ceres A. Zlotnick, Biochemistry 41, 11525 (2002)].

  16. Effect of nanostructures and electrostatic interactions on disjoining pressure of ultra-thin liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Han; Weinberger, Christopher; Sun, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Disjoining pressure, the excess pressure that stems from the long-range intermolecular interactions, plays a key role in the stability of thin films in applications such as lubrication, wetting, boiling, condensation and evaporation. In recent years, nanostructures have been introduced as a means to control the stability of thin films. However, the classic theory of disjoining pressure assumes atomically smooth surface and neglects the electrostatic interactions. In the present study, the effect of nanostructures and electrostatic interactions on disjoining pressure is examined with combined modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. A model of meniscus shape and disjoining pressure for a thin liquid film on a nanostructured surface is derived based on minimization of system free energy and Derjaguin approximation. The scaled healing length ξ / D (D the nanostructure depth) is used to characterize the competition between the liquid surface tension and solid-liquid intermolecular forces. The result shows disjoining pressure increases with D. The model prediction agrees well with molecular dynamics simulations for a water-gold system. The electrostatic interactions enhance the disjoining pressure effect but the strength of the electrostatic interactions becomes weaker as the aspect ratio of the nanostructures increases.

  17. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. First topical report, Results of laboratory screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of {le} 10 {mu}m dia.

  18. Primary explosives: electrostatic discharge initiation, additive effect and its relation to thermal and explosive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Agrawal, A P; Anniyappan, M; Wani, D S; Bansode, M K; Gore, G M

    2006-09-21

    All explosives, under all conditions must be considered vulnerable to generation, accumulation and discharge of static charge. The low energy static hazards of the order as low as 2-3 mJ need to be guarded against in case of highly sensitive compounds namely primary explosives. The hazard is normally associated with manufacturing and filling operations due to discharge of static charge accumulated on a person supplying energy up to 20 mJ. To reduce the risk associated with static initiation hazard in the processing and handling of the explosives, the electrostatic sensitivity tests can provide an important input regarding electrostatic hazards. This paper presents electrostatic sensitivity data in terms of zero ignition probability data (E(SE0)) of some of the initiatory explosives such as nickel/cobalt hydrazinium nitrate, silver azide, lead azide and mercury salt of 5-nitro tetrazole. Similar data has also been presented for samples coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone to study its effect on electrostatic sensitivity. The electrostatic spark sensitivity of some conventional and novel made to explain the increased spark sensitivity behavior on the basis of the possible primary explosives has been studied. The electrostatic spark sensitivity of primary explosives decreased in the order of AgN3 = NHN > PbN6 > MNT > CoHN > BNCP. A possible correlation of spark energy with approximation and assumption has been drawn with thermal, detonation and mechanical properties. The polyvinyl pyrrolidone coated samples followed the same order but interestingly with increased spark sensitivity. An attempt has been reasoning of dielectric nature of the materials or exothermic effects of decomposition products of PVP. The present work also reports the electrostatic spark sensitivity of cap compositions.

  19. A refined polarizable water model for the coarse-grained MARTINI force field with long-range electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalowsky, Julian; Schäfer, Lars V.; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2017-02-01

    We present a refined version of the polarizable Martini water model - coined refPOL - designed specifically for the use with long-range electrostatics. The refPOL model improves the agreement with the experimentally measured dielectric constant and the mass density of water at room temperature compared to the original polarizable Martini water force field when particle mesh Ewald electrostatics are employed. Our study reveals that the model remains applicable with various commonly used settings for the non-bonded interactions, including reaction field electrostatics. The oil/water partitioning behavior of uncharged Martini bead types is thoroughly investigated: Lennard-Jones interactions between the refPOL model and the remaining Martini beads are adjusted to reproduce the hydration free energies obtained with the original polarizable water model, while free energies of solvation in apolar media remain unchanged. The cross-interactions with charged bead types are parameterized to agree with the experimentally observed area per lipid of a fully solvated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. We additionally verify the model by analyzing the potentials of mean force between different sample pairs in refPOL water and comparing the results to reference data obtained using the original polarizable Martini water model as well as fully atomistic simulations. Based on the results, we suggest to replace the original polarizable Martini water model with the new refPOL model for future applications.

  20. Dynamics of Gold Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanostructures Driven by van der Waals and Electrostatic Interactions.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Alessandro; Gimenez-Lopez, Maria del Carmen; Fay, Michael W; Lucas, Carlos Herreros; Brown, Paul D; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2015-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies on the assembly and growth of gold nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes supported on few-layer graphene and amorphous carbon reveal a competition between van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions, enabling controlled positioning and sizing of adsorbed nanoparticles at the nanochannels formed between the carbon nanotube and the few-layer graph-ene surface.

  1. Interaction of a patterned amphiphilic polyphenylene dendrimer with a lipid monolayer: electrostatic interactions dominate.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Masanari; Mezger, Markus; Stangenberg, René; Baumgarten, Martin; Müllen, Klaus; Bonn, Mischa; Backus, Ellen H G

    2015-02-17

    Dendrimeric macromolecules with defined shape and size are promising candidates for delivering drug or DNA molecules into cells. In this work we study the influence of an amphiphilic polyphenylene dendrimer on a model cell membrane consisting of a condensed 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid monolayer. A small surface pressure decrease is observed when the dendrimer solution is injected into the aqueous phase below the monolayer. X-ray reflectivity measurements show that the surface monolayer remains intact. The molecular-scale picture is obtained with sum-frequency generation spectroscopy. With this technique, we observe that the tails of the surfactant molecules become less ordered upon interaction with the amphiphilic polyphenylene dendrimer. In contrast, the water molecules below the DPPC layer become more ordered. Our observations suggest that electrostatic interactions between the negative charge of the dendrimer and the positively charged part of the DPPC headgroup keep the dendrimer located below the headgroup. No evidence of dendrimer insertion into the membrane has been observed. Apparently before entering the cell membrane the dendrimer can stick at the hydrophilic part of the lipids.

  2. Electrostatic interactions at the microscale modulate dynamics and distribution of lipids in bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, Agustín; Wilke, Natalia

    2017-01-18

    For decades, it has been assumed that electrostatic long-range (micron distances) repulsions in lipid bilayers are negligible due to screening from the aqueous milieu. This concept, mostly derived from theoretical calculations, is broadly accepted in the biophysical community. Here we present experimental evidence showing that domain-domain electrostatic repulsions in charged and also in neutral lipid bilayers regulate the diffusion, in-plane structuring and merging of lipid domains in the micron range. All the experiments were performed on both, lipid monolayers and bilayers, and the remarkable similarity in the results found in bilayers compared to monolayers led us to propose that inter-domain repulsions occur mainly within the plane of the membrane. Finally, our results indicate that electrostatic interactions between the species inserted in a cell membrane are not negligible, not only at nanometric but also at larger distances, suggesting another manner for regulating the membrane properties.

  3. Electrostatic versus Resonance Interactions in Photoreceptor Proteins: The Case of Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Guareschi, Riccardo; Valsson, Omar; Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-11-17

    Light sensing in photoreceptor proteins is subtly modulated by the multiple interactions between the chromophoric unit and its binding pocket. Many theoretical and experimental studies have tried to uncover the fundamental origin of these interactions but reached contradictory conclusions as to whether electrostatics, polarization, or intrinsically quantum effects prevail. Here, we select rhodopsin as a prototypical photoreceptor system to reveal the molecular mechanism underlying these interactions and regulating the spectral tuning. Combining a multireference perturbation method and density functional theory with a classical but atomistic and polarizable embedding scheme, we show that accounting for electrostatics only leads to a qualitatively wrong picture, while a responsive environment can successfully capture both the classical and quantum dominant effects. Several residues are found to tune the excitation by both differentially stabilizing ground and excited states and through nonclassical "inductive resonance" interactions. The results obtained with such a quantum-in-classical model are validated against both experimental data and fully quantum calculations.

  4. Electrostatic fluctuation interactions between neutral surfaces with adsorbed, mobile ions or dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Phil; Kjellander, Roland; Mitchell, D. John; Jönsson, Bo

    1988-08-01

    The electrostatic fluctuation interactions between two surfaces which carry charged or dipolar, laterally mobile particles, are investigated using both a formally exact theory and approximate methods. Each surface constitutes the boundary between two dielectric continua and has no net charge. The exact analysis demonstrates the interdependence of the van der Waals interaction between the dielectric media and the electrostatic image interactions of the particles. General asymptotic laws for the pressure between the surfaces, valid at large separations, are extracted from the exact equations. Even at relatively small separations, the asymptotic expressions give surprisingly good estimates of the actual interactions, as calculated using the hypernetted chain equation and Monte Carlo techniques. A simple mean field perturbation approximation is also investigated and is shown to give good results, provided accurate pair distributions are known for the corresponding isolated, single surface.

  5. Electrostatic unfolding and interactions of albumin driven by pH changes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Baler, K; Martin, O A; Carignano, M A; Ameer, G A; Vila, J A; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-30

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation.

  6. Motions and electrostatic interactions in natural and semisynthetic myoglobins: a carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Maskalick, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    It is expected that the internal motions of amino acid side chains and protein backbone segments influence and are in turn affected by charge-charge and related interactions, steric constraints, hydrophobic forces, and hydrogen bonding. As an initial test of this theory /sup 13/C-enriched glycine, alanine, and isoleucine have been substituted for the amino terminal valine of sperm whale myoglobin using semisynthetic techniques. /sup 13/C-NMR has been used to analyze the motions of the side chain and the protonation state of the alpha amino group as a function of pH. The addition of a single methyl group to the side chain can alter the alpha amino pK value by as much as 0.3 pH units indicating a delicately balanced set of change-charge interactions between the alpha amino group and the rest of the protein. Further evidence in support of the state theory was found upon examination of the internal motions of seven of nine isoleucine vectors. These motions were extracted from natural abundance /sup 13/C-NMR relaxation data. The results suggest a strong possibility that concerted motions are important. Also, an increase in temperature from 32/sup 0/C to 52/sup 0/C leads to an electrostatically driven tightening of the myoglobin structure as evidenced by no significant increase in motion amplitude of most of the vectors.

  7. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample. PMID:22003461

  8. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy-magnetic force microscopy combination.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria; Asenjo, Agustina

    2011-01-01

    The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25-50 nm such that the long range tip-sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip-sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  9. Prediction of the most favorable configuration in the ACBP-membrane interaction based on electrostatic calculations.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Diego F; Zamarreño, Fernando; Guérin, Diego M A; Grigera, J Raul; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2009-03-01

    Acyl-CoA binding proteins (ACBPs) are highly conserved 10 kDa cytosolic proteins that bind medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. They act as intracellular carriers of acyl-CoA and play a role in acyl-CoA metabolism, gene regulation, acyl-CoA-mediated cell signaling, transport-mediated lipid synthesis, membrane trafficking and also, ACBPs were indicated as a possible inhibitor of diazepam binding to the GABA-A receptor. To estimate the importance of the non-specific electrostatic energy in the ACBP-membrane interaction, we computationally modeled the interaction of HgACBP with both anionic and neutral membranes. To compute the Free Electrostatic Energy of Binding (dE), we used the Finite Difference Poisson Boltzmann Equation (FDPB) method as implemented in APBS. In the most energetically favorable orientation, ACBP brings charged residues Lys18 and Lys50 and hydrophobic residues Met46 and Leu47 into membrane surface proximity. This conformation suggests that these four ACBP amino acids are most likely to play a leading role in the ACBP-membrane interaction and ligand intake. Thus, we propose that long range electrostatic forces are the first step in the interaction mechanism between ACBP and membranes.

  10. Role of electrostatic interactions in the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toward Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pagnout, Christophe; Jomini, Stéphane; Dadhwal, Mandeep; Caillet, Céline; Thomas, Fabien; Bauda, Pascale

    2012-04-01

    The increasing production and use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NP-TiO(2)) has led to concerns about their possible impact on the environment. Bacteria play crucial roles in ecosystem processes and may be subject to the toxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we showed that at low ionic strength, the cell viability of Escherichia coli was more severely affected at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.0 and pH 9.5. At pH 5.5, nanoparticles (positively charged) strongly interacted with the bacterial cells (negatively charged) and accumulated on their surfaces. This phenomenon was observed in a much lower degree at pH 7.0 (NP-TiO(2) neutrally charged and cells negatively charged) and pH 9.5 (both NP-TiO(2) and cells negatively charged). It was also shown that the addition of electrolytes (NaCl, CaCl(2), Na(2)SO(4)) resulted in a gradual reduction of the NP-TiO(2) toxicity at pH 5.5 and an increase in this toxicity at pH 9.5, which was closely related to the reduction of the NP-TiO(2) and bacterial cell electrostatic charges.

  11. Electrostatic analysis of the interactions between charged particles of dielectric materials.

    PubMed

    Bichoutskaia, Elena; Boatwright, Adrian L; Khachatourian, Armik; Stace, Anthony J

    2010-07-14

    An understanding of the electrostatic interactions that exist between charged particles of dielectric materials has applications that span much of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. Areas of interest include cloud formation, ink-jet printing, and the stability of emulsions. A general solution to the problem of calculating electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles is presented. The solution converges very rapidly for low values of the dielectric constant and is stable up to the point where particles touch. Through applications to unspecified particles with a range of size and charge ratios, the model shows that there exist distinct regions of dielectric space where particles with the same sign of charge are strongly attracted to one another.

  12. Self-assembly of polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticle films using repulsive electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Du, Chuan; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2014-02-04

    An approach for manufacturing polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticle films using repulsive electrostatic interactions was developed. This approach used the strong repulsive force between colloidal nanoparticles and a substrate surface to cause the colloidal nanoparticles to suspend and self-assemble at a near-wall equilibrium position. A suspended monolayer was formed and was subsequently deposited on the substrate surface. A relatively large-area (3 × 3 cm(2)), close-packed unordered monolayer of polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles was observed. Multilayer nanoparticle films were also generated by increasing the particle concentration and deposition time. This work confirms the feasibility of nanoparticle self-assembly under repulsive electrostatic interactions and provides new routes for the large-area fabrication of monolayer and multilayer close-packed nanoparticle films.

  13. Dissipative particle dynamics for systems with high density of charges: Implementation of electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, A. A.; Chertovich, A. V.; Kramarenko, E. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the question of how to introduce electrostatic interactions in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method in order to correctly reproduce the properties of systems with high density of charges, including those with inhomogeneous charge distribution. To this end, we formulate general requirements for the electrostatic force in DPD and propose a new functional form of the force which suits better for satisfying these requirements than the previously used ones. In order to verify the proposed model, we study the problem of a single polyelectrolyte chain collapse and compare the results with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which the exact Coulomb force is used. We show that an excellent quantitative agreement between MD and DPD models is observed if the length parameter D of the proposed electrostatic force is chosen properly; the recommendations concerning the choice of this parameter value are given based on the analysis of a polyelectrolyte chain collapse behavior. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of DPD with the proposed electrostatic force to studying microphase separation phenomenon in polyelectrolyte melts and show that the same values of D as in the case of single chain collapse should be used, thus indicating universality of the model. Due to the charge correlation attraction, a long-range order in such melts can be observed even at zero Flory-Huggins parameter.

  14. The calculation of electrostatic interactions and their role in determining the energies and geometries of explosive molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.P.; Kober, E.M.; Copenhaver, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Three different procedures were used to calculate electrostatic interactions in explosive molecular crystals. The use of Potential Derived Charges (PDC's) and atom-centered multipole expansions (ACME's) provides reasonable fits of the molecular electrostatic potential. The ability of these approaches to reproduce observed crystal structures was also evaluated.

  15. Crystal design using multipolar electrostatic interactions: A concept study for organic electronics

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Qiong; Untenecker, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Summary Using a simple synthetic protocol, heterohexacene analogues with a quadrupolar distribution of partial charges are readily available. In contrast to most other acenes, these compounds crystallize with a slipped-stack, brickwork-like packing which is mainly controlled by electrostatic interactions. This type of packing offers an advantage for organic semiconductors, because it allows more isotropic charge transport compared to the “herring bone” stacking observed for other acenes. PMID:24367401

  16. Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Kade H. Poper; Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael Daniels

    2014-10-01

    Powder energetic materials are highly sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) ignition. This study shows that small concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to the highly reactive mixture of aluminum and copper oxide (Al + CuO) significantly reduces ESD ignition sensitivity. CNT act as a conduit for electric energy, bypassing energy buildup and desensitizing the mixture to ESD ignition. The lowest CNT concentration needed to desensitize ignition is 3.8 vol.% corresponding to percolation corresponding to an electrical conductivity of 0.04 S/cm. Conversely, added CNT increased Al + CuO thermal ignition sensitivity to a hot wire igniter.

  17. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim; Heyda, Jan

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  18. Coarse-grained electrostatic interactions of coronene: Towards the crystalline phase.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-11-07

    In this article, we present and compare two different, coarse-grained approaches to model electrostatic interactions of disc-shaped aromatic molecules, specifically coronene. Our study builds on our previous work [T. Heinemann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214110 (2014)], where we proposed, based on a systematic coarse-graining procedure starting from the atomistic level, an anisotropic effective (Gay-Berne-like) potential capable of describing van der Waals contributions to the interaction energy. To take into account electrostatics, we introduce, first, a linear quadrupole moment along the symmetry axis of the coronene disc. The second approach takes into account the fact that the partial charges within the molecules are distributed in a ring-like fashion. We then reparametrize the effective Gay-Berne-like potential such that it matches, at short distances, the ring-ring potential. To investigate the validity of these two approaches, we perform many-particle molecular dynamics simulations, focusing on the crystalline phase (karpatite) where electrostatic interaction effects are expected to be particularly relevant for the formation of tilted stacked columns. Specifically, we investigate various structural parameters as well as the melting transition. We find that the second approach yields consistent results with those from experiments despite the fact that the underlying potential decays with the wrong distance dependence at large molecule separations. Our strategy can be transferred to a broader class of molecules, such as benzene or hexabenzocoronene.

  19. Coarse-grained electrostatic interactions of coronene: Towards the crystalline phase

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Thomas Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Palczynski, Karol Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-11-07

    In this article, we present and compare two different, coarse-grained approaches to model electrostatic interactions of disc-shaped aromatic molecules, specifically coronene. Our study builds on our previous work [T. Heinemann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214110 (2014)], where we proposed, based on a systematic coarse-graining procedure starting from the atomistic level, an anisotropic effective (Gay-Berne-like) potential capable of describing van der Waals contributions to the interaction energy. To take into account electrostatics, we introduce, first, a linear quadrupole moment along the symmetry axis of the coronene disc. The second approach takes into account the fact that the partial charges within the molecules are distributed in a ring-like fashion. We then reparametrize the effective Gay-Berne-like potential such that it matches, at short distances, the ring-ring potential. To investigate the validity of these two approaches, we perform many-particle molecular dynamics simulations, focusing on the crystalline phase (karpatite) where electrostatic interaction effects are expected to be particularly relevant for the formation of tilted stacked columns. Specifically, we investigate various structural parameters as well as the melting transition. We find that the second approach yields consistent results with those from experiments despite the fact that the underlying potential decays with the wrong distance dependence at large molecule separations. Our strategy can be transferred to a broader class of molecules, such as benzene or hexabenzocoronene.

  20. Extended Structures in RNA Folding Intermediates Are Due to Nonnative Interactions Rather than Electrostatic Repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Gong, Haipeng; Zaheer, Syed S.; Freed, Karl F.; Pan, Tao; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2010-05-25

    RNA folding occurs via a series of transitions between metastable intermediate states for Mg{sup 2+} concentrations below those needed to fold the native structure. In general, these folding intermediates are considerably less compact than their respective native states. Our previous work demonstrates that the major equilibrium intermediate of the 154-residue specificity domain (S-domain) of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA is more extended than its native structure. We now investigate two models with falsifiable predictions regarding the origins of the extended intermediate structures in the S-domains of the B. subtilis and the Escherichia coli RNase P RNA that belong to different classes of P RNA and have distinct native structures. The first model explores the contribution of electrostatic repulsion, while the second model probes specific interactions in the core of the folding intermediate. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and Langevin dynamics simulations, we show that electrostatics plays only a minor role, whereas specific interactions largely account for the extended nature of the intermediate. Structural contacts in the core, including a nonnative base pair, help to stabilize the intermediate conformation. We conclude that RNA folding intermediates adopt extended conformations due to short-range, nonnative interactions rather than generic electrostatic repulsion of helical domains. These principles apply to other ribozymes and riboswitches that undergo functionally relevant conformational changes.

  1. ICSM: An order N method for calculating electrostatic interactions added to TINKER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Katherine; Baumketner, Andrij; Lin, Yuchun; Deng, Shaozhong; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We present an order N method for calculating electrostatic interactions that has been integrated into the molecular dynamics portion of the TINKER Molecular Modeling package. This method, introduced in a previous paper [Y. Lin, A. Baumketner, S. Deng, Z. Xu, D. Jacobs, W. Cai, An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 154103] and termed the Image-Charge Solvation Model (ICSM), is a hybrid electrostatic approach that combines the strengths of both explicit and implicit representations of the solvent. A multiple-image method is used to calculate reaction fields due to the implicit part while the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) is used to calculate the Coulomb interactions for all charges, including the explicit part. The integrated package is validated through test simulations of liquid water. The results are compared with those obtained by the Particle Mesh Ewald (PME) method that is built in the TINKER package. Timing performance of TINKER with the integrated ICSM is benchmarked on bulk water as a function of the size of the system. In particular, timing analysis results show that the ICSM outperforms the PME for sufficiently large systems with the break-even point at around 30,000 particles in the simulated system.

  2. Coarse-grained electrostatic interactions of coronene: Towards the crystalline phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present and compare two different, coarse-grained approaches to model electrostatic interactions of disc-shaped aromatic molecules, specifically coronene. Our study builds on our previous work [T. Heinemann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214110 (2014)], where we proposed, based on a systematic coarse-graining procedure starting from the atomistic level, an anisotropic effective (Gay-Berne-like) potential capable of describing van der Waals contributions to the interaction energy. To take into account electrostatics, we introduce, first, a linear quadrupole moment along the symmetry axis of the coronene disc. The second approach takes into account the fact that the partial charges within the molecules are distributed in a ring-like fashion. We then reparametrize the effective Gay-Berne-like potential such that it matches, at short distances, the ring-ring potential. To investigate the validity of these two approaches, we perform many-particle molecular dynamics simulations, focusing on the crystalline phase (karpatite) where electrostatic interaction effects are expected to be particularly relevant for the formation of tilted stacked columns. Specifically, we investigate various structural parameters as well as the melting transition. We find that the second approach yields consistent results with those from experiments despite the fact that the underlying potential decays with the wrong distance dependence at large molecule separations. Our strategy can be transferred to a broader class of molecules, such as benzene or hexabenzocoronene.

  3. Perturbation of the Stability of Amyloid Fibrils through Alteration of Electrostatic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Sarah L.; Knowles, Tuomas P.J.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; MacPhee, Cait E.; Welland, Mark E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Devlin, Glyn L.

    2011-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into polymeric amyloid fibrils is a process that has important implications ranging from the understanding of protein misfolding disorders to the discovery of novel nanobiomaterials. In this study, we probe the stability of fibrils prepared at pH 2.0 and composed of the protein insulin by manipulating electrostatic interactions within the fibril architecture. We demonstrate that strong electrostatic repulsion is sufficient to disrupt the hydrogen-bonded, cross-β network that links insulin molecules and ultimately results in fibril dissociation. The extent of this dissociation correlates well with predictions for colloidal models considering the net global charge of the polypeptide chain, although the kinetics of the process is regulated by the charge state of a single amino acid. We found the fibrils to be maximally stable under their formation conditions. Partial disruption of the cross-β network under conditions where the fibrils remain intact leads to a reduction in their stability. Together, these results support the contention that a major determinant of amyloid stability stems from the interactions in the structured core, and show how the control of electrostatic interactions can be used to characterize the factors that modulate fibril stability. PMID:21641324

  4. Formation of chitosan-fucoidan nanoparticles and their electrostatic interactions: Quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Ju; Lim, Kwang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The stoichiometric distributions of both positive amino groups and negative sulfate ions loaded in chitosan-fucoidan nanoparticles (CFNs) were predicted quantitatively by correlating the separate yields of loaded chitosan and fucoidan, and a proposed relative charge density model (case 1). In addition, those distributions of both positive amino groups and negative sulfate ions loaded in CFNs were obtained by deriving the expression of their loaded concentrations directly from the experimental data (case 2). Both the model-prediction and experimental derivations were remarkably consistent with each other except at pH 2. The discrepancy between cases 1 and 2 at pH 2 was explained by an increase in the sulfate group loading because of the most intensive electrostatic (specific ion) interactions at pH 2. The ratio of the CFN-free net charge density shielded by counter-ions in the solution entrapped in CFNs to their counter-ion-crosslinking charge density was suggested to be a quantitative criterion for determining the size distribution of CFNs. The formation of CFNs ranked according to size was predicted well and explained reasonably by the suggested criterion, considering both the ionic strength of the entrapped solution in CFNs and the nonspecific binding (interaction) of the positive amino groups among the chitosan molecules. Furthermore, the fraction of nonspecifically-bound positive amino groups causing hysteresis was quantified from the positive net charged amino groups per unit-mass CFN. Thus, its magnitude was predicted to have a strong correlation with the CFN-preparation conditions, such as pH and fucoidan to chitosan mass ratio.

  5. Interaction of oligonucleotides with cationic lipids: the relationship between electrostatics, hydration and state of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Meidan, V M; Cohen, J S; Amariglio, N; Hirsch-Lerner, D; Barenholz, Y

    2000-04-05

    Lipoplexes, which are spontaneously formed complexes between oligonucleotide (ODN) and cationic lipid, can be used to deliver ODNs into cells, both in vitro and in vivo. The present study was aimed at characterizing the interactions associated with the formation of lipoplexes, specifically in terms of electrostatics, hydration and particle size. Large unilamellar vesicles (approximately 100 nm diameter), composed of either DOTAP, DOTAP/cholesterol (mole ratio 1:1) or DOTAP/DOPE (mole ratio 1:1) were employed as a model of cationic liposomes. Neutral vesicles ( approximately 100 nm diameter), composed of DOPC/DOPE (mole ratio 1:1), were employed as control liposomes. After ODN addition to vesicles, at different mole ratios, changes in pH and electrical surface potential at the lipid-water interface were analyzed by using the fluorophore heptadecyl-7-hydroxycoumarin. In separate 'mirror image' experiments, liposomes were added at different mole ratios to fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled ODNs, thus yielding data about changes in the pH near the ODN molecules induced by the complexation with the cationic lipid. Particle size distribution and turbidity fluctuations were analyzed by the use of photon correlation spectroscopy and static light-scattering, respectively. In additional fluorescent probe studies, TMADPH was used to quantify membrane defects while laurdan was used to measure the level of hydration at the water-lipid interface. The results indicate that mutual neutralization of cationic lipids by ODNs and vice versa is a spontaneous reaction and that this neutralization is the main driving force for lipoplex generation. When lipid neutralization is partial, induced membrane defects cause the lipoplexes to exhibit increased size instability.

  6. Diffusion of Particles in the Extracellular Matrix: The Effect of Repulsive Electrostatic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Poh, Ming-Zher; Insin, Numpon; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Fukumura, Dai; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusive transport of macromolecules and nanoparticles in charged fibrous media is of interest in many biological applications, including drug delivery and separation processes. Experimental findings have shown that diffusion can be significantly hindered by electrostatic interactions between the diffusing particle and charged components of the extracellular matrix. The implications, however, have not been analyzed rigorously. Here, we present a mathematical framework to study the effect of charge on the diffusive transport of macromolecules and nanoparticles in the extracellular matrix of biological tissues. The model takes into account steric, hydrodynamic, and electrostatic interactions. We show that when the fiber size is comparable to the Debye length, electrostatic forces between the fibers and the particles result in slowed diffusion. However, as the fiber diameter increases the repulsive forces become less important. Our results explain the experimental observations that neutral particles diffuse faster than charged particles. Taken together, we conclude that optimal particles for delivery to tumors should be initially cationic to target the tumor vessels and then change to neutral charge after exiting the blood vessels. PMID:20816045

  7. Reentrant Behavior of Divalent-Counterion-Mediated DNA-DNA Electrostatic Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seil; Le, Tung T.; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2010-12-01

    The problem of DNA-DNA interaction mediated by divalent counterions is studied using computer simulation. Although divalent counterions cannot condense free DNA molecules in solution, we show that if DNA configurational entropy is restricted, divalent counterions can cause DNA reentrant condensation similar to that caused by tri- or tetravalent counterions. DNA-DNA interaction is strongly repulsive at small or large counterion concentration and is negligible or slightly attractive for a concentration in between. Implications of our results to experiments of DNA ejection from bacteriophages are discussed. The quantitative result serves to understand electrostatic effects in other experiments involving DNA and divalent counterions.

  8. Modification of electrostatic charge on inhaled carrier lactose particles by addition of fine particles.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F S; Carter, P A; Rowley, G; Dandiker, Y

    1999-01-01

    Triboelectrification affects particle adhesion and agglomeration and hence the formulation, manufacture, and use of dry powder inhaler (DPI) devices. Electrostatic charge measurement of two component mixes of spray-dried or crystalline lactose fine particles (< 10 microns) 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30% w/w with spray-dried or crystalline lactose 63-90 microns, respectively, has been undertaken using a system incorporating pneumatic transport of the mixed powders to a stainless steel cyclone charging device. The magnitude of charge on the mixes was shown to decrease with increased fine particle content, and there was no significant difference in charge for each concentration between spray-dried and crystalline lactose. Both the variation of charge and powder adhesion to the cyclone surface increased with increase in fine particle content. The proportion of fine particles in carrier systems in DPIs may thus have an important role where triboelectrification is involved.

  9. Intermolecular Interactions and Electrostatic Properties of the [beta]-Hydroquinone Apohost: Implications for Supramolecular Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Henrik F.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Overgaard, Jacob; Koutsantonis, George A.; Spackman, Mark A.; Iversen, Bo B.

    2012-02-07

    The crystal structure of the {beta}-polymorph of hydroquinone ({beta}-HQ), the apohost of a large family of clathrates, is reported with a specific focus on intermolecular interactions and the electrostatic nature of its cavity. Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals subtle close contacts between two interconnecting HQ networks, and the local packing and related close contacts were examined by breakdown of the fingerprint plot. An experimental multipole model containing anisotropic thermal parameters for hydrogen atoms has been successfully refined against 15(2) K single microcrystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data. The experimental electron density model has been compared with a theoretical electron density calculated with the molecule embedded in its own crystal field. Hirshfeld charges, interaction energies and the electrostatic potential calculated for both models are qualitatively in good agreement, but small differences in the electrostatic potential persist due to charge transfer from all hydrogen atoms to the oxygen atoms in the theoretical model. The electrostatic potential in the center of the cavity is positive, very shallow and highly symmetric, suggesting that the inclusion of polar molecules in the void will involve a balance between opposing effects. The electric field is by symmetry zero in the center of the cavity, increasing to a value of 0.0185 e/{angstrom}{sup 2} (0.27 V/{angstrom}) 1 {angstrom} along the 3-fold axis and 0.0105 e/{angstrom}{sup 2} (0.15 V/{angstrom}) 1 {angstrom} along the perpendicular direction. While these values are substantial in a macroscopic context, they are quite small for a molecular cavity and are not expected to strongly polarize a guest molecule.

  10. A Comparative Study of Transferable Aspherical Pseudoatom Databank and Classical Force Fields for Predicting Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Dimers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and fast evaluation of electrostatic interactions in molecular systems is one of the most challenging tasks in the rapidly advancing field of macromolecular chemistry and drug design. Electrostatic interactions are of crucial importance in biological systems. They are well represented by quantum mechanical methods; however, such calculations are computationally expensive. In this study, we have evaluated the University of Buffalo Pseudoatom Databank (UBDB)1,2 approach for approximation of electrostatic properties of macromolecules and their complexes. We selected the S663 and JSCH-20054 data sets (208 molecular complexes in total) for this study. These complexes represent a wide range of chemical and biological systems for which hydrogen bonding, electrostatic, and van der Waals interactions play important roles. Reference electrostatic energies were obtained directly from wave functions at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory using the SAPT (Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory) scheme for calculation of electrostatic contributions to total intermolecular interaction energies. Electrostatic energies calculated on the basis of the UBDB were compared with corresponding reference results. Results were also compared with energies computed using a point charge model from popular force fields (AM1-BCC and RESP used in AMBER and CGenFF from CHARMM family). The energy trends are quite consistent (R2 ≈ 0.98) for the UBDB method as compared to the AMBER5 and CHARMM force field methods6(R2 ≈ 0.93 on average). The RSMEs do not exceed 3.2 kcal mol–1 for the UBDB and are in the range of 3.7–7.6 kcal mol–1 for the point charge models. We also investigated the discrepancies in electrostatic potentials and magnitudes of dipole moments among the tested methods. This study shows that estimation of electrostatic interaction energies using the UBDB databank is accurate and reasonably fast when compared to other known methods, which opens potential new applications

  11. Infinite Boundary Terms of Ewald Sums and Pairwise Interactions for Electrostatics in Bulk and at Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonghan

    2014-12-09

    We present a unified derivation of the Ewald sum for electrostatics in a three-dimensional infinite system that is periodic in one, two, or three dimensions. The derivation leads to the Ewald3D sum being expressed as a sum of a real space contribution and a reciprocal space contribution, as in previous work. However, the k → 0 term in the reciprocal space contribution is analyzed further and found to give an additional contribution that is not part of previous reciprocal space contributions. The transparent derivation provides a unified view of the existing conducting infinite boundary term, the vacuum spherical infinite boundary term and the vacuum planar infinite boundary term for the Ewald3D sum. The derivation further explains that the infinite boundary term is conditional for the Ewald3D sum because it depends on the asymptotic behavior that the system approaches the infinite in 3D but it becomes a definite term for the Ewald2D or Ewald1D sum irrespective of the asymptotic behavior in the reduced dimensions. Moreover, the unified derivation yields two formulas for the Ewald sum in one-dimensional periodicity, and we rigorously prove that the two formulas are equivalent. These formulas might be useful for simulations of organic crystals with wirelike shapes or liquids confined in uniform cylinders. More importantly, the Ewald3D, Ewald2D, and Ewald1D sums are further written as sums of well-defined pairwise potentials overcoming the difficulty in splitting the total Coulomb potential energy into contributions from each individual group of charges. The pairwise interactions with their clear physical meaning of the explicit presence of the periodic images thus can be used to consistently perform analysis based on the trajectories from computer simulations of bulk or interfaces.

  12. Tuning of electrostatic vs. depletion interaction in deciding the phase behavior of nanoparticle-polymer system

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sugam Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-24

    Nanoparticle-polymer system interestingly show a re-entrant phase behavior where charge stabilized silica nanoparticles (phase I) undergo particle clustering (phase II) and then back to individual particles (phase I) as a function of polymer concentration. Such phase behavior arises as a result of dominance of various interactions (i) nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion (ii) polymer induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles and (iii) polymer-polymer repulsion, at different concentration regimes. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the evolution of interaction during this re-entrant phase behavior of nanoparticles by contrast-marching the polymer. The SANS data have been modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accounting for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The degree of both of these parts has been separately tuned by varying the polymer concentration and ionic strength of the solution. Both of these parts are found to have long-range nature. At low polymer concentrations, the electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion attraction. The magnitude and the range of the depletion interaction increase with the polymer concentration leading to nanoparticle clustering. At higher polymer concentrations, the increased polymer-polymer repulsion reduces the strength of depletion leading to re-entrant phase behavior. The clusters formed under depletion attraction are found to have surface fractal morphology.

  13. Roles of long-range electrostatic domain interactions and K+ in phosphoenzyme transition of Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Kazuo; Daiho, Takashi; Danko, Stefania; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-07-12

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase couples the motions and rearrangements of three cytoplasmic domains (A, P, and N) with Ca(2+) transport. We explored the role of electrostatic force in the domain dynamics in a rate-limiting phosphoenzyme (EP) transition by a systematic approach combining electrostatic screening with salts, computer analysis of electric fields in crystal structures, and mutations. Low KCl concentration activated and increasing salt above 0.1 m inhibited the EP transition. A plot of the logarithm of the transition rate versus the square of the mean activity coefficient of the protein gave a linear relationship allowing division of the activation energy into an electrostatic component and a non-electrostatic component in which the screenable electrostatic forces are shielded by salt. Results show that the structural change in the transition is sterically restricted, but that strong electrostatic forces, when K(+) is specifically bound at the P domain, come into play to accelerate the reaction. Electric field analysis revealed long-range electrostatic interactions between the N and P domains around their hinge. Mutations of the residues directly involved and other charged residues at the hinge disrupted in parallel the electric field and the structural transition. Favorable electrostatics evidently provides a low energy path for the critical N domain motion toward the P domain, overcoming steric restriction. The systematic approach employed here is, in general, a powerful tool for understanding the structural mechanisms of enzymes.

  14. Ca2+ induces clustering of membrane proteins in the plasma membrane via electrostatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zilly, Felipe E; Halemani, Nagaraj D; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Schreiber, Arne; Jahn, Reinhard; Lang, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins and membrane lipids are frequently organized in submicron-sized domains within cellular membranes. Factors thought to be responsible for domain formation include lipid–lipid interactions, lipid–protein interactions and protein–protein interactions. However, it is unclear whether the domain structure is regulated by other factors such as divalent cations. Here, we have examined in native plasma membranes and intact cells the role of the second messenger Ca2+ in membrane protein organization. We find that Ca2+ at low micromolar concentrations directly redistributes a structurally diverse array of membrane proteins via electrostatic effects. Redistribution results in a more clustered pattern, can be rapid and triggered by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and is reversible. In summary, the data demonstrate that the second messenger Ca2+ strongly influences the organization of membrane proteins, thus adding a novel and unexpected factor that may control the domain structure of biological membranes. PMID:21364530

  15. Ca2+ induces clustering of membrane proteins in the plasma membrane via electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Zilly, Felipe E; Halemani, Nagaraj D; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Schreiber, Arne; Jahn, Reinhard; Lang, Thorsten

    2011-04-06

    Membrane proteins and membrane lipids are frequently organized in submicron-sized domains within cellular membranes. Factors thought to be responsible for domain formation include lipid-lipid interactions, lipid-protein interactions and protein-protein interactions. However, it is unclear whether the domain structure is regulated by other factors such as divalent cations. Here, we have examined in native plasma membranes and intact cells the role of the second messenger Ca(2+) in membrane protein organization. We find that Ca(2+) at low micromolar concentrations directly redistributes a structurally diverse array of membrane proteins via electrostatic effects. Redistribution results in a more clustered pattern, can be rapid and triggered by Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated calcium channels and is reversible. In summary, the data demonstrate that the second messenger Ca(2+) strongly influences the organization of membrane proteins, thus adding a novel and unexpected factor that may control the domain structure of biological membranes.

  16. Effects of organic ligands, electrostatic and magnetic interactions in formation of colloidal and interfacial inorganic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Khomutov, G B; Koksharov, Yu A

    2006-09-25

    This paper discusses effects of organic ligands, electrostatic and magnetic interactions involved in morphological control of chemically synthesized inorganic nanostructures including colloid and planar systems. The special attention was concentrated on noble metal (gold and palladium) nanoparticles and nanostructures formed at the gas-liquid interface. The analysis of experimental data showed that electrostatic and ligand-related interactions influence very strongly on the metal nanostructure morphology. The hydrophobicity of ligand, charge and binding affinity to inorganic phase are important factors influencing the morphology of inorganic nanostructures formed in a layer at the gas/liquid interface by the interfacial synthesis method. The important point of this method is the quasi two-dimensional character of reaction area and possibilities to realize ultimately thin and anisotropic dynamic monomolecular reaction system with two-dimensional diffusion and interactions of precursors, intermediates and ligands resulting in planar growth and organization of inorganic nanoparticles and nanostructures in the plain of Langmuir monolayer. The morphology of resulting inorganic nanostructures can be controlled efficiently by variations of growth conditions via changes in state and composition of interfacial planar reaction media with the same precursor, and by variations of composition of adjacent bulk phases. The extreme anisotropy and heterogeneity of two-dimensional interfacial reaction system allows creating conditions when growing inorganic particles floating on the aqueous phase surface interact selectively with hydrophobic water-insoluble ligands in interfacial monolayer or with hydrophilic bulk-phase ligands, or at the same time with ligands of different nature present in monolayer and in aqueous phase. The spatial anisotropy of interfacial reaction system and non-homogeneity of ligand binding to inorganic phase gives possibilities for growth of integrated

  17. Competition Between Resonant Plasmonic Coupling and Electrostatic Interaction in Reduced Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Karna, Sanjay; Mahat, Meg; Choi, Tae-Youl; Shimada, Ryoko; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-11-22

    The light emission from reduced graphene oxide quantum dots (rGO-QDs) exhibit a significant enhancement in photoluminescence (PL) due to localized surface plasmon (LSP) interactions. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) coupled to rGO nanoparticles exhibit the effect of resonant LSP coupling on the emission processes. Enhancement of the radiative recombination rate in the presence of Ag-NPs induced LSP tuned to the emission energy results in a four-fold increase in PL intensity. The localized field due to the resonantly coupled LSP modes induces n-π* transitions that are not observed in the absence of the resonant interaction of the plasmons with the excitons. An increase in the density of the Ag-NPs result in a detuning of the LSP energy from the emission energy of the nanoparticles. The detuning is due to the cumulative effect of the red-shift in the LSP energy and the electrostatic field induced blue shift in the PL energy of the rGO-QDs. The detuning quenches the PL emission from rGO-QDs at higher concentration of Ag NPs due to non-dissipative effects unlike plasmon induced Joule heating that occurs under resonance conditions. An increase in Au nanoparticles concentration results in an enhancement of PL emission due to electrostatic image charge effect.

  18. Competition Between Resonant Plasmonic Coupling and Electrostatic Interaction in Reduced Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Karna, Sanjay; Mahat, Meg; Choi, Tae-Youl; Shimada, Ryoko; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-01-01

    The light emission from reduced graphene oxide quantum dots (rGO-QDs) exhibit a significant enhancement in photoluminescence (PL) due to localized surface plasmon (LSP) interactions. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) coupled to rGO nanoparticles exhibit the effect of resonant LSP coupling on the emission processes. Enhancement of the radiative recombination rate in the presence of Ag-NPs induced LSP tuned to the emission energy results in a four-fold increase in PL intensity. The localized field due to the resonantly coupled LSP modes induces n-π* transitions that are not observed in the absence of the resonant interaction of the plasmons with the excitons. An increase in the density of the Ag-NPs result in a detuning of the LSP energy from the emission energy of the nanoparticles. The detuning is due to the cumulative effect of the red-shift in the LSP energy and the electrostatic field induced blue shift in the PL energy of the rGO-QDs. The detuning quenches the PL emission from rGO-QDs at higher concentration of Ag NPs due to non-dissipative effects unlike plasmon induced Joule heating that occurs under resonance conditions. An increase in Au nanoparticles concentration results in an enhancement of PL emission due to electrostatic image charge effect. PMID:27872487

  19. The height of biomolecules measured with the atomic force microscope depends on electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, D J; Engel, A

    1997-01-01

    In biological applications of atomic force microscopy, the different surface properties of the biological sample and its support become apparent. Observed height differences between the biomolecule and its supporting surface are thus not only of structural origin, but also depend on the different sample-tip and support-tip interactions. This can result in negative or positive contributions to the measured height, effects that are described by the DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory. Experimental verification shows that the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample can strongly influence the result obtained. To overcome this problem, pH and electrolyte concentration of the buffer solution have to be adjusted to screen out electrostatic forces. Under these conditions, the tip comes into direct contact with the surface of support and biological system, even when low forces required to prevent sample deformation are applied. In this case, the measured height can be related to the thickness of the native biological structure. The observed height dependence of the macromolecules on electrolyte concentration makes it possible to estimate surface charge densities. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:9284330

  20. Targeting electrostatic interactions in accelerated molecular dynamics with application to protein partial unfolding.

    PubMed

    Flores-Canales, Jose C; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-06-09

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is a promising sampling method to generate an ensemble of conformations and to explore the free energy landscape of proteins in explicit solvent. Its success resides in its ability to reduce barriers in the dihedral and the total potential energy space. However, aMD simulations of large proteins can generate large fluctuations of the dihedral and total potential energy with little conformational changes in the protein structure. To facilitate wider conformational sampling of large proteins in explicit solvent, we developed a direct intrasolute electrostatic interactions accelerated MD (DISEI-aMD) approach. This method aims to reduce energy barriers within rapidly changing electrostatic interactions between solute atoms at short-range distances. It also results in improved reconstruction quality of the original statistical ensemble of the system. Recently, we characterized a pH-dependent partial unfolding of diphtheria toxin translocation domain (T-domain) using microsecond long MD simulations. In this work, we focus on the study of conformational changes of a low-pH T-domain model in explicit solvent using DISEI-aMD. On the basis of the simulations of the low-pH T-domain model, we show that the proposed sampling method accelerates conformational rearrangement significantly faster than multiple standard aMD simulations and microsecond long conventional MD simulations.

  1. Mutagenesis study to disrupt electrostatic interactions on the twofold symmetry interface of Escherichia coli bacterioferritin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Lijun; Ardejani, Maziar S; Aris, Nur Fazlina; Li, Xun; Orner, Brendan P; Wang, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Ferritins and other cage proteins have been utilized as models to understand the fundamentals of protein folding and self-assembly. The bacterioferritin (BFR) from Escherichia coli, a maxi-ferritin made up of 24 subunits, was chosen as the basis for a mutagenesis study to investigate the role of electrostatic intermolecular interactions mediated through charged amino acids. Through structural and computational analyses, three charged amino acids R30, D56 and E60 which involved in an electrostatic interaction network were mutated to the opposite charge. Four mutants, R30D, D56R, E60H and D56R-E60H, were expressed, purified and characterized. All of the mutants fold into α-helical structures. Consistent with the computational prediction, they all show a lowered thermostability; double mutant D56R-E60H was found to be 16°C less stable than the wild type. Except for the mutant E60H, all the other mutations completely shut down the formation of protein cages to favour the dimer state in solution. The mutants, however, retain their ability to form cage-like nanostructures in the dried, surface immobilized conditions of transmission electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that even a single charge-inversion mutation at the 2-fold interface of BFR can affect the quaternary structure of its dimers and their ability to self-assemble into cage structures.

  2. Influence of nanoparticle-membrane electrostatic interactions on membrane fluidity and bending elasticity.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Velikonja, Aljaž; Perutkova, Šarka; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Kulkarni, Mukta; Genova, Julia; Eleršič, Kristina; Iglič, Aleš; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between the nanoparticles and the membrane lipids on altering the physical properties of the liposomal membrane such as fluidity and bending elasticity. For this purpose, we have used nanoparticles and lipids with different surface charges. Positively charged iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, neutral and negatively charged cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles were encapsulated in neutral lipid 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine lipid mixture. Membrane fluidity was assessed through the anisotropy measurements using the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Though the interaction of both the types of nanoparticles reduced the membrane fluidity, the results were more pronounced in the negatively charged liposomes encapsulated with positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles due to strong electrostatic attractions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results also confirmed the presence of significant quantity of positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles in negatively charged liposomes. Through thermally induced shape fluctuation measurements of the giant liposomes, a considerable reduction in the bending elasticity modulus was observed for cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. The experimental results were supported by the simulation studies using modified Langevin-Poisson-Boltzmann model.

  3. Competition Between Resonant Plasmonic Coupling and Electrostatic Interaction in Reduced Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Sanjay; Mahat, Meg; Choi, Tae-Youl; Shimada, Ryoko; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-11-01

    The light emission from reduced graphene oxide quantum dots (rGO-QDs) exhibit a significant enhancement in photoluminescence (PL) due to localized surface plasmon (LSP) interactions. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) coupled to rGO nanoparticles exhibit the effect of resonant LSP coupling on the emission processes. Enhancement of the radiative recombination rate in the presence of Ag-NPs induced LSP tuned to the emission energy results in a four-fold increase in PL intensity. The localized field due to the resonantly coupled LSP modes induces n-π* transitions that are not observed in the absence of the resonant interaction of the plasmons with the excitons. An increase in the density of the Ag-NPs result in a detuning of the LSP energy from the emission energy of the nanoparticles. The detuning is due to the cumulative effect of the red-shift in the LSP energy and the electrostatic field induced blue shift in the PL energy of the rGO-QDs. The detuning quenches the PL emission from rGO-QDs at higher concentration of Ag NPs due to non-dissipative effects unlike plasmon induced Joule heating that occurs under resonance conditions. An increase in Au nanoparticles concentration results in an enhancement of PL emission due to electrostatic image charge effect.

  4. Anomalous self-generated electrostatic fields in nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lancia, L.; Antici, P.; Grech, M.; Weber, S.; Marques, J.-R.; Romagnani, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Bellue, A.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Grismayer, T.; Lin, T.; Nkonga, B.; Kodama, R.

    2011-03-15

    Electrostatic (E) fields associated with the interaction of a well-controlled, high-power, nanosecond laser pulse with an underdense plasma are diagnosed by proton radiography. Using a current three-dimensional wave propagation code equipped with nonlinear and nonlocal hydrodynamics, we can model the measured E-fields that are driven by the laser ponderomotive force in the region where the laser undergoes filamentation. However, strong fields of up to 110 MV/m measured in the first millimeter of propagation cannot be reproduced in the simulations. This could point to the presence of unexpected strong thermal electron pressure gradients possibly linked to ion acoustic turbulence, thus emphasizing the need for the development of full kinetic collisional simulations in order to properly model laser-plasma interaction in these strongly nonlinear conditions.

  5. Luminescence Color Tuning by Regulating Electrostatic Interaction in Light-Emitting Devices and Two-Photon Excited Information Decryption.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Liu, Shujuan; Yang, Huiran; Zeng, Yi; She, Pengfei; Zhu, Nianyong; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2017-03-06

    It is well-known that the variation of noncovalent interactions of luminophores, such as π-π interaction, metal-to-metal interaction, and hydrogen-bonding interaction, can regulate their emission colors. Electrostatic interaction is also an important noncovalent interaction. However, very few examples of luminescence color tuning induced by electrostatic interaction were reported. Herein, a series of Zn(II)-bis(terpyridine) complexes (Zn-AcO, Zn-BF4, Zn-ClO4, and Zn-PF6) containing different anionic counterions were reported, which exhibit counterion-dependent emission colors from green-yellow to orange-red (549 to 622 nm) in CH2Cl2 solution. More importantly, it was found that the excited states of these Zn(II) complexes can be regulated by changing the electrostatic interaction between Zn(2+) and counterions. On the basis of this controllable excited state, white light emission has been achieved by a single molecule, and a white light-emitting device has been fabricated. Moreover, a novel type of data decryption system with Zn-PF6 as the optical recording medium has been developed by the two-photon excitation technique. Our results suggest that rationally controlled excited states of these Zn(II) complexes by regulating electrostatic interaction have promising applications in various optoelectronic fields, such as light-emitting devices, information recording, security protection, and so on.

  6. Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming widely accepted that catalytic promiscuity, i.e., the ability of a single enzyme to catalyze the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme functions. In this context, the members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have been extensively studied as model systems in order to understand the phenomenon of enzyme multifunctionality. In the present work, we model the selectivity of two multiply promiscuous members of this superfamily, namely the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophylli and Rhizobium leguminosarum. We have performed extensive simulations of the enzymatic reaction of both wild-type enzymes and several experimentally characterized mutants. Our computational models are in agreement with key experimental observables, such as the observed activities of the wild-type enzymes, qualitative interpretations of experimental pH-rate profiles, and activity trends among several active site mutants. In all cases the substrates of interest bind to the enzyme in similar conformations, with largely unperturbed transition states from their corresponding analogues in aqueous solution. Examination of transition-state geometries and the contribution of individual residues to the calculated activation barriers suggest that the broad promiscuity of these enzymes arises from cooperative electrostatic interactions in the active site, allowing each enzyme to adapt to the electrostatic needs of different substrates. By comparing the structural and electrostatic features of several alkaline phosphatases, we suggest that this phenomenon is a generalized feature driving selectivity and promiscuity within this superfamily and can be in turn used for artificial enzyme design. PMID:26091851

  7. Interplay among electrostatic, dispersion and steric interactions: Spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations of π-hydrogen bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Vaishnav, Jamuna Kanaram; Hill, J Grant; Das, Aloke

    2017-01-26

    π-hydrogen bonding interactions are ubiquitous in both materials and biology. Despite their relatively weak nature great progress has been made in their investigation by experimental and theoretical methods, but this becomes significantly more complicated when secondary intermolecular interactions are present. In this study the effect of successive methyl substitution on the supramolecular structure and interaction energy of indole⋯methylated benzene (ind⋯n-mb, n = 1-6) complexes is probed through a combination of supersonic jet experiment and benchmark quality quantum chemical calculations. It is demonstrated that additional secondary interactions introduce a subtle interplay among electrostatic and dispersion forces, as well as steric repulsion, which fine-tunes the overall structural motif. Resonant Two-Photon Ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy techniques were used to probe jet-cooled ind⋯n-mb (n = 2, 3, 6) complexes, with red-shifting of the N-H IR stretching frequency showing that increasing the degree of methyl substitution increases the strength of the primary N-H⋯π interaction. Ab initio harmonic frequency and binding energy calculations confirm this trend for all six complexes. Electronic spectra of the three dimers are broad and structureless, with quantum chemical calculations revealing that this is likely due to multiple tilted conformations of each dimer possessing similar stabilization energies.

  8. Electrostatic Interactions in the Binding Pathway of a Transient Protein Complex Studied by NMR and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry*

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Erick; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of protein binding pathways is derived from extremely stable complexes that interact very tightly, with lifetimes of hours to days. Much less is known about weaker interactions and transient complexes because these are challenging to characterize experimentally. Nevertheless, these types of interactions are ubiquitous in living systems. The combination of NMR relaxation dispersion Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry allows the quantification of rapid binding kinetics for complexes with submillisecond lifetimes that are difficult to study using conventional techniques. We have used this approach to investigate the binding pathway of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, which forms complexes with peptide targets whose lifetimes are on the order of about a millisecond. Long range electrostatic interactions have been shown to play a critical role in the binding pathways of tightly binding complexes. The role of electrostatics in the binding pathways of transient complexes is less well understood. Similarly to previously studied tight complexes, we find that SH3 domain association rates are enhanced by long range electrostatics, whereas short range interactions are formed late in the docking process. However, the extent of electrostatic association rate enhancement is several orders of magnitudes less, whereas the electrostatic-free basal association rate is significantly greater. Thus, the SH3 domain is far less reliant on electrostatic enhancement to achieve rapid association kinetics than are previously studied systems. This suggests that there may be overall differences in the role played by electrostatics in the binding pathways of extremely stable versus transient complexes. PMID:25122758

  9. Electro-osmosis over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempt to bring out a generalized formulation for electro-osmotic flows over inhomogeneously charged surfaces in presence of non-electrostatic ion-ion interactions. To this end, we start with modified electro-chemical potential of the individual species and subsequently use it to derive modified Nernst-Planck equation accounting for the ionic fluxes generated because of the presence of non-electrostatic potential. We establish what we refer to as the Poisson-Helmholtz-Nernst-Planck equations, coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations, to describe the complete transport process. Our analysis shows that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions between the ions results in an excess body force on the fluid, and modifies the osmotic pressure as well, which has hitherto remained unexplored. We further apply our analysis to a simple geometry, in an effort to work out the Smoluchowski slip velocity for thin electrical double layer limits. To this end, we employ singular perturbation and develop a general framework for the asymptotic analysis. Our calculations reveal that the final expression for slip velocity remains the same as that without accounting for non-electrostatic interactions. However, the presence of non-electrostatic interactions along with ion specificity can significantly change the quantitative behavior of Smoluchowski slip velocity. We subsequently demonstrate that the presence of non-electrostatic interactions may significantly alter the effective interfacial potential, also termed as the "Zeta potential." Our analysis can potentially act as a guide towards the prediction and possibly quantitative determination of the implications associated with the existence of non-electrostatic potential, in an electrokinetic transport process.

  10. Electrostatic interactions in the binding pathway of a transient protein complex studied by NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Erick; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2014-10-03

    Much of our knowledge of protein binding pathways is derived from extremely stable complexes that interact very tightly, with lifetimes of hours to days. Much less is known about weaker interactions and transient complexes because these are challenging to characterize experimentally. Nevertheless, these types of interactions are ubiquitous in living systems. The combination of NMR relaxation dispersion Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry allows the quantification of rapid binding kinetics for complexes with submillisecond lifetimes that are difficult to study using conventional techniques. We have used this approach to investigate the binding pathway of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, which forms complexes with peptide targets whose lifetimes are on the order of about a millisecond. Long range electrostatic interactions have been shown to play a critical role in the binding pathways of tightly binding complexes. The role of electrostatics in the binding pathways of transient complexes is less well understood. Similarly to previously studied tight complexes, we find that SH3 domain association rates are enhanced by long range electrostatics, whereas short range interactions are formed late in the docking process. However, the extent of electrostatic association rate enhancement is several orders of magnitudes less, whereas the electrostatic-free basal association rate is significantly greater. Thus, the SH3 domain is far less reliant on electrostatic enhancement to achieve rapid association kinetics than are previously studied systems. This suggests that there may be overall differences in the role played by electrostatics in the binding pathways of extremely stable versus transient complexes.

  11. Globular-disorder transition in proteins: a compromise between hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions?

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2016-08-17

    The charge-hydrophobicity correlation of globular and disordered proteins is explored using a generalized self-consistent field theoretical method combined with Monte Carlo simulations. Globular and disordered protein sequences with varied mean net charge and mean hydrophobicity are designed by theory, while Metropolis Monte Carlo generates a suitable ensemble of conformations. Results imply a transition of the dominant interactions between globular and disordered proteins across the charge-hydrophobicity boundary. It is observed that the charge-hydrophobicity boundary actually represents a trade-off between the repulsive and attractive interactions in a protein sequence. The attractive interactions predominate on the globular side of the boundary, while the repulsive interactions prevail on the disordered side. For globular proteins, core forming hydrophobic interactions are dominant leading to a minimally frustrated native conformation. For disordered proteins, the repulsive electrostatic interactions prevail yielding a minimally frustrated region comprising of an expanded, dynamic conformational ensemble. Thus, protein disorder, like protein folding, satisfies the principle of minimal frustration. All results are compared to real globular and disordered proteins. Thus this algorithm may be useful to probe the conformational characteristics of disordered proteins.

  12. Prospective Teachers' Difficulties in Interpreting Elementary Phenomena of Electrostatic Interactions: Indicators of the Status of Their Intuitive Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criado, Ana Maria; Garcia-Carmona, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Student teachers were tested before and after a teaching unit on electrostatic interactions in an attempt to consider their intuitive ideas and concept development. A study was made of students' explanations of basic interactions: those between two charged bodies, and those between a charged body and a neutral body. Two indicators of the cognitive…

  13. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    PubMed

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  14. Trifluoroethanol effects on helix propensity and electrostatic interactions in the helical peptide from ribonuclease T1.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. K.; Pace, C. N.; Scholtz, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Trifluoroethanol (TFE) is often used to increase the helicity of peptides to make them usable as models of helices in proteins. We have measured helix propensities for all 20 amino acids in water and two concentrations of trifluoroethanol, 15 and 40% (v/v) using, as a model system, a peptide derived from the sequence of the alpha-helix of ribonuclease T1. There are three main conclusions from our studies. (1) TFE alters electrostatic interactions in the ribonuclease T1 helical peptide such that the dependence of the helical content on pH is lost in 40% TFE. (2) Helix propensities measured in 15% TFE correlate well with propensities measured in water, however, the correlation with propensities measured in 40% TFE is significantly worse. (3) Propensities measured in alanine-based peptides and the ribonuclease T1 peptide in TFE show very poor agreement, revealing that TFE greatly increases the effect of sequence context. PMID:9521115

  15. Rigorous surface charge method for determining electrostatic interaction energies in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Classical electrostatics plays a crucial role in bimolecular systems, dominating the interactions that determine the formation and dissolution of complexes responsible for the operation of cells. For systems that can be modeled as a set of piecewise-constant dielectric bodies, surface charge methods are usually preferable in both analytical and numerical contexts. We present a numerical implementation of a surface charge method previously used in analytical contexts. The method is applied to a realistic model of trypsin, an important protein involved in digesting other proteins, and one of its inhibitors, benzamidine. The classical calculations are complemented by density function theory calculations at short separations for which the classical model is inappropriate. We find that the surface charge method correctly distinguishes between correct and incorrect docking sites. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, National Library of Medicine.

  16. Diffusion coefficients from resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.

    2009-11-15

    Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients have been calculated for resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves using quasilinear diffusion theory. Unlike previous calculations, the parallel group velocity has been included in this study. Further, ECH wave intensity is expressed as a function of wave frequency and wave normal angle with respect to ambient magnetic field. It is found that observed wave electric field amplitudes in Earth's magnetosphere are sufficient to set electrons on strong diffusion in the energy ranges of a few hundred eV. However, the required amplitudes are larger than the observed values for keV electrons and higher by about a factor of 3 compared to past calculations. Required electric field amplitudes are smaller at larger radial distances. It is concluded that ECH waves are responsible for diffuse auroral precipitation of electrons with energies less than about 500 eV.

  17. Competition of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between small hydrophobes and model enclosures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The binding affinity between a probe hydrophobic particle and model hydrophobic plates with different charge (or dipole) densities in water was investigated through molecular dynamics simulations free-energy perturbation calculations. We observed a reduced binding affinity when the plates are charged, in agreement with previous findings. With increased charge density, the plates can change from “hydrophobic like” (pulling the particle into the interplate region) to “hydrophilic like” (ejecting the particle out of the interplate region), demonstrating the competition between hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The reduction of the binding affinity is quadratically dependent on the magnitude of the charge for symmetric systems, but linear and cubic terms also make a contribution for asymmetric systems. Statistical perturbation theory explains these results and shows when and why implicit solvent models fail. PMID:20443643

  18. The Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Folding of β-Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Caitlin M.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2016-01-01

    Atomic-level molecular dynamic simulations are capable of fully folding structurally diverse proteins; however, they are limited in their ability to accurately represent electrostatic interactions. Here we have experimentally tested the role of charged residues on stability and folding kinetics of one of the most widely simulated β-proteins, the WW domain. The folding of wild type Pin1 WW domain, which has two positively charged residues in the first turn, was compared to the fast folding mutant FiP35 Pin1, which introduces a negative charge into the first turn. A combination of FTIR spectroscopy and laser-induced temperature-jump coupled with infrared spectroscopy was used to probe changes in the amide I region. The relaxation dynamics of the peptide backbone, β-sheets and β-turns, and negatively charged aspartic acid side chain of FiP35 were measured independently by probing the corresponding bands assigned in the amide I region. Folding is initiated in the turns and the β-sheets form last. While the global folding mechanism is in good agreement with simulation predictions, we observe changes in the protonation state of aspartic acid during folding that have not been captured by simulation methods. The protonation state of aspartic acid is coupled to protein folding; the apparent pKa of aspartic acid in the folded protein is 6.4. The dynamics of the aspartic acid follow the dynamics of the intermediate phase, supporting assignment of this phase to formation of the first hairpin. These results demonstrate the importance of electrostatic interactions in turn stability and formation of extended β-sheet structures. PMID:26750867

  19. A variety of electrostatic interactions and adducts can activate NAD(P) cofactors for hydride transfer.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Rob; Cedergren-Zeppezauer, Eila

    2009-03-16

    In NAD(P)-dependent enzymes the coenzyme gives or takes a hydride ion, but how the nicotinamide ring is activated to form the transition state for hydride transfer is not clear. On the basis of ultra-high resolution X-ray crystal structures of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) in complex with NADH and a number of substrate analogues we proposed that the activation of NADH is an integral part of the enzyme mechanism of aldehyde reduction [R. Meijers, R.J. Morris, H.W. Adolph, A. Merli, V.S. Lamzin, E.S. Cedergren-Zeppezauer, On the enzymatic activation of NADH, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 276(12) (2001) 9316-9321, %U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11134046; R. Meijers, H.-W. Adolph, Z. Dauter, K.S. Wilson, V.S. Lamzin, E.S. Cedergren-Zeppezauer, Structural evidence for a ligand coordination switch in liver alcohol dehydrogenase, Biochemistry 46(18) (2007) 5446-5454, %U http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17429946]. We observed a nicotinamide with a severely distorted pyridine ring and a water molecule in close proximity to the ring. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that (de)protonation of the water molecule can be directly coupled to activation of NADH for hydride transfer. A systematic search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for atoms that come within van der Waals distance of the pyridine ring of the nicotinamide reveals that a large number of NAD(P)-containing protein complexes are involved in electrostatic interactions with the enzymatic environment. Using the deposited diffraction data to analyze the cofactor and its surroundings, we observe several adducts between protein atoms and the pyridine ring that were not previously reported. This further indicates that the enzymatic activation of NAD(P) induced by electrostatic interactions is an essential part of the hydride transfer mechanism.

  20. Lattice simulations of phase morphology on lipid bilayers: Renormalization, membrane shape, and electrostatic dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazon, Jonathan J.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2014-02-01

    When liquid phases coexist at equilibrium but are not driven to minimize domain interfacial contact energy, the resulting patterns of phase domains can have important implications for living cells. In this study we explore some of the interactions and conditions that produce the stable patterned phases that are observed in model lipid mixtures. By use of Monte Carlo simulations we find that background curvature is important for the formation of patterned (modulated) phases. The interactions that stabilize nanoscopic phase separation are still not well understood. We show that inclusion of an electrostatic dipole repulsion with decay lengths as short as two to four lipid diameters can break up domains at the nanometer scale and that the location of the miscibility critical point is sensitive to this interaction. The use of a coarse-grained simulation raises questions about comparing parameters in simulations performed at different length scales. Using renormalization group techniques we show how to reconcile this problem, treating line tension as a running coupling constant.

  1. Proton interaction with quasi-electrostatic whistler mode waves in an inhomogeneous plasma (magnetosphere)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, D. R.; Titova, E. E.

    2017-01-01

    We study the interaction between energetic protons of the Earth's radiation belts and quasi-electrostatic whistler mode waves. The nature of these waves is well known: whistler waves, which are excited in the magnetosphere due to cyclotron instability, enter the resonant regime of propagation and become quasielectrostatic, while their amplitude significantly increases. Far enough from the equator where proton gyrofrequency and transversal velocity increase the nonlinear interaction between these waves and energetic protons becomes possible. We show that plasma inhomogeneity may destroy cyclotron resonance between wave and proton on the time scale of the order of particle gyroperiod which in fact means the absence of cyclotron resonance; nevertheless, the interaction between waves and energetic particles remains nonlinear. In this case, particle dynamics in the phase space has the character of diffusion; however, the diffusion coefficients are determined by the averaged amplitude of the wave field, but not by its resonant harmonics. For real parameters of the waves and magnetospheric plasma, proton pitch-angle diffusion leading to their precipitation from the magnetosphere becomes essential.

  2. pH-programmable self-assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles: hydrophobic interaction versus electrostatic repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weikun; Kanyo, Istvan; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Thanneeru, Srinivas; He, Jie

    2014-12-01

    We report a general strategy to conceptualize a new design for the pH-programmable self-assembly of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) tethered by random copolymers of poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (P(St-co-AA)). It is based on using pH as an external stimulus to reversibly change the surface charge of polymer tethers and to control the delicate balance of interparticle attractive and repulsive interactions. By incorporating -COOH moieties locally within PSt hydrophobic segments, the change in the ionization degree of -COOH moieties can dramatically disrupt the hydrophobic attraction within a close distance. pH acts as a key parameter to control the deprotonation of -COOH moieties and ``programs'' the assembled nanostructures of plasmonic nanoparticles in a stepwise manner. At a higher solution pH where -COOH groups of polymer tethers became highly deprotonated, electrostatic repulsion dominated the self-assembly and favored the formation of end-to-end, anisotropic assemblies, e.g. 1-D single-line chains. At a lower pH, the less deprotonated -COOH groups led to the decrease of electrostatic repulsion and the side-to-side aggregates, e.g. clusters and multi-line chains of AuNPs, became favorable. The pH-programmable self-assembly allowed us to engineer a ``manual'' program for a sequential self-assembly by changing the pH of the solution. We demonstrated that the two-step pH-programmable assembly could generate more sophisticated ``multi-block'' chains using two differently sized AuNPs. Our strategy offers a general means for the programmable design of plasmonic nanoparticles into the specific pre-ordained nanostructures that are potentially useful for the precise control over their plasmon coupling.We report a general strategy to conceptualize a new design for the pH-programmable self-assembly of plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) tethered by random copolymers of poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (P(St-co-AA)). It is based on using pH as an external stimulus to

  3. Potential electrostatic interactions in multiple regions affect human metapneumovirus F-mediated membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andres; Hackett, Brent A; Winter, Christine C; Buchholz, Ursula J; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-09-01

    The recently identified human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a worldwide respiratory virus affecting all age groups and causing pneumonia and bronchiolitis in severe cases. Despite its clinical significance, no specific antiviral agents have been approved for treatment of HMPV infection. Unlike the case for most paramyxoviruses, the fusion proteins (F) of a number of strains, including the clinical isolate CAN97-83, can be triggered by low pH. We recently reported that residue H435 in the HRB linker domain acts as a pH sensor for HMPV CAN97-83 F, likely through electrostatic repulsion forces between a protonated H435 and its surrounding basic residues, K295, R396, and K438, at low pH. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that a positive charge at position 435 is required but not sufficient for F-mediated membrane fusion. Arginine or lysine substitution at position 435 resulted in a hyperfusogenic F protein, while replacement with aspartate or glutamate abolished fusion activity. Studies with recombinant viruses carrying mutations in this region confirmed its importance. Furthermore, a second region within the F(2) domain identified as being rich in charged residues was found to modulate fusion activity of HMPV F. Loss of charge at residues E51, D54, and E56 altered local folding and overall stability of the F protein, with dramatic consequences for fusion activity. As a whole, these studies implicate charged residues and potential electrostatic interactions in function, pH sensing, and overall stability of HMPV F.

  4. Electrostatic Interactions between Elongated Monomers Drive Filamentation of Drosophila Shrub, a Metazoan ESCRT-III Protein.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Brian J; Tibbe, Christine; Jeon, Hyesung; Drabek, Andrew A; Klein, Thomas; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2016-08-02

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a conserved protein complex that facilitates budding and fission of membranes. It executes a key step in many cellular events, including cytokinesis and multi-vesicular body formation. The ESCRT-III protein Shrub in flies, or its homologs in yeast (Snf7) or humans (CHMP4B), is a critical polymerizing component of ESCRT-III needed to effect membrane fission. We report the structural basis for polymerization of Shrub and define a minimal region required for filament formation. The X-ray structure of the Shrub core shows that individual monomers in the lattice interact in a staggered arrangement using complementary electrostatic surfaces. Mutations that disrupt interface salt bridges interfere with Shrub polymerization and function. Despite substantial sequence divergence and differences in packing interactions, the arrangement of Shrub subunits in the polymer resembles that of Snf7 and other family homologs, suggesting that this intermolecular packing mechanism is shared among ESCRT-III proteins.

  5. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  6. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; ...

    2016-05-09

    We develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Also, 3 G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to traditional heterodyne based MFM on model systems including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) and electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstratemore » its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode coupling phenomena. Finally we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any AFM platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties as well as their mutual interactions.« less

  7. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-09

    We develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Also, 3 G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to traditional heterodyne based MFM on model systems including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) and electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode coupling phenomena. Finally we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any AFM platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties as well as their mutual interactions.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of human prion protein: importance of correct treatment of electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Zuegg, J; Gready, J E

    1999-10-19

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the dynamical and structural behavior of a homology model of human prion protein HuPrP(90-230) generated from the NMR structure of the Syrian hamster prion protein ShPrP(90-231) and of ShPrP(<90-231) itself. These PrPs have a large number of charged residues on the protein surface. At the simulation pH 7, HuPrP(90-230) has a net charge of -1 eu from 15 positively and 14 negatively charged residues. Simulations for both PrPs, using the AMBER94 force field in a periodic box model with explicit water molecules, showed high sensitivity to the correct treatment of the electrostatic interactions. Highly unstable behavior of the structured region of the PrPs (127-230) was found using the truncation method, and stable trajectories could be achieved only by including all the long-range electrostatic interactions using the particle mesh Ewald (PME) method. The instability using the truncation method could not be reduced by adding sodium and chloride ions nor by replacing some of the sodium ions with calcium ions. The PME simulations showed, in accordance with NMR experiments with ShPrP and mouse PrP, a flexibly disordered N-terminal part, PrP(90-126), and a structured C-terminal part, PrP(127-230), which includes three alpha-helices and a short antiparallel beta-strand. The simulations showed some tendency for the highly conserved hydrophobic segment PrP(112-131) to adopt an alpha-helical conformation and for helix C to split at residues 212-213, a known disease-associated mutation site (Q212P). Three highly occupied salt bridges could be identified (E146/D144<-->R208, R164<-->D178, and R156<-->E196) which appear to be important for the stability of PrP by linking the stable main structured core (helices B and C) with the more flexible structured part (helix A and strands A and B). Two of these salt bridges involve disease-associated mutations (R208H and D178N). Decreased PrP stability shown by protein unfolding

  9. Electrostatic Interactions in Dissipative Particle Dynamics: Toward a Mesoscale Modeling of the Polyelectrolyte Brushes.

    PubMed

    Ibergay, Cyrille; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2009-12-08

    We report mesoscopic simulations of bulk electrolytes and polyelectrolyte brushes using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. The calculation of the electrostatic interactions is carried out using both the Ewald summation method and the particle-particle particle-mesh technique with charges distributed over the particles. The local components of the pressure tensor are calculated using the Irving and Kirkwood, and the method of planes and mechanical equilibrium is demonstrated. The profiles of the normal component of the pressure tensor are shown to be similar for both the Ewald and particle-particle particle-mesh methods for a single polyelectrolyte brush. We show that the PPPM method with the MOP technique is the appropriate choice for simulations of this type. The mesoscale modeling of a strongly stretched polylectrolyte brush formed by strong charged polymer chains at a high grafting density shows that the polyelectrolyte follows the nonlinear osmotic regime, as expected from the calculation of the Gouy-Chapman length and the dimensionless Manning ratio.

  10. Electrocatalytic tuning of biosensing response through electrostatic or hydrophobic enzyme-graphene oxide interactions.

    PubMed

    Baptista-Pires, Luis; Pérez-López, Briza; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Morales-Narváez, Eden; Domingo, Neus; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Alzina, Francesc; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M; Merkoçi, Arben

    2014-11-15

    The effect of graphene oxidative grades upon the conductivity and hydrophobicity and consequently the influence on an enzymatic biosensing response is presented. The electrochemical responses of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been compared with the responses obtained from the oxide form (oGO) and their performances have been accordingly discussed with various evidences obtained by optical techniques. We used tyrosinase enzyme as a proof of concept receptor with interest for phenolic compounds detection through its direct adsorption onto a screen-printed carbon electrode previously modified with oGO or rGO with a carbon-oxygen ratio of 1.07 or 1.53 respectively. Different levels of oGO directly affect the (bio)conjugation properties of the biosensor due to changes at enzyme/graphene oxide interface coming from the various electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions with biomolecules. The developed biosensor was capable of reaching a limit of detection of 0.01 nM catechol. This tuning capability of the biosensor response can be of interest for building several other biosensors, including immunosensors and DNA sensors for various applications.

  11. Modulation of electrostatic interactions to improve controlled drug delivery from nanogels.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Emanuele; Chincarini, Giulia M F; Rigamonti, Riccardo; Magagnin, Luca; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Rossi, Filippo

    2017-03-01

    The synthesis of nanogels as devices capable to maintain the drug level within a desired range for a long and sustained period of time is a leading strategy in controlled drug delivery. However, with respect to the good results obtained with antibodies and peptides there are a lot of problems related to the quick and uncontrolled diffusion of small hydrophilic molecules through polymeric network pores. For these reasons research community is pointing toward the use of click strategies to reduce release rates of the linked drugs to the polymer chains. Here we propose an alternative method that considers the electrostatic interactions between polymeric chains and drugs to tune the release kinetics from nanogel network. The main advantage of these systems lies in the fact that the carried drugs are not modified and no chemical reactions take place during their loading and release. In this work we synthesized PEG-PEI based nanogels with different protonation degrees and the release kinetics with charged and uncharged drug mimetics (sodium fluorescein, SF, and rhodamine B, RhB) were studied. Moreover, also the effect of counterion used to induce protonation was taken into account in order to build a tunable drug delivery system able to provide multiple release rates with the same device.

  12. Accurate and general treatment of electrostatic interaction in Hamiltonian adaptive resolution simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, M.; Cortes-Huerto, R.; Donadio, D.; Potestio, R.

    2016-10-01

    In adaptive resolution simulations the same system is concurrently modeled with different resolution in different subdomains of the simulation box, thereby enabling an accurate description in a small but relevant region, while the rest is treated with a computationally parsimonious model. In this framework, electrostatic interaction, whose accurate treatment is a crucial aspect in the realistic modeling of soft matter and biological systems, represents a particularly acute problem due to the intrinsic long-range nature of Coulomb potential. In the present work we propose and validate the usage of a short-range modification of Coulomb potential, the Damped shifted force (DSF) model, in the context of the Hamiltonian adaptive resolution simulation (H-AdResS) scheme. This approach, which is here validated on bulk water, ensures a reliable reproduction of the structural and dynamical properties of the liquid, and enables a seamless embedding in the H-AdResS framework. The resulting dual-resolution setup is implemented in the LAMMPS simulation package, and its customized version employed in the present work is made publicly available.

  13. Evolution of Clouds of Migrating Micron-particles with Hydrodynamic and Electrostatic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuiqing; Chen, Sheng

    2016-11-01

    The evolution of dilute clouds of charged micron-sized particles during the migration in an external electric field is numerically investigated. The hydrodynamic interaction is modeled employing the Oseen dynamics in the limit of small-but-finite particle Reynolds number. The effects of external field and inter-particle Coulomb repulsion are accounted by a pairwise summation. As a result, with a dominant external electrostatic force, the cloud is seen to flatten into a planar configuration with particle leakage in the tail and eventually breaks up into two small clouds. Decreasing the external force or increasing the pairwise Coulomb repulsion has a similar effect on the dynamics of the cloud, i.e., decreases the scaled migrating velocity of the cloud and makes the cloud steady in its spherical shape. While this behavior bears some similarity with the transition from the Stokes regime to the micro-scale inertia dominant regime, the underlying physical mechanisms differ. Finally, the variation of the typical aspect ratio of the cloud, as a function of a scaled radial velocity of particles, is used to quantify the effect of Coulomb repulsion on the stability of the shape of the cloud.

  14. Doxorubicin-loaded polypeptide nanorods based on electrostatic interactions for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longlong; Zhang, Pei; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhang, Yongchun; Cao, Longqiao; Luan, Yuxia

    2016-02-15

    An amphiphilic anionic polypeptide, methoxypolyethylene glycol-poly (glutamic acid) (mPEG-PGA), was synthesized, characterized and evaluated as a nanocarrier for the cationic anticancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl). The complex self-assembled into nanorods in aqueous solutions via electrostatic interactions and exhibited a superior drug loading content (50.8%) and drug loading efficiency (90.2%). The average major axis of the drug-loaded nanorods was approximately 300nm, as determined by transmission electron microscopy. An in vitro release assay showed that drug-loaded nanorods exhibited pH-sensitivity and sustained release. Haemolysis assays demonstrated that the polypeptide was haemocompatible, and the polypeptide drug carrier significantly reduced the haemolysis ratio of DOX·HCl. The pharmacokinetics study showed that DOX-loaded nanorods significantly prolonged the resident time in blood. An in vitro cytotoxicity study and cellular uptake assays demonstrated that the DOX-loaded nanorods resulted in higher cell proliferation inhibition and a higher level of tumour cell uptake in A549 cells than with free DOX·HCl. The prolonged circulation and enhanced antitumor efficacy of DOX-loaded nanorods shows promise for efficient cancer chemotherapy.

  15. Electrostatic interactions at the C-terminal domain of nucleoplasmin modulate its chromatin decondensation activity.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Aitor; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Bañuelos, Sonia; Prado, Adelina; Muga, Arturo

    2002-05-21

    The chromatin decondensation activity, thermal stability, and secondary structure of recombinant nucleoplasmin, of two deletion mutants, and of the protein isolated from Xenopus oocytes have been characterized. As previously reported, the chromatin decondensation activity of recombinant, unphosphorylated nucleoplasmin is almost negligible. Our data show that deletion of 50 residues at the C-terminal domain of the protein, containing the positively charged nuclear localization sequence, activates its chromatin decondensation ability and decreases its stability. Interestingly, both the decondensation activity and thermal stability of this deletion mutant resemble those of the phosphorylated protein isolated from Xenopus oocytes. Deletion of 80 residues at the C-terminal domain, containing the above-mentioned positively charged region and a poly(Glu) tract, inactivates the protein and increases its thermal stability. These findings, along with the effect of salt on the thermal stability of these proteins, suggest that electrostatic interactions between the positive nuclear localization sequence and the poly(Glu) tract, at the C-terminal domain, modulate protein activity and stability.

  16. Zero-multipole summation method for efficiently estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular system.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo

    2013-11-07

    The zero-multipole summation method has been developed to efficiently evaluate the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a point charge system. This summation prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large amounts of energetic noise and significant artifacts. The resulting energy function is represented by a constant term plus a simple pairwise summation, using a damped or undamped Coulombic pair potential function along with a polynomial of the distance between each particle pair. Thus, the implementation is straightforward and enables facile applications to high-performance computations. Any higher-order multipole moment can be taken into account in the neutrality principle, and it only affects the degree and coefficients of the polynomial and the constant term. The lowest and second moments correspond respectively to the Wolf zero-charge scheme and the zero-dipole summation scheme, which was previously proposed. Relationships with other non-Ewald methods are discussed, to validate the current method in their contexts. Good numerical efficiencies were easily obtained in the evaluation of Madelung constants of sodium chloride and cesium chloride crystals.

  17. Zero-multipole summation method for efficiently estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo

    2013-11-01

    The zero-multipole summation method has been developed to efficiently evaluate the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a point charge system. This summation prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large amounts of energetic noise and significant artifacts. The resulting energy function is represented by a constant term plus a simple pairwise summation, using a damped or undamped Coulombic pair potential function along with a polynomial of the distance between each particle pair. Thus, the implementation is straightforward and enables facile applications to high-performance computations. Any higher-order multipole moment can be taken into account in the neutrality principle, and it only affects the degree and coefficients of the polynomial and the constant term. The lowest and second moments correspond respectively to the Wolf zero-charge scheme and the zero-dipole summation scheme, which was previously proposed. Relationships with other non-Ewald methods are discussed, to validate the current method in their contexts. Good numerical efficiencies were easily obtained in the evaluation of Madelung constants of sodium chloride and cesium chloride crystals.

  18. Zero-multipole summation method for efficiently estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular system

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Ikuo

    2013-11-07

    The zero-multipole summation method has been developed to efficiently evaluate the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a point charge system. This summation prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large amounts of energetic noise and significant artifacts. The resulting energy function is represented by a constant term plus a simple pairwise summation, using a damped or undamped Coulombic pair potential function along with a polynomial of the distance between each particle pair. Thus, the implementation is straightforward and enables facile applications to high-performance computations. Any higher-order multipole moment can be taken into account in the neutrality principle, and it only affects the degree and coefficients of the polynomial and the constant term. The lowest and second moments correspond respectively to the Wolf zero-charge scheme and the zero-dipole summation scheme, which was previously proposed. Relationships with other non-Ewald methods are discussed, to validate the current method in their contexts. Good numerical efficiencies were easily obtained in the evaluation of Madelung constants of sodium chloride and cesium chloride crystals.

  19. Electrostatic Interactions Guide the Active Site Face of a Structure-Specific Ribonuclease to Its RNA Substrate†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Restrictocin, a member of the α-sarcin family of site-specific endoribonucleases, uses electrostatic interactions to bind to the ribosome and to RNA oligonucleotides, including the minimal specific substrate, the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 23S−28S rRNA. Restrictocin binds to the SRL by forming a ground-state E:S complex that is stabilized predominantly by Coulomb interactions and depends on neither the sequence nor structure of the RNA, suggesting a nonspecific complex. The 22 cationic residues of restrictocin are dispersed throughout this protein surface, complicating a priori identification of a Coulomb interacting surface. Structural studies have identified an enzyme−substrate interface, which is expected to overlap with the electrostatic E:S interface. Here, we identified restrictocin residues that contribute to binding in the E:S complex by determining the salt dependence [∂ log(k2/K1/2)/∂ log[KCl

  20. Beyond the electrostatic model: the significant roles of orbital interaction and the dispersion effect in aqueous-π systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rundong; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-01-04

    The electrostatic model, which is widely used to explain π-involved interactions, gives an intuitive picture of these intermolecular interactions and has successfully predicted many phenomena in recent decades. Still, this simple model faces problems in certain cases and it has come under fire in previous studies on π-π stacking interactions. Here, employing ab initio calculations, we have identified several counter examples in aqueous-π systems which cannot be explained adequately using the classical electrostatic model, and revealed the underlying reason. We find strong intermolecular orbital interactions in both aqueous-π hydrogen bond and lone-pair-π interactions, and thus extend the previously proposed new model for π-π stacking to aqueous-π systems: while the electrostatic attraction and dispersion effects are the main driving forces pulling the monomers together, Pauli repulsion plays a role in keeping them apart. Interestingly, the molecular orbitals on the concerned monomers exhibit a weak bonding nature at the equilibrium distance.

  1. Colistin-entrapped liposomes driven by the electrostatic interaction: Mechanism of drug loading and in vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Tang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Enbo; Yang, Li

    2016-12-30

    The potential in vivo application of liposome for polycationic colistin has been hindered by the poor entrapment efficiency (EE) due to their phospholipid membrane permeability. The objective of this study is to investigate the loading mechanism and validity of applying electrostatic attraction for the colistin entrapment and delivery in liposomes. Anionic lipids with various structures were used for colistin entrapment, and the properties of resulting liposomes (i.e. zeta-potential, EE and release rate) were highly dependent on the structure of anionic lipids. Based on consideration of intermolecular interactions, the retention of electrostatically entrapped colistin is essentially determined by the balance of interfacial hydrophobic attraction and electrostatic repulsion. The liposomal colistin showed the reduced bacterial killing rate, but did not compromise the in vitro antibacterial activity. Specially, the PEGylated liposomal colistin of sodium cholesteryl sulfate (Chol-SO4(-)) showed the best drug retention, resulting in the significantly increased maximum-tolerated dose, prolonged blood circulation and decreased colistin distribution in kidney after intravenous administration in mice. These results highlight the potential utility of electrostatically entrapped liposome for polycationic colistin delivery.

  2. Effective electrostatic interactions among charged thermo-responsive microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    González-Mozuelos, P.

    2016-02-07

    This work explores the nature and thermodynamic behavior of the effective electrostatic interactions among charged microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte, taking special interest in the effects due to the thermally induced variation of the microgel size while the remaining parameters (microgel charge and concentration, plus the amount of added salt) are kept constant. To this end, the rigorous approach obtained from applying the precise methodology of the dressed ion theory to the proper definition of the effective direct correlation functions, which emerge from tracing-out the degrees of freedom of the microscopic ions, is employed to provide an exact description of the parameters characterizing such interactions: screening length, effective permittivity, and renormalized charges. A model solution with three components is assumed: large permeable anionic spheres for the microgels, plus small charged hard spheres of equal size for the monovalent cations and anions. The two-body correlations among the components of this model suspension, used as the input for the determination of the effective interaction parameters, are here calculated by using the hyper-netted chain approximation. It is then found that at finite microgel concentrations the values of these parameters change as the microgel size increases, even though the ionic strength of the supporting electrolyte and the bare charge of the microgels remain fixed during this process. The variation of the screening length, as well as that of the effective permittivity, is rather small, but still interesting in view of the fact that the corresponding Debye length stays constant. The renormalized charges, in contrast, increase markedly as the microgels swell. The ratio of the renormalized charge to the corresponding analytic result obtained in the context of an extended linear response theory allows us to introduce an effective charge that accounts for the non-linear effects induced by the short

  3. Control of Electrostatic Interactions Between F-Actin And Genetically Modified Lysozyme in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, L.K.; Xian, W.; Guaqueta, C.; Strohman, M.; Vrasich, C.R.; Luijten, E.; Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  4. Control of electrostatic interactions between F-actin and genetically modified lysozyme in aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Lori K.; Xian, Wujing; Guaqueta, Camilo; Strohman, Michael J.; Vrasich, Chuck R.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2008-07-11

    The aim for deterministic control of the interactions between macroions in aqueous media has motivated widespread experimental and theoretical work. Although it has been well established that like-charged macromolecules can aggregate under the influence of oppositely charged condensing agents, the specific conditions for the stability of such aggregates can only be determined empirically. We examine these conditions, which involve an interplay of electrostatic and osmotic effects, by using a well defined model system composed of F-actin, an anionic rod-like polyelectrolyte, and lysozyme, a cationic globular protein with a charge that can be genetically modified. The structure and stability of actin-lysozyme complexes for different lysozyme charge mutants and salt concentrations are examined by using synchrotron x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We provide evidence that supports a structural transition from columnar arrangements of F-actin held together by arrays of lysozyme at the threefold interstitial sites of the actin sublattice to marginally stable complexes in which lysozyme resides at twofold bridging sites between actin. The reduced stability arises from strongly reduced partitioning of salt between the complex and the surrounding solution. Changes in the stability of actin-lysozyme complexes are of biomedical interest because their formation has been reported to contribute to the persistence of airway infections in cystic fibrosis by sequestering antimicrobials such as lysozyme. We present x-ray microscopy results that argue for the existence of actin-lysozyme complexes in cystic fibrosis sputum and demonstrate that, for a wide range of salt conditions, charge-reduced lysozyme is not sequestered in ordered complexes while retaining its bacterial killing activity.

  5. Activation of the SN2 Reaction by Adjacent π Systems: The Critical Role of Electrostatic Interactions and of Dissociative Character.

    PubMed

    Robiette, Raphaël; Trieu-Van, Tran; Aggarwal, Varinder K; Harvey, Jeremy N

    2016-01-27

    The activation of the SN2 reaction by π systems is well documented in textbooks. It has been shown previously that this is not primarily due to classical (hyper)conjugative effects. Instead, π-conjugated substituents enhance favorable substrate-nucleophile electrostatic interactions, with electron-withdrawing groups (EWG) on the sp(2) system leading to even stronger activation. Herein we report computational and experimental results which show that this activation by sp(2) EWG-substitution only occurs in a fairly limited number of cases, when the nucleophile involves strong electrostatic interactions (usually strongly basic negatively charged nucleophiles). In other cases, where bond breaking is more advanced than bond making at the transition state, electrophile-nucleophile electrostatic interactions are less important. In such cases, (hyper)conjugative electronic effects determine the reactivity, and EWG-substitution leads to decreased reactivity. The basicity of the nucleophile as well as solvent effects can help to determine which of these two regimes occurs for a given electrophile.

  6. Investigation of plasma–surface interaction effects on pulsed electrostatic manipulation for reentry blackout alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Close, S.

    2017-03-01

    The reentry blackout phenomenon affects most spacecraft entering a dense planetary atmosphere from space, due to the presence of a plasma layer that surrounds the spacecraft. This plasma layer is created by ionization of ambient air due to shock and frictional heating, and in some cases is further enhanced due to contamination by ablation products. This layer causes a strong attenuation of incoming and outgoing electromagnetic waves including those used for command and control, communication and telemetry over a period referred to as the ‘blackout period’. The blackout period may last up to several minutes and is a major contributor to the landing error ellipse at best, and a serious safety hazard in the worst case, especially in the context of human spaceflight. In this work, we present a possible method for alleviation of reentry blackout using electronegative DC pulses applied from insulated electrodes on the reentry vehicle’s surface. We study the reentry plasma’s interaction with a DC pulse using a particle-in-cell (PIC) model. Detailed models of plasma–insulator interaction are included in our simulations. The absorption and scattering of ions and electrons at the plasma–dielectric interface are taken into account. Secondary emission from the insulating surface is also considered, and its implications on various design issues is studied. Furthermore, we explore the effect of changing the applied voltage and the impact of surface physics on the creation and stabilization of communication windows. The primary aim of this analysis is to examine the possibility of restoring L- and S-band communication from the spacecraft to a ground station. Our results provide insight into the effect of key design variables on the response of the plasma to the applied voltage pulse. Simulations show the creation of pockets where electron density in the plasma layer is reduced three orders of magnitude or more in the vicinity of the electrodes. These pockets extend to

  7. Electrochemical genosensor based on peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR and asymmetric PCR techniques: Electrostatic interactions with a metal cation.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Nagatani, Naoki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2006-04-01

    The unique structure of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), linking the N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units that create a neutral backbone, and prevent it from acting as a primer for DNA polymerase, has been utilized in an electrochemical biosensor scheme for simple and sensitive detection of hybridization. When the PNA is targeted against a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or wild-type site on the gene, PNA-mediated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clamping method effectively blocks the formation of a PCR product. In our report, PNA probe for PCR clamping was targeted against the wild-type site of alcohol dehydrogenase. The electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged DNA and neutral PNA molecules with redox-active metal cation cobalt(III)hexamine ([Co(NH3)6]3+) were monitored using differential pulse voltammetry. The electrostatic binding of [Co(NH3)6]3+ to DNA provided the basis for the discrimination against PNA/PNA, PNA/DNA, and DNA/DNA hybrid molecules. We have optimized the experimental conditions, such as probe concentration, [Co(NH3)6]3+ concentration, accumulation time for [Co(NH3)6]3+, and target concentration. A new pretreatment method has also been employed to allow fast and simple detection of hybridization reaction between the PCR amplicon and the probe on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. This method was based on the application of a high-temperature treatment (95 degrees C, 5 min), followed by a 1-min incubation in the presence of DNA primers. The excess concentration of DNA primers prevented the rehybridization of the denatured strands, while enabling the target gene sequence to bind with the immobilized probe. Additionally, asymmetric PCR was employed to detect the presence of genetically modified organism in standard Roundup Ready soybean samples. The amplicons of asymmetric PCR, which were predominantly single-stranded DNA as a result of unequal primer concentration, hybridized with the DNA probe on the sensor surface efficiently. The

  8. Electrostatically enhanced FF interactions through hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding and metal coordination: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2016-07-27

    In this manuscript the ability of hydrogen and halogen bonding interactions, as well as metal coordination to enhance FF interactions involving fluorine substituted aromatic rings has been studied at the RI-MP2/def2-TZVPD level of theory. We have used 4-fluoropyridine, 4-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-(4-fluorophenyl)propiolonitrile and their respective meta derivatives as aromatic compounds. In addition, we have used HF and IF as hydrogen and halogen bond donors, respectively, and Ag(i) as the coordination metal. Furthermore, we have also used HF as an electron rich fluorine donor entity, thus establishing FF interactions with the above mentioned aromatic systems. Moreover, a CSD (Cambridge Structural Database) search has been carried out and some interesting examples have been found, highlighting the impact of FF interactions involving aromatic fluorine atoms in solid state chemistry. Finally, cooperativity effects between FF interactions and both hydrogen and halogen bonding interactions have been analyzed and compared. We have also used Bader's theory of "atoms in molecules" to further describe the cooperative effects.

  9. Linear (in oscillation dimensionless amplitude) interaction between the modes of a nonspherical charged drop in an external electrostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, S. O.; Petrushov, N. A.; Grigor'ev, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    The stability of a heavily charged drop in a weak uniform electrostatic field (in which the equilibrium shape of the drop can be represented by a prolate spheroid) is calculated in the fourth order of smallness in the eccentricity of the spheroidal drop and in the first order of smallness in the drop oscillation dimensionless amplitude. It is found that as the order of approximation in eccentricity grows, so does the number of modes interacting with the initially excited mode. In the given order of smallness, the preferred (initially excited) mode is shown to interact with the nearest eight modes. The drop becomes unstable if such is the second mode.

  10. Amine-Rich Organic Thin Films for Cell Culture: Possible Electrostatic Effects in Cell-Surface Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheimer, Michael R.; St-Georges-Robillard, Amélie; Lerouge, Sophie; Mwale, Fackson; Elkin, Bentsian; Oehr, Christian; Wirges, Werner; Gerhard, Reimund

    2012-11-01

    In recent communications from these laboratories, we observed that amine-rich thin organic layers are very efficient surfaces for the adhesion of mammalian cells. We prepare such deposits by plasma polymerization at low pressure, atmospheric pressure, or by vacuum-ultraviolet photo-polymerization. More recently, we have also investigated a commercially available material, Parylene diX AM. In this article we first briefly introduce literature relating to electrostatic interactions between cells, proteins, and charged surfaces. We then present certain selected cell-response results that pertain to applications in orthopedic and cardiovascular medicine: we discuss the influence of surface properties on the observed behaviors of two particular cell lines, human U937 monocytes, and Chinese hamster ovary cells. Particular emphasis is placed on possible electrostatic attractive forces due to positively charged R-NH3+ groups and negatively charged proteins and cells, respectively. Experiments carried out with electrets, polymers with high positive or negative surface potentials are added for comparison.

  11. Interactions Between Small Arrays of Atmospheric Pressure Micro-Plasma Jets: Gas Dynamic, Radiation and Electrostatic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets are widely used devices for biomedical applications. A typical plasma jet consists of a tube through which noble gas or its mixture with a molecular gas flows. The noble gas creates a channel into the ambient air which is eventually dispersed by interdiffusion with the air. Plasma plumes are formed by the propagation of ionization waves (IWs) through the tubes and then through the noble gas phase channel. The IW typically propagates until the mole fraction of the ambient air in the channel increases above a critical values which requires a larger E/N to propagate the IW. By grouping several jets together to form an array of jets, one can in principle increase the area treated by the plume. If the jets are sufficiently far apart, the IWs and resulting plasma plumes are independent. As the spacing between the jets decreases, the plasma jets begin to mutually interact. In this talk, we discuss results from a computational investigation of small arrays of He/O2 micro-plasma jets propagating into ambient air. The model used in this work, nonPDPSIM, is a plasma hydrodynamics model in which continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for charged and neutral species with solution of Poisson's equation for the electric potential. Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the gas dynamics and radiation transport is addressed using a propagator method. We found that as the spacing between the jets decreases, the He channels from the individual jets tend to merge. The IWs from each channel also merge into regions having the highest He mole fraction and so lowest E/N to sustain the IW. The proximity of the IWs enable other forms of interaction. If the IWs are of the same polarity, electrostatic forces can warp the paths of the IWs. If in sufficient proximity, the photoionization from one IW can influence its neighbors. The synchronization of the voltage pulses of adjacent IWs can also influence its neighbors. With synchronized pulses

  12. Protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin films: role of electrostatic interactions inferred from zeta-potential measurements versus chemisorption.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Frisch, Benoît; Ringwald, Christian; Ball, Vincent

    2010-04-01

    We recently showed the possibility to build dopamine-melanin films of controlled thickness by successive immersions of a substrate in alkaline solutions of dopamine [F. Bernsmann, A. Ponche, C. Ringwald, J. Hemmerlé, J. Raya, B. Bechinger, J.-C. Voegel, P. Schaaf, V. Ball, J. Phys. Chem. C 113 (2009) 8234-8242]. In this work the structure and properties of such films are further explored. The zeta-potential of dopamine-melanin films is measured as a function of the total immersion time to build the film. It appears that the film bears a constant zeta-potential of (-39+/-3) mV after 12 immersion steps. These data are used to calculate the surface density of charged groups of the dopamine-melanin films at pH 8.5 that are mostly catechol or quinone imine chemical groups. Furthermore the zeta-potential is used to explain the adsorption of three model proteins (lysozyme, myoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin), which is monitored by quartz crystal microbalance. We come to the conclusion that protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin is not only determined by possible covalent binding between amino groups of the proteins and catechol groups of dopamine-melanin but that electrostatic interactions contribute to protein binding. Part of the adsorbed proteins can be desorbed by sodium dodecylsulfate solutions at the critical micellar concentration. The fraction of weakly bound proteins decreases with their isoelectric point. Additionally the number of available sites for covalent binding of amino groups on melanin grains is quantified.

  13. An investigation of electrostatic interactions between organically functionalized silica particles, surfaces, and metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Sarah Margaret

    This research focuses on the electrostatic interactions between silica particles and either coated surfaces or metal ions. This work has two objectives: to begin a preliminary investigation into particle-surface systems that may be ideal for further investigation as a sensor and to investigate metal-ligand interactions for the potential use of metal ions to aid in the self assembly of silica particles. Silica particles with various organic functionalizations were synthesized from trialkoxysilane precursors using variations of the Stöber synthesis method, a well-known colloidal suspensions technique. The functional groups that were used in this work include mercaptopropyl (MPTMS), ethylenediamine (enTMOS), and aminopropyl groups (APTES). The aminopropyl functionalized particles were synthesized by varying the mol% of APTES in a tetraethoxyorthosilicate (TEOS) particle formulation. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyze the particles for size, shape, and composition. Silica particles with all three functionalizations were used for the particle-surface study, whereas only MPTMS particles were used in the metal-ligand study. The coatings used for the particle-surface study were synthesized using standard sol gel chemistry with trialkoxysilane precursors as well. The functional groups used in this study include methyl (MTMOS) and aminopropyl groups (TEOS/APTES). Sol gel coatings incorporating carboxy and ammonium groups were also investigated but were not suitable for further study. FTIR was used to analyze the MTMOS and TEOS/APTES coatings. The adsorption of the MPTMS particles onto TEOS/APTES coatings and enTMOS or TEOS/APTES particles onto MTMOS coatings over time was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. Since silica particles are not fluorescent in the visible light range, a fluorescent dye was incorporated into the particles, either rhodamine (MPTMS particles) or pyranine dye (enTMOS, TEOS

  14. Toward transferable interatomic van der Waals interactions without electrons: The role of multipole electrostatics and many-body dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Bereau, Tristan; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2014-07-21

    We estimate polarizabilities of atoms in molecules without electron density, using a Voronoi tesselation approach instead of conventional density partitioning schemes. The resulting atomic dispersion coefficients are calculated, as well as many-body dispersion effects on intermolecular potential energies. We also estimate contributions from multipole electrostatics and compare them to dispersion. We assess the performance of the resulting intermolecular interaction model from dispersion and electrostatics for more than 1300 neutral and charged, small organic molecular dimers. Applications to water clusters, the benzene crystal, the anti-cancer drug ellipticine—intercalated between two Watson-Crick DNA base pairs, as well as six macro-molecular host-guest complexes highlight the potential of this method and help to identify points of future improvement. The mean absolute error made by the combination of static electrostatics with many-body dispersion reduces at larger distances, while it plateaus for two-body dispersion, in conflict with the common assumption that the simple 1/R{sup 6} correction will yield proper dissociative tails. Overall, the method achieves an accuracy well within conventional molecular force fields while exhibiting a simple parametrization protocol.

  15. Toward transferable interatomic van der Waals interactions without electrons: The role of multipole electrostatics and many-body dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2014-07-01

    We estimate polarizabilities of atoms in molecules without electron density, using a Voronoi tesselation approach instead of conventional density partitioning schemes. The resulting atomic dispersion coefficients are calculated, as well as many-body dispersion effects on intermolecular potential energies. We also estimate contributions from multipole electrostatics and compare them to dispersion. We assess the performance of the resulting intermolecular interaction model from dispersion and electrostatics for more than 1300 neutral and charged, small organic molecular dimers. Applications to water clusters, the benzene crystal, the anti-cancer drug ellipticine—intercalated between two Watson-Crick DNA base pairs, as well as six macro-molecular host-guest complexes highlight the potential of this method and help to identify points of future improvement. The mean absolute error made by the combination of static electrostatics with many-body dispersion reduces at larger distances, while it plateaus for two-body dispersion, in conflict with the common assumption that the simple 1/R6 correction will yield proper dissociative tails. Overall, the method achieves an accuracy well within conventional molecular force fields while exhibiting a simple parametrization protocol.

  16. Electrostatic Interactions between Complement Regulator CD46(SCR1-2) and Adenovirus Ad11/Ad21 Fiber Protein Knob

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Carl Z.; Gorham, Ronald D.; Gaieb, Zied; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses bind to a variety of human cells to cause infection. Both the B2 adenovirus 11 and B1 adenovirus 21 use protein knobs to bind to complement regulator CD46(SCR1-2) in order to gain entry into host cells. In each complex, the two proteins are highly negatively charged but bind to each other at an interface with oppositely charged surface patches. We computationally generated single-alanine mutants of charged residues in the complexes CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad11k and CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad21k. We used electrostatic clustering and Poisson-Boltzmann free energy calculations to propose a hypothesis on the role of electrostatics in association. Our results delineate specific interfacial electrostatic interactions that are critical for association in both CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad11k and CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad21k. These results will serve as a predictive tool in the selection of mutants with desired binding affinity in experimental mutagenesis studies. This study will also serve as a foundation for the design of inhibitors to treat adenovirus infections. PMID:26357573

  17. Electrostatic Interactions between Complement Regulator CD46(SCR1-2) and Adenovirus Ad11/Ad21 Fiber Protein Knob.

    PubMed

    Chen, Carl Z; Gorham, Ronald D; Gaieb, Zied; Morikis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses bind to a variety of human cells to cause infection. Both the B2 adenovirus 11 and B1 adenovirus 21 use protein knobs to bind to complement regulator CD46(SCR1-2) in order to gain entry into host cells. In each complex, the two proteins are highly negatively charged but bind to each other at an interface with oppositely charged surface patches. We computationally generated single-alanine mutants of charged residues in the complexes CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad11k and CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad21k. We used electrostatic clustering and Poisson-Boltzmann free energy calculations to propose a hypothesis on the role of electrostatics in association. Our results delineate specific interfacial electrostatic interactions that are critical for association in both CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad11k and CD46(SCR1-2)-Ad21k. These results will serve as a predictive tool in the selection of mutants with desired binding affinity in experimental mutagenesis studies. This study will also serve as a foundation for the design of inhibitors to treat adenovirus infections.

  18. Accurate prediction of polarised high order electrostatic interactions for hydrogen bonded complexes using the machine learning method kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Timothy J.; Kandathil, Shaun M.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2015-02-01

    As intermolecular interactions such as the hydrogen bond are electrostatic in origin, rigorous treatment of this term within force field methodologies should be mandatory. We present a method able of accurately reproducing such interactions for seven van der Waals complexes. It uses atomic multipole moments up to hexadecupole moment mapped to the positions of the nuclear coordinates by the machine learning method kriging. Models were built at three levels of theory: HF/6-31G**, B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ. The quality of the kriging models was measured by their ability to predict the electrostatic interaction energy between atoms in external test examples for which the true energies are known. At all levels of theory, >90% of test cases for small van der Waals complexes were predicted within 1 kJ mol-1, decreasing to 60-70% of test cases for larger base pair complexes. Models built on moments obtained at B3LYP and M06-2X level generally outperformed those at HF level. For all systems the individual interactions were predicted with a mean unsigned error of less than 1 kJ mol-1.

  19. Accurate prediction of polarised high order electrostatic interactions for hydrogen bonded complexes using the machine learning method kriging.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy J; Kandathil, Shaun M; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-02-05

    As intermolecular interactions such as the hydrogen bond are electrostatic in origin, rigorous treatment of this term within force field methodologies should be mandatory. We present a method able of accurately reproducing such interactions for seven van der Waals complexes. It uses atomic multipole moments up to hexadecupole moment mapped to the positions of the nuclear coordinates by the machine learning method kriging. Models were built at three levels of theory: HF/6-31G(**), B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ. The quality of the kriging models was measured by their ability to predict the electrostatic interaction energy between atoms in external test examples for which the true energies are known. At all levels of theory, >90% of test cases for small van der Waals complexes were predicted within 1 kJ mol(-1), decreasing to 60-70% of test cases for larger base pair complexes. Models built on moments obtained at B3LYP and M06-2X level generally outperformed those at HF level. For all systems the individual interactions were predicted with a mean unsigned error of less than 1 kJ mol(-1).

  20. Interactive effects of nutrient additions and predation on infaunal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Posey, M.H.; Alphin, T.D.; Cahoon, L.; Lindquist, D.; Becker, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrient additions represent an important anthropogenic stress on coastal ecosystems. At moderate levels, increased nutrients may lead to increased primary production and, possibly, to increased biomass of consumers although complex trophic interactions may modify or mask these effects. We examined the influence of nutrient additions and interactive effects of trophic interactions (predation) on benthic infaunal composition and abundances through small-scale field experiments in 2 estuaries that differed in ambient nutrient conditions. A blocked experimental design was used that allowed an assessment of direct nutrient effects in the presence and absence of predation by epibenthic predators as well as an assessment of the independent effects of predation. Benthic microalgal production increased with experimental nutrient additions and was greater when infaunal abundances were lower, but there were no significant interactions between these factors. Increased abundances of one infaunal taxa, Laeonereis culveri, as well as the grazer feeding guild were observed with nutrient additions and a number of taxa exhibited higher abundances with predator exclusion. In contrast to results from freshwater systems there were no significant interactive effects between nutrient additions and predator exclusion as was predicted. The infaunal responses observed here emphasize the importance of both bottom-up (nutrient addition and primary producer driven) and top-down (predation) controls in structuring benthic communities. These processes may work at different spatial and temporal scales, and affect different taxa, making observation of potential interactive effects difficult.

  1. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Weng, S. M.; Li, Y. T.; Yuan, D. W.; Chen, M.; Mulser, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zheng, X. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strong time-oscillating electric field accompanying the laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma.

  2. Nonlocal electrostatics in ionic liquids: The key to an understanding of the screening decay length and screened interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellander, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Screened electrostatic interactions in ionic liquids are investigated by means of exact statistical mechanical analysis combined with physical arguments that enhance the transparency and conceptual accessibility of the analysis and results. The constituent ions and immersed particles in the liquid can have arbitrary shapes and any internal charge distributions. The decay of the screened electrostatic potential and the free energy of interaction in ionic liquids can be exponentially damped oscillatory (like in molten simple salts) as well as plain exponential and long-ranged (like in dilute electrolyte solutions). Both behaviors are in agreement with the exact statistical mechanical analysis and reasons for their appearances are investigated. Exact but surprisingly simple expressions for the decay parameter κ of the screened electrostatics are obtained, which replace the classical expression for the Debye-Hückel parameter κDH (the reciprocal Debye length). The expressions are applicable both for cases with plain exponential and oscillatory behaviors. The key importance of nonlocal electrostatics is thereby demonstrated explicitly. Dielectric properties of ionic liquids and other electrolytes are investigated, in particular the static dielectric function ɛ ˜ ( k ) and some effective relative permittivities ( Er eff and Er ∗ ), which take roles that the dielectric constant ɛr has for polar liquids consisting of electroneutral molecules. The dielectric constant in the latter case, which is the limit of ɛ ˜ ( k ) when the wave number k → 0, can be expressed solely in terms of dipolar features of the molecules. In contrast to this, the effective dielectric permittivities of ionic liquids have contributions also from quadrupolar, octupolar, and higher multipolar features of the constituent ions. The "dielectric constant" of electrolytes does not exist since ɛ ˜ ( k ) → ∞ when k → 0, a well-known effect of perfect screening. The effective relative

  3. Nonlocal electrostatics in ionic liquids: The key to an understanding of the screening decay length and screened interactions.

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Roland

    2016-09-28

    Screened electrostatic interactions in ionic liquids are investigated by means of exact statistical mechanical analysis combined with physical arguments that enhance the transparency and conceptual accessibility of the analysis and results. The constituent ions and immersed particles in the liquid can have arbitrary shapes and any internal charge distributions. The decay of the screened electrostatic potential and the free energy of interaction in ionic liquids can be exponentially damped oscillatory (like in molten simple salts) as well as plain exponential and long-ranged (like in dilute electrolyte solutions). Both behaviors are in agreement with the exact statistical mechanical analysis and reasons for their appearances are investigated. Exact but surprisingly simple expressions for the decay parameter κ of the screened electrostatics are obtained, which replace the classical expression for the Debye-Hückel parameter κDH (the reciprocal Debye length). The expressions are applicable both for cases with plain exponential and oscillatory behaviors. The key importance of nonlocal electrostatics is thereby demonstrated explicitly. Dielectric properties of ionic liquids and other electrolytes are investigated, in particular the static dielectric function ϵ̃(k) and some effective relative permittivities (Er(eff) and Er(∗)), which take roles that the dielectric constant εr has for polar liquids consisting of electroneutral molecules. The dielectric constant in the latter case, which is the limit of ϵ̃(k) when the wave number k → 0, can be expressed solely in terms of dipolar features of the molecules. In contrast to this, the effective dielectric permittivities of ionic liquids have contributions also from quadrupolar, octupolar, and higher multipolar features of the constituent ions. The "dielectric constant" of electrolytes does not exist since ϵ̃(k)→∞ when k → 0, a well-known effect of perfect screening. The effective relative permittivities, Er

  4. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  5. A divide and conquer real-space approach for all-electron molecular electrostatic potentials and interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losilla, S. A.; Sundholm, D.

    2012-06-01

    A computational scheme to perform accurate numerical calculations of electrostatic potentials and interaction energies for molecular systems has been developed and implemented. Molecular electron and energy densities are divided into overlapping atom-centered atomic contributions and a three-dimensional molecular remainder. The steep nuclear cusps are included in the atom-centered functions making the three-dimensional remainder smooth enough to be accurately represented with a tractable amount of grid points. The one-dimensional radial functions of the atom-centered contributions as well as the three-dimensional remainder are expanded using finite element functions. The electrostatic potential is calculated by integrating the Coulomb potential for each separate density contribution, using our tensorial finite element method for the three-dimensional remainder. We also provide algorithms to compute accurate electron-electron and electron-nuclear interactions numerically using the proposed partitioning. The methods have been tested on all-electron densities of 18 reasonable large molecules containing elements up to Zn. The accuracy of the calculated Coulomb interaction energies is in the range of 10-3 to 10-6 Eh when using an equidistant grid with a step length of 0.05 a0.

  6. Loss of intramolecular electrostatic interactions and limited conformational ensemble may promote self-association of cis-tau peptide.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Hamelberg, Donald

    2015-03-01

    Self-association of proteins can be triggered by a change in the distribution of the conformational ensemble. Posttranslational modification, such as phosphorylation, can induce a shift in the ensemble of conformations. In the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients, the formation of intra-cellular neurofibrillary tangles deposition is a result of self-aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein. Biochemical and NMR studies suggest that the cis peptidyl prolyl conformation of a phosphorylated threonine-proline motif in the tau protein renders tau more prone to aggregation than the trans isomer. However, little is known about the role of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerization in tau aggregation. Here, we show that intra-molecular electrostatic interactions are better formed in the trans isomer. We explore the conformational landscape of the tau segment containing the phosphorylated-Thr(231)-Pro(232) motif using accelerated molecular dynamics and show that intra-molecular electrostatic interactions are coupled to the isomeric state of the peptidyl prolyl bond. Our results suggest that the loss of intra-molecular interactions and the more restricted conformational ensemble of the cis isomer could favor self-aggregation. The results are consistent with experiments, providing valuable complementary atomistic insights and a hypothetical model for isomer specific aggregation of the tau protein.

  7. Electrostatically screened, voltage-controlled electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott

    2001-01-01

    Employing an electrostatically screened, voltage-controlled electrostatic chuck particularly suited for holding wafers and masks in sub-atmospheric operations will significantly reduce the likelihood of contaminant deposition on the substrates. The electrostatic chuck includes (1) an insulator block having a outer perimeter and a planar surface adapted to support the substrate and comprising at least one electrode (typically a pair of electrodes that are embedded in the insulator block), (2) a source of voltage that is connected to the at least one electrode, (3) a support base to which the insulator block is attached, and (4) a primary electrostatic shield ring member that is positioned around the outer perimeter of the insulator block. The electrostatic chuck permits control of the voltage of the lithographic substrate; in addition, it provides electrostatic shielding of the stray electric fields issuing from the sides of the electrostatic chuck. The shielding effectively prevents electric fields from wrapping around to the upper or front surface of the substrate, thereby eliminating electrostatic particle deposition.

  8. Stretching single-stranded DNA: interplay of electrostatic, base-pairing, and base-pair stacking interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Zhou, H; Ou-Yang, Z C

    2001-01-01

    Recent single-macromolecule observations revealed that the force/extension characteristics of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) are closely related to solution ionic concentration and DNA sequence composition. To understand this, we studied the elastic property of ssDNA through the Monte Carlo implementation of a modified freely jointed chain (FJC), with electrostatic, base-pairing, and base-pair stacking interactions all incorporated. The simulated force-extension profiles for both random and designed sequences have attained quantitative agreements with the experimental data. In low-salt solution, electrostatic interaction dominates, and at low forces, the molecule can be more easily aligned than an unmodified FJC. In high-salt solution, secondary hairpin structure appears in ssDNA by the formation of base pairs between complementary bases, and external stretching causes a hairpin-coil structural transition, which is continuous for ssDNA made of random sequences. In designed sequences such as poly(dA-dT) and poly(dG-dC), the stacking potential between base pairs encourages the aggregation of base pairs into bulk hairpins and makes the hairpin-coil transition a discontinuous (first-order) process. The sensitivity of elongation to the base-pairing rule is also investigated. The comparison of modeling calculations and the experimental data suggests that the base pairing of single-stranded polynucleotide molecules tends to form a nested and independent planar hairpin structure rather than a random intersecting pattern. PMID:11463654

  9. Molecular dynamics scheme for precise estimation of electrostatic interaction via zero-dipole summation principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Nakamura, Haruki

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel idea, zero-dipole summation, for evaluating the electrostatic energy of a classical particle system, and have composed an algorithm for effectively utilizing the idea for molecular dynamics. It conceptually prevents the nonzero-charge and nonzero-dipole states artificially generated by a simple cutoff truncation. The resulting energy formula is nevertheless represented by a simple pairwise function sum, which enables facile application to high-performance computation. By following a heuristic approach to derive the current electrostatic energy formula, we developed an axiomatic approach to construct the method consistently. Explorations of the theoretical details of our method revealed the structure of the generated error, and we analyzed it by comparisons with other methods. A numerical simulation using liquid sodium chloride confirmed that the current method with a small damping factor yielded sufficient accuracy with a practical cutoff distance region. The current energy function also conducts stable numerical integration in a liquid MD simulation. Our method is an extension of the charge neutralized summation developed by Wolf et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8254 (1999)]. Furthermore, we found that the current method becomes a generalization of the preaveraged potential method proposed by Yakub and Ronchi [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11556 (2003)], which is based on a viewpoint different from the neutrality. The current study presents these relationships and suggests possibilities for their further applications.

  10. Behaviors of Polymer Additives Under EHL and Influences of Interactions Between Additives on Friction Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    Polymer additives have become requisite for the formulation of multigrade engine oils. The behavior of polymethacrylate (PMA)-thickened oils as lubricants in concentrated contacts under nominal rolling and pure sliding conditions was investigated by conventional optical interferometry. The PMA thickened oils behaved differently from the base oil in the formation of elastohydrodynamic (EHL) films. The higher the elastohydrodynamic molecular weight of the PMA contained in the lubricant, the thinner was the oil film under EHL conditions. The film thickness of shear-degraded PMA-thickened oils was also investigated. The behavior of graphite particles dispersed in both the base oil and the PMA-thickened oil was studied under pure sliding by taking photomicrographs. Many kinds of additives are contained in lubricating oil and the interactions between additives are considered. The interactions of zinc-organodithiophosphates (ZDP) with other additives is discussed.

  11. Surface charge tunability as a powerful strategy to control electrostatic interaction for high efficiency silencing, using tailored oligopeptide-modified poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs).

    PubMed

    Dosta, Pere; Segovia, Nathaly; Cascante, Anna; Ramos, Victor; Borrós, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Here we present an extended family of pBAEs that incorporate terminal oligopeptide moieties synthesized from both positive and negative amino acids. Polymer formulations of mixtures of negative and positive oligopeptide-modified pBAEs are capable of condensing siRNA into discrete nanoparticles. We have demonstrated that efficient delivery of nucleic acids in a cell-type dependent manner can be achieved by careful control of the pBAE formulation. In addition, our approach of adding differently charged oligopeptides to the termini of poly(β-amino ester)s is of great interest for the design of tailored complexes having specific features, such as tuneable zeta potential. We anticipate that this surface charge tunability may be a powerful strategy to control unwanted electrostatic interactions, while preserving high silencing efficiency and reduced toxicity.

  12. A Study of the Electrostatic Interaction Between Insulators and Martian/Lunar Soil Simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.

    2001-01-01

    Using our previous experience with the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) electrometer, we have designed a new type of aerodynamic electrometer. The goal of the research was to measure the buildup of electrostatic surface charge on a stationary cylindrical insulator after windborne granular particles have collided with the insulator surface in a simulated dust storm. The experiments are performed inside a vacuum chamber. This allows the atmospheric composition and pressure to be controlled in order to simulate the atmospheric conditions near the equator on the Martian surface. An impeller fan was used to propel the dust particles at a cylindrically shaped insulator under low vacuum conditions. We tested the new electrometer in a 10 mbar CO2 atmosphere by exposing two types of cylindrical insulators, Teflon (1.9 cm diameter) and Fiberglass (2.5 cm diameter), to a variety of windborne granular particulate materials. The granular materials tested were JSC Mars-1 simulant, which is a mixture of coarse and fine (<5microns diameter) particle sizes, and some of the major mineral constituents of the Martian soil. The minerals included Ottawa sand (SiO2), iron oxide (Fe2O3), aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and magnesium oxide (MgO). We also constructed a MECA-like electrometer that contained an insulator capped planar electrode for measuring the amount of electrostatic charge produced by rubbing an insulator surface over Martian and lunar soil simulants. The results of this study indicate that it is possible to detect triboelectric charging of insulator surfaces by windborne Martian soil simulant, and by individual mineral constituents of the soil simulant. We have also found that Teflon and Fiberglass insulator surfaces respond in different ways by developing opposite polarity surface charge, which decays at different rates after the particle impacts cease.

  13. Contribution of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions to the membrane integration of the Shaker K+ channel voltage sensor domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyan; Sato, Yoko; Hessa, Tara; von Heijne, Gunnar; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kodama, Itsuo; Sakaguchi, Masao; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2007-05-15

    Membrane-embedded voltage-sensor domains in voltage-dependent potassium channels (K(v) channels) contain an impressive number of charged residues. How can such highly charged protein domains be efficiently inserted into biological membranes? In the plant K(v) channel KAT1, the S2, S3, and S4 transmembrane helices insert cooperatively, because the S3, S4, and S3-S4 segments do not have any membrane insertion ability by themselves. Here we show that, in the Drosophila Shaker K(v) channel, which has a more hydrophobic S3 helix than KAT1, S3 can both insert into the membrane by itself and mediate the insertion of the S3-S4 segment in the absence of S2. An engineered KAT1 S3-S4 segment in which the hydrophobicity of S3 was increased or where S3 was replaced by Shaker S3 behaves as Shaker S3-S4. Electrostatic interactions among charged residues in S2, S3, and S4, including the salt bridges between E283 or E293 in S2 and R368 in S4, are required for fully efficient membrane insertion of the Shaker voltage-sensor domain. These results suggest that cooperative insertion of the voltage-sensor transmembrane helices is a property common to K(v) channels and that the degree of cooperativity depends on a balance between electrostatic and hydrophobic forces.

  14. A structural model for K2P potassium channels based on 23 pairs of interacting sites and continuum electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Kollewe, Astrid; Lau, Albert Y.; Sullivan, Ashley; Benoît Roux

    2009-01-01

    K2PØ, the two-pore domain potassium background channel that determines cardiac rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster, and its homologues that establish excitable membrane activity in mammals are of unknown structure. K2P subunits have two pore domains flanked by transmembrane (TM) spans: TM1-P1-TM2-TM3-P2-TM4. To establish spatial relationships in K2PØ, we identified pairs of sites that display electrostatic compensation. Channels silenced by the addition of a charge in pore loop 1 (P1) or P2 were restored to function by countercharges at specific second sites. A three-dimensional homology model was determined using the crystal structure of KV1.2, effects of K2PØ mutations to establish alignment, and compensatory charge–charge pairs. The model was refined and validated by continuum electrostatic free energy calculations and covalent linkage of introduced cysteines. K2P channels use two subunits arranged so that the P1 and P2 loops contribute to one pore, identical P loops face each other diagonally across the pore, and the channel complex has bilateral symmetry with a fourfold symmetric selectivity filter. PMID:19564427

  15. Preparation and characterisation of the colistin-entrapped liposome driven by electrostatic interaction for intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Huang, Lingling; Tang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Enbo; Ding, Lei; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Potential use of liposome for polycationic colistin is hindered by their phospholipid membrane permeability. In this study, liposomes were modified with sodium cholesteryl sulphate (Chol-SO4(-)) for improving the colistin loading by enhancing the colistin-bilayer electrostatic attraction. We have evaluated two liposomes: colistin-entrapped liposome of Chol-SO4(-) (CCL) and coated Chol-SO4(-)/colistin complex liposome (CCCL). In comparison with CCL which formed large aggregates at Chol-SO4(-)/colistin charge ratio below 2:1, CCCL showed a smaller size less dependent on the charge ratio, probably arising from more colistin entrapped on the inner leaflet of bilayer. Both liposomes exhibited significantly increased entrapment efficiency as compared with the liposome without Chol-SO4(-). But colistin released upon dilution, implying free transfer of colistin through bilayers. Pharmacokinetics results showed the approximately four-fold increase in the plasma AUC0-8 h for CCCL and CCL as compared with colistin solution, showing potential benefit for infectious target localisation by prolonging the systemic circulation of colistin.

  16. High sensitivity of diamond resonant microcantilevers for direct detection in liquids as probed by molecular electrostatic surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Bongrain, Alexandre; Agnès, Charles; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Ruffinatto, Sébastien; Omnès, Franck; Mailley, Pascal; Lissorgues, Gaëlle; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2011-10-04

    Resonant microcantilevers have demonstrated that they can play an important role in the detection of chemical and biological agents. Molecular interactions with target species on the mechanical microtransducers surface generally induce a change of the beam's bending stiffness, resulting in a shift of the resonance frequency. In most biochemical sensor applications, cantilevers must operate in liquid, even though damping deteriorates the vibrational performances of the transducers. Here we focus on diamond-based microcantilevers since their transducing properties surpass those of other materials. In fact, among a wide range of remarkable features, diamond possesses exceptional mechanical properties enabling the fabrication of cantilever beams with higher resonant frequencies and Q-factors than when made from other conventional materials. Therefore, they appear as one of the top-ranked materials for designing cantilevers operating in liquid media. In this study, we evaluate the resonator sensitivity performances of our diamond microcantilevers using grafted carboxylated alkyl chains as a tool to investigate the subtle changes of surface stiffness as induced by electrostatic interactions. Here, caproic acid was immobilized on the hydrogen-terminated surface of resonant polycrystalline diamond cantilevers using a novel one-step grafting technique that could be also adapted to several other functionalizations. By varying the pH of the solution one could tune the -COO(-)/-COOH ratio of carboxylic acid moieties immobilized on the surface, thus enabling fine variations of the surface stress. We were able to probe the cantilevers resonance frequency evolution and correlate it with the ratio of -COO(-)/-COOH terminations on the functionalized diamond surface and consequently the evolution of the electrostatic potential over the cantilever surface. The approach successfully enabled one to probe variations in cantilevers bending stiffness from several tens to hundreds of

  17. Rational design of viscosity reducing mutants of a monoclonal antibody: Hydrophobic versus electrostatic inter-molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Pilarin; Li, Li; Kumar, Sandeep; Buck, Patrick M; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Balthazor, Bryan; Conley, Tami R; Sek, David; Allen, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    High viscosity of monoclonal antibody formulations at concentrations ≥100 mg/mL can impede their development as products suitable for subcutaneous delivery. The effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular interactions on the solution behavior of MAB 1, which becomes unacceptably viscous at high concentrations, was studied by testing 5 single point mutants. The mutations were designed to reduce viscosity by disrupting either an aggregation prone region (APR), which also participates in 2 hydrophobic surface patches, or a negatively charged surface patch in the variable region. The disruption of an APR that lies at the interface of light and heavy chain variable domains, VH and VL, via L45K mutation destabilized MAB 1 and abolished antigen binding. However, mutation at the preceding residue (V44K), which also lies in the same APR, increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1 without sacrificing antigen binding or thermal stability. Neutralizing the negatively charged surface patch (E59Y) also increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1, but charge reversal at the same position (E59K/R) caused destabilization, decreased solubility and led to difficulties in sample manipulation that precluded their viscosity measurements at high concentrations. Both V44K and E59Y mutations showed similar increase in apparent solubility. However, the viscosity profile of E59Y was considerably better than that of the V44K, providing evidence that inter-molecular interactions in MAB 1 are electrostatically driven. In conclusion, neutralizing negatively charged surface patches may be more beneficial toward reducing viscosity of highly concentrated antibody solutions than charge reversal or aggregation prone motif disruption. PMID:25559441

  18. Rational design of viscosity reducing mutants of a monoclonal antibody: hydrophobic versus electrostatic inter-molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Pilarin; Li, Li; Kumar, Sandeep; Buck, Patrick M; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Balthazor, Bryan; Conley, Tami R; Sek, David; Allen, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    High viscosity of monoclonal antibody formulations at concentrations ≥100 mg/mL can impede their development as products suitable for subcutaneous delivery. The effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular interactions on the solution behavior of MAB 1, which becomes unacceptably viscous at high concentrations, was studied by testing 5 single point mutants. The mutations were designed to reduce viscosity by disrupting either an aggregation prone region (APR), which also participates in 2 hydrophobic surface patches, or a negatively charged surface patch in the variable region. The disruption of an APR that lies at the interface of light and heavy chain variable domains, VH and VL, via L45K mutation destabilized MAB 1 and abolished antigen binding. However, mutation at the preceding residue (V44K), which also lies in the same APR, increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1 without sacrificing antigen binding or thermal stability. Neutralizing the negatively charged surface patch (E59Y) also increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1, but charge reversal at the same position (E59K/R) caused destabilization, decreased solubility and led to difficulties in sample manipulation that precluded their viscosity measurements at high concentrations. Both V44K and E59Y mutations showed similar increase in apparent solubility. However, the viscosity profile of E59Y was considerably better than that of the V44K, providing evidence that inter-molecular interactions in MAB 1 are electrostatically driven. In conclusion, neutralizing negatively charged surface patches may be more beneficial toward reducing viscosity of highly concentrated antibody solutions than charge reversal or aggregation prone motif disruption.

  19. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Two Dimensional Self Assembly of Tobacco Mosaic Viruses on Cationic Lipid Mololayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Yang, L.; Fukuto, M.; Checco, A.; Niu, Z.; Wang, Q.

    2011-03-21

    We explore two-dimensional self-assembly of tobacco mosaic viruses (TMVs) on a substrate-supported, fluid lipid monolayer by manipulating the electrostatic interactions, with specific focus on the effects of the cationic lipid concentration in the monolayer and the presence of Ca{sup 2+} ions in the surrounding bulk solution. The TMV assemblies were characterized by grazing-incidence X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy, and the inter-particle interaction quantified through X-ray scattering data analysis. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+} ions, we found that higher charge densities on the lipid monolayer led to poorer in-plane order, which may be attributed to faster adsorption kinetics, due to the surface potential that increases with charge density. At the same time, higher lipid-charge densities also resulted in weaker repulsion between TMVs, due to partial screening of Coulomb repulsion by mobile cationic lipids in the monolayer. The lipid-charge dependence was diminished with increasing concentration of Ca{sup 2+} ions, which also led to tighter packing of TMVs. The results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} ions strengthen the screening of Coulomb repulsion between TMVs and consequently enhance the role of attractive forces. Control experiments involving Na{sup +} ions suggest that the attractive inter-TMV interaction has contributions from both the van der Waals force and the counter-ion-induced attraction that depends on ion valence.

  20. Electrostatic polarization is crucial in reproducing Cu(I) interaction energies and hydration.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Sergei Y; Click, Timothy H; Kaminski, George A

    2011-08-25

    We have explored the suitability of fixed-charges and polarizable force fields for modeling interactions of the monovalent Cu(I) ion. Parameters for this ion have been tested and refitted within the fixed-charges OPLS-AA and polarizable force field (PFF) frameworks. While this ion plays an important role in many protein interactions, the attention to it in developing empirical force fields is limited. Our PFF parameters for the copper ion worked very well for the Cu(I) interactions with water, while both the original OPLS2005 and our refitted OPLS versions moderately underestimated the copper-water interaction energy. However, the greatest problem in using the nonpolarizable fixed-charges OPLS force field was observed while calculating interaction energies and distances for Cu(I)-benzene complexes. The OPLS2005 model underestimates the interaction energy by a factor of 4. Refitting the OPLS parameters reduced this underestimation to a factor of 2.2-2.4, but only at a cost of distorting the complex geometry. At the same time, the polarizable calculations had an error of about 4%. Moreover, we then used the PFF and nonpolarizable refitted OPLS models for finding free energy of hydration for copper ion via molecular dynamics simulations. While the OPLS calculations lead to a 22% error in the solvation energy, the PFF result was off by only 1.8%. This was achieved with no refitting of the parameters but simply by employing the model developed for the Cu(I) interaction with a single water molecule. We believe that the presented results not only lead to a conclusion about a qualitatively greater suitability of polarizable force fields for simulating molecular interactions with ions but also attest to the excellent level of transferability of PFF parameters.

  1. Solid-state structure of gelatin-mono epoxy terminated polydimethylsiloxane polymer: effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Xia, Yongmei; Qiao, Cong-De; Zhu, Weiyue; Wang, Yuexia; Li, Tian-Duo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, a hybrid synthetic gelatin-mono epoxy terminated polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS-E grafted gelatin (PGG)) was successfully synthesized on a large scale. Supramolecular structure of gelatin, which was decided by the sophisticated inter- and intra-molecular interactions, significantly affected the self-assembly and phase behavior of PGG. Interestingly, the supramolecular organization of PGG could be tuned finely by negatively charged surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium tetradecyl sulfonate (STSo), as revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy (LM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM images exhibited the presence of spherical aggregates in PGG/SDS films while hexagonal array was observed in PGG/STSo films. The results of LM revealed that when PGG/STSo solution was dried, a successive structural transformation from spheres to hexagons, via sticks and butterfly-shaped aggregates as intermediates, was observed. However, the morphologies of the aggregates formed in PGG/SDS system did not exhibit any obvious change upon drying. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectra combined with AFM observations indicated that the secondary structure and aggregation behavior of gelatin was modified with the change in the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, leading to the formation of diversified solid-state structures of PGG.

  2. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  3. Electrostatic and non-covalent interactions in dicationic imidazolium-sulfonium salts with mixed anions.

    PubMed

    Fei, Zhaofu; Zhu, Dun-Ru; Yan, Ning; Scopelliti, Rosario; Katsuba, Sergey A; Laurenczy, Gabor; Chisholm, Danielle M; McIndoe, J Scott; Seddon, Kenneth R; Dyson, Paul J

    2014-04-07

    A series of thioether-functionalised imidazolium salts have been prepared and characterized. Subsequent reaction of the thioether-functionalised imidazolium salts with iodomethane affords imidazolium-sulfonium salts composed of doubly charged cations and two different anions. Imidazolium-sulfonium salts containing a single anion type are obtained either by a solvent extraction method or by anion exchange. The imidazolium-sulfonium salts undergo a methyl-transfer reaction on exposure to water, giving rise to a new, singly charged imidazolium salt with iodide introduced at the 2-position of the imidazolium ring. Crystal structures of some of the imidazolium-sulfonium salts were determined by X-ray crystallography providing the topology of the interactions between the dications and the anions. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical calculations were used to rationalise the relative strength of these interactions.

  4. Surface decoration through electrostatic interaction leading to enhanced reactivity: Low temperature synthesis of nanostructured chromium borides (CrB and CrB{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Menaka,; Kumar, Bharat; Kumar, Sandeep; Ganguli, A.K.

    2013-04-15

    The present study describes a novel low temperature route at ambient pressure for the synthesis of nanocrystalline chromium borides (CrB and CrB{sub 2}) without using any flux or additives. The favorable and intimate mixing of nanoparticles of chromium acetate (Cr source) and boron forms an active chromium–boron precursor which decomposes at much lower temperature (400 °C) to form CrB (which is ∼1000 °C less than the known ambient pressure synthesis). The chromium acetate nanoparticles (∼5 nm) decorate the larger boron particles (150–200 nm) due to electrostatic interactions resulting from opposing surface charges of boron (zeta potential:+48.101 mV) and chromium acetate (zeta potential:−4.021 mV) in ethanolic medium and is evident in the TEM micrographs. The above method leads to the formation of pure CrB film like structure at 400 °C and nanospheres (40–60 nm) at 600 °C. Also, chromium diboride (CrB{sub 2}) nanoparticles (25 nm) could be obtained at 1000 °C. - Graphical abstract: Variation of surface charge of reactants, precursor and the products, chromium borides (CrB and CrB{sub 2}). Highlights: ► Novel borothermal reduction process for synthesis of chromium boride. ► Significant lowering of reaction temperature to obtain nanocrystalline chromium boride. ► Enhanced reactivity due to appropriate surface interactions.

  5. Nonspecific shielding of unfavorable electrostatic intramolecular interactions in the erythropoietin native-state increase conformational stability and limit non-native aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Douglas D

    2015-01-01

    Previous equilibrium and kinetic folding studies of the glycoprotein erythropoietin indicate that sodium chloride increases the conformational stability of this therapeutically important cytokine, ostensibly by stabilizing the native-state [Banks DD, (2011) The Effect of Glycosylation on the Folding Kinetics of Erythropoietin. J Mol Biol 412:536–550]. The focus of the current report is to determine the underlying cause of the salt dependent increase in erythropoietin conformational stability and to understand if it has any impact on aggregation, an instability that remains a challenge to the biotech industry in maintaining the efficacy and shelf-life of protein therapeutics. Isothermal urea denaturation experiments conducted at numerous temperatures in the absence and presence of sodium chloride indicated that salt stabilizes erythropoietin primarily by increasing the difference in enthalpy between the native and unfolded sates. This result, and the finding that the salt induced increases in erythropoietin melting temperatures were independent of the identity of the salt cation and anion, indicates that salt likely increases the conformational stability of erythropoietin at neutral pH by nonspecific shielding of unfavorable electrostatic interaction(s) in the native-state. The addition of salt (even low concentrations of the strong chaotrope salt guanidinium hydrochloride) also exponentially decreased the initial rate of soluble erythropoietin non-native aggregation at 37 °C storage. PMID:25628168

  6. One-electron properties and electrostatic interaction energies from the expectation value expression and wave function of singles and doubles coupled cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Korona, Tatiana; Jeziorski, Bogumil

    2006-11-14

    One-electron density matrices resulting from the explicitly connected commutator expansion of the expectation value were implemented at the singles and doubles coupled cluster (CCSD) level. In the proposed approach the one-electron density matrix is obtained at a little extra cost in comparison to the calculation of the CCSD correlation energy. Therefore, in terms of the computational time the new method is significantly less demanding than the conventional linear-response CCSD theory which requires additionally an expensive calculation of the left-hand solution of the CCSD equations. The quality of the new density matrices was investigated by computing a set of one-electron properties for a series of molecules of varying sizes and comparing the results with data obtained using the full configuration interaction method or higher level coupled cluster theory. It has been found that the results obtained using the new approach are of the same quality as those predicted by the linear-response CCSD method. The novel one-electron density matrices have also been applied to study the energy of the electrostatic interaction for a number of van der Waals complexes, including the benzene and azulene dimers.

  7. Modulation of additive and interactive effects by trial history revisited.

    PubMed

    Masson, Michael E J; Rabe, Maximilian M; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2017-04-01

    Masson and Kliegl (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 898-914, 2013) reported evidence that the nature of the target stimulus on the previous trial of a lexical decision task modulates the effects of independent variables on the current trial, including additive versus interactive effects of word frequency and stimulus quality. In contrast, recent reanalyses of previously published data from experiments that, unlike the Masson and Kliegl experiments, did not include semantic priming as a factor, found no evidence for modulation of additive effects of frequency and stimulus quality by trial history (Balota, Aschenbrenner, & Yap, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 1563-1571, 2013; O'Malley & Besner, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 1400-1411, 2013). We report two experiments that included semantic priming as a factor and that attempted to replicate the modulatory effects found by Masson and Kliegl. In neither experiment was additivity of frequency and stimulus quality modulated by trial history, converging with the findings reported by Balota et al. and O'Malley and Besner. Other modulatory influences of trial history, however, were replicated in the new experiments and reflect potential trial-by-trial alterations in decision processes.

  8. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bond dynamics in chloride pumping by halorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Tobias, Douglas J

    2014-12-01

    Translocation of negatively charged ions across cell membranes by ion pumps raises the question as to how protein interactions control the location and dynamics of the ion. Here we address this question by performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations of wild type and mutant halorhodopsin, a seven-helical transmembrane protein that translocates chloride ions upon light absorption. We find that inter-helical hydrogen bonds mediated by a key arginine group largely govern the dynamics of the protein and water groups coordinating the chloride ion.

  9. An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuchun; Baumketner, Andrij; Deng, Shaozhong; Xu, Zhenli; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, a new solvation model is proposed for simulations of biomolecules in aqueous solutions that combines the strengths of explicit and implicit solvent representations. Solute molecules are placed in a spherical cavity filled with explicit water, thus providing microscopic detail where it is most needed. Solvent outside of the cavity is modeled as a dielectric continuum whose effect on the solute is treated through the reaction field corrections. With this explicit/implicit model, the electrostatic potential represents a solute molecule in an infinite bath of solvent, thus avoiding unphysical interactions between periodic images of the solute commonly used in the lattice-sum explicit solvent simulations. For improved computational efficiency, our model employs an accurate and efficient multiple-image charge method to compute reaction fields together with the fast multipole method for the direct Coulomb interactions. To minimize the surface effects, periodic boundary conditions are employed for nonelectrostatic interactions. The proposed model is applied to study liquid water. The effect of model parameters, which include the size of the cavity, the number of image charges used to compute reaction field, and the thickness of the buffer layer, is investigated in comparison with the particle-mesh Ewald simulations as a reference. An optimal set of parameters is obtained that allows for a faithful representation of many structural, dielectric, and dynamic properties of the simulated water, while maintaining manageable computational cost. With controlled and adjustable accuracy of the multiple-image charge representation of the reaction field, it is concluded that the employed model achieves convergence with only one image charge in the case of pure water. Future applications to pKa calculations, conformational sampling of solvated biomolecules and electrolyte solutions are briefly discussed.

  10. Catalytically Relevant Electrostatic Interactions of Cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17A1) and Cytochrome b5*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hwei-Ming; Liu, Jiayan; Forsberg, Sarah E.; Tran, Hong T.; Anderson, Sean M.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Two acidic residues, Glu-48 and Glu-49, of cytochrome b5 (b5) are essential for stimulating the 17,20-lyase activity of cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17A1). Substitution of Ala, Gly, Cys, or Gln for these two glutamic acid residues abrogated all capacity to stimulate 17,20-lyase activity. Mutations E49D and E48D/E49D retained 23 and 38% of wild-type activity, respectively. Using the zero-length cross-linker ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, we obtained cross-linked heterodimers of b5 and CYP17A1, wild-type, or mutations R347K and R358K. In sharp contrast, the b5 double mutation E48G/E49G did not form cross-linked complexes with wild-type CYP17A1. Mass spectrometric analysis of the CYP17A1-b5 complexes identified two cross-linked peptide pairs as follows: CYP17A1-WT: 84EVLIKK89-b5: 53EQAGGDATENFEDVGHSTDAR73 and CYP17A1-R347K: 341TPTISDKNR349-b5: 40FLEEHPGGEEVLR52. Using these two sites of interaction and Glu-48/Glu-49 in b5 as constraints, protein docking calculations based on the crystal structures of the two proteins yielded a structural model of the CYP17A1-b5 complex. The appositional surfaces include Lys-88, Arg-347, and Arg-358/Arg-449 of CYP17A1, which interact with Glu-61, Glu-42, and Glu-48/Glu-49 of b5, respectively. Our data reveal the structural basis of the electrostatic interactions between these two proteins, which is critical for 17,20-lyase activity and androgen biosynthesis. PMID:25315771

  11. Delicate balance of electrostatic interactions and disulfide bridges in thermostability of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Somayeh; Moradi, Maryam; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2012-12-01

    The wild type Photinus pyralis luciferase does not have any disulfide bridge. Disulfide bridges are determinant in inherent stability of protein at moderate temperatures. Meanwhile, arginin is responsible for thermostability at higher temperatures. In this study, by concomitant introduction of disulfide bridge and a surface arginin in a mutant (A296C-A326C/I232R), the contribution of disulfide bridge introduction and surface hydrophilic residue on activity and global stability of P. pyralis luciferase is investigated. In addition to the mentioned mutant; I232R, A296C-A326C and wild type luciferases are characterized. Though addition of Arg caused stability against proteolysis but in combination with disulfide bridge resulted in decreased thermal stability compared to A296C-A326C mutant. In spite of long distance of two different mutations (A296C-A326C and I232R) from each other in the three-dimensional structure, combination of their effects on the stability of luciferase was not cumulative.

  12. Modeling multicomponent ionic transport in groundwater with IPhreeqc coupling: Electrostatic interactions and geochemical reactions in homogeneous and heterogeneous domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    The key role of small-scale processes like molecular diffusion and electrochemical migration has been increasingly recognized in multicomponent reactive transport in saturated porous media. In this study, we propose a two-dimensional multicomponent reactive transport model taking into account the electrostatic interactions during transport of charged ions in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media. The modeling approach is based on the local charge balance and on the description of compound-specific and spatially variable diffusive/dispersive fluxes. The multicomponent ionic transport code is coupled with the geochemical code PHREEQC-3 by utilizing the IPhreeqc module, thus enabling to perform the geochemical calculations included in the PHREEQC's reaction package. The multicomponent reactive transport code is benchmarked with different 1-D and 2-D transport problems. Successively, conservative and reactive transport examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of the proposed model to simulate transport of charged species in heterogeneous porous media with spatially variable physical and chemical properties. The results reveal that the Coulombic cross-coupling between dispersive fluxes can significantly influence conservative as well as reactive transport of charged species both at the laboratory and at the field scale.

  13. Enantioselective acyl transfer catalysis by a combination of common catalytic motifs and electrostatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Hiroki; Fujii, Kazuki; Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Abe, Kenko; Mitsudo, Koichi; Korenaga, Toshinobu; Suga, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Catalysts that can promote acyl transfer processes are important to enantioselective synthesis and their development has received significant attention in recent years. Despite noteworthy advances, discovery of small-molecule catalysts that are robust, efficient, recyclable and promote reactions with high enantioselectivity can be easily and cost-effectively prepared in significant quantities (that is, >10 g) has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that by attaching a binaphthyl moiety, appropriately modified to establish H-bonding interactions within the key intermediates in the catalytic cycle, and a 4-aminopyridyl unit, exceptionally efficient organic molecules can be prepared that facilitate enantioselective acyl transfer reactions. As little as 0.5 mol% of a member of the new catalyst class is sufficient to generate acyl-substituted all-carbon quaternary stereogenic centres in quantitative yield and in up to 98:2 enantiomeric ratio (er) in 5 h. Kinetic resolution or desymmetrization of 1,2-diol can be performed with high efficiency and enantioselectivity as well. PMID:27079273

  14. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-07

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  15. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  16. Interaction between Polymeric Additives and Secondary Fluids in Capillary Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Boris; Braunschweig, Björn; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-02-16

    Capillary suspensions are ternary systems including a solid and two liquid phases representing a novel formulation platform for pastes with unique processing and end-use properties. Here we have investigated aqueous suspensions of non-Brownian graphite particles including different polymers commonly used as thickening agents or binders in paste formulations. We have studied the interaction between these additives and organic solvents in order to elucidate its effect on the characteristic formation of a particle network structure in corresponding ternary capillary suspension systems. Organic solvents with different polarity have been employed, and in the presence of nonadsorbing poly(ethylene oxide), all of them, whether they preferentially wet the graphite surface or not, induce the formation of a network structure within the suspension as indicated by a strong change in rheological properties. However, when the adsorbing polymers carboxymethylcellulose and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are included, the drastic change in rheological behavior occurs only when polar organic solvents are used as secondary liquids. Obviously, these solvents can form pendular bridges, finally resulting in a sample-spanning particle network. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy provides evidence that these polar liquids remove the adsorbed polymer from the graphite particles. In contrast, nonpolar and nonwetting solvents do not force polymer desorption. In these cases, the formation of a percolating network structure within the suspensions is presumably prevented by the strong steric repulsion among graphite particles, not allowing for the formation of particle clusters encapsulating the secondary liquid. Accordingly, polymeric additives and secondary fluids have to be carefully selected in capillary suspension formulations, then offering a new pathway to customize paste formulations. The polymer may serve to adjust an appropriate viscosity level, and the capillary bridging induces the

  17. Electrostatics at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Walker, David A; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2011-04-01

    Electrostatic forces are amongst the most versatile interactions to mediate the assembly of nanostructured materials. Depending on experimental conditions, these forces can be long- or short-ranged, can be either attractive or repulsive, and their directionality can be controlled by the shapes of the charged nano-objects. This Review is intended to serve as a primer for experimentalists curious about the fundamentals of nanoscale electrostatics and for theorists wishing to learn about recent experimental advances in the field. Accordingly, the first portion introduces the theoretical models of electrostatic double layers and derives electrostatic interaction potentials applicable to particles of different sizes and/or shapes and under different experimental conditions. This discussion is followed by the review of the key experimental systems in which electrostatic interactions are operative. Examples include electroactive and "switchable" nanoparticles, mixtures of charged nanoparticles, nanoparticle chains, sheets, coatings, crystals, and crystals-within-crystals. Applications of these and other structures in chemical sensing and amplification are also illustrated.

  18. Role of the Electrostatic Interactions in the Stabilization of Ionic Liquid Crystals: Insights from Coarse-Grained MD Simulations of an Imidazolium Model.

    PubMed

    Saielli, Giacomo; Wang, Yanting

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of the electrostatic interactions in stabilizing various phases of ionic liquids, especially smectic ionic liquid crystals, we have employed a coarse-grained model of 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, [C16mim][NO3], to perform molecular dynamics simulations with the partial charges artificially rescaled by a factor from 0.7 to 1.2. The simulated systems have been characterized by means of orientational and translational order parameters and by distribution functions. We have found that increasing the total charge of the ions strongly stabilizes the ionic smectic phase by shifting the clearing point (melting into the isotropic liquid phase) to higher temperatures, while a smaller effect is observed on the stability of the crystal phase. Our results highlight the importance of the electrostatic interactions in promoting the formation of ionic liquid crystals through microphase segregation. Moreover, as the total charge of the model is increased, we observe a transformation from a homogeneous to a nanosegregated isotropic structure typical of ionic liquids. Therefore, a connection can be established between the degree of nanosegregation of ILs and the stability of ILC phases. All the above can be understood by the competition among electrostatic interactions between charged groups (cationic head groups and anions), van der Waals interactions between nonpolar cationic tail groups, and thermal fluctuations.

  19. The role of positively charged amino acids and electrostatic interactions in the complex of U1A protein and U1 hairpin II RNA

    PubMed Central

    Law, Michael J.; Linde, Michael E.; Chambers, Eric J.; Oubridge, Chris; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Nilsson, Lennart; Haworth, Ian S.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2006-01-01

    Previous kinetic investigations of the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain of spliceosomal protein U1A, interacting with its RNA target U1 hairpin II, provided experimental evidence for a ‘lure and lock’ model of binding in which electrostatic interactions first guide the RNA to the protein, and close range interactions then lock the two molecules together. To further investigate the ‘lure’ step, here we examined the electrostatic roles of two sets of positively charged amino acids in U1A that do not make hydrogen bonds to the RNA: Lys20, Lys22 and Lys23 close to the RNA-binding site, and Arg7, Lys60 and Arg70, located on ‘top’ of the RRM domain, away from the RNA. Surface plasmon resonance-based kinetic studies, supplemented with salt dependence experiments and molecular dynamics simulation, indicate that Lys20 predominantly plays a role in association, while nearby residues Lys22 and Lys23 appear to be at least as important for complex stability. In contrast, kinetic analyses of residues away from the RNA indicate that they have a minimal effect on association and stability. Thus, well-positioned positively charged residues can be important for both initial complex formation and complex maintenance, illustrating the multiple roles of electrostatic interactions in protein–RNA complexes. PMID:16407334

  20. Effects of obliqueness and strong electrostatic interaction on linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma is theoretically investigated. The normal mode analysis (reductive perturbation method) is employed to investigate the role of ambient/external magnetic field, obliqueness, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature in modifying the properties of linear (nonlinear) dust-acoustic waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The effective electrostatic dust-temperature, which arises from strong electrostatic interactions among highly charged dust, is considered as a dynamical variable. The linear dispersion relation (describing the linear propagation characteristics) for the obliquely propagating dust-acoustic waves is derived and analyzed. On the other hand, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves (particularly, propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves) is derived and solved. It is shown that the combined effects of obliqueness, magnitude of the ambient/external magnetic field, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature significantly modify the basic properties of linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. The results of this work are compared with those observed by some laboratory experiments.

  1. Quantum effects in the capture of charged particles by dipolar polarizable symmetric top molecules. II. Interplay between electrostatic and gyroscopic interactions.

    PubMed

    Auzinsh, M; Dashevskaya, E I; Litvin, I; Nikitin, E E; Troe, J

    2013-10-14

    Within the general axially nonadiabatic channel approach described in Paper I of this series [M. Auzinsh, E. I. Dashevskaya, I. Litvin, E. E. Nikitin, and J. Troe, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 084311 (2013)], the present article analyzes the simultaneous manifestation of electrostatic and gyroscopic interactions in the quantum capture of dipolar polarizable symmetric top molecules by ions. As a demonstration, the rate coefficients for capture of CH3D and CD3H by H(+), D(+), and H3(+) are calculated.

  2. Charge ordering and nonlinear electrical transport in quasi-one-dimensional organic chains with strong electrostatic interchain interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kentaro; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Wataru; Awaga, Kunio; Inabe, Tamotsu

    2007-08-01

    We here examine the electrical and magnetic properties of the isostructural NT3•MCl4 ( NT=naphtho [2,1- d :6,5- d' ]bis([1,2,3] dithiazole and M=Ga and Fe). The crystal structure of NT3•MCl4 consists of one-dimensional π -stacking chains of NT with strong interchain interactions caused by electrostatic Sδ+•••Nδ- contacts. This structure includes four NT molecules with significant differences in molecular structure and charge, exhibiting a characteristic charge ordering, namely, three-dimensional alternation of charge-rich (or -intermediate) and -poor molecules. NT3•GaCl4 and NT3•FeCl4 are found to be semiconductors with σRT˜0.5Scm-1 and to exhibit a nonlinear electrical transport at room temperature with a very low threshold field of 80Vcm-1 for the negative differential resistance. This threshold field significantly increases with a decrease in temperature. The X -band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of NT3•GaCl4 consist of a single-line absorption ascribable to that of the NT+ cation. When the sample is exposed to a current at room temperature, this signal exhibits a drastic decrease in intensity with little change in linewidth. This is attributed to the inhomogeneous formation of EPR-silent conducting pathways for the nonlinear transport. The temperature dependence of the EPR spin susceptibility χs of NT3•GaCl4 suggests a transition toward a spin-gap state below 20K ; χs exhibits a Bonner-Fisher-type temperature dependence above 20K , but gradually collapses to zero below this temperature.

  3. Roles of electrostatic interaction and dispersion in CH···CH, CH···π, and π···π ethylene dimers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ye; Wong, Ming Wah

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were performed up to the CCSD(T)/CBS level to investigate the roles of the electrostatic interaction and dispersion in three basic types of intermolecular interaction, namely CH···CH, CH···π, and π···π interactions, in D(2d), C(2v), and C(i) ethylene dimers, respectively. SAPT energy decomposition revealed that the electrostatic interaction is more significant than expected, with its value being close to that of the net interaction energy. Dispersion is the largest stabilizing force and it plays the main role in balancing out exchange repulsion. This balance is related to the proposed concept of "contact." The roles of the σ and π electrons were distinguished in the electrostatic interaction by performing distributed multipole analysis and in dispersion by performing frozen-orbital SAPT (fo-SAPT) calculations. The electrostatic part of the interaction energy for each ethylene dimer can be understood as either a quadrupole-quadrupole attraction or the attraction between C and H atoms. (Electron pair)-(electron pair) contributions to the dispersion were calculated by the fo-SAPT method to shed light on the nature of dispersion. In these dimers, contributions to the dispersion can arise from π↔π, σ↔π, or σ↔σ electron-pair interactions. Surprisingly, σ↔π interactions dominate the dispersion in all three ethylene dimers. The π↔π contribution is very small, even in the displaced parallel structure (C(i)). The σ↔σ interaction contributes to intermolecular binding by helping the dispersion to balance out exchange repulsion, but this interaction is limited to the most stable D(2d) structure, which is characterized by four pairs of close dihydrogen contacts. The concept of an electron-pair "contact" was introduced to describe the exchange-dispersion balance. The D(2d) dimer is stabilized by a large number of such contacts.

  4. Interaction of field-aligned cold plasma flows with an equatorially-trapped hot plasma - Electrostatic shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    Effects of equatorially trapped hot plasma on the highly supersonic cold-plasma flow occurring during early stage plasmaspheric refilling are studied by means of numerical simulations. It is shown that the equatorially trapped hot ions set up a potential barrier for the cold ion beams and facilitate formation of electrostatic shocks by reflecting them from the equatorial region. Simulations with and without the hot plasma show different flow properties; the formation of electrostatic shocks occur only in the former case. The simulation with the hot plasma also reveals that the magnetic trapping in conjunction with the evolution of the electrostatic potential barrier produces ion velocity distribution functions consisting of a cold core and a hot ring in the perpendicular velocity. Such a distribution function provides a source of free energy for equatorial waves. The corresponding electron population is warm and field-aligned.

  5. Binding of cationic pentapeptides with modified side chain lengths to negatively charged lipid membranes: Complex interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Hoernke, Maria; Schwieger, Christian; Kerth, Andreas; Blume, Alfred

    2012-07-01

    Basic amino acids play a key role in the binding of membrane associated proteins to negatively charged membranes. However, side chains of basic amino acids like lysine do not only provide a positive charge, but also a flexible hydrocarbon spacer that enables hydrophobic interactions. We studied the influence of hydrophobic contributions to the binding by varying the side chain length of pentapeptides with ammonium groups starting with lysine to lysine analogs with shorter side chains, namely omithine (Orn), alpha, gamma-diaminobutyric acid (Dab) and alpha, beta-diaminopropionic acid (Dap). The binding to negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes was investigated by calorimetry, FT-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and monolayer techniques. The binding was influenced by counteracting and sometimes compensating contributions. The influence of the bound peptides on the lipid phase behavior depends on the length of the peptide side chains. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments showed exothermic and endothermic effects compensating to a different extent as a function of side chain length. The increase in lipid phase transition temperature was more significant for peptides with shorter side chains. FTIR-spectroscopy revealed changes in hydration of the lipid bilayer interface after peptide binding. Using monolayer techniques, the contributions of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects could clearly be observed. Peptides with short side chains induced a pronounced decrease in surface pressure of PG monolayers whereas peptides with additional hydrophobic interactions decreased the surface pressure much less or even lead to an increase, indicating insertion of the hydrophobic part of the side chain into the lipid monolayer.

  6. Electrostatic Toys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Describes typical electrostatic toys which may be used to show students phenomena associated with sparks, sudden drops in potential, induction, and forces between bodies of like and opposite charges. Many of these demonstrations are suitable for student projects. (Author/JN)

  7. Evidence for crucial electrostatic interactions between Bcl-2 homology domains BH3 and BH4 in the anti-apoptotic Nr-13 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lalle, Philippe; Aouacheria, Abdel; Dumont-Miscopein, Agnès; Jambon, Martin; Venet, Séverine; Bobichon, Hélène; Colas, Pierre; Deléage, Gilbert; Geourjon, Christophe; Gillet, Germain

    2002-01-01

    Nr-13 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family previously shown to interact with Bax. The biological significance of this interaction was explored both in yeast and vertebrate cells and revealed that Nr-13 is able to counteract the pro-apoptotic activity of Bax. The Bax-interacting domain has been identified and corresponds to alpha-helices 5 and 6 in Nr-13. Site-directed mutagenesis has revealed that the N-terminal region of Nr-13 is essential for activity and corresponds to a genuine Bcl-2 homology domain (BH4). The modelling of Nr-13, based on its similarity with other Bcl-2 family proteins and energy minimization, suggests the possibility of electrostatic interactions between the two N-terminal-conserved domains BH4 and BH3. Disruption of these interactions severely affects Nr-13 anti-apoptotic activity. Together our results suggest that electrostatic interactions between BH4 and BH3 domains play a role in the control of activity of Nr-13 and a subset of Bcl-2 family members. PMID:12133006

  8. Preferential binding of positive nanoparticles on cell membranes is due to electrostatic interactions: A too simplistic explanation that does not take into account the nanoparticle protein corona.

    PubMed

    Forest, Valérie; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2017-01-01

    The internalization of nanoparticles by cells (and more broadly the nanoparticle/cell interaction) is a crucial issue both for biomedical applications (for the design of nanocarriers with enhanced cellular uptake to reach their intracellular therapeutic targets) and in a nanosafety context (as the internalized dose is one of the key factors in cytotoxicity). Many parameters can influence the nanoparticle/cell interaction, among them, the nanoparticle physico-chemical features, and especially the surface charge. It is generally admitted that positive nanoparticles are more uptaken by cells than neutral or negative nanoparticles. It is supposedly due to favorable electrostatic interactions with negatively charged cell membrane. However, this theory seems too simplistic as it does not consider a fundamental element: the nanoparticle protein corona. Indeed, once introduced in a biological medium nanoparticles adsorb proteins at their surface, forming a new interface defining the nanoparticle "biological identity". This adds a new level of complexity in the interactions with biological systems that cannot be any more limited to electrostatic binding. These interactions will then influence cell behavior. Based on a literature review and on an example of our own experience the parameters involved in the nanoparticle protein corona formation as well as in the nanoparticle/cell interactions are discussed.

  9. A theoretical study of complexes formed between cations and curved aromatic systems: electrostatics does not always control cation-π interaction.

    PubMed

    Carrazana-García, Jorge A; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús

    2017-04-10

    The present work studies the interaction of two extended curved π-systems (corannulene and sumanene) with various cations (sodium, potassium, ammonium, tetramethylammonium, guanidinium and imidazolium). Polyatomic cations are models of groups found in important biomolecules in which cation-π interaction plays a fundamental role. The results indicate an important size effect: with extended π systems and cations of the size of potassium and larger, dispersion is much more important than has been generally recognized for cation-π interactions. In most of the systems studied here, the stability of the cation-π complexes is the result of a balanced combination of electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions. None of the systems studied here owes its stability to the electrostatic interaction more than 42%. Induction dominates stabilization in complexes with sodium, and in some of the potassium and ammonium complexes. In complexes with large cations and with flat cations dispersion is the major stabilizing contribution and can provide more than 50% of the stabilization energy. This implies that theoretical studies of the cation-π interaction involving large or even medium-size fragments require a level of calculation capable of properly modelling dispersion. The separation between the cation and the π system is another important factor to take into account, especially when the fragments of the cation-π complex are bound (for example, to a protein backbone) and cannot interact at the most favourable distance.

  10. Computational Methods for Biomolecular Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Olsen, Brett; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of intermolecular interactions is essential for insight into how cells develop, operate, communicate and control their activities. Such interactions include several components: contributions from linear, angular, and torsional forces in covalent bonds, van der Waals forces, as well as electrostatics. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long range and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, and amino or nucleic acids, which are some of the primary components of living systems. Electrostatics, therefore, play important roles in determining the structure, motion and function of a wide range of biological molecules. This chapter presents a brief overview of electrostatic interactions in cellular systems with a particular focus on how computational tools can be used to investigate these types of interactions. PMID:17964951

  11. Delineating ion-ion interactions by electrostatic modeling for predicting rhizotoxicity of metal mixtures to lettuce Lactuca sativa.

    PubMed

    Le, T T Yen; Wang, Peng; Vijver, Martina G; Kinraide, Thomas B; Hendriks, A Jan; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2014-09-01

    Effects of ion-ion interactions on metal toxicity to lettuce Lactuca sativa were studied based on the electrical potential at the plasma membrane surface (ψ0 ). Surface interactions at the proximate outside of the membrane influenced ion activities at the plasma membrane surface ({M(n+)}0). At a given free Cu(2+) activity in the bulk medium ({Cu(2+)}b), additions of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) resulted in substantial decreases in {Cu(2+)}0. Additions of Zn(2+) led to declines in {Cu(2+)}0, but Cu(2+) and Ag(+) at the exposure levels tested had negligible effects on the plasma membrane surface activity of each other. Metal toxicity was expressed by the {M(n+)}0 -based strength coefficient, indicating a decrease of toxicity in the order: Ag(+)  > Cu(2+)  > Zn(2+). Adsorbed Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) had significant and dose-dependent effects on Cu(2+) toxicity in terms of osmolarity. Internal interactions between Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) and between Cu(2+) and Ag(+) were modeled by expanding the strength coefficients in concentration addition and response multiplication models. These extended models consistently indicated that Zn(2+) significantly alleviated Cu(2+) toxicity. According to the extended concentration addition model, Ag(+) significantly enhanced Cu(2+) toxicity whereas Cu(2+) reduced Ag(+) toxicity. By contrast, the response multiplication model predicted insignificant effects of adsorbed Cu(2+) and Ag(+) on the toxicity of each other. These interactions were interpreted using ψ0, demonstrating its influence on metal toxicity.

  12. Interaction Between the Pipeline and Additional Equipment for Trenchless Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, V. S.; Temirbaev, R. M.; Toropov, E. S.; Toropov, S. Yu

    2016-10-01

    In this article the authors defined the limits of applicability of the pipeline pusher as additional equipment for pipeline construction when using trenchless methods. In this case, the pushing force is applied to the free end of the pipeline section located on the day surface. The authors obtained analytical dependences for determining the stress-strain state of the pushed pipeline when using the pusher in a particular case. In addition, they identified values of axial pushing force that are considered dangerous, because they can cause pipeline dropping down from the roller supports during pipeline pullback.

  13. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  14. Nematic ordering of rigid rod polyelectrolytes induced by electrostatic interactions: Effect of discrete charge distribution along the chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dian; Venev, Sergey V.; Palyulin, Vladimir V.; Potemkin, Igor I.

    2011-02-01

    Similar to the Debye-Hückel plasma, charged groups in solutions of rigid rod polyelectrolytes attract each other. We derive expression for the correlation free energy of electrostatic attraction of the rods within the random phase approximation. In this theory, we explicitly take into account positions of charged groups on the chains and examine both charge and polymer concentration fluctuations. The correlation free energies and the osmotic pressures are calculated for isotropic and completely ordered nematic phase. The results of the discrete model are compared with results of a continuous model. The discrete model gives rise to a stronger attraction between the charged groups both in the isotropic and nematic phases and to a stronger orienting action of the electrostatic forces.

  15. Energetics of the Cleft Closing Transition and the Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Conformational Rearrangements of the Glutamate Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mamonova, Tatyana; Yonkunas, Michael J.; Kurnikova, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptors are localized in the pre- and postsynaptic membrane of neurons in the brain. Activation by the principal excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate allows the ligand binding domain to change conformation, communicating opening of the channel for ion conduction. The free energy of the GluR2 S1S2 ligand binding domain (S1S2) closure transition was computed using a combination of thermodynamic integration and umbrella sampling modeling methods. A path that involves lowering the charge on E705 was chosen to clarify the role of this binding site residue. A continuum electrostatic approach in S1S2 is used to show E705, located in the ligand binding cleft, stabilizes the closed conformation of S1S2. In the closed conformation, in the absence of a ligand, S1S2 is somewhat more closed than reported from X-ray structures. A semi-open conformation has been identified which is characterized by disruption of a single cross-cleft interaction and differs only slightly in energy from the fully closed S1S2. The fully open S1S2 conformation exhibits a wide energy well and shares structural similarity to the apo S1S2 crystal structure. Hybrid continuum electrostatics/MD calculations along the chosen closure transition pathway reveal solvation energies, as well as electrostatic interaction energies between two lobes of the protein increase the relative energetic difference between the open and the closed conformational states. By analyzing the role of several cross-cleft contacts as well as other binding site residues we demonstrate how S1S2 interactions facilitate formation of the closed conformation of the ligand binding domain. PMID:18823129

  16. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  17. The additive effect of harmonics on conservative and dissipative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sergio; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Multifrequency atomic force microscopy holds promise as a tool for chemical and topological imaging with nanoscale resolution. Here, we solve the equation of motion exactly for the fundamental mode in terms of the cantilever mean deflection, the fundamental frequency of oscillation, and the higher harmonic amplitudes and phases. The fundamental frequency provides information about the mean force, dissipation, and variations in the magnitude of the attractive and the repulsive force components during an oscillation cycle. The contributions of the higher harmonics to the position, velocity, and acceleration can be added gradually where the details of the true instantaneous force are recovered only when tens of harmonics are included. A formalism is developed here to decouple and quantify the viscous term of the force in the short and long range. It is also shown that the viscosity independent paths on tip approach and tip retraction can also be decoupled by simply acquiring a FFT at two different cantilever separations. The two paths correspond to tip distances at which metastability is present as, for example, in the presence of capillary interactions and where there is surface energy hysteresis.

  18. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  19. Electrostatic Interactions Govern “Odd/Even” Effects in Water-Induced Gemini Surfactant Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mantha, Sriteja; McDaniel, Jesse G.; Perroni, Dominic V.; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-12-27

    Gemini surfactants comprise two single-tailed surfactants connected by a linker at or near the hydrophilic headgroup. They display a variety of water concentration-dependent lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) morphologies that are sensitive to surfactant molecular structure, and na- ture of the headgroups and counterions. Recently, an interesting dependence of the aqueous phase behavior on the length of the linker has been discovered; odd-numbered linker length surfactants exhibit characteristically different phase diagrams than even-numbered linker sur- factants. In this work, we investigate this “odd/even effect” using computer simulations, focusing on experimentally studied gemini dicarboxylates with Na+ counterions, 7 non-terminal carbon atoms in the tails, and either 3, 4, 5, or 6 carbon atoms in the linker (denoted Na-73, Na-74, Na-75, and Na-76 respectively). We find that the relative electrostatic repulsion be- tween headgroups in the different morphologies is correlated with qualitative features of the experimental phase diagrams, predicting destabilization of hexagonal phases as the cylinders pack close together at low water content. Significant differences in the relative headgroup ori- entations of Na-74 and Na-76 compared to Na-73 and Na-75 surfactants lead to differences in linker-linker packing, and long-range headgroup/headgroup electrostatic repulsion, which affects the delicate electrostatic balance between hexagonal and gyroid phases. Finally, much of the fundamental insight presented in this work is enabled by the ability to computationally construct and analyze metastable phases that are not observable in experiments.

  20. Electrostatic Interactions Govern “Odd/Even” Effects in Water-Induced Gemini Surfactant Self-Assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Mantha, Sriteja; McDaniel, Jesse G.; Perroni, Dominic V.; ...

    2016-12-27

    Gemini surfactants comprise two single-tailed surfactants connected by a linker at or near the hydrophilic headgroup. They display a variety of water concentration-dependent lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) morphologies that are sensitive to surfactant molecular structure, and na- ture of the headgroups and counterions. Recently, an interesting dependence of the aqueous phase behavior on the length of the linker has been discovered; odd-numbered linker length surfactants exhibit characteristically different phase diagrams than even-numbered linker sur- factants. In this work, we investigate this “odd/even effect” using computer simulations, focusing on experimentally studied gemini dicarboxylates with Na+ counterions, 7 non-terminal carbon atoms inmore » the tails, and either 3, 4, 5, or 6 carbon atoms in the linker (denoted Na-73, Na-74, Na-75, and Na-76 respectively). We find that the relative electrostatic repulsion be- tween headgroups in the different morphologies is correlated with qualitative features of the experimental phase diagrams, predicting destabilization of hexagonal phases as the cylinders pack close together at low water content. Significant differences in the relative headgroup ori- entations of Na-74 and Na-76 compared to Na-73 and Na-75 surfactants lead to differences in linker-linker packing, and long-range headgroup/headgroup electrostatic repulsion, which affects the delicate electrostatic balance between hexagonal and gyroid phases. Finally, much of the fundamental insight presented in this work is enabled by the ability to computationally construct and analyze metastable phases that are not observable in experiments.« less

  1. Induced Electrostatic Self-Interaction in the Space-Time of a Global Monopole with Inner Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Spinelly, J.

    In this work we analyze the electrostatic self-energy and self-force on a pointlike electric-charged particle induced by a global monopole space-time considering an inner structure for it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points inside and outside the monopole's core the self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first is induced by the geometry associated with the space-time under consideration, and the second is a correction due to the nonvanishing inner structure attributed to it. Considering specifically the ballpoint pen model for the region inside, we are able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies in the regions outside and inside the monopole's core.

  2. Competition between excluded-volume and electrostatic interactions for nanogel swelling: effects of the counterion valence and nanogel charge.

    PubMed

    Adroher-Benítez, Irene; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Ahualli, Silvia; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Odriozola, Gerardo; Moncho-Jordá, Arturo

    2017-03-01

    In this work the equilibrium distribution of ions around a thermo-responsive charged nanogel particle in an electrolyte aqueous suspension is explored using coarse-grained Monte Carlo computer simulations and the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theory. We explicitly consider the ionic size in both methods and study the interplay between electrostatic and excluded-volume effects for swollen and shrunken nanogels, monovalent and trivalent counterions, and for two different nanogel charges. We find good quantitative agreement between the ionic density profiles obtained using both methods when the excluded repulsive force exerted by the cross-linked polymer network is taken into account. For the shrunken conformation, the electrostatic repulsion between the charged groups provokes a heterogeneous polymer density profile, leading to a nanogel structure with an internal low density hole surrounded by a dense corona. The results show that the excluded-volume repulsion strongly hinders the ion permeation for shrunken nanogels, where volume exclusion is able to significantly reduce the concentration of counterions in the more dense regions of the nanogel. In general, we demonstrate that the thermosensitive behaviour of nanogels, as well as their internal structure, is strongly influenced by the valence of the counterions and also by the charge of the particles. On the one hand, an increase of the counterion valence moves the swelling transition to lower temperatures, and induces a major structuring of the charged monomers into internal and external layers around the crown for shrunken nanogels. On the other hand, increasing the particle charge shifts the swelling curve to larger values of the effective radius of the nanogel.

  3. Influence of pH and ionic strength on electrostatic properties of ferredoxin, FNR, and hydrogenase and the rate constants of their interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, A. N.; Khrushchev, S. S.; Kovalenko, I. B.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein transfers electrons from photosystem I (PSI) to ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as other metabolic pathways. In some photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria and green unicellular algae under anaerobic conditions Fd transfers electrons not only to FNR but also to hydrogenase—an enzyme which catalyzes reduction of atomic hydrogen to H2. One of the questions posed by this competitive relationship between proteins is which characteristics of thylakoid stroma media allow switching of the electron flow between the linear path PSI-Fd-FNR-NADP+ and the path PSI-Fd-hydrogenase-H2. The study was conducted using direct multiparticle simulation approach. In this method protein molecules are considered as individual objects that experience Brownian motion and electrostatic interaction with the surrounding media and each other. Using the model we studied the effects of pH and ionic strength (I) upon complex formation between ferredoxin and FNR and ferredoxin and hydrogenase. We showed that the rate constant of Fd-FNR complex formation is constant in a wide range of physiologically significant pH values. Therefore it can be argued that regulation of FNR activity doesn’t involve pH changes in stroma. On the other hand, in the model rate constant of Fd-hydrogenase interaction dramatically depends upon pH: in the range 7-9 it increases threefold. It may seem that because hydrogenase reduces protons it should be more active when pH is acidic. Apparently, regulation of hydrogenase’s affinity to both her reaction partners (H+ and Fd) is carried out by changes in its electrostatic properties. In the dark, the protein is inactive and in the light it is activated and starts to interact with both Fd and H+. Therefore, we can conclude that in chloroplasts the rate of hydrogen production is regulated by pH through the changes in the affinity between hydrogenase and ferredoxin.

  4. Intermolecular interactions, charge-density distribution and the electrostatic properties of pyrazinamide anti-TB drug molecule: an experimental and theoretical charge-density study.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, Gnanasekaran; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Kumaradhas, Poomani

    2014-06-01

    An experimental charge-density analysis of pyrazinamide (a first line antitubercular drug) was performed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction data [(sin θ/λ)max = 1.1 Å(-1)] measured at 100 (2) K. The structure was solved by direct methods using SHELXS97 and refined by SHELXL97. The total electron density of the pyrazinamide molecule was modeled using the Hansen-Coppens multipole formalism implemented in the XD software. The topological properties of electron density determined from the experiment were compared with the theoretical results obtained from CRYSTAL09 at the B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory. The crystal structure was stabilized by N-H...N and N-H...O hydrogen bonds, in which the N3-H3B...N1 and N3-H3A...O1 interactions form two types of dimers in the crystal. Hirshfeld surface analysis was carried out to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The fingerprint plot reveals that the N...H and O...H hydrogen-bonding interactions contribute 26.1 and 18.4%, respectively, of the total Hirshfeld surface. The lattice energy of the molecule was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-31G** basis set. The molecular electrostatic potential of the pyrazinamide molecule exhibits extended electronegative regions around O1, N1 and N2. The existence of a negative electrostatic potential (ESP) region just above the upper and lower surfaces of the pyrazine ring confirm the π-electron cloud.

  5. Electrostatic interactions play an essential role in the binding of oleic acid with α-lactalbumin in the HAMLET-like complex: a study using charge-specific chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yongjing; Min, Soyoung; Harte, Níal P; Kirk, Hannah; O'Brien, John E; Voorheis, H Paul; Svanborg, Catharina; Hun Mok, K

    2013-01-01

    Human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) and its analogs are partially unfolded protein-oleic acid (OA) complexes that exhibit selective tumoricidal activity normally absent in the native protein itself. To understand the nature of the interaction between protein and OA moieties, charge-specific chemical modifications of lysine side chains involving citraconylation, acetylation, and guanidination were employed and the biophysical and biological properties were probed. Upon converting the original positively-charged lysine residues to negatively-charged citraconyl or neutral acetyl groups, the binding of OA to protein was eliminated, as were any cytotoxic activities towards osteosarcoma cells. Retention of the positive charges by converting lysine residues to homoarginine groups (guanidination); however, yielded unchanged binding of OA to protein and identical tumoricidal activity to that displayed by the wild-type α-lactalbumin-oleic acid complex. With the addition of OA, the wild-type and guanidinated α-lactalbumin proteins underwent substantial conformational changes, such as partial unfolding, loss of tertiary structure, but retention of secondary structure. In contrast, no significant conformational changes were observed in the citraconylated and acetylated α-lactalbumins, most likely because of the absence of OA binding. These results suggest that electrostatic interactions between the positively-charged basic groups on α-lactalbumin and the negatively-charged carboxylate groups on OA molecules play an essential role in the binding of OA to α-lactalbumin and that these interactions appear to be as important as hydrophobic interactions.

  6. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  7. The Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Histone H3K4me2/3 to the Sgf29 Tandem Tudor Domain.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Bas J G E; Meulenbroeks, Erik; Belle, Roman; Mecinović, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Several reader domain proteins that specifically recognize methyllysine-containing histones contain the negatively-charged aspartate or glutamate residues as part of the aromatic cage. Herein, we report thermodynamic analyses for the recognition of histone H3K4me3 and H3K4me2 by the tandem tudor domain of Sgf29 and its recognition site variants. Small uncharged and large aromatic substitutions on the Asp266 site resulted in a significant decrease in binding affinities for both H3K4me3 and H3K4me2, demonstrating the role of the negative charge of Asp266 in the readout process by Sgf29. This study emphasizes the essential contribution of electrostatic interactions to the overall binding affinity, and reveals that the underlying mechanisms for the recognition of Kme2/3 depend on the composition and arrangement of the aromatic cage.

  8. The Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Histone H3K4me2/3 to the Sgf29 Tandem Tudor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, Bas J. G. E.; Meulenbroeks, Erik; Belle, Roman; Mecinović, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Several reader domain proteins that specifically recognize methyllysine-containing histones contain the negatively-charged aspartate or glutamate residues as part of the aromatic cage. Herein, we report thermodynamic analyses for the recognition of histone H3K4me3 and H3K4me2 by the tandem tudor domain of Sgf29 and its recognition site variants. Small uncharged and large aromatic substitutions on the Asp266 site resulted in a significant decrease in binding affinities for both H3K4me3 and H3K4me2, demonstrating the role of the negative charge of Asp266 in the readout process by Sgf29. This study emphasizes the essential contribution of electrostatic interactions to the overall binding affinity, and reveals that the underlying mechanisms for the recognition of Kme2/3 depend on the composition and arrangement of the aromatic cage. PMID:26421618

  9. P20A inhibits HIV-1 fusion through its electrostatic interaction with the distal region of the gp41 fusion core.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shushu; Tong, Pei; Tan, Yue; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2015-09-01

    We previously identified an HIV-1 fusion inhibitor P20A targeting HIV-1 gp41 6-HB fusion core. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis, we investigated the effect of 6-HB surface residue mutations on the binding affinity between P20A and 6-HB. Substitution of positively or negatively charged residues in the distal region of 6-HB with alanines resulted in significant decrease or increase of its binding affinity to P20A, respectively. The 6-HB with E630K, D632K, or E634K mutation exhibited enhanced binding affinity with P20A, suggesting that P20A blocks HIV-1 fusion through electrostatic interaction with the positively charged residues in the distal region of the gp41 fusion core.

  10. Electrostatic Forces as Dominant Interactions Between Proteins and Polyanions: an ESI MS Study of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding to Heparin Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Dubin, Paul L; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2017-04-01

    The interactions between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are facilitated by heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin (Hp), highly sulfated biological polyelectrolytes. The molecular basis of FGF interactions with these polyelectrolytes is highly complex due to the structural heterogeneity of HS/Hp, and many details still remain elusive, especially the significance of charge density and minimal chain length of HS/Hp in growth factor recognition and multimerization. In this work, we use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to investigate the association of relatively homogeneous oligoheparins (octamer, dp8, and decamer, dp10) with acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This growth factor forms 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 protein/heparinoid complexes with both dp8 and dp10, and the fraction of bound protein is highly dependent on protein/heparinoid molar ratio. Multimeric complexes are preferentially formed on the highly sulfated Hp oligomers. Although a variety of oligomers appear to be binding-competent, there is a strong correlation between the affinity and the overall level of sulfation (the highest charge density polyanions binding FGF most strongly via multivalent interactions). These results show that the interactions between FGF-1 and Hp oligomers are primarily directed by electrostatics, and also demonstrate the power of ESI MS as a tool to study multiple binding equilibria between proteins and structurally heterogeneous polyanions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Electrostatic Forces as Dominant Interactions Between Proteins and Polyanions: an ESI MS Study of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding to Heparin Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Dubin, Paul L.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2017-02-01

    The interactions between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are facilitated by heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin (Hp), highly sulfated biological polyelectrolytes. The molecular basis of FGF interactions with these polyelectrolytes is highly complex due to the structural heterogeneity of HS/Hp, and many details still remain elusive, especially the significance of charge density and minimal chain length of HS/Hp in growth factor recognition and multimerization. In this work, we use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to investigate the association of relatively homogeneous oligoheparins (octamer, dp8, and decamer, dp10) with acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This growth factor forms 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 protein/heparinoid complexes with both dp8 and dp10, and the fraction of bound protein is highly dependent on protein/heparinoid molar ratio. Multimeric complexes are preferentially formed on the highly sulfated Hp oligomers. Although a variety of oligomers appear to be binding-competent, there is a strong correlation between the affinity and the overall level of sulfation (the highest charge density polyanions binding FGF most strongly via multivalent interactions). These results show that the interactions between FGF-1 and Hp oligomers are primarily directed by electrostatics, and also demonstrate the power of ESI MS as a tool to study multiple binding equilibria between proteins and structurally heterogeneous polyanions.

  12. The thermosensitivity of pH/thermoresponsive microspheres activated by the electrostatic interaction of pH-sensitive units with a bioactive compound.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Asmarandei, Ionela; Harabagiu, Valeria; Ascenzi, Paolo; Simionescu, Bogdan C

    2013-06-01

    pH/thermosensitive hydrogels whose thermosensitivity is activated by the electrostatic interaction of the pH-sensitive units with a hydrophobic bioactive compound are proposed here as sensor-based self-regulated drug delivery systems. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide-co-aminoethylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm-co-AEAAm)) was prepared as a new pH/thermoresponsive polymer by hydrolysis of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide (poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm)) at high temperature (120°C) in the presence of ethylenediamine. Owing to the hydrophilicity of the inserted amine, the copolymers lose the thermosensitivity at physiological temperature and have a slow-phase transition at temperatures much higher than that of the human body. However, when the positively charged amine groups of the pH-sensitive units bind electrostatically with the negatively charged drug diclofenac, the copolymers retrieve the thermosensitivity. Poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm-co-AEAAm) was transformed into pH/thermoresponsive stable microspheres by an original approach based on crosslinking of the amine groups of aminoethylacrylamide (AEAAm) with glutaraldehyde at a temperature slightly below the lower critical solution temperature. The swelling/deswelling processes of microspheres occur only after the interaction of poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm-co-AEAAm) with the negatively charged drug diclofenac. The pH/temperature-sensitive microgels and dicofenac act as sensors and as the triggering agent, respectively. Conductometric titration reveals that the thermosensitivity of poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm-co-AEAAm) is retrieved when just half of its amino groups are complexed with diclofenac.

  13. Effective cytoplasmic release of siRNA from liposomal carriers by controlling the electrostatic interaction of siRNA with a charge-invertible peptide, in response to cytoplasmic pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Shoko; Hama, Susumu; Matsui, Ryo; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    effectively released via electrostatic repulsion of siRNA with negatively charged SAPSP at cytoplasmic pH (7.4). The condensed complex of siRNA and positively-charged SAPSP at acidic pH (siRNA/SAPSP) was found to result in almost complete release of siRNA upon charge inversion of SAPSP at pH 7.4, with the resultant negatively-charged SAPSP having no undesirable interactions with endogenous mRNA. Moreover, liposomes encapsulating siRNA/SAPSP demonstrated knockdown efficiencies comparable to those of commercially available siRNA carriers. Taken together, SAPSP may be very useful as a siRNA condenser, as it facilitates effective cytoplasmic release of siRNA, and subsequent induction of specific RNAi effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: De-condensation of siRNA cores by addition of heparin; time-lapse moving image of the siRNA release. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08365f

  14. Contributions of long-range electrostatic interactions to 4-chlorobenzoyl-CoA dehalogenase catalysis: a combined theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingbo; Xu, Dingguo; Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Canhui; Guo, Hua; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2006-01-10

    It is well established that electrostatic interactions play a vital role in enzyme catalysis. In this work, we report theory-guided mutation experiments that identified strong electrostatic contributions of a remote residue, namely, Glu232 located on the adjacent subunit, to 4-chlorobenzoyl-CoA dehalogenase catalysis. The Glu232Asp mutant was found to bind the substrate analogue 4-methylbenzoyl-CoA more tightly than does the wild-type dehalogenase. In contrast, the kcat for 4-chlorobenzoyl-CoA conversion to product was reduced 10000-fold in the mutant. UV difference spectra measured for the respective enzyme-ligand complexes revealed an approximately 3-fold shift in the equilibrium of the two active site conformers away from that inducing strong pi-electron polarization in the ligand benzoyl ring. Increased substrate binding, decreased ring polarization, and decreased catalytic efficiency indicated that the repositioning of the point charge in the Glu232Asp mutant might affect the orientation of the Asp145 carboxylate with respect to the substrate aromatic ring. The time course for formation and reaction of the arylated enzyme intermediate during a single turnover was measured for wild-type and Glu232Asp mutant dehalogenases. The accumulation of arylated enzyme in the wild-type dehalogenase was not observed in the mutant. This indicates that the reduced turnover rate in the mutant is the result of a slow arylation of Asp145, owing to decreased efficiency in substrate nucleophilic attack by Asp145. To rationalize the experimental observations, a theoretical model is proposed, which computes the potential of mean force for the nucleophilic aromatic substitution step using a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method. To this end, the removal or reorientation of the side chain charge of residue 232, modeled respectively by the Glu232Gln and Glu232Asp mutants, is shown to increase the rate-limiting energy barrier. The calculated 23.1 kcal/mol free energy

  15. Poisson-Boltzmann model for protein-surface electrostatic interactions and grid-convergence study using the PyGBe code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher D.; Barba, Lorena A.

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between surfaces and proteins occur in many vital processes and are crucial in biotechnology: the ability to control specific interactions is essential in fields like biomaterials, biomedical implants and biosensors. In the latter case, biosensor sensitivity hinges on ligand proteins adsorbing on bioactive surfaces with a favorable orientation, exposing reaction sites to target molecules. Protein adsorption, being a free-energy-driven process, is difficult to study experimentally. This paper develops and evaluates a computational model to study electrostatic interactions of proteins and charged nanosurfaces, via the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. We extended the implicit-solvent model used in the open-source code PyGBe to include surfaces of imposed charge or potential. This code solves the boundary integral formulation of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, discretized with surface elements. PyGBe has at its core a treecode-accelerated Krylov iterative solver, resulting in O(N log N) scaling, with further acceleration on hardware via multi-threaded execution on GPUs. It computes solvation and surface free energies, providing a framework for studying the effect of electrostatics on adsorption. We derived an analytical solution for a spherical charged surface interacting with a spherical dielectric cavity, and used it in a grid-convergence study to build evidence on the correctness of our approach. The study showed the error decaying with the average area of the boundary elements, i.e., the method is O(1 / N) , which is consistent with our previous verification studies using PyGBe. We also studied grid-convergence using a real molecular geometry (protein G B1 D4‧), in this case using Richardson extrapolation (in the absence of an analytical solution) and confirmed the O(1 / N) scaling. With this work, we can now access a completely new family of problems, which no other major bioelectrostatics solver, e.g. APBS, is capable of dealing with. PyGBe is open

  16. Study on the interaction of the toxic food additive carmoisine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-30

    The interaction of the synthetic azo dye and food colorant carmoisine with human and bovine serum albumins was studied by microcalorimetric techniques. A complete thermodynamic profile of the interaction was obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. The equilibrium constant of the complexation process was of the order of 10(6)M(-1) and the binding stoichiometry was found to be 1:1 with both the serum albumins. The binding was driven by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropy contributions. The binding affinity was lower at higher salt concentrations in both cases but the same was dominated by mostly non-electrostatic forces at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic forces contributed only 5-8% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change. The standard molar enthalpy change enhanced whereas the standard molar entropic contribution decreased with rise in temperature but they compensated each other to keep the standard molar Gibbs energy change almost invariant. The negative standard molar heat capacity values suggested the involvement of a significant hydrophobic contribution in the complexation process. Besides, enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was also observed in both the systems. The thermal stability of the serum proteins was found to be remarkably enhanced on binding to carmoisine.

  17. Affinity chromatography of GroEL chaperonin based on denatured proteins: role of electrostatic interactions in regulation of GroEL affinity for protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Iu; Marchenkov, V V; Kaĭsheva, A L; Kashparov, I A; Kotova, N V; Kaliman, P A; Semisotnov, G V

    2006-12-01

    The chaperonin GroEL of the heat shock protein family from Escherichia coli cells can bind various polypeptides lacking rigid tertiary structure and thus prevent their nonspecific association and provide for acquisition of native conformation. In the present work we studied the interaction of GroEL with six denatured proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, ribonuclease A, egg lysozyme in the presence of dithiothreitol, pepsin, beta-casein, and apocytochrome c) possessing negative or positive total charge at neutral pH values and different in hydrophobicity (affinity for a hydrophobic probe ANS). To prevent the influence of nonspecific association of non-native proteins on their interaction with GroEL and make easier the recording of the complexing, the proteins were covalently attached to BrCN-activated Sepharose. At low ionic strength (lower than 60 mM), tight binding of the negatively charged denatured proteins with GroEL (which is also negatively charged) needed relatively low concentrations (approximately 10 mM) of bivalent cations Mg2+ or Ca2+. At the high ionic strength (approximately 600 mM), a tight complex was produced also in the absence of bivalent cations. In contrast, positively charged denatured proteins tightly interacted with GroEL irrespectively of the presence of bivalent cations and ionic strength of the solution (from 20 to 600 mM). These features of GroEL interaction with positively and negatively charged denatured proteins were confirmed by polarized fluorescence (fluorescence anisotropy). The findings suggest that the affinity of GroEL for denatured proteins can be determined by the balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions.

  18. Defining protein electrostatic recognition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Roberts, Victoria A.

    The objective is to elucidate the nature of electrostatic forces controlling protein recognition processes by using a tightly coupled computational and interactive computer graphics approach. The TURNIP program was developed to determine the most favorable precollision orientations for two molecules by systematic search of all orientations and evaluation of the resulting electrostatic interactions. TURNIP was applied to the transient interaction between two electron transfer metalloproteins, plastocyanin and cytochrome c. The results suggest that the productive electron-transfer complex involves interaction of the positive region of cytochrome c with the negative patch of plastocyanin, consistent with experimental data. Application of TURNIP to the formation of the stable complex between the HyHEL-5 antibody and its protein antigen lysozyme showed that long-distance electrostatic forces guide lysozyme toward the HyHEL-5 binding site, but do not fine tune its orientation. Determination of docked antigen/antibody complexes requires including steric as well as electrostatic interactions, as was done for the U10 mutant of the anti-phosphorylcholine antibody S107. The graphics program Flex, a convenient desktop workstation program for visualizing molecular dynamics and normal mode motions, was enhanced. Flex now has a user interface and was rewritten to use standard graphics libraries, so as to run on most desktop workstations.

  19. 3D RISM theory with fast reciprocal-space electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, Jochen; Kast, Stefan M.

    2015-03-21

    The calculation of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions in 3D RISM (“three-dimensional reference interaction site model”) integral equation theory is recast in a form that allows for a computational treatment analogous to the “particle-mesh Ewald” formalism as used for molecular simulations. In addition, relations that connect 3D RISM correlation functions and interaction potentials with thermodynamic quantities such as the chemical potential and average solute-solvent interaction energy are reformulated in a way that calculations of expensive real-space electrostatic terms on the 3D grid are completely avoided. These methodical enhancements allow for both, a significant speedup particularly for large solute systems and a smoother convergence of predicted thermodynamic quantities with respect to box size, as illustrated for several benchmark systems.

  20. Electrostatic Return of Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantanen, R.; Gordon, T.

    2003-01-01

    A Model has been developed capable of calculating the electrostatic return of spacecraft-emitted molecules that are ionized and attracted back to the spacecraft by the spacecraft electric potential on its surfaces. The return of ionized contaminant molecules to charged spacecraft surfaces is very important to all altitudes. It is especially important at geosynchronous and interplanetary environments, since it may be the only mechanism by which contaminants can degrade a surface. This model is applicable to all altitudes and spacecraft geometries. In addition to results of the model will be completed to cover a wide range of potential space systems.

  1. Beta-scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-10-01

    Beta-scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of beta-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembrane segments in domain II, or making charge-reversal mutation of the two outermost gating charges of the IIS4 voltage sensor, shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive potentials and enhances the effect of beta-scorpion toxin. Thus, mutations of acidic residues in IIS2 and IIS3 segments are able to promote voltage-sensor trapping in a way that is similar to the mutations of the arginines in the IIS4 segment. In order to disclose the network of interactions among acidic and basic residues we performed functional analysis of charge-inversion double mutants: our data suggest that the first arginine of the voltage sensor S4 in domain II (R850) interacts specifically with E805, D814 and E821 in the S2 and S3 segments, whereas the second arginine (R853) only interacts with D827 in the S3 segment. Our results suggest that the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II form a voltage-sensing structure, and that molecular interactions between the charged residues of this structure modulate the availability of the IIS4 voltage sensor for trapping by beta-toxins. They also provide unique insights into the molecular events that occur during channel activation, as well as into the structure of the channel.

  2. β-Scorpion toxin effects suggest electrostatic interactions in domain II of voltage-dependent sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Cestèle, Sandrine

    2005-01-01

    β-Scorpion toxins specifically modulate the voltage dependence of sodium channel activation by acting through a voltage-sensor trapping model. We used mutagenesis, functional analysis and the action of β-toxin as tools to investigate the existence and role in channel activation of molecular interactions between the charged residues of the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II of sodium channels. Mutating to arginine the acidic residues of the S2 and S3 transmembrane segments in domain II, or making charge-reversal mutation of the two outermost gating charges of the IIS4 voltage sensor, shifts the voltage dependence of channel activation to more positive potentials and enhances the effect of β-scorpion toxin. Thus, mutations of acidic residues in IIS2 and IIS3 segments are able to promote voltage-sensor trapping in a way that is similar to the mutations of the arginines in the IIS4 segment. In order to disclose the network of interactions among acidic and basic residues we performed functional analysis of charge-inversion double mutants: our data suggest that the first arginine of the voltage sensor S4 in domain II (R850) interacts specifically with E805, D814 and E821 in the S2 and S3 segments, whereas the second arginine (R853) only interacts with D827 in the S3 segment. Our results suggest that the S2, S3 and S4 segments in domain II form a voltage-sensing structure, and that molecular interactions between the charged residues of this structure modulate the availability of the IIS4 voltage sensor for trapping by β-toxins. They also provide unique insights into the molecular events that occur during channel activation, as well as into the structure of the channel. PMID:16020455

  3. pH-induced conformational changes in human ABO(H) blood group glycosyltransferases confirm the importance of electrostatic interactions in the formation of the semi-closed state.

    PubMed

    Johal, Asha R; Blackler, Ryan J; Alfaro, Javier A; Schuman, Brock; Borisova, Svetlana; Evans, Stephen V

    2014-03-01

    The homologous human ABO(H) A and B blood group glycosyltransferases GTA and GTB have two mobile polypeptide loops surrounding their active sites that serve to allow substrate access and product egress and to recognize and sequester substrates for catalysis. Previous studies have established that these enzymes can move from the "open" state to the "semi-closed" then "closed" states in response to addition of a substrate. The contribution of electrostatic interactions to these conformational changes has now been demonstrated by the determination at various pH of the structures of GTA, GTB and the chimeric enzyme ABBA. At near-neutral pH, GTA displays the closed state in which both mobile loops order around the active site, whereas ABBA and GTB display the open state. At low pH, the apparent protonation of the DXD motif in GTA leads to the expulsion of the donor analog to yield the open state, whereas at high pH, both ABBA and GTB form the semi-closed state in which the first mobile loop becomes an ordered α-helix. Step-wise deprotonation of GTB in increments of 0.5 between pH 6.5 and 10.0 shows that helix ordering is gradual, which indicates that the formation of the semi-closed state is dependent on electrostatic forces consistent with the binding of substrate. Spectropolarimetric studies of the corresponding stand-alone peptide in solution reveal no tendency toward helix formation from pH 7.0 to 10.0, which shows that pH-dependent stability is a product of the larger protein environment and underlines the importance of substrate in active site ordering.

  4. Contributions of the electrostatic and the dispersion interaction to the solvent shift in a dye-polymer system, as investigated by hole-burning spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kador, L.; Jahn, S.; Haarer, D.; Silbey, R.

    1990-06-01

    Persistent spectral holes burned in the system octaethylporphin in poly(styrene) exhibit a symmetrical broadening varying in a linear fashion upon application of a static electric field. This effect is due to permanent electric-dipole moments induced in the dye molecules by the electric ``matrix field.'' The average value of the dipole-moment difference μ between the excited and the ground state of the guest molecules, which can be deduced from the broadening, shows a distinct increase from the blue to the red edge of the inhomogeneous absorption band, thus reflecting the varying dye-matrix interaction for centers with different solvent shift. A detailed analysis of this variation in the framework of a microscopic theory, based on a recent publication by Laird and Skinner [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 3274 (1989)], leads to the conclusion that the solvent shift of the absorption lines and also the μ variation across the inhomogeneous band is largely dominated by the dispersion interaction. The electrostatic contribution to the line shift is smaller by about 2 orders of magnitude.

  5. Interaction between non-specific electrostatic forces and humoral factors in haemocyte attachment and encapsulation in the edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Emma C; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A; Ratcliffe, Norman A

    2006-04-01

    In invertebrates, encapsulation is the common immune defence reaction towards foreign bodies, including multicellular parasites, which enter the haemocoel and are too large to be phagocytosed. This immune response has been most extensively studied in insects, in which it is highly complex, involving a diversity of cellular and molecular processes, but little is known of this process in bivalve molluscs. Non-specific physicochemical properties are known to influence parasite-haemocyte interactions in many invertebrates, and these may provide the common basis of encapsulation on which highly specific biochemical interactions are imposed. The present study uses synthetic beads and thread to mimic inactive metacercarial cysts of trematodes, and thus investigates factors involved in the basic, non-specific mechanisms of cell attachment and encapsulation in the edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule. Results showed that positively charged targets stimulated the most vigorous response, and further detailed experiments revealed that non-specific electrostatic forces and humoral plasma factors have a synergistic role in haemocyte attachment and the encapsulation response of C. edule.

  6. Toward the description of electrostatic interactions between globular proteins: Potential of mean force in the primitive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahirel, Vincent; Jardat, Marie; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Turq, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the exact potential of mean force between charged globular proteins in aqueous solution. The aim of the present paper is to study the influence of the ions of the added salt on the effective interaction between these nanoparticles. The charges of the model proteins, either identical or opposite, are either central or distributed on a discrete pattern. Contrarily to Poisson-Boltzmann predictions, attractive, and repulsive direct forces between proteins are not screened similarly. Moreover, it has been shown that the relative orientations of the charge patterns strongly influence salt-mediated interactions. More precisely, for short distances between the proteins, ions enhance the difference of the effective forces between (i) like-charged and oppositely charged proteins, (ii) attractive and repulsive relative orientations of the proteins, which may affect the selectivity of protein/protein recognition. Finally, such results observed with the simplest models are applied to a more elaborate one to demonstrate their generality.

  7. Electrostatic Contributions Drive the Interaction Between Staphylococcus aureus Protein Efb-C and its Complement Target C3d

    SciTech Connect

    Haspel, N.; Ricklin, D.; Geisbrecht, B.V.; Kavraki, L.E.; Lambris, J.D.

    2008-11-13

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  8. Electrostatic contributions drive the interaction between Staphylococcus aureus protein Efb-C and its complement target C3d.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Nurit; Ricklin, Daniel; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Kavraki, Lydia E; Lambris, John D

    2008-11-01

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  9. Probing the interplay between electrostatic and dispersion interactions in the solvation of nonpolar nonaromatic solute molecules in ionic liquids: An OKE spectroscopic study of CS2/[CnC1im][NTf2] mixtures (n = 1-4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lianjie; Tamas, George; Gurung, Eshan; Quitevis, Edward L.

    2014-04-01

    The intermolecular dynamics of dilute solutions of CS2 in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethane)sulfonyl]amide ([CnC1im][NTf2] for n = 1-4) were studied at 295 K using femtosecond optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectroscopy. The OKE spectra of the CS2/ionic liquid (IL) mixtures were analyzed using an additivity model to obtain the CS2 contribution to the OKE spectrum from which information about the intermolecular modes of CS2 in these mixtures was gleaned. The intermolecular spectrum of CS2 in these mixtures is lower in frequency and narrower than that of neat CS2, as found previously for CS2 in [C5C1im][NTf2]. Moreover, a dependence of the spectra on alkyl chain length is observed that is attributed to the interplay between electrostatic and dispersion interactions. The surprising result in this study is the solubility of CS2 in [C1C1im][NTf2], which involves the interaction of a nonpolar nonaromatic molecular solute and only the charged groups of the IL. We propose that the solubility of CS2 in [C1C1im][NTf2] is determined by three favorable factors - (1) large polarizability of the solute molecule; (2) small size of the solute molecule; and (3) low cohesive energy in the high-charge density regions of the IL.

  10. Modulation of Additive and Interactive Effects in Lexical Decision by Trial History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, Michael E. J.; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Additive and interactive effects of word frequency, stimulus quality, and semantic priming have been used to test theoretical claims about the cognitive architecture of word-reading processes. Additive effects among these factors have been taken as evidence for discrete-stage models of word reading. We present evidence from linear mixed-model…

  11. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examination of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents…

  12. [Bootstrap method-based estimation on the confidence interval for additive interaction in cohort studies].

    PubMed

    Pan, Jin-ren; Chen, Kun

    2010-07-01

    Interaction assessment is an important step in epidemiological analysis. When etiological study is carried out, the logarithmic models such as logistic model or Cox proportional hazard model are commonly used to estimate the independent effects of the risk factors. However, estimating interaction between risk factors by the regression coefficient of the product term is on multiplicative scale, and for public-health purposes, it is supposed to be on additive scale or departure from additivity. This paper illustrates with a example of cohort study by fitting Cox proportional hazard model to estimate three measures for additive interaction which presented by Rothman. Adopting the S-Plus application with a built-in Bootstrap function, it is convenient to estimate the confidence interval for additive interaction. Furthermore, this method can avoid the exaggerated estimation by using ORs in a cohort study to gain better precision. When using the complex combination models between additive interaction and multiplicative interaction, it is reasonable to choose the former one when the result is inconsistent.

  13. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  14. Age and work environment characteristics in relation to sleep: Additive, interactive and curvilinear effects.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Katharine R

    2016-05-01

    Although additive combinations of age and work environment characteristics have been found to predict sleep impairment, possible age x work environment interactions have been largely disregarded. The present study examined linear and curvilinear interactions of age with work environment measures in relation to sleep quality and duration. Survey data were collected from offshore day-shift personnel (N = 901). Main effects and interactions of the age terms with work environment measures (job demand, control, and social support, physical environment and strenuous work) were evaluated. Sleep duration was predicted by a curvilinear interaction, age(2) x job demand (p < .005), and by the age x social support interaction (p < .002); sleep quality was predicted by age x job demand (p < .002). Job control and physical environment showed significant additive effects. At a time when older employees are encouraged to remain in the workforce, the findings serve to increase understanding of how ageing and work demands jointly contribute to sleep impairment.

  15. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions: An Additional Layer of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Immink, Richard G H; Angenent, Gerco C

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger protein complexes. The importance of protein-protein interactions between members of a particular plant TF family has long been recognised; however, a significant number of interfamily TF interactions has recently been reported. The biological implications and the molecular mechanisms involved in cross-family interactions have now started to be elucidated and the examples illustrate potential roles in the bridging of biological processes. Hence, cross-family TF interactions expand the molecular toolbox for plants with additional mechanisms to control and fine-tune robust gene expression patterns and to adapt to their continuously changing environment.

  16. Electrostatics at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürcher, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    In molecular systems, positive and negative charges are separated, making them ideal systems to examine electrostatic interactions. The attractive force between positive and negative charges is balanced by repulsive ‘forces’ that are quantum-mechanical in origin. We introduce an ‘effective’ potential energy that captures the repulsion; it allows us to obtain fairly accurate estimates of the bonding properties of molecular systems. We use units (e.g., kcal mol-1 for energy) that emphasize the relevance of electrostatics to macroscopic behavior.

  17. One-pot synthesis of high molecular weight synthetic heteroprotein dimers driven by charge complementarity electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Hvasanov, David; Nam, Ekaterina V; Peterson, Joshua R; Pornsaksit, Dithepon; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Marquis, Christopher P; Thordarson, Pall

    2014-10-17

    Despite the importance of protein dimers and dimerization in biology, the formation of protein dimers through synthetic covalent chemistry has not found widespread use. In the case of maleimide-cysteine-based dimerization of proteins, we show here that when the proteins have the same charge, dimerization appears to be inherently difficult with yields around 1% or less, regardless of the nature of the spacer used or whether homo- or heteroprotein dimers are targeted. In contrast, if the proteins have opposing (complementary) charges, the formation of heteroprotein dimers proceeds much more readily, and in the case of one high molecular weight (>80 kDa) synthetic dimer between cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin, a 30% yield of the purified, isolated dimer was achieved. This represents at least a 30-fold increase in yield for protein dimers formed from proteins with complementary charges, compared to when the proteins have the same charge, under otherwise similar conditions. These results illustrate the role of ionic supramolecular interactions in controlling the reactivity of proteins toward bis-functionalized spacers. The strategy here for effective synthetic dimerization of proteins could be very useful for developing novel approaches to study the important role of protein-protein interactions in chemical biology.

  18. Electrostatic potential map modelling with COSY Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. A.; Baartman, R.; Planche, T.; Saminathan, S.

    2016-06-01

    COSY Infinity (Makino and Berz, 2005) is a differential-algebra based simulation code which allows accurate calculation of transfer maps to arbitrary order. COSY's existing internal procedures were modified to allow electrostatic elements to be specified using an array of field potential data from the midplane. Additionally, a new procedure was created allowing electrostatic elements and their fringe fields to be specified by an analytic function. This allows greater flexibility in accurately modelling electrostatic elements and their fringe fields. Applied examples of these new procedures are presented including the modelling of a shunted electrostatic multipole designed with OPERA, a spherical electrostatic bender, and the effects of different shaped apertures in an electrostatic beam line.

  19. π-Stacking attraction vs. electrostatic repulsion: competing supramolecular interactions in a tpphz-bridged Ru(ii)/Au(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Sorsche, Dieter; Schaub, Markus; Heinemann, Frank W; Habermehl, Johannes; Kuhri, Susanne; Guldi, Dirk; Guthmuller, Julien; Rau, Sven

    2016-08-09

    The synthesis and characterization of a mixed metal ruthenium(ii)/gold(iii) complex bridged by tetrapyridophenazine (tpphz) are described. It is isostructural and isoelectronic to the well-known photocatalysts with palladium(ii) or platinum(ii). Concentration dependent (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and XRD studies show that the electrostatic repulsion between the gold(iii) moieties exceeds the attractive π-stacking interaction. Theoretical calculations based on the new structural data confirm an increased positive charge on the bridging ligand as well as significantly altered orbital symmetry as compared to the previously investigated palladium(ii) complex. This is the first example of a tpphz ruthenium(ii) complex where π-stacking is completely inhibited. The detailed investigation of the solid-state structure showed for the first time in bimetallic tpphz bridged complexes no significant torsion within the bridging ligand itself. Although catalytic performance for proton reduction by gold(iii) is naturally not observed, its photochemical decomposition in colloidal gold particles could be shown by TEM and DLS.

  20. Inhibition of the Electrostatic Interaction between β -amyloid Peptide and Membranes Prevents β -amyloid-induced Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, C.; Terzi, E.; Hauser, N.; Jakob-Rotne, R.; Seelig, J.; Kemp, J. A.

    1997-08-01

    The accumulation of β -amyloid peptides (Aβ ) into senile plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. Aggregated Aβ is toxic to cells in culture and this has been considered to be the cause of neurodegeneration that occurs in the Alzheimer disease brain. The discovery of compounds that prevent Aβ toxicity may lead to a better understanding of the processes involved and ultimately to possible therapeutic drugs. Low nanomolar concentrations of Aβ 1-42 and the toxic fragment Aβ 25-35 have been demonstrated to render cells more sensitive to subsequent insults as manifested by an increased sensitivity to formazan crystals following MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction. Formation of the toxic β -sheet conformation by Aβ peptides is increased by negatively charged membranes. Here we demonstrate that phloretin and exifone, dipolar compounds that decrease the effective negative charge of membranes, prevent association of Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 25-35 to negatively charged lipid vesicles and Aβ induced cell toxicity. These results suggest that Aβ toxicity is mediated through a nonspecific physicochemical interaction with cell membranes.

  1. Transport and equilibrium uptake of a peptide inhibitor of PACE4 into articular cartilage is dominated by electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sangwon; Tortorella, Micky D; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Fok, Kam; Frank, Eliot H; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2010-07-01

    The availability of therapeutic molecules to targets within cartilage depends on transport through the avascular matrix. We studied equilibrium partitioning and non-equilibrium transport into cartilage of Pf-pep, a 760 Da positively charged peptide inhibitor of the proprotein convertase PACE4. Competitive binding measurements revealed negligible binding of Pf-pep to sites within cartilage. Uptake of Pf-pep depended on glycosaminoglycan charge density, and was consistent with predictions of Donnan equilibrium given the known charge of Pf-pep. In separate transport experiments, the diffusivity of Pf-pep in cartilage was measured to be approximately 1 x 10(-6) cm(2)/s, close to other similarly-sized non-binding solutes. These results suggest that small positively charged therapeutics will have a higher concentration within cartilage than in the surrounding synovial fluid, a desired property for local delivery; however, such therapeutics may rapidly diffuse out of cartilage unless there is additional specific binding to intra-tissue substrates that can maintain enhanced intra-tissue concentration for local delivery.

  2. Manipulation of electrostatic and saccharide linker interactions in the design of efficient glycopolypeptide-based cholera toxin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Ronak; Levenson, Eric A; Kiick, Kristi L

    2010-01-11

    Multivalent, glycopolymer inhibitors designed for the treatment of disease and pathogen infection have shown improvements in binding correlated with general changes in glycopolymer architecture and composition. We have previously demonstrated that control of glycopolypeptide backbone extension and ligand spacing significantly impacts the inhibition of the cholera toxin B subunit pentamer (CT B(5)) by these polymers. In the studies reported here, we elucidate the role of backbone charge and linker length in modulating the inhibition event. Peptides of the sequence AXPXG (where X is a positive, neutral or negative amino acid), equipped with the alkyne functionality of propargyl glycine, were designed and synthesized via solid-phase peptide synthetic methods and glycosylated via Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions. The capacity of the glycopeptides to inhibit the binding of the B(5) subunit of cholera toxin was evaluated. These studies indicated that glycopeptides with a negatively charged backbone show improved inhibition of the binding event relative to the other glycopeptides. In addition, variations in the length of the linker between the peptide and the saccharide ligand also affected the inhibition of CT by the glycopeptides. Our findings suggest that, apart from appropriate saccharide spacing and polypeptide chain extension, saccharide linker conformation and the systematic placement of charges on the polypeptide backbone are also significant variables that can be tuned to improve the inhibitory potencies of glycopolypeptide-based multivalent inhibitors.

  3. Mechanical properties of base-modified DNA are not strictly determined by base stacking or electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Justin P; Mogil, Lauren S; McCauley, Micah J; Williams, Mark C; Maher, L James

    2014-07-15

    This work probes the mystery of what balance of forces creates the extraordinary mechanical stiffness of DNA to bending and twisting. Here we explore the relationship between base stacking, functional group occupancy of the DNA minor and major grooves, and DNA mechanical properties. We study double-helical DNA molecules substituting either inosine for guanosine or 2,6-diaminopurine for adenine. These DNA variants, respectively, remove or add an amino group from the DNA minor groove, with corresponding changes in hydrogen-bonding and base stacking energy. Using the techniques of ligase-catalyzed cyclization kinetics, atomic force microscopy, and force spectroscopy with optical tweezers, we show that these DNA variants have bending persistence lengths within the range of values reported for sequence-dependent variation of the natural DNA bases. Comparison with seven additional DNA variants that modify the DNA major groove reveals that DNA bending stiffness is not correlated with base stacking energy or groove occupancy. Data from circular dichroism spectroscopy indicate that base analog substitution can alter DNA helical geometry, suggesting a complex relationship among base stacking, groove occupancy, helical structure, and DNA bend stiffness.

  4. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  5. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  6. Incorporating Phase-Dependent Polarizability in Non-Additive Electrostatic Models for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Aqueous Liquid-Vapor Interface.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Brad A; Warren, G Lee; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-02-10

    We discuss a new classical water force field that explicitly accounts for differences in polarizability between liquid and vapor phases. The TIP4P-QDP (4-point transferable intermolecular potential with charge dependent-polarizability) force field is a modification of the original TIP4P-FQ fluctuating charge water force field of Rick et al.(1) that self-consistently adjusts its atomic hardness parameters via a scaling function dependent on the M-site charge. The electronegativity (χ) parameters are also scaled in order to reproduce condensed-phase dipole moments of comparable magnitude to TIP4P-FQ. TIP4P-QDP is parameterized to reproduce experimental gas-phase and select condensed-phase properties. The TIP4P-QDP water model possesses a gas phase polarizability of 1.40 Å(3) and gas-phase dipole moment of 1.85 Debye, in excellent agreement with experiment and high-level ab initio predictions. The liquid density of TIP4P-QDP is 0.9954(±0.0002) g/cm(3) at 298 K and 1 atmosphere, and the enthalpy of vaporization is 10.55(±0.12) kcal/mol. Other condensed-phase properties such as the isobaric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and diffusion constant are also calculated within reasonable accuracy of experiment and consistent with predictions of other current state-of-the-art water force fields. The average molecular dipole moment of TIP4P-QDP in the condensed phase is 2.641(±0.001) Debye, approximately 0.02 Debye higher than TIP4P-FQ and within the range of values currently surmised for the bulk liquid. The dielectric constant, ε = 85.8 ± 1.0, is 10% higher than experiment. This is reasoned to be due to the increase in the condensed phase dipole moment over TIP4P-FQ, which estimates ε remarkably well. Radial distribution functions for TIP4P-QDP and TIP4P-FQ show similar features, with TIP4P-QDP showing slightly reduced peak heights and subtle shifts towards larger distance interactions. Since the greatest effects of the phase-dependent polarizability are

  7. Electrostatic interactions for directed assembly of high performance nanostructured energetic materials of Al/Fe2O3/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Ma, Zhuang; Li, Guoping; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Benbo; Luo, Yunjun

    2016-05-01

    Electrostatic self-assembly in organic solvent without intensively oxidative or corrosive environments, was adopted to prepare Al/Fe2O3/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials as an energy generating material. The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe2O3 (oxide) nanoparticles. This spontaneous assembly method without any surfactant chemistry or other chemical and biological moieties decreased the aggregation of the same nanoparticles largely, moreover, the poor interfacial contact between the Al (fuel) and Fe2O3 (oxide) nanoparticles was improved significantly, which was the key characteristic of high performance nanostructured energetic materials. In addition, the assembly process was confirmed as Diffusion-Limited Aggregation. The assembled Al/Fe2O3/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials showed excellent performance with heat release of 2400 J/g, peak pressure of 0.42 MPa and pressurization rate of 105.71 MPa/s, superior to that in the control group Al/Fe2O3 nanostructured energetic materials prepared by sonication with heat release of 1326 J/g, peak pressure of 0.19 MPa and pressurization rate of 33.33 MPa/s. Therefore, the approach, which is facile, opens a promising route to the high performance nanostructured energetic materials.

  8. Ammonium catalyzed cyclitive additions: evidence for a cation-π interaction with alkynes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Edith; St Germain, Elijah; Cosme, Patrick; Maity, Pradip; Terentis, Andrew C; Lepore, Salvatore D

    2016-02-07

    The addition of carbamate nitrogen to a non-conjugated carbon-carbon triple bond is catalyzed by an ammonium salt leading to a cyclic product. Studies in homogeneous systems suggest that the ammonium agent facilitates nitrogen-carbon bond formation through a cation-π interaction with the alkyne unit that, for the first time, is directly observed by Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Ammonium Catalyzed Cyclitive Additions: Evidence for a Cation-π Interaction with Alkynes†

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Edith; St.Germain, Elijah; Cosme, Patrick; Maity, Pradip; Terentis, Andrew C.; Lepore, Salvatore D.

    2016-01-01

    The addition of carbamate nitrogen to a non-conjugated carbon-carbon triple bond is catalyzed by an ammonium salt leading to a cyclic product. Studies in homogeneous systems suggest that the ammonium agent facilitates nitrogen-carbon bond formation through a cation-π interaction with the alkyne unit that, for the first time, is directly observed by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26728333

  10. Interactions between organic additives and active powders in water-based lithium iron phosphate electrode slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chia-Chen; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    2012-12-01

    The interactions of organic additives with active powders are investigated and are found to have great influence on the determination of the mixing process for preparing electrode slurries with good dispersion and electrochemical properties of lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) electrodes. Based on the analyses of zeta potential, sedimentation, and rheology, it is shown that LiFePO4 prefers to interact with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) relative to other organic additives such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC), and thus shows preferential adsorption by SBR, whereas SBR has much lower efficiency than SCMC in dispersing LiFePO4. Therefore, for SCMC to interact with and disperse LiFePO4 before the interaction of LiFePO4 with SBR, it is suggested to mix SCMC with LiFePO4 prior to the addition of SBR during the slurry preparation process. For the electrode prepared via the suggested process, i.e., the sequenced adding process in which SCMC is mixed with active powders prior to the addition of SBR, a much better electrochemical performance is obtained than that of the one prepared via the process referred as the simultaneous adding process, in which mixing of SCMC and SBR with active powders in simultaneous.

  11. Electrostatic analysis of nanoelectromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yang

    much stronger screening abilities than semiconducting SWNTs. Our results indicate that it is possible to distinctly identify different ions and also to differentiate between arm-chair and zigzag nanotubes. The TB method is further applied to compute the electrostatic signals generated by DNA segments inside semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. The electrostatic signals indicate that when defective DNA molecules pass through the CNTs, it is possible to identify the number of total base pairs and the relative positions of defective base pairs in DNA chains. Our calculations suggest that it is possible to differentiate Dickerson and hairpin DNA structures by comparing electrical signal patterns. In addition to the multiscale method, we present an ab initio study of electronic properties of graphene flakes and nanoribbons adsorbed on clean and H-passivated (100) silicon surfaces. The graphene electronic properties are not perturbed by the H-passivated Si substrate. In contrast, the interaction between the clean Si surface and graphene can significantly change the bandstructure of graphene. This is caused by the covalent bonding formed by C and surface Si atoms, which changes the pi-band network of the graphene layer. The dispersion curves and density of states calculations show that the bonded Si-C surface states are highly delocalized and located near the Fermi energy. Adsorption energy indicates that the graphene flakes and nanoribbons are stable on clean Si(100) surfaces.

  12. Quasi-chemical approach for adsorption of mixtures with non-additive lateral interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, O. A.; Pasinetti, P. M.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    The statistical thermodynamics of binary mixtures with non-additive lateral interactions was developed on a generalization in the spirit of the lattice-gas model and the classical quasi-chemical approximation (QCA). The traditional assumption of a strictly pairwise additive nearest-neighbors interaction is replaced by a more general one, namely that the bond linking a certain atom with any of its neighbors depends considerably on how many of them are actually present (or absent) on the sites in the first coordination shell of the atom. The total and partial adsorption isotherms are given for both attractive and repulsive lateral interactions between the adsorbed species. Interesting behaviors are observed and discussed in terms of the low-temperature phases formed in the system. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations are performed in order to test the validity of the theoretical model.

  13. Role of strongly interacting additives in tuning the structure and properties of polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Vikram Kumar

    Block copolymer (BCP) nanocomposites are an important class of hybrid materials in which the BCP guides the spatial location and the periodic assembly of the additives. High loadings of well-dispersed nanofillers are generally important for many applications including mechanical reinforcing of polymers. In particular the composites shown in this work might find use as etch masks in nanolithography, or for enabling various phase selective reactions for new materials development. This work explores the use of hydrogen bonding interactions between various additives (such as homopolymers and non-polymeric additives) and small, disordered BCPs to cause the formation of well-ordered morphologies with small domains. A detailed study of the organization of homopolymer chains and the evolution of structure during the process of ordering is performed. The results demonstrate that by tuning the selective interaction of the additive with the incorporating phase of the BCP, composites with significantly high loadings of additives can be formed while maintaining order in the BCP morphology. The possibility of high and selective loading of additives in one of the phases of the ordered BCP composite opens new avenues due to high degree of functionalization and the proximity of the additives within the incorporating phase. This aspect is utilized in one case for the formation of a network structure between adjoining additive cores to derive mesoporous inorganic materials with their structures templated by the BCP. The concept of additive-driven assembly is extended to formulate BCPadditive blends with an ability to undergo photo-induced ordering. Underlying this strategy is the ability to transition a weakly interacting additive to its strongly interacting form. This strategy provides an on-demand, non-intrusive route for formation of well-ordered nanostructures in arbitrarily defined regions of an otherwise disordered material. The second area explored in this dissertation deals

  14. Versatile electrostatic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to create either a double-well or a donut-shaped trapping field. The profile of the {sup 15}ND{sub 3} packet in each of these four trapping potentials is measured, and the dependence of the well-separation and barrier height of the double-well and donut potential on the hexapole and dipole term are discussed.

  15. Electrostatic interactions, but not the YGNGV consensus motif, govern the binding of pediocin PA-1 and its fragments to phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Ludescher, R D; Montville, T J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize in detail the binding of pediocin PA-1 and its fragments to target membranes by using tryptophan fluorescence as a probe. Based on a three-dimensional model (Y. Chen, R. Shapira, M. Eisenstein, and T. J. Montville, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:524-531, 1997), four synthetic N-terminal pediocin fragments were selected to study the mechanism of the initial step by which the bacteriocin associates with membranes. Binding of pediocin PA-1 to vesicles of phosphatidylglycerol, the major component of Listeria membranes, caused an increase in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence intensity with a blue shift of the emission maximum. The Stern-Volmer constants for acrylamide quenching of the fluorescence of pediocin PA-1 in buffer and in the lipid vesicles were 8.83 +/- 0.42 and 3.53 +/- 0.67 M-1, respectively, suggesting that the tryptophan residues inserted into the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer. The synthetic pediocin fragments bound strongly to the lipid vesicles when a patch of positively charged amino acid residues (K-11 and H-12) was present but bound weakly when this patch was mutated out. Quantitative comparison of changes in tryptophan fluorescence parameters, as well as the dissociation constants for pediocin PA-1 and its fragments, revealed that the relative affinity to the lipid vesicles paralleled the net positive charge in the peptide. The relative affinity for the fragment containing the YGNGV consensus motif was 10-fold lower than that for the fragment containing the positive patch. Furthermore, changing the pH from 6.0 to 8.0 decreased binding of the fragments containing the positive patch, probably due to deprotonation of His residues. These results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions, but not the YGNGV motif, govern pediocin binding to the target membrane. PMID:9406395

  16. Electrostatic interaction between an enzyme and electrodes in the electric double layer examined in a view of direct electron transfer-type bioelectrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yu; Kitazumi, Yuki; Tsujimura, Seiya; Shirai, Osamu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kano, Kenji

    2015-01-15

    Effects of the electrode poential on the activity of an adsorbed enzyme has been examined by using copper efflux oxidase (CueO) as a model enzyme and by monitoring direct electron transfer (DET)-type bioelectrocatalysis of oxygen reduction. CueO adsorbed on bare Au electrodes at around the point of zero charge (E(pzc)) shows the highest DET activity, and the activity decreases as the adsorption potential (E(ad); at which the enzyme adsorbs) is far from E(pzc). We propose a model to explain the phenomena in which the electrostatic interaction between the enzyme and electrodes in the electric double layer affects the orientation and the stability of the adsorbed enzyme. The self-assembled monolayer of butanethiol on Au electrodes decreases the electric field in the outside of the inner Helmholtz plane and drastically diminishes the E(ad) dependence of the DET activity of CueO. When CueO is adsorbed on bare Au electrodes under open circuit potential and then is held at hold potentials (E(ho)) more positive than E(pzc), the DET activity of the CueO rapidly decreases with the hold time. The strong electric field with positive surface charge density on the metallic electrode (σ(M)) leads to fatal denaturation of the adsorbed CueO. Such denaturation effect is not so serious at E(ho)

  17. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  18. Electrostatic Levitator Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation system inside Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Cartagena-Rivera, A. X.; Lošdorfer Božič, A.; Carrillo, P. J. P.; San Martín, C.; Mateu, M. G.; Raman, A.; Podgornik, R.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of

  20. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC GOVERNORS, CIRCUITS, VACUUM SEALS, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, VACUUM, ELECTRODES, FINISHES, SURFACE...FINISHING, SURFACE PROPERTIES, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, FIELD EMISSION.

  1. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, FIELD EMISSION, ELECTRODES, VACUUM, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ANODES, CATHODES, POLISHES...DIELECTRICS, COATINGS, PRESSURE, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, VACUUM SEALS, EQUATIONS.

  2. Synergistic interactions between commonly used food additives in a developmental neurotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Lau, Karen; McLean, W Graham; Williams, Dominic P; Howard, C Vyvyan

    2006-03-01

    Exposure to non-nutritional food additives during the critical development window has been implicated in the induction and severity of behavioral disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although the use of single food additives at their regulated concentrations is believed to be relatively safe in terms of neuronal development, their combined effects remain unclear. We therefore examined the neurotoxic effects of four common food additives in combinations of two (Brilliant Blue and L-glutamic acid, Quinoline Yellow and aspartame) to assess potential interactions. Mouse NB2a neuroblastoma cells were induced to differentiate and grow neurites in the presence of additives. After 24 h, cells were fixed and stained and neurite length measured by light microscopy with computerized image analysis. Neurotoxicity was measured as an inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Two independent models were used to analyze combination effects: effect additivity and dose additivity. Significant synergy was observed between combinations of Brilliant Blue with L-glutamic acid, and Quinoline Yellow with aspartame, in both models. Involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in food additive-induced neurite inhibition was assessed with a NMDA antagonist, CNS-1102. L-glutamic acid- and aspartame-induced neurotoxicity was reduced in the presence of CNS-1102; however, the antagonist did not prevent food color-induced neurotoxicity. Theoretical exposure to additives was calculated based on analysis of content in foodstuff, and estimated percentage absorption from the gut. Inhibition of neurite outgrowth was found at concentrations of additives theoretically achievable in plasma by ingestion of a typical snack and drink. In addition, Trypan Blue dye exclusion was used to evaluate the cellular toxicity of food additives on cell viability of NB2a cells; both combinations had a straightforward additive effect on cytotoxicity. These data have implications for the

  3. Defining Protein Electrostatic Recognition Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    electrostatic Interactions, as we have done for the U10 mutant of the antl- phosphorylcholine antibody S107. We have enhanced the graphics program Fla, a...10486 9393-10486 phosphorylcholine -binding antibody S107, (Chign et al., 1989; Behar et al., 1989). This mutant antibody results from a single-site...mutation of Asp 101 to Ala, over 9 A distant from the antigen binding site, which results in a complete loss of phosphorylcholine binding activity. A

  4. Biokinetics of food additive silica nanoparticles and their interactions with food components.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Song, Jae Ho; Jo, Mi-Rae; Yu, Jin; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Young-Rok; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials have been widely utilized in the food industry in production, packaging, sensors, nutrient delivery systems, and food additives. However, research on the interactions between food-grade nanoparticles and biomolecules as well as their potential toxicity is limited. In the present study, the in vivo solubility, oral absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion kinetics of one of the most extensively used food additives, silica (SiO2) were evaluated with respect to particle size (nano vs bulk) following single-dose oral administration to rats. Intestinal transport mechanism was investigated using a 3D culture system, in vitro model of human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium (FAE). The effect of the presence of food components, such as sugar and protein, on the oral absorption of nanoparticles was also evaluated with focus on their interactions. The results obtained demonstrated that the oral absorption of nanoparticles (3.94±0.38%) was greater than that of bulk materials (2.95±0.37%), possibly due to intestinal transport by microfold (M) cells. On the other hand, particle size was found to have no significant effect on in vivo dissolution property, biodistribution, or excretion kinetics. Oral absorption profile of silica nanoparticles was highly dependent on the presence of sugar or protein, showing rapid absorption rate in glucose, presumably due to their surface interaction on nanoparticles. These findings will be useful for predicting the potential toxicity of food-grade nanoparticles and for understanding biological interactions.

  5. Quantitative Membrane Electrostatics with the Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is sensitive to electric double layer interactions in electrolyte solutions, but provides only a qualitative view of interfacial electrostatics. We have fully characterized silicon nitride probe tips and other experimental parameters to allow a quantitative electrostatic analysis by AFM, and we have tested the validity of a simple analytical force expression through numerical simulations. As a test sample, we have measured the effective surface charge density of supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine membranes with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine. The resulting surface charge density and surface potential values are in quantitative agreement with those predicted by the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation, but only when the numerical analysis is employed. In addition, we demonstrate that the AFM can detect double layer forces at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by <2%. Finally, we demonstrate 50-nm resolution electrostatic mapping on heterogeneous model membranes with the AFM. This novel combination of capabilities demonstrates that the AFM is a unique and powerful probe of membrane electrostatics. PMID:17158563

  6. Electrostatic Levitator (ESL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Rulison of Space System LORAl working with the Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) prior to the donation. Space System/LORAL donated the electrostatic containerless processing system to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The official hand over took place in July 1998.

  7. Edutainment Science: Electrostatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlers, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Electrostatics should find a special place in all primary school science curricula. It is a great learning area that reinforces the basics that underpin electricity and atomic structure. Furthermore, it has many well documented hands-on activities. Unfortunately, the "traditional" electrostatics equipment such as PVC rods, woollen cloths, rabbit…

  8. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    Both developed and developing nations have an urgent need to diagnose disease cheaply, reliably, and independently of centralized facilities. Microfulidic platforms are well-positioned to address the need for portable diagnostics, mainly due to their obvious advantage in size. However, most microfluidic methods rely on equipment outside of the chip either for driving fluid flow (e.g., syringe pumps) or for taking measurements (e.g., lasers or microscopes). The energy and space requirements of the whole system inhibit portability and contribute to costs. To capitalize on the strengths of microfluidic platforms and address the serious needs of society, system components need to be miniaturized. Also, miniaturization should be accomplished as simply as possible, considering that simplicity is usually requisite for achieving truly transformative technology. Herein, I attempt to address the issue of controlling fluid flow in portable microfluidic systems. I focus on systems that are driven by elastomer-based membrane valves, since these valves are inherently simple, yet they are capable of sophisticated fluid manipulation. Others have attempted to modify pneumatic microvalves for portable applications, e.g., by transitioning to electromagnetic, thermopneumatic, or piezoelectric actuation principles. However, none of these strategies maintain the proper balance of simplicity, functionality, and ease of integration. My research centers on electrostatic actuators, due to their conceptual simplicity and the efficacy of electrostatic forces on the microscale. To ensure easy integration with polymer-based systems, and to maintain simplicity in the fabrication procedure, the actuators were constructed solely from poly(dimethylsiloxane) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the actuators were fabricated exclusively with soft-lithographic techniques. A mathematical model was developed to identify actuator parameters compatible with soft-lithography, and also to

  9. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  10. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Tool for Lunar Dust Control

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Cheung, C. Y.; Keller, J. F.; Moore, M.; Calle, C. I.

    2009-03-16

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Solving the dust problem is essential before we return to the Moon. During the Apollo missions, the discovery was made that regolith fines, or dust, behaved like abrasive velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, and making movement progressively more difficult as it was mechanically stirred up during surface operations, and abrading surfaces, including spacesuits, when attempts were made to remove it manually. In addition, some of the astronauts experienced breathing difficulties when exposed to dust that got into the crew compartment. The successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Here we will describe the surface properties of dust particles, the basis for their behavior, and an electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue confirmed by our preliminary results. Our device concept utilizes a focused electron beam to control the electrostatic potential of the surface. A plate of the opposite potential is then used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of <5 kg mass and using <5 watts of power to be operational in <5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  11. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography for estimating changes in cell surface charge of Escherichia coli cells treated with pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun; Zhang, Howard

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatments, a nonthermal process, have been reported to injure and inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, the effect of this treatment on bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity has not been investigated. Apple juice (pH 3.8) purchased from a wholesale distributor was inoculated with cocktail of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at 7.4 log CFU/mL, processed with a PEF at a field strength of 18.4 kV/cm and 32.2 kV/cm at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C with a treatment time of 160 μs and a flow rate of 120 mL/min. Bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity of untreated and PEF-treated E. coli O157:H7 were determined immediately and after storage at 5°C and 23°C using hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography. Similarly, the populations surviving the PEF treatments including injured cells were determined by plating 0.1 mL of the sample on sorbitol MacConkey agar and tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The surviving populations of E. coli cells after PEF treatment varied depending on field strength and treatment temperature used. Percent injury in the surviving populations was high immediately after PEF treatment and varied among treatment temperatures. Cell surface charge of E. coli bacteria before PEF treatment averaged 32.10±8.12. PEF treatments at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C reduced the above surface charge to 26.34±1.24, 14.24±3.30, and 6.72±2.82, respectively. Similarly, the surface hydrophobicity of untreated E. coli cells at 0.194±0.034 was increased to an average of 0.268±0.022, 0.320±0.124, and 0.586±0.123 after PEF treatments at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C, respectively. The results of this study indicate that PEF treatment affects the outer cell envelope of E. coli bacteria as evidenced by the changes in surface hydrophobicity and cell surface charge leading to injury and subsequent inactivation of the cells.

  12. Electrostatic self-assembly of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Charged filaments and membranes are natural structures abundant in cell media. In this talk we discuss the assembly of amphiphiles into biocompatible fibers, ribbons and membranes. We describe one- and two-dimensional assemblies that undergo re-entrant transitions in crystalline packing in response to changes in the solution pH and/or salt concentration resulting in different mesoscale morphologies and properties. In the case of one-dimensional structures, we discuss self-assembled amphiphiles into highly charged nanofibers in water that order into two-dimensional crystals. These fibers of about 6 nm cross-sectional diameter form crystalline arrays with inter-fiber spacings of up to 130 nm. Solution concentration and temperature can be adjusted to control the inter-fiber spacings. The addition of salt destroys crystal packing, indicating that electrostatic repulsions are necessary for the observed ordering. We describe the crystallization of bundles of filament networks interacting via long-range repulsions in confinement by a phenomenological model. Two distinct crystallization mechanisms in the short and large screening length regimes are discussed and the phase diagram is obtained. Simulation of large bundles predicts the existence of topological defects among bundled filaments. Crystallization processes driven by electrostatic attractions are also discussed. Funded by Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science (CBES), which is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0000989.

  13. PHI-base update: additions to the pathogen–host interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Winnenburg, Rainer; Urban, Martin; Beacham, Andrew; Baldwin, Thomas K.; Holland, Sabrina; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Hansen, Hilde; Rawlings, Christopher; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Köhler, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The pathogen–host interaction database (PHI-base) is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from bacterial, fungal and Oomycete pathogens, which infect human, animal, plant, insect, fish and fungal hosts. Plant endophytes are also included. PHI-base is therefore an invaluable resource for the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. The database is freely accessible to both academic and non-academic users. This publication describes recent additions to the database and both current and future applications. The number of fields that characterize PHI-base entries has almost doubled. Important additional fields deal with new experimental methods, strain information, pathogenicity islands and external references that link the database to external resources, for example, gene ontology terms and Locus IDs. Another important addition is the inclusion of anti-infectives and their target genes that makes it possible to predict the compounds, that may interact with newly identified virulence factors. In parallel, the curation process has been improved and now involves several external experts. On the technical side, several new search tools have been provided and the database is also now distributed in XML format. PHI-base is available at: http://www.phi-base.org/. PMID:17942425

  14. Electrostatics and aggregation: How charge can turn a crystal into a gel

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Jeremy D.; Whitelam, Stephen; Dill, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization of proteins or colloids is often hindered by the appearance of aggregates of low fractal dimension called gels. Here we study the effect of electrostatics upon crystal and gel formation using an analytic model of hard spheres bearing point charges and short range attractive interactions. We find that the chief electrostatic free energy cost of forming assemblies comes from the entropic loss of counterions that render assemblies charge-neutral. Because there exists more accessible volume for these counterions around an open gel than a dense crystal, there exists an electrostatic entropic driving force favoring the gel over the crystal. This driving force increases with increasing sphere charge, but can be counteracted by increasing counterion concentration. We show that these effects cannot be fully captured by pairwise-additive macroion interactions of the kind often used in simulations, and we show where on the phase diagram to go in order to suppress gel formation. PMID:21895221

  15. The role of electrostatics in the B to A transition of DNA: from solution to assembly.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Laura; Lee, Dominic J; Kornyshev, Alexei A

    2007-10-17

    On the basis of a wealth of published experimental data and computer simulations, we build a simple physical model that allows us to rationalize the A to B transition of DNA in solution and in aggregates. In both cases we find that the electrostatic interactions are strong enough, alone, to induce the transition independently of other energetic contributions, e.g. those related to hydration. On the basis of this analysis we conclude that in ethanol/water mixtures, the effect responsible for the transition is the reduction of dielectric constant in the mixture. This is manifested in electrostatic self-energy terms that include the interaction of phosphate charges with condensed counterions. But in dense aggregates, electrostatics plays a dual role, giving rise to two competing effects. In the absence of groove localized counterions the electrostatic self-energy favours the B form, and the electrostatic interaction energy between neighbouring DNA favours the A form. However, the addition of enough counterions localized in the narrow groove reverses this. In dry aggregates of DNA both terms, in most cases, conspire to keep DNA in the A form. The analysis gives a broad picture of the B to A transition and sets a number of new research goals, particularly concerning simulations that may test our simple model for aggregates.

  16. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  17. The electrostatic storage tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An electrostatic camera system is discussed which is based on the electrostatic storage tube. The development of the system was begun following a series of experiments which indicated that the device offers signficantly improved performance over currently available devices. The approach used in developing the high performance camera involves: converting the input image to an electron image at low loss, applying a low noise gain process, and storing the resulting charge pattern in a low-loss target. The basic processes and elements of the electrostatic storage tube are illustrated and discussed. Graphs that depict the camera performance characteristics are included.

  18. Application of electrostatic prevention technology on polyethylene silos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hong; Liu, Quanzhen; Tan, Fenggui; Zhang, Yunpeng

    2013-03-01

    The main reasons of static electric explosion accidents in polyolefin plant silos were analyzed in this paper, and the study finds that the reasons include control failure of flammable gas content in the feed, high electrification caused by the wind supply, and frequent electrostatic discharge in silos. The electrostatic-reducing technologies of polyolefin powder were introduced, and its application performance in polyolefin plant silos was also clarified. In addition, the methods including FDCS and DGES for evaluation of electrostatic explosion in polyolefin plant silo were proposed. In the end, the risk of electrostatic explosion in PE plant blended silo was evaluated before and after application of electrostatic reducing technology.

  19. Interactive effects between N addition and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Annika; Strengbom, Joachim; From, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    In management of boreal forests, nitrogen (N) enrichment from atmospheric deposition or from forest fertilization can appear in combination with land-use related disturbances, i.e. tree harvesting by clear-felling. Long-term interactive effects between N enrichment and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function are, however, poorly known. We investigated effects of N enrichment by forest fertilization done > 25 years ago on forest understory species composition in old-growth (undisturbed) forests, and in forests clear-felled 10 years ago (disturbed). In clear-felled forests we also investigated effects of the previous N addition on growth of tree saplings. The results show that the N enrichment effect on the understory species composition was strongly dependent on the disturbance caused by clear-felling. In undisturbed forests, there were small or no effects on understory species composition from N addition. In contrast, effects were large in forests first exposed to N addition and subsequently disturbed by clear-felling. Effects of N addition differed among functional groups of plants. Abundance of graminoids increased (+232%) and abundance of dwarf shrubs decreased (-44%) following disturbance in N fertilized forests. For vascular plants, the two perturbations had contrasting effects on α-(within forests) and β-diversity (among forests): in disturbed forests, N addition reduced, or had no effect on α-diversity, while β-diversity increased. For bryophytes, negative effects of disturbance on α-diversity were smaller in N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized, while neither N addition nor disturbance had any effects on β-diversity. Moreover, sapling growth in forests clear-felled 10 years ago was significantly higher in previously N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized. Our study show that effects of N addition on plant communities may appear small, short-lived, or even absent until exposed to a disturbance. This

  20. Miniature Electrostatic Ion Thruster With Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A miniature electrostatic ion thruster is proposed that, with one exception, would be based on the same principles as those of the device described in the previous article, "Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster". The exceptional feature of this thruster would be that, in addition to using electric fields for linear acceleration of ions and electrons, it would use a magnetic field to rotationally accelerate slow electrons into the ion stream to neutralize the ions.

  1. Insight into the interaction between layered lithium-rich oxide and additive-containing electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Wenqiang; Xia, Pan; Zheng, Xiongwen; Ye, Changchun; Xu, Mengqiang; Li, Weishan

    2017-02-01

    Electrolyte additives have been found to be effective for the cyclic stability improvement of layered lithium-rich oxide (LRO), which is ascribed to the formation of cathode films derived from the preferential oxidation of the electrolyte additives. However, the detailed mechanism on the formation of the cathode film is unclear. This paper uncovers the interaction between LRO and additive-containing electrolyte through theoretical calculations, electrochemical measurements and physical characterizations. A representative LRO, Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2, is synthesized, and an electrolyte, 1 M LiPF6 in EC/DMC (1/2, in volume) using triethyl phosphite (TEP) as additive, is considered. Charge/discharge tests demonstrate that LRO suffers severe capacity fading and TEP can significantly improve the cyclic stability of LRO. Characterizations from SEM and TEM demonstrate that a cathode film exists on the LRO after cycling in the TEP-containing electrolyte. The theoretical calculations suggest that TEP traps the active oxygen and is then oxidized on LRO preferentially compared to the electrolyte, forming the cathode film. The further characterizations from FTIR and GC, confirm that the preferential combination of TEP with active oxygen is beneficial for the suppression of oxygen evolution, and that the resulting cathode film can suppress the electrolyte decomposition and protect LRO from destruction.

  2. An improved proximity force approximation for electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2012-08-15

    A quite straightforward approximation for the electrostatic interaction between two perfectly conducting surfaces suggests itself when the distance between them is much smaller than the characteristic lengths associated with their shapes. Indeed, in the so called 'proximity force approximation' the electrostatic force is evaluated by first dividing each surface into a set of small flat patches, and then adding up the forces due two opposite pairs, the contributions of which are approximated as due to pairs of parallel planes. This approximation has been widely and successfully applied in different contexts, ranging from nuclear physics to Casimir effect calculations. We present here an improvement on this approximation, based on a derivative expansion for the electrostatic energy contained between the surfaces. The results obtained could be useful for discussing the geometric dependence of the electrostatic force, and also as a convenient benchmark for numerical analyses of the tip-sample electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proximity force approximation (PFA) has been widely used in different areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PFA can be improved using a derivative expansion in the shape of the surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the improved PFA to compute electrostatic forces between conductors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results can be used as an analytic benchmark for numerical calculations in AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight is provided for people who use the PFA to compute nuclear and Casimir forces.

  3. Electrostatic correlations near charged planar surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingge; Em Karniadakis, George

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic correlation effects near charged planar surfaces immersed in a symmetric electrolytes solution are systematically studied by numerically solving the nonlinear six-dimensional electrostatic self-consistent equations. We compare our numerical results with widely accepted mean-field (MF) theory results, and find that the MF theory remains quantitatively accurate only in weakly charged regimes, whereas in strongly charged regimes, the MF predictions deviate drastically due to the electrostatic correlation effects. We also observe a first-order like phase-transition corresponding to the counterion condensation phenomenon in strongly charged regimes, and compute the phase diagram numerically within a wide parameter range. Finally, we investigate the interactions between two likely-charged planar surfaces, which repulse each other as MF theory predicts in weakly charged regimes. However, our results show that they attract each other above a certain distance in strongly charged regimes due to significant electrostatic correlations. PMID:25194382

  4. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  5. Contribution of temperament to eating disorder symptoms in emerging adulthood: Additive and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Burt, Nicole M; Boddy, Lauren E; Bridgett, David J

    2015-08-01

    Temperament characteristics, such as higher negative emotionality (NE) and lower effortful control (EC), are individual difference risk factors for developmental psychopathology. Research has also noted relations between temperament and more specific manifestations of psychopathology, such as eating disorders (EDs). Although work is emerging that indicates that NE and EC may additively contribute to risk for ED symptoms, no studies have considered the interactive effects of NE and EC in relation to ED symptoms. In the current investigation, we hypothesized that (1) low EC would be associated with increased ED symptoms, (2) high NE would be associated with increased ED symptoms, and (3) these temperament traits would interact, such that the relationship between NE and ED symptoms would be strongest in the presence of low EC. After controlling for gender and child trauma history, emerging adults' (N=160) lower EC (i.e., more difficulties with self-regulation) was associated with more ED symptoms. NE did not emerge as a direct predictor of ED symptoms. However, the anticipated interaction of these temperament characteristics on ED symptoms was found. The association between NE and ED symptoms was only significant in the context of low EC. These findings provide evidence that elevated NE may only be a risk factor for the development of eating disorders when individuals also have self-regulation difficulties. The implications of these findings for research and interventions are discussed.

  6. Genetic evidence for an additional function of phage T4 gene 32 protein: interaction with ligase.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Breschkin, A M

    1975-04-01

    Gene 32 of bacteriophage T4 is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In an attempt to clarify the role of the corresponding gene product, we have looked for mutations that specifically inactivate one but not all of its functions and for compensating suppressor mutations in other genes. Here we describe a gene 32 ts mutant that does not produce progeny, but in contrast to an am mutant investigated by others, is capable of some primary and secondary DNA replication and of forming "joint" recombinational intermediates after infection of Escherichia coli B at the restrictive temperature. However, parental and progeny DNA strands are not ligated to covalently linked "recombinant" molecules, and single strands of vegetative DNA do not exceed unit length. Progeny production as well as capacity for covalent linkage in this gene 32 ts mutant are partially restored by additional rII mutations. Suppression by rII depends on functioning host ligase [EC 6.5.1.2; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming, NMN-forming)]. This gene 32 ts mutation (unlike some others) in turn suppresses the characteristic plaque morphology of rII mutants. We conclude that gene 32 protein, in addition to its role in DNA replication and in the formation of "joint" recombinational intermediates, interacts with T4 ligase [EC 6.5.1.1; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming)] when recombining DNA strands are covalently linked. The protein of the mutant that we describe here is mainly defective in this interaction, thus inactivating T4 ligase in recombination. Suppressing rII mutations facilitate substitution of host ligase. There is suggestive evidence that these interactions occur at the membrane.

  7. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  8. More Electrostatic Explorations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay; Gallai, Ditta

    1998-01-01

    Presents worksheet activities that enable students to explore the concept of electrostatic induction and learn the meaning of grounding. Students build two classic devices, the electrophorus and the leaf electroscope. (DDR)

  9. Graphene Electrostatic Microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Onishi, Seita; Zettl, A.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a wideband electrostatic graphene microphone displaying flat frequency response over the entire human audible region as well as into the ultrasonic regime. Using the microphone, low-level ultrasonic bat calls are successfully recorded. The microphone can be paired with a similarly constructed electrostatic graphene loudspeaker to create a wideband ultrasonic radio. Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California - Berkeley.

  10. Electrostatic discharge test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William Conrad (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Electrostatic discharge properties of materials are quantitatively measured and ranked. Samples are rotated on a turntable beneath selectable, co-available electrostatic chargers, one being a corona charging element and the other a sample-engaging triboelectric charging element. Samples then pass under a voltage meter to measure the amount of residual charge on the samples. After charging is discontinued, measurements are continued to record the charge decay history over time.

  11. Electrostatic Levitator in Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Metal droplet levitated inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  12. Electrostatic Levitator Electrode Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Schematic of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) electrodes and controls system. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  13. Electrostatic Levitator Layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    General oayout of Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  14. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-21

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ∼ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  15. Additivity in protein–DNA interactions: how good an approximation is it?

    PubMed Central

    Benos, Panayiotis V.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2002-01-01

    Man and Stormo and Bulyk et al. recently presented their results on the study of the DNA binding affinity of proteins. In both of these studies the main conclusion is that the additivity assumption, usually applied in methods to search for binding sites, is not true. In the first study, the analysis of binding affinity data from the Mnt repressor protein bound to all possible DNA (sub)targets at positions 16 and 17 of the binding site, showed that those positions are not independent. In the second study, the authors analysed DNA binding affinity data of the wild-type mouse EGR1 protein and four variants differing on the middle finger. The binding affinity of these proteins was measured to all 64 possible trinucleotide (sub)targets of the middle finger using microarray technology. The analysis of the measurements also showed interdependence among the positions in the DNA target. In the present report, we review the data of both studies and we re- analyse them using various statistical methods, including a comparison with a multiple regression approach. We conclude that despite the fact that the additivity assumption does not fit the data perfectly, in most cases it provides a very good approximation of the true nature of the specific protein–DNA interactions. Therefore, additive models can be very useful for the discovery and prediction of binding sites in genomic DNA. PMID:12384591

  16. Deppdb--DNA electrostatic potential properties database: electrostatic properties of genome DNA.

    PubMed

    Osypov, Alexander A; Krutinin, Gleb G; Kamzolova, Svetlana G

    2010-06-01

    The electrostatic properties of genome DNA influence its interactions with different proteins, in particular, the regulation of transcription by RNA-polymerases. DEPPDB--DNA Electrostatic Potential Properties Database--was developed to hold and provide all available information on the electrostatic properties of genome DNA combined with its sequence and annotation of biological and structural properties of genome elements and whole genomes. Genomes in DEPPDB are organized on a taxonomical basis. Currently, the database contains all the completely sequenced bacterial and viral genomes according to NCBI RefSeq. General properties of the genome DNA electrostatic potential profile and principles of its formation are revealed. This potential correlates with the GC content but does not correspond to it exactly and strongly depends on both the sequence arrangement and its context (flanking regions). Analysis of the promoter regions for bacterial and viral RNA polymerases revealed a correspondence between the scale of these proteins' physical properties and electrostatic profile patterns. We also discovered a direct correlation between the potential value and the binding frequency of RNA polymerase to DNA, supporting the idea of the role of electrostatics in these interactions. This matches a pronounced tendency of the promoter regions to possess higher values of the electrostatic potential.

  17. DEPPDB - DNA electrostatic potential properties database. Electrostatic properties of genome DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Osypov, Alexander A; Krutinin, Gleb G; Krutinina, Eugenia A; Kamzolova, Svetlana G

    2012-04-01

    Electrostatic properties of genome DNA are important to its interactions with different proteins, in particular, related to transcription. DEPPDB - DNA Electrostatic Potential (and other Physical) Properties Database - provides information on the electrostatic and other physical properties of genome DNA combined with its sequence and annotation of biological and structural properties of genomes and their elements. Genomes are organized on taxonomical basis, supporting comparative and evolutionary studies. Currently, DEPPDB contains all completely sequenced bacterial, viral, mitochondrial, and plastids genomes according to the NCBI RefSeq, and some model eukaryotic genomes. Data for promoters, regulation sites, binding proteins, etc., are incorporated from established DBs and literature. The database is complemented by analytical tools. User sequences calculations are available. Case studies discovered electrostatics complementing DNA bending in E.coli plasmid BNT2 promoter functioning, possibly affecting host-environment metabolic switch. Transcription factors binding sites gravitate to high potential regions, confirming the electrostatics universal importance in protein-DNA interactions beyond the classical promoter-RNA polymerase recognition and regulation. Other genome elements, such as terminators, also show electrostatic peculiarities. Most intriguing are gene starts, exhibiting taxonomic correlations. The necessity of the genome electrostatic properties studies is discussed.

  18. SmaggIce 2.0: Additional Capabilities for Interactive Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Vickerman, Mary B.

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils (SmaggIce) software toolkit has been extended to allow interactive grid generation for multi-element iced airfoils. The essential phases of an icing effects study include geometry preparation, block creation and grid generation. SmaggIce Version 2.0 now includes these main capabilities for both single and multi-element airfoils, plus an improved flow solver interface and a variety of additional tools to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of icing effects studies. An overview of these features is given, especially the new multi-element blocking strategy using the multiple wakes method. Examples are given which illustrate the capabilities of SmaggIce for conducting an icing effects study for both single and multi-element airfoils.

  19. Non-additive increases in sediment stability are generated by macroinvertebrate species interactions in laboratory streams.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Lindsey K; Cardinale, Bradley J; Sklar, Leonard S

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological structures such as plant roots can have large impacts on landscape morphodynamics, and that physical models that do not incorporate biology can generate qualitatively incorrect predictions of sediment transport. However, work to date has focused almost entirely on the impacts of single, usually dominant, species. Here we ask whether multiple, coexisting species of hydropsychid caddisfly larvae have different impacts on sediment mobility compared to single-species systems due to competitive interactions and niche differences. We manipulated the presence of two common species of net-spinning caddisfly (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in laboratory mesocosms and measured how their silk filtration nets influence the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment grain motion when they were in monoculture versus polyculture. We found that critical shear stress increases non-additively in polycultures where species were allowed to interact. Critical shear stress was 26% higher in multi-species assemblages compared to the average single-species monoculture, and 21% greater than levels of stability achieved by the species having the largest impact on sediment motion in monoculture. Supplementary behavioral experiments suggest the non-additive increase in critical shear stress may have occurred as competition among species led to shifts in the spatial distribution of the two populations and complementary habitat use. To explore the implications of these results for field conditions, we used results from the laboratory study to parameterize a common model of sediment transport. We then used this model to estimate potential bed movement in a natural stream for which we had measurements of channel geometry, grain size, and daily discharge. Although this extrapolation is speculative, it illustrates that multi-species impacts could be sufficiently large to reduce bedload sediment flux over annual time scales in

  20. Non-Additive Increases in Sediment Stability Are Generated by Macroinvertebrate Species Interactions in Laboratory Streams

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, Lindsey K.; Cardinale, Bradley J.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological structures such as plant roots can have large impacts on landscape morphodynamics, and that physical models that do not incorporate biology can generate qualitatively incorrect predictions of sediment transport. However, work to date has focused almost entirely on the impacts of single, usually dominant, species. Here we ask whether multiple, coexisting species of hydropsychid caddisfly larvae have different impacts on sediment mobility compared to single-species systems due to competitive interactions and niche differences. We manipulated the presence of two common species of net-spinning caddisfly (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in laboratory mesocosms and measured how their silk filtration nets influence the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment grain motion when they were in monoculture versus polyculture. We found that critical shear stress increases non-additively in polycultures where species were allowed to interact. Critical shear stress was 26% higher in multi-species assemblages compared to the average single-species monoculture, and 21% greater than levels of stability achieved by the species having the largest impact on sediment motion in monoculture. Supplementary behavioral experiments suggest the non-additive increase in critical shear stress may have occurred as competition among species led to shifts in the spatial distribution of the two populations and complementary habitat use. To explore the implications of these results for field conditions, we used results from the laboratory study to parameterize a common model of sediment transport. We then used this model to estimate potential bed movement in a natural stream for which we had measurements of channel geometry, grain size, and daily discharge. Although this extrapolation is speculative, it illustrates that multi-species impacts could be sufficiently large to reduce bedload sediment flux over annual time scales in

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-02

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer.

  2. Additive and interactive effects of plant genotypic diversity on arthropod communities and plant fitness.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marc T J; Lajeunesse, Marc J; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2006-01-01

    Recent research suggests that genetic diversity in plant populations can shape the diversity and abundance of consumer communities. We tested this hypothesis in a field experiment by manipulating patches of Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis) to contain one, four or eight plant genotypes. We then surveyed 92 species of naturally colonizing arthropods. Genetically diverse plant patches had 18% more arthropod species, and a greater abundance of omnivorous and predacious arthropods, but not herbivores, compared with monocultures. The effects of genotypic diversity on arthropod communities were due to a combination of interactive and additive effects among genotypes within genetically diverse patches. Greater genetic diversity also led to a selective feedback, as mean genotype fitness was 27% higher in diverse patches than in monocultures. A comparison between our results and the literature reveals that genetic diversity and species diversity can have similar qualitative and quantitative effects on arthropod communities. Our findings also illustrate the benefit of preserving genetic variation to conserve species diversity and interactions within multitrophic communities.

  3. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  4. Reactivity of Dazomet, a Hydraulic Fracturing Additive: Hydrolysis and Interaction with Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolazio, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Karamalidis, A.; Hakala, A.

    2015-12-01

    reaction products. Our results indicate the need to determine specific mineral-additive interactions to evaluate the potential risks of chemical use in hydraulic fracturing.

  5. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  6. The electrochemical surface forces apparatus: the effect of surface roughness, electrostatic surface potentials, and anodic oxide growth on interaction forces, and friction between dissimilar surfaces in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Valtiner, Markus; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Greene, George W; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-09-11

    We present a newly designed electrochemical surface forces apparatus (EC-SFA) that allows control and measurement of surface potentials and interfacial electrochemical reactions with simultaneous measurement of normal interaction forces (with nN resolution), friction forces (with μN resolution), and distances (with Å resolution) between apposing surfaces. We describe three applications of the developed EC-SFA and discuss the wide-range of potential other applications. In particular, we describe measurements of (1) force-distance profiles between smooth and rough gold surfaces and apposing self-assembled monolayer-covered smooth mica surfaces; (2) the effective changing thickness of anodically growing oxide layers with Å-accuracy on rough and smooth surfaces; and (3) friction forces evolving at a metal-ceramic contact, all as a function of the applied electrochemical potential. Interaction forces between atomically smooth surfaces are well-described using DLVO theory and the Hogg-Healy-Fuerstenau approximation for electric double layer interactions between dissimilar surfaces, which unintuitively predicts the possibility of attractive double layer forces between dissimilar surfaces whose surface potentials have similar sign, and repulsive forces between surfaces whose surface potentials have opposite sign. Surface roughness of the gold electrodes leads to an additional exponentially repulsive force in the force-distance profiles that is qualitatively well described by an extended DLVO model that includes repulsive hydration and steric forces. Comparing the measured thickness of the anodic gold oxide layer and the charge consumed for generating this layer allowed the identification of its chemical structure as a hydrated Au(OH)(3) phase formed at the gold surface at high positive potentials. The EC-SFA allows, for the first time, one to look at complex long-term transient effects of dynamic processes (e.g., relaxation times), which are also reflected in friction

  7. Detecting Departure From Additivity Along a Fixed-Ratio Mixture Ray With a Piecewise Model for Dose and Interaction Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Gennings, Chris; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Plewa, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    For mixtures of many chemicals, a ray design based on a relevant, fixed mixing ratio is useful for detecting departure from additivity. Methods for detecting departure involve modeling the response as a function of total dose along the ray. For mixtures with many components, the interaction may be dose dependent. Therefore, we have developed the use of a three-segment model containing both a dose threshold and an interaction threshold. Prior to the dose threshold, the response is that of background; between the dose threshold and the interaction threshold, an additive relationship exists; the model allows for departure from additivity beyond the interaction threshold. With such a model, we can conduct a hypothesis test of additivity, as well as a test for a region of additivity. The methods are illustrated with cytotoxicity data that arise when Chinese hamster ovary cells are exposed to a mixture of nine haloacetic acids. PMID:21359103

  8. Pairwise additivity in the nuclear magnetic resonance interactions of atomic xenon.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2009-04-14

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of atomic (129/131)Xe is used as a versatile probe of the structure and dynamics of various host materials, due to the sensitivity of the Xe NMR parameters to intermolecular interactions. The principles governing this sensitivity can be investigated using the prototypic system of interacting Xe atoms. In the pairwise additive approximation (PAA), the binary NMR chemical shift, nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC), and spin-rotation (SR) curves for the xenon dimer are utilized for fast and efficient evaluation of the corresponding NMR tensors in small xenon clusters Xe(n) (n = 2-12). If accurate, the preparametrized PAA enables the analysis of the NMR properties of xenon clusters, condensed xenon phases, and xenon gas without having to resort to electronic structure calculations of instantaneous configurations for n > 2. The binary parameters for Xe(2) at different internuclear distances were obtained at the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock level of theory. Quantum-chemical (QC) calculations at the corresponding level were used to obtain the NMR parameters of the Xe(n) (n = 2-12) clusters at the equilibrium geometries. Comparison of PAA and QC data indicates that the direct use of the binary property curves of Xe(2) can be expected to be well-suited for the analysis of Xe NMR in the gaseous phase dominated by binary collisions. For use in condensed phases where many-body effects should be considered, effective binary property functions were fitted using the principal components of QC tensors from Xe(n) clusters. Particularly, the chemical shift in Xe(n) is strikingly well-described by the effective PAA. The coordination number Z of the Xe site is found to be the most important factor determining the chemical shift, with the largest shifts being found for high-symmetry sites with the largest Z. This is rationalized in terms of the density of virtual electronic states available for response to magnetic perturbations.

  9. Interactions between cocoa flavanols and inorganic nitrate: additive effects on endothelial function at achievable dietary amounts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Hezel, Michael; Aydin, Hilal; Kelm, Malte; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Heiss, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Dietary intervention studies have shown that flavanols and inorganic nitrate can improve vascular function, suggesting that these two bioactives may be responsible for beneficial health effects of diets rich in fruits and vegetables. We aimed to study interactions between cocoa flavanols (CF) and nitrate, focusing on absorption, bioavailability, excretion, and efficacy to increase endothelial function. In a double-blind randomized, dose-response crossover study, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured in 15 healthy subjects before and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after consumption of CF (1.4-10.9 mg/kg bw) or nitrate (0.1-10 mg/kg bw). To study flavanol-nitrate interactions, an additional intervention trial was performed with nitrate and CF taken in sequence at low and high amounts. FMD was measured before (0 h) and at 1h after ingestion of nitrate (3 or 8.5 mg/kg bw) or water. Then subjects received a CF drink (2.7 or 10.9 mg/kg bw) or a micro- and macronutrient-matched CF-free drink. FMD was measured at 1, 2, and 4 h thereafter. Blood and urine samples were collected and assessed for CF and nitric oxide (NO) metabolites with HPLC and gas-phase reductive chemiluminescence. Finally, intragastric formation of NO after CF and nitrate consumption was investigated. Both CF and nitrate induced similar intake-dependent increases in FMD. Maximal values were achieved at 1 h postingestion and gradually decreased to reach baseline values at 4 h. These effects were additive at low intake levels, whereas CF did not further increase FMD after high nitrate intake. Nitrate did not affect flavanol absorption, bioavailability, or excretion, but CF enhanced nitrate-related gastric NO formation and attenuated the increase in plasma nitrite after nitrate intake. Both flavanols and inorganic nitrate can improve endothelial function in healthy subjects at intake amounts that are achievable with a normal diet. Even low dietary intake of these bioactives may exert relevant effects on endothelial

  10. Electrostatic graphene loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qin; Zettl, A.

    2013-06-01

    Graphene has extremely low mass density and high mechanical strength, and key qualities for efficient wide-frequency-response electrostatic audio speaker design. Low mass ensures good high frequency response, while high strength allows for relatively large free-standing diaphragms necessary for effective low frequency response. Here, we report on construction and testing of a miniaturized graphene-based electrostatic audio transducer. The speaker/earphone is straightforward in design and operation and has excellent frequency response across the entire audio frequency range (20 Hz-20 kHz), with performance matching or surpassing commercially available audio earphones.

  11. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  12. Electrostatic Levitator Inspected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Larry Savage, Dr. Jan Rogers, Dr. Michael Robinson (All NASA) and Doug Huie (Mevatec) inspect the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  13. Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Graph depicting Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) heating and cooling cycle to achieve undercooling of liquid metals. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity matierials sciences program.

  14. Electrostatic Levitator at Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A 3 mm drop of nickel-zirconium, heated to incandescence, hovers between electrically charged plates inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  15. Additive interfacial chiral interaction in multilayers for stabilization of small individual skyrmions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau-Luchaire, C.; Moutafis, C.; Reyren, N.; Sampaio, J.; Vaz, C. A. F.; van Horne, N.; Bouzehouane, K.; Garcia, K.; Deranlot, C.; Warnicke, P.; Wohlhüter, P.; George, J.-M.; Weigand, M.; Raabe, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.

    2016-05-01

    Facing the ever-growing demand for data storage will most probably require a new paradigm. Nanoscale magnetic skyrmions are anticipated to solve this issue as they are arguably the smallest spin textures in magnetic thin films in nature. We designed cobalt-based multilayered thin films in which the cobalt layer is sandwiched between two heavy metals and so provides additive interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMIs), which reach a value close to 2 mJ m-2 in the case of the Ir|Co|Pt asymmetric multilayers. Using a magnetization-sensitive scanning X-ray transmission microscopy technique, we imaged small magnetic domains at very low fields in these multilayers. The study of their behaviour in a perpendicular magnetic field allows us to conclude that they are actually magnetic skyrmions stabilized by the large DMI. This discovery of stable sub-100 nm individual skyrmions at room temperature in a technologically relevant material opens the way for device applications in the near future.

  16. GroPBS: Fast Solver for Implicit Electrostatics of Biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Bertelshofer, Franziska; Sun, Liping; Greiner, Günther; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the electrostatic potential on the surface of biomolecules or biomembranes under physiological conditions is an important step in the attempt to characterize the physico-chemical properties of these molecules and, in particular, also their interactions with each other. Additionally, knowledge about solution electrostatics may also guide the design of molecules with specified properties. However, explicit water models come at a high computational cost, rendering them unsuitable for large design studies or for docking purposes. Implicit models with the water phase treated as a continuum require the numerical solution of the Poisson–Boltzmann equation (PBE). Here, we present a new flexible program for the numerical solution of the PBE, allowing for different geometries, and the explicit and implicit inclusion of membranes. It involves a discretization of space and the computation of the molecular surface. The PBE is solved using finite differences, the resulting set of equations is solved using a Gauss–Seidel method. It is shown for the example of the sucrose transporter ScrY that the implicit inclusion of a surrounding membrane has a strong effect also on the electrostatics within the pore region and, thus, needs to be carefully considered, e.g., in design studies on membrane proteins. PMID:26636074

  17. GroPBS: Fast Solver for Implicit Electrostatics of Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Bertelshofer, Franziska; Sun, Liping; Greiner, Günther; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the electrostatic potential on the surface of biomolecules or biomembranes under physiological conditions is an important step in the attempt to characterize the physico-chemical properties of these molecules and, in particular, also their interactions with each other. Additionally, knowledge about solution electrostatics may also guide the design of molecules with specified properties. However, explicit water models come at a high computational cost, rendering them unsuitable for large design studies or for docking purposes. Implicit models with the water phase treated as a continuum require the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). Here, we present a new flexible program for the numerical solution of the PBE, allowing for different geometries, and the explicit and implicit inclusion of membranes. It involves a discretization of space and the computation of the molecular surface. The PBE is solved using finite differences, the resulting set of equations is solved using a Gauss-Seidel method. It is shown for the example of the sucrose transporter ScrY that the implicit inclusion of a surrounding membrane has a strong effect also on the electrostatics within the pore region and, thus, needs to be carefully considered, e.g., in design studies on membrane proteins.

  18. Magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, P.

    1977-01-01

    The spectrum of electrostatic plasma waves in the terrestrial magnetosheath was studied using the plasma wave experiment on the IMP-6 satellite. Electrostatic plasma wave turbulence is almost continuously present throughout the magnetosheath with broadband (20 Hz- 70 kHz) r.m.s. field intensities typically 0.01 - 1.0 millivolts/m. Peak intensities of about 1.0 millivolts/m near the electron plasma frequency (30 - 60 kHz) were detected occasionally. The components usually identified in the spectrum of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence include a high frequency ( or = 30 kHz) component peaking at the electron plasma frequency f sub pe, a low frequency component with a broad intensity maximum below the nominal ion plasma frequency f sub pi (approximately f sub pe/43), and a less well defined intermediate component in the range f sub pi f f sub pe. The intensity distribution of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence clearly shows that the low frequency component is associated with the bow shock, suggesting that the ion heating begun at the shock continues into the downstream magnetosheath.

  19. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  20. Inherently tunable electrostatic assembly of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongjun; Whited, Gregg; Nguyen, Chi; Okerlund, Adam; Stucky, Galen D

    2008-01-01

    Membrane proteins are a class of nanoscopic entities that control the matter, energy, and information transport across cellular boundaries. Electrostatic interactions are shown to direct the rapid co-assembly of proteorhodopsin (PR) and lipids into long-range crystalline arrays. The roles of inherent charge variations on lipid membranes and PR variants with different compositions are examined by tuning recombinant PR variants with different extramembrane domain sizes and charged amino acid substitutions, lipid membrane compositions, and lipid-to-PR stoichiometric ratios. Rational control of this predominantly electrostatic assembly for PR crystallization is demonstrated, and the same principles should be applicable to the assembly and crystallization of other integral membrane proteins.

  1. Evaluation of electrostatic binding of PAMAM dendrimers and charged phthalocyanines by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernandez, Emilio; Paulo, Pedro M R; Costa, Sílvia M B

    2015-02-14

    We have assessed host-guest interactions between PAMAM dendrimers and charged phthalocyanine probes by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Our results show strong binding in water at low ionic strength with an affinity that decreases from KB ∼ 10(9) to 10(8) M(-1) upon decreasing the phthalocyanine charge of z = -4, -2 and -1. The binding affinity also decreases significantly upon salt addition leading to KB values of ca. 10(5)-10(6) M(-1). The changes of binding affinity probed by varying the phthalocyanine charge, and by changing the ionic strength or pH conditions, allowed us to evaluate the electrostatic contribution (Kel) in dendrimer-phthalocyanine interactions. In particular, this approach afforded values of electrostatic potential for PAMAM dendrimers in water at low ionic strength and at dendrimer concentrations in the nanomolar range. The electrostatic potential of PAMAM generations 4 and 7 are around 50 mV in close agreement with theoretical estimates using the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. Interestingly, the nonelectrostatic binding is significant and contributes even more than electrostatic binding to dendrimer-phthalocyanine interactions. The nonelectrostatic binding contributes to an affinity of KB above 10(5) M(-1), as measured under conditions of low dendrimer charge and high ionic strength, which makes these dendrimers promising hosts as drug carriers.

  2. Persistent Currents and Addition Spectrum in Strongly Interacting Chaotic Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Damir; Mathur, H.; Murthy, Ganpathy

    2003-03-01

    Murthy and Shankar(Ganpathy Murthy, R. Shankar, Quantum Dots with Disorder and Interactions: A Solvable Large-g Limit), family cond-mat/0209136 have introduced a non-perturbative approach to analyzing the effects of interaction and randomness in chaotic quantum dots in the limit of large Thouless number. Using this framework we study two experimentally observable quantities in the strongly interacting regime. First we compare the Coulomb blockade peak spacing distribution in the strong coupling regime to the distribution in the weak coupling regime (described by the ``universal Hamiltonian''). Second we study persistent currents in mesoscopic rings in the regime of strong interaction.

  3. Electrostatic effects on hyaluronic acid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezney, John; Saleh, Omar

    2015-03-01

    In systems of polyelectrolytes, such as solutions of charged biopolymers, the electrostatic repulsion between charged monomers plays a dominant role in determining the molecular conformation. Altering the ionic strength of the solvent thus affects the structure of such a polymer. Capturing this electrostatically-driven structural dependence is important for understanding many biological systems. Here, we use single molecule manipulation experiments to collect force-extension behavior on hyaluronic acid (HA), a polyanion which is a major component of the extracellular matrix in all vertebrates. By measuring HA elasticity in a variety of salt conditions, we are able to directly assess the contribution of electrostatics to the chain's self-avoidance and local stiffness. Similar to recent results from our group on single-stranded nucleic acids, our data indicate that HA behaves as a swollen chain of electrostatic blobs, with blob size proportional to the solution Debye length. Our data indicate that the chain structure within the blob is not worm-like, likely due to long-range electrostatic interactions. We discuss potential models of this effect.

  4. Electrostatic Tuning of Cellular Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, Sara I.; Parkkari, Teija; Hammarström, Sven; Elinder, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated ion channels regulate the electric activity of excitable tissues, such as the heart and brain. Therefore, treatment for conditions of disturbed excitability is often based on drugs that target ion channels. In this study of a voltage-gated K channel, we propose what we believe to be a novel pharmacological mechanism for how to regulate channel activity. Charged lipophilic substances can tune channel opening, and consequently excitability, by an electrostatic interaction with the channel's voltage sensors. The direction of the effect depends on the charge of the substance. This was shown by three compounds sharing an arachidonyl backbone but bearing different charge: arachidonic acid, methyl arachidonate, and arachidonyl amine. Computer simulations of membrane excitability showed that small changes in the voltage dependence of Na and K channels have prominent impact on excitability and the tendency for repetitive firing. For instance, a shift in the voltage dependence of a K channel with −5 or +5 mV corresponds to a threefold increase or decrease in K channel density, respectively. We suggest that electrostatic tuning of ion channel activity constitutes a novel and powerful pharmacological approach with which to affect cellular excitability. PMID:20141752

  5. Attachment of Li[Ni0.2Li0.2Mn0.6]O2 Nanoparticles to the Graphene Surface Using Electrostatic Interaction Without Deterioration of Phase Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Min Ho; Park, Yong Joon

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we report a facile approach to enhance the electrochemical performance of Li-rich oxides with vulnerable phase stability. The Li-rich oxide nanoparticles were attached to the surface of graphene; the graphene surface acted as a matrix with high electronic conductivity that compensated for the low conductivity and enhanced the rate capability of the oxides. Our novel approach constitutes a direct assembly of two materials via electrostatic interaction, without a high-temperature heat treatment. The inevitable deterioration in phase integrity of previous composites between carbon and Li-rich oxides resulted from the reaction of oxygen in the structure with carbon during the heat-treatment process. However, our new method successfully attached Li-rich nanoparticles to the surface of graphene, without a phase change of the oxides. The resulting graphene/Li-rich oxide composites exhibited superior capacity and rate capability compared to their pristine Li-rich counterparts.

  6. Biobriefcase electrostatic aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Perry M.; Christian, Allen T.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Willis, Ladona; Masquelier, Donald A.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2009-03-17

    A system for sampling air and collecting particles entrained in the air comprising a receiving surface, a liquid input that directs liquid to the receiving surface and produces a liquid surface, an air input that directs the air so that the air with particles entrained in the air impact the liquid surface, and an electrostatic contact connected to the liquid that imparts an electric charge to the liquid. The particles potentially including bioagents become captured in the liquid by the air with particles entrained in the air impacting the liquid surface. Collection efficiency is improved by the electrostatic contact electrically charging the liquid. The effects of impaction and adhesion due to electrically charging the liquid allows a unique combination in a particle capture medium that has a low fluid consumption rate while maintaining high efficiency.

  7. Electrostatically clean solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore Garry (Inventor); Krumweide, Duane Eric (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Provided are methods of manufacturing an electrostatically clean solar array panel and the products resulting from the practice of these methods. The preferred method uses an array of solar cells, each with a coverglass where the method includes machining apertures into a flat, electrically conductive sheet so that each aperture is aligned with and undersized with respect to its matched coverglass sheet and thereby fashion a front side shield with apertures (FSA). The undersized portion about each aperture of the bottom side of the FSA shield is bonded to the topside portions nearest the edges of each aperture's matched coverglass. Edge clips are attached to the front side aperture shield edges with the edge clips electrically and mechanically connecting the tops of the coverglasses to the solar panel substrate. The FSA shield, edge clips and substrate edges are bonded so as to produce a conductively grounded electrostatically clean solar array panel.

  8. Investigation of Electrostatic Charge in Hose Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    storage tanks and, thereby, impose hazardous electrical energy concentrations sufficient to cause incendive arc discharges. This hazard problem... dissipater additives with the objective of quantifying and minimizing electrostatic charging in flexible fuel transport hoses. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

  9. Electrostatic Enhancement of Coagulation in Protoplanetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Cuzzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity experiments suggest that electrostatic forces (overwhelmed by normal Earth gravity) could greatly enhance cohesive strength of preplanetary aggregates. Cohesive forces may be 103 times larger than those for van der Waals adhesion. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. SMPBS: Web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yang; Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2017-03-30

    SMPBS (Size Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers) is a web server for computing biomolecular electrostatics using finite element solvers of the size modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE). SMPBE not only reflects ionic size effects but also includes the classic Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) as a special case. Thus, its web server is expected to have a broader range of applications than a PBE web server. SMPBS is designed with a dynamic, mobile-friendly user interface, and features easily accessible help text, asynchronous data submission, and an interactive, hardware-accelerated molecular visualization viewer based on the 3Dmol.js library. In particular, the viewer allows computed electrostatics to be directly mapped onto an irregular triangular mesh of a molecular surface. Due to this functionality and the fast SMPBE finite element solvers, the web server is very efficient in the calculation and visualization of electrostatics. In addition, SMPBE is reconstructed using a new objective electrostatic free energy, clearly showing that the electrostatics and ionic concentrations predicted by SMPBE are optimal in the sense of minimizing the objective electrostatic free energy. SMPBS is available at the URL: smpbs.math.uwm.edu © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Electrostatic Levitator Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers (left) and Larry Savage (foreground) of the Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are joined by Dr. Richard Weber (Center) and April Hixon of Containerless Research Inc. of Evanston, Ill., in conducting an experiment run of the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) using insulating materials. Materials researchers use unique capability of the facility to levitate and study the properties of various materials important in manufacturing processes.

  12. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1994-12-31

    In the field of microelectronics, and in particular the fabrication of microelectronics during plasma etching processes, electrostatic chucks have been used to hold silicon wafers during the plasma etching process. Current electrostatic chucks that operate by the {open_quotes}Johnson-Rahbek Effect{close_quotes} consist of a metallic base plate that is typically coated with a thick layer of slightly conductive dielectric material. A silicon wafer of approximately the same size as the chuck is placed on top of the chuck and a potential difference of several hundred volts is applied between the silicon and the base plate of the electrostatic chuck. This causes an electrostatic attraction proportional to the square of the electric field in the gap between the silicon wafer and the chuck face. When the chuck is used in a plasma filled chamber the electric potential of the wafer tends to be fixed by the effective potential of the plasma. The purpose of the dielectric layer on the chuck is to prevent the silicon wafer from coming into direct electrical contact with the metallic part of the chuck and shorting out the potential difference. On the other hand, a small amount of conductivity appears to be desirable in the dielectric coating so that much of its free surface between points of contact with the silicon wafer is maintained near the potential of the metallic base plate; otherwise, a much larger potential difference would be needed to produce a sufficiently large electric field in the vacuum gap between the wafer and chuck. Typically, the face of the chuck has a pattern of grooves in which about 10 torr pressure of helium gas is maintained. This gas provides cooling (thermal contact) between the wafer and the chuck. A pressure of 10 torr is equivalent to about 0.2 psi.

  13. Electrostatic supersolitons in three-species plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-15

    Superficially, electrostatic potential profiles of supersolitons look like those of traditional solitons. However, their electric field profiles are markedly different, having additional extrema on the wings of the standard bipolar structure. This new concept was recently pointed out in the literature for a plasma model with five species. Here, it is shown that electrostatic supersolitons are not an artefact of exotic, complicated plasma models, but can exist even in three-species plasmas and are likely to occur in space plasmas. Further, a methodology is given to delineate their existence domains in a systematic fashion by determining the specific limiting factors.

  14. Electrostatics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to continue developing an understanding of electrostatic phenomena in preparation for any future flight opportunities of the EGM experiment, originally slated for a 2004 Space Station deployment. Work would be based on theoretical assessments, ground-based lab experiments, and reduced-gravity experiments. The ability to examine dipoles in the lab proved to be elusive, and thus, effort was concentrated on monopoles -how materials become charged, the fate of the charge, the role of material type, and so forth. Several significant milestones were achieved in this regard. In regard of the dipoles, experiments were designed in collaboration with the University of Chicago school district who had access to reduced gravity on the KC-135 aircraft. Two experiments were slated to fly last year but were cancelled after the Columbia accident. One of the experiments has been given a second life and will fly sometime in 2005 if the Shuttle flights resume. There remains active interest in the question of electrostatic dipoles within the educational community, and experiments using magnetic dipoles as a substitute are to be examined. The KC-135 experiments will also examine dispersion methods for particles as a verification of possible future techniques in microgravity. Both laboratory and theoretical work established a number of breakthroughs in our understanding of electrostatic phenomena. These breakthroughs are listed in this paper.

  15. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  16. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2008-09-01

    For the success of NASA’s new vision for space exploration to Moon, Mars and beyond, exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is ‘a must solve’ problem. The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions. The exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE), and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage. There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies. The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies. The full space radiation environment has been used, for the first time, to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding. The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons. Conclusions are drawn for the future directions of space radiation protection.

  17. Breakdown mechanisms in electrostatic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, M.; Cuttone, G.; Zappalà, E.; Passarello, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Electrostatic Beam Deflectors for the K800 Superconducting Cyclotron are the most critical elements of the beam extraction system. It has been carried out an accurate investigation from the microscopic point of view, leading to a better comprehension of the complex phenomena taking part in the breakdown process. The environmental conditions are high electric field (up to 130 kV/cm), high magnetic field (up to 5 T) in addition with high energy (70 MeV/u) and high power ion beam. It has been found that all the materials constituent the electrostatic deflector, and not only the electrodes, give an important contribute to the mechanism of breakdown that occurs in two main ways: insulator metalization and enhanced electrodes electron emission. These two effects are involved in a positive feedback process which amplifies the effects leading to a fast breakdown. These phenomena are here shown and some possible solutions are at the moment under test using several bulk (Mo, Ti, Cu) and coating materials (TiN, Diamond Like Carbon).

  18. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  19. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  20. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies of bovine serum albumin interaction with sodium acetate food additive.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh-Aghdash, Hossein; Ezzati Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar; Dehghan, Parvin; Panahi-Azar, Vahid; Barzegar, Abolfazl

    2017-08-01

    Sodium acetate (SA) has been used as a highly effective protectant in food industry and the possible effect of this additive on the binding to albumin should be taken into consideration. Therefore, for the first time, the mechanism of SA interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated by multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods under physiological conditions. Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching analysis showed an increase in the fluorescence intensity of BSA upon increasing the amounts of SA. The high affinity of SA to BSA was demonstrated by a binding constant value (1.09×10(3) at 310°K). The thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrophobic binding plays a main role in the binding of SA to Albumin. Furthermore, the results of UV-vis spectra confirmed the interaction of this additive to BSA. In addition, molecular modeling study demonstrated that A binding sites of BSA play the main role in the interaction with acetate.

  1. Antioxidative stress effect of epicatechin and catechin induced by Aβ25-35 in rats and use of the electrostatic potential and the Fukui function as a tool to elucidate specific sites of interaction.

    PubMed

    Cruz-González, Trinidad; Cortez-Torres, Estephania; Perez-Severiano, Francisca; Espinosa, Blanca; Guevara, Jorge; Perez-Benitez, Aarón; Melendez, Francisco J; Díaz, Alfonso; Ramírez, Ramsés E

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the aggregation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) in senile plaques and cerebral vasculature. The Aβ25-35 fraction has shown the most toxicity; its neurotoxic mechanisms are associated with the generation of oxidative stress and reactive astrogliosis that induce neuronal death and memory impairment. Studies indicate that pharmacological treatment with flavonoids reduces the rate of AD, in particular, it has been shown that antioxidants are compounds that could interact with this peptide due to their antioxidant proprieties. In this study, experimental and computational tools were used to calculate the molecular electrostatic potential and the Fukui function with the Gaussian 09 computational program, to predict the most reactive parts of these molecules and make the complex between Aβ25-35 and two flavonoids (catechin and epicatechin) in the absolute gas-phase, where a possible interaction between them was observed. This is important for understanding the Aβ25-35-Flavonoid (A-F) interaction as a therapeutic strategy to inhibit the neurotoxic effects that this peptide causes in AD, which currently is still considered an ambiguous process.

  2. Thermodynamic and Structural Properties of Methanol-Water Solutions Using Non-Additive Interaction Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yang; Warren, G. Lee; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    We study bulk structural and thermodynamic properties of methanol-water solutions via molecular dynamics simulations using novel interaction potentials based on the charge equilibration (fluctuating charge) formalism to explicitly account for molecular polarization at the atomic level. The study uses the TIP4P-FQ potential for water-water interactions, and the CHARMM-based (Chemistry at HARvard Molecular Mechanics) fluctuating charge potential for methanol-methanol and methanol-water interactions. In terms of bulk solution properties, we discuss liquid densities, enthalpies of mixing, dielectric constants, self-diffusion constants, as well as structural properties related to local hydrogen bonding structure as manifested in radial distribution functions and cluster analysis. We further explore the electronic response of water and methanol in the differing local environments established by the interaction of each species predominantly with molecules of the other species. The current force field for the alcohol-water interaction performs reasonably well for most properties, with the greatest deviation from experiment observed for the excess mixing enthalpies, which are predicted to be too favorable. This is qualitatively consistent with the overestimation of the methanol-water gas-phase interaction energy for the lowest-energy conformer (methanol as proton donor). Hydration free energies for methanol in TIP4P-FQ water are predicted to be −5.6±0.2 kcal/mole, in respectable agreement with the experimental value of −5.1 kcal/mole. With respect to solution micro-structure, the present cluster analysis suggests that the micro-scale environment for concentrations where select thermodynamic quantities reach extremal values is described by a bi-percolating network structure. PMID:18074339

  3. Inverse gene-for-gene interactions contribute additively to tan spot susceptibility in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tan spot of wheat, caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, is an important disease in almost all wheat-growing areas of the world. The disease system is known to involve at least three fungal-produced necrotrophic effectors (NEs) that interact with corresponding host sensitivity (S) genes in an inv...

  4. Different responses of alpine plants to nitrogen addition: effects on plant-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Peng; Yang, Hao; Mou, Chengxiang; Mo, Li

    2016-01-01

    The different responses of plant species to resource stress are keys to understand the dynamics of plant community in a changing environment. To test the hypothesis that nitrogen (N) increase would benefit N competitive species, rather than N stress-tolerant species, to compete with neighbours, we conducted an experiment with neighbour removal, N addition and soil moisture as treatments in an alpine grassland on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Both growths and competitive-response abilities (CRA, the ability to tolerate the inhibitory effects of neighbors) of Kobresia macrantha, Polygonum viviparum and Potentilla anserine in wet site were facilitated by N addition, conversely, both growths and CRA of Taraxacum mongolicum and Ligularia virgaurea were suppressed by N addition, indicating that the responses of CRA of target species under N addition were consistent with the N utilization strategies of them. Moreover, the facilitative effects of N addition on competitive-response abilities of Kobresia macrantha and Polygonum viviparum were not found at the dry site, illustrating that soil moisture can alter the changes of neighbour effects caused by N addition. Life strategy of dominant species in plant community on the undisturbed southeastern Tibetan Plateau may shift from N stress-tolerant to N competitive, if the N increases continuously. PMID:27922131

  5. Phase Segregation and Dynamics in Strongly Interacting Small Molecule Additive - Block Copolymer Surfactant Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Rohit; Khalil, Ahmed; Henning Winter, H.; Watkins, James J.

    2012-02-01

    Rheology and Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) were used to investigate order to disorder transitions (ODTs) and disorder to order transitions (DOTs) of poly(ethyleneoxide-b-propyleneoxide-b-ethyleneoxide) block copolymer surfactants mixed with hydrogen-bond-donating small molecule additives. A series of additives having a core benzene ring and systematic variation in the number of carboxylic or hydroxyl groups attached to the ring were of particular interest. Ordered cylindrical morphologies, confirmed using SAXS, were obtained only in a certain additive concentration region. ODTs were characterized by sudden changes in the linear viscoelastic properties in low frequency region upon increasing temperature. The locations of ODTs varied widely with hydrogen-bond-donating ability of the functional group and were found to be strongly dependent on the number of functional groups attached to the ring. For a given additive, the temperature at which ODT occur was strong function of the additive loading, whereas the linear viscoelastic properties of the ordered state were little changed upon varying additive concentration in ordered region. The location and dynamics of DOTs upon cooling were comparable to the ODTs upon heating. Studies using these model systems provide insight into the design of well-ordered hybrid materials.

  6. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-05-19

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed.

  7. Microencapsulation and Electrostatic Processing Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods are provided for forming spherical multilamellar microcapsules having alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic liquid layers, surrounded by flexible, semi-permeable hydrophobic or hydrophilic outer membranes which can be tailored specifically to control the diffusion rate. The methods of the invention rely on low shear mixing and liquid-liquid diffusion process and are particularly well suited for forming microcapsules containing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. These methods can be carried out in the absence of gravity and do not rely on density-driven phase separation, mechanical mixing or solvent evaporation phases. The methods include the process of forming, washing and filtering microcapsules. In addition, the methods contemplate coating microcapsules with ancillary coatings using an electrostatic field and free fluid electrophoresis of the microcapsules. The microcapsules produced by such methods are particularly useful in the delivery of pharmaceutical compositions.

  8. Micromachined, Electrostatically Deformable Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Randall K.; Wang, Paul K. C.; Miller, Linda M.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Agronin, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachined, closed-loop, electrostatically actuated reflectors (microCLEARs) provide relatively simple and inexpensive alternatives to large, complex, expensive adaptive optics used to control wavefronts of beams of light in astronomy and in experimental laser weapons. Micromachining used to make deformable mirror, supporting structure, and actuation circuitry. Development of microCLEARs may not only overcome some of disadvantages and limitations of older adaptive optics but may also satisfy demands of potential market for small, inexpensive deformable mirrors in electronically controlled film cameras, video cameras, and other commercial optoelectronic instruments.

  9. Electrostatically Driven Nanoballoon Actuator.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Hamid Reza; Yan, Aiming; Coh, Sinisa; Gracia-Espino, Eduardo; Dunn, Gabriel; Wågberg, Thomas; Louie, Steven G; Cohen, Marvin L; Zettl, Alex

    2016-11-09

    We demonstrate an inflatable nanoballoon actuator based on geometrical transitions between the inflated (cylindrical) and collapsed (flattened) forms of a carbon nanotube. In situ transmission electron microscopy experiments employing a nanoelectromechanical manipulator show that a collapsed carbon nanotube can be reinflated by electrically charging the nanotube, thus realizing an electrostatically driven nanoballoon actuator. We find that the tube actuator can be reliably cycled with only modest control voltages (few volts) with no apparent wear or fatigue. A complementary theoretical analysis identifies critical parameters for nanotube nanoballoon actuation.

  10. PREFACE: Electrostatics 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics 2015, supported by the Institute of Physics, was held in the Sir James Matthews building at Southampton Solent University, UK between 12th and 16th April 2015. Southampton is a historic city on the South Coast of England with a strong military and maritime history. Southampton is home to two Universities: Solent University, which hosted the conference, and the University of Southampton, where much work is undertaken related to electrostatics. 37 oral and 44 poster presentations were accepted for the conference, and 60 papers were submitted and accepted for the proceedings. The Bill Bright Memorial Lecture was delivered this year by Professor Mark Horenstein from Boston University who was, until recently, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Electrostatics. He spoke on The contribution of surface potential to diverse problems in electrostatics and his thorough knowledge of the subject of electrostatics was evident in the presentation. The first session was chaired by the Conference Chair, Dr Keith Davies, whose experience in the field showed through his frequent contributions to the discussions throughout the conference. Hazards and Electrostatic Discharge have formed a strong core to Electrostatics conferences for many years, and this conference contained sessions on both Hazards and on ESD, including an invited talk from Dr Jeremy Smallwood on ESD in Industry - Present and Future. Another strong theme to emerge from this year's programme was Non-Thermal Plasmas, which was covered in two sessions. There were two invited talks on this subject: Professor Masaaki Okubo gave a talk on Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid after treatment and Dr David Go presented a talk on Atmospheric-pressure ionization processes: New approaches and applications for plasmas in contact with liquids. A new innovation to the conference this year was the opportunity for conference sponsors to present to the delegates a technical

  11. Biomolecular electrostatics and solvation: a computational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Pengyu; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G.; Schnieders, Michael J.; Marucho, Marcelo; Zhang, Jiajing; Baker, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of molecular interactions is essential for insight into biological systems at the molecular scale. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long-range nature and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and membrane lipids. In particular, robust models of electrostatic interactions are essential for understanding the solvation properties of biomolecules and the effects of solvation upon biomolecular folding, binding, enzyme catalysis, and dynamics. Electrostatics, therefore, are of central importance to understanding biomolecular structure and modeling interactions within and among biological molecules. This review discusses the solvation of biomolecules with a computational biophysics view towards describing the phenomenon. While our main focus lies on the computational aspect of the models, we provide an overview of the basic elements of biomolecular solvation (e.g., solvent structure, polarization, ion binding, and nonpolar behavior) in order to provide a background to understand the different types of solvation models. PMID:23217364

  12. DNA interaction studies of sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxyphenol) food additive.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Tahmasian Ghobadi, Ameneh; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shariati, Zohreh

    2013-02-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxyphenol) in Tris-HCl buffer at neutral pH 7.4 was monitored by absorption spectrophotometry, viscometry and spectrofluorometry. It is found that sesamol molecules could interact with DNA outside and/or groove binding modes, as are evidenced by: hyperchromism in UV absorption band, very slow decrease in specific viscosity of DNA, and small increase in the fluorescence of methylene blue (MB)-DNA solutions in the presence of increasing amounts of sesamol, which indicates that it is able to partially release the bound MB. Furthermore, the enthalpy and entropy of the reaction between sesamol and CT-DNA showed that the reaction is enthalpy-favored and entropy-disfavored (ΔH = -174.08 kJ mol(-1); ΔS = -532.92 J mol(-1) K(-1)). The binding constant was determined using absorption measurement and found to be 2.7 × 10(4) M(-1); its magnitude suggests that sesamol interacts to DNA with a high affinity.

  13. Electrostatic correlations at the Stern layer: Physics or chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travesset, A.; Vangaveti, S.

    2009-11-01

    We introduce a minimal free energy describing the interaction of charged groups and counterions including both classical electrostatic and specific interactions. The predictions of the model are compared against the standard model for describing ions next to charged interfaces, consisting of Poisson-Boltzmann theory with additional constants describing ion binding, which are specific to the counterion and the interfacial charge ("chemical binding"). It is shown that the "chemical" model can be appropriately described by an underlying "physical" model over several decades in concentration, but the extracted binding constants are not uniquely defined, as they differ depending on the particular observable quantity being studied. It is also shown that electrostatic correlations for divalent (or higher valence) ions enhance the surface charge by increasing deprotonation, an effect not properly accounted within chemical models. The charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine is analyzed as a concrete example with good agreement with experimental results. We conclude with a detailed discussion on the limitations of chemical or physical models for describing the rich phenomenology of charged interfaces in aqueous media and its relevance to different systems with a particular emphasis on phospholipids.

  14. Coarse-graining, Electrostatics and pH effects in phospholipid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travesset, Alex; Vangaveti, Sweta

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a minimal free energy describing the interaction of charged groups and counterions including both classical electrostatic and specific interactions. The predictions of the model are compared against the standard model for describing ions next to charged interfaces, consisting of Poisson-Boltzmann theory with additional constants describing ion binding, which are specific to the counterion and the interfacial charge (``chemical binding''). It is shown that the ``chemical'' model can be appropriately described by an underlying ``physical'' model over several decades in concentration, but the extracted binding constants are not uniquely defined, as they differ depending on the particular observable quantity being studied. It is also shown that electrostatic correlations for divalent (or higher valence) ions enhance the surface charge by increasing deprotonation, an effect not properly accounted within chemical models. The model is applied to the charged phospholipids phosphatidylserine, Phosphatidc acid and Phosphoinositides and implications for different biological processes are discussed.

  15. Thermodynamic method of calculating the effect of alloying additives on interphase interaction in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuchinsky, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of alloying additives to the matrix of a composite on the high temperature solubility rate of a single component fiber was analyzed thermodynamically. With an example of binary Ni alloys, with Group IV-VI transition metals reinforced with W fibers, agreement between the calculated and experimental data was demonstrated.

  16. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  17. Electrostatic Beneficiation of Coal

    SciTech Connect

    D. Lindquist; K. B. Tennal; M. K. Mazumder

    1998-10-29

    It was suggested in the proposal that small particles, due to low inertia, may not impact on the surfaces of the tribocharger. They would, thus, not receive charge and would not be beneficiated in the electrostatic separation. A milling process was proposed in which the small particles are stirred together with larger carrier beads producing the desired contact charge exchange. A force is necessary for removing the coal particles from the carrier beads. In copying machines electrostatic force is used to pull toner particles away horn iron carrier particles which are held back by magnetic force. Aerodynamic force is used in test instruments for measuring the charge to mass ratio on toners. A similar system of milling and removal is desired for use with the small coal particles. The carrier beads need to be made of copper rather than iron. This complicates the separation process since copper is non-magnetic. We are working on coating of iron beads with a layer of copper. Dr. Robert Engleken of Arkansas State University has supplied us with several test batches of copper-coated iron in the size range of -40 +70 mesh. ` We are currently testing whether the milling process used with the copper coated iron beads produces the desired charge on the coal particles.

  18. The emotion potential of simple sentences: additive or interactive effects of nouns and adjectives?

    PubMed Central

    Lüdtke, Jana; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of studies on affective processes in reading focus on single words. The most robust finding is a processing advantage for positively valenced words, which has been replicated in the rare studies investigating effects of affective features of words during sentence or story comprehension. Here we were interested in how the different valences of words in a sentence influence its processing and supralexical affective evaluation. Using a sentence verification task we investigated how comprehension of simple declarative sentences containing a noun and an adjective depends on the valences of both words. The results are in line with the assumed general processing advantage for positive words. We also observed a clear interaction effect, as can be expected from the affective priming literature: sentences with emotionally congruent words (e.g., The grandpa is clever) were verified faster than sentences containing emotionally incongruent words (e.g., The grandpa is lonely). The priming effect was most prominent for sentences with positive words suggesting that both, early processing as well as later meaning integration and situation model construction, is modulated by affective processing. In a second rating task we investigated how the emotion potential of supralexical units depends on word valence. The simplest hypothesis predicts that the supralexical affective structure is a linear combination of the valences of the nouns and adjectives (Bestgen, 1994). Overall, our results do not support this: The observed clear interaction effect on ratings indicate that especially negative adjectives dominated supralexical evaluation, i.e., a sort of negativity bias in sentence evaluation. Future models of sentence processing thus should take interactive affective effects into account. PMID:26321975

  19. Electrostatic 'bounce' instability in a magnetotail configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.; Tur, A.

    2013-02-15

    To understand the possible destabilization of two-dimensional current sheets, a kinetic model is proposed to describe the resonant interaction between electrostatic modes and trapped particles that bounce within the sheet. This work follows the initial investigation by Tur et al.[Phys. Plasmas 17, 102905 (2010)] that is revised and extended. Using a quasi-parabolic equilibrium state, the linearized gyro-kinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electrostatic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. Using an appropriated Fourier expansion of the particle motion along the magnetic field, the complete time integration of the non-local perturbed distribution functions is performed. The dispersion relation for electrostatic modes is then obtained through the quasineutrality condition. It is found that strongly unstable electrostatic modes may develop provided that the current sheet is moderately stretched and, more important, that the proportion of passing particle remains small (less than typically 10%). This strong but finely tuned instability may offer opportunities to explain features of magnetospheric substorms.

  20. Structure, dynamics, and interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) DprE1 and DprE2 examined by molecular modeling, simulation, and electrostatic studies.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Isha; Loharch, Saurabh; Gupta, Pawan; Madathil, Rethi; Parkesh, Raman

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose oxidase (DprE1) and decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose-2-epimerase (DprE2) catalyze epimerization of decaprenylphosporyl ribose (DPR) todecaprenylphosporyl arabinose (DPA) and are critical for the survival of Mtb. Crystal structures of DprE1 so far reported display significant disordered regions and no structural information is known for DprE2. We used homology modeling, protein threading, molecular docking and dynamics studies to investigate the structural and dynamic features of Mtb DprE1 and DprE2 and DprE1-DprE2 complex. A three-dimensional model for DprE2 was generated using the threading approach coupled with ab initio modeling. A 50 ns simulation of DprE1 and DprE2 revealed the overall stability of the structures. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) demonstrated the convergence of sampling in both DprE1 and DprE2. In DprE1, residues in the 269-330 area showed considerable fluctuation in agreement with the regions of disorder observed in the reported crystal structures. In DprE2, large fluctuations were detected in residues 95-113, 146-157, and 197-226. The study combined docking and MD simulation studies to map and characterize the key residues involved in DprE1-DprE2 interaction. A 60 ns MD simulation for DprE1-DprE2 complex was also performed. Analysis of data revealed that the docked complex is stabilized by H-bonding, hydrophobic and ionic interactions. The key residues of DprE1 involved in DprE1-DprE2 interactions belong to the disordered region. We also examined the docked complex of DprE1-BTZ043 to investigate the binding pocket of DprE1 and its interactions with the inhibitor BTZ043. In summary, we hypothesize that DprE1-DprE2 interaction is crucial for the synthesis of DPA and DprE1-DprE2 complex may be a new therapeutic target amenable to pharmacological validation. The findings have important implications in tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery and will facilitate drug development efforts against TB.

  1. Gender and migration on the labour market: Additive or interacting disadvantages in Germany?

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Fenella; Höhne, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Despite substantial differences in labour market attainment according to gender and migration status, gender and ethnic differences in labour market behaviour are most often studied separately. In contrast, this study describes and analyses interactions between gender, ethnic background and immigrant generation with regard to labour market participation, part-time work, and occupational status. The double comparison aims to reveal whether gender gaps in these labour market outcomes among the majority population generalise to ethnic minorities. Moreover, we ask whether variation in gender gaps in labour market behaviour follows the patterns in migrants' origin countries, and whether gender gaps show signs of intergenerational assimilation. Our heterogeneous choice and OLS regressions of 2009 German Microcensus data reveal considerable variation in gender gaps in labour market behaviour between East and West Germany, across ethnic groups and across generations. Intergenerational comparisons show that most ethnic minorities assimilate towards German patterns of gendered labour market attainment.

  2. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  3. Carbon source utilization profiles suggest additional metabolic interactions in a synergistic linuron-degrading bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik; Springael, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    A bacterial triple-species consortium that synergistically metabolizes the phenylurea herbicide linuron was studied to determine whether synergy is extended toward the metabolism of other C-sources. The metabolic performance and range of the individual consortium members were compared with those of paired and three-species combinations in Biolog GN2 MicroPlate assays. The strain combinations showed an increase in the rate and extent of utilization of 80% of the C-sources that were utilized by either one or more of the individual consortium members and the additional utilization of eight C-sources for which oxidation was not observed for the individual strains. When one of the three strains was replaced by bacterial strains 'foreign' to the consortium, either belonging to the same genus or to other genera, mainly antagonistic effects occurred. The data suggest that the consortium members cooperate in the metabolism of C-sources in addition to linuron. This feature can contribute in consolidating consortium composition when linuron is absent or present at low concentrations.

  4. ELECTROSTATIC MEMORY SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Chu, J.C.

    1958-09-23

    An improved electrostatic memory system is de scribed fer a digital computer wherein a plarality of storage tubes are adapted to operate in either of two possible modes. According to the present irvention, duplicate storage tubes are provided fur each denominational order of the several binary digits. A single discriminator system is provided between corresponding duplicate tubes to determine the character of the infurmation stored in each. If either tube produces the selected type signal, corresponding to binazy "1" in the preferred embodiment, a "1" is regenerated in both tubes. In one mode of operation each bit of information is stored in two corresponding tubes, while in the other mode of operation each bit is stored in only one tube in the conventional manner.

  5. MEMS electrostatic influence machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phu Le, Cuong; Halvorsen, Einar

    2016-11-01

    This paper analyses the possibility of MEMS electrostatic influence machines using electromechanical switches like the historical predecessors did two centuries ago. We find that a generator design relying entirely on standard silicon-on-insulator(SOI) micromachining is conceivable and analyze its performance by simulations. The concept appears preferable over comparable diode circuits due to its higher maximum energy, faster charging and low precharging voltage. A full electromechanical lumped-model including parasitic capacitances of the switches is built to capture the dynamic of the generator. Simulation results show that the output voltage can be exponentially bootstrapped from a very low precharging voltage so that otherwise inadequately small voltage differences or charge imbalances can be made useful.

  6. Thermodynamics of the interaction of the food additive tartrazine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2015-05-15

    The thermodynamics of the interaction of the food colourant tartrazine with two homologous serum proteins, HSA and BSA, were investigated, employing microcalorimetric techniques. At T=298.15K the equilibrium constants for the tartrazine-BSA and HSA complexation process were evaluated to be (1.92 ± 0.05) × 10(5)M(-1) and (1.04 ± 0.05) × 10(5)M(-1), respectively. The binding was driven by a large negative standard molar enthalpic contribution. The binding was dominated essentially by non-polyelectrolytic forces which remained largely invariant at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic contribution was weak at all salt concentrations and accounted for only 6-18% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change in the salt concentration range 10-50mM. The negative standard molar heat capacity values, in conjunction with the enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon observed, established the involvement of dominant hydrophobic forces in the complexation process. Tartrazine enhanced the stability of both serum albumins against thermal denaturation.

  7. Teaching Electrostatics in University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Describes an optional course on applied electrostatics that was offered to electrical engineers in their final year. Topics included the determination of electric fields, nature of the charging process, static electricity in liquids, solid state processes, charged particle applications, and electrostatic ignition. (GS)

  8. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Disrupts Electrostatic Interactions That Maintain Atypical Protein Kinase C in Its Active Conformation on the Scaffold p62.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Xie, Lei; Dore, Kim; Xie, Li; Del Rio, Jason C; King, Charles C; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Hulme, Christopher; Malinow, Roberto; Bourne, Philip E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2015-09-04

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) enzymes signal on protein scaffolds, yet how they are maintained in an active conformation on scaffolds is unclear. A myristoylated peptide based on the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate fragment of the atypical PKCζ, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), has been extensively used to inhibit aPKC activity; however, we have previously shown that ZIP does not inhibit the catalytic activity of aPKC isozymes in cells (Wu-Zhang, A. X., Schramm, C. L., Nabavi, S., Malinow, R., and Newton, A. C. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 12879-12885). Here we sought to identify a bona fide target of ZIP and, in so doing, unveiled a novel mechanism by which aPKCs are maintained in an active conformation on a protein scaffold. Specifically, we used protein-protein interaction network analysis, structural modeling, and protein-protein docking to predict that ZIP binds an acidic surface on the Phox and Bem1 (PB1) domain of p62, an interaction validated by peptide array analysis. Using a genetically encoded reporter for PKC activity fused to the p62 scaffold, we show that ZIP inhibits the activity of wild-type aPKC, but not a construct lacking the pseudosubstrate. These data support a model in which the pseudosubstrate of aPKCs is tethered to the acidic surface on p62, locking aPKC in an open, signaling-competent conformation. ZIP competes for binding to the acidic surface, resulting in displacement of the pseudosubstrate of aPKC and re-engagement in the substrate-binding cavity. This study not only identifies a cellular target for ZIP, but also unveils a novel mechanism by which scaffolded aPKC is maintained in an active conformation.

  9. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    PubMed Central

    Nsa, Imade Y.; Kareem, Kehinde T.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar “White” and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu 76). The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV), genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV), genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple) at 10, 20, and 30 days after planting (DAP). The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth, and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV, and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10 DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30 DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30 DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar “White” was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods, and seeds). CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures. PMID:26483824

  10. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp).

    PubMed

    Nsa, Imade Y; Kareem, Kehinde T

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar "White" and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu 76). The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV), genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV), genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple) at 10, 20, and 30 days after planting (DAP). The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth, and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV, and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10 DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30 DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30 DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar "White" was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods, and seeds). CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures.

  11. Biofilm formation and local electrostatic force characteristics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 observed by electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Y. J.; Jo, W.; Yang, Y.; Park, S.

    2007-04-01

    The authors report growth media dependence of electrostatic force characteristics in Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm through local measurement by electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The difference values of electrostatic interaction between the bacterial surface and the abiotic surface show an exponential decay behavior during biofilm development. In the EFM data, the biofilm in the low nutrient media shows a faster decay than the biofilm in the rich media. The surface potential in the bacterial cells was changed from 957to149mV. Local characterization of extracellular materials extracted from the bacteria reveals the progress of the biofilm formation and functional complexities.

  12. Autoinducer-2-like activity associated with foods and its interaction with food additives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingeng; Hume, Michael E; Pillai, Suresh D

    2004-07-01

    The autoinducer-2 (AI-2) molecule produced by bacteria as part of quorum sensing is considered to be a universal inducer signal in bacteria because it reportedly influences gene expression in a variety of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. The objective of this study was to determine whether selected fresh produce and processed foods have AI-2-like activity and whether specific food additives can act as AI-2 mimics and result in AI-2-like activity. The luminescence-based response of the reporter strain Vibrio harveyi BB170 was used as the basis for determining AI-2 activity in the selected foods and food ingredients. Maximum AI-2 activity was seen on the frozen fish sample (203-fold, compared with the negative control) followed by tomato, cantaloupe, carrots, tofu, and milk samples. Interestingly, some samples were capable of inhibiting AI-2 activity. Turkey patties showed the highest inhibition (99.8% compared with the positive control) followed by chicken breast (97.5%), homemade cheeses (93.7%), beef steak (90.6%), and beef patties (84.4%). AI-2 activity was almost totally inhibited by sodium propionate, whereas sodium benzoate caused 93.3% inhibition, compared with 75% inhibition by sodium acetate. Sodium nitrate did not have any appreciable effect, even at 200 ppm. Understanding the relationships that exist between AI-2 activity on foods and the ecology of pathogens and food spoilage bacteria on foods could yield clues about factors controlling food spoilage and pathogen virulence.

  13. A non-additive interaction in a single locus causes a very short root phenotype in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanlong; Zhu, Huilan; Challa, Ghana S; Zhang, Zhengzhi

    2013-05-01

    Non-additive allelic interactions underlie over dominant and under dominant inheritance, which explain positive and negative heterosis. These heteroses are often observed in the aboveground traits, but rarely reported in root. We identified a very short root (VSR) phenotype in the F1 hybrid between the common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) landrace Chinese Spring and synthetic wheat accession TA4152-71. When germinated in tap water, primary roots of the parental lines reached ~15 cm 10 days after germination, but those of the F1 hybrid were ~3 cm long. Selfing populations segregated at a 1 (long-root) to 1 (short-root) ratio, indicating that VSR is controlled by a non-additive interaction between two alleles in a single gene locus, designated as Vsr1. Genome mapping localized the Vsr1 locus in a 3.8-cM interval delimited by markers XWL954 and XWL2506 on chromosome arm 5DL. When planted in vermiculite with supplemental fertilizer, the F1 hybrid had normal root growth, virtually identical to the parental lines, but the advanced backcrossing populations segregated for VSR, indicating that the F1 VSR expression was suppressed by interactions between other genes in the parental background and the vermiculite conditions. Preliminary physiological analyses showed that the VSR suppression is independent of light status but related to potassium homeostasis. Phenotyping additional hybrids between common wheat and synthetics revealed a high VSR frequency and their segregation data suggested more Vsr loci involved. Because the VSR plants can be regularly maintained and readily phenotyped at the early developmental stage, it provides a model for studies of non-additive interactions in wheat.

  14. Plant species, atmospheric CO2 and soil N interactively or additively control C allocation within plant-soil systems.

    PubMed

    F U, Shenglei; Ferris, Howard

    2006-12-01

    Two plant species, Medicago truncatula (legume) and Avena sativa (non-legume), were grown in low- or high-N soils under two CO2 concentrations to test the hypothesis whether C allocation within plant-soil system is interactively or additively controlled by soil N and atmospheric CO2 is dependent upon plant species. The results showed the interaction between plant species and soil N had a significant impact on microbial activity and plant growth. The interaction between CO2 and soil N had a significant impact on soil soluble C and soil microbial biomass C under Madicago but not under Avena. Although both CO2 and soil N affected plant growth significantly, there was no interaction between CO2 and soil N on plant growth. In other words, the effects of CO2 and soil N on plant growth were additive. We considered that the interaction between N2 fixation trait of legume plant and elevated CO2 might have obscured the interaction between soil N and elevated CO2 on the growth of legume plant. In low-N soil, the shoot-to-root ratio of Avena dropped from 2.63 +/- 0.20 in the early growth stage to 1.47 +/- 0.03 in the late growth stage, indicating that Avena plant allocated more energy to roots to optimize nutrient uptake (i.e. N) when soil N was limiting. In high-N soil, the shoot-to-root ratio of Medicago increased significantly over time (from 2.45 +/- 0.30 to 5.43 +/- 0.10), suggesting that Medicago plants allocated more energy to shoots to optimize photosynthesis when N was not limiting. The shoot-to-root ratios were not significantly different between two CO2 levels.

  15. PHI-base: a new interface and further additions for the multi-species pathogen-host interactions database.

    PubMed

    Urban, Martin; Cuzick, Alayne; Rutherford, Kim; Irvine, Alistair; Pedro, Helder; Pant, Rashmi; Sadanadan, Vidyendra; Khamari, Lokanath; Billal, Santoshkumar; Mohanty, Sagar; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E

    2017-01-04

    The pathogen-host interactions database (PHI-base) is available at www.phi-base.org PHI-base contains expertly curated molecular and biological information on genes proven to affect the outcome of pathogen-host interactions reported in peer reviewed research articles. In addition, literature that indicates specific gene alterations that did not affect the disease interaction phenotype are curated to provide complete datasets for comparative purposes. Viruses are not included. Here we describe a revised PHI-base Version 4 data platform with improved search, filtering and extended data display functions. A PHIB-BLAST search function is provided and a link to PHI-Canto, a tool for authors to directly curate their own published data into PHI-base. The new release of PHI-base Version 4.2 (October 2016) has an increased data content containing information from 2219 manually curated references. The data provide information on 4460 genes from 264 pathogens tested on 176 hosts in 8046 interactions. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens are represented in almost equal numbers. Host species belong ∼70% to plants and 30% to other species of medical and/or environmental importance. Additional data types included into PHI-base 4 are the direct targets of pathogen effector proteins in experimental and natural host organisms. The curation problems encountered and the future directions of the PHI-base project are briefly discussed.

  16. PHI-base: a new interface and further additions for the multi-species pathogen–host interactions database

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Martin; Cuzick, Alayne; Rutherford, Kim; Irvine, Alistair; Pedro, Helder; Pant, Rashmi; Sadanadan, Vidyendra; Khamari, Lokanath; Billal, Santoshkumar; Mohanty, Sagar; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.

    2017-01-01

    The pathogen–host interactions database (PHI-base) is available at www.phi-base.org. PHI-base contains expertly curated molecular and biological information on genes proven to affect the outcome of pathogen–host interactions reported in peer reviewed research articles. In addition, literature that indicates specific gene alterations that did not affect the disease interaction phenotype are curated to provide complete datasets for comparative purposes. Viruses are not included. Here we describe a revised PHI-base Version 4 data platform with improved search, filtering and extended data display functions. A PHIB-BLAST search function is provided and a link to PHI-Canto, a tool for authors to directly curate their own published data into PHI-base. The new release of PHI-base Version 4.2 (October 2016) has an increased data content containing information from 2219 manually curated references. The data provide information on 4460 genes from 264 pathogens tested on 176 hosts in 8046 interactions. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens are represented in almost equal numbers. Host species belong ∼70% to plants and 30% to other species of medical and/or environmental importance. Additional data types included into PHI-base 4 are the direct targets of pathogen effector proteins in experimental and natural host organisms. The curation problems encountered and the future directions of the PHI-base project are briefly discussed. PMID:27915230

  17. Interactions of Carbon Gain and Nitrogen Addition in a Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzaz, F. A.

    2001-12-01

    In plants, carbon and nitrogen are intimately related. The plant gains carbon using nitrogen because it is a major constituent of both the light reaction (chlorophyll) and dark reaction (Rubisco and PEP carboxylase). The plant also gains more nitrogen by using carbon to grow roots that can forage for nitrogen, especially the less mobile (NH4+). Rising CO2 and increased nitrogen deposition are important elements of global change, both of which may affect ecosystem structure and function. They may cause a particularly large shift in species composition in systems where contrasting groups of species co-occur, e.g. evergreen coniferous and deciduous broad-leaved tree species. We studied the impact of nitrogen deposition in a mixed forest in central Massachusetts (Harvard Forest). We found that the early-successional broad-leaved species, yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) and red maple (Acer rubrum), both showed large increases in biomass, while the late successional species sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and all the coniferous species, hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red spruce (Picea rubens) and white pine (Pinus strobus), only showed slight increases. As a result, when these species wre grown together, there was a decrease in species diversity. There was a significant correlation between species growth rate and the growth enhancement following nitrogen addition. We used SORTIE, a spatially explicit forest model to speculate about the future of this community. In both hemlock and red oak stands, nitrogen deposition led to shift in forest composition towards further dominance of young forests by yellow birch. We conclude that seedling physiological and demographic responses to increased nitrogen availability will scale up to exaggerate successional dynamics in mixed temperate forests in the future

  18. Critical assessment of nucleic acid electrostatics via experimental and computational investigation of an unfolded state ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yu; Chu, Vincent B.; Lipfert, Jan; Pande, Vijay S.; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic forces, acting between helices and modulated by the presence of the ion atmosphere, are key determinants in the energetic balance that governs RNA folding. Previous studies have employed Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory to compute the energetic contribution of these forces in RNA folding. However, the complex interaction of these electrostatic forces with RNA features such as tertiary contact formation, specific ion-binding, and complex interhelical junctions present in prior studies precluded a rigorous evaluation of PB theory, especially in physiologically important Mg2+ solutions. To critically assess PB theory, we developed a model system that isolates these electrostatic forces. The model system, composed of two DNA duplexes tethered by a polyethylene glycol junction, is an analog for the unfolded state of canonical helix-junction-helix motifs found in virtually all structured RNAs. This model system lacks the complicating features that have precluded a critical assessment of PB in prior studies, ensuring that interhelical electrostatic forces dominate the behavior of the system. The system’s simplicity allows PB predictions to be directly compared with small angle x-ray scattering experiments over a range of monovalent and divalent ion concentrations. These comparisons indicate that PB is a reasonable description of the underlying electrostatic energies for monovalent ions, but large deviations are observed for divalent ions. The validation of PB for monovalent solutions allows analysis of the change in the conformational ensemble of this simple motif as salt concentration is changed. Addition of ions allows the motif to sample more compact microstates, increasing its conformational entropy. The increase of conformational entropy presents an additional barrier to folding by stabilizing the unfolded state. Neglecting this effect will adversely impact the accuracy of folding analyses and models. PMID:18722445

  19. Hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions in the 1:1 complex of DABCO di-betaine with squaric acid: Crystallographic, theoretical and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barczyński, P.; Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2012-06-01

    The molecular structure of the 1:1 complex of DABCO di-betaine (1,4-dicarboxymethyl-1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane inner salt) with squaric acid (1) has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Crystals 1 are monoclinic, space group P21/c. One proton of squaric acid is transferred to one of the carboxylate groups of DABCO di-betaine. The mono-protonated DABCO di-betaine cation is further engaged in the COOH⋯OOC hydrogen bond of 2.526(2) Å with the neighboring cations, linking them into a zigzag chain. The hydrogen squarate anion interacts with the oxygen atom of the carboxylate group of DABCO di-betaine cation, through the Osbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bonds of 2.600(2) Å. The structures of monomer 1a, dimer 2 and cation 3 have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The FTIR spectrum is consistent with the X-ray results. The second-derivative spectrum of 1 and calculated frequencies for the optimized structure 1a are used to explain the frequencies in the experimental FTIR spectrum.

  20. Structural and denaturation studies of two mutants of a cold adapted superoxide dismutase point to the importance of electrostatic interactions in protein stability.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Antonello; Russo Krauss, Irene; Castellano, Immacolata; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Capasso, Alessandra; De Vendittis, Emmanuele; Rossi, Bianca; Sica, Filomena

    2014-03-01

    A peculiar feature of the psychrophilic iron superoxide dismutase from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (PhSOD) is the presence in its amino acid sequence of a reactive cysteine (Cys57). To define the role of this residue, a structural characterization of the effect of two PhSOD mutations, C57S and C57R, was performed. Thermal and denaturant-induced unfolding of wild type and mutant PhSOD followed by circular dichroism and fluorescence studies revealed that C→R substitution alters the thermal stability and the resistance against denaturants of the enzyme, whereas C57S only alters the stability of the protein against urea. The crystallographic data on the C57R mutation suggest an involvement of the Arg side chain in the formation of salt bridges on protein surface. These findings support the hypothesis that the thermal resistance of PhSOD relies on optimization of charge-charge interactions on its surface. Our study contributes to a deeper understanding of the denaturation mechanism of superoxide dismutases, suggesting the presence of a structural dimeric intermediate between the native state and the unfolded state. This hypothesis is supported by the crystalline and solution data on the reduced form of the enzyme.

  1. Protein quantitation by complexation of fluorescent tetraphenylthiophene cation to anion-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide): aggregation-enhanced emission and electrostatic interaction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shiang-Lin; Hsiao, Tai-Shen; Shih, Ke-Ying; Hong, Jin-Long

    2014-09-05

    A fluorescent biological sensor utilizing aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE) property was developed in our laboratory. First, the AEE-active fluorescent tetraphenylthiophene (TP) unit was synthetically connected to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) by covalent and ionic bonds, resulting in the respective c- and i-TP-PNIPAM for the detection and quantification of the bovine serum albumin (BSA) model protein. When bind to BSA, the ionic i-TP-PNIPAM shows much better fluorescence (FL) sensitivity compared to c-PNIPAM. The fluorescence (FL) intensity of i-TP-PNIAPM displays a good linear dependence on concentration of BSA (0-1 mg/mL), indicating quantitative fluorimetric protein detection can be achieved. Further addition of anionic surfactant of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) considerably raised the FL intensity of the complex solution. All the FL response was discussed in term of conformational freedom of the TP unit under different environmental constraints.

  2. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-07-05

    Reaction rates of environmental processes occurring at hydrated mineral surfaces are primarily controlled by the electrostatic potential that develops at the interface. This potential depends on the structure of exposed crystal faces, as well as the pH and the type of ions and their interactions with these faces. Despite its importance, experimental methods for determining fundamental electrostatic properties of specific crystal faces such as the point of zero charge are few. Here we show that this information may be obtained from simple, cyclic potentiometric titration using a well characterized single-crystal electrode exposing the face of interest. The method exploits the presence of a hysteresis loop in the titration measurements that allows extraction of key electrostatic descriptors using the Maxwell construction. The approach is demonstrated for hematite (α-Fe2O3) (001), and a thermodynamic proof is provided for the resulting estimate of its point of zero charge. Insight gained from this method will aid in predicting the fate of migrating contaminants, mineral growth/dissolution processes, mineral-microbiological interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories.

  3. Modeling electrostatic and heterogeneity effects on proton dissociation from humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tipping, E.; Reddy, M.M.; Hurley, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The apparent acid dissociation constant of humic substances increases by 2-4 pK units as ionization of the humic carboxylate groups proceeds. This change in apparent acid strength is due in part to the increase in electrical charge on the humic molecules as protons are shed. In addition, proton dissociation reactions are complicated because humic substances are heterogeneous with respect to proton dissociating groups and molecular size. In this paper, we use the Debye-Hu??ckel theory to describe the effects of electrostatic interactions on proton dissociation of humic substances. Simulations show that, for a size-heterogeneous system of molecules, the weight-average molecular weight is preferable to the number-average value for averaging the effects of electrostatic interactions. Analysis of published data on the proton dissociation of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River shows that the electrostatic interactions can be satisfactorily described by a hypothetical homogeneous compound having a molecular weight of 1000 (similar to the experimentally determined weight-average value). Titration data at three ionic strengths, for several fulvic acid concentrations, and in the pH range from 2.9 to 6.4 can be fitted with three adjustable parameters (pK??int values), given information on molecular size and carboxylate group content. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  4. Teaching Electrostatics and Entropy in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Mark

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology courses is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. I will present material developed to teach electrostatic screening in solutions and the function of nerve cells where entropic effects act to counterbalance electrostatic attraction. These ideas are taught in an introductory, calculus-based physics course to biomedical engineers using SCALEUP pedagogy. Results of student mastering of complex problems that cross disciplinary boundaries between biology and physics, as well as the challenges that they face in learning this material will be presented.

  5. Contemporary NMR Studies of Protein Electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Mulder, Frans A A

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatics play an important role in many aspects of protein chemistry. However, the accurate determination of side chain proton affinity in proteins by experiment and theory remains challenging. In recent years the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has advanced the way that protonation states are measured, allowing researchers to examine electrostatic interactions at an unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. Experiments are now in place that follow pH-dependent (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts as spatially close as possible to the sites of protonation, allowing all titratable amino acid side chains to be probed sequence specifically. The strong and telling response of carefully selected reporter nuclei allows individual titration events to be monitored. At the same time, improved frameworks allow researchers to model multiple coupled protonation equilibria and to identify the underlying pH-dependent contributions to the chemical shifts.

  6. A Feasability Study of the Wheel Electrostatic Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael Ryan; Phillips, James Ralph; Kelley, Joshua David; Mackey, Paul J.; Holbert, Eirik; Clements, Gregory R.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2014-01-01

    Mars rover missions rely on time-consuming, power-exhausting processes to analyze the Martian regolith. A low power electrostatic sensor in the wheels of a future Mars rover could be used to quickly determine when the rover is driving over a different type of regolith. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center developed the Wheel Electrostatic Spectrometer as a feasibility study to investigate this option. In this paper, we discuss recent advances in this technology to increase the repeatability of the tribocharging experiments, along with supporting data. In addition, we discuss the development of a static elimination tool optimized for Martian conditions.

  7. Multidimensional electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) for quantitative analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome in clinical and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Loroch, Stefan; Schommartz, Tim; Brune, Wolfram; Zahedi, René Peiman; Sickmann, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics have become key disciplines in understanding cellular processes. Fundamental research can be done using cell culture providing researchers with virtually infinite sample amounts. In contrast, clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research is often restricted to minute sample amounts and requires an efficient analysis with only micrograms of protein. To address this issue, we generated a highly sensitive workflow for combined LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics by refining an ERLIC-based 2D phosphoproteomics workflow into an ERLIC-based 3D workflow covering the global proteome as well. The resulting 3D strategy was successfully used for an in-depth quantitative analysis of both, the proteome and the phosphoproteome of murine cytomegalovirus-infected mouse fibroblasts, a model system for host cell manipulation by a virus. In a 2-plex SILAC experiment with 150 μg of a tryptic digest per condition, the 3D strategy enabled the quantification of ~75% more proteins and even ~134% more peptides compared to the 2D strategy. Additionally, we could quantify ~50% more phosphoproteins by non-phosphorylated peptides, concurrently yielding insights into changes on the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Beside its sensitivity, our novel three-dimensional ERLIC-strategy has the potential for semi-automated sample processing rendering it a suitable future perspective for clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research.

  8. Addition theorems for Slater-type orbitals and their application to multicenter multielectron integrals of central and noncentral interaction potentials.

    PubMed

    Guseinov, Israfil

    2003-06-01

    By the use of complete orthonormal sets of psi(alpha)-ETOs (alpha=1, 0, m1, m2,...) introduced by the author, new addition theorems are derived for STOs and arbitrary central and noncentral interaction potentials (CIPs and NCIPs). The expansion coefficients in these addition theorems are expressed through the Gaunt and Gegenbauer coefficients. Using the addition theorems obtained for STOs and potentials, general formulae in terms of three-center overlap integrals are established for the multicenter t-electron integrals of CIPs and NCIPs that arise in the solution of the N-electron atomic and molecular problem (2hthN) when a Hylleraas approximation in Hartree-Fock-Roothaan theory is employed. With the help of expansion formulae for translation of STOs, the three-center overlap integrals are expressed through the two-center overlap integrals. The formulae obtained are valid for arbitrary quantum numbers, screening constants and location of orbitals.

  9. Interactive responses of grass litter decomposition to warming, nitrogen addition and detritivore access in a temperate old field.

    PubMed

    Moise, Eric R D; Henry, Hugh A L

    2014-12-01

    Plant litter decomposition has been studied extensively in the context of both climate warming and increased atmospheric N deposition. However, much of this research is based on microbial responses, despite the potential for detritivores to contribute substantially to litter breakdown. We measured litter mass-loss responses to the combined effects of warming, N addition and detritivore access in a grass-dominated old field. We concurrently assessed the roles of litter treatment origin vs. microenvironment (direct warming and N-addition effects) to elucidate the mechanisms through which these factors affect decomposition. After 6 weeks, mass loss increased in N-addition plots, and it increased with detritivore access in the absence of warming. After 1 year, warming, N addition, and detritivore access all increased litter mass loss, although the effects of N addition and warming were non-additive in the detritivore-access plots. For the litter-origin experiment, mass loss after 6 weeks increased in litter from N-addition plots and warmed plots, but unlike the overall decomposition response, the N-addition effect was enhanced by detritivore access. Conversely, for the microenvironment experiment, detritivore access only increased mass loss in unfertilized plots. After 1 year, detritivore access increased mass loss in the litter-origin and microenvironment experiments, but there were no warming or N-addition effects. Overall, our results provide support for a substantial role of detritivores in promoting litter mass loss in our system. Moreover, they reveal important interactions between litter origin, microclimate and detritivores in determining decomposition responses to global change.

  10. Electrostatic-field-enhanced photoexfoliation of bilayer benzene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Kazuki; Silaeva, Elena P.; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Photoexfoliation of bilayer benzene in an external electrostatic (dc) field is studied using time-dependent density functional theory combined with molecular dynamics. We find that the dc-field-induced force on the upper benzene in addition to the repulsive interaction between the positively charged benzene molecules induced by the laser field leads to fast athermal exfoliation. Thus, we conclude that the dc field enhances the photoexfoliation due to dc-field emission in addition to laser-assisted photoemission. The athermal exfoliation process is shown to depend crucially on the charge state of benzene molecules rather than on the excitation energy supplied by the laser.

  11. DNA/chitosan electrostatic complex.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Anaya, Lourdes Mónica; Soltero, J F Armando; Rinaudo, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Up to now, chitosan and DNA have been investigated for gene delivery due to chitosan advantages. It is recognized that chitosan is a biocompatible and biodegradable non-viral vector that does not produce immunological reactions, contrary to viral vectors. Chitosan has also been used and studied for its ability to protect DNA against nuclease degradation and to transfect DNA into several kinds of cells. In this work, high molecular weight DNA is compacted with chitosan. DNA-chitosan complex stoichiometry, net charge, dimensions, conformation and thermal stability are determined and discussed. The influence of external salt and chitosan molecular weight on the stoichiometry is also discussed. The isoelectric point of the complexes was found to be directly related to the protonation degree of chitosan. It is clearly demonstrated that the net charge of DNA-chitosan complex can be expressed in terms of the ratio [NH3(+)]/[P(-)], showing that the electrostatic interactions between DNA and chitosan are the main phenomena taking place in the solution. Compaction of DNA long chain complexed with low molar mass chitosan gives nanoparticles with an average radius around 150nm. Stable nanoparticles are obtained for a partial neutralization of phosphate ionic sites (i.e.: [NH3(+)]/[P(-)] fraction between 0.35 and 0.80).

  12. Micro-Particles as Electrostatic Probes for Plasma Sheath Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Haass, Moritz; Ockenga, Taalke; Kersten, Holger; Blazec, Joseph; Basner, Ralf

    2008-09-07

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles of different sizes with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purpose. In the plasma micro-disperse particles are negatively charged and confined in the sheath. The particles are trapped by an equilibrium of gravity, electric field force and ion drag force. From the behavior, local electric fields can be determined, e.g. particles are used as electrostatic probes. In combination with additional measurements of the plasma parameters with Langmuir probes and thermal probes as well as by comparison with an analytical sheath model, the structure of the sheath can be described. In the present work we focus on the behavior of micro-particles of different sizes and several plasma parameters e.g. the gas pressure and the rf-power.

  13. Electrostatic cloaking of surface structure for dynamic wetting

    PubMed Central

    Nita, Satoshi; Do-Quang, Minh; Wang, Jiayu; Chen, Yu-Chung; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic wetting problems are fundamental to understanding the interaction between liquids and solids. Even in a superficially simple experimental situation, such as a droplet spreading over a dry surface, the result may depend not only on the liquid properties but also strongly on the substrate-surface properties; even for macroscopically smooth surfaces, the microscopic geometrical roughness can be important. In addition, because surfaces may often be naturally charged or electric fields are used to manipulate fluids, electric effects are crucial components that influence wetting phenomena. We investigate the interplay between electric forces and surface structures in dynamic wetting. Although surface microstructures can significantly hinder spreading, we find that electrostatics can “cloak” the microstructures, that is, deactivate the hindering. We identify the physics in terms of reduction in contact-line friction, which makes the dynamic wetting inertial force dominant and insensitive to the substrate properties. PMID:28275725

  14. Electrostatic cloaking of surface structure for dynamic wetting.

    PubMed

    Nita, Satoshi; Do-Quang, Minh; Wang, Jiayu; Chen, Yu-Chung; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic wetting problems are fundamental to understanding the interaction between liquids and solids. Even in a superficially simple experimental situation, such as a droplet spreading over a dry surface, the result may depend not only on the liquid properties but also strongly on the substrate-surface properties; even for macroscopically smooth surfaces, the microscopic geometrical roughness can be important. In addition, because surfaces may often be naturally charged or electric fields are used to manipulate fluids, electric effects are crucial components that influence wetting phenomena. We investigate the interplay between electric forces and surface structures in dynamic wetting. Although surface microstructures can significantly hinder spreading, we find that electrostatics can "cloak" the microstructures, that is, deactivate the hindering. We identify the physics in terms of reduction in contact-line friction, which makes the dynamic wetting inertial force dominant and insensitive to the substrate properties.

  15. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  16. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  17. Electrostatic drops in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Isabel J.; Schmidt, Erin; Weislogel, Mark M.; Pettit, Donald

    2016-11-01

    We present what we think are the first intentional electrostatic orbits in the near-weightless environment of a drop tower. Classical physics problems involving Coulombic forces in orbital mechanics have traditionally been confined to thought experiments due to practical terrestrial experimental limitations, namely, the preponderance of gravity. However, the use of a drop tower as an experimental platform can overcome this challenge for brief periods. We demonstrate methanol-water droplets in orbit around a variety of charged objects- some of which can be used to validate special cases of N-body systems. Footage collected via a high-speed camera is analyzed and orbital trajectories are compared with existing theoretical predictions. Droplets of diameters 0.5 to 2mm in a variety of obits are observed. Due to the repeatability of drop tower initial conditions and effective low-g environment, such experiments may be used to construct empirical analogues and confirm analyses toward the benefit of other fields including space and planetary science. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A, Portland State LSAMP, Robert E. McNair Scholars Program.

  18. The Electrostatic Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martrou, Guillaume; Leonetti, Marc

    2016-11-01

    An initially static fluid-fluid interface is known to become unstable under a strong electric field leading to jet instability, surface pattern and spout formation. Applying an electric field to an initial dripping mode accelerates the dripping rate and leads to a continuous jet mode. We show that those two different configurations, when applied to dielectric liquids, can lead to the same instability, the formation of an unexpected macroscopic fluid bell-shape of typical size few times the capillary length even if the needle is as small as 200 μm . The instability results from the competition between the dielectric and the gravity forces, reminiscent of the Taylor-Melcher mechanism. The study is performed on several fluids of various densities, permittivity and surface tension on a large range of electric field. We show that the transition is an imperfect subcritical bifurcation with its characteristic bottleneck effect (lag time). Finally, in the case of flow rate, we established a shape diagram with four domains corresponding to dripping, jetting, bridge and electrostatic bell.

  19. Non-equilibrium fluctuations and metastability arising from non-additive interactions in dissipative multi-component Rydberg gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Garrahan, Juan P.; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2016-09-01

    We study the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of dissipative gases of atoms excited to two or more high-lying Rydberg states. This situation bears interesting similarities to classical binary (in general p-ary) mixtures of particles. The effective forces between the components are determined by the inter-level and intra-level interactions of Rydberg atoms. These systems permit to explore new parameter regimes which are physically inaccessible in a classical setting, for example one in which the mixtures exhibit non-additive interactions. In this situation the out-of-equilibrium evolution is characterized by the formation of metastable domains that reach partial equilibration long before the attainment of stationarity. In experimental settings with mesoscopic sizes, this collective behavior may in fact take the appearance of dynamic symmetry breaking.

  20. The additive and interactive effects of parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems of children of divorce.

    PubMed

    Lengua, L J; Wolchik, S A; Sandler, I N; West, S G

    2000-06-01

    Investigated the interaction between parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems in children of divorce. The study utilized a sample of 231 mothers and children, 9 to 12 years old, who had experienced divorce within the previous 2 years. Both mothers' and children's reports on parenting, temperament, and adjustment variables were obtained and combined to create cross-reporter measures of the variables. Parenting and temperament were directly and independently related to outcomes consistent with an additive model of their effects. Significant interactions indicated that parental rejection was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children low in positive emotionality, and inconsistent discipline was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children high in impulsivity. These findings suggest that children who are high in impulsivity may be at greater risk for developing problems, whereas positive emotionality may operate as a protective factor, decreasing the risk of adjustment problems in response to negative parenting.

  1. Explosion safety in industrial electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, S. V.; Kiss, I.; Berta, I.

    2011-01-01

    Complicated industrial systems are often endangered by electrostatic hazards, both from atmospheric (lightning phenomenon, primary and secondary lightning protection) and industrial (technological problems caused by static charging and fire and explosion hazards.) According to the classical approach protective methods have to be used in order to remove electrostatic charging and to avoid damages, however no attempt to compute the risk before and after applying the protective method is made, relying instead on well-educated and practiced expertise. The Budapest School of Electrostatics - in close cooperation with industrial partners - develops new suitable solutions for probability based decision support (Static Control Up-to-date Technology, SCOUT) using soft computing methods. This new approach can be used to assess and audit existing systems and - using the predictive power of the models - to design and plan activities in industrial electrostatics.

  2. Electrostatic evaluation of isosteric analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayle, Roger; Nicholls, Anthony

    2006-04-01

    A method is presented for enumerating a large number of isosteric analogues of a ligand from a known protein-ligand complex structure and then rapidly calculating an estimate of their binding energies. This approach takes full advantage of the observed crystal structure, by reusing the atomic co-ordinates determined experimentally for one ligand, to approximate those of similar compounds that have approximately the same shape. By assuming that compounds with similar shapes adopt similar binding poses, and that entropic and protein flexibility effects are approximately constant across such an isosteric series ("the frozen ligand approximation"), it is possible to order their binding affinities relatively accurately. Additionally, the constraint that the atomic coordinates are invariant allows for a dramatic simplification in the Poisson-Boltzmann method used to calculation the electrostatic component of the binding energy. This algorithmic improvement allows for the calculation of tens of thousands of binding energies per second for drug-like molecules, enabling this technique to be used in screening large virtual libraries of isosteric analogues. Most significantly, this procedure is shown to be able to reproduce SAR effects of subtle medicinal chemistry substitutions. Finally, this paper reports the results of the proposed methodology on␣seven model systems; dihydrofolate reductase, Lck␣kinase, ribosome inactivating protein, l-arabinose binding protein, neuraminidase, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and COX-2.

  3. Electrostatic attraction and phase separation in solutions of like-charged colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linse, Per; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2000-02-01

    Asymmetric electrolytes consisting of highly charged spherical macroions and small ions representing an aqueous solution of ionic surfactant micelles have been studied at different macroion concentrations by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The model system comprises macroions with 60 elementary charges and either monovalent, divalent, or trivalent counterions interacting solely through hard-core and Coulomb forces. Thermodynamic and structural properties are examined, and the effects of the counterion valency are discussed. For the lowest electrostatic macroion-counterion coupling (monovalent counterions), the macroions are well separated and an effective repulsive potential is acting between them. At stronger electrostatic coupling (divalent counterions), the double-layer repulsion between the macroions is strongly reduced and at short separations the attractive force becomes comparable to the double-layer repulsion. At even stronger coupling (trivalent counterions), the attractive correlation force between the macroions dominates and causes the solution to separate into two fluid phases of highly different density of the electrolyte. Our results differ quantitatively from the mean-field Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, one of the cornerstones of colloid science, which predicts a purely repulsive electrostatic force among like-charged colloidal particles under all conditions. At the same time, our results are consistent with similar finding of an attraction of electrostatic origin between two similarly charged planar surfaces at sufficiently large electrostatic coupling. A detailed analysis of the counterion distribution in the neighborhood of two macroions close to each other has also been performed for divalent counterions. Finally, the effect of salt addition has also been examined.

  4. Electrostatic Levitation Technique for Investigations of Physical Properties of Liquid States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Junpei; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Paradis, Paul-Francois; Yoda, Shinichi

    Electrostatic levitator (ESL) levitates a charged sample in a high vacuum using computer con-trolled electrostatic fields [1]. It can levitate materials such as metals, semiconductors, and some insulators. Sample temperature can be varied over a wide range, and samples can be deeply undercooled. We have been engaged in the research and development of the electro-static levitation technique with the aim of performing levitation dissolution experiments in the International Space Station (ISS). Our device for the electrostatic levitation dissolution test has been developed for experiments on the ISS. To this end, the system is designed to be compact and portable so that it can be launched by rocket and used for experiments in the limited space on the ISS. Accordingly, the device can be installed not just on the ISS or our research laboratory, but also in various external sites. We devised a plan to install the electrostatic levitation system in a site other than the ISS to study atomic structure and electron structure of ultra-high-temperature liquids. We mounted our system on third generation synchrotron radiation facility "SPring-8" in Japan, to investigate the atomic and electron structures of high-temperature liquids. The SPring-8 is an experimental facility that allows use of the most powerful X-rays in the world. We conducted a variety of experiments on ultra-high-temperature liquids using SPring-8. The X-ray is ideal for exploring atomic structure and electron structure. Since the X-ray is an electromagnetic wave, it interacts with electrons. In addition, most electrons gather around the atomic nucleus. By close analysis of the scattered x-rays, we can determine its atomic structure and electron structure in detail. In this talk, we introduce an x-ray Compton scattering and x-ray Raman scattering measurements on liquid aluminum and silicon. [1] W. -K. Rhim, et al, Rev. Sci. Instrum. (1985) 56 307.

  5. Electrostatic prepregging of thermoplastic matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzzy, John D.; Varughese, Babu; Thammongkol, Vivan; Tincher, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    Thermoplastic towpregs of PEEK/AS-4, PEEK/S-2 glass and LaRC-TPI/AS-4, produced by electrostatic deposition of charged and fluidized polymer powders on spread continuous fiber tows, are described. Processing parameters for combining PEEK 150 powder with unsized 3k AS-4 carbon fiber are presented. The experimental results for PEEK 150/AS-4 reveal that electrostatic fluidized bed coating may be an economically attractive process for producing towpreg.

  6. Electrostatic Control of Protein-Surface Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-21

    2012 4.00 Annette F. Raigoza, Lauren J. Webb. Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy ...Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy .” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 19354-19357. b) Papers published in non-peer-reviewed...ambient scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We were motivated to perform these experiments in order to look for large-scale heterogeneities in our

  7. HBV maintains electrostatic homeostasis by modulating negative charges from phosphoserine and encapsidated nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pei-Yi; Yang, Ching-Jen; Chu, Tien-Hua; Chang, Chih-Hsu; Chiang, Chiayn; Tang, Fan-Mei; Lee, Chih-Yin; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-01-01

    Capsid assembly and stability of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) particles depend on balanced electrostatic interactions between encapsidated nucleic acids and an arginine-rich domain (ARD) of HBc in the capsid interior. Arginine-deficient ARD mutants preferentially encapsidated spliced viral RNA and shorter DNA, which can be fully or partially rescued by reducing the negative charges from acidic residues or serine phosphorylation of HBc, dose-dependently. Similarly, empty capsids without RNA encapsidation can be generated by ARD hyper-phosphorylation in insect, bacteria, and human hepatocytes. De-phosphorylation of empty capsids by phosphatase induced capsid disassembly. Empty capsids can convert into RNA-containing capsids by increasing HBc serine de-phosphorylation. In an HBV replicon system, we observed a reciprocal relationship between viral and non-viral RNA encapsidation, suggesting both non-viral RNA and serine-phosphorylation could serve as a charge balance buffer in maintaining electrostatic homeostasis. In addition, by comparing the biochemistry assay results between a replicon and a non-replicon system, we observed a correlation between HBc de-phosphorylation and viral replication. Balanced electrostatic interactions may be important to other icosahedral particles in nature. PMID:27958343

  8. Effect of particle distribution on electrostatic tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Heming; Xu, Chuanlong; Fu, Feifei; Wang, Shimin

    2012-03-01

    Particle is charged due to frictional contact and collisions between particles and pipe wall. Electrostatic tomography technology (EST) is used to monitor the traveling particle charge. However the electric field distribution in the electrostatic sensor arrays is simultaneously affected by both the particle permittivity distribution and particle charge. In the paper, the effect of the different particle flow regimes on EST is investigated numerically and experimentally. Results indicated the particle distribution affected the induced charge on the electrostatic sensor array. But the effect relates to the relationship between the charge distribution and the particle distribution. Furthermore, a fusion of dual modality tomography system consisting of a capacitance sensor and electrostatic sensor arrays is used to investigate the relationship between the particle distribution and charge distribution in a gravity conveying rig. Results showed that the higher particle concentration has higher charge distribution in the gravity conveying rig. Additionally, the measurement of the mass flow rate by EST was investigated.

  9. Multiple Stressors in Agricultural Streams: A Mesocosm Study of Interactions among Raised Water Temperature, Sediment Addition and Nutrient Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Jeremy J.; Lange, Katharina; Townsend, Colin R.; Matthaei, Christoph D.

    2012-01-01

    Changes to land use affect streams through nutrient enrichment, increased inputs of sediment and, where riparian vegetation has been removed, raised water temperature. We manipulated all three stressors in experimental streamside channels for 30 days and determined the individual and pair-wise combined effects on benthic invertebrate and algal communities and on leaf decay, a measure of ecosystem functioning. We added nutrients (phosphorus+nitrogen; high, intermediate, natural) and/or sediment (grain size 0.2 mm; high, intermediate, natural) to 18 channels supplied with water from a nearby stream. Temperature was increased by 1.4°C in half the channels, simulating the loss of upstream and adjacent riparian shade. Sediment affected 93% of all biological response variables (either as an individual effect or via an interaction with another stressor) generally in a negative manner, while nutrient enrichment affected 59% (mostly positive) and raised temperature 59% (mostly positive). More of the algal components of the community responded to stressors acting individually than did invertebrate components, whereas pair-wise stressor interactions were more common in the invertebrate community. Stressors interacted often and in a complex manner, with interactions between sediment and temperature most common. Thus, the negative impact of high sediment on taxon richness of both algae and invertebrates was stronger at raised temperature, further reducing biodiversity. In addition, the decay rate of leaf material (strength loss) accelerated with nutrient enrichment at ambient but not at raised temperature. A key implication of our findings for resource managers is that the removal of riparian shading from streams already subjected to high sediment inputs, or land-use changes that increase erosion or nutrient runoff in a landscape without riparian buffers, may have unexpected effects on stream health. We highlight the likely importance of intact or restored buffer strips, both

  10. A model study of sequential enzyme reactions and electrostatic channeling.

    PubMed

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Metzger, Vincent T; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-03-14

    We study models of two sequential enzyme-catalyzed reactions as a basic functional building block for coupled biochemical networks. We investigate the influence of enzyme distributions and long-range molecular interactions on reaction kinetics, which have been exploited in biological systems to maximize metabolic efficiency and signaling effects. Specifically, we examine how the maximal rate of product generation in a series of sequential reactions is dependent on the enzyme distribution and the electrostatic composition of its participant enzymes and substrates. We find that close proximity between enzymes does not guarantee optimal reaction rates, as the benefit of decreasing enzyme separation is countered by the volume excluded by adjacent enzymes. We further quantify the extent to which the electrostatic potential increases the efficiency of transferring substrate between enzymes, which supports the existence of electrostatic channeling in nature. Here, a major finding is that the role of attractive electrostatic interactions in confining intermediate substrates in the vicinity of the enzymes can contribute more to net reactive throughput than the directional properties of the electrostatic fields. These findings shed light on the interplay of long-range interactions and enzyme distributions in coupled enzyme-catalyzed reactions, and their influence on signaling in biological systems.

  11. Long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Matthew A; Dobbs, Howard A; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-06-16

    Electrolyte solutions with high concentrations of ions are prevalent in biological systems and energy storage technologies. Nevertheless, the high interaction free energy and long-range nature of electrostatic interactions makes the development of a general conceptual picture of concentrated electrolytes a significant challenge. In this work, we study ionic liquids, single-component liquids composed solely of ions, in an attempt to provide a novel perspective on electrostatic screening in very high concentration (nonideal) electrolytes. We use temperature-dependent surface force measurements to demonstrate that the long-range, exponentially decaying diffuse double-layer forces observed across ionic liquids exhibit a pronounced temperature dependence: Increasing the temperature decreases the measured exponential (Debye) decay length, implying an increase in the thermally driven effective free-ion concentration in the bulk ionic liquids. We use our quantitative results to propose a general model of long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids, where thermally activated charge fluctuations, either free ions or correlated domains (quasiparticles), take on the role of ions in traditional dilute electrolyte solutions. This picture represents a crucial step toward resolving several inconsistencies surrounding electrostatic screening and charge transport in ionic liquids that have impeded progress within the interdisciplinary ionic liquids community. More broadly, our work provides a previously unidentified way of envisioning highly concentrated electrolytes, with implications for diverse areas of inquiry, ranging from designing electrochemical devices to rationalizing electrostatic interactions in biological systems.

  12. Long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Dobbs, Howard A.; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Electrolyte solutions with high concentrations of ions are prevalent in biological systems and energy storage technologies. Nevertheless, the high interaction free energy and long-range nature of electrostatic interactions makes the development of a general conceptual picture of concentrated electrolytes a significant challenge. In this work, we study ionic liquids, single-component liquids composed solely of ions, in an attempt to provide a novel perspective on electrostatic screening in very high concentration (nonideal) electrolytes. We use temperature-dependent surface force measurements to demonstrate that the long-range, exponentially decaying diffuse double-layer forces observed across ionic liquids exhibit a pronounced temperature dependence: Increasing the temperature decreases the measured exponential (Debye) decay length, implying an increase in the thermally driven effective free-ion concentration in the bulk ionic liquids. We use our quantitative results to propose a general model of long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids, where thermally activated charge fluctuations, either free ions or correlated domains (quasiparticles), take on the role of ions in traditional dilute electrolyte solutions. This picture represents a crucial step toward resolving several inconsistencies surrounding electrostatic screening and charge transport in ionic liquids that have impeded progress within the interdisciplinary ionic liquids community. More broadly, our work provides a previously unidentified way of envisioning highly concentrated electrolytes, with implications for diverse areas of inquiry, ranging from designing electrochemical devices to rationalizing electrostatic interactions in biological systems. PMID:26040001

  13. Engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents results from an engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration test. The electrostatic enclosure is part of an overall in-depth contamination control strategy for transuranic (TRU) waste recovery operations. TRU contaminants include small particles of plutonium compounds associated with defense-related waste recovery operations. Demonstration test items consisted of an outer Perma-con enclosure, an inner tent enclosure, and a ventilation system test section for testing electrostatic curtain devices. Three interchangeable test fixtures that could remove plutonium from the contaminated dust were tested in the test section. These were an electret filter, a CRT as an electrostatic field source, and an electrically charged parallel plate separator. Enclosure materials tested included polyethylene, anti-static construction fabric, and stainless steel. The soil size distribution was determined using an eight stage cascade impactor. Photographs of particles containing plutonium were obtained with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM also provided a second method of getting the size distribution. The amount of plutonium removed from the aerosol by the electrostatic devices was determined by radiochemistry from input and output aerosol samplers. The inner and outer enclosures performed adequately for plutonium handling operations and could be used for full scale operations.

  14. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  15. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  16. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  17. Fabrication of nanoscale electrostatic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinno, I.; Sanz-Velasco, A.; Kang, S.; Jansen, H.; Olsson, E.; Enoksson, P.; Svensson, K.

    2010-09-01

    The fabrication of cylindrical multi-element electrostatic lenses at the nanoscale presents a challenge; they are high-aspect-ratio structures that should be rotationally symmetric, well aligned and freestanding, with smooth edges and flat, clean surfaces. In this paper, we present the fabrication results of a non-conventional process, which uses a combination of focused gallium ion-beam milling and hydrofluoric acid vapor etching. This process makes it possible to fabricate nanoscale electrostatic lenses down to 140 nm in aperture diameter and 4.2 µm in column length, with a superior control of the geometry as compared to conventional lithography-based techniques.

  18. Charge sniffer for electrostatics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Mihai P.

    2011-02-01

    An electronic electroscope with a special design for demonstrations and experiments on static electricity is described. It operates as an electric charge sniffer by detecting slightly charged objects when they are brought to the front of its sensing electrode. The sniffer has the advantage of combining high directional sensitivity with a logarithmic bar display. It allows for the identification of electric charge polarity during charge separation by friction, peeling, electrostatic induction, batteries, or secondary coils of power transformers. Other experiments in electrostatics, such as observing the electric field of an oscillating dipole and the distance dependence of the electric field generated by simple charge configurations, are also described.

  19. Elasticity and Electrostatics of Plectonemic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Clauvelin, N.; Audoly, B.; Neukirch, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present a self-contained theory for the mechanical response of DNA in single molecule experiments. Our model is based on a one-dimensional continuum description of the DNA molecule and accounts both for its elasticity and for DNA-DNA electrostatic interactions. We consider the classical loading geometry used in experiments where one end of the molecule is attached to a substrate and the other one is pulled by a tensile force and twisted by a given number of turns. We focus on configurations relevant to the limit of a large number of turns, which are made up of two phases, one with linear DNA and the other one with superhelical DNA. The model takes into account thermal fluctuations in the linear phase and electrostatic interactions in the superhelical phase. The values of the torsional stress, of the supercoiling radius and angle, and key features of the experimental extension-rotation curves, namely the slope of the linear region and thermal buckling threshold, are predicted. They are found in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:19413977

  20. The risk analysis of dust electrostatic based on on-site survey of polypropylene plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiumin; He, Mingjun; Yu, Haibo

    2013-03-01

    The dust electrostatic explosion accidents in polypropylene plant are mainly caused by the interaction of combustible gas, dust and static electricity. This paper analyses the key parts easy to produce dust and the risks of dust electrostatic by on-site survey of polypropylene plant, and proposes corresponding safety protection measures. The analysis results indicate that any careless mistakes and deviation in every step of process control may lead to electrostatic explosion in the silo. And if the equipment has some inherent defects and there are some careless mistakes in the process control, it will be easier to cause dust electrostatic explosion accidents.

  1. Electrostatic gating in carbon nanotube aptasensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Han Yue; Alsager, Omar A.; Zhu, Bicheng; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Plank, Natalie O. V.

    2016-07-01

    Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10 picomolar. The signal was shown to arise from a specific aptamer-target interaction that stabilises a G-quadruplex structure, bringing high negative charge density near the CNT channel. Electrostatic gating is established via the specificity and the sign of the current response, and by observing its suppression when higher ionic strength decreases the Debye length at the CNT-water interface. Sensitivity towards potassium and selectivity against other ions is demonstrated in both resistive mode and real time transistor mode measurements. The effective device architecture presented, along with the identification of clear response signatures, should inform the development of new electronic biosensors using the growing library of aptamer receptors.Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10

  2. An additional aromatic interaction improves the thermostability and thermophilicity of a mesophilic family 11 xylanase: structural basis and molecular study.

    PubMed Central

    Georis, J.; de Lemos Esteves, F.; Lamotte-Brasseur, J.; Bougnet, V.; Devreese, B.; Giannotta, F.; Granier, B.; Frère, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    In a general approach to the understanding of protein adaptation to high temperature, molecular models of the closely related mesophilic Streptomyces sp. S38 Xyl1 and thermophilic Thermomonospora fusca TfxA family 11 xylanases were built and compared with the three-dimensional (3D) structures of homologous enzymes. Some of the structural features identified as potential contributors to the higher thermostability of TfxA were introduced in Xyl1 by site-directed mutagenesis in an attempt to improve its thermostability and thermophilicity. A new Y11-Y16 aromatic interaction, similar to that present in TfxA and created in Xyl1 by the T11Y mutation, improved both the thermophilicity and thermostability. Indeed, the optimum activity temperature (70 vs. 60 degrees C) and the apparent Tm were increased by about 9 degrees C, and the mutant was sixfold more stable at 57 degrees C. The combined mutations A82R/F168H/N169D/delta170 potentially creating a R82-D169 salt bridge homologous to that present in TfxA improved the thermostability but not the thermophilicity. Mutations R82/D170 and S33P seemed to be slightly destabilizing and devoid of influence on the optimal activity temperature of Xyl1. Structural analysis revealed that residues Y11 and Y16 were located on beta-strands B1 and B2, respectively. This interaction should increase the stability of the N-terminal part of Xyl1. Moreover, Y11 and Y16 seem to form an aromatic continuum with five other residues forming putative subsites involved in the binding of xylan (+3, +2, +1, -1, -2). Y11 and Y16 might represent two additional binding subsites (-3, -4) and the T11Y mutation could thus improve substrate binding to the enzyme at higher temperature and thus the thermophilicity of Xyl1. PMID:10752608

  3. DelPhi webserver: Comprehensive suite for electrostatic calculations of biological macromolecules and their complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Shawn; Boylen, Brett; Owesen, Barr; Rocchia, Walter; Alexov, Emil

    2011-03-01

    Electrostatic forces and energies are two of the major components that contribute to the stability, function and interaction of biological macromolecules. The calculations of the electrostatic potential distribution in such systems, which are comprised of irregularly shaped objects immersed in a water phase, is not a trivial task. In addition, an accurate model requires any missing hydrogen atoms of the corresponding structural files (Protein Data Bank, or, PDB files) to be generated in silico and, if necessary, missing atoms or residues to be predicted as well. Here we report a comprehensive suite, an academic DelPhi webserver, which allows the users to upload their structural file, calculate the components of the electrostatic energy, generate the corresponding potential (and/or concentration/dielectric constant) distribution map, and choose the appropriate force field. The webserver utilizes modern technology to take user input and construct an algorithm that suits the users specific needs. The webserver uses Clemson University's Palmetto Supercomputer Cluster to handle the DelPhi calculations, which can range anywhere from small and short computation times, to extensive and computationally demanding runtimes. The work was supported by a grant from NIGMS, NIH, grant number 1R01GM093937-01.

  4. Controllable growth and electrostatic properties of Bernal stacked bilayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Song; Yang, Bingchu; Gao, Yongli

    2016-09-01

    Compared with the most studied monolayer MoS2, bilayer MoS2 possesses many distinct fascinating physical properties and potential applications owing to interlayer interactions and structural symmetry. Here, bilayer MoS2 domains with strict identical AB Bernal stacked order were controllably synthesized using chemical vapor deposition method. In addition, the electrostatic properties of bilayer MoS2 were systematically investigated by multiple means of photoemission electron microscopy, electrostatic force microscopy, and kelvin probe force microscopy. We found that the work function of monolayer MoS2 is homogeneous across single crystals and polycrystalline films except for grain boundaries. However, the work function of the Bernal stacked bilayer MoS2 decreases by 50 ± 4 meV compared with that of monolayer MoS2 due to the interlayer coupling and screening effects. The deeper understanding gained here on the electrostatic properties of the AB Bernal stacked bilayer MoS2 should help in the creation of next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  5. A variational formulation of electrostatics in a medium with spatially varying dielectric permittivity.

    PubMed

    Jadhao, Vikram; Solis, Francisco J; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2013-02-07

    In biological and synthetic materials, many important processes involve charges that are present in a medium with spatially varying dielectric permittivity. To accurately understand the role of electrostatic interactions in such systems, it is important to take into account the spatial dependence of the permittivity of the medium. However, due to the ensuing theoretical and computational challenges, this inhomogeneous dielectric response of the medium is often ignored or excessively simplified. We develop a variational formulation of electrostatics to accurately investigate systems that exhibit this inhomogeneous dielectric response. Our formulation is based on a true energy functional of the polarization charge density. The defining characteristic of a true energy functional is that at its minimum it evaluates to the actual value of the energy; this is a feature not found in many commonly used electrostatic functionals. We explore in detail the charged systems that exhibit sharp discontinuous change in dielectric permittivity, and we show that for this case our functional reduces to a functional of only the surface polarization charge density. We apply this reduced functional to study model problems for which analytical solutions are well known. We demonstrate, in addition, that the functional has many properties that make it ideal for use in molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Designing Electrostatic Accelerometers for Next Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Square cuboid electrostatic accelerometers sensor core have been used in various combinations in recent and still flying missions (CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE). ONERA is now in the process of delivering such accelerometers for the GRACE Follow-On mission. The goal is to demonstrate the performance benefits of an interferometry laser ranging method for future low-low satellite to satellite missions. The electrostatic accelerometer becoming thus the system main performance limiter, we propose for future missions a new symmetry which will allow for three ultrasensitive axes instead of two. This implies no performance ground testing, as the now cubic proof-mass will be too heavy, but only free fall tests in catapult mode, taking advantage of the additional microgravity testing time offered by the updated ZARM tower. The updated mission will be in better adequacy with the requirements of a next generation of smaller and drag compensated micro-satellites. In addition to the measurement of the surface forces exerted on the spacecraft by the atmospheric drag and by radiation pressures, the accelerometer will become a major part of the attitude and orbit control system by acting as drag free sensor and by accurately measuring the angular accelerations. ONERA also works on a hybridization of the electrostatic accelerometer with an atomic interferometer to take advantage of the absolute nature of the atomic interferometer acceleration measurement and its great accuracy in the [5-100] mHz bandwidth. After a description of the improvement of the GRACE-FO accelerometer with respect to the still in-orbit previous models and a status of its development, the presentation will describe the new cubic configuration and how its operations and performances can be verified in the Bremen drop tower.

  7. Resistivity Problems in Electrostatic Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harry J.

    1974-01-01

    The process of electrostatic precipitation has ever-increasing application in more efficient collection of fine particles from industrial air emissions. This article details a large number of new developments in the field. The emphasis is on high resistivity particles which are a common cause of poor precipitator performance. (LS)

  8. Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) TRAINING MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual assists engineers in using a computer program, the ESPVI 4.0W, that models all elements of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The program is a product of the Electric Power Research Institute and runs in the Windows environment. Once an ESP is accurately modeled, the...

  9. Processes and applications of electrostatic fiber formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2008-12-01

    'Electrospinning' is an electrohydrodynamic jetting process that enables the production of continuous fibers, tubes and wires with diameters as small as 10 nm. The process itself is dependent upon electrostatic interactions such as charge-charge repulsion and charge-field interaction. The interplay of charge repulsion, viscoelasticity and surface tension gives rise to interesting electrohydrodynamic phenomena that challenge fundamental understanding as well as practical implementation and quality control in the final fibers. The morphology and diameter of these fibers can be understood and controlled through manipulation of fluid properties and operating parameters. The fibers thus produced are illustrative of nanotechnology in a 1-dimensional form, and have inspired considerable activity in the research community into their potential applications. Proposed uses range from high performance filtration media and membranes, to sensors and actuators, to medical devices and drug delivery vehicles. Two examples, tissue scaffold engineering and superhydrophobicity, are illustrated here.

  10. Fire in the Amazon: impact of experimental fuel addition on responses of ants and their interactions with myrmecochorous seeds.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Lucas N; Maia, Maria L B; Solar, Ricardo R C; Campos, Ricardo I; Schoereder, José H; Andersen, Alan N

    2016-10-01

    The widespread clearing of tropical forests causes lower tree cover, drier microclimate, and higher and drier fuel loads of forest edges, increasing the risk of fire occurrence and its intensity. We used a manipulative field experiment to investigate the influence of fire and fuel loads on ant communities and their interactions with myrmecochorous seeds in the southern Amazon, a region currently undergoing extreme land-use intensification. Experimental fires and fuel addition were applied to 40 × 40-m plots in six replicated blocks, and ants were sampled between 15 and 30 days after fires in four strata: subterranean, litter, epigaeic, and arboreal. Fire had extensive negative effects on ant communities. Highly specialized cryptobiotic and predator species of the litter layer and epigaeic specialist predators were among the most sensitive, but we did not find evidence of overall biotic homogenization following fire. Fire reduced rates of location and transport of myrmecochorous seeds, and therefore the effectiveness of a key ecosystem service provided by ants, which we attribute to lower ant abundance and increased thermal stress. Experimental fuel addition had only minor effects on attributes of fire severity, and limited effects on ant responses to fire. Our findings indicate that enhanced fuel loads will not decrease ant diversity and ecosystem services through increased fire severity, at least in wetter years. However, higher fuel loads can still have a significant effect on ants from Amazonian rainforests because they increase the risk of fire occurrence, which has a detrimental impact on ant communities and a key ecosystem service they provide.

  11. Zoledronic acid inhibits aromatase activity and phosphorylation: potential mechanism for additive zoledronic acid and letrozole drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Schech, Amanda J; Nemieboka, Brandon E; Brodie, Angela H

    2012-11-01

    Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate originally indicated for use in osteoporosis, has been reported to exert a direct effect on breast cancer cells, although the mechanism of this effect is currently unknown. Data from the ABCSG-12 and ZO-FAST clinical trials suggest that treatment with the combination of ZA and aromatase inhibitors (AI) result in increased disease free survival in breast cancer patients over AI alone. To determine whether the mechanism of this combination involved inhibition of aromatase, AC-1 cells (MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with an aromatase construct) were treated simultaneously with combinations of ZA and AI letrozole. This combination significantly increased inhibition of aromatase activity of AC-1 cells when compared to letrozole alone. Treatment of 1 nM letrozole in combination with 1 μM or 10 μM ZA resulted in an additive drug interaction on inhibition of cell viability, as measured by MTT assay. Treatment with ZA was found to inhibit phosphorylation of aromatase on serine residues. Zoledronic acid was also shown to be more effective in inhibiting cell viability in aromatase transfected AC-1 cells when compared to inhibition of cell viability observed in non-transfected MCF-7. Estradiol was able to partially rescue the effect of 1 μM and 10 μM ZA on cell viability following treatment for 72 h, as shown by a shift to the right in the estradiol dose-response curve. In conclusion, these results indicate that the combination of ZA and letrozole results in an additive inhibition of cell viability. Furthermore, ZA alone can inhibit aromatase activity through inhibition of serine phosphorylation events important for aromatase enzymatic activity and contributes to inhibition of cell viability.

  12. Electrostatic effects in macromolecules: fundamental concepts and practical modeling.

    PubMed

    Warshel, A; Papazyan, A

    1998-04-01

    The past few years have seen an exponential growth in the calculations of electrostatic energies of macromolecules and an increased recognition of the crucial role of electrostatic effects. This review considers the current state of the field. Focus is placed on calculations of pKas, redox potentials and binding energies in macromolecules and clarification of the fact that the value of the dielectric 'constant' of a protein depends on its definition and that small dielectric constants should not be used in describing charge-charge interactions by current continuum models.

  13. THE AGS ELECTROSTATIC SEPTUM.

    SciTech Connect

    HOCK,J.RUSSO,T.GLEN,J.BROWN,K.

    2003-05-12

    The previous slow beam extraction electro static septum in the AGS was designed in 1981. Research documented at the Fermi Laboratory was used as the base line for this design. The septum consisted of a ground plane of .002 inch diameter wire tungsten-rhenium alloy (75%W 25%Re) with a hollow welded titanium cathode assembly. The vacuum chamber is stationary and the septum is moved with a pair of high vacuum linear feed throughs. After years of beam time, the frequency of failures increased. The vacuum system design was poor by today's standards and resulted in long pump down times after repairs. The failures ranged from broken septum wires to a twisted cathode. In addition to the failures, the mechanical drive system had too much backlash, making the operating position difficult to repeat. The new septum needed to address all of these issues in order to become a more reliable septum.

  14. Amplification of a fast wave by extracting both the kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy of a large-orbit relativistic electron beam in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shichang

    2010-05-15

    Nonlinear model and simulation technique of the interaction and energy transfer between a fast wave and a large-orbit relativistic electron beam in a coaxial electrostatic wiggler are presented. Unlike the situations in a magnetostatic-wiggler free-electron laser (MWFEL) and in an electron cyclotron maser (ECM), the electrostatic potential of the electrons plays an important role and participates in the energy exchange between the wave and the electron beam. Compared to MWFEL and ECM, the coaxial electrostatic-wiggler configuration has a distinguishing peculiarity that besides the electron-beam's kinetic energy, its electrostatic potential energy can be effectively transferred to the fast wave. Simulation shows that wave could be amplified with ultrahigh gain by extracting both the kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy of the electron beam.

  15. Electrostatic gating in carbon nanotube aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han Yue; Alsager, Omar A; Zhu, Bicheng; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Plank, Natalie O V

    2016-07-14

    Synthetic DNA aptamer receptors could boost the prospects of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based electronic biosensors if signal transduction can be understood and engineered. Here, we report CNT aptasensors for potassium ions that clearly demonstrate aptamer-induced electrostatic gating of electronic conduction. The CNT network devices were fabricated on flexible substrates via a facile solution processing route and non-covalently functionalised with potassium binding aptamers. Monotonic increases in CNT conduction were observed in response to increasing potassium ion concentration, with a level of detection as low as 10 picomolar. The signal was shown to arise from a specific aptamer-target interaction that stabilises a G-quadruplex structure, bringing high negative charge density near the CNT channel. Electrostatic gating is established via the specificity and the sign of the current response, and by observing its suppression when higher ionic strength decreases the Debye length at the CNT-water interface. Sensitivity towards potassium and selectivity against other ions is demonstrated in both resistive mode and real time transistor mode measurements. The effective device architecture presented, along with the identification of clear response signatures, should inform the development of new electronic biosensors using the growing library of aptamer receptors.

  16. Multipolar electrostatics for proteins: atom-atom electrostatic energies in crambin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongna; Mills, Matthew J L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-02-15

    Accurate electrostatics necessitates the use of multipole moments centered on nuclei or extra point charges centered away from the nuclei. Here, we follow the former alternative and investigate the convergence behavior of atom-atom electrostatic interactions in the pilot protein crambin. Amino acids are cut out from a Protein Data Bank structure of crambin, as single amino acids, di, or tripeptides, and are then capped with a peptide bond at each side. The atoms in the amino acids are defined through Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) as finite volume electron density fragments. Atom-atom electrostatic energies are computed by means of a multipole expansion with regular spherical harmonics, up to a total interaction rank of L = ℓA+ ℓB + 1 = 10. The minimum internuclear distance in the convergent region of all the 15 possible types of atom-atom interactions in crambin that were calculated based on single amino acids are close to the values calculated from di and tripeptides. Values obtained at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ levels are only slightly larger than those calculated at HF/6-31G(d,p) level. This convergence behavior is transferable to the well-known amyloid beta polypeptide Aβ1-42. Moreover, for a selected central atom, the influence of its neighbors on its multipole moments is investigated, and how far away this influence can be ignored is also determined. Finally, the convergence behavior of AMBER becomes closer to that of QCT with increasing internuclear distance.

  17. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of [le] 10 [mu]m dia.

  18. Asteroid electrostatic instrumentation and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Urbak, E.; Keane, D.; Sawyer, E. C.

    2011-06-01

    Asteroid surface material is expected to become photoelectrically charged, and is likely to be transported through electrostatic levitation. Understanding any movement of the surface material is relevant to proposed space missions to return samples to Earth for detailed isotopic analysis. Motivated by preparations for the Marco Polo sample return mission, we present electrostatic modelling for a real asteroid, Itokawa, for which detailed shape information is available, and verify that charging effects are likely to be significant at the terminator and at the edges of shadow regions for the Marco Polo baseline asteroid, 1999JU3. We also describe the Asteroid Charge Experiment electric field instrumentation intended for Marco Polo. Finally, we find that the differing asteroid and spacecraft potentials on landing could perturb sample collection for the short landing time of 20min that is currently planned.

  19. Electrostatic Gating of Ultrathin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Electrostatic gating of ultrathin films can be used to modify electronic and magnetic properties of materials by effecting controlled alterations of carrier concentration while, in principle, not changing the level of disorder. As such, electrostatic gating can facilitate the development of novel devices and can serve as a means of exploring the fundamental properties of materials in a manner far simpler than is possible with the conventional approach of chemical doping. The entire phase diagram of a compound can be traversed by changing the gate voltage. In this review, we survey results involving conventional field effect devices as well as more recent progress, which has involved structures that rely on electrochemical configurations such as electric double-layer transistors. We emphasize progress involving thin films of oxide materials such as high-temperature superconductors, magnetic oxides, and oxides that undergo metal-insulator transitions.

  20. Closed loop electrostatic levitation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Saffren, M. M.; Elleman, D. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An electrostatic levitation system is described, which can closely control the position of objects of appreciable size. A plurality of electrodes surround the desired position of an electrostatically charged object, the position of the objects is monitored, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied to hold the object at a desired position. In one system, the object is suspended above a plate-like electrode which has a concave upper face to urge the object toward the vertical axis of the curved plate. An upper electrode that is also curved can be positioned above the object, to assure curvature of the field at any height above the lower plate. In another system, four spherical electrodes are positioned at the points of a tetrahedron, and the voltages applied to the electrodes are varied in accordance with the object position as detected by two sensors.

  1. Electrostatic Spraying With Conductive Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Dawn, Frederic S.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Atkins, Loren E.

    1989-01-01

    Thin, uniform polymer coatings applied in water base normally impossible to charge. Electrostatic sprayer modified so applies coatings suspended or dissolved in electrically conductive liquids. Nozzle and gun constructed of nonconductive molded plastic. Liquid passageway made long enough electrical leakage through it low. Coaxial hose for liquid built of polytetrafluoroethylene tube, insulating sleeve, and polyurethane jacket. Sprayer provided with insulated seal at gun-to-hose connection, nonconductive airhose, pressure tank electrically isolated from ground, and special nozzle electrode. Supply of atomizing air reduced so particle momentum controlled by electrostatic field more effectively. Developed to apply water-base polyurethane coating to woven, shaped polyester fabric. Coating provides pressure seal for fabric, which is part of spacesuit. Also useful for applying waterproof, decorative, or protective coatings to fabrics for use on Earth.

  2. Bipolar Transistors Can Detect Charge in Electrostatic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvorak, L.

    2012-01-01

    A simple charge indicator with bipolar transistors is described that can be used in various electrostatic experiments. Its behaviour enables us to elucidate links between 'static electricity' and electric currents. In addition it allows us to relate the sign of static charges to the sign of the terminals of an ordinary battery. (Contains 7 figures…

  3. Electrostatic generator/motor configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-02-04

    Electrostatic generators/motors designs are provided that generally may include a first cylindrical stator centered about a longitudinal axis; a second cylindrical stator centered about the axis, a first cylindrical rotor centered about the axis and located between the first cylindrical stator and the second cylindrical stator. The first cylindrical stator, the second cylindrical stator and the first cylindrical rotor may be concentrically aligned. A magnetic field having field lines about parallel with the longitudinal axis is provided.

  4. Electrostatic forces for personnel restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, N.; Ciciora, J.; Gardner, R.; Porter, K.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing electrostatic forces for personnel retention devices on exterior spacecraft surfaces was analyzed. The investigation covered: (1) determination of the state of the art; (2) analysis of potential adhesion surfaces; (3) safety considerations for personnel; (4) electromagnetic force field determination and its effect on spacecraft instrumentation; and (5) proposed advances to current technology based on documentation review, analyses, and experimental test data.

  5. Computational studies on the interactions among redox couples, additives and TiO2: implications for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, Abu Md; Schreckenbach, Georg

    2010-11-21

    One of the major and unique components of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) is the iodide/triiodide redox couple. Periodic density-functional calculations have been carried out to study the interactions among three different components of the DSSC, i.e. the redox shuttle, the TiO(2) semiconductor surface, and nitrogen containing additives, with a focus on the implications for the performance of the DSSC. Iodide and bromide with alkali metal cations as counter ions are strongly adsorbed on the TiO(2) surface. Small additive molecules also strongly interact with TiO(2). Both interactions induce a negative shift of the Fermi energy of TiO(2). The negative shift of the Fermi energy is related to the performance of the cell by increasing the open voltage of the cell and retarding the injection dynamics (decreasing the short circuit current). Additive molecules, however, have relatively weaker interaction with iodide and triiodide.

  6. Monitoring Mars for Electrostatic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, D.

    2011-01-01

    The DSN radio telescope DSS-13 was used to monitor Mars for electrostatic discharges from 17 February to 11 April, 2010, and from 19 April to 4 May, 2011, over a total of 72 sessions. Of these sessions, few showed noteworthy results and no outstanding electrostatic disturbances were observed on Mars from analyzing the kurtosis of radio emission from Mars. Electrostatic discharges on mars were originally detected in June of 2006 by Ruf et al. using DSS-13. he kurtosis (normalized fourth moment of the electrical field strength) is sensitive to non-thermal radiation. Two frequencies bands, either 2.4 and 8.4 GHz or 8.4 and 32 GHz were used. The non-thermal radiation spectrum should have peaks at the lowest three modes of the theoretical Schumann Resonances of Mars. The telescope was pointed away from Mars every 5 minutes for 45 seconds to confirm if Mars was indeed the sources of any events. It was shown that by including a down-link signal in one channel and by observing when the kurtosis changed as the telescope was pointed away from the source that the procedure can monitor Mars without the need of extra equipment monitoring a control source.

  7. KSC Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Discussion of key electrostatic issues that have arisen during the past few years at KSC that the Electrostatics Laboratory has studied. The lab has studied in depth the Space Shuttle's Thermal Control System Blankets, the International Space Station Thermal Blanket, the Pan/Tilt Camera Blankets, the Kapton Purge Barrier Curtain, the Aclar Purge Barrier Curtain, the Thrust Vector Controller Blankets, the Tyvek Reaction Control System covers, the AID-PAK and FLU-9 pyro inflatable devices, the Velostat Solid Rocket Booster mats, and the SCAPE suits. In many cases these materials are insulating meaning that they might be a source of unsafe levels of electrostatic discharge (ESD). For each, the lab provided in-depth testing of each material within its current configuration to ensure that it does not cause an ESD concern that may violate the safety of the astronauts, the workers and equipment for NASA. For example the lab provides unique solutions and testing such as Spark Incendivity Testing that checks whether a material is capable of generating a spark strong enough to ignite a flammable gas. The lab makes recommendations to changes in specifications, procedures, and material if necessary. The lab also consults with a variety of non-safety related ESD issues for the agency.

  8. Relativistic electrostatic slater integrals, 2 or equal to Z or equal to 106

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, M.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Huang, K. N.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    Two-electron electrostatic interaction integrals were computed with Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions. Results are listed for all orbitals in atoms with atomic numbers from Z = 2 through Z = 106.

  9. Electrostatic contributions in the increased compatibility of polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Linares, Elisângela M; Jannuzzi, Sergio A V; Galembeck, Fernando

    2011-12-20

    Successful blending of different polymers to make a structural or functional material requires overcoming limitations due to immiscibility and/or incompatibility that arise from large polymer-polymer interfacial tensions. In the case of latex blends, the combination of capillary adhesion during the blended dispersion drying stage with electrostatic adhesion in the final product is an effective strategy to avoid these limitations, which has been extended to a number of polymer blends and composites. This work shows that adhesion of polymer domains in blends made with natural rubber and synthetic latexes is enhanced by electrostatic adhesion that is in turn enhanced by ion migration, according to the results from scanning electric potential microscopy. The additional attractive force between domains improves blend stability and mechanical properties, broadening the possibilities and scope of latex blends, in consonance with the "green chemistry" paradigm. This novel approach based on electrostatic adhesion can be easily extended to multicomponent systems, including nonpolymers.

  10. Microscopic models for bridging electrostatics and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, L.; DeAmbrosis, A.; Mascheretti, P.

    2007-03-01

    A teaching sequence based on the use of microscopic models to link electrostatic phenomena with direct currents is presented. The sequence, devised for high school students, was designed after initial work carried out with student teachers attending a school of specialization for teaching physics at high school, at the University of Pavia. The results obtained with them are briefly presented, because they directed our steps for the development of the teaching sequence. For both the design of the experiments and their interpretation, we drew inspiration from the original works of Alessandro Volta; in addition, a structural model based on the particular role of electrons as elementary charges both in electrostatic phenomena and in currents was proposed. The teaching sequence starts from experiments on charging objects by rubbing and by induction, and engages students in constructing microscopic models to interpret their observations. By using these models and by closely examining the ideas of tension and capacitance, the students acknowledge that a charging (or discharging) process is due to the motion of electrons that, albeit for short time intervals, represent a current. Finally, they are made to see that the same happens in transients of direct current circuits.

  11. The polarized Debye sheath effect on Kadomtsev-Petviashvili electrostatic structures in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Alinejad, H.

    2015-04-15

    We give a theoretical investigation on the dynamics of nonlinear electrostatic waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with strong electrostatic interaction between dust grains in the presence of the polarization force (i.e., the force due to the polarized Debye sheath). Adopting a reductive perturbation method, we derived a three-dimensional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation that describes the evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic localized waves. The energy integral equation is used to study the existence domains of the localized structures. The analysis provides the localized structure existence region, in terms of the effects of strong interaction between the dust particles and polarization force.

  12. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  13. Controlling synaptotagmin activity by electrostatic screening.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongsoo; Hernandez, Javier M; van den Bogaart, Geert; Ahmed, Saheeb; Holt, Matthew; Riedel, Dietmar; Jahn, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    Exocytosis of neurosecretory vesicles is mediated by the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins syntaxin-1, synaptobrevin and SNAP-25, with synaptotagmin functioning as the major Ca(2+) sensor for triggering membrane fusion. Here we show that bovine chromaffin granules readily fuse with large unilamellar liposomes in a SNARE-dependent manner. Fusion is enhanced by Ca(2+), but only when the target liposomes contain phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate and when polyphosphate anions, such as nucleotides or pyrophosphate, are present. Ca(2+)-dependent enhancement is mediated by endogenous synaptotagmin-1. Polyphosphates operate by an electrostatic mechanism that reverses an inactivating cis association of synaptotagmin-1 with its own membrane without affecting trans binding. Hence, the balancing of trans- and cis-membrane interactions of synaptotagmin-1 could be a crucial element in the pathway of Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis.

  14. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  15. Epithelial Microvilli Establish an Electrostatic Barrier to Microbial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kaila M.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Microvilli are membrane extensions on the apical surface of polarized epithelia, such as intestinal enterocytes and tubule and duct epithelia. One notable exception in mucosal epithelia is M cells, which are specialized for capturing luminal microbial particles; M cells display a unique apical membrane lacking microvilli. Based on studies of M cell uptake under different ionic conditions, we hypothesized that microvilli may augment the mucosal barrier by providing an increased surface charge density from the increased membrane surface and associated glycoproteins. Thus, electrostatic charges may repel microbes from epithelial cells bearing microvilli, while M cells are more susceptible to microbial adhesion. To test the role of microvilli in bacterial adhesion and uptake, we developed polarized intestinal epithelial cells with reduced microvilli (“microvillus-minus,” or MVM) but retaining normal tight junctions. When tested for interactions with microbial particles in suspension, MVM cells showed greatly enhanced adhesion and uptake of particles compared to microvillus-positive cells. This preference showed a linear relationship to bacterial surface charge, suggesting that microvilli resist binding of microbes by using electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, this predicts that pathogen modification of electrostatic forces may contribute directly to virulence. Accordingly, the effacement effector protein Tir from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 expressed in epithelial cells induced a loss of microvilli with consequent enhanced microbial binding. These results provide a new context for microvillus function in the host-pathogen relationship, based on electrostatic interactions. PMID:24778113

  16. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, sociodemographic and built environment) on preterm birth

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this ...

  17. Electrostatic particle collection in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Damit, Brian; Wu, Chang-Yu; Sorloaica-Hickman, Nicoleta

    2011-09-01

    Lunar grains accumulate charges due to solar-based ionizing radiations, and the repelling action of like-charged particles causes the levitation of lunar dust. The lunar dust deposit on sensitive and costly surfaces of investigative equipment is a serious concern in lunar explorations. Inspired by electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), the Electrostatic Lunar Dust Collector (ELDC) was proposed for collecting already charged lunar dust particles to prevent the lunar dust threat. As the conditions for terrestrial counterparts are not valid in the lunar environment, equations developed for terrestrial devices yield incorrect predictions in lunar application. Hence, a mathematical model was developed for the ELDC operating in vacuum to determine its collection efficiency. The ratios of electrical energy over potential energy, kinetic energy over potential energy and the ratio of ELDC dimensions were identified to be the key dimensionless parameters. Sensitivity analyses of the relevant parameters showed that depending on ELDC orientation, smaller particles would be collected more easily at vertical orientation, whereas larger particles were easier to collect in a horizontal ELDC configuration. In the worst case scenario, the electrostatic field needed to be 10 times stronger in the vertical mode in order to adequately collect larger particles. The collection efficiency was very sensitive to surface potential of lunar dust and it reached the maximum when surface potential was between 30 and 120 V. Except for regions of the lunar day side with surface potential close to zero, providing 1 kV ( E = 20 kV m -1) with the ELDC was more than enough for collecting all the particles in the most critical orientation. The needed field strength was about 4000 times less than that for repelling 1-μm size particles already settled on the surfaces. The analysis shows that the ELDC offers a viable solution for lunar dust control due to its effectiveness, ease of cleaning and low voltage

  18. Optimizing electrostatic affinity in ligand-receptor binding: Theory, computation, and ligand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik; Tidor, Bruce

    1998-11-01

    The design of a tight-binding molecular ligand involves a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred when the ligand binds a receptor in aqueous solution and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. Using continuum electrostatic models we have developed a theoretical framework for analyzing this problem and have shown that the ligand-charge distribution can be optimized to produce the most favorable balance of these opposing free energy contributions [L.-P. Lee and B. Tidor, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8681 (1997)]. Herein the theoretical framework is extended and calculations are performed for a wide range of model receptors. We examine methods for computing optimal ligands (including cases where there is conformational change) and the resulting properties of optimized ligands. In particular, indicators are developed to aid in the determination of the deficiencies in a specific ligand or basis. A connection is established between the optimization problem here and a generalized image problem, from which an inverse-image basis set can be defined; this basis is shown to perform very well in optimization calculations. Furthermore, the optimized ligands are shown to have favorable electrostatic binding free energies (in contrast to many natural ligands), there is a strong correlation between the receptor desolvation penalty and the optimized binding free energy for fixed geometry, and the ligand and receptor cannot generally be mutually optimal. Additionally, we introduce the display of complementary desolvation and interaction potentials and the deviation of their relationship from ideal as a useful tool for judging effective complementarity. Scripts for computing and displaying these potentials with GRASP are available at http://mit.edu/tidor.

  19. Non-covalent nanodiamond-polymer dispersions and electrostatic immobilization of bovine serum albumin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaltsas, T.; Pispas, S.; Tagmatarchis, N.

    2015-11-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) lack efficient dispersion, not only in solvents but also in aqueous media. The latter is of great importance, considering the inherent biocompatibility of NDs and the plethora of suitable strategies for immobilizing functional biomolecules. In this work, a series of polymers was non-covalently interacted with NDs, forming ND-polymer ensembles, and their dispersibility and stability was examined. Dynamic light scattering gave valuable information regarding the size of the ensembles in liquid phase, while their morphology was further examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, thermal analysis measurements were applied to collect information on the thermal behavior of NDs and their ensembles and to calculate the amount of polymer interacting with the NDs, as well as the dispersibility values of the ND-polymer ensembles. Finally, the bovine serum albumin protein was electrostatically bound to a ND-polymer ensemble in which the polymeric moiety was carrying quaternized pyridine units.

  20. Use of Membrane Collectors in Electrostatic Precipitators.

    PubMed

    Bayless, David J; Pasic, Hajrudin; Alam, M Khairul; Shi, Liming; Haynes, Brian; Cochran, Joe; Khan, Wajahat

    2001-10-01

    Membrane collection surfaces, developed and patented by researchers at Ohio University, were used to replace steel plates in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Such replacement facilitates tension-based rapping, which shears the adhered particle layer from the collector surface more effectively than hammer-based rapping. Tests were performed to measure the collection efficiency of the membranes and to quantify the potential improvements of this novel cleaning technique with respect to re-entrainment. Results indicate that even semiconductor materials (e.g., carbon fibers) collect ash nearly as efficiently as steel plates, potentially indicating that collection surface resistivity is primarily dictated by the accumulated ash layer and not by the underlying plate conductivity. In addition, virtually all sheared particles separated from the collecting membranes fell within the boundary layer of the membrane, indicating extremely low potential for re-entrainment.

  1. Use of membrane collectors in electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Bayless, D J; Pasic, H; Alam, M K; Shi, L; Haynes, B; Cochran, J; Khan, W

    2001-10-01

    Membrane collection surfaces, developed and patented by researchers at Ohio University, were used to replace steel plates in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Such replacement facilitates tension-based rapping, which shears the adhered particle layer from the collector surface more effectively than hammer-based rapping. Tests were performed to measure the collection efficiency of the membranes and to quantify the potential improvements of this novel cleaning technique with respect to re-entrainment. Results indicate that even semiconductor materials (e.g., carbon fibers) collect ash nearly as efficiently as steel plates, potentially indicating that collection surface resistivity is primarily dictated by the accumulated ash layer and not by the underlying plate conductivity. In addition, virtually all sheared particles separated from the collecting membranes fell within the boundary layer of the membrane, indicating extremely low potential for re-entrainment.

  2. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  3. Electrostatically Embedded Many-Body Expansion for Large Systems, with Applications to Water Clusters.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Erin E; Truhlar, Donald G

    2007-01-01

    The use of background molecular charge to incorporate environmental effects on a molecule or active site is widely employed in quantum chemistry. In the present article we employ this practice in conjunction with many-body expansions. In particular, we present electrostatically embedded two-body and three-body expansions for calculating the energies of molecular clusters. The system is divided into fragments, and dimers or trimers of fragments are calculated in a field of point charges representing the electrostatic potential of the other fragments. We find that including environmental point charges can lower the errors in the electrostatically embedded pairwise additive (EE-PA) energies for a series of water clusters by as much as a factor of 10 when compared to the traditional pairwise additive approximation and that for the electrostatically embedded three-body (EE-3B) method the average mean unsigned error over nine different levels of theory for a set of six tetramers and one pentamer is only 0.05 kcal/mol, which is only 0.4% of the mean unsigned net interaction energy. We also test the accuracy of the EE-PA and EE-3B methods for a cluster of 21 water molecules and find that the errors relative to a full MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculation to be only 2.97 and 0.38 kcal/mol, respectively, which are only 1.5% and 0.2%, respectively, of the net interaction energy. This method offers the advantage over some other fragment-based methods in that it does not use an iterative method to determine the charges and thus provides substantial savings for large clusters. The method is convenient to adapt to a variety of electronic structure methods and program packages, it has N(2) or N(3) computational scaling for large systems (where N is the number of fragments), it is easily converted to an O(N) method, and its linearity allows for convenient analytic gradients.

  4. Electrostatic properties of graphitic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbahar, Dogan

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanostructures are considered to be one of the most important candidates of circuit elements for future nanoelectronics. However, being one of the main issues of conventional circuitry used today, charge accumulation on circuit elements can also be expected to have important effects on the performance of the nanoscale devices. In this work we investigated charge accumulation on various graphitic systems by simulated charge doping. We report ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of electrostatically charged multilayered carbon nano structures. We investigate the effect of total and background charge on charge distribution profiles on the systems under consideration varying from multilayered graphene to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. We show that the charge distribution profile on the inner layers are mainly induced from the background charge which is imposed by the code on periodic systems. Our population anaylsis indicates that the outermost two layers effectively shields the inner layers electrostatically. Illuminating the typical skin depth of those systems our results could give important insights for designing the nanocircuit elements.

  5. Electrostatic charging of lunar dust

    SciTech Connect

    Walch, Bob; Horanyi, Mihaly; Robertson, Scott

    1998-10-21

    Transient dust clouds suspended above the lunar surface were indicated by the horizon glow observed by the Surveyor spacecrafts and the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite Experiment (Apollo 17), for example. The theoretical models cannot fully explain these observations, but they all suggest that electrostatic charging of the lunar surface due to exposure to the solar wind plasma and UV radiation could result in levitation, transport and ejection of small grains. We report on our experimental studies of the electrostatic charging properties of an Apollo-17 soil sample and two lunar simulants MLS-1 and JSC-1. We have measured their charge after exposing individual grains to a beam of fast electrons with energies in the range of 20{<=}E{<=}90 eV. Our measurements indicate that the secondary electron emission yield of the Apollo-17 sample is intermediate between MLS-1 and JSC-1, closer to that of MLS-1. We will also discuss our plans to develop a laboratory lunar surface model, where time dependent illumination and plasma bombardment will closely emulate the conditions on the surface of the Moon.

  6. Microencapsulation and Electrostatic Processing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor); Cassanto, John M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A microencapsulation and electrostatic processing (MEP) device is provided for forming microcapsules. In one embodiment, the device comprises a chamber having a filter which separates a first region in the chamber from a second region in the chamber. An aqueous solution is introduced into the first region through an inlet port, and a hydrocarbon/ polymer solution is introduced into the second region through another inlet port. The filter acts to stabilize the interface and suppress mixing between the two immiscible solutions as they are being introduced into their respective regions. After the solutions have been introduced and have become quiescent, the interface is gently separated from the filter. At this point, spontaneous formation of microcapsules at the interface may begin to occur, or some fluid motion may be provided to induce microcapsule formation. In any case, the fluid shear force at the interface is limited to less than 100 dynes/sq cm. This low-shear approach to microcapsule formation yields microcapsules with good sphericity and desirable size distribution. The MEP device is also capable of downstream processing of microcapsules, including rinsing, re-suspension in tertiary fluids, electrostatic deposition of ancillary coatings, and free-fluid electrophoretic separation of charged microcapsules.

  7. Effects of RNA branching on the electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-08-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses self-assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although there is growing evidence that the sequence of the viral RNA also plays a role in packaging. In particular, the sequence will determine the possible secondary structures that the ssRNA will take in solution. In this work, we use a mean-field theory to investigate how the secondary structure of the RNA combined with electrostatic interactions affects the efficiency of assembly and stability of the assembled virions. We show that the secondary structure of RNA may result in negative osmotic pressures while a linear polymer causes positive osmotic pressures for the same conditions. This may suggest that the branched structure makes the RNA more effectively packaged and the virion more stable.

  8. Electrostatics-Driven Hierarchical Buckling of Charged Flexible Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the rich morphologies of an electrically charged flexible ribbon, which is a prototype for many beltlike structures in biology and nanomaterials. Long-range electrostatic repulsion is found to govern the hierarchical buckling of the ribbon from its initially flat shape to its undulated and out-of-plane twisted conformations. In this process, the screening length is the key controlling parameter, suggesting that a convenient way to manipulate the ribbon morphology is simply to change the salt concentration. We find that these shapes originate from the geometric effect of the electrostatic interaction, which fundamentally changes the metric over the ribbon surface. We also identify the basic modes by which the ribbon reshapes itself in order to lower the energy. The geometric effect of the physical interaction revealed in this Letter has implications for the shape design of extensive ribbonlike materials in nano- and biomaterials.

  9. Atomistic simulations of liquid water using Lekner electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid water using three different potential models in the NVT and NPT ensembles. The flexible SPC model, the rigid TIP4P model and the rigid/polarizable TIP4P-FQ potential were studied. The Lekner method was used to handle long range electrostatic interactions, and an efficient trivariate cubic spline interpolation method was devised for this purpose. A partitioning of the electrostatic interactions into medium and long range parts was performed, and the concomitant use of multiple timestep techniques led to substantially enhanced computation speeds. The simulations were carried out using 256 molecules in the NVT ensemble at 25°C and 997kgm-3 and in the NPT ensemble at 25°C and 1 bar. Various dynamic, structural, dielectric, rotational and thermodynamic properties were calculated, and it was found that the simulation methodologies performed satisfactorily vis-à-vis previous simulation results and experimental observations.