Science.gov

Sample records for additional energy input

  1. Instrumentation for measuring energy inputs to implements

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, F.D.; Wilhelm, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    A microcomputer-based instrumentation system for monitoring tractor operating parameters and energy inputs to implements was developed and mounted on a 75-power-takeoff-KW tractor. The instrumentation system, including sensors and data handling equipment, is discussed. 10 refs.

  2. Solar wind-magnetosphere energy input functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bargatze, L.F.; McPherron, R.L.; Baker, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A new formula for the solar wind-magnetosphere energy input parameter, P/sub i/, is sought by applying the constraints imposed by dimensional analysis. Applying these constraints yields a general equation for P/sub i/ which is equal to rho V/sup 3/l/sub CF//sup 2/F(M/sub A/,theta) where, rho V/sup 3/ is the solar wind kinetic energy density and l/sub CF//sup 2/ is the scale size of the magnetosphere's effective energy ''collection'' region. The function F which depends on M/sub A/, the Alfven Mach number, and on theta, the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle is included in the general equation for P/sub i/ in order to model the magnetohydrodynamic processes which are responsible for solar wind-magnetosphere energy transfer. By assuming the form of the function F, it is possible to further constrain the formula for P/sub i/. This is accomplished by using solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indices, and simple statistical methods. It is found that P/sub i/ is proportional to (rho V/sup 2/)/sup 1/6/VBG(theta) where, rho V/sup 2/ is the solar wind dynamic pressure and VBG(theta) is a rectified version of the solar wind motional electric field. Furthermore, it is found that G(theta), the gating function which modulates the energy input to the magnetosphere, is well represented by a ''leaky'' rectifier function such as sin/sup 4/(theta/2). This function allows for enhanced energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented southward. This function also allows for some energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented northward. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  3. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  4. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  5. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  6. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  7. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  8. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  9. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements to provide heat... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  10. Gaze and Feet as Additional Input Modalities for Interacting with Geospatial Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çöltekin, A.; Hempel, J.; Brychtova, A.; Giannopoulos, I.; Stellmach, S.; Dachselt, R.

    2016-06-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are complex software environments and we often work with multiple tasks and multiple displays when we work with GIS. However, user input is still limited to mouse and keyboard in most workplace settings. In this project, we demonstrate how the use of gaze and feet as additional input modalities can overcome time-consuming and annoying mode switches between frequently performed tasks. In an iterative design process, we developed gaze- and foot-based methods for zooming and panning of map visualizations. We first collected appropriate gestures in a preliminary user study with a small group of experts, and designed two interaction concepts based on their input. After the implementation, we evaluated the two concepts comparatively in another user study to identify strengths and shortcomings in both. We found that continuous foot input combined with implicit gaze input is promising for supportive tasks.

  11. Dayside Thermospheric Upwelling Driven by Magnetospheric Energy Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Ober, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, accelerometer data from the Champ and GRACE satellites has illustrated that the thermospheric density at high latitudes can be highly structured in both space and time. The standard interpretation is that the thermosphere is responding to spatially and temporally structured energy inputs from the magnetosphere. In this presentation we report on our studies to test this hypothesis and determine whether the electromagnetic energy flux (Poynting) or precipitating particle energy flux is the main driver of thermospheric upwelling at high latitudes. To determine the magnetospheric energy input we use data from satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) which carry a suite of space environment sensors whose data can be used to quantify magnetospheric energy input to the upper atmosphere. These include (1) an ion/electron precipitation spectrometer (30 eV - 30 keV), (2) an ion retarding potential analyzer, (3) an ion driftmeter, and (4) a magnetometer. Data from the spectrometer can be used to quantify precipitating particle energy flux while measurements of plasma drifts and magnetic perturbations can be combined to find down-going Poynting flux. To determine the thermospheric response to this energy input we use densities derived from drag measurements made by the GRACE and Champ satellites. We use a method recently developed by Burke et al. [2009] to convert the thermospheric density increases into atmospheric energy gains in order to compare with the magnetospheric energy supplied.

  12. Slow light in ruby: delaying energy beyond the input pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which light is slowed through ruby has been the subject of great debate. To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the problem in the time domain by modulating a laser beam with a chopper to create a clean square wave. By exploring the trailing edge of the pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby, we can determine whether energy is delayed beyond the input pulse. The effects of a time-varying absorber alone cannot delay energy into the trailing edge of the pulse, as a time-varying absorber can only attenuate a coherent pulse. Therefore, our observation of an increase in intensity at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than just pulse reshaping. In addition, investigating the Fourier components of the modulated square wave shows that harmonic components with different frequencies are delayed by different amounts, regardless of the intensity of the component itself. Understanding the difference in delays of the individual Fourier components of the modulated beam reveals the cause of the distortion the pulse undergoes as it propagates through the ruby.

  13. Energy Inputs Uncertainty: Total Amount, Distribution and Correlation Between Different Forms of Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Describes solar energy inputs contributing to ionospheric and thermospheric weather processes, including total energy amounts, distributions and the correlation between particle precipitation and Poynting flux.

  14. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies.

  15. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:25030908

  16. Modeling the cardiovascular system using a nonlinear additive autoregressive model with exogenous input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, M.; Suhrbier, A.; Malberg, H.; Penzel, T.; Bretthauer, G.; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2008-07-01

    The parameters of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability have proved to be useful analytical tools in cardiovascular physics and medicine. Model-based analysis of these variabilities additionally leads to new prognostic information about mechanisms behind regulations in the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we analyze the complex interaction between heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration by nonparametric fitted nonlinear additive autoregressive models with external inputs. Therefore, we consider measurements of healthy persons and patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with and without hypertension. It is shown that the proposed nonlinear models are capable of describing short-term fluctuations in heart rate as well as systolic blood pressure significantly better than similar linear ones, which confirms the assumption of nonlinear controlled heart rate and blood pressure. Furthermore, the comparison of the nonlinear and linear approaches reveals that the heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects is caused by a higher level of noise as well as nonlinearity than in patients suffering from OSAS. The residue analysis points at a further source of heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects, in addition to heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration. Comparison of the nonlinear models within and among the different groups of subjects suggests the ability to discriminate the cohorts that could lead to a stratification of hypertension risk in OSAS patients.

  17. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  18. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  19. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  20. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  1. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  2. Energy input-output analysis of herbaceous energy and short-rotation woody crop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    Energy input-output analyses, expressed in terms of energy-profit ratios, were derived for the production of a biocrude fuel oil from switchgrass and silver maple. Each energy analysis was concerned with determining the amount of direct and embodied energy associated with crop production, transport, processing, and conversion. Direct energy inputs include energy derived from gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and/or LP-gas. Embodied energy inputs are the amount of energy allocated to the machinery, chemicals, and equipment needed to perform the various operations associated with producing, transporting, processing, and converting bioenergy crops to a useful energy source. Energy-profit ratios varied from 1.96 to 2.48 for switchgrass and were 1.46 to 1.97 when short-rotation woody crops were the feedstock.

  3. Fluctuations in the energy input determine Kolmogorov constants in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Gregory; Lachaussée, Florent; Kassel, Johannes; Voth, Greg; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-11-01

    Attention to turbulence is often focused, for good reason, on flows that either maintain a steady state or decay freely. But these conditions are not typical in natural or industrial flows. We ask what effect deviations from these conditions have on the turbulence itself. To answer the question, we employ a new active grid with many independently controllable degrees of freedom to generate turbulence in a wind tunnel. We find the following: The anisotropy in the flow can be set to various states, including an isotropic one, by adjusting the correlations between motions on the grid. Some part of the fluctuations in the flow can be attributed to the instantaneous configuration of the grid, in the sense that it is reproduced when the grid returns to the same configuration. The value of the Kolmogorov constants for the structure functions of different order can be adjusted by changing over time the degree to which the active grid agitates the flow. We interpret these variations in agitation as variations of the energy input rate. We then find that the Kolmogorov constants, in particular those of order higher than two, can be made to have universal values when the variation of the energy input rate is accounted for by a model based on the refined similarity theory.

  4. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-10-11

    An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

  5. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Johnson, Steve A.

    1994-01-01

    An interface module (10) for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams (36) in the form of illumination bar (54) to the lasing zone (18) of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier (12). The preferred interface module (10) includes an optical fiber array (30) having a plurality of optical fibers (38) arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends (44) receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source (46), and their proximal ends (4) delivered into a relay structure (3). The proximal ends (42) of the optical fibers (38) are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array (36) delivered from the optical fiber array (30) is acted upon by an optical element array (34) to produce an illumination bar (54) which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window (18). The illumination bar (54) is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout.

  6. Spatial Statistical Procedures to Validate Input Data in Energy Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2006-01-27

    Energy modeling and analysis often relies on data collected for other purposes such as census counts, atmospheric and air quality observations, economic trends, and other primarily non-energy-related uses. Systematic collection of empirical data solely for regional, national, and global energy modeling has not been established as in the above-mentioned fields. Empirical and modeled data relevant to energy modeling is reported and available at various spatial and temporal scales that might or might not be those needed and used by the energy modeling community. The incorrect representation of spatial and temporal components of these data sets can result in energy models producing misleading conclusions, especially in cases of newly evolving technologies with spatial and temporal operating characteristics different from the dominant fossil and nuclear technologies that powered the energy economy over the last two hundred years. Increased private and government research and development and public interest in alternative technologies that have a benign effect on the climate and the environment have spurred interest in wind, solar, hydrogen, and other alternative energy sources and energy carriers. Many of these technologies require much finer spatial and temporal detail to determine optimal engineering designs, resource availability, and market potential. This paper presents exploratory and modeling techniques in spatial statistics that can improve the usefulness of empirical and modeled data sets that do not initially meet the spatial and/or temporal requirements of energy models. In particular, we focus on (1) aggregation and disaggregation of spatial data, (2) predicting missing data, and (3) merging spatial data sets. In addition, we introduce relevant statistical software models commonly used in the field for various sizes and types of data sets.

  7. Spatial Statistical Procedures to Validate Input Data in Energy Models

    SciTech Connect

    Johannesson, G.; Stewart, J.; Barr, C.; Brady Sabeff, L.; George, R.; Heimiller, D.; Milbrandt, A.

    2006-01-01

    Energy modeling and analysis often relies on data collected for other purposes such as census counts, atmospheric and air quality observations, economic trends, and other primarily non-energy related uses. Systematic collection of empirical data solely for regional, national, and global energy modeling has not been established as in the abovementioned fields. Empirical and modeled data relevant to energy modeling is reported and available at various spatial and temporal scales that might or might not be those needed and used by the energy modeling community. The incorrect representation of spatial and temporal components of these data sets can result in energy models producing misleading conclusions, especially in cases of newly evolving technologies with spatial and temporal operating characteristics different from the dominant fossil and nuclear technologies that powered the energy economy over the last two hundred years. Increased private and government research and development and public interest in alternative technologies that have a benign effect on the climate and the environment have spurred interest in wind, solar, hydrogen, and other alternative energy sources and energy carriers. Many of these technologies require much finer spatial and temporal detail to determine optimal engineering designs, resource availability, and market potential. This paper presents exploratory and modeling techniques in spatial statistics that can improve the usefulness of empirical and modeled data sets that do not initially meet the spatial and/or temporal requirements of energy models. In particular, we focus on (1) aggregation and disaggregation of spatial data, (2) predicting missing data, and (3) merging spatial data sets. In addition, we introduce relevant statistical software models commonly used in the field for various sizes and types of data sets.

  8. Sequential recovery of copper and nickel from wastewater without net energy input.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wen-Fang; Fang, Xiao-Wen; Xu, Meng-Xi; Liu, Xiao-He; Wang, Yun-Hai

    2015-01-01

    A novel bioelectrochemical system (BES) was designed to recover copper and nickel from wastewater sequentially. The BES has two chambers separated by a bipolar membrane and two cathodes. Firstly, the copper ions were reduced on a graphite cathode with electricity output, and then with an additional bias-potential applied, the nickel ions were recovered sequentially on a copper sheet with electricity input. In this design, nickel and copper can be recovered and separated sequentially on two cathodes. By adjusting the molar ratio of copper and nickel ions to 2.99:1 in wastewater, 1.40 mmol Cu²⁺ could be recovered with 143.78 J electricity outputs, while 50.68 J electricity was input for 0.32 mmol nickel reduction. The total energy output of copper recovery was far more than the electricity input of nickel reduction. The present technology provides a potential method for heavy metal ion separation and recovery.

  9. Atmospheric transport and deposition, an additional input pathway for triazine herbicides to surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.C.G.; Rawn, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    Although surface runoff from treated fields is regarded as the major route of entry of triazine herbicides to surface waters, other pathways such as deposition via precipitation, gas absorption and dryfall may also be important. Triazine herbicides have been detected in precipitation but there has been only a very limited amount of work on gas phase and aerosols. To examine the importance of atmospheric inputs concentrations of atrazine, cyanazine and terbuthylazine in gas phase/aerosols, precipitation, and surface waters were determined (along with other herbicides) using selected ion GC-MS. Atrazine was detected at low ng/L concentrations in surface waters (<0.04-5.3 ng/L) and precipitation (0.1-53 ng/L), and at 0.02-0.1 ng/m{sup 3} in air. Cyanazine and terbuthylazine were detected in air and infrequently in water. Highest atrazine concentrations in air were found during June each year on both gas phase and particles. Concentrations of atrazine in surface waters at both locations increased during June, even in the absence of precipitation or overland flow, presumably due to inputs from dryfall and to gas areas and boreal forest lakes due to transport and deposition. Ecological risk assessment of triazines, especially for pristine aquatic environments should include consideration of this atmospheric pathway.

  10. Three new crystal structures in the Na-Pb system: solving structures without additional experimental input.

    PubMed

    Ward, Logan; Michel, Kyle; Wolverton, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The structures of three Na-Pb compounds, γ, δ and δ', have remained incompletely solved for nearly 60 years. The space group, lattice parameters and positions of the Pb atoms of these three structures have been determined, but the positions of the Na atoms are still unknown. In this work, the First-Principles Assisted Structure Solution (FPASS) method [Meredig & Wolverton (2013). Nat. Mater. 12, 123-127] has been used to complete the description of these three structures using only experimental information available from the literature as input. The paper also discusses the relative advantages of constrained crystal structure prediction tools, like FPASS, in comparison to conventional crystal structure prediction methods in reference to their abilities to complete the solution of other unsolved structures. PMID:26317197

  11. Soluble metal pool as affected by soil addition with organic inputs.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C; Peña, Aránzazu; Mingorance, Maria Dolores

    2013-04-01

    The potential impact of diverse inputs of organic matter (hay, maize straw, and peat) on the mobility and bioavailability of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn was examined at laboratory scale for three soils with contrasting properties and for two moisture regimes: field capacity and saturated conditions. Soil solution was characterized for total soluble metals, dissolved soil organic carbon, and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm. Speciation analyses were performed with WHAM VI. For field capacity conditions, metal mobility increased (Pb>Cu>Zn>Cd) for all soils and treatments compared with controls and was significantly correlated (p<0.05) with dissolved organic matter (r=0.540). Solubilization of organic matter was mostly driven by Al mobilization (r=0.580, p<0.05) and variations in solution pH. The bioavailable pool of metals, estimated as free ion activities, decreased with the increasing occurrence of metal-organic matter complexes, which was accompanied by an increase in solution of highly aromatic organic matter. Soil saturation generally decreased metal mobility and the ratio of metal-organo matter complexes in solution. Consistently, such effects were accompanied by a decrease in the solubilization of organic matter and lower mobilization of Al, Fe, and Mn.

  12. An assessment of energy use efficiency and sensitivity analysis of inputs in rice paddy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Rafiee, S.; Jafari, A.; Keyhani, A.

    2012-04-01

    This research studies the energy balance between the inputs and the output and estimation of inputs sensitivity for paddy production in Golestan province, Iran. The sensitivity of energy inputs was estimated using the marginal physical productivity (MPP) method and partial regression coefficients on rice yield. The results indicated that total energy inputs were found to be 29668 MJ ha-1. The results showed that among energy inputs, the share of chemical fertilizers was highest with 39% followed by water for irrigation with 32%. Energy use efficiency and energy productivity were found to be 2.5 and 0.2 ¬kg MJ-1, respectively. Sensitivity analysis indicates that highest MPP was for machinery energy, followed by human labour energy. The MPP estimated for biocides energy was found negative, indicating that biocides energy consumption is high in paddy production. It is suggested that specific policy is to be taken to increase yield by raising partial productivity of energy inputs without depending on mainly non-renewable energy sources such as chemical fertilizers and biocides that create environmental risk problems. Keywords:Energy input, Sensitivity analysis, Chemical fertilizers, Paddy

  13. Revolutions in energy input and material cycling in Earth history and human history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, Timothy M.; Pichler, Peter-Paul; Weisz, Helga

    2016-04-01

    Major revolutions in energy capture have occurred in both Earth and human history, with each transition resulting in higher energy input, altered material cycles and major consequences for the internal organization of the respective systems. In Earth history, we identify the origin of anoxygenic photosynthesis, the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis, and land colonization by eukaryotic photosynthesizers as step changes in free energy input to the biosphere. In human history we focus on the Palaeolithic use of fire, the Neolithic revolution to farming, and the Industrial revolution as step changes in free energy input to human societies. In each case we try to quantify the resulting increase in energy input, and discuss the consequences for material cycling and for biological and social organization. For most of human history, energy use by humans was but a tiny fraction of the overall energy input to the biosphere, as would be expected for any heterotrophic species. However, the industrial revolution gave humans the capacity to push energy inputs towards planetary scales and by the end of the 20th century human energy use had reached a magnitude comparable to the biosphere. By distinguishing world regions and income brackets we show the unequal distribution in energy and material use among contemporary humans. Looking ahead, a prospective sustainability revolution will require scaling up new renewable and decarbonized energy technologies and the development of much more efficient material recycling systems - thus creating a more autotrophic social metabolism. Such a transition must also anticipate a level of social organization that can implement the changes in energy input and material cycling without losing the large achievements in standard of living and individual liberation associated with industrial societies.

  14. High-latitude energy input and its impact on the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G.; Richmond, A. D.; Lühr, H.; Paxton, L.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a quantitative assessment of high-latitude energy input and its partitioning in the polar cap by synthesizing various space and ground-based observations during the 17 January 2005 geomagnetic storm. It was found that Joule heating is the primary form of magnetospheric energy input, especially during active times when the hemispheric-integrated Joule heating can be an order of magnitude larger than the hemispheric-integrated auroral power. Most of magnetospheric energy is dissipated in the auroral zone rather than in the polar cap. On average, only about 22-25% of the total hemispheric energy input is dissipated into the polar cap region bordered by the convection reversal boundary (CRB) and the poleward auroral flux boundary (FXB). The impact of high-latitude energy input was also investigated to unveil the causal relationship between Joule heating and the formation of polar cap mass density anomalies. Our numerical simulation demonstrated that thermosphere dynamics readily redistributes composition, temperature, and mass through upwelling and atmospheric gravity waves. The polar cap mass density anomalies observed by the CHAMP satellite during the storm were largely a result of large-scale atmospheric gravity waves. Therefore, an increase in local thermospheric mass density does not necessarily mean there is direct energy input.

  15. Effect of variable energy input on nitrogen fixation in instantaneous linear discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The reported analysis implies that the number of molecules of NO produced per joule of discharge varies with input energy. The calculations assume a cylindrical symmetry but the results are consistent with equivalent calculations using spherical symmetry. If NO yield does vary with input energy, extrapolation of laboratory experiments using small sparks is not as straightforward as has previously been assumed. Calculated curves for the yield of NO as a function of discharge energy are presented and are compared with experimental values and other theoretical values.

  16. Energy Input and Dissipation in the Ionosphere-Thermosphere (IT) System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Huang, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Sutton, E. K.; Hairston, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    AFRL The long-held view of energy input and dissipation into the IT system says that the primary region in which dynamic and electrodynamic processes occur is the auroral zone. Recent observations have indicated that this may not be completely true. The dominant form of energy input to the IT system is electromagnetic, and not particle precipitation. Poynting flux measured on DMSP spacecraft during storms indicates that energy can be deposited at all local times (LTs) in both hemispheres at polar latitudes as well as in the auroral zones. One major effect of this energy input is Joule heating of the ionosphere and thermosphere. We have analyzed the ion temperature measured by DMSP for a number of storms. During storm main phases, the increase in ion temperature maximizes at polar latitudes. We have processed neutral densities from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE which show localized Joule heating at extremely high latitudes in both hemispheres. We conclude that energy input and dissipation occurs in the polar cap as well as in the auroral zones. Our results require a re-examination of the processes by which energy can enter the IT system, as well as where and how energy is transferred to ions and neutrals

  17. Input-Output Modeling for Urban Energy Consumption in Beijing: Dynamics and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lixiao; Hu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Input-output analysis has been proven to be a powerful instrument for estimating embodied (direct plus indirect) energy usage through economic sectors. Using 9 economic input-output tables of years 1987, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007, this paper analyzes energy flows for the entire city of Beijing and its 30 economic sectors, respectively. Results show that the embodied energy consumption of Beijing increased from 38.85 million tonnes of coal equivalent (Mtce) to 206.2 Mtce over the past twenty years of rapid urbanization; the share of indirect energy consumption in total energy consumption increased from 48% to 76%, suggesting the transition of Beijing from a production-based and manufacturing-dominated economy to a consumption-based and service-dominated economy. Real estate development has shown to be a major driving factor of the growth in indirect energy consumption. The boom and bust of construction activities have been strongly correlated with the increase and decrease of system-side indirect energy consumption. Traditional heavy industries remain the most energy-intensive sectors in the economy. However, the transportation and service sectors have contributed most to the rapid increase in overall energy consumption. The analyses in this paper demonstrate that a system-wide approach such as that based on input-output model can be a useful tool for robust energy policy making. PMID:24595199

  18. NECAP 4.1: NASA's Energy-Cost Analysis Program fast input manual and example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. N.; Miner, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    NASA's Energy-Cost Analysis Program (NECAP) is a powerful computerized method to determine and to minimize building energy consumption. The program calculates hourly heat gain or losses taking into account the building thermal resistance and mass, using hourly weather and a response factor method. Internal temperatures are allowed to vary in accordance with thermostat settings and equipment capacity. NECAP 4.1 has a simplified input procedure and numerous other technical improvements. A very short input method is provided. It is limited to a single zone building. The user must still describe the building's outside geometry and select the type of system to be used.

  19. Effect of Energy Input on the Characteristic of AISI H13 and D2 Tool Steels Deposited by a Directed Energy Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Seok; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Min-Gyu; Sung, Ji Hyun; Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-05-01

    Among the many additive manufacturing technologies, the directed energy deposition (DED) process has attracted significant attention because of the application of metal products. Metal deposited by the DED process has different properties than wrought metal because of the rapid solidification rate, the high thermal gradient between the deposited metal and substrate, etc. Additionally, many operating parameters, such as laser power, beam diameter, traverse speed, and powder mass flow rate, must be considered since the characteristics of the deposited metal are affected by the operating parameters. In the present study, the effect of energy input on the characteristics of H13 and D2 steels deposited by a direct metal tooling process based on the DED process was investigated. In particular, we report that the hardness of the deposited H13 and D2 steels decreased with increasing energy input, which we discuss by considering microstructural observations and thermodynamics.

  20. Input energy measurement toward warm dense matter generation using intense pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, R.; Ito, T.; Ishitani, T.; Tamura, F.; Kudo, T.; Takakura, N.; Kashine, K.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, Nob.; Jiang, W.; Tokuchi, A.

    2016-05-01

    In order to investigate properties of warm dense matter (WDM) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), evaluation method for the WDM with isochoric heating on the implosion time-scale using an intense pulsed power generator ETIGO-II (∼1 TW, ∼50 ns) has been considered. In this study, the history of input energy into the sample is measured from the voltage and the current waveforms. To achieve isochoric heating, a foamed aluminum with pore sizes 600 μm and with 90% porosity was packed into a hollow glass capillary (ø 5 mm × 10 mm). The temperature of the sample is calculated from the numerical calculation using the measured input power. According to the above measurements, the input energy into a sample and the achievable temperature are estimated to be 300 J and 6000 K. It indicates that the WDM state is generated using the proposed method with ICF implosion time-scale.

  1. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  2. Intensity of energy input during radiation drying of porcelain products in metallic molds

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarev, V.A.; Mikhalev, V.P.; Gubskii, G.Z.

    1987-03-01

    The authors seek to optimize the energy input and efficiency of the process and equipment for drying porcelain in a parametric analysis which maximizes the drying rate against the limiting condition of the onset of temperature-dependent crack propagation in the porcelain.

  3. Sustainable agricultural practices: energy inputs and outputs, pesticide, fertilizer and greenhouse gas management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Wen

    2009-01-01

    The food security issue was addressed by the development of "modern agriculture" in the last century. But food safety issues and environment degradation were the consequences suffered as a result. Climate change has been recognized as the result of release of stored energy in fossil fuel into the atmosphere. Homogeneous crop varieties, machinery, pesticides and fertilizers are the foundation of uniform commodities in modern agriculture. Fossil fuels are used to manufacture fertilizers and pesticides as well as the energy source for agricultural machinery, thus characterizes modern agriculture. Bio-fuel production and the possibility of the agriculture system as a form of energy input are discussed. PMID:19965338

  4. The influence of riparian vegetation on the energy input of the rivers Lafnitz and Pinka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzapfel, Gerda; Rauch, Hans Peter; Weihs, Philipp; Trimmel, Heidelinde; Formayer, Herbert; Leitner, Patrick; Graf, Wolfram; Melcher, Andreas; Dossi, Florian

    2013-04-01

    In Central Europe freshwater ecosystems have to deal with a loss of habitat structures due to channelisation and standardisation. Unimpaired streams and rivers are very rare, which leads to a few, remaining populations of sensitive invertebrate species which are severely fragmented. This progress is mainly noticed in lowland rivers in agricultural intensely used areas, where habitat degradation and pollution affect the ecosystems. Additional pressures on the freshwater systems will be expected due to climate change effects. In the Austrian Lowlands, an increase of air temperature about 2-2.5 °C is predicted till 2040. This will in turn lead to the highest increase in water temperature in the lowland rivers of the "Hungarian Plains", Ecoregion 11 on which the impacts of climate change will most likely be highest in Austria. Global warming on its own may lead to severe changes in aquatic ecosystems. Human impacts increase the negative effects even more. Main factors for a sustainable survival of benthic invertebrates and fishes are closely connected with parameters like water temperature, the availability of oxygen and nutrients, or radiation and nutrients for primary production which are closely related to climate. Natural bank vegetation reduces the influx of solar radiation as well as it forms a microclimate of its own and could provide very important niches for terrestrial and aquatic stages. Riparian areas with trees provide direct shade for the water body and thus avoiding the corresponding increase in water temperature. Wide riparian wooded areas can even decrease evaporation and increase the relative air humidity, which contributes to reducing water temperature. Input of deadwood like trees or logs represents essential habitats for invertebrates and fish assemblages. Its presence is one essential drivers of bed-morphology creating heterogeneous instream habitat patterns. In the framework of the project BIO_CLIC the potential of riparian vegetation to

  5. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  6. Observations of the directional distribution of the wind energy input function over swell waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Behnam; Babanin, Alex V.; Baldock, Tom E.

    2016-02-01

    Field measurements of wind stress over shallow water swell traveling in different directions relative to the wind are presented. The directional distribution of the measured stresses is used to confirm the previously proposed but unverified directional distribution of the wind energy input function. The observed wind energy input function is found to follow a much narrower distribution (β∝cos⁡3.6θ) than the Plant (1982) cosine distribution. The observation of negative stress angles at large wind-wave angles, however, indicates that the onset of negative wind shearing occurs at about θ≈ 50°, and supports the use of the Snyder et al. (1981) directional distribution. Taking into account the reverse momentum transfer from swell to the wind, Snyder's proposed parameterization is found to perform exceptionally well in explaining the observed narrow directional distribution of the wind energy input function, and predicting the wind drag coefficients. The empirical coefficient (ɛ) in Snyder's parameterization is hypothesised to be a function of the wave shape parameter, with ɛ value increasing as the wave shape changes between sinusoidal, sawtooth, and sharp-crested shoaling waves.

  7. Documentation of Calculation Methodology, Input data, and Infrastructure for the Home Energy Saver Web Site

    SciTech Connect

    Pinckard, Margaret J.; Brown, Richard E.; Mills, Evan; Lutz, James D.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Atkinson, Celina; Bolduc, Chris; Homan, Gregory K.; Coughlin, Katie

    2005-07-13

    The Home Energy Saver (HES, http://HomeEnergySaver.lbl.gov) is an interactive web site designed to help residential consumers make decisions about energy use in their homes. This report describes the underlying methods and data for estimating energy consumption. Using engineering models, the site estimates energy consumption for six major categories (end uses); heating, cooling, water heating, major appliances, lighting, and miscellaneous equipment. The approach taken by the Home Energy Saver is to provide users with initial results based on a minimum of user input, allowing progressively greater control in specifying the characteristics of the house and energy consuming appliances. Outputs include energy consumption (by fuel and end use), energy-related emissions (carbon dioxide), energy bills (total and by fuel and end use), and energy saving recommendations. Real-world electricity tariffs are used for many locations, making the bill estimates even more accurate. Where information about the house is not available from the user, default values are used based on end-use surveys and engineering studies. An extensive body of qualitative decision-support information augments the analytical results.

  8. Autonomic energy conversion. I. The input relation: phenomenological and mechanistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Caplan, S R

    1968-10-01

    The differences between completely and incompletely coupled linear energy converters are discussed using suitable electrochemical cells as examples. The output relation for the canonically simplest class of self-regulated incompletely coupled linear energy converters has been shown to be identical to the Hill force-velocity characteristic for muscle. The corresponding input relation (the "inverse" Hill equation) is now derived by two independent methods. The first method is a direct transformation of the output relation through the phenomenological equations of the converter; Onsager symmetry has no influence on the result. The second method makes use of a model system, a hydroelectric device with a regulator mechanism which depends only on the operational limits of the converter (an electro-osmosis cell operated in reverse) and on the load. The inverse Hill equation is shown to be the simplest solution of the regulator equation. An interesting and testable series of relations between input and output parameters arises from the two forms of the Hill equation. For optimal regulation the input should not be greatly different in the two limiting stationary states (level flow and static head). The output power will then be nearly maximal over a considerable range of load resistance, peak output being obtained at close to peak efficiency.

  9. Minimum-energy control for time-varying systems with multiple state and input delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Lin; Tang, Gong-You; Yang, Xue

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the minimum-energy control problem for a class of time-varying systems with multiple state and input delays. First, a state transform matrix is presented. By using the transform matrix, a system with multiple state and input delays is converted to a formal equivalent one without delay. Then, the optimal problem of the novel system is solved by using the maximum principle. Analytical expressions of the optimal control law and optimal performance are given by two formulas with respect to the state transform matrix. At last, an algorithm is given to solve the analytical expression of the state transform matrix. Simulation results show that the design algorithm is efficient and easy to implement.

  10. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na+ and K+ currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism. PMID:26074810

  11. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na(+) and K(+) currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism.

  12. Energy and environmental policymaking in Wisconsin state government: university faculty participation and input

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, K.J.F.

    1984-01-01

    State officials in Wisconsin (147) having responsibilities tied to energy or environmental policies identified 303 faculty members they had worked with in the past two years. In-depth interviews were conducted with a random sample of these faculty advisors. Background questionnaires and vita were used to collect data on attitudes, career histories and research activities. A model linking the type of information provided to phases of the policymaking process was hypothesized from the literature. Log linear analysis was used to test the model. Policymaking is viewed here as an ongoing, cyclic process in which it is possible to distinguish the activities of problem definition, policy formulation, legitimation, implementation, and evaluation. There is a correlation between policy formulation and such input as policy options and assessments of impact; and implementation and such input as functional operating assistance, advice on program direction, and site-specific assessments. Faculty are interacting with elected and appointed officials as well as middle management and staff. However, input is most frequently presented to staff. Faculty are most active in ad hoc and appointed roles; research, program collaboration and expert witness assignments are less frequent.

  13. Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

    2004-08-02

    Energy efficiency standards set minimum levels of energy efficiency that must be met by new products. Depending on the dynamics of the market and the level of the standard, the effect on the market for a given product may be small, moderate, or large. Energy efficiency standards address a number of market failures that exist in the buildings sector. Decisions about efficiency levels often are made by people who will not be responsible for the energy bill, such as landlords or developers of commercial buildings. Many buildings are occupied for their entire lives by very temporary owners or renters, each unwilling to make long-term investments that would mostly reward subsequent users. And sometimes what looks like apathy about efficiency merely reflects inadequate information or time invested to evaluate it. In addition to these sector-specific market failures, energy efficiency standards address the endemic failure of energy prices to incorporate externalities. In the U.S., energy efficiency standards for consumer products were first implemented in California in 1977. National standards became effective starting in 1988. By the end of 2001, national standards were in effect for over a dozen residential appliances, as well as for a number of commercial sector products. Updated standards will take effect in the next few years for several products. Outside the U.S., over 30 countries have adopted minimum energy performance standards. Technologies and markets are dynamic, and additional opportunities to improve energy efficiency exist. There are two main avenues for extending energy efficiency standards. One is upgrading standards that already exist for specific products. The other is adopting standards for products that are not covered by existing standards. In the absence of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards, it is likely that many new products will enter the stock with lower levels of energy efficiency than would otherwise be the case. Once in the stock

  14. Energy-Dominated Local Carbon Emissions in Beijing 2007: Inventory and Input-Output Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shan; Liu, J. B.; Shao, Ling; Li, J. S.; An, Y. R.

    2012-01-01

    For greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by Beijing economy 2007, a concrete emission inventory covering carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) is presented and associated with an input-output analysis to reveal the local GHG embodiment in final demand and trade without regard to imported emissions. The total direct GHG emissions amount to 1.06E + 08 t CO2-eq, of which energy-related CO2 emissions comprise 90.49%, non-energy-related CO2 emissions 6.35%, CH4 emissions 2.33%, and N2O emissions 0.83%, respectively. In terms of energy-related CO2 emissions, the largest source is coal with a percentage of 53.08%, followed by coke with 10.75% and kerosene with 8.44%. Sector 26 (Construction Industry) holds the top local emissions embodied in final demand of 1.86E + 07 t CO2-eq due to its considerable capital, followed by energy-intensive Sectors 27 (Transport and Storage) and 14 (Smelting and Pressing of Ferrous and Nonferrous Metals). The GHG emissions embodied in Beijing's exports are 4.90E + 07 t CO2-eq, accounting for 46.01% of the total emissions embodied in final demand. The sound scientific database totally based on local emissions is an important basis to make effective environment and energy policies for local decision makers. PMID:23193385

  15. GEM-CEDAR Study of Ionospheric Energy Input and Joule Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastaetter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Shim, Jasoon

    2012-01-01

    We are studying ionospheric model performance for six events selected for the GEM-CEDAR modeling challenge. DMSP measurements of electric and magnetic fields are converted into Poynting Flux values that estimate the energy input into the ionosphere. Models generate rates of ionospheric Joule dissipation that are compared to the energy influx. Models include the ionosphere models CTIPe and Weimer and the ionospheric electrodynamic outputs of global magnetosphere models SWMF, LFM, and OpenGGCM. This study evaluates the model performance in terms of overall balance between energy influx and dissipation and tests the assumption that Joule dissipation occurs locally where electromagnetic energy flux enters the ionosphere. We present results in terms of skill scores now commonly used in metrics and validation studies and we can measure the agreement in terms of temporal and spatial distribution of dissipation (i.e, location of auroral activity) along passes of the DMSP satellite with the passes' proximity to the magnetic pole and solar wind activity level.

  16. The energy and momentum input of supernova explosions in structured and ionized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the early impact of single and binary supernova (SN) explosions on dense gas clouds with three-dimensional, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations. The effect of cloud structure, radiative cooling and ionizing radiation from the progenitor stars on the net input of kinetic energy, fkin = Ekin/ESN, thermal energy, ftherm = Etherm/ESN, and gas momentum, fP = P/PSN, to the interstellar medium (ISM) is tested. For clouds with bar{n} = 100cm^{-3}, the momentum generating Sedov and pressure-driven snowplough phases are terminated early (∝0.01 Myr) and radiative cooling limits the coupling to ftherm ˜ 0.01, fkin ˜ 0.05, and fP ˜ 9, significantly lower than for the case without cooling. For pre-ionized clouds, these numbers are only increased by ˜50 per cent, independent of the cloud structure. This only suffices to accelerate ˜5 per cent of the cloud to radial velocities ≳30 km s-1. A second SN might enhance the coupling efficiencies if delayed past the Sedov phase of the first explosion. Such very low coupling efficiencies cast doubts on many subresolution models for SN feedback, which are, in general, validated a posteriori. Ionizing radiation appears not to significantly enhance the coupling of SNe to the surrounding gas as it drives the ISM into inert dense shells and cold clumps, a process which is unresolved in galaxy-scale simulations. Our results indicate that the momentum input of SNe in ionized, structured clouds is larger (more than a factor of 10) than the corresponding momentum yield of the progenitor's stellar winds.

  17. Redefining RECs: Additionality in the voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillenwater, Michael Wayne

    In the United States, electricity consumers are told that they can "buy" electricity from renewable energy projects, versus fossil fuel-fired facilities, through participation in a voluntary green power program. The marketing messages communicate to consumers that their participation and premium payments for a green label will cause additional renewable energy generation and thereby allow them to claim they consume electricity that is absent pollution as well as reduce pollutant emissions. Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) and wind energy are the basis for the majority of the voluntary green power market in the United States. This dissertation addresses the question: Do project developers respond to the voluntary REC market in the United States by altering their decisions to invest in wind turbines? This question is investigated by modeling and probabilistically quantifying the effect of the voluntary REC market on a representative wind power investor in the United States using data from formal expert elicitations of active participants in the industry. It is further explored by comparing the distribution of a sample of wind power projects supplying the voluntary green power market in the United States against an economic viability model that incorporates geographic factors. This dissertation contributes the first quantitative analysis of the effect of the voluntary REC market on project investment. It is found that 1) RECs should be not treated as equivalent to emission offset credits, 2) there is no clearly credible role for voluntary market RECs in emissions trading markets without dramatic restructuring of one or both markets and the environmental commodities they trade, and 3) the use of RECs in entity-level GHG emissions accounting (i.e., "carbon footprinting") leads to double counting of emissions and therefore is not justified. The impotence of the voluntary REC market was, at least in part, due to the small magnitude of the REC price signal and lack of

  18. Demand-driven energy requirement of world economy 2007: A multi-region input-output network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan-Ming; Chen, G. Q.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents a network simulation of the global embodied energy flows in 2007 based on a multi-region input-output model. The world economy is portrayed as a 6384-node network and the energy interactions between any two nodes are calculated and analyzed. According to the results, about 70% of the world's direct energy input is invested in resource, heavy manufacture, and transportation sectors which provide only 30% of the embodied energy to satisfy final demand. By contrast, non-transportation services sectors contribute to 24% of the world's demand-driven energy requirement with only 6% of the direct energy input. Commodity trade is shown to be an important alternative to fuel trade in redistributing energy, as international commodity flows embody 1.74E + 20 J of energy in magnitude up to 89% of the traded fuels. China is the largest embodied energy exporter with a net export of 3.26E + 19 J, in contrast to the United States as the largest importer with a net import of 2.50E + 19 J. The recent economic fluctuations following the financial crisis accelerate the relative expansions of energy requirement by developing countries, as a consequence China will take over the place of the United States as the world's top demand-driven energy consumer in 2022 and India will become the third largest in 2015.

  19. Tampering with the turbulent energy cascade with polymer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Pedro; da Silva, Carlos; Pinho, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    We show that the strong depletion of the viscous dissipation in homogeneous viscoelastic turbulence reported by previous authors does not necessarily imply a depletion of the turbulent energy cascade. However, for large polymer relaxation times there is an onset of a polymer-induced kinetic energy cascade which competes with the non-linear energy cascade leading to its depletion. Remarkably, the total energy cascade flux from both cascade mechanisms remains approximately the same fraction of the kinetic energy over the turnover time as the non-linear energy cascade flux in Newtonian turbulence. The authors acknowledge the funding from COMPETE, FEDER and FCT (Grant PTDC/EME-MFE/113589/2009).

  20. Can an energy balance model provide additional constraints on how to close the energy imbalance?

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Widmoser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the causes for the energy imbalance, i.e. the phenomenon that eddy covariance latent and sensible heat fluxes fall short of available energy, is an outstanding problem in micrometeorology. This paper tests the hypothesis that the full energy balance, through incorporation of additional independent measurements which determine the driving forces of and resistances to energy transfer, provides further insights into the causes of the energy imbalance and additional constraints on energy balance closure options. Eddy covariance and auxiliary data from three different biomes were used to test five contrasting closure scenarios. The main result of our study is that except for nighttime, when fluxes were low and noisy, the full energy balance generally did not contain enough information to allow further insights into the causes of the imbalance and to constrain energy balance closure options. Up to four out of the five tested closure scenarios performed similarly and in up to 53% of all cases all of the tested closure scenarios resulted in plausible energy balance values. Our approach may though provide a sensible consistency check for eddy covariance energy flux measurements. PMID:24465072

  1. Can an energy balance model provide additional constraints on how to close the energy imbalance?

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Widmoser, Peter

    2013-02-15

    Elucidating the causes for the energy imbalance, i.e. the phenomenon that eddy covariance latent and sensible heat fluxes fall short of available energy, is an outstanding problem in micrometeorology. This paper tests the hypothesis that the full energy balance, through incorporation of additional independent measurements which determine the driving forces of and resistances to energy transfer, provides further insights into the causes of the energy imbalance and additional constraints on energy balance closure options. Eddy covariance and auxiliary data from three different biomes were used to test five contrasting closure scenarios. The main result of our study is that except for nighttime, when fluxes were low and noisy, the full energy balance generally did not contain enough information to allow further insights into the causes of the imbalance and to constrain energy balance closure options. Up to four out of the five tested closure scenarios performed similarly and in up to 53% of all cases all of the tested closure scenarios resulted in plausible energy balance values. Our approach may though provide a sensible consistency check for eddy covariance energy flux measurements.

  2. Interrelationship between conservation tillage and energy and other input use in U.S. agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Uri, N.D.

    1996-12-01

    An important issue with regard to the overall effectiveness of conservation tillage practices in reducing the impact of agricultural production on the environment concerns what happens to energy, pesticide, and fertilizer use as these practices are more extensively adopted. To gain some insight into this, the conservation tillage adoption decision is modeled. Starting with the assumption that the conservation tillage adoption decision is a two-step procedure--the first is the decision whether or not to adopt a conservation tillage production system and the second is the decision on the extent to which conservation tillage should be used--appropriate models of the Cragg and Heckman (dominance) type are estimated. Based on a farm-level data on corn production in the US for 1987, the profile of a farm on which conservation tillage was adopted is that the cropland had above average slope and experienced above average rainfall, the farm was a cash grain enterprise, and it had an above average expenditure on pesticides, a below average expenditure on energy, and a below average expenditure on custom pesticide applications. Additionally, for a farm adopting a no-tillage production practice, an above average expenditure was made on fertilizer.

  3. Removing energy from a beverage influences later food intake more than the same energy addition.

    PubMed

    McCrickerd, K; Salleh, N B; Forde, C G

    2016-10-01

    Designing reduced-calorie foods and beverages without compromising their satiating effect could benefit weight management, assuming that consumers do not compensate for the missing calories at other meals. Though research has demonstrated that compensation for overfeeding is relatively limited, the extent to which energy reductions trigger adjustments in later food intake is less clear. The current study tested satiety responses (characterised by changes in appetite and later food intake) to both a covert 200 kcal reduction and an addition of maltodextrin to a soymilk test beverage. Twenty-nine healthy male participants were recruited to consume three sensory-matched soymilk beverages across four non-consecutive study days: a medium energy control (ME: 300 kcal) and a lower energy (LE: 100 kcal) and higher energy (HE: 500 kcal) version. The ME control was consumed twice to assess individual consistency in responses to this beverage. Participants were unaware of the energy differences across the soymilks. Lunch intake 60 min later increased in response to the LE soymilk, but was unchanged after consuming the HE version. These adjustments accounted for 40% of the energy removed from the soymilk and 13% of the energy added in. Rated appetite was relatively unaffected by the soymilk energy content. No further adjustments were noted for the rest of the day. These data suggest that adult men tested were more sensitive to calorie dilution than calorie addition to a familiar beverage.

  4. Removing energy from a beverage influences later food intake more than the same energy addition.

    PubMed

    McCrickerd, K; Salleh, N B; Forde, C G

    2016-10-01

    Designing reduced-calorie foods and beverages without compromising their satiating effect could benefit weight management, assuming that consumers do not compensate for the missing calories at other meals. Though research has demonstrated that compensation for overfeeding is relatively limited, the extent to which energy reductions trigger adjustments in later food intake is less clear. The current study tested satiety responses (characterised by changes in appetite and later food intake) to both a covert 200 kcal reduction and an addition of maltodextrin to a soymilk test beverage. Twenty-nine healthy male participants were recruited to consume three sensory-matched soymilk beverages across four non-consecutive study days: a medium energy control (ME: 300 kcal) and a lower energy (LE: 100 kcal) and higher energy (HE: 500 kcal) version. The ME control was consumed twice to assess individual consistency in responses to this beverage. Participants were unaware of the energy differences across the soymilks. Lunch intake 60 min later increased in response to the LE soymilk, but was unchanged after consuming the HE version. These adjustments accounted for 40% of the energy removed from the soymilk and 13% of the energy added in. Rated appetite was relatively unaffected by the soymilk energy content. No further adjustments were noted for the rest of the day. These data suggest that adult men tested were more sensitive to calorie dilution than calorie addition to a familiar beverage. PMID:27356202

  5. Converting oil shale to liquid fuels: energy inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the Shell in situ conversion process.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam R

    2008-10-01

    Oil shale is a sedimentary rock that contains kerogen, a fossil organic material. Kerogen can be heated to produce oil and gas (retorted). This has traditionally been a CO2-intensive process. In this paper, the Shell in situ conversion process (ICP), which is a novel method of retorting oil shale in place, is analyzed. The ICP utilizes electricity to heat the underground shale over a period of 2 years. Hydrocarbons are produced using conventional oil production techniques, leaving shale oil coke within the formation. The energy inputs and outputs from the ICP, as applied to oil shales of the Green River formation, are modeled. Using these energy inputs, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the ICP are calculated and are compared to emissions from conventional petroleum. Energy outputs (as refined liquid fuel) are 1.2-1.6 times greater than the total primary energy inputs to the process. In the absence of capturing CO2 generated from electricity produced to fuel the process, well-to-pump GHG emissions are in the range of 30.6-37.1 grams of carbon equivalent per megajoule of liquid fuel produced. These full-fuel-cycle emissions are 21%-47% larger than those from conventionally produced petroleum-based fuels.

  6. Effect of Specific Energy Input on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nickel-Base Intermetallic Alloy Deposited by Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Kumar, Santosh; Chandra, Kamlesh; Vishwanadh, B.; Kishore, R.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    This article describes the microstructural features and mechanical properties of nickel-base intermetallic alloy laser-clad layers on stainless steel-316 L substrate, with specific attention on the effect of laser-specific energy input (defined as the energy required per unit of the clad mass, kJ/g) on the microstructure and properties of the clad layer, keeping the other laser-cladding parameters same. Defect-free clad layers were observed, in which various solidified zones could be distinguished: planar crystallization near the substrate/clad interface, followed by cellular and dendritic morphology towards the surface of the clad layer. The clad layers were characterized by the presence of a hard molybdenum-rich hexagonal close-packed (hcp) intermetallic Laves phase dispersed in a relatively softer face-centered cubic (fcc) gamma solid solution or a fine lamellar eutectic phase mixture of an intermetallic Laves phase and gamma solid solution. The microstructure and properties of the clad layers showed a strong correlation with the laser-specific energy input. As the specific energy input increased, the dilution of the clad layer increased and the microstructure changed from a hypereutectic structure (with a compact dispersion of characteristic primary hard intermetallic Laves phase in eutectic phase mixture) to near eutectic or hypoeutectic structure (with reduced fraction of primary hard intermetallic Laves phase) with a corresponding decrease in the clad layer hardness.

  7. Energy inputs in the polar cap during geomagnetic storms and the impacts on the ionosphere/thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Sheng, C.; Huang, Y.; Huang, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Large Poynting flux has been observed in the polar cap by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites during the main phase of the August 5, 2011 storm, the magnitude of which is comparable to that in the auroral zone. In order to understand the mechanisms for the observed large Poynting flux in the polar cap, the particle precipitation along DMSP satellite trajectory has been studied. Meanwhile, the global ionosphere-thermosphere model (GITM) has been run to examine the relative contribution of convection pattern and conductance to the polar cap Poynting flux enhancement. The influence of energy inputs in the polar cap including both Poynting flux and soft particle precipitation on the thermosphere has been examined through the analysis of the GRACE neutral density observations and GITM simulations with different forcings. This study will help to illustrate the mechanisms and impacts of the polar cap energy inputs.

  8. Energy input from quasars regulates the growth and activity of black holes and their host galaxies.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Tiziana; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2005-02-10

    In the early Universe, while galaxies were still forming, black holes as massive as a billion solar masses powered quasars. Supermassive black holes are found at the centres of most galaxies today, where their masses are related to the velocity dispersions of stars in their host galaxies and hence to the mass of the central bulge of the galaxy. This suggests a link between the growth of the black holes and their host galaxies, which has indeed been assumed for a number of years. But the origin of the observed relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion, and its connection with the evolution of galaxies, have remained unclear. Here we report simulations that simultaneously follow star formation and the growth of black holes during galaxy-galaxy collisions. We find that, in addition to generating a burst of star formation, a merger leads to strong inflows that feed gas to the supermassive black hole and thereby power the quasar. The energy released by the quasar expels enough gas to quench both star formation and further black hole growth. This determines the lifetime of the quasar phase (approaching 100 million years) and explains the relationship between the black hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion.

  9. Inductive-Dynamic Simulation on Locations of Energy Input to and Deposition in the Ionosphere-Thermospher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations of the net Poynting flux deposition to the ionosphere showed that the strongest energy input from the magnetosphere is in the polar cap where the plasma flow speed is high and not where the flow reverses, implying that the field-aligned current is not the primary agent of the energy transfer and that other physical progresses are at play. In this study we assess locations of the energy transfer and deposition by a simulation conducted with a self-consistent inductive-dynamic (including self-consistent solutions of Faraday's law and retaining inertia terms in the plasma momentum equations) ionosphere-thermosphere model. In a 2-D global geometry (dawn-dusk meridian plane), we solve the multifluid-collisional-Hall MHD equations including photochemistry. The preliminary simulation results demonstrate propagation and evolution of the field-aligned currents and the dynamic processes of the formation of the ionospheric Pedersen currents. By comparing locations of the field-aligned currents and ionosphere/thermosphere heating driven by the magnetospheric convection we show that the energy input to the IT system and the energy dissipation occurs in the polar cap instead of regions where the field-aligned currents reside. The implication of these results is that the field-aligned currents are not the primary agent of the energy transfer from the magnetosphere to the IT system.

  10. Toward a Regional MOD16: Addition of a High-resolution Precipitation Input and a Simple Soil Moisture Component to the MOD16 Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seirer, J.; Running, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    MOD16 is a Penman-Monteith based remote sensing model developed to assess spatial patterns of terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) across the entire globe. Due to the lack of a satisfactory global precipitation dataset, MOD16 was originally forced to rely on vapor pressure deficit as water stress input. As high resolution precipitation datasets are becoming available, the logic of MOD16 has been revisited to include a daily 4-km gridded precipitation input and a simple soil moisture model. Estimates yielded by the new model, titled "regional MOD16", have been validated against several flux towers in the north central climate region of the United States. Results show that adding a precipitation input and a simple soil moisture model can improve the modeled estimates across multiple biomes and elevation gradients.

  11. The roles of direct input of energy from the solar wind and unloading of stored magnetotail energy in driving magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, G.; Akasofu, S. I.; Baumjohann, W.; Kamide, Y.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions to the substorm expansive phase of direct energy input from the solar wind and from energy stored in the magnetotail which is released in an unpredictable manner are considered. Two physical processes for the dispensation of the energy input from the solar wind are identified: (1) a driven process in which energy supplied from the solar wind is directly dissipated in the ionosphere; and (2) a loading-unloading process in which energy from the solar wind is first stored in the magnetotail and then is suddenly released to be deposited in the ionosphere. The pattern of substorm development in response to changes in the interplanetary medium has been elucidated for a canonical isolated substorm.

  12. Cylindrical mirror energy analyzer with the input of charged particles through end-surface diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, L. A.

    2016-08-01

    Computer simulation is used to study electron-optical properties of a cylindrical mirror analyzer with the input of charged particles through the end-surface diaphragm. Regimes with double crossing of the optical axis (two-stage analyzer) are considered to increase the linear dispersion. The external electrode of the electron-optical system under study can be divided into several insulated parts with independently controlled potentials. Such an approach allows the second-order tuning of focusing and wide-range variation in the dispersion. Optimal working regimes make it possible to increase the linear dispersion by a factor of 3-4 in comparison with the one-stage regime.

  13. The effect of output-input isolation on the scaling and energy consumption of all-spin logic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiaxi; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-05-07

    All-spin logic (ASL) is a novel approach for digital logic applications wherein spin is used as the state variable instead of charge. One of the challenges in realizing a practical ASL system is the need to ensure non-reciprocity, meaning the information flows from input to output, not vice versa. One approach described previously, is to introduce an asymmetric ground contact, and while this approach was shown to be effective, it remains unclear as to the optimal approach for achieving non-reciprocity in ASL. In this study, we quantitatively analyze techniques to achieve non-reciprocity in ASL devices, and we specifically compare the effect of using asymmetric ground position and dipole-coupled output/input isolation. For this analysis, we simulate the switching dynamics of multiple-stage logic devices with FePt and FePd perpendicular magnetic anisotropy materials using a combination of a matrix-based spin circuit model coupled to the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The dipole field is included in this model and can act as both a desirable means of coupling magnets and a source of noise. The dynamic energy consumption has been calculated for these schemes, as a function of input/output magnet separation, and the results show that using a scheme that electrically isolates logic stages produces superior non-reciprocity, thus allowing both improved scaling and reduced energy consumption.

  14. The effect of output-input isolation on the scaling and energy consumption of all-spin logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiaxi; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-05-01

    All-spin logic (ASL) is a novel approach for digital logic applications wherein spin is used as the state variable instead of charge. One of the challenges in realizing a practical ASL system is the need to ensure non-reciprocity, meaning the information flows from input to output, not vice versa. One approach described previously, is to introduce an asymmetric ground contact, and while this approach was shown to be effective, it remains unclear as to the optimal approach for achieving non-reciprocity in ASL. In this study, we quantitatively analyze techniques to achieve non-reciprocity in ASL devices, and we specifically compare the effect of using asymmetric ground position and dipole-coupled output/input isolation. For this analysis, we simulate the switching dynamics of multiple-stage logic devices with FePt and FePd perpendicular magnetic anisotropy materials using a combination of a matrix-based spin circuit model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The dipole field is included in this model and can act as both a desirable means of coupling magnets and a source of noise. The dynamic energy consumption has been calculated for these schemes, as a function of input/output magnet separation, and the results show that using a scheme that electrically isolates logic stages produces superior non-reciprocity, thus allowing both improved scaling and reduced energy consumption.

  15. Energy intensity of computer manufacturing: hybrid assessment combining process and economic input-output methods.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric

    2004-11-15

    The total energy and fossil fuels used in producing a desktop computer with 17-in. CRT monitor are estimated at 6400 megajoules (MJ) and 260 kg, respectively. This indicates that computer manufacturing is energy intensive: the ratio of fossil fuel use to product weight is 11, an order of magnitude larger than the factor of 1-2 for many other manufactured goods. This high energy intensity of manufacturing, combined with rapid turnover in computers, results in an annual life cycle energy burden that is surprisingly high: about 2600 MJ per year, 1.3 times that of a refrigerator. In contrast with many home appliances, life cycle energy use of a computer is dominated by production (81%) as opposed to operation (19%). Extension of usable lifespan (e.g. by reselling or upgrading) is thus a promising approach to mitigating energy impacts as well as other environmental burdens associated with manufacturing and disposal.

  16. Energy inputs and outputs of fuel-alcohol production. Appendices A and B. Ethanol from grain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Estimates are developed of present energy requirements for producing five grains (corn, grain, sorghum, winter wheat, barley and oats) and of energy requirements for increasing production of two of these grains (corn and grain sorghum). Brief discussions are also included of the overall potential for increasing crop land and for increasing grain production for conversion to ethanol. The energy and materials consumption of both wet and dry milling technologies are considered for the conversion of grain to ethanol.

  17. Compilation and application of Japanese inventories for energy consumption and air pollutant emissions using input-output tables.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Moriguchi, Yuichi; Tohno, Susumu

    2003-05-01

    Preparing emission inventories is essential to the assessment and management of our environment. In this study, Japanese air pollutant emissions, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions categorized by approximately 400 sectors (as classified by Japanese input-output tables in 1995) were estimated, and the contributions of each sector to the total amounts were analyzed. The air pollutants examined were nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and suspended particulate matter (SPM). Consumptions of about 20 fossil fuels and five other fuels were estimated according to sector. Air pollutant emission factors for stationary sources were calculated from the results of a survey on air pollution prevention in Japan. Pollutant emissions from mobile sources were estimated taking into consideration vehicle types, traveling speeds, and distances. This work also counted energy supply and emissions from seven nonfossil fuel sources, including nonthermal electric power, and CO2 emissions from limestone (for example, during cement production). The total energy consumption in 1995 was concluded to be 18.3 EJ, and the annual total emissions of CO2, NOx, SOx, and SPM were, respectively, 343 Mt-C, 3.51 Mt, 1.87 Mt, and 0.32 Mt. An input-output analysis of the emission inventories was used to calculate the amounts of energy consumption and emissions induced in each sector by the economic final demand. PMID:12775078

  18. Interacting Electrons in Parabolic Quantum Dots:. Energy Levels, Addition Energies, and Charge Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Michael; Siewert, Jens; Vojta, Thomas

    We investigate the properties of interacting electrons in a parabolic confinement. To this end we numerically diagonalize the Hamiltonian using the Hartree-Fock based diagonalization method which is related to the configuration interaction approach. We study different types of interactions, Coulomb as well as short range. In addition to the ground state energy we calculate the spatial charge distribution and compare the results to those of the classical calculation. We find that a sufficiently strong screened Coulomb interaction produces energy level bunching for classical as well as for quantum-mechanical dots. Bunching in the quantum-mechanical system occurs due to an interplay of kinetic and interaction energy, moreover, it is observed well before reaching the limit of a Wigner crystal. It also turns out that the shell structure of classical and quantum mechanical spatial charge distributions is quite similar.

  19. Interacting Electrons in Parabolic Quantum Dots:. Energy Levels, Addition Energies, and Charge Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Michael; Siewert, Jens; Vojta, Thomas

    2001-08-01

    We investigate the properties of interacting electrons in a parabolic confinement. To this end we numerically diagonalize the Hamiltonian using the Hartree-Fock based diagonalization method which is related to the configuration interaction approach. We study different types of interactions, Coulomb as well as short range. In addition to the ground state energy we calculate the spatial charge distribution and compare the results to those of the classical calculation. We find that a sufficiently strong screened Coulomb interaction produces energy level bunching for classical as well as for quantum-mechanical dots. Bunching in the quantum-mechanical system occurs due to an interplay of kinetic and interaction energy, moreover, it is observed well before reaching the limit of a Wigner crystal. It also turns out that the shell structure of classical and quantum mechanical spatial charge distributions is quite similar.

  20. Regenerative Fuel Cells: Renewable Energy Storage Devices Based on Neutral Water Input

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    GRIDS Project: Proton Energy Systems is developing an energy storage device that converts water to hydrogen fuel when excess electricity is available, and then uses hydrogen to generate electricity when energy is needed. The system includes an electrolyzer, which generates and separates hydrogen and oxygen for storage, and a fuel cell which converts the hydrogen and oxygen back to electricity. Traditional systems use acidic membranes, and require expensive materials including platinum and titanium for key parts of the system. In contrast, Proton Energy Systems’ new system will use an inexpensive alkaline membrane and will contain only inexpensive metals such as nickel and stainless steel. If successful, Proton Energy Systems’ system will have similar performance to today’s regenerative fuel cell systems at a fraction of the cost, and can be used to store electricity on the electric grid.

  1. Energy direct inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the main industrial trawl fishery of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Port, Dagoberto; Perez, Jose Angel Alvarez; de Menezes, João Thadeu

    2014-11-15

    This study provides first-time estimates of direct fuel inputs and greenhouse gas emissions produced by the trawl fishing fleet operating off southeastern and southern Brazil. Analyzed data comprised vessel characteristics, landings, fishing areas and trawling duration of 10,144 fishing operations monitored in Santa Catarina State from 2003 to 2011. Three main fishing strategies were differentiated: 'shrimp trawling', 'slope trawling' and 'pair trawling'. Jointly these operations burned over 9.1 million liters of diesel to land 342.3 million kilograms of fish and shellfish. Annually, 0.023-0.031 l were consumed for every kg of catch landed. Because all fishing strategies relied on multispecific catches to raise total incomes, estimates of fuel use intensity were generally low but increased 200-900% if only nominal targets were considered. In nine years, trawling operations emitted 6.69 GgC to the atmosphere, between 2300 and 3300 tons CO2 per year.

  2. Energy direct inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the main industrial trawl fishery of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Port, Dagoberto; Perez, Jose Angel Alvarez; de Menezes, João Thadeu

    2016-06-15

    This study provides first-time estimates of direct fuel inputs and greenhouse gas emissions produced by the trawl fishing fleet operating off southeastern and southern Brazil. Analyzed data comprised vessel characteristics, landings, fishing areas and trawling duration of 10,144 fishing operations monitored in Santa Catarina State from 2003 to 2011. Three main fishing strategies were differentiated: 'shrimp trawling', 'slope trawling' and 'pair trawling'. Jointly these operations burned over 141.5millionl of diesel to land 342.3millionkg of fish and shellfish. Annually, 0.36-0.48l were consumed for every kg of catch landed. Because all fishing strategies relied on multispecific catches to raise total incomes, estimates of fuel use intensity were generally low but increased 316-1025% if only nominal targets were considered. In nine years, trawling operations emitted 104.07GgC to the atmosphere, between 36,800-49,500tons CO2 per year.

  3. Energy direct inputs and greenhouse gas emissions of the main industrial trawl fishery of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Port, Dagoberto; Perez, Jose Angel Alvarez; de Menezes, João Thadeu

    2016-06-15

    This study provides first-time estimates of direct fuel inputs and greenhouse gas emissions produced by the trawl fishing fleet operating off southeastern and southern Brazil. Analyzed data comprised vessel characteristics, landings, fishing areas and trawling duration of 10,144 fishing operations monitored in Santa Catarina State from 2003 to 2011. Three main fishing strategies were differentiated: 'shrimp trawling', 'slope trawling' and 'pair trawling'. Jointly these operations burned over 141.5millionl of diesel to land 342.3millionkg of fish and shellfish. Annually, 0.36-0.48l were consumed for every kg of catch landed. Because all fishing strategies relied on multispecific catches to raise total incomes, estimates of fuel use intensity were generally low but increased 316-1025% if only nominal targets were considered. In nine years, trawling operations emitted 104.07GgC to the atmosphere, between 36,800-49,500tons CO2 per year. PMID:27068561

  4. Energy budgeting and carbon footprint of transgenic cotton-wheat production system through peanut intercropping and FYM addition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raman Jeet; Ahlawat, I P S

    2015-05-01

    Two of the most pressing sustainability issues are the depletion of fossil energy resources and the emission of atmospheric green house gases like carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. The aim of this study was to assess energy budgeting and carbon footprint in transgenic cotton-wheat cropping system through peanut intercropping with using 25-50% substitution of recommended dose of nitrogen (RDN) of cotton through farmyard manure (FYM) along with 100% RDN through urea and control (0 N). To quantify the residual effects of previous crops and their fertility levels, a succeeding crop of wheat was grown with varying rates of nitrogen, viz. 0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha(-1). Cotton + peanut-wheat cropping system recorded 21% higher system productivity which ultimately helped to maintain higher net energy return (22%), energy use efficiency (12%), human energy profitability (3%), energy productivity (7%), carbon outputs (20%), carbon efficiency (17%), and 11% lower carbon footprint over sole cotton-wheat cropping system. Peanut addition in cotton-wheat system increased the share of renewable energy inputs from 18 to 21%. With substitution of 25% RDN of cotton through FYM, share of renewable energy resources increased in the range of 21% which resulted into higher system productivity (4%), net energy return (5%), energy ratio (6%), human energy profitability (74%), energy productivity (6%), energy profitability (5%), and 5% lower carbon footprint over no substitution. The highest carbon footprint (0.201) was recorded under control followed by 50 % substitution of RDN through FYM (0.189). With each successive increase in N dose up to 150 kg N ha(-1) to wheat, energy productivity significantly reduced and share of renewable energy inputs decreased from 25 to 13%. Application of 100 kg N ha(-1) to wheat maintained the highest grain yield (3.71 t ha(-1)), net energy return (105,516 MJ ha(-1)), and human energy profitability (223.4) over other N doses applied to wheat

  5. Energy budgeting and carbon footprint of transgenic cotton-wheat production system through peanut intercropping and FYM addition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raman Jeet; Ahlawat, I P S

    2015-05-01

    Two of the most pressing sustainability issues are the depletion of fossil energy resources and the emission of atmospheric green house gases like carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. The aim of this study was to assess energy budgeting and carbon footprint in transgenic cotton-wheat cropping system through peanut intercropping with using 25-50% substitution of recommended dose of nitrogen (RDN) of cotton through farmyard manure (FYM) along with 100% RDN through urea and control (0 N). To quantify the residual effects of previous crops and their fertility levels, a succeeding crop of wheat was grown with varying rates of nitrogen, viz. 0, 50, 100, and 150 kg ha(-1). Cotton + peanut-wheat cropping system recorded 21% higher system productivity which ultimately helped to maintain higher net energy return (22%), energy use efficiency (12%), human energy profitability (3%), energy productivity (7%), carbon outputs (20%), carbon efficiency (17%), and 11% lower carbon footprint over sole cotton-wheat cropping system. Peanut addition in cotton-wheat system increased the share of renewable energy inputs from 18 to 21%. With substitution of 25% RDN of cotton through FYM, share of renewable energy resources increased in the range of 21% which resulted into higher system productivity (4%), net energy return (5%), energy ratio (6%), human energy profitability (74%), energy productivity (6%), energy profitability (5%), and 5% lower carbon footprint over no substitution. The highest carbon footprint (0.201) was recorded under control followed by 50 % substitution of RDN through FYM (0.189). With each successive increase in N dose up to 150 kg N ha(-1) to wheat, energy productivity significantly reduced and share of renewable energy inputs decreased from 25 to 13%. Application of 100 kg N ha(-1) to wheat maintained the highest grain yield (3.71 t ha(-1)), net energy return (105,516 MJ ha(-1)), and human energy profitability (223.4) over other N doses applied to wheat

  6. NECAP 4.1: NASA's Energy-Cost Analysis Program input manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The computer program NECAP (NASA's Energy Cost Analysis Program) is described. The program is a versatile building design and energy analysis tool which has embodied within it state of the art techniques for performing thermal load calculations and energy use predictions. With the program, comparisons of building designs and operational alternatives for new or existing buildings can be made. The major feature of the program is the response factor technique for calculating the heat transfer through the building surfaces which accounts for the building's mass. The program expands the response factor technique into a space response factor to account for internal building temperature swings; this is extremely important in determining true building loads and energy consumption when internal temperatures are allowed to swing.

  7. An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

  8. The World's Largest Experiment Manipulating Solar Energy Input To Earth Resumed In 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Small amounts of solar-ultraviolet-energy absorbing gases such as ozone, SO2, and NO2 play an unusually large role warming the atmosphere. A mere 3 to 8 ppmv ozone at elevations of 15 to 50 km and associated exothermic chemical reactions warm the atmosphere >50oC, forming the stratosphere. All three molecules have an asymmetric top shape that, unlike linear molecules of CO2, forms a permanent electromagnetic dipole enhancing interaction with electromagnetic radiation. Planck’s postulate (Energy = a constant times frequency) implies that solar ultraviolet energy strongly absorbed by SO2 is 43 times greater than infrared energy radiated by earth and strongly absorbed by CO2. Solar energy in the blue visible spectrum and ultraviolet causes electronic transitions and an absorption spectrum that is a continuum, absorbing far more energy per unit gas than spectral line absorption of infrared energy caused by rotational and vibrational transitions. Absorption of electromagnetic energy by atmospheric gases increases rapidly with increasing frequency, an observation not accounted for by the use of specific heat in atmospheric models to link energy flux with temperature. While SO2 in the stratosphere is oxidized to a sulfuric acid aerosol that reflects sunlight, cooling the earth, SO2 in the troposphere is oxidized much more slowly than commonly assumed. Well-documented concentrations of tens of ppbv SO2 emitted by humans burning fossil fuels, especially coal, in northern mid-latitudes are contemporaneous, with suitable time delays for warming the ocean, with increased global warming during the 20th century, greatest by nearly a factor of two in the northern hemisphere. A decrease by 18% of anthropogenic SO2 emissions between 1979 and 2000 aimed at reducing acid rain had the unintended effect of reducing the global mean rate of temperature increase to zero by 1998. By 2003, global SO2 emissions began to rise sharply due to the rapid increase in number of new coal

  9. Early life height and weight production functions with endogenous energy and protein inputs.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Esteban; Wang, Fan; Behrman, Jere R; Cunha, Flavio; Hoddinott, John; Maluccio, John A; Adair, Linda S; Borja, Judith B; Martorell, Reynaldo; Stein, Aryeh D

    2016-09-01

    We examine effects of protein and energy intakes on height and weight growth for children between 6 and 24 months old in Guatemala and the Philippines. Using instrumental variables to control for endogeneity and estimating multiple specifications, we find that protein intake plays an important and positive role in height and weight growth in the 6-24 month period. Energy from other macronutrients, however, does not have a robust relation with these two anthropometric measures. Our estimates indicate that in contexts with substantial child undernutrition, increases in protein-rich food intake in the first 24 months can have important growth effects, which previous studies indicate are related significantly to a range of outcomes over the life cycle.

  10. Early life height and weight production functions with endogenous energy and protein inputs.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Esteban; Wang, Fan; Behrman, Jere R; Cunha, Flavio; Hoddinott, John; Maluccio, John A; Adair, Linda S; Borja, Judith B; Martorell, Reynaldo; Stein, Aryeh D

    2016-09-01

    We examine effects of protein and energy intakes on height and weight growth for children between 6 and 24 months old in Guatemala and the Philippines. Using instrumental variables to control for endogeneity and estimating multiple specifications, we find that protein intake plays an important and positive role in height and weight growth in the 6-24 month period. Energy from other macronutrients, however, does not have a robust relation with these two anthropometric measures. Our estimates indicate that in contexts with substantial child undernutrition, increases in protein-rich food intake in the first 24 months can have important growth effects, which previous studies indicate are related significantly to a range of outcomes over the life cycle. PMID:27026217

  11. Journey on greener pathways: from the use of alternate energy inputs and benign reaction media to sustainable applications of nano-catalysts in synthesis and environmental remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable synthetic processes developed during the past two decades involving the use of alternate energy inputs and greener reaction media are summarized. These processes include examples of coupling reactions, the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of reactio...

  12. Application of low-mixing energy input for the coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Vadasarukkai, Yamuna S; Gagnon, Graham A

    2015-11-01

    Rapid-mixing tanks with mechanical mixers are a common design used in treatment plants. Yet, the role of such rapid-mixing systems on the effectiveness of the coagulation performance is unclear. This study looked at optimizing the direct energy used in the coagulation process for removal of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM). The role of coagulation mixing intensity (G-value) on total organic carbon (TOC) and turbidity removal was examined for the water types with high organic content, with a specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) of at least 2-2.5 units of m(-1) of absorbance per mg/L. A standard jar test using ferric sulfate coagulant was performed to optimize the chemical condition in coagulation for removal of dissolved organics as well as particles. The jar test analysis at an acidic pH (4.5 ± 0.3) required an iron dose <0.3 mM to arrive at an optimal coagulant concentration and resulted in above 75% of TOC removal. The influence of coagulation mixing on TOC and turbidity removal was evaluated at G varying from 0 to 1500 s(-1) at the optimized coagulant dose and pH conditions for enhanced coagulation. In this study, a combined effective removal of TOC and turbidity was achieved at a low-mixing intensity range of 110 s(-1) < G < 450 s(-1). Coagulation operated at G greater than 450 s(-1) showed negligible improvement in TOC removal. Minimizing energy consumption in enhanced coagulation is feasible at the proposed mixing intensity range (i.e., 110 s(-1) < G < 450 s(-1)), without sacrificing the effectiveness of DOM removal by coagulation. These findings represent an opportunity for energy savings for the water industry without sacrificing quality.

  13. PC index as a ground-based characteristic for the solar wind energy input into the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Stauning, Peter

    The solar wind energy input into the magnetosphere is usually evaluated by power of the magnetic disturbances detected at the Earth and estimated by the AE(AL) and Dst indices, characterizing, correspondingly, the magnetospheric substorm and geomagnetic storm dynamics and intensity. It is generally agreed, however, that the magnetospheric substorms and magnetic storms are the result of release of the energy accumulated by that time in the magnetosphere. Theoretical estimations of the solar wind energy input, making allowance for the actually observed solar wind parameters (for example, -function of Akasofu), turned out impracticable on the reasons of their imperfection and impossibility to organize the reliable monitoring the solar wind parameters in the key points of the space. By now the only PC index is serving as an on-line ground-based indicator of the geoeffective solar wind impact on the magnetosphere. The PC index characterizes the polar cap magnetic activity, generated by the geeffective interplanetary electric field (GIEF). The index is derived by magnetic data of only two stations Thule and Vostok, located in the northern (PCN) and southern (PCS) near-pole regions. The index was put into practice about 25 years ago, but obtained his final design as late as 2006. The unified procedure provides the on-line calculation of the PCN and PCS indices consistent with the GIEF value irrespective of the UT time, season and solar cycle. The proper response of the PC index to actual changes in the interplanetary electric field and the solar wind dynamic pressure is demonstrated. The main attention is given to relationships between the PC index behavior and development of the magnetospheric substorms and geomagnetic storms. It is shown that the magnetospheric substorms intensity and the substorm growth phase duration can be predicted by the PC index growth rate, whereas the geomagnetic storms magnitude and their lenght is indicated by the PC values averaged for the

  14. Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

    2009-10-01

    The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

  15. Coupling between fluid dynamics and energy addition in arcjet and microwave thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micci, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach to numerically solving the problem of the constricted electric arcjet is presented. An Euler Implicit finite difference scheme is used to solve the full compressible Navier Stokes equations in two dimensions. The boundary and initial conditions represent the constrictor section of the arcjet, and hydrogen is used as a propellant. The arc is modeled as a Gaussian distribution across the centerline of the constrictor. Temperature, pressure and velocity profiles for steady state converged solutions show both axial and radial changes in distributions resulting from their interaction with the arc energy source for specific input conditions. The temperature rise is largest at the centerline where there is a the greatest concentration arc energy. The solution does not converge for all initial inputs and the limitations in the range of obtainable solutions are discussed.

  16. Analysis of health impact inputs to the US Department of Energy's risk information system

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Buck, J.W.; Strenge, D.L.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of completing a survey of environmental problems, referred to as the Environmental Survey, at their facilities across the country. The DOE Risk Information System (RIS) is being used to prioritize these environmental problems identified in the Environmental Survey's findings. This report contains a discussion of site-specific public health risk parameters and the rationale for their inclusion in the RIS. These parameters are based on computed potential impacts obtained with the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS). MEPAS is a computer-based methodology for evaluating the potential exposures resulting from multimedia environmental transport of hazardous materials. This report has three related objectives: document the role of MEPAS in the RIS framework, report the results of the analysis of alternative risk parameters that led to the current RIS risk parameters, and describe analysis of uncertainties in the risk-related parameters. 20 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. 48 CFR 204.470 - U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol. 204.470 Section 204.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Information Within Industry 204.470 U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol....

  18. 48 CFR 204.470 - U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol. 204.470 Section 204.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Information Within Industry 204.470 U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol....

  19. 48 CFR 204.470 - U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol. 204.470 Section 204.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Information Within Industry 204.470 U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol....

  20. 48 CFR 204.470 - U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol. 204.470 Section 204.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Information Within Industry 204.470 U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol....

  1. 48 CFR 204.470 - U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol. 204.470 Section 204.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Information Within Industry 204.470 U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol....

  2. Tracking the energy input form the magnetosphere to the ionosphere-thermosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zesta, E.; Connor, H.; Shi, Y.; Raeder, J.; Fedrizzi, M.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Codrescu, M.

    2014-12-01

    During geomagnetically active times, the ionosphere - thermosphere (IT) system is strongly affected by magnetospheric energy that comes in the form of auroral particle precipitation and Poynting flux. This ultimately results in the increase of the thermospheric mass density, a critical parameter not only for determining and predicting air drag on satellites, but also for understanding the solar wind - magnetosphere- IT coupling. We use observations and model simulations to explore when, where and how energy transfers from the solar wind through the magnetosphere and is deposited into the IT system during solar wind disturbances. We observe and simulate dynamic pressure impacts on the magnetosphere and a magnetic storm main phase. We use thermospheric density observations from the CHAMP and GRACE satellites and Poynting flux measurements from Defense Meteorological Satellite Platform (DMSP) satellites. We show that the thermosphere density as well as the downward Poynting flux intensified shortly after (within ~20 min) the sudden enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure mostly in the dayside auroral zone and polar cap regions with the peaks in the vicinity of the cusp. Simulations from the two-way coupled OpenGGCM-CTIM magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere model show that the ionospheric Joule heating also increases abruptly along with the sudden enhancement of the dynamic pressure in the same regions. The modeling results show that the pair of high-latitude localized cusp field-aligned currents (FACs) are intensified and extended azimuthally as a result of the enhanced dayside high-latitude reconnection caused by the sudden increase of the solar wind dynamic pressure. They are likely the source of the enhanced Joule heating and the ensuing thermospheric heating in that region. We also look at the first hours of a magnetic storm main phase where the picture is significantly more complex, but Poynting flux and thermospheric density first enhance at polar

  3. Variation of structure with input energy during laser surface engineering of ceramic coatings on aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadolkar, Puja; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2002-10-01

    Surface modification of metal alloys using laser has become a unique tool to reduce surface related failure mechanisms such as wear, corrosion, erosion or high temperature oxidation. Laser surface engineered (LSE) ceramic coatings have been proved to enhance surface properties of Al alloys such as hardness and wear resistance. This technique has been shown to be capable of producing a wide variety of interesting metallurgical microstructure in the coating as well as in the adjoining substrate. These microstructures provide novel properties, which cannot be produced by any conventional processing technique. In addition, these coatings are metallurgically bonded, thus providing a sound and adherent interface between the coating and the substrate. In this present investigation, laser surface engineering technique has been employed to deposit ceramic (TiC) coating on aluminum alloy substrate. TiC coating was deposited on two types of aluminum substrates, alloy 2024 and 6061 using an Nd-YAG laser beam. The effect of laser processing parameters, such as power intensity and speed on the thickness, microstructure and morphology of both the coating and the heat-affected zone have been evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of experiments in this study show that by controlling the process parameters it is possible to produce varied microstructures according to the surface requirement of the application.

  4. Immobilization of antimony in waste-to-energy bottom ash by addition of calcium and iron containing additives.

    PubMed

    Van Caneghem, Jo; Verbinnen, Bram; Cornelis, Geert; de Wijs, Joost; Mulder, Rob; Billen, Pieter; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The leaching of Sb from waste-to-energy (WtE) bottom ash (BA) often exceeds the Dutch limit value of 0.32mgkg(-1) for recycling of BA in open construction applications. From the immobilization mechanisms described in the literature, it could be concluded that both Ca and Fe play an important role in the immobilization of Sb in WtE BA. Therefore, Ca and Fe containing compounds were added to the samples of the sand fraction of WtE BA, which in contrast to the granulate fraction is not recyclable to date, and the effect on the Sb leaching was studied by means of batch leaching tests. Results showed that addition of 0.5 and 2.5% CaO, 5% CaCl2, 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 and 1% FeCl3 decreased the Sb leaching from 0.62±0.02mgkgDM(-1) to 0.20±0.02, 0.083±0.044, 0.25±0.01, 0.27±0.002 and 0.29±0.02mgkgDM(-1), respectively. Due to the increase in pH from 11.41 to 12.53 when 2.5% CaO was added, Pb and Zn leaching increased and exceeded the respective leaching limits. Addition of 5% CaCO3 had almost no effect on the Sb leaching, as evidenced by the resulting 0.53mgkgDM(-1) leaching concentration. This paper shows a complementary enhancement of the effect of Ca and Fe, by comparing the aforementioned Sb leaching results with those of WtE BA with combined addition of 2.5% CaO or 5% CaCl2 with 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 or 1% FeCl3. These lab scale results suggest that formation of romeites with a high Ca content and formation of iron antimonate (tripuhyite) with a very low solubility are the main immobilization mechanisms of Sb in WtE BA. Besides the pure compounds and their mixtures, also addition of 10% of two Ca and Fe containing residues of the steel industry, hereafter referred to as R1 and R2, was effective in decreasing the Sb leaching from WtE BA below the Dutch limit value for reuse in open construction applications. To evaluate the long term effect of the additives, pilot plots of WtE BA with 10% of R1 and 5% and 10% of R2 were built and samples were submitted to leaching tests at

  5. Immobilization of antimony in waste-to-energy bottom ash by addition of calcium and iron containing additives.

    PubMed

    Van Caneghem, Jo; Verbinnen, Bram; Cornelis, Geert; de Wijs, Joost; Mulder, Rob; Billen, Pieter; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The leaching of Sb from waste-to-energy (WtE) bottom ash (BA) often exceeds the Dutch limit value of 0.32mgkg(-1) for recycling of BA in open construction applications. From the immobilization mechanisms described in the literature, it could be concluded that both Ca and Fe play an important role in the immobilization of Sb in WtE BA. Therefore, Ca and Fe containing compounds were added to the samples of the sand fraction of WtE BA, which in contrast to the granulate fraction is not recyclable to date, and the effect on the Sb leaching was studied by means of batch leaching tests. Results showed that addition of 0.5 and 2.5% CaO, 5% CaCl2, 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 and 1% FeCl3 decreased the Sb leaching from 0.62±0.02mgkgDM(-1) to 0.20±0.02, 0.083±0.044, 0.25±0.01, 0.27±0.002 and 0.29±0.02mgkgDM(-1), respectively. Due to the increase in pH from 11.41 to 12.53 when 2.5% CaO was added, Pb and Zn leaching increased and exceeded the respective leaching limits. Addition of 5% CaCO3 had almost no effect on the Sb leaching, as evidenced by the resulting 0.53mgkgDM(-1) leaching concentration. This paper shows a complementary enhancement of the effect of Ca and Fe, by comparing the aforementioned Sb leaching results with those of WtE BA with combined addition of 2.5% CaO or 5% CaCl2 with 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 or 1% FeCl3. These lab scale results suggest that formation of romeites with a high Ca content and formation of iron antimonate (tripuhyite) with a very low solubility are the main immobilization mechanisms of Sb in WtE BA. Besides the pure compounds and their mixtures, also addition of 10% of two Ca and Fe containing residues of the steel industry, hereafter referred to as R1 and R2, was effective in decreasing the Sb leaching from WtE BA below the Dutch limit value for reuse in open construction applications. To evaluate the long term effect of the additives, pilot plots of WtE BA with 10% of R1 and 5% and 10% of R2 were built and samples were submitted to leaching tests at

  6. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  7. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  8. The role of natural resource and environmental economics in determining the trade-offs in consumption and production of energy inputs: The case of biomass energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Graham, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Natural resource economics issues deal with flows and funds of renewable and nonrenewable resources over time. These issues include topics concerned with management of fisheries, forests, mineral, energy resources, the extinction of species and the irreversibility of development over time. Environmental economics issues deal with regulation of polluting activities and the valuation of environmental amenities. In this study we outline a framework for studying both natural resource and environmental economics issues for any renewable or nonrenewable resource. Valuation from both the cost and benefit sides are addressed as they relate to the valuation of environmental programs or policies. By using this top-down approach to analyze and determine the costs and benefits of using renewable or nonrenewable resources, policy-makers on the global, national and local scales may be better informed as to the probable nonmarket and market ramifications of their natural resource and environmental policy decisions. This general framework for analysis is then focused to address biomass energy crops and their usage as inputs to energy production. As with any energy technology, a complete analysis must include an examination of the entire fuel cycle; specifically both production and consumption sides. From a production standpoint, market valuation issues such as crop management techniques, inputs to production, and community economics issues must be addressed as well as nonmarket valuation issues such as soil erosion, ground water effects and carbon sequestration. On the consumption side, market valuation considerations such as energy fuel efficiency and quality, cost of conversion and employment of labor are important factors while the critical nonmarket valuation factors are ambient air visibility, greenhouse gas release, and disposal of the by-products of conversion and combustion.

  9. Midrapidity inclusive densities in high energy pp collisions in additive quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabelski, Yu. M.; Shuvaev, A. G.

    2016-08-01

    High energy (CERN SPS and LHC) inelastic pp (pbar{p}) scattering is treated in the framework of the additive quark model together with Pomeron exchange theory. We extract the midrapidity inclusive density of the charged secondaries produced in a single quark-quark collision and investigate its energy dependence. Predictions for the π p collisions are presented.

  10. Rapid engineering of versatile molecular logic gates using heterologous genetic transcriptional modules† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary methods, gene regulatory sequences used, the characterised dose responses of the single-input Buffer gate and the three promoter inputs under various cognate chemical induction levels. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cc05264a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We designed and constructed versatile modular genetic logic gates in bacterial cells. These function as digital logic 1-input Buffer gate, 2-input and 3-input AND gates with one inverted input and integrate multiple chemical input signals in customised logic manners. Such rapidly engineered devices serve to achieve increased sensing signal selectivity. PMID:25062273

  11. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO₃) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO₄) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO₄ the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO₄ increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO₄. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO₄ concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO₄ promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO₄ adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  12. Free energy calculation of water addition coupled to reduction of aqueous RuO4-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Blumberger, Jochen; Ohno, Takahisa; Sprik, Michiel

    2007-05-01

    Free energy calculations were carried out for water addition coupled reduction of aqueous ruthenate, RuO4-+H2O +e-→[RuO3(OH)2]2-, using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The full reaction is divided into the reduction of the tetrahedral monoanion, RuO4-+e-→RuO42-, followed by water addition, RuO42-+H2O →[RuO3(OH)2]2-. The free energy of reduction is computed from the fluctuations of the vertical energy gap using the MnO4-+e -→MnO42- reaction as reference. The free energy for water addition is estimated using constrained molecular dynamics methods. While the description of this complex reaction, in principle, involves multiple reaction coordinates, we found that reversible transformation of the reactant into the product can be achieved by control of a single reaction coordinate consisting of a suitable linear combination of atomic distances. The free energy difference of the full reaction is computed to be -0.62eV relative to the normal hydrogen electrode. This is in good agreement with the experimental value of -0.59eV, lending further support to the hypothesis that, contrary to the ruthenate monoanion, the dianion is not tetrahedral but forms a trigonal-bipyramidal dihydroxo complex in aqueous solution. We construct an approximate two-dimensional free energy surface using the coupling parameter for reduction and the mechanical constraint for water addition as variables. Analyzing this surface we find that in the most favorable reaction pathway the reduction reaction precedes water addition. The latter takes place via the protonated complex [RuO3(OH)]- and subsequent transport of the created hydroxide ion to the fifth coordination site of Ru.

  13. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  14. Activation energies for addition of O/3P/ to simple olefins.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Description of relative rate measurements for the addition of O(3P) to C2H4, C2F4, C3H6, and C4H8-1 in liquid argon at 87.5 K. The data strongly indicate that the activation energies for the addition of O(3P) to the double bonds of propylene and butene-1 are identical, probably to within 0.1 kcal/mole. It is very doubtful that differences in pre-exponential factors or other factors such as solvent effects, could invalidate this conclusion. A similar argument holds for the C2H4 and C2F4 reactions. Furthermore, the experiments suggest that the activation energy for addition of O(3P) to the double bond of butene-1 is about 0.1 kcal/mole.

  15. Modeling the ionosphere-thermosphere response to a geomagnetic storm using physics-based magnetospheric energy input: OpenGGCM-CTIM results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Hyunju Kim; Zesta, Eftyhia; Fedrizzi, Mariangel; Shi, Yong; Raeder, Joachim; Codrescu, Mihail V.; Fuller-Rowell, Tim J.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetosphere is a major source of energy for the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere (IT) system. Current IT models drive the upper atmosphere using empirically calculated magnetospheric energy input. Thus, they do not sufficiently capture the storm-time dynamics, particularly at high latitudes. To improve the prediction capability of IT models, a physics-based magnetospheric input is necessary. Here, we use the Open Global General Circulation Model (OpenGGCM) coupled with the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Model (CTIM). OpenGGCM calculates a three-dimensional global magnetosphere and a two-dimensional high-latitude ionosphere by solving resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with solar wind input. CTIM calculates a global thermosphere and a high-latitude ionosphere in three dimensions using realistic magnetospheric inputs from the OpenGGCM. We investigate whether the coupled model improves the storm-time IT responses by simulating a geomagnetic storm that is preceded by a strong solar wind pressure front on August 24, 2005. We compare the OpenGGCM-CTIM results with low-earth-orbit satellite observations and with the model results of Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe). CTIPe is an up-to-date version of CTIM that incorporates more IT dynamics such as a low-latitude ionosphere and a plasmasphere, but uses empirical magnetospheric input. OpenGGCM-CTIM reproduces localized neutral density peaks at ~ 400 km altitude in the high-latitude dayside regions in agreement with in situ observations during the pressure shock and the early phase of the storm. Although CTIPe is in some sense a much superior model than CTIM, it misses these localized enhancements. Unlike the CTIPe empirical input models, OpenGGCM-CTIM more faithfully produces localized increases of both auroral precipitation and ionospheric electric fields near the high-latitude dayside region after the pressure shock and after the storm onset, which in turn

  16. Estimates of embodied global energy and air-emission intensities of Japanese products for building a Japanese input-output life cycle assessment database with a global system boundary.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Suh, Sangwon; Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaba, Rokuta; Tohno, Susumu

    2012-08-21

    To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) database of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input-output LCA method with a global link input-output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input-output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant emissions (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input-output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains. PMID:22881452

  17. Estimates of embodied global energy and air-emission intensities of Japanese products for building a Japanese input-output life cycle assessment database with a global system boundary.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Suh, Sangwon; Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaba, Rokuta; Tohno, Susumu

    2012-08-21

    To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) database of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input-output LCA method with a global link input-output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input-output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant emissions (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input-output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains.

  18. Reduction of ammonia emission by shallow slurry injection: injection efficiency and additional energy demand.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Martin N; Sommer, Sven G; Madsen, Niels P

    2003-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emission from livestock production causes undesirable environmental effects and a loss of plant-available nitrogen. Much atmospheric NH3 is lost from livestock manure applied in the field. The NH3 emission may be reduced by slurry injection, but slurry injection in general, and especially on grassland, increases the energy demand and places heavy demands on the slurry injection techniques used. The reduction in NH3 emission, injection efficiency, and energy demand of six different shallow slurry-injection techniques was examined. The NH3 emission from cattle slurry applied to grassland was reduced by all the injectors tested in the study, but there were major differences in the NH3 reduction potential of the different types of injectors. Compared with the trailing hose spreading technique, the NH3 loss was reduced by 75% when cattle slurry was injected using the most efficient slurry injection technique, and by 20% when incorporated by the least efficient injection technique. The reduction in NH3 emission was correlated with injection depth and the volume of the slot created. The additional energy demand for reducing ammonia emissions by slurry injection was approximately 13 000 kJ ha(-1) for a 20% reduction and 34 000 kJ ha(-1) for a 75% reduction. The additional energy demand corresponds to additional emissions of, respectively, 5.6 and 14.5 kg CO2 per ha injected.

  19. High Energy Density Additives for Hybrid Fuel Rockets to Improve Performance and Enhance Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a conceptual study of prototype strained hydrocarbon molecules as high energy density additives for hybrid rocket fuels to boost the performance of these rockets without compromising safety and reliability. Use of these additives could extend the range of applications for which hybrid rockets become an attractive alternative to conventional solid or liquid fuel rockets. The objectives of the study were to confirm and quantify the high enthalpy of these strained molecules and to assess improvement in rocket performance that would be expected if these additives were blended with conventional fuels. We confirmed the chemical properties (including enthalpy) of these additives. However, the predicted improvement in rocket performance was too small to make this a useful strategy for boosting hybrid rocket performance.

  20. Non-pairwise additivity of the leading-order dispersion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, Joshua W.

    2015-02-28

    The leading-order (i.e., dipole-dipole) dispersion energy is calculated for one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) infinite lattices, and an infinite 1D array of infinitely long lines, of doubly occupied locally harmonic wells. The dispersion energy is decomposed into pairwise and non-pairwise additive components. By varying the force constant and separation of the wells, the non-pairwise additive contribution to the dispersion energy is shown to depend on the overlap of density between neighboring wells. As well separation is increased, the non-pairwise additivity of the dispersion energy decays. The different rates of decay for 1D and 2D lattices of wells is explained in terms of a Jacobian effect that influences the number of nearest neighbors. For an array of infinitely long lines of wells spaced 5 bohrs apart, and an inter-well spacing of 3 bohrs within a line, the non-pairwise additive component of the leading-order dispersion energy is −0.11 kJ mol{sup −1} well{sup −1}, which is 7% of the total. The polarizability of the wells and the density overlap between them are small in comparison to that of the atomic densities that arise from the molecular density partitioning used in post-density-functional theory (DFT) damped dispersion corrections, or DFT-D methods. Therefore, the nonadditivity of the leading-order dispersion observed here is a conservative estimate of that in molecular clusters.

  1. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO4) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO4 the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO4 increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO4. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO4 concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO4 promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO4 adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  2. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    DOE PAGES

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO₃) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO₄) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO₄ the film exhibits thermalmore » instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO₄ increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO₄. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO₄ concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO₄ promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO₄ adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.« less

  3. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO{sub 4}) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO{sub 4} the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO{sub 4} increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO{sub 4}. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO{sub 4} concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO{sub 4} promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO{sub 4} adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  4. Methods and energy storage devices utilizing electrolytes having surface-smoothing additives

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang; Graff, Gordon L; Chen, Xilin; Ding, Fei

    2015-11-12

    Electrodeposition and energy storage devices utilizing an electrolyte having a surface-smoothing additive can result in self-healing, instead of self-amplification, of initial protuberant tips that give rise to roughness and/or dendrite formation on the substrate and anode surface. For electrodeposition of a first metal (M1) on a substrate or anode from one or more cations of M1 in an electrolyte solution, the electrolyte solution is characterized by a surface-smoothing additive containing cations of a second metal (M2), wherein cations of M2 have an effective electrochemical reduction potential in the solution lower than that of the cations of M1.

  5. Role of energy input model on the remediation of the p-Nitrophenol contaminated over-wet soil by pulsed corona discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. H.; Zhang, X.; Wang, T. C.; Lu, N.; Li, J.; Wu, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Low-temperature plasma has exhibited high efficiency for fast remediation of organic-polluted soil with water content (less than 20%). In the present study, the feasibility of remediation of p-Nitrophenol (PNP) contaminated over-wet soil (water content of 100%) was studied using pulsed corona discharge plasma, which was generated in a needle-plate discharge reactor. Effect of energy input model, including pulse voltage and pulse frequency on PNP degradation, was studied. Experimental results showed that about 86.3% of PNP could be smoothly removed after 60 min discharge treatment. PNP degradation efficiency increased with an increase in pulse voltage or pulse frequency, due to the enhancement of energy input. Existence of water contributed to H2O2 generation and the amount of exhausted H2O2 increased with pulse voltage. This study is expected to provide an alternative method for remediation of contaminated soil containing much water by pulsed discharge plasma without drying pretreatment.

  6. Energy level formula for the Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-yi; Chen, Bo-zhan; Fan, Yue

    1996-02-01

    Based on the <η| representation which is the common eigenstate of the relative position x1 - x2 and the total momentum P1 + P2 of two particles we derive the energy level formula for a Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential. The <η| representation seems to provide a direct and convenient approach for solving certain dynamical problems for two-body systems.

  7. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy losses in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-28

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. We found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  8. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a frictionmore » term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.« less

  9. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  10. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  11. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-01-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface. PMID:25034006

  12. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integrates engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.

  13. Strong polarization-induced reduction of addition energies in single-molecule nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Flensberg, Karsten

    2008-11-01

    We address polarization-induced renormalization of molecular levels in solid-state based single-molecule transistors and focus on an organic conjugate molecule where a surprisingly large reduction of the addition energy has been observed. We have developed a scheme that combines a self-consistent solution of a quantum chemical calculation with a realistic description of the screening environment. Our results indeed show a large reduction, and we explain this to be a consequence of both (a) a reduction of the electrostatic molecular charging energy and (b) polarization induced level shifts of the HOMO and LUMO levels. Finally, we calculate the charge stability diagram and explain at a qualitative level general features observed experimentally.

  14. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG (‡) and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically.

  15. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG (‡) and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  16. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines

    PubMed Central

    Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol−1 and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG ‡ and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  17. Inventory of CO2 emissions driven by energy consumption in Hubei Province: a time-series energy input-output analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiashuo; Luo, Ran; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping

    2016-03-01

    Based on an input-output analysis, this paper compiles inventories of fuel-related CO2 emissions of Hubei economy in the years of 2002, 2005, and 2007. Results show that calculated total direct CO2 emissions rose from 114,462.69 kt (2002) to 196,650.31 kt (2005), reaching 210,419.93 kt in 2007, with an average 22.50% rate of increase. Raw coal was the dominant source of the direct emissions throughout the three years. The sector of Electric Power, Heat Production, and Supply was the main direct emissions contributor, with the largest intensities observed from 2002 (1192.97 g/CNY) to 2007 (1739.15 g/ CNY). From the industrial perspective, the secondary industry, which is characterized as manufacture of finished products, was still the pillar of the Hubei economy during this period concerned, contributing more than 80% of the total direct emissions. As a net exporter of embodied CO2 emissions in 2002 and 2007, Hubei reported net-exported emissions of 4109.00 kt and 17,871.77 kt respectively; however, Hubei was once a net importer of CO2 emissions in 2005 (2511.93 kt). The CO2 emissions embodied in export and fixed capital formation had the two leading fractions of emissions embodied in the final use. The corresponding countermeasures, such as promoting renewable and clean energy and properly reducing the exports of low value added and carbon-intensive products are suggestions for reducing CO2 emissions in Hubei.

  18. Schlieren Visualization of the Energy Addition by Multi Laser Pulse in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    The experimental results of the energy addition by multi laser pulse in Mach 7 hypersonic flow are presented. Two high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA lasers (TEA1 5.5 J, TEA2 3.9 J) were assembled sharing the same optical cavity to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The lasers can be triggered with a selectable time delay and in the present report the results obtained with delay between 30 {mu}s and 80 {mu}s are shown. The schlieren technique associated with a high speed camera was used to accomplish the influence of the energy addition in the mitigation of the shock wave formed on the model surface by the hypersonic flow. A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to obtain the time history of the impact pressure at stagnation point of the model and the pressure reduction could be measured. The total recovery of the shock wave between pulses as well as the prolonged effect of the mitigation without recovery was observed by changing the delay.

  19. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integratesmore » engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.« less

  20. The zonation patterns of Caribbean coral reefs as controlled by wave and light energy input, bathymetric setting and reef morphology: computer simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, Richard R.; MacIntyre, Ian G.

    1989-06-01

    The computer model COREEF was used to simulate variations in the zonation patterns of Caribbean reefs in relation to parameters that affect the magnitude and distribution of wave and light energy. We first developed a simulated standard reef by exposing a simplified profile of the reef at Discovery Bay, Jamaica, to the known wave and light energy conditions to establish a reference coralgal and sedimentological zonation pattern. We then varied 13 parameters related to the wave and light energy input, bathymetric setting, and gross morphology of this reef to determine the effects of each parameter on the zonation pattern. Analysis of the simulation results indicates that submerging the reef or altering the wave or light energy input to the reef produces the greatest modifications of the zonation pattern. Morphological structures that alter a reef's horizontal dimensions only minimally affect the zonation pattern, but those structures that alter a reef's vertical dimensions-particularly steep-sided, wave reflecting structures-can significantly modify the zonation of the structure itself and that of more leeward areas. The more seaward the location of a morphological structure, the more profoundly it can affect the overall reef zonation. If waves break at the reef crest, wave energy conditions in the back reef are greatly reduced and the bottom consists of lower wave energy zones than those found at the same depths in the fore reef. If waves do not break at the crest, the back reef is subjected to almost the same wave conditions that exist in the fore reef, and the zones tend to be similar. The zonation patterns of some existing reefs resemble those of our simulated reefs, but other zonation patterns cannot be reproduced accurately because our simulation experiments do not consider the interactions between multiple parameters found on many existing reefs.

  1. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays, there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission, which suggests that energy is already being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere at this stage. This work analyzes the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well-observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analyzed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minute duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons in either hard X-rays or microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to sustain the observed temperature and emission measure. Under the assumption of this energy being transported toward the chromosphere via thermal conduction, significant energy deposition at the chromosphere is expected. However, no detectable increase of the emission in the AIA wavelength channels sensitive to chromospheric temperatures is observed. The observations suggest energy release and deposition in the flaring loop before the onset of particle acceleration, yet a model in which energy is conducted to the chromosphere and subsequent heating of the chromosphere is not supported by the observations.

  2. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater. PMID:26405833

  3. Structure and function of natural sulphide-oxidizing microbial mats under dynamic input of light and chemical energy.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Meyer, Steffi; Häusler, Stefan; Macalady, Jennifer L; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2016-04-01

    We studied the interaction between phototrophic and chemolithoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing microorganisms in natural microbial mats forming in sulphidic streams. The structure of these mats varied between two end-members: one characterized by a layer dominated by large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB; mostly Beggiatoa-like) on top of a cyanobacterial layer (B/C mats) and the other with an inverted structure (C/B mats). C/B mats formed where the availability of oxygen from the water column was limited (<5 μm). Aerobic chemolithotrophic activity of the SOB depended entirely on oxygen produced locally by cyanobacteria during high light conditions. In contrast, B/C mats formed at locations where oxygen in the water column was comparatively abundant (>45 μM) and continuously present. Here SOB were independent of the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria and outcompeted the cyanobacteria in the uppermost layer of the mat where energy sources for both functional groups were concentrated. Outcompetition of photosynthetic microbes in the presence of light was facilitated by the decoupling of aerobic chemolithotrophy and oxygenic phototrophy. Remarkably, the B/C mats conserved much less energy than the C/B mats, although similar amounts of light and chemical energy were available. Thus ecosystems do not necessarily develop towards optimal energy usage. Our data suggest that, when two independent sources of energy are available, the structure and activity of microbial communities is primarily determined by the continuous rather than the intermittent energy source, even if the time-integrated energy flux of the intermittent energy source is greater.

  4. Acceleration of type 2 spicules in the solar chromosphere. II. Viscous braking and upper bounds on coronal energy input

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Michael L.

    2014-04-20

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ≤12.5 and 25 G. Plasma is accelerated to terminal vertical speeds of 66 and 78 km s{sup –1} in 100 s, compared with 124 and 397 km s{sup –1} for the case of zero viscosity. The flows are localized within horizontal diameters ∼80 and 50 km. The total thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation is ∼10 times larger than that due to Joule dissipation, but the magnitude of the total cooling due to rarefaction is ≳ this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in intergranular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  5. Stringent test for non-additive, non-interacting, kinetic energy functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kaili; Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) provides an ideal framework for testing and developing new approximations to the non-additive and non-interacting kinetic energy functional (Tsnadd [ {nα } ]), understood as a functional of the set of fragment ground-state densities. We present our progress on both of these fronts: (1) Systematic comparison of the performance of various existing approximations to Tsnadd [ {nα } ] ; and (2) Development of new approximations. We find that a re-parametrization of the GGA enhancement factor employed for the construction of Tsnadd [ {nα } ] through the conjointness conjecture captures essential features of the functional derivatives of Tsnadd [ {nα } ] . A physically-motivated two-orbital approximation for Tsnadd [ {nα } ] is shown to outperform most other approximations for the case of He2, and an intriguing one-parameter formula makes this approximation accurate for all noble-gas diatomics.

  6. Effect of electrolyte addition to rehydration drinks consumed after severe fluid and energy restriction.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the effect of electrolyte addition to drinks ingested after severe fluid and energy restriction (FER). Twelve subjects (6 male and 6 female) completed 3 trials consisting of 24-hour FER (energy intake: 21 kJ·kg body mass; water intake: 5 ml·kg body mass), followed by a 2-hour rehydration period and a 4-hour monitoring period. During rehydration, subjects ingested a volume of drink equal to 125% of the body mass lost during FER in 6 aliquots, once every 20 minutes. Drinks were a sugar-free lemon squash (P) or the P drink with the addition of 50 mmol·L sodium chloride (Na) or 30 mmol·L potassium chloride (K). Total void urine samples were given before and after FER and every hour during rehydration and monitoring. Over all trials, FER produced a 2.1% reduction in body mass and negative sodium (-67 mmol), potassium (-48 mmol), and chloride (-84 mmol) balances. Urine output after drinking was 1627 (540) ml (P), 1391 (388) ml (K), and 1150 (438) ml (Na), with a greater postdrinking urine output during P than Na (p ≤ 0.05). Ingestion of drink Na resulted in a more positive sodium balance compared with P or K (p < 0.001), whereas ingestion of drink K resulted in a more positive potassium balance compared with P or Na (p < 0.001). These results demonstrate that after 24-hour FER, ingestion of a high sodium drink results in an increased sodium balance that augments greater drink retention compared with a low electrolyte placebo drink.

  7. Effect of electrolyte addition to rehydration drinks consumed after severe fluid and energy restriction.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the effect of electrolyte addition to drinks ingested after severe fluid and energy restriction (FER). Twelve subjects (6 male and 6 female) completed 3 trials consisting of 24-hour FER (energy intake: 21 kJ·kg body mass; water intake: 5 ml·kg body mass), followed by a 2-hour rehydration period and a 4-hour monitoring period. During rehydration, subjects ingested a volume of drink equal to 125% of the body mass lost during FER in 6 aliquots, once every 20 minutes. Drinks were a sugar-free lemon squash (P) or the P drink with the addition of 50 mmol·L sodium chloride (Na) or 30 mmol·L potassium chloride (K). Total void urine samples were given before and after FER and every hour during rehydration and monitoring. Over all trials, FER produced a 2.1% reduction in body mass and negative sodium (-67 mmol), potassium (-48 mmol), and chloride (-84 mmol) balances. Urine output after drinking was 1627 (540) ml (P), 1391 (388) ml (K), and 1150 (438) ml (Na), with a greater postdrinking urine output during P than Na (p ≤ 0.05). Ingestion of drink Na resulted in a more positive sodium balance compared with P or K (p < 0.001), whereas ingestion of drink K resulted in a more positive potassium balance compared with P or Na (p < 0.001). These results demonstrate that after 24-hour FER, ingestion of a high sodium drink results in an increased sodium balance that augments greater drink retention compared with a low electrolyte placebo drink. PMID:25162651

  8. Flight Test Validation of Optimal Input Design and Comparison to Conventional Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for designing optimal inputs for aerodynamic parameter estimation was flight tested on the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV). Model parameter accuracies calculated from flight test data were compared on an equal basis for optimal input designs and conventional inputs at the same flight condition. In spite of errors in the a priori input design models and distortions of the input form by the feedback control system, the optimal inputs increased estimated parameter accuracies compared to conventional 3-2-1-1 and doublet inputs. In addition, the tests using optimal input designs demonstrated enhanced design flexibility, allowing the optimal input design technique to use a larger input amplitude to achieve further increases in estimated parameter accuracy without departing from the desired flight test condition. This work validated the analysis used to develop the optimal input designs, and demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the optimal input design technique.

  9. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  10. Sensing for directed energy deposition and powder bed fusion additive manufacturing at Penn State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Abdalla R.; Reutzel, Edward W.; Brown, Stephen W.; Morgan, John P.; Morgan, Jacob P.; Natale, Donald J.; Tutwiler, Rick L.; Feck, David P.; Banks, Jeffery C.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing of metal components through directed energy deposition or powder bed fusion is a complex undertaking, often involving hundreds or thousands of individual laser deposits. During processing, conditions may fluctuate, e.g. material feed rate, beam power, surrounding gas composition, local and global temperature, build geometry, etc., leading to unintended variations in final part geometry, microstructure and properties. To assess or control as-deposited quality, researchers have used a variety of methods, including those based on sensing of melt pool and plume emission characteristics, characteristics of powder application, and layer-wise imaging. Here, a summary of ongoing process monitoring activities at Penn State is provided, along with a discussion of recent advancements in the area of layer-wise image acquisition and analysis during powder bed fusion processing. Specifically, methods that enable direct comparisons of CAD model, build images, and 3D micro-tomographic scan data will be covered, along with thoughts on how such analyses can be related to overall process quality.

  11. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: Control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, A.; Hansen, S. R.; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2014-07-01

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment.

  12. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness.

    PubMed

    Vivek, A; Hansen, S R; Daehn, Glenn S

    2014-07-01

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment. PMID:25085167

  13. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: Control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek, A. Hansen, S. R.; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2014-07-15

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment.

  14. Influence of the Energy Input on the Vapor Flux and on the Temperature Distribution of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhoff, J.

    One major goal of com et research is to understand the power balance at the surface of the nucleus, which is essential to study the chemical and physical evolution of a comet. Sublimation of minor gases from ices inside of a porous comet nucleus strongly depends on the available energy and on the chemical and physical parameters of the nucleus. Unfortunately, there are only very few direct observations of comet nuclei. However, it is believed that the nucleus composition can be determined from analysis of coma mixing ratios as a function of the distance from the sun. The composition of the coma changes with heliocentric distance. In several analysis three sources for the coma gas were identified: (1) the surface of the nucleus (releasing water vapor), (2) the interior of the porous nucleus (releasing many species more volatile than water), and (3) the distributed source (releasing gases from ices and hydrocarbon polycondensates trapped or contained in coma dust) were assumed. Thermal evolution models can be used to predict local properties such as gas and dust emission, local stratigraphy, presence or absence of a refractory crust. We report on new results of our calculations to be applied to target comets of past and future spacecraft missions.

  15. Solar zenith angle dependence of empirical formulas between energy inputs to the ionosphere and O+ and H+ ion outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, N.; Seki, K.; Keika, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Hori, T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Lund, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent satellite observations and simulations have clarified that plasma outflows play an important role in abrupt changes in the ion composition in the plasmasheet and ring current during geomagnetic storms. Statistical studies by Strangeway et al. [2005] and Brambles et al. [2011] indicated that fluxes of ion outflows are correlated well with soft electron precipitation (precipitating electron density and electron density in the loss cone), and DC and Alfvenic Poynting fluxes using the data obtained by the FAST satellite near the cusp region in the dayside during the 24-25 September 1998 geomagnetic storm. To evaluate the correlations for H+ and O+ ions separately, we performed statistical studies using the ion composition data in addition to the ion, electron, and field data obtained by the FAST satellite during January 1998 and January 1999. The longer dataset enables us to identify empirical formulas between outflowing O+ and H+ ion fluxes and precipitating electron densities, DC and Alfvenic Poynting fluxes in a wide solar zenith angle (SZA) range (45°-145°). These empirical formulas would be useful for global magnetospheric simulations as the boundary conditions. Under dark conditions, H+ ion fluxes increases with increasing precipitating electron density, but not as much as those do under sunlit conditions. The precipitating electron density that corresponds to the H+ ion flux of ~107 /cm2/s (mapped to 1000 km altitude) decreases with increasing SZA. This SZA dependence is less clear for O+ ions as compared with H+ ions. The empirical formulas between outflowing O+ and H+ ion fluxes and DC and Alfvenic Poynting fluxes are not so strongly affected by SZA. Under sunlit conditions, the flux O+ ions tends to be larger than that of H+ ions, while H+ ions tend to become dominant under dark conditions. Intense ion (especially O+ ion) outflow events (>108 /cm2/s mapped to 1000 km altitude) mostly occurred under sunlit conditions or near the terminator.

  16. An application of input-output analysis in analyzing the impacts of final demands changes on the total outputs of Japanese energy sectors: A further study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to continue the previous study which discussed the impacts of final demands changes on the total outputs of Japanese energy sectors. More specifically, this study aims to conduct a deeper analysis regarding these impacts. This study employs a demand-pull Input- Output (IO) quantity model, one of the calculation instruments in IO analysis, as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on two sectors, namely (1) petroleum refinery products, and (2) non-ferrous metals. Two conditions are considered in the analysis part, namely (1) “whole sector change”, and (2) “pure change”. The results show that in both conditions, both discussed sectors have similar patterns. The results also explain that, in both conditions, the biggest positive impact for the sector of petroleum refinery products is given by scenario 4, the modification of consumption expenditures of private.

  17. Department of Energy Efforts to Promote Universal Adherence to the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Killinger, Mark H.; Hansen, Linda H.; Kovacic, Don N.; VanSickle, Matthew; Apt, Kenneth E.

    2009-10-06

    Entry-into-force of the U.S. Additional Protocol (AP) in January 2009 continues to demonstrate the ongoing commitment by the United States to promote universal adherence to the AP. The AP is a critical tool for improving the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) capabilities to detect undeclared activities that indicate a clandestine nuclear weapons program. This is because States Parties are required to provide information about, and access to, nuclear fuel cycle activities beyond their traditional safeguards reporting requirements. As part of the U.S. AP Implementation Act and Senate Resolution of Ratification, the Administration is required to report annually to Congress on measures taken to achieve the adoption of the AP in non-nuclear weapon states, as well as assistance to the IAEA to promote the effective implementation of APs in those states. A key U.S. effort in this area is being managed by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Through new and existing bilateral cooperation agreements, INSEP has initiated technical assistance projects for AP implementation with selected non-weapon states. States with which INSEP is currently cooperating include Vietnam and Thailand, with Indonesia, Algeria, Morocco, and other countries as possible future collaborators in the area of AP implementation. The INSEP collaborative model begins with a joint assessment with our partners to identify specific needs they may have regarding entering the AP into force and any impediments to successful implementation. An action plan is then developed detailing and prioritizing the necessary joint activities. Such assistance may include: advice on developing legal frameworks and regulatory documents; workshops to promote understanding of AP requirements; training to determine possible declarable activities; assistance in developing a system to collect and submit declarations; performing industry outreach to

  18. The influence of feed energy density and a formulated additive on rumen and rectal temperature in hanwoo steers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sangbuem; Mbiriri, David Tinotenda; Shim, Kwanseob; Lee, A-Leum; Oh, Seong-Jin; Yang, Jinho; Ryu, Chaehwa; Kim, Young-Hoon; Seo, Kang-Seok; Chae, Jung-Il; Oh, Young Kyoon; Choi, Nag-Jin

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated the optimum blending condition of protected fat, choline and yeast culture for lowering of rumen temperature. The Box Benken experimental design, a fractional factorial arrangement, and response surface methodology were employed. The optimum blending condition was determined using the rumen simulated in vitro fermentation. An additive formulated on the optimum condition contained 50% of protected fat, 25% of yeast culture, 5% of choline, 7% of organic zinc, 6.5% of cinnamon, and 6.5% of stevioside. The feed additive was supplemented at a rate of 0.1% of diet (orchard grass:concentrate, 3:7) and compared with a control which had no additive. The treatment resulted in lower volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and biogas than the control. To investigate the effect of the optimized additive and feed energy levels on rumen and rectal temperatures, four rumen cannulated Hanwoo (Korean native beef breed) steers were in a 4×4 Latin square design. Energy levels were varied to low and high by altering the ratio of forage to concentrate in diet: low energy (6:4) and high energy (4:6). The additive was added at a rate of 0.1% of the diet. The following parameters were measured; feed intake, rumen and rectal temperatures, ruminal pH and VFA concentration. This study was conducted in an environmentally controlled house with temperature set at 30°C and relative humidity levels of 70%. Steers were housed individually in raised crates to facilitate collection of urine and feces. The adaptation period was for 14 days, 2 days for sampling and 7 days for resting the animals. The additive significantly reduced both rumen (p<0.01) and rectal temperatures (p<0.001) without depressed feed intake. There were interactions (p<0.01) between energy level and additive on ruminal temperature. Neither additive nor energy level had an effect on total VFA concentration. The additive however, significantly increased (p<0.01) propionate and subsequently had lower

  19. The Influence of Feed Energy Density and a Formulated Additive on Rumen and Rectal Temperature in Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sangbuem; Mbiriri, David Tinotenda; Shim, Kwanseob; Lee, A-Leum; Oh, Seong-Jin; Yang, Jinho; Ryu, Chaehwa; Kim, Young-Hoon; Seo, Kang-Seok; Chae, Jung-Il; Oh, Young Kyoon; Choi, Nag-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the optimum blending condition of protected fat, choline and yeast culture for lowering of rumen temperature. The Box Benken experimental design, a fractional factorial arrangement, and response surface methodology were employed. The optimum blending condition was determined using the rumen simulated in vitro fermentation. An additive formulated on the optimum condition contained 50% of protected fat, 25% of yeast culture, 5% of choline, 7% of organic zinc, 6.5% of cinnamon, and 6.5% of stevioside. The feed additive was supplemented at a rate of 0.1% of diet (orchard grass:concentrate, 3:7) and compared with a control which had no additive. The treatment resulted in lower volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and biogas than the control. To investigate the effect of the optimized additive and feed energy levels on rumen and rectal temperatures, four rumen cannulated Hanwoo (Korean native beef breed) steers were in a 4×4 Latin square design. Energy levels were varied to low and high by altering the ratio of forage to concentrate in diet: low energy (6:4) and high energy (4:6). The additive was added at a rate of 0.1% of the diet. The following parameters were measured; feed intake, rumen and rectal temperatures, ruminal pH and VFA concentration. This study was conducted in an environmentally controlled house with temperature set at 30°C and relative humidity levels of 70%. Steers were housed individually in raised crates to facilitate collection of urine and feces. The adaptation period was for 14 days, 2 days for sampling and 7 days for resting the animals. The additive significantly reduced both rumen (p<0.01) and rectal temperatures (p<0.001) without depressed feed intake. There were interactions (p<0.01) between energy level and additive on ruminal temperature. Neither additive nor energy level had an effect on total VFA concentration. The additive however, significantly increased (p<0.01) propionate and subsequently had lower

  20. Activation energy associated with the electromigration of oligosaccharides through viscosity modifier and polymeric additive containing background electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kerékgyártó, Márta; Járvás, Gábor; Novák, Levente; Guttman, András

    2016-02-01

    The activation energy related to the electromigration of oligosaccharides can be determined from their measured electrophoretic mobilities at different temperatures. The effects of a viscosity modifier (ethylene glycol) and a polymeric additive (linear polyacrylamide) on the electrophoretic mobility of linear sugar oligomers with α1-4 linked glucose units (maltooligosaccharides) were studied in CE using the activation energy concept. The electrophoretic separations of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate-labeled maltooligosaccharides were monitored by LIF detection in the temperature range of 20-50°C, using either 0-60% ethylene glycol (viscosity modifier) or 0-3% linear polyacrylamide (polymeric additive) containing BGEs. Activation energy curves were constructed based on the slopes of the Arrhenius plots. With the use of linear polyacrylamide additive, solute size-dependent activation energy variations were found for the maltooligosaccharides with polymerization degrees below and above maltoheptaose (DP 7), probably due to molecular conformation changes and possible matrix interaction effects.

  1. Solvation free energy of the peptide group: its model dependence and implications for the additive-transfer free-energy model of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Asthagiri, D; Weber, Valéry

    2013-09-17

    The group-additive decomposition of the unfolding free energy of a protein in an osmolyte solution relative to that in water poses a fundamental paradox: whereas the decomposition describes the experimental results rather well, theory suggests that a group-additive decomposition of free energies is, in general, not valid. In a step toward resolving this paradox, here we study the peptide-group transfer free energy. We calculate the vacuum-to-solvent (solvation) free energies of (Gly)n and cyclic diglycine (cGG) and analyze the data according to experimental protocol. The solvation free energies of (Gly)n are linear in n, suggesting group additivity. However, the slope interpreted as the free energy of a peptide unit differs from that for cGG scaled by a factor of half, emphasizing the context dependence of solvation. However, the water-to-osmolyte transfer free energies of the peptide unit are relatively independent of the peptide model, as observed experimentally. To understand these observations, a way to assess the contribution to the solvation free energy of solvent-mediated correlation between distinct groups is developed. We show that linearity of solvation free energy with n is a consequence of uniformity of the correlation contributions, with apparent group-additive behavior in the water-to-osmolyte transfer arising due to their cancellation. Implications for inferring molecular mechanisms of solvent effects on protein stability on the basis of the group-additive transfer model are suggested.

  2. Elongated Quantum Dots of Ge on Si Growth Kinetics Modeling with Respect to the Additional Energy of Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovoy, K. A.; Pishchagin, A. A.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper refining of mathematical model for calculation of parameters of selforganised quantum dots (QDs) of Ge on Si grown by the method of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is done. Calculations of pyramidal and wedge-like clusters formation energy were conducted with respect to contributions of surface energy, additional edge energy, elastic strain relaxation, and decrease in the atoms attraction to substrate. With the help of well-known model based on the generalization of classical nucleation theory it was shown that elongated islands emerge later than pyramidal clusters. Calculations of QDs surface density and size distribution function for wedge-like clusters with different length to width ratio were performed. The absence of special geometry of islands for which surface density and average size of islands reach points of extremum that was predicted earlier by the model not taking into account energy of edges was revealed when considering the additional contribution of edge formation energy.

  3. Biofuels from pyrolysis in perspective: trade-offs between energy yields and soil-carbon additions.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Dominic; Lehmann, Johannes; Fisher, Elizabeth M; Angenent, Largus T

    2014-06-01

    Coproduction of biofuels with biochar (the carbon-rich solid formed during biomass pyrolysis) can provide carbon-negative bioenergy if the biochar is sequestered in soil, where it can improve fertility and thus simultaneously address issues of food security, soil degradation, energy production, and climate change. However, increasing biochar production entails a reduction in bioenergy obtainable per unit biomass feedstock. Quantification of this trade-off for specific biochar-biofuel pathways has been hampered by lack of an accurate-yet-simple model for predicting yields, product compositions, and energy balances from biomass slow pyrolysis. An empirical model of biomass slow pyrolysis was developed and applied to several pathways for biochar coproduction with gaseous and liquid biofuels. Here, we show that biochar production reduces liquid biofuel yield by at least 21 GJ Mg(-1) C (biofuel energy sacrificed per unit mass of biochar C), with methanol synthesis giving this lowest energy penalty. For gaseous-biofuel production, the minimum energy penalty for biochar production is 33 GJ Mg(-1) C. These substitution rates correspond to a wide range of Pareto-optimal system configurations, implying considerable latitude to choose pyrolysis conditions to optimize for desired biochar properties or to modulate energy versus biochar yields in response to fluctuating price differentials for the two commodities.

  4. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  5. Evidence of additional excitation energy transfer pathways in the phycobiliprotein antenna system of Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Nganou, A C; David, L; Adir, N; Pouhe, D; Deen, M J; Mkandawire, M

    2015-02-01

    To improve the energy conversion efficiency of solar organic cells, the clue may lie in the development of devices inspired by an efficient light harvesting mechanism of some aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms that are adapted to low light intensity. Consequently, we investigated the pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) from successive light harvesting pigments to the low energy level inside the phycobiliprotein antenna system of Acaryochloris marina, a cyanobacterium, using a time resolved absorption difference spectroscopy with a resolution time of 200 fs. The objective was to understand the actual biochemical process and pathways that determine the EET mechanism. Anisotropy of the EET pathway was calculated from the absorption change trace in order to determine the contribution of excitonic coupling. The results reveal a new electron energy relaxation pathway of 14 ps inside the phycocyanin component, which runs from phycocyanin to the terminal emitter. The bleaching of the 660 nm band suggests a broader absorption of the terminal emitter between 660 nm and 675 nm. Further, there are trimer depolarization kinetics of 450 fs and 500 fs in high and low ionic strength, respectively, which arise from the relaxation of the β84 and α84 in adjacent monomers of phycocyanin. Under conditions of low ionic strength buffer solution, the evolution of the kinetic amplitude during the depolarization of the trimer is suggestive of trimer conservation within the phycocyanin hexamer. The anisotropy values were 0.38 and 0.40 in high and in low ionic strength, respectively, indicating that there is no excitonic delocalization in the high energy level of phycocyanin hexamers.

  6. Addition of lipid to the photosynthetic membrane: effects on membrane structure and energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experiments in which the lipid composition of the photosynthetic membrane has been altered by the addition of lipid from a defined source under experimental conditions. Liposomes prepared by sonication are mixed with purified photosynthetic membranes obtained from spinach chloroplasts and are taken through cycles of freezing and thawing. Several lines of evidence, including gel electrophoresis and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, indicate that an actual addition of lipid has taken place. Structural analysis by freeze-fracture shows that intramembrane particles are widely separated after the addition of large amounts of lipid, with one exception: large hexagonal lattices of particles appear in some regions of the membrane. These lattices are identical in appearance with lattices formed from a single purified component of the membrane known as chlorophyll-protein complex II. The suggestion that the presence of such lattices in lipid-enriched membranes reflects a profound rearrangement of photosynthetic structures has been confirmed by analysis of the fluorescence emission spectra of natural and lipid- enriched membranes. Specifically, lipid addition in each of the cases we have studied results in the apparent detachment of chlorophyll- protein complex II from photosynthetic reaction centers. It is concluded that specific arrangements of components in the photosynthetic membrane, necessary for the normal functioning of the membrane in the light reaction of photosynthesis, can be regulated to a large extent by the lipid content of the membrane. PMID:7298712

  7. Feasibility and testing of lighweight, energy efficient, additive manufactured pneumatic control valve

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J.; Mell, Ellen

    2015-02-01

    AeroValve s innovative pneumatic valve technology recycles compressed air through the valve body with each cycle of the valve, and was reported to reduce compressed air requirements by an average of 25% 30%.This technology collaboration project between ORNL and Aerovalve confirms the energy efficiency of valve performance. Measuring air consumption per work completed, the AeroValve was as much as 85% better than the commercial Festo valve.

  8. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: the HIV II protease-Indinavir case.

    PubMed

    Ucisik, Melek N; Dashti, Danial S; Faver, John C; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-08-28

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ∼82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n=3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions. PMID:21895219

  9. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: The HIV II protease-Indinavir case

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Faver, John C.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ∼82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n = 3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions. PMID:21895219

  10. Additions to the spectrum and energy levels and critical compilation of doubly ionized boron, B III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.; Ryabtsev, A. N.; Ekberg, J. O.; Kink, I.; Mannervik, S.; Martinson, I.

    2008-08-01

    We have undertaken the study of the Li-like spectrum of doubly ionized boron, B III. The spectroscopic data have been obtained with beam-foil spectroscopy and high-resolution spark spectroscopy. The experimental work was combined with theoretical calculations using ab initio and semi-empirical techniques. About 50 new transitions have been observed, and most of the previously known lines have been measured with improved accuracy. We have also critically evaluated all previous and recent data for this spectrum. Complete data on wavelengths and energy levels based on this analysis are tabulated.

  11. Yield Improvement and Energy Savings Uing Phosphonates as Additives in Kraft pulping

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrike W. Tschirner; Timothy Smith

    2007-03-31

    Project Objective: Develop a commercially viable modification to the Kraft process resulting in energy savings, increased yield and improved bleachability. Evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a spectrum of wood species used in North America. Develop detailed fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which phosphonates improve KAPPA number and yield. Evaluate the North American market potential for the use of phosphonates in the Kraft pulping process. Examine determinants of customer perceived value and explore organizational and operational factors influencing attitudes and behaviors. Provide an economic feasibility assessment for the supply chain, both suppliers (chemical supply companies) and buyers (Kraft mills). Provide background to most effectively transfer this new technology to commercial mills.

  12. Graph model for calculating the properties of saturated monoalcohols based on the additivity of energy terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebeshkov, V. V.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2012-05-01

    A 16-constant additive scheme was derived for calculating the physicochemical properties of saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O and decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle based on the similarity of subgraphs in the molecular graphs (MGs) of the homologous series of these alcohols. It was shown, using this scheme for calculation of properties of saturated monoalcohols as an example, that each coefficient of the scheme (in other words, the number of methods to impose a chain of a definite length i 1, i 2, … on a molecular graph) is the result of the decomposition of the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle. A linear dependence was found within the adopted classification of structural elements. Sixteen parameters of the schemes were recorded as linear combinations of 17 parameters. The enthalpies of vaporization L {298/K 0} of the saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O, for which there were no experimental data, were calculated. It was shown that the parameters are not chosen randomly when using the given procedure for constructing an additive scheme by decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle.

  13. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-05-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs.

  14. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  15. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  16. Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali

    2013-09-26

    This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne's research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse gas

  17. Talking Speech Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss-Vincent, Jane; Whitford, Gigi

    2002-01-01

    This article presents both the factors involved in successful speech input use and the potential barriers that may suggest that other access technologies could be more appropriate for a given individual. Speech input options that are available are reviewed and strategies for optimizing use of speech recognition technology are discussed. (Contains…

  18. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  19. Development of a New Hypersonic Shock Tunnel Facility to Investigate Electromagnetic Energy Addition for Flow Control and Basic Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, P. G. P.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Chanes, J. B.; Pereira, A. L.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    2006-05-01

    A new 0.6-m. diameter Hypersonic Shock Tunnel is been designed, fabricated and will be installed at the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics IEAv-CTA, Brazil. The brand new hypersonic facility, designated as T3, is primarily intended to be used as an important tool in the investigation of supersonic combustion management and of electromagnetic energy addition for flow control. The design of the runnel enables relatively long test times, 2-10 milliseconds, suitable for basic supersonic combustion and energy addition by laser experiments. Free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25 can be produced and stagnation pressures and temperatures of 200 atm. and 5,500 K, respectively, can be generated. Shadowgraph and schlieren optical techniques will be used for flow visualization and the new facility is expected to be commissioned by the end of 2006.

  20. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... geothermal energy, the energy source must be an inexhaustible energy supply. Accordingly, wood and... approved list of energy-conserving components or renewable energy sources. 1.23-6 Section 1.23-6 Internal... During A Taxable Year § 1.23-6 Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of...

  1. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... geothermal energy, the energy source must be an inexhaustible energy supply. Accordingly, wood and... approved list of energy-conserving components or renewable energy sources. 1.23-6 Section 1.23-6 Internal... During A Taxable Year § 1.23-6 Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of...

  2. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... geothermal energy, the energy source must be an inexhaustible energy supply. Accordingly, wood and... approved list of energy-conserving components or renewable energy sources. 1.23-6 Section 1.23-6 Internal... During A Taxable Year § 1.23-6 Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of...

  3. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  4. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir

    2015-05-01

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/Lα two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol-1. The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol-1.

  5. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir

    2015-05-15

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/L{sup α} two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}. The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}.

  6. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  7. Experimental investigations of the swirling flow in the conical diffuser using flow-feedback control technique with additional energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tǎnasǎ, C.; Bosioc, A. I.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.; Muntean, S.

    2012-11-01

    The previous experimental and numerical investigations of decelerated swirling flows in conical diffusers have demonstrated that water injection along to the axis mitigates the pressure fluctuations associated to the precessing vortex rope [1]. However, for swirling flows similar to Francis turbines operated at partial discharge, the water jet becomes effective when the jet discharge is larger than 10% from the turbine discharge, leading to large volumetric losses when the jet is supplied from upstream the runner. As a result, it was introduced a new approach for supplying the jet by using a fraction of the discharge collected downstream the conical diffuser [2]. This is called flow-feedback control technique (FFCT) and it was investigated experimentally in order to assess its capability [3]. The FFCT approach not requires additional energy to supply the jet. Consequently, the turbine efficiency is not diminished due to the volumetric losses injected even if around 10% of the main flow is used. However, the equivalent amplitude of the pressure pulsations associated to the vortex rope decreases with 30% if 10% jet discharge is applied [3]. Using 12% water jet discharge from upstream then the equivalent amplitude of the pressure pulsations is mitigated with 70% according to Bosioc et al. [4]. In our case, an extra 2% jet discharge is required in order to obtain similar results with FFCT. This extra discharge is provided using an additional energy source. Therefore, the paper presents experimental investigation performed with FFCT with additional energy source. The experimental results obtained with this technique are compared against FFCT and the swirling flow with vortex rope, respectively.

  8. Effect of high energy β-radiation and addition of triallyl isocyanurate on the selected properties of polylactide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Rafał

    2016-06-01

    Comparison of some changes occurring in polylactide (PLA) due to high energy β-radiation and addition of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) was the main objective of the present study. It was found that irradiation of PLA by high energy β-radiation causes essential changes in its properties, that undergoes mainly degradation, to form a porous structure. The PLA degradation can be diminished by introduction into the polymer matrix of a low-molecular mass multifunctional compound like TAIC. Upon the electron radiation, effective crosslinking of PLA by TAIC occurs. Application of TAIC favorably influences hindering of the PLA degradation or, when the doses are very large, diminishes worsening of the PLA functional qualities. It was also found that the optimum crosslinking of PLA is obtained when the electron radiation doses of the range of 40-200 kGy are applied and the amount of TAIC equal 3-5 wt% is used.

  9. Calcium Carbonate Nanoplate Assemblies with Directed High-Energy Facets: Additive-Free Synthesis, High Drug Loading, and Sustainable Releasing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Yu; Xie, Hao; Su, Bao-Lian; Yao, Bin; Yin, Yixia; Li, Shipu; Chen, Fang; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-07-29

    Developing drug delivery systems (DDSs) with high drug-loading capacity and sustainable releasing is critical for long-term chemotherapeutic efficacy, and it still remains challenging. Herein, vaterite CaCO3 nanoplate assemblies with exposed high-energy {001} facets have been synthesized via a novel, additive-free strategy. The product shows a high doxorubicin-loading capacity (65%); the best of all the CaCO3-based DDSs so far. Also, the product's sustainable releasing performance and its inhibition of the initial burst release, together, endow it with long-term drug efficacy. The work may shed light on exposing directed high-energy facets for rationally designing of a drug delivery system with long-term efficacy.

  10. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    PubMed Central

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias; Huson, Vincent; Mamer, Lauren; Kalogreades, Lawrence; ter Veer, Mirelle; Ruiter, Marvin; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The energy required to fuse synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane (‘activation energy’) is considered a major determinant in synaptic efficacy. From reaction rate theory, we predict that a class of modulations exists, which utilize linear modulation of the energy barrier for fusion to achieve supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05531.001 PMID:25871846

  11. Recent Additions in the Modeling Capabilities of an Open-Source Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, N.; Lawson, M.; Yu, Y. H.

    2015-04-20

    WEC-Sim is a midfidelity numerical tool for modeling wave energy conversion devices. The code uses the MATLAB SimMechanics package to solve multibody dynamics and models wave interactions using hydrodynamic coefficients derived from frequency-domain boundary-element methods. This paper presents the new modeling features introduced in the latest release of WEC-Sim. The first feature discussed conversion of the fluid memory kernel to a state-space form. This enhancement offers a substantial computational benefit after the hydrodynamic body-to-body coefficients are introduced and the number of interactions increases exponentially with each additional body. Additional features include the ability to calculate the wave-excitation forces based on the instantaneous incident wave angle, allowing the device to weathervane, as well as import a user-defined wave elevation time series. A review of the hydrodynamic theory for each feature is provided and the successful implementation is verified using test cases.

  12. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  13. Methanol Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Oxide Catalysts: Molecular and Dissociative Routes and Hydrogen Addition Energies as Descriptors of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-13

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanols on oxide catalysts is generally described as involving H-abstraction from alkoxy species formed via O–H dissociation. Kinetic and isotopic data cannot discern between such routes and those involving kinetically-relevant H-abstraction from undissociated alkanols. Here, we combine such experiments with theoretical estimates of activation energies and entropies to show that the latter molecular routes prevail over dissociative routes for methanol reactions on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters at all practical reaction temperatures. The stability of the late transition states that mediate H-abstraction depend predominantly on the stability of the O–H bond formed, making H-addition energies (HAE) accurate and single-valued descriptors of reactivity. Density functional theory-derived activation energies depend linearly on HAE values at each O-atom location on clusters with a range of composition (H3PMo12, H4SiMo12, H3PW12, H4PV1Mo11, and H4PV1W11); both barriers and HAE values reflect the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy of metal centers that accept the electron and the protonation energy of O-atoms that accept the proton involved in the H-atom transfer. Bridging O-atoms form O–H bonds that are stronger than those of terminal atoms and therefore exhibit more negative HAE values and higher ODH reactivity on all POM clusters. For each cluster composition, ODH turnover rates reflect the reactivity-averaged HAE of all accessible O-atoms, which can be evaluated for each cluster composition to provide a rigorous and accurate predictor of ODH reactivity for catalysts with known structure. These relations together with oxidation reactivity measurements can then be used to estimate HAE values and to infer plausible structures for catalysts with uncertain active site structures.

  14. The Addition of a Video Game to Stationary Cycling: The Impact on Energy Expenditure in Overweight Children.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Bryan L; Siegel, Shannon R; Wikin, Linda D

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The prevalence of obesity in children has reached epidemic proportions with over 37% of children aged 6-11 years in the U.S. being classified as "at risk for overweight" or "overweight." Utilization of active video games has been proposed as one possible mechanism to help shift the tide of the obesity epidemic. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if riding a stationary bike that controlled a video game would lead to significantly greater energy expenditure than riding the same bike without the video game connected. METHODS: Twenty children, 7-14 years old, with a BMI classification of "at risk for overweight" or "overweight" participated in this study. Following familiarization, energy expenditure was evaluated while riding a stationary bike for 20 minutes. One test was performed without the addition of a video game and one test with the bike controlling the speed of a car on the video game. RESULTS: Oxygen consumption and energy expenditure were significantly elevated above baseline in both conditions. Energy expenditure was significantly higher while riding the bike as it controlled the video game (4.4 ± 1.2 Kcal·min(-1)) than when riding the bike by itself (3.7 ± 1.1 Kcal·min(-1)) (p<0.05). Perceived exertion was not significantly different between the two sessions (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: Using a stationary bike to control a video game led to greater energy expenditure than riding a stationary bike without the video game and without a related increase in perceived exertion. PMID:19946380

  15. Input-current shaped ac to dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The problem of achieving near unity power factor while supplying power to a dc load from a single phase ac source of power is examined. Power processors for this application must perform three functions: input current shaping, energy storage, and output voltage regulation. The methods available for performing each of these three functions are reviewed. Input current shaping methods are either active or passive, with the active methods divided into buck-like and boost-like techniques. In addition to large reactances, energy storage methods include resonant filters, active filters, and active storage schemes. Fast voltage regulation can be achieved by post regulation or by supplementing the current shaping topology with an extra switch. Some indications of which methods are best suited for particular applications concludes the discussion.

  16. Input characterization of a shock test strructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Hylok, J. E.; Groethe, M. A.; Maupin, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    Often in experimental work, measuring input forces and pressures is a difficult and sometimes impossible task. For one particular shock test article, its input sensitivity required a detailed measurement of the pressure input. This paper discusses the use of a surrogate mass mock test article to measure spatial and temporal variations of the shock input within and between experiments. Also discussed will be the challenges and solutions in making some of the high speed transient measurements. The current input characterization work appears as part of the second phase in an extensive model validation project. During the first phase, the system under analysis displayed sensitivities to the shock input's qualitative and quantitative (magnitude) characteristics. However, multiple shortcomings existed in the characterization of the input. First, the experimental measurements of the input were made on a significantly simplified structure only, and the spatial fidelity of the measurements was minimal. Second, the sensors used for the pressure measurement contained known errors that could not be fully quantified. Finally, the measurements examined only one input pressure path (from contact with the energetic material). Airblast levels from the energetic materials were unknown. The result was a large discrepancy between the energy content in the analysis and experiments.

  17. Additivity and associative effects of metabolizable energy and amino acid digestibility in barley and canola meal for White Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Hong, D; Ragland, D; Adeola, O

    2001-11-01

    An experiment was conducted using the TMEn bioassay method to investigate the additivity and associative effects of metabolizable energy and amino acid digestibility in barley and canola meal for White Pekin ducks. Additivity was tested by comparing the difference between observed values determined in a complete diet and predicted values from measurements determined with individual ingredients (barley and canola meal). Six ducks each were assigned to diets of barley, canola meal, the complete diet, and dextrose. Dextrose-fed ducks were used for estimation of endogenous losses for calculation of true amino acid digestibility. The observed AME, TME, AMEn, and TMEn values in the complete diet were 0.065, 0.083, 0.016, and 0.023 (kcal/g), respectively, numerically higher than predicted values. Differences between observed and predicted values were not significant (P > 0.05), indicating that the AME, AMEn, TME, and TMEn in barley and canola meal were all additive. In general, observed values for apparent amino acid digestibility (AAAD) and true amino acid digestibility (TAAD) in the complete diet were higher than those predicted from individual ingredients. Observed AAAD for lysine, histidine, tryptophan, alanine, and aspartate were higher (P < 0.05) than predicted values, indicating that digestibilities of these amino acids were not additive. The mean of AAAD in canola meal (77.29%) was higher (P < 0.05) than the observed values of barley (52.2%) and complete diet (64.55%). For TAAD values, differences between observed and predicted values were significant for lysine, histidine, and tryptophan (P < 0.05). The mean of TAAD in canola meal, barley, and complete diet were 85.88, 80.87, and 81.33%, respectively. The average difference between observed and predicted values for TAAD (1.18 %) was smaller than that of AAAD (5.41%). These results indicated that ME values for barley and canola meal were additive in the complete diet but that digestibilities of some amino acids

  18. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  19. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  20. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  1. The role of input-output analysis of energy and ecologic systems. In the early development of ecological economics--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A summary is provided of the early history of research on the flow of nonrenewable energy resources through the economy and of the flow of renewable energy resources through a natural ecosystem. The techniques are similar, and many specific applications are provided. A combined economic and ecological technique is also defined. The early history and people of the International Society Ecological Economic are cited.

  2. The role of input-output analysis of energy and ecologic systems. In the early development of ecological economics--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    A summary is provided of the early history of research on the flow of nonrenewable energy resources through the economy and of the flow of renewable energy resources through a natural ecosystem. The techniques are similar, and many specific applications are provided. A combined economic and ecological technique is also defined. The early history and people of the International Society Ecological Economic are cited. PMID:20146760

  3. Two-scale evaluation of remediation technologies for a contaminated site by applying economic input-output life cycle assessment: risk-cost, risk-energy consumption and risk-CO2 emission.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasushi; Katayama, Arata

    2011-09-15

    A two-scale evaluation concept of remediation technologies for a contaminated site was expanded by introducing life cycle costing (LCC) and economic input-output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA). The expanded evaluation index, the rescue number for soil (RN(SOIL)) with LCC and EIO-LCA, comprises two scales, such as risk-cost, risk-energy consumption or risk-CO(2) emission of a remediation. The effectiveness of RN(SOIL) with LCC and EIO-LCA was examined in a typical contamination and remediation scenario in which dieldrin contaminated an agricultural field. Remediation was simulated using four technologies: disposal, high temperature thermal desorption, biopile and landfarming. Energy consumption and CO(2) emission were determined from a life cycle inventory analysis using monetary-based intensity based on an input-output table. The values of RN(SOIL) based on risk-cost, risk-energy consumption and risk-CO(2) emission were calculated, and then rankings of the candidates were compiled according to RN(SOIL) values. A comparison between three rankings showed the different ranking orders. The existence of differences in ranking order indicates that the scales would not have reciprocal compatibility for two-scale evaluation and that each scale should be used independently. The RN(SOIL) with LCA will be helpful in selecting a technology, provided an appropriate scale is determined.

  4. Demonstration of the Recent Additions in Modeling Capabilities for the WEC-Sim Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, N.; Lawson, M.; Yu, Y. H.

    2015-03-01

    WEC-Sim is a mid-fidelity numerical tool for modeling wave energy conversion (WEC) devices. The code uses the MATLAB SimMechanics package to solve the multi-body dynamics and models the wave interactions using hydrodynamic coefficients derived from frequency domain boundary element methods. In this paper, the new modeling features introduced in the latest release of WEC-Sim will be presented. The first feature discussed is the conversion of the fluid memory kernel to a state-space approximation that provides significant gains in computational speed. The benefit of the state-space calculation becomes even greater after the hydrodynamic body-to-body coefficients are introduced as the number of interactions increases exponentially with the number of floating bodies. The final feature discussed is the capability toadd Morison elements to provide additional hydrodynamic damping and inertia. This is generally used as a tuning feature, because performance is highly dependent on the chosen coefficients. In this paper, a review of the hydrodynamic theory for each of the features is provided and successful implementation is verified using test cases.

  5. Arctic science input wanted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Arctic Research and Policy Act (Eos, June 26, 1984, p. 412) was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan this past July. One of its objectives is to develop a 5-year research plan for the Arctic. A request for input to this plan is being issued this week to nearly 500 people in science, engineering, and industry.To promote Arctic research and to recommend research policy in the Arctic, the new law establishes a five-member Arctic Research Commission, to be appointed by the President, and establishes an Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, to be composed of representatives from nearly a dozen agencies having interests in the region. The commission will make policy recommendations, and the interagency committee will implement those recommendations. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has been designated as the lead agency of the interagency committee.

  6. Integrated Autopilot/Autothrottle Based on a Total Energy Control Concept: Design and Evaluation of Additional Autopilot Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    An integrated autopilot/autothrottle system was designed using a total energy control design philosophy. This design ensures that the system can differentiate between maneuvers requiring a change in thrust to accomplish a net energy change, and those maneuvers which only require elevator control to redistribute energy. The system design, the development of the system, and a summary of simulation results are defined.

  7. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  8. Input in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan M., Ed.; Madden, Carolyn G., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "When Does Teacher Talk Work as Input?"; "Cultural Input in Second Language Learning"; "Skilled Variation in a Kindergarten Teacher's Use of Foreigner Talk"; "Teacher-Pupil Interaction in Second Language Development"; "Foreigner Talk in the University Classroom"; "Input and Interaction in the…

  9. Intensive Input in Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimino, Andy; Ferguson, Nancy

    This paper discusses the role of input as one of the universals in second language acquisition theory. Considerations include how language instructors can best organize and present input and when certain kinds of input are more important. A self-administered program evaluation exercise using relevant theoretical and methodological contributions…

  10. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A novel input filter compensation scheme for a buck regulator that eliminates the interaction between the input filter output impedance and the regulator control loop is presented. The scheme is implemented using a feedforward loop that senses the input filter state variables and uses this information to modulate the duty cycle signal. The feedforward design process presented is seen to be straightforward and the feedforward easy to implement. Extensive experimental data supported by analytical results show that significant performance improvement is achieved with the use of feedforward in the following performance categories: loop stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance and transient response. The use of feedforward results in isolating the switching regulator from its power source thus eliminating all interaction between the regulator and equipment upstream. In addition the use of feedforward removes some of the input filter design constraints and makes the input filter design process simpler thus making it possible to optimize the input filter. The concept of feedforward compensation can also be extended to other types of switching regulators.

  11. INGEN: A COBRA-NC input generator user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    The INGEN (INput GENerator) computer program has been developed as a preprocessor to simplify input generation for the COBRA-NC computer program. INGEN uses several empirical correlations and geometric assumptions to simplify the data input requirements for the COBRA-NC computer code. The simplified input scheme is obtained at the expense of much flexibility provided by COBRA-NC. For more complex problems requiring additional flexibility however, INGEN may be used to provide a skeletal input file to which the more detailed input may be added. This report describes the input requirements for INGEN and describes the algorithms and correlations used to generate the COBRA-NC input. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  13. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  14. SDR input power estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, J. C.; Nappier, J. M.

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  15. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  16. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  17. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  18. Characterisation of vibration input to flywheel used on urban bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Kanarachos, S.; Christensen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Vibration induced from road surface has an impact on the durability and reliability of electrical and mechanical components attached on the vehicle. There is little research published relevant to the durability assessment of a flywheel energy recovery system installed on city and district buses. Relevant international standards and legislations were reviewed and large discrepancy was found among them, in addition, there are no standards exclusively developed for kinetic energy recovery systems on vehicles. This paper describes the experimentation of assessment of road surface vibration input to the flywheel on a bus as obtained at the MIRA Proving Ground. Power density spectra have been developed based on the raw data obtained during the experimentation. Validation of this model will be carried out using accelerated life time tests that will be carried out on a shaker rig using an accumulated profile based on the theory of fatigue damage equivalence in time and frequency domain aligned with the model predictions.

  19. Example of input-output analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The thirty sectors included in the ECASTAR energy input-output model were listed. Five of these belong to energy producing sectors, fifteen to manufacturing industries, two to residential and commercial sectors, and eight to service industries. The model is capable of tracing impacts of an action in three dimensions: dollars, BTU's of energy, and labor. Four conservation actions considered were listed and then discussed separately, dealing with the following areas: increase in fuel efficiency, reduction in fuel used by the transportation and warehousing group, manufacturing of smaller automobiles, and a communications/transportation trade-off.

  20. Additions to the spectra and energy levels of the zinc-like ions Y X-Cd XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litzén, Ulf; Hansson, Anna

    1989-10-01

    Transitions from 4p4d 1F and 3F have been identified in the spectra Y X-Cd XIX emitted from laserproduced plasmas. Energy levels have been derived, and the term structure has been studied with special emphasis on the 4s4f-4p4d configuration interaction.

  1. Biogenic inputs to ocean mixing.

    PubMed

    Katija, Kakani

    2012-03-15

    Recent studies have evoked heated debate about whether biologically generated (or biogenic) fluid disturbances affect mixing in the ocean. Estimates of biogenic inputs have shown that their contribution to ocean mixing is of the same order as winds and tides. Although these estimates are intriguing, further study using theoretical, numerical and experimental techniques is required to obtain conclusive evidence of biogenic mixing in the ocean. Biogenic ocean mixing is a complex problem that requires detailed understanding of: (1) marine organism behavior and characteristics (i.e. swimming dynamics, abundance and migratory behavior), (2) mechanisms utilized by swimming animals that have the ability to mix stratified fluids (i.e. turbulence and fluid drift) and (3) knowledge of the physical environment to isolate contributions of marine organisms from other sources of mixing. In addition to summarizing prior work addressing the points above, observations on the effect of animal swimming mode and body morphology on biogenic fluid transport will also be presented. It is argued that to inform the debate on whether biogenic mixing can contribute to ocean mixing, our studies should focus on diel vertical migrators that traverse stratified waters of the upper pycnocline. Based on our understanding of mixing mechanisms, body morphologies, swimming modes and body orientation, combined with our knowledge of vertically migrating populations of animals, it is likely that copepods, krill and some species of gelatinous zooplankton and fish have the potential to be strong sources of biogenic mixing. PMID:22357597

  2. 77 FR 59393 - Jordan Cove Energy Project LP; Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline LP; Notice of Additional Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... Additional Public Scoping Meetings for the Jordan Cove Liquefaction and Pacific Connector Pipeline Projects... (Jordan Cove) proposed liquefaction project in Coos County, Oregon, in Docket No. PF12-7-000, and Pacific... Environmental Impact Statement for the Planned Jordan Cove Liquefaction and Pacific Connector Pipeline...

  3. Application of the mathematical Graf's addition theorem to the problem of electron energy absorption in laser-irradiated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    The electron energy absorption in laser-irradiated plasma is determined by the sum of the rates of photon absorption and emission. These rates contain the square of the Bessel functions. It was shown that in a moderate laser field, terms with absorption and emission of several photons are large, but cancel exactly each other. Therefore, we should take into account terms with the absorption and emission of only one laser photon. This statement is proved analytically using Graf's theorem for Bessel functions.

  4. Influence of magnetospheric inputs definition on modeling of ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchilin, A. V.; Romanova, E. B.; Kurkin, V. I.

    Usually for numerical modeling of ionospheric storms corresponding empirical models specify parameters of neutral atmosphere and magnetosphere. Statistical kind of these models renders them impractical for simulation of the individual storm. Therefore one has to correct the empirical models using various additional speculations. The influence of magnetospheric inputs such as distributions of electric potential, number and energy fluxes of the precipitating electrons on the results of the ionospheric storm simulations has been investigated in this work. With this aim for the strong geomagnetic storm on September 25, 1998 hour global distributions of those magnetospheric inputs from 20 to 27 September were calculated by the magnetogram inversion technique (MIT). Then with the help of 3-D ionospheric model two variants of ionospheric response to this magnetic storm were simulated using MIT data and empirical models of the electric fields (Sojka et al., 1986) and electron precipitations (Hardy et al., 1985). The comparison of the received results showed that for high-latitude and subauroral stations the daily variations of electron density calculated with MIT data are more close to observations than those of empirical models. In addition using of the MIT data allows revealing some peculiarities in the daily variations of electron density during strong geomagnetic storm. References Sojka J.J., Rasmussen C.E., Schunk R.W. J.Geophys.Res., 1986, N10, p.11281. Hardy D.A., Gussenhoven M.S., Holeman E.A. J.Geophys.Res., 1985, N5, p.4229.

  5. Investigation of the oxidation states of Cu additive in colored borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Guang Cheng, Shaodong; Li, Chao; Ma, Chuansheng; Zhong, Jiasong; Xiang, Weidong; Wang, Zhao

    2014-12-14

    Three optically transparent colorful (red, green, and blue) glasses were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Nano-sized precipitates were found in scanning electron microscopy images. The precipitates were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The measured lattice parameters of these precipitates were found to fit the metallic copper in red glass but deviate from single valenced Cu oxides in green and blue glasses. The chemistry of these nano-sized particles was confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By fitting the EELS spectra obtained from the precipitates with the linear combination of reference spectra from Cu reference compounds, the oxidation states of Cu in the precipitates have been derived. First principle calculations suggested that the Cu nano-particles, which are in the similar oxidation states as our measurement, would show green color in the visible light range.

  6. Partitioning of dietary energy of chickens fed maize- or wheat-based diets with and without a commercial blend of phytogenic feed additives.

    PubMed

    Pirgozliev, V; Beccaccia, A; Rose, S P; Bravo, D

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a standardized mixture of a commercial blend of phytogenic feed additives containing 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum on utilization of dietary energy and performance in broiler chickens. Four experimental diets were offered to the birds from 7 to 21 d of age. These included 2 basal control diets based on either wheat or maize that contained 215 g CP/kg and 12.13 MJ/kg ME and another 2 diets using the basal control diets supplemented with the plant extracts combination at 100 mg/kg diet. Each diet was fed to 16 individually penned birds following randomization. Dietary plant extracts improved feed intake and weight gain (P < 0.05) and slightly (P < 0.1) improved feed efficiency of birds fed the maize-based diet. Supplementary plant extracts did not change dietary ME (P > 0.05) but improved (P < 0.05) dietary NE by reducing the heat increment (P < 0.05) per kilogram feed intake. Feeding phytogenics improved (P < 0.05) total carcass energy retention and the efficiency of dietary ME for carcass energy retention. The number of interactions between type of diet and supplementary phytogenic feed additive suggest that the chemical composition and the energy to protein ratio of the diet may influence the efficiency of phytogenics when fed to chickens. The experiment showed that although supplementary phytogenic additives did not affect dietary ME, they caused a significant improvement in the utilization of dietary energy for carcass energy retention but this did not always relate to growth performance.

  7. Input impedance of microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Bailey, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Using Richmond's reaction integral equation, an expression is derived for the input impedance of microstrip patch antennas excited by either a microstrip line or a coaxial probe. The effects of the finite substrate thickness, a dielectric protective cover, and associated surface waves are properly included by the use of the exact dyadic Green's function. Using the present formulation the input impedance of a rectangular microstrip antenna is determined and compared with experimental and earlier calculated results.

  8. Nonlinear input-output systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Luksic, Mladen; Su, Renjeng

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions that the nonlinear system dot-x = f(x) + ug(x) and y = h(x) be locally feedback equivalent to the controllable linear system dot-xi = A xi + bv and y = C xi having linear output are found. Only the single input and single output case is considered, however, the results generalize to multi-input and multi-output systems.

  9. Input design for identification of aircraft stability and control derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for designing inputs to identify stability and control derivatives from flight test data is presented. This approach is based on finding inputs which provide the maximum possible accuracy of derivative estimates. Two techniques of input specification are implemented for this objective - a time domain technique and a frequency domain technique. The time domain technique gives the control input time history and can be used for any allowable duration of test maneuver, including those where data lengths can only be of short duration. The frequency domain technique specifies the input frequency spectrum, and is best applied for tests where extended data lengths, much longer than the time constants of the modes of interest, are possible. These technqiues are used to design inputs to identify parameters in longitudinal and lateral linear models of conventional aircraft. The constraints of aircraft response limits, such as on structural loads, are realized indirectly through a total energy constraint on the input. Tests with simulated data and theoretical predictions show that the new approaches give input signals which can provide more accurate parameter estimates than can conventional inputs of the same total energy. Results obtained indicate that the approach has been brought to the point where it should be used on flight tests for further evaluation.

  10. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  11. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  12. Input-anticipating critical reservoirs show power law forgetting of unexpected input events.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Norbert Michael

    2015-05-01

    Usually reservoir computing shows an exponential memory decay. This letter investigates under which circumstances echo state networks can show a power law forgetting. That means traces of earlier events can be found in the reservoir for very long time spans. Such a setting requires critical connectivity exactly at the limit of what is permissible according to the echo state condition. However, for general matrices, the limit cannot be determined exactly from theory. In addition, the behavior of the network is strongly influenced by the input flow. Results are presented that use certain types of restricted recurrent connectivity and anticipation learning with regard to the input, where power law forgetting can indeed be achieved.

  13. Additional correction for energy transfer efficiency calculation in filter-based Förster resonance energy transfer microscopy for more accurate results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2010-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is commonly used to monitor protein interactions with filter-based imaging systems, which require spectral bleedthrough (or cross talk) correction to accurately measure energy transfer efficiency (E). The double-label (donor+acceptor) specimen is excited with the donor wavelength, the acceptor emission provided the uncorrected FRET signal and the donor emission (the donor channel) represents the quenched donor (qD), the basis for the E calculation. Our results indicate this is not the most accurate determination of the quenched donor signal as it fails to consider the donor spectral bleedthrough (DSBT) signals in the qD for the E calculation, which our new model addresses, leading to a more accurate E result. This refinement improves E comparisons made with lifetime and spectral FRET imaging microscopy as shown here using several genetic (FRET standard) constructs, where cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins are tethered by different amino acid linkers.

  14. Circadian light-input pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Taishi; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Light is the most important environmental cue to entrain the circadian clock in most animals. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the light entrainment mechanisms of the clock have been well-studied. The Drosophila brain contains approximately 150 neurons that rhythmically express circadian clock genes. These neurons are called "clock neurons" and control behavioral activity rhythms. Many clock neurons express the Cryptochrome (CRY) protein, which is sensitive to UV and blue light, and thus enables clock neurons deep in the brain to directly perceive light. In addition to the CRY protein, external photoreceptors in the Drosophila eyes play an important role in circadian light-input pathways. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that integrate these light inputs into the circadian network of the brain. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the light entrainment pathways in the Drosophila circadian clock. PMID:27066180

  15. Residential oil burners with low input and two stages firing

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.; Krajewski, R.; Leigh, R.

    1997-12-31

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized, retention head burner. At low firing rates pressure atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low pressure air-atomized burner has been developed watch can operate at fining rates as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low fining rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a side-wall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space heating loads.

  16. Design of the spoke cavity ED&D input coupler.

    SciTech Connect

    Schmierer, E. N.; Chan, K. D.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Haynes, W. B.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Montoya, D. I.; Roybal, P. L.; Schrage, D. L.; Tajima, T.

    2001-01-01

    The current design of the Accelerator Driven Test Facility (ADTF) accelerator contains multiple {beta}, superconducting, resonant cavities. Spoke-type resonators ({beta} = 0.175 and {beta} = 0.34) are proposed for the low energy linac immediately following the radio frequency quadrupole. A continuous wave power requirement of 8.5 - 211.8 kW, 350 MHz has been established for the input couplers of these spoke cavities. The coupler design approach was to have a single input coupler design for beam currents of 13.3 mA and 100 mA and both cavity {beta}'s. The baseline design consists of a half-height WR2300 waveguide section merged with a shorted coaxial conductor. At the transition is a 4.8-mm thick cylindrical ceramic window creating the air/vacuum barrier. The coax is 103-mm inner diameter, 75 Ohm. The coax extends from the short through the waveguide and terminates with an antenna tip in the sidewall of the cavity. A full diameter pumping port is located in the quarter-wave stub to facilitate good vacuum. The coaxial geometry chosen was based on multipacting and thermal design considerations. The coupling coefficient is adjusted by statically adjusting the outer conductor length. The RF-physics, thermal, vacuum, and structural design considerations will be discussed in this paper, in addition to future room temperature testing plans.

  17. Effect of Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions on the energy spectrum, chemical potential, addition energy and spin-splitting in a many-electron parabolic GaAs quantum dot in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-11-01

    The effect of electron-electron interaction and the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on the electronic properties of a many-electron system in a parabolically confined quantum dot placed in an external magnetic field is studied. With a simple and physically reasonable model potential for electron-electron interaction term, the problem is solved exactly to second-order in the spin-orbit coupling constants to obtain the energy spectrum, the chemical potential, addition energy and the spin-splitting energy.

  18. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  19. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  20. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  1. Input in an Institutional Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen; Hartford, Beverly S.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the nature of input available to learners in the institutional setting of the academic advising session. Results indicate that evidence for the realization of speech acts, positive evidence from peers and status unequals, the effect of stereotypes, and limitations of a learner's pragmatic and grammatical competence are influential…

  2. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  3. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  4. Input/output interface module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozyazici, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    Module detects level changes in any of its 16 inputs, transfers changes to its outputs, and generates interrupts when changes are detected. Up to four changes-in-state per line are stored for later retrieval by controlling computer. Using standard TTL logic, module fits 19-inch rack-mounted console.

  5. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

  6. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for hydrogen atom addition to N2 - Implications for the unimolecular lifetime of HN2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Duchovic, Ronald J.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from CASSCF externally contracted CI ab initio computations of the minimum-energy path for the addition of H to N2. The theoretical basis and numerical implementation of the computations are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The zero-point-corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation is estimated as 8.5 kcal/mol, and the lifetime of the lowest-lying quasi-bound vibrational state of HN2 is found to be between 88 psec and 5.8 nsec (making experimental observation of this species very difficult).

  7. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  8. Effects of Input Noise on a Simple Biochemical Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Kessler, David A.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2011-09-01

    Many biological processes are controlled by biomolecular switches which themselves are regulated by various upstream chemical molecules (the input). Understanding how input noise affects the output stochastic switching process is of significant interest in various biophysical systems like gene regulation, chemosensing, and cell motility. Here, we propose an exactly solvable model where the noisy input signal arises from a simple birth-death process and directly regulates the transition rates of a downstream switch. We solve the joint master equations to analyze the statistical properties of the output switching process. Our results suggest that the conventional wisdom of an additive input-output noise rule fails to describe signaling systems containing a single molecular switch, and, instead, the most important effect of input noise is to effectively reduce the on rate of the switch.

  9. Bayesian approach to neural-network modeling with input uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Wright, W A

    1999-01-01

    It is generally assumed when using Bayesian inference methods for neural networks that the input data contains no noise or corruption. For real-world (errors in variable) problems this is clearly an unsafe assumption. This paper presents a Bayesian neural-network framework which allows for input noise provided that some model of the noise process exists. In the limit where the noise process is small and symmetric it is shown, using the Laplace approximation, that this method gives an additional term to the usual Bayesian error bar which depends on the variance of the input noise process. Further by treating the true (noiseless) input as a hidden variable and sampling this jointly with the network's weights, using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, it is demonstrated that it is possible to infer the regression over the noiseless input.

  10. Alternative energy sources and new energy technologies for Turkish rural areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ultanir, M.O.

    1983-12-01

    Modern agriculture is an energy consumer sector, also agriculture is an energy conversion process. In addition to biomass energy's raw materials are harvested by agriculture. The concept of energy in agriculture, energy is one of the main and outstanding factor which renders the realization of the overall development of the agriculture and rural areas. Agricultural income depends on total mechanical power in agricultural mechanization; general energy consumption of rural sector; cultural energy consumption by agricultural inputs which are fertilizer, pesticides, indirect energy in machinery, irrigation equipments, buildings and other services; direct energy consumption in agricultural mechanization which are fuel and electricity etc. In general, energy input in the rural areas is classified as direct and indirect. Direct energy input reflects demands for mechanical energy, electrical energy and heat energy. Indirect energy consists of inputs which have been produced by industrial sector and introduced into rural sector. Although conventional energy sources, especially petroleum products are used in meeting direct energy input requirements, alternative energy sources may be used as well in this respect. Especially emphasis is being given to new and renewable alternative sources for heat and electrical energy requirements.

  11. Input states for quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrist, A.; White, A.G.; Munro, W.J.

    2003-04-01

    We examine three possible implementations of nondeterministic linear optical controlled NOT gates with a view to an in-principle demonstration in the near future. To this end we consider demonstrating the gates using currently available sources, such as spontaneous parametric down conversion and coherent states, and current detectors only able to distinguish between zero and many photons. The demonstration is possible in the coincidence basis and the errors introduced by the nonoptimal input states and detectors are analyzed.

  12. Structural response and input identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, G. D.; Callahan, J. C.; Mcelman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Three major goals were delineated: (1) to develop a general method for determining the response of a structure to combined base and acoustic random excitation: (2) to develop parametric relationships to aid in the design of plates which are subjected to random force or random base excitation: (3) to develop a method to identify the individual acoustic and base input to a structure with only a limited number of measurement channels, when both types of excitation act simultaneously.

  13. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  14. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies.

  15. WORM: A general-purpose input deck specification language

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.

    1999-07-01

    Using computer codes to perform criticality safety calculations has become common practice in the industry. The vast majority of these codes use simple text-based input decks to represent the geometry, materials, and other parameters that describe the problem. However, the data specified in input files are usually processed results themselves. For example, input decks tend to require the geometry specification in linear dimensions and materials in atom or weight fractions, while the parameter of interest might be mass or concentration. The calculations needed to convert from the item of interest to the required parameter in the input deck are usually performed separately and then incorporated into the input deck. This process of calculating, editing, and renaming files to perform a simple parameter study is tedious at best. In addition, most computer codes require dimensions to be specified in centimeters, while drawings or other materials used to create the input decks might be in other units. This also requires additional calculation or conversion prior to composition of the input deck. These additional calculations, while extremely simple, introduce a source for error in both the calculations and transcriptions. To overcome these difficulties, WORM (Write One, Run Many) was created. It is an easy-to-use programming language to describe input decks and can be used with any computer code that uses standard text files for input. WORM is available, via the Internet, at worm.lanl.gov. A user's guide, tutorials, example models, and other WORM-related materials are also available at this Web site. Questions regarding WORM should be directed to worm{at}lanl.gov.

  16. Functionalisation of graphene by edge-halogenation and radical addition using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon models: edge electron density-binding energy relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amarjeet; Mishra, P. C.

    2015-04-01

    Structures and properties of functionalised graphene were investigated using several derivatives of some small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) taken as finite size models employing unrestricted density functional theory. The functionalisation reactions included fluorination or chlorination of all the edge carbon sites, addition of H, F or Cl atom, OH or OOH group at the different sites and addition of OH or OOH group at the different sites of the edge-halogenated PAHs. σ-inductive effects of fluorine and chlorine in the edge-fluorinated and edge-chlorinated PAHs, respectively, were found to affect electron density and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distributions significantly. σ-holes were located at the MEP surfaces along the CH and CCl bonds of the unmodified and edge-chlorinated PAHs, respectively. The H and F atoms and the OH group were found to add to all the carbon sites of PAHs exothermically, while addition of the Cl atom and the OOH group was found to be exothermic at a few carbon sites and endothermic at the other carbon sites. Enhanced electron densities at the edge carbon sites of the PAHs and binding energies of adducts of H and F atoms and the OH group at these sites were found to be linearly correlated.

  17. Input from Key Stakeholders in the National Security Technology Incubator

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-31

    This report documents the input from key stakeholders of the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) in developing a new technology incubator and related programs for southern New Mexico. The technology incubator is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes identification of key stakeholders as well as a description and analysis of their input for the development of an incubator.

  18. Reconstruction of dynamic structural inputs in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Solomon, O.M. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    This report describes a technique to reconstruct dynamic structural inputs by deconvolution of measured data. The structure to which this technique has been applied is a mild steel bar (3 in diameter and 60 in. long) with a conical nose which provides some geometric simulation of penetrating structures which are used in field test. The deconvolution technique successfully reconstructs dynamic inputs to the bar with and without additive white noise present in the measured response.

  19. Effect of the addition of β-mannanase on the performance, metabolizable energy, amino acid digestibility coefficients, and immune functions of broilers fed different nutritional levels

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, H. C.; Hannas, M. I.; Albino, L. F. T.; Rostagno, H. S.; Neme, R.; Faria, B. D.; Xavier, M. L.; Rennó, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of β-mannanase (BM) supplementation on the performance, metabolizable energy, amino acid digestibility, and immune function of broilers. A total of 1,600 broilers were randomly distributed in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement (4 nutritional levels × 0 or 500 g/ton BM), with 10 replicates and 20 broilers per pen. The same design was used in the energy and digestibility experiments with 8 and 6 replicates, respectively, and 6 broilers per pen. The nutritional levels (NL) were formulated to meet the nutritional requirements of broilers (NL1); reductions of 100 kcal metabolizable energy (NL2); 3% of the total amino acids (NL3); and 100 kcal metabolizable energy and 3% total amino acids (NL4) from NL1. The serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentration was determined in two broilers per pen, and these broilers were slaughtered to determine the relative weight of spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius. Throughout the experiment, the lower nutritional levels reduced (P < 0.05) body weight gain (BWG) and increased (P < 0.05) feed conversion (FCR) for the NL4 treatment. The BM increased (P < 0.05) the BWG values and improved (P < 0.05) the FCR of the broilers. The apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn) values were reduced (P < 0.05) for NL2 and NL3. The BM increased (P < 0.05) the AMEn values and reduced (P < 0.05) the excreted nitrogen. NL3 and NL4 reduced (P < 0.05) the true ileal digestibility coefficients (TIDc) of the amino acids cystine and glycine, and BM increased (P < 0.05) the TIDc for all amino acids. The addition of BM reduced (P < 0.05) the relative weights of the spleen and bursa. NL2 increased (P < 0.05) the Ig values, whereas BM reduced (P < 0.05) the serum IgA, IgG, and IgM values of the broilers. This study indicates that using suboptimal nutrient levels leads to losses in production parameters, whereas BM-supplemented diets were effective in improving performance, energy

  20. A Theoretical Investigation of the Input Characteristics of a Rectangular Cavity-Backed Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Equations which represent the magnetic and electric stored energies are derived for an infinite section of rectangular waveguide and a rectangular cavity. These representations which are referred to as being physically observable are obtained by considering the difference in the volume integrals appearing in the complex Poynting theorem. It is shown that the physically observable stored energies are determined by the field components that vanish in a reference plane outside the aperture. These physically observable representations are used to compute the input admittance of a rectangular cavity-backed slot antenna in which a single propagating wave is assumed to exist in the cavity. The slot is excited by a voltage source connected across its center; a sinusoidal distribution is assumed in the slot. Input-admittance calculations are compared with measured data. In addition, input-admittance curves as a function of electrical slot length are presented for several size cavities. For the rectangular cavity backed slot antenna, the quality factor and relative bandwidth were computed independently by using these energy relationships. It is shown that the asymptotic relationship which is usually assumed to exist between the quality bandwidth and the reciprocal of relative bandwidth is equally valid for the rectangular cavity backed slot antenna.

  1. Optimal input shaping for Fisher identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberger, Michael J.

    This dissertation examines the fundamental challenge of optimally shaping input trajectories to maximize parameter identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models. Identifiability is a property from information theory that determines the solvability of parameter estimation for mathematical models using input-output measurements. This dissertation creates a framework that exploits the Fisher information metric to quantify the level of battery parameter identifiability, optimizes this metric through input shaping, and facilitates faster and more accurate estimation. The popularity of lithium-ion batteries is growing significantly in the energy storage domain, especially for stationary and transportation applications. While these cells have excellent power and energy densities, they are plagued with safety and lifespan concerns. These concerns are often resolved in the industry through conservative current and voltage operating limits, which reduce the overall performance and still lack robustness in detecting catastrophic failure modes. New advances in automotive battery management systems mitigate these challenges through the incorporation of model-based control to increase performance, safety, and lifespan. To achieve these goals, model-based control requires accurate parameterization of the battery model. While many groups in the literature study a variety of methods to perform battery parameter estimation, a fundamental issue of poor parameter identifiability remains apparent for lithium-ion battery models. This fundamental challenge of battery identifiability is studied extensively in the literature, and some groups are even approaching the problem of improving the ability to estimate the model parameters. The first approach is to add additional sensors to the battery to gain more information that is used for estimation. The other main approach is to shape the input trajectories to increase the amount of information that can be gained from input

  2. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  3. The recovery of the polymerizability of Lys-61-labelled actin by the addition of phalloidin. Fluorescence polarization and resonance-energy-transfer measurements.

    PubMed

    Miki, M

    1987-04-01

    Modification of Lys-61 in actin with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) blocks actin polymerization [Burtnick, L. D. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 791, 57-62]. FITC-labelled actin recovered its ability to polymerize on addition of phalloidin. The polymers had the same characteristic helical thread-like structure as normal F-actin and the addition of myosin subfragment-1 to the polymers formed the characteristic arrowhead structure in electron microscopy. The polymers activated the ATPase activity of myosin subfragment-1 as efficiently as normal F-actin. These results indicate that Lys-61 is not directly involved in an actin-actin binding region nor in myosin binding site. From static fluorescence polarization measurements, the rotational relaxation time of FITC-labelled actin filaments was calculated to be 20 ns as the value reduced in water at 20 degrees C, while any rotational relaxation time of 1,5-IAEDANS bound to Cys-374 on F-actin in the presence of a twofold molar excess of phalloidin could not be detected by static polarization measurements under the same conditions. This indicates that the Lys-61 side chain is extremely mobile even in the filamentous structure. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the donor 1,5-IAEDANS bound to SH1 of myosin subfragment-1 and the acceptor fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate bound to Lys-61 of actin in the rigor complex was measured. The transfer efficiency was 0.39 +/- 0.05 which corresponds to the distance of 5.2 +/- 0.1 nm, assuming that the energy donor and acceptor rotate rapidly relative to the fluorescence lifetime and that the transfer occurs between a single donor and an acceptor.

  4. Early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition and ontogenetic changes in muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout: short- and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Alami-Durante, Hélène; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Duval, Carine; Maunas, Patrick; Girod-David, Virginia; Médale, Françoise

    2014-09-14

    As the understanding of the nutritional regulation of muscle growth mechanisms in fish is fragmentary, the present study aimed to (1) characterise ontogenetic changes in muscle growth-related genes in parallel to changes in muscle cellularity; (2) determine whether an early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition affects the muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) alevins; and (3) determine whether this early feeding of a high-fat (HF) diet to alevins had a long-term effect on muscle growth processes in juveniles fed a commercial diet. Developmental regulation of hyperplasia and hypertrophy was evidenced at the molecular (expression of myogenic regulatory factors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and myosin heavy chains (MHC)) and cellular (number and diameter of white muscle fibres) levels. An early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition stimulated the body growth of alevins but led to a fatty phenotype, with accumulation of lipids in the anterior part, and less caudal muscle when compared at similar body weights, due to a decrease in both the white muscle hyperplasia and maximum hypertrophy of white muscle fibres. These HF diet-induced cellular changes were preceded by a very rapid down-regulation of the expression of fast-MHC. The present study also demonstrated that early dietary composition had a long-term effect on the subsequent muscle growth processes of juveniles fed a commercial diet for 3 months. When compared at similar body weights, initially HF diet-fed juveniles indeed had a lower mean diameter of white muscle fibres, a smaller number of large white muscle fibres, and lower expression levels of MyoD1 and myogenin. These findings demonstrated the strong effect of early feed composition on the muscle growth mechanisms of trout alevins and juveniles.

  5. Additional hemodynamic measurements with an esophageal Doppler monitor: a preliminary report of compliance, force, kinetic energy, and afterload in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Glen; Brealey, David; Dhar, Sunil; Dikta, Gerhard; Singer, Meryvn

    2012-12-01

    The esophageal Doppler monitor (EDM) is a minimally-invasive hemodynamic device which evaluates both cardiac output (CO), and fluid status, by estimating stroke volume (SV) and calculating heart rate (HR). The measurement of these parameters is based upon a continuous and accurate approximation of distal thoracic aortic blood flow. Furthermore, the peak velocity (PV) and mean acceleration (MA), of aortic blood flow at this anatomic location, are also determined by the EDM. The purpose of this preliminary report is to examine additional clinical hemodynamic calculations of: compliance (C), kinetic energy (KE), force (F), and afterload (TSVR(i)). These data were derived using both velocity-based measurements, provided by the EDM, as well as other contemporaneous physiologic parameters. Data were obtained from anesthetized patients undergoing surgery or who were in a critical care unit. A graphical inspection of these measurements is presented and discussed with respect to each patient's clinical situation. When normalized to each of their initial values, F and KE both consistently demonstrated more discriminative power than either PV or MA. The EDM offers additional applications for hemodynamic monitoring. Further research regarding the accuracy, utility, and limitations of these parameters is therefore indicated.

  6. Statistical plant set estimation using Schroeder-phased multisinusoidal input design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A frequency domain method is developed for plant set estimation. The estimation of a plant 'set' rather than a point estimate is required to support many methods of modern robust control design. The approach here is based on using a Schroeder-phased multisinusoid input design which has the special property of placing input energy only at the discrete frequency points used in the computation. A detailed analysis of the statistical properties of the frequency domain estimator is given, leading to exact expressions for the probability distribution of the estimation error, and many important properties. It is shown that, for any nominal parametric plant estimate, one can use these results to construct an overbound on the additive uncertainty to any prescribed statistical confidence. The 'soft' bound thus obtained can be used to replace 'hard' bounds presently used in many robust control analysis and synthesis methods.

  7. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  8. Tilt compensated MOEMS projector as input device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüger, Heinrich; Heberer, Andreas; Gerwig, Christian; Nauber, Petra; Scholles, Michael; Lakner, Hubert

    2007-02-01

    Silicon micro machining once headed into two directions: MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) based sensors like accelerometers and gyroscopes on the one hand, MOEMS (micro opto electro mechanical systems) based actuators like scanner mirrors on the other hand. Now both directions meet again: A tilt compensated projector module uses a two dimensional excited scanner mirror as well as accelerometers and gyroscopes. The projector module can have a minimum size of 30 x 15 x 15 mm 3 with a monochrome red laser source (λ = 635 nm). It reaches a resolution of 640 x 480 pixels (VGA) and a frame rate of 50fps. Colour projection requires lager size due to the lack of compact green laser sources. The tilt and roll angles are measured statically by a three axes accelerometer, fast movement is detected dynamically by three single axis gyroscopes. Thus tilt of the projection systems was compensated successfully. The dynamic range was set to 300 x 300 pixels for sufficient system dynamic. Furthermore the motion detection was used to achieve control and input device functions. The first demonstration and test system consists of a projector mounted at the axis of a PC racing wheel together with the additional inertial measurement unit (IMU) system. It was shown that projection and input function work well together. Using this approach, new possibilities for hand-held devices arise in the close future.

  9. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  10. Operational Realities: Obtaining adequate drivers and inputs for radiation belt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, R. H. W.; Chen, Y.; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Reeves, G. D.; Lichtenberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in 3D diffusion codes for the high energy electron radiation belt have shown that the model representation of microphysical processes in terms of diffusion coefficients, capturing radial, energy and pitch-angle diffusion (including mixed diffusion terms) is quite capable of capturing the dynamics and physics of the radiation belt system, while remaining computationally tractable; making these codes an ideal candidate for operational application. However, we hold that the major obstacle to a realistic application of such codes for now- or forecasting is our insufficient knowledge of drivers and inputs to these codes - rather than any additional improved physics in the codes. These include the specification of the initial conditions, knowledge of the background plasma distribution, the global distribution of waves, the low-energy boundary condition and the outer boundary condition. In this talk we will discuss realistic and affordable strategies of specifying these inputs through the use of proxies, ground based measurement techniques and data assimilative methods; present examples of where this is already possible (outer boundary and global chorus wave and plasma density specification), and outline where additional effort is needed. Finally we present an example of using such realistic model drivers in a state-of-the-art 3D diffusion code which demonstrates a remarkable ability of such codes to reproduce the observed dynamics - by simply using the existing physics in the code but providing the "correct" drivers and boundary conditions.

  11. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  12. Suppression of activation energy and superconductivity by the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in CuTl-1223 matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbar, Abdul; Qasim, Irfan; Mumtaz, M.; Zubair, M.; Nadeem, K.; Khurram, A. A.

    2014-05-28

    Low anisotropic (Cu{sub 0.5}Tl{sub 0.5})Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10−δ} (CuTl-1223) high T{sub c} superconducting matrix was synthesized by solid-state reaction and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared separately by co-precipitation method. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were added with different concentrations during the final sintering cycle of CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix to get the required (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub y}/CuTl-1223, y = 0.0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.5 wt. %, composites. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and dc-resistivity (ρ) measurements. The activation energy and superconductivity were suppressed with increasing concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in (CuTl-1223) matrix. The XRD analysis showed that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles did not affect the crystal structure of the parent CuTl-1223 superconducting phase. The suppression of activation energy and superconducting properties is most probably due to weak flux pinning in the samples. The possible reason of weak flux pinning is reduction of weak links and enhanced inter-grain coupling due to the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries. The presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries possibly reduced the number of flux pinning centers, which were present in the form of weak links in the pure CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix. The increase in the values of inter-grain coupling (α) deduced from the fluctuation induced conductivity analysis with the increased concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles is a theoretical evidence of improved inter-grain coupling.

  13. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  14. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  15. Effects of Auditory Input in Individuation Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Christopher W.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Under many conditions auditory input interferes with visual processing, especially early in development. These interference effects are often more pronounced when the auditory input is unfamiliar than when the auditory input is familiar (e.g. human speech, pre-familiarized sounds, etc.). The current study extends this research by examining how…

  16. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Problems caused by input filter interaction and conventional input filter design techniques are discussed. The concept of feedforward control is modeled with an input filter and a buck regulator. Experimental measurement and comparison to the analytical predictions is carried out. Transient response and the use of a feedforward loop to stabilize the regulator system is described. Other possible applications for feedforward control are included.

  17. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  18. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.15 Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2... programs. NIFA will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input in the RFA. NIFA will...

  19. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Pre-award: Solicitation and Application § 3430.15 Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2... programs. NIFA will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input in the RFA. NIFA will...

  20. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2) of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998... RFAs for competitive programs. CSREES will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... § 3430.607 Stakeholder input. CSREES shall seek and obtain stakeholder input through a variety of...

  2. Input calibration for negative originals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    1995-04-01

    One of the major challenges in the prepress environment consists of controlling the electronic color reproduction process such that a perfect match of any original can be realized. Whether this goal can be reached depends on many factors such as the dynamic range of the input device (scanner, camera), the color gamut of the output device (dye sublimation printer, ink-jet printer, offset), the color management software etc. The characterization of the color behavior of the peripheral devices is therefore very important. Photographs and positive transparents reflect the original scene pretty well; for negative originals, however, there is no obvious link to either the original scene or a particular print of the negative under consideration. In this paper, we establish a method to scan negatives and to convert the scanned data to a calibrated RGB space, which is known colorimetrically. This method is based on the reconstruction of the original exposure conditions (i.e., original scene) which generated the negative. Since the characteristics of negative film are quite diverse, a special calibration is required for each combination of scanner and film type.

  3. COSMIC/NASTRAN Free-field Input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    A user's guide to the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input for the Bulk Data section of the NASTRAN program is proposed. The free field input is designed to be user friendly and the user is not forced out of the computer system due to input errors. It is easy to use, with only a few simple rules to follow. A stand alone version of the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input is also available. The use of free field input is illustrated by a number of examples.

  4. The effect of input perturbations on swimming performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Thornycroft, Patrick J. M.; Lauder, George V.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of flexibility and fluid characteristics on the hydrodynamics of swimming has been investigated for a range of experimental systems. One investigative method is to use reduced-order physical models--pitching and heaving hydrofoils. Typically, a smooth, periodic, input signal is used to control foil motion in experiments that explore fundamental factors (aspect ratio, shape, etc.) in swimming performance. However, the significance of non-smooth input signals in undulating swimmers is non-trivial. Instead of varying external properties, we study the impact of perturbed input motions on swimming performance. A smooth sinusoid is overlaid with high frequency, low amplitude perturbations as the input signal for a heaving panel in a closed loop flow tank. Specifically, 1 cm heave amplitude base sinusoids are added to 0.1 cm heave perturbations with frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 13 Hz. Two thin foils with different stiffness are flapped with the combined input signals in addition to the individual high heave and low heave signals that were added to create the combined inputs. Results demonstrate that perturbations can increase thrust and that adding the perturbed signal to a base frequency alters wake structure.

  5. Effects of control inputs on the estimation of stability and control parameters of a light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannaday, R. L.; Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique was used to determine the values of stability and control derivatives from flight test data for a low-wing, single-engine, light airplane. Several input forms were used during the tests to investigate the consistency of parameter estimates as it relates to inputs. These consistencies were compared by using the ensemble variance and estimated Cramer-Rao lower bound. In addition, the relationship between inputs and parameter correlations was investigated. Results from the stabilator inputs are inconclusive but the sequence of rudder input followed by aileron input or aileron followed by rudder gave more consistent estimates than did rudder or ailerons individually. Also, square-wave inputs appeared to provide slightly improved consistency in the parameter estimates when compared to sine-wave inputs.

  6. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  7. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis.

  8. Input-output analysis of some sector actions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Selected energy conservation actions previously discussed in depth but separately in the areas of the energy industry, the industry sector, the transportation sector, and the residential and commercial sector, were brought together and assessed as a group. Particular emphasis was devoted to identifying secondary or indirect impacts and multiple interactions. Preliminary results obtained from the ECASTAR energy input-output model suggest that the impacts of energy conservation actions can be grossly misrepresented if secondary impacts are not included in the assessment. A methodology which stresses the importance of secondary and multiple interactions permeates the underlying philosophy of this discussion.

  9. Hybrid Energy System Modeling in Modelica

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Binder; Christiaan J. J. Paredis; Humberto E. Garcia

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a Hybrid Energy System (HES) configuration is modeled in Modelica. Hybrid Energy Systems (HES) have as their defining characteristic the use of one or more energy inputs, combined with the potential for multiple energy outputs. Compared to traditional energy systems, HES provide additional operational flexibility so that high variability in both energy production and consumption levels can be absorbed more effectively. This is particularly important when including renewable energy sources, whose output levels are inherently variable, determined by nature. The specific HES configuration modeled in this paper include two energy inputs: a nuclear plant, and a series of wind turbines. In addition, the system produces two energy outputs: electricity and synthetic fuel. The models are verified through simulations of the individual components, and the system as a whole. The simulations are performed for a range of component sizes, operating conditions, and control schemes.

  10. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core "DSB" response specific to clastogenic treatments.

    PubMed

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A; Culligan, Kevin M; Huefner, Neil D; Britt, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as "collateral" damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe(26+) high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5-24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the "DSB response" were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing "extended night." This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants.

  11. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The... activity to submit additional information....

  12. Uniform electron gas for transition metals: Input parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.H. ); Shore, H.B. )

    1993-12-15

    Input parameters are reported for the theory of ideal metals, a uniform electron-gas model of the elemental transition metals. These input parameters, the electron density, and the bonding valence,'' have been given previously for the 3[ital d] and 4[ital d] series of transition metals. Here, we extend our work based on recent calculations of Sigalas [ital et] [ital al]. [Phys. Rev. B 45, 5777 (1992)] to include the 5[ital d] series. We have also calculated the cohesive energies of the 5[ital d] transition metals using the theory of ideal metals with these parameters. The calculations agree with experiment to within [plus minus]25%.

  13. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  14. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  15. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  16. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  17. Application of calcium chloride as an additive for secondary refrigerant in the air conditioning system type chiller to minimized energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwono, A.; Indartono, Y. S.; Irsyad, M.; Al-Afkar, I. C.

    2015-09-01

    One way to resolve the energy problem is to increase the efficiency of energy use. Air conditioning system is one of the equipment that needs to be considered, because it is the biggest energy user in commercial building sector. Research currently developing is the use of phase change materials (PCM) as thermal energy storage (TES) in the air conditioning system to reduce energy consumption. Salt hydrates have been great potential to be developed because they have been high latent heat and thermal conductivity. This study has used a salt hydrate from calcium chloride to be tested in air conditioning systems type chiller. Thermal characteristics were examined using temperature history (T-history) test and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The test results showed that the thermal characteristics of the salt hydrate has been a high latent heat and in accordance with the evaporator temperature. The use of salt hydrates in air conditioning system type chiller can reduce energy consumption by 51.5%.

  18. Steam System Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: fixing steam leaks. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  19. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  20. Thermochemical Properties and Bond Dissociation Energies for Fluorinated Methanol, CH3-xFxOH, and Fluorinated Methyl Hydroperoxides, CH3-xFxOOH: Group Additivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2016-09-01

    Oxygenated fluorocarbons are routinely found in sampling of environmental soils and waters as a result of the widespread use of fluoro and chlorofluoro carbons as heat transfer fluids, inert materials, polymers, fire retardants and solvents; the influence of these chemicals on the environment is a growing concern. The thermochemical properties of these species are needed for understanding their stability and reactions in the environment and in thermal process. Structures and thermochemical properties on the mono- to trifluoromethanol, CH3-xFxOH, and fluoromethyl hydroperoxide, CH3-xFxOOH (1 ≤ x ≤ 3), are determined by CBS-QB3, CBS-APNO, and G4 calculations. Entropy, S°298, and heat capacities, Cp(T)'s (300 ≤ T/K ≤ 1500) from vibration, translation, and external rotation contributions are calculated on the basis of the vibration frequencies and structures obtained from the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) density functional method. Potential barriers for the internal rotations are also calculated from this method and used to calculate hindered rotor contributions to S°298 and Cp(T)'s using direct integration over energy levels of the internal rotational potentials. Standard enthalpies of formation, ΔfH°298 (units in kcal mol(-1)) are CH2FOOH (-83.7), CHF2OOH (-138.1), CF3OOH (-193.6), CH2FOO(•) (-44.9), CHF2OO(•) (-99.6), CF3OO(•) (-153.8), CH2FOH (-101.9), CHF2OH (-161.6), CF3OH (-218.1), CH2FO(•) (-49.1), CHF2O(•) (-97.8), CF3O(•) (-150.5), CH2F(•) (-7.6), CHF2(•) (-58.8), and CF3(•) (-112.6). Bond dissociation energies for the R-OOH, RO-OH, ROO-H, R-OO(•), RO-O(•), R-OH, RO-H, R-O(•), and R-H bonds are determined and compared with methyl hydroperoxide to observe the trends from added fluoro substitutions. Enthalpy of formation for the fluoro-hydrocarbon oxygen groups C/F/H2/O, C/F2/H/O, C/F3/O, are derived from the above fluorinated methanol and fluorinated hydroperoxide species for use in Benson's Group Additivity. It was determined that

  1. Localized input fields in rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Auer, Maximilian; Brenner, Karl-Heinz

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new treatment for localized input fields in coupled-wave theory. It consists of a combination of angular spectrum decomposition and a cyclic formulation of rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), which does not require the computation of several standard RCWA calculations. The cyclic approach especially concerns the definition of the convolution matrix of the permittivity and enables the processing of multiple input plane waves in a single RCWA calculation. At the same time it ensures physically meaningful simulation results for finite truncation limits and thus inherently conserves energy. By adapting the three-dimensional (3D)-RCWA algorithm to efficiently simulate the effects of localized and arbitrarily polarized input fields to 3D volume gratings, various advanced diffraction problems such as fiber coupling, the influence of distorted plane waves, or the effects of focused beams on diffraction gratings can be investigated. Therefore, the impact of this work should concern many fields of application.

  2. Optical device with conical input and output prism faces

    DOEpatents

    Brunsden, Barry S.

    1981-01-01

    A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

  3. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  4. Contaminant inputs to the Hudson-Raritan estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.A.; Gerrish, T.A.; Casey, M.C.

    1982-08-01

    Source locations and an estimate of the magnitude of contaminant inputs to the Hudson-Raritan Estuary are presented. The relative contribution of the various sources is indicated and data gaps are identified. Six sources of contaminant inputs were evaluated: nontidal tributary, municipal and industrial wastewater, atmospheric, urban runoff, accidental spills, and landfill leachate. The latter five sources were evaluated downstream of the tributary water quality stations, since sources above these points are reflected in the tributary inputs. In addition to flow or volume for each source, data on concentrations of conventional pollutants (solids, organic matter, nutrients, and bacterial indicators), organic toxics, and heavy metals were sought. A large quantity of data was obtained from numerous federal, state, county, and municipal agencies, and private firms. The data were analyzed to obtain average mass loads of specific contaminants into the Hudson-Raritan Estuary.

  5. Dynamic Input Conductances Shape Neuronal Spiking1,2

    PubMed Central

    Franci, Alessio; Dethier, Julie; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Assessing the role of biophysical parameter variations in neuronal activity is critical to the understanding of modulation, robustness, and homeostasis of neuronal signalling. The paper proposes that this question can be addressed through the analysis of dynamic input conductances. Those voltage-dependent curves aggregate the concomitant activity of all ion channels in distinct timescales. They are shown to shape the current−voltage dynamical relationships that determine neuronal spiking. We propose an experimental protocol to measure dynamic input conductances in neurons. In addition, we provide a computational method to extract dynamic input conductances from arbitrary conductance-based models and to analyze their sensitivity to arbitrary parameters. We illustrate the relevance of the proposed approach for modulation, compensation, and robustness studies in a published neuron model based on data of the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis. PMID:26464969

  6. Kriging atomic properties with a variable number of inputs.

    PubMed

    Davie, Stuart J; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-09-14

    A new force field called FFLUX uses the machine learning technique kriging to capture the link between the properties (energies and multipole moments) of topological atoms (i.e., output) and the coordinates of the surrounding atoms (i.e., input). Here we present a novel, general method of applying kriging to chemical systems that do not possess a fixed number of (geometrical) inputs. Unlike traditional kriging methods, which require an input system to be of fixed dimensionality, the method presented here can be readily applied to molecular simulation, where an interaction cutoff radius is commonly used and the number of atoms or molecules within the cutoff radius is not constant. The method described here is general and can be applied to any machine learning technique that normally operates under a fixed number of inputs. In particular, the method described here is also useful for interpolating methods other than kriging, which may suffer from difficulties stemming from identical sets of inputs corresponding to different outputs or input biasing. As a demonstration, the new method is used to predict 54 energetic and electrostatic properties of the central water molecule of a set of 5000, 4 Å radius water clusters, with a variable number of water molecules. The results are validated against equivalent models from a set of clusters composed of a fixed number of water molecules (set to ten, i.e., decamers) and against models created by using a naïve method of treating the variable number of inputs problem presented. Results show that the 4 Å water cluster models, utilising the method presented here, return similar or better kriging models than the decamer clusters for all properties considered and perform much better than the truncated models. PMID:27634248

  7. Kriging atomic properties with a variable number of inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davie, Stuart J.; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-09-01

    A new force field called FFLUX uses the machine learning technique kriging to capture the link between the properties (energies and multipole moments) of topological atoms (i.e., output) and the coordinates of the surrounding atoms (i.e., input). Here we present a novel, general method of applying kriging to chemical systems that do not possess a fixed number of (geometrical) inputs. Unlike traditional kriging methods, which require an input system to be of fixed dimensionality, the method presented here can be readily applied to molecular simulation, where an interaction cutoff radius is commonly used and the number of atoms or molecules within the cutoff radius is not constant. The method described here is general and can be applied to any machine learning technique that normally operates under a fixed number of inputs. In particular, the method described here is also useful for interpolating methods other than kriging, which may suffer from difficulties stemming from identical sets of inputs corresponding to different outputs or input biasing. As a demonstration, the new method is used to predict 54 energetic and electrostatic properties of the central water molecule of a set of 5000, 4 Å radius water clusters, with a variable number of water molecules. The results are validated against equivalent models from a set of clusters composed of a fixed number of water molecules (set to ten, i.e., decamers) and against models created by using a naïve method of treating the variable number of inputs problem presented. Results show that the 4 Å water cluster models, utilising the method presented here, return similar or better kriging models than the decamer clusters for all properties considered and perform much better than the truncated models.

  8. Kriging atomic properties with a variable number of inputs.

    PubMed

    Davie, Stuart J; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-09-14

    A new force field called FFLUX uses the machine learning technique kriging to capture the link between the properties (energies and multipole moments) of topological atoms (i.e., output) and the coordinates of the surrounding atoms (i.e., input). Here we present a novel, general method of applying kriging to chemical systems that do not possess a fixed number of (geometrical) inputs. Unlike traditional kriging methods, which require an input system to be of fixed dimensionality, the method presented here can be readily applied to molecular simulation, where an interaction cutoff radius is commonly used and the number of atoms or molecules within the cutoff radius is not constant. The method described here is general and can be applied to any machine learning technique that normally operates under a fixed number of inputs. In particular, the method described here is also useful for interpolating methods other than kriging, which may suffer from difficulties stemming from identical sets of inputs corresponding to different outputs or input biasing. As a demonstration, the new method is used to predict 54 energetic and electrostatic properties of the central water molecule of a set of 5000, 4 Å radius water clusters, with a variable number of water molecules. The results are validated against equivalent models from a set of clusters composed of a fixed number of water molecules (set to ten, i.e., decamers) and against models created by using a naïve method of treating the variable number of inputs problem presented. Results show that the 4 Å water cluster models, utilising the method presented here, return similar or better kriging models than the decamer clusters for all properties considered and perform much better than the truncated models.

  9. Practical input optimization for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. Ph.D. Thesis, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this research was to develop an algorithm for the design of practical, optimal flight test inputs for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. A general, single pass technique was developed which allows global optimization of the flight test input design for parameter estimation using the principles of dynamic programming with the input forms limited to square waves only. Provision was made for practical constraints on the input, including amplitude constraints, control system dynamics, and selected input frequency range exclusions. In addition, the input design was accomplished while imposing output amplitude constraints required by model validity and considerations of safety during the flight test. The algorithm has multiple input design capability, with optional inclusion of a constraint that only one control move at a time, so that a human pilot can implement the inputs. It is shown that the technique can be used to design experiments for estimation of open loop model parameters from closed loop flight test data. The report includes a new formulation of the optimal input design problem, a description of a new approach to the solution, and a summary of the characteristics of the algorithm, followed by three example applications of the new technique which demonstrate the quality and expanded capabilities of the input designs produced by the new technique. In all cases, the new input design approach showed significant improvement over previous input design methods in terms of achievable parameter accuracies.

  10. Statistical Signal Analysis for Systems with Interferenced Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, R. M.; Mielnicka-Pate, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is introduced, based on statistical signal analysis, which overcomes the error due to input signal interference. The model analyzed is given. The input signals u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t) are assumed to be unknown. The measurable signals x sub 1 (t) and x sub 2 (t) are interferened according to the frequency response functions, H sub 12 (f) and H sub 21 (f). The goal of the analysis was to evaluate the power output due to each input, u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t), for the case where both are applied to the same time. In addition, all frequency response functions are calculated. The interferenced system is described by a set of five equations with six unknown functions. An IBM XT Personal Computer, which was interfaced with the FFT, was used to solve the set of equations. The software was tested on an electrical two-input, one-output system. The results were excellent. The research presented includes the analysis of the acoustic radiation from a rectangular plate with two force inputs and the sound pressure as an output signal.

  11. Circuit-level input integration in bacterial gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Espinar, Lorena; Dies, Marta; Cagatay, Tolga; Süel, Gürol M; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-04-23

    Gene regulatory circuits can receive multiple simultaneous inputs, which can enter the system through different locations. It is thus necessary to establish how these genetic circuits integrate multiple inputs as a function of their relative entry points. Here, we use the dynamic circuit regulating competence for DNA uptake in Bacillus subtilis as a model system to investigate this issue. Specifically, we map the response of single cells in vivo to a combination of (i) a chemical signal controlling the constitutive expression of key competence genes, and (ii) a genetic perturbation in the form of copy number variation of one of these genes, which mimics the level of stress signals sensed by the bacteria. Quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy shows that a variety of dynamical behaviors can be reached by the combination of the two inputs. Additionally, the integration depends strongly on the relative locations where the two perturbations enter the circuit. Specifically, when the two inputs act upon different circuit elements, their integration generates novel dynamical behavior, whereas inputs affecting the same element do not. An in silico bidimensional bifurcation analysis of a mathematical model of the circuit offers good quantitative agreement with the experimental observations, and sheds light on the dynamical mechanisms leading to the different integrated responses exhibited by the gene regulatory circuit.

  12. Nitrogen input effectiveness on carbon sequestration in rainfed cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Poma, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The combined effect of total N and C/N ratio had a large influence on the decomposition rate and consequently on potential soil organic carbon sequestration. The aim of the work was to evaluate Carbon sequestration potentiality under three mineral N fertilization levels in interaction with two cropping systems characterized by addition of N input due to leguminous species in the rotation. The study was carried out in the semiarid Mediterranean environment in a 18years long-term experiment. Is well know that in the semiarid environment the excess of N fertilization reduces biomass yield and the consequent C input. On the contrary, both N and C input determine high difference in C/N input ratio and faster organic matter mineralization. Results showed no influence of N fertilization on SOC sequestration and a reduction of SOC stock due to crop rotation due to lower C input. Crop residue quality of durum wheat-pea crop rotation characterized by a faster decomposition rate could explain the lower ability of crop rotation to sequester C in the semiarid environment.

  13. Remote sensing inputs to water demand modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Jensen, J. R.; Tinney, L. R.; Rector, M.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the ability of remote sensing techniques to economically generate data required by water demand models, the Geography Remote Sensing Unit, in conjunction with the Kern County Water Agency of California, developed an analysis model. As a result it was determined that agricultural cropland inventories utilizing both high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery can be conducted cost effectively. In addition, by using average irrigation application rates in conjunction with cropland data, estimates of agricultural water demand can be generated. However, more accurate estimates are possible if crop type, acreage, and crop specific application rates are employed. An analysis of the effect of saline-alkali soils on water demand in the study area is also examined. Finally, reference is made to the detection and delineation of water tables that are perched near the surface by semi-permeable clay layers. Soil salinity prediction, automated crop identification on a by-field basis, and a potential input to the determination of zones of equal benefit taxation are briefly touched upon.

  14. Fresh carbon input differentially impacts soil carbon decomposition across natural and managed systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongkui; Wang, Enli; Smith, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The amount of fresh carbon input into soil is experiencing substantial changes under global change. It is unclear what will be the consequences of such input changes on native soil carbon decomposition across ecosystems. By synthesizing data from 143 experimental comparisons, we show that, on average, fresh carbon input stimulates soil carbon decomposition by 14%. The response was lower in forest soils (1%) compared with soils from other ecosystems (> 24%), and higher following inputs of plant residue-like substrates (31%) compared to root exudate-like substrates (9%). The responses decrease with the baseline soil carbon decomposition rate under no additional carbon input, but increase with the fresh carbon input rate. The rates of these changes vary significantly across ecosystems and with the carbon substrates being added. These findings can be applied to provide robust estimates of soil carbon balance across ecosystems under changing aboveground and belowground inputs as consequence of climate and land management changes.

  15. The Input Hypothesis: An Inside Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Theodore V.

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes and discusses Krashen's "input hypothesis" as presented in his "Principles and Practice in Second Language Acquisition." Suggests that the input hypothesis fails to account convincingly for arrested second language acquisition in an acquisition-rich environment and that it is not directly applicable to U.S. high school and university…

  16. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  17. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  18. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  19. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  20. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND..., requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  3. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  4. Input Effects within a Constructionist Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Jeremy K.; Goldberg, Adele E.

    2009-01-01

    Constructionist approaches to language hypothesize that grammar can be learned from the input using domain-general mechanisms. This emphasis has engendered a great deal of research--exemplified in the present issue--that seeks to illuminate the ways in which input-related factors can both drive and constrain constructional acquisition. In this…

  5. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,…

  6. Modality of Input and Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of input modality (video, audio, and captions, i.e., on-screen text in the same language as audio) on (a) the learning of written and aural word forms, (b) overall vocabulary gains, (c) attention to input, and (d) vocabulary learning strategies of beginning L2 learners. Twenty-six second-semester learners of Russian…

  7. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  8. Input, innateness, and induction in language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J L

    1990-11-01

    Input and innateness compliment one another in language acquisition. Children exposed to different languages acquire different languages. Children's language experience, however, underdetermines the grammars that they acquire; the constraints that are not supplied by input must be available endogenously, and the ultimate origin of these endogenous contributions to acquisition may be traced to the biology of the mind. To the extent that assumptions of innateness encourage greater explicitness in the formulation of theories of acquisition, they should be welcomed. Excessively powerful assumptions of innateness may not be subject to empirical disconfirmation, however. Therefore, attention should be devoted to the development of a theory of language input, particularly with regard to identifying invariants of input. In combination with a linguistic theory providing an account of the endstate of acquisition, a theory of input would permit the deduction of properties of the mind that underlie the acquisition of language.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen additions induce distinct priming effects along an organic-matter decay continuum

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Hu, Yuehua; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Liu, Yongwen; Schaefer, Douglas; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter (OM) in soil, affecting carbon (C) cycling and climate feedbacks, depends on microbial activities driven by C and nitrogen (N) availability. However, it remains unknown how decomposition of various OMs vary across global supplies and ratios of C and N inputs. We examined OM decomposition by incubating four types of OM (leaf litter, wood, organic matter from organic and mineral horizons) from a decay continuum in a subtropical forest at Ailao Mountain, China with labile C and N additions. Decomposition of wood with high C:N decreased for 3.9 to 29% with these additions, while leaf decomposition was accelerated only within a narrow C:N range of added C and N. Decomposition of OM from organic horizon was accelerated by high C:N and suppressed by low C:N, but mineral soil was almost entirely controlled by high C:N. These divergent responses to C and N inputs show that mechanisms for priming (i.e. acceleration or retardation of OM decomposition by labile inputs) vary along this decay continuum. We conclude that besides C:N ratios of OM, those of labile inputs control the OM decay in the litter horizons, while energy (labile C) regulates decomposition in mineral soil. This suggests that OM decomposition can be predicted from its intrinsic C:N ratios and those of labile inputs. PMID:26806914

  10. Carbon and nitrogen additions induce distinct priming effects along an organic-matter decay continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Hu, Yuehua; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Liu, Yongwen; Schaefer, Douglas; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter (OM) in soil, affecting carbon (C) cycling and climate feedbacks, depends on microbial activities driven by C and nitrogen (N) availability. However, it remains unknown how decomposition of various OMs vary across global supplies and ratios of C and N inputs. We examined OM decomposition by incubating four types of OM (leaf litter, wood, organic matter from organic and mineral horizons) from a decay continuum in a subtropical forest at Ailao Mountain, China with labile C and N additions. Decomposition of wood with high C:N decreased for 3.9 to 29% with these additions, while leaf decomposition was accelerated only within a narrow C:N range of added C and N. Decomposition of OM from organic horizon was accelerated by high C:N and suppressed by low C:N, but mineral soil was almost entirely controlled by high C:N. These divergent responses to C and N inputs show that mechanisms for priming (i.e. acceleration or retardation of OM decomposition by labile inputs) vary along this decay continuum. We conclude that besides C:N ratios of OM, those of labile inputs control the OM decay in the litter horizons, while energy (labile C) regulates decomposition in mineral soil. This suggests that OM decomposition can be predicted from its intrinsic C:N ratios and those of labile inputs.

  11. 10 CFR 725.13 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional information. 725.13 Section 725.13 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Applications § 725.13 Additional information. The... and before the termination of the permit, require additional information in order to enable the...

  12. A novel material detection algorithm based on 2D GMM-based power density function and image detail addition scheme in dual energy X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Pourghassem, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Material detection is a vital need in dual energy X-ray luggage inspection systems at security of airport and strategic places. In this paper, a novel material detection algorithm based on statistical trainable models using 2-Dimensional power density function (PDF) of three material categories in dual energy X-ray images is proposed. In this algorithm, the PDF of each material category as a statistical model is estimated from transmission measurement values of low and high energy X-ray images by Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM). Material label of each pixel of object is determined based on dependency probability of its transmission measurement values in the low and high energy to PDF of three material categories (metallic, organic and mixed materials). The performance of material detection algorithm is improved by a maximum voting scheme in a neighborhood of image as a post-processing stage. Using two background removing and denoising stages, high and low energy X-ray images are enhanced as a pre-processing procedure. For improving the discrimination capability of the proposed material detection algorithm, the details of the low and high energy X-ray images are added to constructed color image which includes three colors (orange, blue and green) for representing the organic, metallic and mixed materials. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on real images that had been captured from a commercial dual energy X-ray luggage inspection system. The obtained results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and operative in detection of the metallic, organic and mixed materials with acceptable accuracy.

  13. Incinerator performance: effects of changes in waste input and furnace operation on air emissions and residues.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Thomas; Riber, Christian; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2011-10-01

    Waste incineration can be considered a robust technology for energy recovery from mixed waste. Modern incinerators are generally able to maintain relatively stable performance, but changes in waste input and furnace operation may affect emissions. This study investigated how inorganic air emissions and residue composition at a full-scale incinerator were affected by known additions of specific waste materials to the normal municipal solid waste (MSW) input. Six individual experiments were carried out (% ww of total waste input): NaCl (0.5%), shoes (1.6%), automobile shredder waste (14%), batteries (0.5%), poly(vinyl chloride) (5.5%) and chromate-cupper-arsenate impregnated wood (11%). Materials were selected based on chemical composition and potential for being included or excluded from the waste mix. Critical elements in the waste materials were identified based on comparison with six experiments including 'as-large-as-possible' changes in furnace operation (oxygen levels, air supply and burnout level) only using normal MSW as input. The experiments showed that effects from the added waste materials were significant in relation to: air emissions (in particular As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb), element transfer coefficients, and residue composition (As, Cd, Cl, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Zn). Changes in furnace operation could not be directly linked to changes in emissions and residues. The results outlined important elements in waste which should be addressed in relation to waste incinerator performance. Likely ranges of element transfer coefficients were provided as the basis for sensitivity analysis of life-cycle assessment (LCA) results involving waste incinerator technologies.

  14. Singular year of high geomagnetic responses to the same solar wind input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Olsthoorn, Bart; Nicolaou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Using high-resolution (5 min) solar wind data and westward auroral electrojet index (AL) index since 1981, temporal variation of the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency (AL response to the solar wind electromagnetic energy/flux input) was examined. To separate the seasonal variation, 3-month averaged statistics is used. (1) The Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for moderate solar wind input occasionally increased beyond the seasonal variation for about half a year during the declining phase of solar cycles; (2) Excluding these singular years and seasonal variation, the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for moderate or low solar wind input continuously decreased over the past three decades; (3) These temporal variations do not correlate with F10.7 index (proxy for the Solar UV flux). The results confirm some of the previous study using 1-hour resolution data with a better accuracy, and suggest that the existence of additional controlling mechanisms either at the Sun (e.g., magnetic field or solar cycle strength) or solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling (e.g., through the solar wind composition). On the other hand, the Sun-Earth coupling efficiency for large solar wind input is very variable and the present correlation method is not sufficient to determine the conditions for large AL activities and its temporal variation. Acknowledgement: Auroral electrojet (AE) indices and sunspot numbers (RI) are official IAGA and IAA endorsed indices that are provided by World Data Center for Geomagnetism, Kyoto University, Japan (AE) and the Royal Observatory of Belgium, Brussels (RI). Including these indices, all data in 5-minutes values are obtained from NASA-GSFC/SPDF through OMNIWeb (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/ow.html).

  15. Incinerator performance: effects of changes in waste input and furnace operation on air emissions and residues.

    PubMed

    Astrup, Thomas; Riber, Christian; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2011-10-01

    Waste incineration can be considered a robust technology for energy recovery from mixed waste. Modern incinerators are generally able to maintain relatively stable performance, but changes in waste input and furnace operation may affect emissions. This study investigated how inorganic air emissions and residue composition at a full-scale incinerator were affected by known additions of specific waste materials to the normal municipal solid waste (MSW) input. Six individual experiments were carried out (% ww of total waste input): NaCl (0.5%), shoes (1.6%), automobile shredder waste (14%), batteries (0.5%), poly(vinyl chloride) (5.5%) and chromate-cupper-arsenate impregnated wood (11%). Materials were selected based on chemical composition and potential for being included or excluded from the waste mix. Critical elements in the waste materials were identified based on comparison with six experiments including 'as-large-as-possible' changes in furnace operation (oxygen levels, air supply and burnout level) only using normal MSW as input. The experiments showed that effects from the added waste materials were significant in relation to: air emissions (in particular As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb), element transfer coefficients, and residue composition (As, Cd, Cl, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Zn). Changes in furnace operation could not be directly linked to changes in emissions and residues. The results outlined important elements in waste which should be addressed in relation to waste incinerator performance. Likely ranges of element transfer coefficients were provided as the basis for sensitivity analysis of life-cycle assessment (LCA) results involving waste incinerator technologies. PMID:21930520

  16. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  17. Changes in lead biogeochemistry in response to decreasing atmospheric inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Likens, G.E.; Siccama, T.G.

    1995-08-01

    In the 1970s, the US Congress passed legislation restricting the sale of gasoline with alkyl-lead additives. In the intervening years, the amount of lead (Pb) consumed in gasoline has declined sharply, resulting in lower rates of atmospheric Pb deposition. At the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, the input of Pb in precipitation has declined by 97% between 1976 and 1989. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the long-term response of forest and associated aquatic ecosystems to these declining inputs of Pb. Lead continues to accumulate in the forest ecosystem of the HBEF, in spite of lower inputs, due to extremely low losses in drainage water. However, between 1977 and 1987 the Pb content in the forest floor declined by 29%. Lead now appears to be accumulating in the mineral soil. The stratigraphy of Pb in sediment from a nearby lake shows continued Pb deposition, though at a declining rate. Much of our understanding of the long-term patterns of lead accumulation in ecosystems has been shaped by paleoecological studies, in which input of lead are assumed to be irreversibly retained. Using a regression model and historical information concerning Pb consumption in gasoline, we estimated Pb inputs to the HBEF ecosystem during the period 1926-1989. Based on this analysis and our field observations, it is clear that Pb mobility at the HBEF is greater than previously reported: {approx}30% of the total atmospheric Pb input between 1926 and 1989 was not retained in organic soils or pond sediments. The potential for Pb pollution in drainage water may therefore be greater than suspected in regions with continued high rates of atmospheric Pb deposition. 53 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Additions to the spectrum and energy levels and a critical compilation of helium-like and hydrogen-like boron, B IV and B V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.; Ryabtsev, A. N.; Ekberg, J. O.; Kink, I.; Mannervik, S.; Martinson, I.

    2008-08-01

    Using beam-foil spectroscopy, we have observed several new lines in the B IV and B V spectra. This experimental work was combined with theoretical calculations using ab initio and semi-empirical techniques. We have also critically evaluated all previous and recent experimental and theoretical data for these spectra. Complete data on wavelengths and energy levels based on this analysis are tabulated.

  19. CHARACTERISTIC LENGTH SCALE OF INPUT DATA IN DISTRIBUTED MODELS: IMPLICATIONS FOR MODELING GRID SIZE. (R824784)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model resp...

  20. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  1. The Linguistic Landscape as an Additional Source of Input in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenoz, Jasone; Gorter, Durk

    2008-01-01

    In this article we explore the role that the linguistic landscape, in the sense of all the written language in the public space, can have in second language acquisition (SLA). The linguistic landscape has symbolic and informative functions and it is multimodal, because it combines visual and printed texts, and multilingual, because it uses several…

  2. Frequency dependent precompensation for dominance in a four input/output theme problem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, R. M.; Sain, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on additional experience in applying the CARDIAD methodology to design of dynamical input compensation to achieve column dominance for linear multivariable models of realistic turbine engine simulations. In particular, the approach has been extended to models having four inputs and four outputs, and successful compensations have been achieved with an investment of about thirty minutes desk time.

  3. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  4. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry V.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. Microporous bulk insulation is used in the ground support test hardware to minimize the loss of thermal energy from the electric heat source to the environment. The insulation package is characterized before operation to predict how much heat will be absorbed by the convertor and how much will be lost to the environment during operation. In an effort to validate these predictions, numerous tasks have been performed, which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs. This test and modeling effort included: (a) making thermophysical property measurements of test setup materials to provide inputs to the numerical models, (b) acquiring additional test data that was collected during convertor tests to provide numerical models with temperature profiles of the test setup via thermocouple and infrared measurements, (c) using multidimensional numerical models (computational fluid dynamics code) to predict net heat input of an operating convertor, and (d) using validation test hardware to provide direct comparison of numerical results and validate the multidimensional numerical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This effort produced high fidelity ASC net heat input predictions, which were successfully validated using

  5. Scaling of global input-output networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sai; Qi, Zhengling; Qu, Shen; Zhu, Ji; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Jia, Xiaoping; Xu, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Examining scaling patterns of networks can help understand how structural features relate to the behavior of the networks. Input-output networks consist of industries as nodes and inter-industrial exchanges of products as links. Previous studies consider limited measures for node strengths and link weights, and also ignore the impact of dataset choice. We consider a comprehensive set of indicators in this study that are important in economic analysis, and also examine the impact of dataset choice, by studying input-output networks in individual countries and the entire world. Results show that Burr, Log-Logistic, Log-normal, and Weibull distributions can better describe scaling patterns of global input-output networks. We also find that dataset choice has limited impacts on the observed scaling patterns. Our findings can help examine the quality of economic statistics, estimate missing data in economic statistics, and identify key nodes and links in input-output networks to support economic policymaking.

  6. Development of a Novel Bi-Directional Isolated Multiple-Input DC-DC Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.

    2005-10-24

    There is vital need for a compact, lightweight, and efficient energy-storage system that is both affordable and has an acceptable cycle life for the large-scale production of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Most of the current research employs a battery-storage unit (BU) combined with a fuel cell (FC) stack in order to achieve the operating voltage-current point of maximum efficiency for the FC system. A system block diagram is shown in Fig.1.1. In such a conventional arrangement, the battery is sized to deliver the difference between the energy required by the traction drive and the energy supplied by the FC system. Energy requirements can increase depending on the drive cycle over which the vehicle is expected to operate. Peak-power transients result in an increase of losses and elevated temperatures which result in a decrease in the lifetime of the battery. This research will propose a novel two-input direct current (dc) dc to dc converter to interface an additional energy-storage element, an ultracapacitor (UC), which is shown in Fig.1.2. It will assist the battery during transients to reduce the peak-power requirements of the battery.

  7. Higher-order electric multipole contributions to retarded non-additive three-body dispersion interaction energies between atoms: equilateral triangle and collinear configurations.

    PubMed

    Salam, A

    2013-12-28

    The theory of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to calculate higher electric multipole contributions to the dispersion energy shift between three atoms or molecules arranged in a straight line or in an equilateral triangle configuration. As in two-body potentials, three-body dispersion interactions are viewed in the QED formalism to arise from exchange of virtual photons between coupled pairs of particles. By employing an interaction Hamiltonian that is quadratic in the electric displacement field means that third-order perturbation theory can be used to yield the energy shift for a particular combination of electric multipole polarizable species, with only six time-ordered diagrams needing to be summed over. Specific potentials evaluated include dipole-dipole-quadrupole (DDQ), dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole (DQQ), and dipole-dipole-octupole (DDO) terms. For the geometries of interest, near-zone limiting forms are found to exhibit an R(-11) dependence on separation distance for the DDQ interaction, and an R(-13) behaviour for DQQ and DDO shifts, agreeing with an earlier semi-classical computation. Retardation weakens the potential in each case by R(-1) in the far-zone. It is found that by decomposing the octupole moment into its irreducible components of weights-1 and -3 that the former contribution to the DDO potential may be taken to be a higher-order correction to the leading triple dipole energy shift. PMID:24387355

  8. Higher-order electric multipole contributions to retarded non-additive three-body dispersion interaction energies between atoms: Equilateral triangle and collinear configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Salam, A.

    2013-12-28

    The theory of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to calculate higher electric multipole contributions to the dispersion energy shift between three atoms or molecules arranged in a straight line or in an equilateral triangle configuration. As in two-body potentials, three-body dispersion interactions are viewed in the QED formalism to arise from exchange of virtual photons between coupled pairs of particles. By employing an interaction Hamiltonian that is quadratic in the electric displacement field means that third-order perturbation theory can be used to yield the energy shift for a particular combination of electric multipole polarizable species, with only six time-ordered diagrams needing to be summed over. Specific potentials evaluated include dipole-dipole-quadrupole (DDQ), dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole (DQQ), and dipole-dipole-octupole (DDO) terms. For the geometries of interest, near-zone limiting forms are found to exhibit an R{sup −11} dependence on separation distance for the DDQ interaction, and an R{sup −13} behaviour for DQQ and DDO shifts, agreeing with an earlier semi-classical computation. Retardation weakens the potential in each case by R{sup −1} in the far-zone. It is found that by decomposing the octupole moment into its irreducible components of weights-1 and -3 that the former contribution to the DDO potential may be taken to be a higher-order correction to the leading triple dipole energy shift.

  9. Energy Sources of T-Tauri Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, N.; Albarran, J.

    1984-06-01

    We empirically estimated the total energy loss from the atmospheric regions above the photo sphere in T Tauri stars. We have also estimated the flux input into the atmosphere by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) aves produced in the subphotospheric convection zone. Within the uncertainties of both theory and observations, this flux seems to represent the basic energy input into the atmosphere provided that a large surface coverage of magnetic regions exists. In addition to this basic energy input from the convection zone the T Tauri atmospheres must have other energy sources, originating in the stellar surfitee. Among those we can include the flux of energy carried by Alfven waves resulting from the action of surface material motions on magnetic flux tubes, as well as dissipation and annihilation of magnetic fields in flare events. The observed decrease in emission line fluxes with luminosity seems to indicate that MHD wave fluxes heat the chromosphere, while the uppermost atmospheric regions require another source of heating.

  10. Computing functions by approximating the input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-12-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their output. Our approach assumes only the most rudimentary knowledge of algebra and trigonometry, and makes no use of calculus.

  11. Halogen-free bis(imidazolium)/bis(ammonium)-di[bis(salicylato)borate] ionic liquids as energy-efficient and environmentally friendly lubricant additives.

    PubMed

    Gusain, Rashi; Gupta, Piyush; Saran, Sandeep; Khatri, Om P

    2014-09-10

    Bis(imidazolium)- and bis(ammonium)-di[bis(salicylato)borate] ionic liquids with variable alkyl chain and cyclic ring structures, were synthesized and then evaluated them as potential lubricant additives. The copper strip test results revealed noncorrosive properties of these ionic liquids. Introduction of halogen content in bis(imidazolium) ionic liquid by replacement of bis(salicylato)borate (BScB) anion with hexafluorophosphate (PF6(-)), severely corroded the copper strip. Thermogravimetric results showed that bis(imidazolium) ionic liquids exhibited higher thermal stability than bis(ammonium) ionic liquids owing to compact structure provided by imidazolium rings, higher intermolecular interactions, smaller free volume and low steric hindrance. The lubrication properties of these ionic liquids as additives to synthetic lubricant poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG 200) were evaluated for steel balls. Results showed that bis(ammonium)- and bis(imidazolium)-(BScB)2 ionic liquids as additives significantly reduced both friction coefficient and wear of PEG 200. The structure of cations, particularly the variation in substituted alkyl chain length monitored the degree of reduction in friction and wear. The excellent lubrication properties were attributed to the formation of adsorbed tribo-thin film and tribochemical product during the tribo-contact. Being halogen-, phosphorus-, and sulfur-free, these ionic liquids (a) protects contact surfaces from tribo-corrosive events, (b) reduces the friction and wear, and (c) keep environment green and clean.

  12. Stein's neuronal model with pooled renewal input.

    PubMed

    Rajdl, Kamil; Lansky, Petr

    2015-06-01

    The input of Stein's model of a single neuron is usually described by using a Poisson process, which is assumed to represent the behaviour of spikes pooled from a large number of presynaptic spike trains. However, such a description of the input is not always appropriate as the variability cannot be separated from the intensity. Therefore, we create and study Stein's model with a more general input, a sum of equilibrium renewal processes. The mean and variance of the membrane potential are derived for this model. Using these formulas and numerical simulations, the model is analyzed to study the influence of the input variability on the properties of the membrane potential and the output spike trains. The generalized Stein's model is compared with the original Stein's model with Poissonian input using the relative difference of variances of membrane potential at steady state and the integral square error of output interspike intervals. Both of the criteria show large differences between the models for input with high variability. PMID:25910437

  13. Input/output system for multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernick, D.L.; Chan, K.K.; Chan, W.M.; Dan, Y.F.; Hoang, D.M.; Hussain, Z.; Iswandhi, G.I.; Korpi, J.E.; Sanner, M.W.; Zwangerman, J.A.

    1989-04-11

    A device controller is described, comprising: a first port-input/output controller coupled to a first input/output channel bus; and a second port-input/output controlled coupled to a second input/output channel bus; each of the first and second port-input/output controllers having: a first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a first host processor to provide a first data path on a first I/O channel through the first port I/O controller between the first host processor and any peripheral, and at least a second ownership latch means operative independently of the first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a second host processor independently of the first port input/output controller to provide a second data path on a second I/O channel through the second port I/O controller between the second host processor and any peripheral devices coupled to the device controller.

  14. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  15. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  16. Stability enhancement of haptic interaction by analog input shaper and its application to scaled teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yo-An; Kim, Jong-Phil; Ryu, Jeha

    2007-12-01

    This paper addresses an analog input shaper introduced in haptic control to improve the stability when interacting with virtual environments. High frequency inputs to a haptic device, which can occur in collision with a virtual wall with high stiffness, can bring limit cycle oscillations and instabilities. In order to reduce the high frequency input to an haptic device an analog input shaper is added to the control system. Since the input shaper acts as a low-pass filter, when a haptic pointer leaves the virtual wall with high stiffness, a user may feel slow decrease of impedance, moreover there may be negative impedance as if the wall is pulling. In order to prevent this, we add half-wave rectifiers which allow fast decrease of impedance and no negative input to a haptic device. The input shaper reduces the total energy supplied to a haptic device by preventing inputs with high frequency from flowing into a haptic device. Therefore it can be regarded as an artificial damping element. In order to apply the Energy-Bounding Algorithm (EBA),1 which can guarantee the stable haptic interaction, to a scaled teleoperation in a virtual nano-environment two scaling factors (velocity and force) are incorporated into EBA. By applying the analog input shaper to EBA in scaled teleoperation, the range of virtual wall stiffness which can be stably rendered by a haptic device is significantly extended.

  17. Conceptualizing, Understanding, and Predicting Responsible Decisions and Quality Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, N.; PytlikZillig, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    reported use of climate information in one's personal and work-related decisions, as well as significant predictors of one's willingness to commit to attend a four-hour public meeting and discussion with city leaders and energy experts for the purposes of thinking about and discussing local energy-related decisions. Finally, in order to consider future directions for assessing "responsible" or "quality" input in the area of climate change, we report data and results from experimental studies conducted in a different area of science: nanotechnology. Specifically, we discuss our methods for assessing quality of written input on the future development and regulation of nanotechnology under different experimental conditions (e.g., written alone or after discussion with a group), and the compare and contrast the best predictors of those operational definitions to those that we have explored in the area of climate change outreach contexts. Discussion will focus on the pros and cons of different ways of assessing the quality of public input.

  18. Budding of Taenia crassiceps Cysticerci In Vitro Is Promoted by Crowding in Addition to Hormonal, Stress, and Energy-Related Signals

    PubMed Central

    Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Ostoa-Jacobo, Pedro; Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Bazúa, Silvana; Larralde, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps cysticerci (cysts) reproduce by budding. The cysts' production of buds was measured in vitro to explore parasite and environmental-related factors involved in the extreme individual variation in parasite loads of inbred mice. Cysts were placed in in vitro culture for 10 days at initial parasite densities of 1, 5, 10 cysts/well in 1 ml of RPMI Medium 1640 without serum. Results showed that there is considerable intrinsic initial variation among inoculated cysts in their production of buds and that increasing parasite density (crowding) stimulates the overall production of buds and recruit into budding most of the cysts. Identical cultures were then subjected to various treatments such as heating and exposure to peroxide to induce stress, or to 17ß-estradiol, insulin, glucose, or insulin+glucose to supplement putatively limiting hormonal and energy resources. All treatments increased budding but the parasites' strong budding response to crowding alone overshadows the other treatments. PMID:20168999

  19. Superconducting Properties of MgB2 with Addition of Other AlB2-type Diborides and Carbon Sources, Prepared Using High Energy Ball Milling and HIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Durval; Silva, Lucas B. S. da; Metzner, Vivian C. V.; Hellstrom, Eric E.

    In the present work it is described the production of MgB2 samples by using the mixture of MgB2 with other diborides, (TaB2, VB2, and AlB2) which have the same C32 hexagonal structure as the MgB2, and simultaneous addition with the diborides and SiC, that contribute with C, to replace B in the crystalline structure of the matrix. As an important result, the critical current density (Jc) was improved at low magnetic fields when just the diborides are added. However, when SiC is added simultaneously with the diborides, the result is the improvement of Jc at high fields. The critical temperature (Tc) was maintained high.

  20. Input shaped large thrust maneuver with a tethered debris object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, Lee; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2014-03-01

    In order to reduce the debris population in LEO, remediation is necessary. An active debris removal method is explored that utilizes fuel reserves on a recently launched upper stage to rendezvous with, and tether to, debris. The system's tethered dynamics are explored using a discretized tether model attached to six degree of freedom end bodies. The thrust output is shaped to remove the spectral energy at the natural frequencies of the tether, significantly reducing the post-burn relative motion between the vehicles. The sensitivity of the input shaping performance due to imperfect knowledge of the debris mass demonstrates that a double notch spanning multiple frequencies around the first mode is necessary to be robust to unknown debris mass. On-orbit simulations show that input shaping helps the tethered system achieve smooth oscillations about a gravity gradient alignment, reducing collision likelihood.

  1. Input Shaped Large Thrust Maneuver with a Tethered Debris Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, L.; Schaub, H.

    2013-08-01

    In order to reduce the debris population in LEO, remediation is necessary. An active debris removal method is explored that utilizes fuel reserves on a recently launched upper stage to rendezvous with, and tether to, debris. The system's tethered dynamics are explored using a discretized tether model attached to six degree of freedom end bodies. The thrust output is shaped to remove the spectral energy at the natural frequencies of the tether, significantly reducing the post-burn relative motion between the vehicles. The sensitivity of the input shaping performance due to imperfect knowledge of the debris mass demonstrates that a double notch spanning multiple frequencies around the first mode is necessary to be robust to unknown debris mass. On-orbit simulations show that input shaping helps the tethered system achieve smooth oscillations about a gravity gradient alignment, reducing collision likelihood.

  2. The effect of cutting conditions on power inputs when machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushin, S. I.; Gruby, S. V.; Nosirsoda, Sh C.

    2016-08-01

    Any technological process involving modification of material properties or product form necessitates consumption of a certain power amount. When developing new technologies one should take into account the benefits of their implementation vs. arising power inputs. It is revealed that procedures of edge cutting machining are the most energy-efficient amongst the present day forming procedures such as physical and technical methods including electrochemical, electroerosion, ultrasound, and laser processing, rapid prototyping technologies etc, such as physical and technical methods including electrochemical, electroerosion, ultrasound, and laser processing, rapid prototyping technologies etc. An expanded formula for calculation of power inputs is deduced, which takes into consideration the mode of cutting together with the tip radius, the form of the replaceable multifaceted insert and its wear. Having taken as an example cutting of graphite iron by the assembled cutting tools with replaceable multifaceted inserts the authors point at better power efficiency of high feeding cutting in comparison with high-speed cutting.

  3. Six axis force feedback input device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a low friction, low inertia, six-axis force feedback input device comprising an arm with double-jointed, tendon-driven revolute joints, a decoupled tendon-driven wrist, and a base with encoders and motors. The input device functions as a master robot manipulator of a microsurgical teleoperated robot system including a slave robot manipulator coupled to an amplifier chassis, which is coupled to a control chassis, which is coupled to a workstation with a graphical user interface. The amplifier chassis is coupled to the motors of the master robot manipulator and the control chassis is coupled to the encoders of the master robot manipulator. A force feedback can be applied to the input device and can be generated from the slave robot to enable a user to operate the slave robot via the input device without physically viewing the slave robot. Also, the force feedback can be generated from the workstation to represent fictitious forces to constrain the input device's control of the slave robot to be within imaginary predetermined boundaries.

  4. Controlling Btu input with high-velocity burners

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, J.J.

    1995-09-01

    StepFire{trademark} (sometimes called pulse fire) controls heat input through a burner by rapidly cycling from high fire to low fire (or from high fire to off) to control the temperature of either an entire kiln or a zone within a kiln. In the StepFire process, each burner, rather than an entire zone of burners, is controlled. The StepFire process provides a better approach to temperature control: high-velocity burners improve temperature distribution across the load, whether the burners are fired vertically downward or horizontally; reentrainment effect of the burners breaks up crown drift and allows dissipation of energy into the product; high-velocity burners generate less NO{sub x} and co than injector-type burners; high-velocity burners put most of the combustion air through the burners and do not have to rely on the mass flow of air from the cooling zone to complete combustion and provide uniformity; individual cycling of the burners does not radically change the total input of gases to the furnace, thereby allowing pressure control; because burners are cycled individually, the entire zone of the furnace does not go from a heating to a cooling mode, but continues at an input rate to maintain uniformity of energy input through the stepping process. StepFire use on all types of kilns results in improved product properties and quality, reduced fuel use, increased production, fewer rejects and reduction of NO{sub x} and CO emissions. Because the burners operate under their optimum conditions during most of the firing cycles, NO{sub x} formation is reduced, and the quenching effect of the flame by excess air is not present, reducing the generation of CO.

  5. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  6. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition...

  7. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The Commission may, by rule, regulation, or order, impose upon any licensee such requirements, in addition to those established in...

  8. Role of the nonperturbative input in QCD resummed Drell-Yan Q{sub T} distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jianwei; Zhang, Xiaofei

    2001-06-01

    We analyze the role of the nonperturbative input in the Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) b-space QCD resummation formalism for Drell-Yan transverse momentum (Q{sub T}) distributions, and investigate the predictive power of the CSS formalism. We find that the predictive power of the CSS formalism has a strong dependence on the collision energy S in addition to its well-known Q{sup 2} dependence, and the S dependence improves the predictive power at collider energies. We show that a reliable extrapolation from perturbatively resummed b-space distributions to the nonperturbative large b region is necessary to ensure the correct Q{sub T} distributions. By adding power corrections to the renormalization group equations in the CSS formalism, we derive a new extrapolation formalism. We demonstrate that at collider energies the CSS resummation formalism plus our extrapolation has an excellent predictive power for W and Z production at all transverse momenta Q{sub T}{<=}Q. We also show that the b-space resummed Q{sub T} distributions provide a good description of Drell-Yan data at fixed target energies.

  9. Computer Generated Inputs for NMIS Processor Verification

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Mullens; J. E. Breeding; J. A. McEvers; R. W. Wysor; L. G. Chiang; J. R. Lenarduzzi; J. T. Mihalczo; J. K. Mattingly

    2001-06-29

    Proper operation of the Nuclear Identification Materials System (NMIS) processor can be verified using computer-generated inputs [BIST (Built-In-Self-Test)] at the digital inputs. Preselected sequences of input pulses to all channels with known correlation functions are compared to the output of the processor. These types of verifications have been utilized in NMIS type correlation processors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1984. The use of this test confirmed a malfunction in a NMIS processor at the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) in 1998. The NMIS processor boards were returned to the U.S. for repair and subsequently used in NMIS passive and active measurements with Pu at VNIIEF in 1999.

  10. Decontextualized language input and preschoolers' vocabulary development.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Meredith L

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses the importance of using decontextualized language, or language that is removed from the here and now including pretend, narrative, and explanatory talk, with preschool children. The literature on parents' use of decontextualized language is reviewed and results of a longitudinal study of parent decontextualized language input in relation to child vocabulary development are explained. The main findings are that parents who provide their preschool children with more explanations and narrative utterances about past or future events in the input have children with larger vocabularies 1 year later, even with quantity of parent input and child prior vocabulary skill controlled. Recommendations for how to engage children in decontextualized language conversations are provided.

  11. The construction of graph models for calculations of the properties of substitution isomers of basis structures on the basis of additivity of energy contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilov, D. Yu.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2012-05-01

    A method for the construction of additive models for calculations of the properties of substitution isomers of basis structures is described for the example of a series of X-substituted methylsilanes CH3 - k X k -SiH3 - l X l (where X = CH3, F, Cl, …, k, l = 0, 1, 2, 3). The method is based on similarity of subgraphs in graphs of several molecules and the arrangement of polygonal numbers (triangular, tetrahedral) of the Pascal triangle. Parameters taking into account multiple nonvalence interactions (-C-Si<, >C-Si<, …) through two atoms along the molecular chain of an X-substituted methylsilane (X = CH3) were for the first time explicitly included in the calculation scheme. Taking these interactions into account allows us to completely differentiate all the structural isomers of certain molecules and obtain numerical parameter values for predicting properties P under consideration in various approximations. Numerical calculations of Δf H {g,298/K o} were performed for 16 alkylsilanes (as X-substituted methylsilanes), including 7 compounds not studied experimentally.

  12. Different Effect of the Additional Electron-Withdrawing Cyano Group in Different Conjugation Bridge: The Adjusted Molecular Energy Levels and Largely Improved Photovoltaic Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyang; Fang, Manman; Hou, Yingqin; Tang, Runli; Yang, Yizhou; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-18

    Four organic sensitizers (LI-68-LI-71) bearing various conjugated bridges were designed and synthesized, in which the only difference between LI-68 and LI-69 (or LI-70 and LI-71) was the absence/presence of the CN group as the auxiliary electron acceptor. Interestingly, compared to the reference dye of LI-68, LI-69 bearing the additional CN group exhibited the bad performance with the decreased Jsc and Voc values. However, once one thiophene moiety near the anchor group was replaced by pyrrole with the electron-rich property, the resultant LI-71 exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency increase by about 3 folds from 2.75% (LI-69) to 7.95% (LI-71), displaying the synergistic effect of the two moieties (CN and pyrrole). Computational analysis disclosed that pyrrole as the auxiliary electron donor (D') in the conjugated bridge can compensate for the lower negative charge in the electron acceptor, which was caused by the CN group as the electron trap, leading to the more efficient electron injection and better photovoltaic performance.

  13. Different Effect of the Additional Electron-Withdrawing Cyano Group in Different Conjugation Bridge: The Adjusted Molecular Energy Levels and Largely Improved Photovoltaic Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyang; Fang, Manman; Hou, Yingqin; Tang, Runli; Yang, Yizhou; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-18

    Four organic sensitizers (LI-68-LI-71) bearing various conjugated bridges were designed and synthesized, in which the only difference between LI-68 and LI-69 (or LI-70 and LI-71) was the absence/presence of the CN group as the auxiliary electron acceptor. Interestingly, compared to the reference dye of LI-68, LI-69 bearing the additional CN group exhibited the bad performance with the decreased Jsc and Voc values. However, once one thiophene moiety near the anchor group was replaced by pyrrole with the electron-rich property, the resultant LI-71 exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency increase by about 3 folds from 2.75% (LI-69) to 7.95% (LI-71), displaying the synergistic effect of the two moieties (CN and pyrrole). Computational analysis disclosed that pyrrole as the auxiliary electron donor (D') in the conjugated bridge can compensate for the lower negative charge in the electron acceptor, which was caused by the CN group as the electron trap, leading to the more efficient electron injection and better photovoltaic performance. PMID:27101840

  14. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  15. Input/Output Subroutine Library Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Efficient, easy-to-use program moved easily to different computers. Purpose of NAVIO, Input/Output Subroutine Library, provides input/output package of software for FORTRAN programs that is portable, efficient, and easy to use. Implemented as hierarchy of libraries. At bottom is very small library containing only non-portable routines called "I/O Kernel." Design makes NAVIO easy to move from one computer to another, by simply changing kernel. NAVIO appropriate for software system of almost any size wherein different programs communicate through files.

  16. Dietary fiber for dogs: III. Effects of beet pulp and oat fiber additions to dog diets on nutrient intake, digestibility, metabolizable energy, and digesta mean retention time.

    PubMed

    Fahey, G C; Merchen, N R; Corbin, J E; Hamilton, A K; Bauer, L L; Titgemeyer, E C; Hirakawa, D A

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine whether alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated oat hulls (termed oat fiber; OF) are nutritionally efficacious as a source of dietary fiber in meat-based dog foods. Thirty female English Pointers were assigned in a completely randomized design to isonitrogenous diets. Treatments were 1) control diet, 2) 7.5% added beet pulp (BP), and 3) 2.5, 4) 5.0, and 5) 7.5% added OF. Inclusion of 7.5% BP increased (P less than .05) DM intake and decreased (P less than .05) digestibility of DM and OM compared with the control. Dry matter intake increased (P less than .05) with increasing level of OF and digestibility of DM, OM, and total dietary fiber (TDF) decreased (P less than .05). Digestibility of DM, OM, and TDF were higher for dogs fed the 7.5% BP than for those fed the 7.5% OF treatment. Digestible energy, expressed as a percentage of GE, was greater for the control treatment than for the 7.5% BP treatment. A linear decrease in DE (percentage of GE) was noted as the concentration of OF increased, and the DE value (percentage of GE) for the 7.5% BP treatment was greater (P less than .05) than that for the 7.5% OF treatment. A linear decrease (P less than .05) was noted in ME, expressed as a percentage of GE, as the level of OF increased. Frequency of defecation and mean retention time were unaffected (P greater than .05) by treatment. Oat fiber was an effective substitute for BP in dog diets.

  17. Partially connected feedforward neural networks structured by input types.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sanggil; Isik, Can

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to model partially connected feedforward neural networks (PCFNNs) from the identified input type (IT) which refers to whether each input is coupled with or uncoupled from other inputs in generating output. The identification is done by analyzing input sensitivity changes as amplifying the magnitude of inputs. The sensitivity changes of the uncoupled inputs are not correlated with the variation on any other input, while those of the coupled inputs are correlated with the variation on any one of the coupled inputs. According to the identified ITs, a PCFNN can be structured. Each uncoupled input does not share the neurons in the hidden layer with other inputs in order to contribute to output in an independent manner, while the coupled inputs share the neurons with one another. After deriving the mathematical input sensitivity analysis for each IT, several experiments, as well as a real example (blood pressure (BP) estimation), are described to demonstrate how well our method works.

  18. Three-input majority logic gate and multiple input logic circuit based on DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2013-06-12

    In biomolecular programming, the properties of biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids are harnessed for computational purposes. The field has gained considerable attention due to the possibility of exploiting the massive parallelism that is inherent in natural systems to solve computational problems. DNA has already been used to build complex molecular circuits, where the basic building blocks are logic gates that produce single outputs from one or more logical inputs. We designed and experimentally realized a three-input majority gate based on DNA strand displacement. One of the key features of a three-input majority gate is that the three inputs have equal priority, and the output will be true if any of the two inputs are true. Our design consists of a central, circular DNA strand with three unique domains between which are identical joint sequences. Before inputs are introduced to the system, each domain and half of each joint is protected by one complementary ssDNA that displays a toehold for subsequent displacement by the corresponding input. With this design the relationship between any two domains is analogous to the relationship between inputs in a majority gate. Displacing two or more of the protection strands will expose at least one complete joint and return a true output; displacing none or only one of the protection strands will not expose a complete joint and will return a false output. Further, we designed and realized a complex five-input logic gate based on the majority gate described here. By controlling two of the five inputs the complex gate can realize every combination of OR and AND gates of the other three inputs.

  19. Residential oil burners with low input and two-stage firing

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.; Leigh, R.; Krajewski, R.; Celebi, Y.; Fisher, L.; Kamath, B.

    1997-12-31

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner. At low firing rates, pressure-atomizing nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the small internal passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. To overcome the low input limitations of conventional burners, a low-pressure air-atomized burner has been developed that can operate at firing rates, as low as 0.25 gallons of oil per hour (10 kW). In addition, the burner can be operated in a high/low firing rate mode. Field tests with this burner have been conducted at a fixed input rate of 0.35 gph (14 kW) with a sidewall vented boiler/water storage tank combination. At the test home, instrumentation was installed to measure fuel and energy flows and record trends in system temperatures. Laboratory efficiency testing with water heaters and boilers has been completed using standard single-purpose and combined appliance test procedures. The tests quantify benefits due to low firing rates and other burner features. A two-stage oil burner gains a strong advantage in rated efficiency while maintaining capacity for high domestic hot water and space-heating loads.

  20. Input Enhancement in Instructed SLA: Theoretical Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael Sharwood

    1993-01-01

    The concept of input to the language learner is examined with reference to some current theorizing about language processing and the idea of modular systems of knowledge. It is argued that exposure to a second language engages the learner in a whole battery of different processing mechanisms. (21 references) (Author/LB)

  1. Multiple Input Microcantilever Sensor with Capacitive Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L., Jr.; Brown, G.M.; Bryan, W.L.; Clonts, L.G.; DePriest, J.C.; Emergy, M.S.; Ericson, M.N.; Hu, Z.; Jones, R.L.; Moore, M.R.; Oden, P.I.; Rochelle, J.M.; Smith, S.F.; Threatt, T.D.; Thundat, T.; Turner, G.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Wintenberg, A.L.

    1999-03-11

    A surface-micromachined MEMS process has been used to demonstrate multiple-input chemical sensing using selectively coated cantilever arrays. Combined hydrogen and mercury-vapor detection was achieved with a palm-sized, self-powered module with spread-spectrum telemetry reporting.

  2. Input-Based Incremental Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This fascinating presentation of current research undoes numerous myths about how we most effectively learn new words in a second language. In clear, reader-friendly text, the author details the successful approach of IBI vocabulary instruction, which emphasizes the presentation of target vocabulary as input early on and the incremental (gradual)…

  3. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon sequ...

  4. Input and Intake in Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents an approach for a productive way forward in the study of language acquisition, sealing the rift between claims of an innate linguistic hypothesis space and powerful domain general statistical inference. This approach breaks language acquisition into its component parts, distinguishing the input in the environment from…

  5. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon (C) input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon ...

  6. Treatments of Precipitation Inputs to Hydrologic Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrological models are used to assess many water resources problems from agricultural use and water quality to engineering issues. The success of these models are dependent on correct parameterization; the most sensitive being the rainfall input time series. These records can come from land-based ...

  7. Multichannel analyzers at high rates of input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, S. J.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Multichannel analyzer, used with a gating system incorporating pole-zero compensation, pile-up rejection, and baseline-restoration, achieves good resolution at high rates of input. It improves resolution, reduces tailing and rate-contributed continuum, and eliminates spectral shift.

  8. Selecting training inputs via greedy rank covering

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, A.L.; Santen, J.P.H. van

    1996-12-31

    We present a general method for selecting a small set of training inputs, the observations of which will suffice to estimate the parameters of a given linear model. We exemplify the algorithm in terms of predicting segmental duration of phonetic-segment feature vectors in a text-to-speech synthesizer, but the algorithm will work for any linear model and its associated domain.

  9. The Contrast Theory of negative input.

    PubMed

    Saxton, M

    1997-02-01

    Beliefs about whether or not children receive corrective input for grammatical errors depend crucially on how one defines the concept of correction. Arguably, previous conceptualizations do not provide a viable basis for empirical research (Gold, 1967; Brown & Hanlon, 1970; Hirsh-Pasek, Treiman & Schneiderman, 1984). Within the Contrast Theory of negative input, an alternative definition of negative evidence is offered, based on the idea that the unique discourse structure created in the juxtaposition of child error and adult correct form can reveal to the child the contrast, or conflict, between the two forms, and hence provide a basis for rejecting the erroneous form. A within-subjects experimental design was implemented for 36 children (mean age 5;0), in order to compare the immediate effects of negative evidence with those of positive input, on the acquisition of six novel irregular past tense forms. Children reproduced the correct irregular model more often, and persisted with fewer errors, following negative evidence rather than positive input.

  10. "Thumball" Auxiliary Data-Input Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. Douglas; Busquets, Anthony M.; Hogge, Thomas W.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1988-01-01

    Track-ball-type device mounted on joystick and operated by thumb. Thumball designed to enable precise input of data about two different axes to autopilot, avionics computer, or other electronic device without need for operator to remove hands from joystick or other vehicle control levers.

  11. Adaptive Random Testing with Combinatorial Input Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics. PMID:24772036

  12. Input, Interaction and Output: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan; Mackey, Alison

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of what has come to be known as the "Interaction Hypothesis," the basic tenet of which is that through input and interaction with interlocutors, language learners have opportunities to notice differences between their own formulations of the target language and the language of their conversational…

  13. Building profile input program - a standardized method for calculating building downwash input values

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhoff, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    Building downwash is a complex technical subject that has important ramifications in the field of air quality dispersion modeling. Building downwash algorithms have been incorporated into air quality dispersion models such as the Industrial Source Complex (ISC2) Models, short term and long term versions (ISCST2 and ISCLT2). Input data preparation for these algorithms must reflect Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance on Good Engineering Practice (GEP) stack height and building downwash. The current guidance is complex and errors can easily be made in the input data preparation. A computer program called the Building Profile Input Program (BPIP) was written to alleviate errors caused during input data preparation and to provide a standardized method for calculating building height (BH) and projected building width (PBW) values for input to the ISC2 models that reflect EPA guidance.

  14. IFC HVAC interface to EnergyPlus - A case of expanded interoperability for energy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Maile, Tobias

    2004-03-29

    Tedious manual input of data that define a building, its systems and its expected pattern of use and operating schedules for building energy performance simulation has in the past diverted time and resources from productive simulation runs. In addition to its previously released IFCtoIDF utility that semiautomates the import of building geometry, the new IFC HVAC interface to EnergyPlus (released at the end of 2003) makes it possible to import and export most of the data that define HVAC equipment and systems in a building directly from and to other IFC compatible software tools. This reduces the manual input of other data needed for successful simulation with EnergyPlus to a minimum. The main purpose of this new interface is to enable import of HVAC equipment and systems definitions, generated by other IFC compatible software tools (such as HVAC systems design tools) and data bases, into EnergyPlus, and to write such definitions contained in EnergyPlus input files to the original IFC files from which building geometry was extracted for the particular EnergyPlus input. In addition, this interface sets an example for developers of other software tools how to import and/or export data other than building geometry from and/or into EnergyPlus. This paper describes the necessary simplifications and shortcuts incorporated in this interface, its operating environment, interface architecture, and the basic conditions and methodology for its use with EnergyPlus.

  15. Allochthonous Matter Input in Five Headwater Streams in Southwestern Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chara, J.; Baird, D.; Telfer, T.

    2005-05-01

    In order to determine the interactions between riparian vegetation and the stream environment in relation to the provision and seasonality of allochthonous energy, a study was done measuring the amount of litter inputs in five streams at mid altitude in southwestern Colombia during one year. Direct and lateral litter traps were placed in a 100m reach of each stream. Total amount of litter fall ranged from 1406 to 2812 g-m-2 year-1. Leaves were the most important component of the litter representing between 56 to 72% of direct and between 68 to 81% of lateral inputs. Seasonality of litter fall was minimal and only in one stream direct input was negatively correlated with rainfall (r=-0.62; p=0.033). According to these results, low-order streams in middle altitude in Colombia receive one of the highest amounts of litter fall reported so far. This supply is constant throughout the year providing a continuous source of food and substrate for the stream environment. As in temperate streams litterfall in the Andean zone is an important link between streams and the riparian environment. The higher amount recorded and the constant supply demonstrate that deforestation of riparian forests may be more negative for the streams in tropical areas.

  16. Reduced heat input keyhole welding through improved joint design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, John M. (Inventor); Harwig, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An improved high energy density welding method for reducing input keyhole welding prepares the weld joint (8) between two edges (10, 14) of at least one member by separating the edges (10, 14) of the member (12, 16) with a controllable gap (22) by a projecting portion (24) selectively positioned on one edge (10, 14) of the member (12, 16). The projecting portion (24) closely abuts the other edge of the member for maintaining the controlled distance (d) of the controllable gap (22) to enhance the welding method.

  17. Feed and manure use in low-N-input and high-N-input dairy cattle production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. Mark

    2014-11-01

    In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa fertilizers and feeds are costly, not readily available and used sparingly in agricultural production. In many parts of Western Europe, North America, and Oceania fertilizers and feeds are relatively inexpensive, readily available and used abundantly to maximize profitable agricultural production. A case study, dairy systems approach was used to illustrate how differences in feed and manure management in a low-N-input dairy cattle system (Niger, West Africa) and a high-N-input dairy production system (Wisconsin, USA) impact agricultural production and environmental N loss. In Niger, an additional daily feed N intake of 114 g per dairy animal unit (AU, 1000 kg live weight) could increase annual milk production from 560 to 1320 kg AU-1, and the additional manure N could greatly increase millet production. In Wisconsin, reductions in daily feed N intake of 100 g AU-1 would not greatly impact milk production but decrease urinary N excretion by 25% and ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from manure by 18% to 30%. In Niger, compared to the practice of housing livestock and applying dung only onto fields, corralling cattle or sheep on cropland (to capture urinary N) increased millet yields by 25% to 95%. The additional millet grain due to dung applications or corralling would satisfy the annual food grain requirements of 2-5 persons; the additional forage would provide 120-300 more days of feed for a typical head of cattle; and 850 to 1600 kg ha-1 more biomass would be available for soil conservation. In Wisconsin, compared to application of barn manure only, corralling heifers in fields increased forage production by only 8% to 11%. The application of barn manure or corralling increased forage production by 20% to 70%. This additional forage would provide 350-580 more days of feed for a typical dairy heifer. Study results demonstrate how different approaches to feed and manure management in low-N-input and high-N-input dairy cattle

  18. Control of food handling by cutaneous receptor input in squirrels.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, G L

    1980-01-01

    In a complementary neuroanatomical study by Brenowitz in 1980, it was shown that tree squirrels (Sciurus niger) have a higher relative density of mechanoreceptors in their glabrous forepaw skin than do ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus). The main purpose of this sudy was to test the prediction that tree squirrels would depend upon somatic sensory (cutaneous) input from their forepaws to a greater extent than would ground squirrels in food handling behavior. In addition, a series of more general questions about the sensory control of food handling was examined. First, using different sized food items, it was shown that food handling (rate of manipulation) is subject to sensory control, in general. Secondly, comparision of sham-operated groups with groups receiving median nerve (innervating the palmar surface) lesions showed that cutaneous input from the volar surface of the forepaw contributes to the sensory control in both species of squirrels. Thirdly, comparison of lesion effects in the two species showed that, as predicted, tree squirrels depend upon cutaneous input from their volar forepaw to a greater extent than do ground squirrels. Fourthly, by reanalyzing the above data it was shown that there is continued sensory feedback from food items rather than only an initial evaluation of them. PMID:7437901

  19. Biological 2-Input Decoder Circuit in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Decoders are combinational circuits that convert information from n inputs to a maximum of 2n outputs. This operation is of major importance in computing systems yet it is vastly underexplored in synthetic biology. Here, we present a synthetic gene network architecture that operates as a biological decoder in human cells, converting 2 inputs to 4 outputs. As a proof-of-principle, we use small molecules to emulate the two inputs and fluorescent reporters as the corresponding four outputs. The experiments are performed using transient transfections in human kidney embryonic cells and the characterization by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. We show a clear separation between the ON and OFF mean fluorescent intensity states. Additionally, we adopt the integrated mean fluorescence intensity for the characterization of the circuit and show that this metric is more robust to transfection conditions when compared to the mean fluorescent intensity. To conclude, we present the first implementation of a genetic decoder. This combinational system can be valuable toward engineering higher-order circuits as well as accommodate a multiplexed interface with endogenous cellular functions. PMID:24694115

  20. Kernel principal component analysis for stochastic input model generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiang; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} KPCA is used to construct a reduced order stochastic model of permeability. {yields} A new approach is proposed to solve the pre-image problem in KPCA. {yields} Polynomial chaos is used to provide a parametric stochastic input model. {yields} Flow in porous media with channelized permeability is considered. - Abstract: Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media provides useful information only if realistic input models of the material property variations are used. These input models are often constructed from a set of experimental samples of the underlying random field. To this end, the Karhunen-Loeve (K-L) expansion, also known as principal component analysis (PCA), is the most popular model reduction method due to its uniform mean-square convergence. However, it only projects the samples onto an optimal linear subspace, which results in an unreasonable representation of the original data if they are non-linearly related to each other. In other words, it only preserves the first-order (mean) and second-order statistics (covariance) of a random field, which is insufficient for reproducing complex structures. This paper applies kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to construct a reduced-order stochastic input model for the material property variation in heterogeneous media. KPCA can be considered as a nonlinear version of PCA. Through use of kernel functions, KPCA further enables the preservation of higher-order statistics of the random field, instead of just two-point statistics as in the standard Karhunen-Loeve (K-L) expansion. Thus, this method can model non-Gaussian, non-stationary random fields. In this work, we also propose a new approach to solve the pre-image problem involved in KPCA. In addition, polynomial chaos (PC) expansion is used to represent the random coefficients in KPCA which provides a parametric stochastic input model. Thus, realizations, which are statistically consistent with the experimental data, can be

  1. Spectrally opponent inputs to the human luminance pathway: slow +M and -L cone inputs revealed by intense long-wavelength adaptation.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Andrew; Plummer, Daniel J; Montag, Ethan D

    2005-07-01

    The nature of the inputs to achromatic luminance flicker perception was explored psychophysically by measuring middle- (M-) and long-wavelength-sensitive (L-) cone modulation sensitivities, M- and L-cone phase delays, and spectral sensitivities as a function of temporal frequency. Under intense long-wavelength adaptation, the existence of multiple luminance inputs was revealed by substantial frequency-dependent changes in all three types of measure. Fast (f) and slow (s) M-cone input signals of the same polarity (+sM and +fM) sum at low frequencies, but then destructively interfere near 16 Hz because of the delay between them. In contrast, fast and slow L-cone input signals of opposite polarity (-sL and +fL) cancel at low frequencies, but then constructively interfere near 16 Hz. Although these slow, spectrally opponent luminance inputs (+sM and -sL) would usually be characterized as chromatic, and the fast, non-opponent inputs (+fM and +fL) as achromatic, both contribute to flicker photometric nulls without producing visible colour variation. Although its output produces an achromatic percept, the luminance channel has slow, spectrally opponent inputs in addition to the expected non-opponent ones. Consequently, it is not possible in general to silence this channel with pairs of 'equiluminant' alternating stimuli, since stimuli equated for the non-opponent luminance mechanism (+fM and +fL) may still generate spectrally opponent signals (+sM and +sL).

  2. Meta-code for systematic analysis of chemical addition (SACHA): application to fluorination of C70 and carbon nanostructure growth.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Christopher P; Lier, Gregory Van; Geerlings, Paul; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a new computer program able to systematically study chemical addition to and growth or evolution of carbon nanostructures. SACHA is a meta-code able to exploit a wide variety of pre-existing molecular structure codes, automating the otherwise onerous task of constructing, running, and analyzing the large number of input files that are required when exploring structural isomers and addition paths. By way of examples we consider fluorination of the fullerene cage C70 and carbon nanostructure growth through C2 addition. We discuss the possibilities for extension of this technique to rapidly and efficiently explore structural energy landscapes and application to other areas of chemical and materials research.

  3. The role of the input scale in parton distribution analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pedro Jimenez-Delgado

    2012-08-01

    A first systematic study of the effects of the choice of the input scale in global determinations of parton distributions and QCD parameters is presented. It is shown that, although in principle the results should not depend on these choices, in practice a relevant dependence develops as a consequence of what is called procedural bias. This uncertainty should be considered in addition to other theoretical and experimental errors, and a practical procedure for its estimation is proposed. Possible sources of mistakes in the determination of QCD parameter from parton distribution analysis are pointed out.

  4. Energy input and HI spin temperatures in low pressure regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbelli, E.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1990-01-01

    Two recent (unpublished) HI emission/absorption studies carried out with good sensitivity using the Arecibo 21 cm beam are discussed. One study (Colgan, Salpeter and Terzian) looked for high velocity clouds of our own Galaxy in absorption in the directions of 63 of the brightest continuum sources reachable with the Arecibo telescope. HI emission mapping in the neighborhood of these directions was also carried out. The other study (Corbelli and Schneider) looked for absorption along lines of sight to about 50 weaker sources which pass within a few diameters of nearby disk galaxies. Neither study detected any absorption.

  5. Disentangling input and output-related components of spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Loetscher, Tobias; Nicholls, Michael E R; Brodtmann, Amy; Thomas, Nicole A; Brugger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a heterogeneous disorder with a multitude of manifestations and subtypes. Common clinical paper and pencil neglect tests fail to differentiate between these subtypes. For example, neglect patients typically bisect lines to the right. This bias can be caused by an underestimation of the left half of the line (input-related deficit), by the failure to direct actions toward the left side of space (output-related deficit), or by a mixture of these impairments. To disentangle these impairments, we used a test consisting of a line bisection task on a touch screen monitor (manual motor task) and the subsequent judgment of one's own bisection performance (visual perceptual task). It was hypothesized that patients with mainly output-related neglect should be better able to recognize their misbisected lines than patients with purely input-related neglect. In a group of 16 patients suffering from spatial neglect after right brain damage, we found that patients were three times more likely to suffer from a predominantly input-related than from an output-related subtype. The results thus suggest that neglect is typically an input-related impairment. Additional analysis of the line bisection task revealed that temporal (slowness in initiation and execution of contralateral movements) and spatial (insufficient movement amplitude toward the contralesional side) aspects of output-related neglect were mutually unrelated. This independence raises the possibility that a fine-grained differentiation of output-related neglect is required. That is, impairments in lateralized temporal and spatial aspects of movements may underlie different neglect subtypes.

  6. Disentangling input and output-related components of spatial neglect

    PubMed Central

    Loetscher, Tobias; Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Brodtmann, Amy; Thomas, Nicole A.; Brugger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a heterogeneous disorder with a multitude of manifestations and subtypes. Common clinical paper and pencil neglect tests fail to differentiate between these subtypes. For example, neglect patients typically bisect lines to the right. This bias can be caused by an underestimation of the left half of the line (input-related deficit), by the failure to direct actions toward the left side of space (output-related deficit), or by a mixture of these impairments. To disentangle these impairments, we used a test consisting of a line bisection task on a touch screen monitor (manual motor task) and the subsequent judgment of one's own bisection performance (visual perceptual task). It was hypothesized that patients with mainly output-related neglect should be better able to recognize their misbisected lines than patients with purely input-related neglect. In a group of 16 patients suffering from spatial neglect after right brain damage, we found that patients were three times more likely to suffer from a predominantly input-related than from an output-related subtype. The results thus suggest that neglect is typically an input-related impairment. Additional analysis of the line bisection task revealed that temporal (slowness in initiation and execution of contralateral movements) and spatial (insufficient movement amplitude toward the contralesional side) aspects of output-related neglect were mutually unrelated. This independence raises the possibility that a fine-grained differentiation of output-related neglect is required. That is, impairments in lateralized temporal and spatial aspects of movements may underlie different neglect subtypes. PMID:22707937

  7. Limited fetch revisited: Comparison of wind input terms, in surface wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Andrei; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    Results pertaining to numerical solutions of the Hasselmann kinetic equation (HE), for wind driven sea spectra, in the fetch limited geometry, are presented. Five versions of source functions, including the recently introduced ZRP model (Zakharov et al., 2012), have been studied, for the exact expression of Snl and high-frequency implicit dissipation, due to wave-breaking. Four of the five experiments were done in the absence of spectral peak dissipation for various Sin terms. They demonstrated the dominance of quadruplet wave-wave interaction, in the energy balance, and the formation of self-similar regimes, of unlimited wave energy growth, along the fetch. Between them was the ZRP model, which strongly agreed with dozens of field observations performed in the seas and lakes, since 1947. The fifth, the WAM3 wind input term experiment, used additional spectral peak dissipation and reproduced the results of a previous, similar, numerical simulation described in Komen et al. (1994), but only supported the field experiments for moderate fetches, demonstrating a total energy saturation at half of that of the Pierson-Moscowits limit. The alternative framework for HE numerical simulation is proposed, along with a set of tests, allowing one to select physically-justified source terms.

  8. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  9. Input to state stability in reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Models in ecology and biogeochemistry, in particular models of the global carbon cycle, can be generalized as systems of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). For many applications, it is important to determine the stability properties for this type of systems, but most methods available for autonomous systems are not necessarily applicable for the non-autonomous case. We discuss here stability notions for non-autonomous nonlinear models represented by systems of ODEs explicitly dependent on time and a time-varying input signal. We propose Input to State Stability (ISS) as candidate for the necessary generalization of the established analysis with respect to equilibria or invariant sets for autonomous systems, and show its usefulness by applying it to reservoir models typical for element cycling in ecosystem, e.g. in soil organic matter decomposition. We also show how ISS generalizes existent concepts formerly only available for Linear Time Invariant (LTI) and Linear Time Variant (LTV) systems to the nonlinear case.

  10. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position,more » and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.« less

  11. Multimodal interfaces with voice and gesture input

    SciTech Connect

    Milota, A.D.; Blattner, M.M.

    1995-07-20

    The modalities of speech and gesture have different strengths and weaknesses, but combined they create synergy where each modality corrects the weaknesses of the other. We believe that a multimodal system such a one interwining speech and gesture must start from a different foundation than ones which are based solely on pen input. In order to provide a basis for the design of a speech and gesture system, we have examined the research in other disciplines such as anthropology and linguistics. The result of this investigation was a taxonomy that gave us material for the incorporation of gestures whose meanings are largely transparent to the users. This study describes the taxonomy and gives examples of applications to pen input systems.

  12. Virtual input device with diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ching Chin; Chu, Chang Sheng

    2005-02-01

    As a portable device, such as PDA and cell phone, a small size build in virtual input device is more convenient for complex input demand. A few years ago, a creative idea called 'virtual keyboard' is announced, but up to now there's still no mass production method for this idea. In this paper we'll show the whole procedure of making a virtual keyboard. First of all is the HOE (Holographic Optical Element) design of keyboard image which yields a fan angle about 30 degrees, and then use the electron forming method to copy this pattern in high precision. And finally we can product this element by inject molding. With an adaptive lens design we can get a well correct keyboard image in distortion and a wilder fan angle about 70 degrees. With a batter alignment of HOE pattern lithography, we"re sure to get higher diffraction efficiency.

  13. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position, and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.

  14. Signaling inputs to invadopodia and podosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Daisuke; Branch, Kevin M.; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is a fundamental cell property that allows cells to alter their microenvironment and move through tissues. Invadopodia and podosomes are subcellular actin-rich structures that are specialized for matrix degradation and are formed by cancer and normal cells, respectively. Although initial studies focused on defining the core machinery of these two structures, recent studies have identified inputs from both growth factor and adhesion signaling as crucial for invasive activity. This Commentary will outline the current knowledge on the upstream signaling inputs to invadopodia and podosomes and their role in governing distinct stages of these invasive structures. We discuss invadopodia and podosomes as adhesion structures and highlight new data showing that invadopodia-associated adhesion rings promote the maturation of already-formed invadopodia. We present a model in which growth factor stimulation leads to phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity and formation of invadopodia, whereas adhesion signaling promotes exocytosis of proteinases at invadopodia. PMID:23843616

  15. Controlling Synfire Chain by Inhibitory Synaptic Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Takashi; Câteau, Hideyuki; Urakubo, Hidetoshi; Okada, Masato

    2007-04-01

    The propagation of highly synchronous firings across neuronal networks, called the synfire chain, has been actively studied both theoretically and experimentally. The temporal accuracy and remarkable stability of the propagation have been repeatedly examined in previous studies. However, for such a mode of signal transduction to play a major role in processing information in the brain, the propagation should also be controlled dynamically and flexibly. Here, we show that inhibitory but not excitatory input can bidirectionally modulate the propagation, i.e., enhance or suppress the synchronous firings depending on the timing of the input. Our simulations based on the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model demonstrate this bidirectional modulation and suggest that it should be achieved with any biologically inspired modeling. Our finding may help describe a concrete scenario of how multiple synfire chains lying in a neuronal network are appropriately controlled to perform significant information processing.

  16. Sensory synergy as environmental input integration

    PubMed Central

    Alnajjar, Fady; Itkonen, Matti; Berenz, Vincent; Tournier, Maxime; Nagai, Chikara; Shimoda, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a method to feed proper environmental inputs back to the central nervous system (CNS) remains one of the challenges in achieving natural movement when part of the body is replaced with an artificial device. Muscle synergies are widely accepted as a biologically plausible interpretation of the neural dynamics between the CNS and the muscular system. Yet the sensorineural dynamics of environmental feedback to the CNS has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we address this issue by exploring the concept of sensory synergy. In contrast to muscle synergy, we hypothesize that sensory synergy plays an essential role in integrating the overall environmental inputs to provide low-dimensional information to the CNS. We assume that sensor synergy and muscle synergy communicate using these low-dimensional signals. To examine our hypothesis, we conducted posture control experiments involving lateral disturbance with nine healthy participants. Proprioceptive information represented by the changes on muscle lengths were estimated by using the musculoskeletal model analysis software SIMM. Changes on muscles lengths were then used to compute sensory synergies. The experimental results indicate that the environmental inputs were translated into the two dimensional signals and used to move the upper limb to the desired position immediately after the lateral disturbance. Participants who showed high skill in posture control were found to be likely to have a strong correlation between sensory and muscle signaling as well as high coordination between the utilized sensory synergies. These results suggest the importance of integrating environmental inputs into suitable low-dimensional signals before providing them to the CNS. This mechanism should be essential when designing the prosthesis' sensory system to make the controller simpler. PMID:25628523

  17. Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingfan Zhang Qinghong

    2006-09-15

    In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

  18. Output-input ratio in thermally fluctuating biomolecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzynski, Michal; Torchala, Mieczyslaw; Chelminiak, Przemyslaw

    2014-01-01

    Biological molecular machines are proteins that operate under isothermal conditions and hence are referred to as free energy transducers. They can be formally considered as enzymes that simultaneously catalyze two chemical reactions: the free energy-donating (input) reaction and the free energy-accepting (output) one. Most if not all biologically active proteins display a slow stochastic dynamics of transitions between a variety of conformational substates composing their native state. This makes the description of the enzymatic reaction kinetics in terms of conventional rate constants insufficient. In the steady state, upon taking advantage of the assumption that each reaction proceeds through a single pair (the gate) of transition conformational substates of the enzyme-substrates complex, the degree of coupling between the output and the input reaction fluxes has been expressed in terms of the mean first-passage times on a conformational transition network between the distinguished substates. The theory is confronted with the results of random-walk simulations on the five-dimensional hypercube. The formal proof is given that, for single input and output gates, the output-input degree of coupling cannot exceed unity. As some experiments suggest such exceeding, looking for the conditions for increasing the degree of coupling value over unity challenges the theory. Performed simulations of random walks on several model networks involving more extended gates indicate that the case of the degree of coupling value higher than 1 is realized in a natural way on critical branching trees extended by long-range shortcuts. Such networks are scale-free and display the property of the small world. For short-range shortcuts, the networks are scale-free and fractal, representing a reasonable model for biomolecular machines displaying tight coupling, i.e., the degree of coupling equal exactly to unity. A hypothesis is stated that the protein conformational transition networks, as

  19. Output-input ratio in thermally fluctuating biomolecular machines.

    PubMed

    Kurzynski, Michal; Torchala, Mieczyslaw; Chelminiak, Przemyslaw

    2014-01-01

    Biological molecular machines are proteins that operate under isothermal conditions and hence are referred to as free energy transducers. They can be formally considered as enzymes that simultaneously catalyze two chemical reactions: the free energy-donating (input) reaction and the free energy-accepting (output) one. Most if not all biologically active proteins display a slow stochastic dynamics of transitions between a variety of conformational substates composing their native state. This makes the description of the enzymatic reaction kinetics in terms of conventional rate constants insufficient. In the steady state, upon taking advantage of the assumption that each reaction proceeds through a single pair (the gate) of transition conformational substates of the enzyme-substrates complex, the degree of coupling between the output and the input reaction fluxes has been expressed in terms of the mean first-passage times on a conformational transition network between the distinguished substates. The theory is confronted with the results of random-walk simulations on the five-dimensional hypercube. The formal proof is given that, for single input and output gates, the output-input degree of coupling cannot exceed unity. As some experiments suggest such exceeding, looking for the conditions for increasing the degree of coupling value over unity challenges the theory. Performed simulations of random walks on several model networks involving more extended gates indicate that the case of the degree of coupling value higher than 1 is realized in a natural way on critical branching trees extended by long-range shortcuts. Such networks are scale-free and display the property of the small world. For short-range shortcuts, the networks are scale-free and fractal, representing a reasonable model for biomolecular machines displaying tight coupling, i.e., the degree of coupling equal exactly to unity. A hypothesis is stated that the protein conformational transition networks, as

  20. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  1. Molecular structure input on the web.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Peter

    2010-02-02

    A molecule editor, that is program for input and editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. This review focuses on a special type of molecule editors, namely those that are used for molecule structure input on the web. Scientific computing is now moving more and more in the direction of web services and cloud computing, with servers scattered all around the Internet. Thus a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, and a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential.The review covers a history of web-based structure input, starting with simple text entry boxes and early molecule editors based on clickable maps, before moving to the current situation dominated by Java applets. One typical example - the popular JME Molecule Editor - will be described in more detail. Modern Ajax server-side molecule editors are also presented. And finally, the possible future direction of web-based molecule editing, based on technologies like JavaScript and Flash, is discussed.

  2. Changes in input strength and number are driven by distinct mechanisms at the retinogeniculate synapse

    PubMed Central

    Lin, David J.; Kang, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vision influences the functional remodeling of the mouse retinogeniculate synapse, the connection between retinal ganglion cells and thalamic relay neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Initially, each relay neuron receives a large number of weak retinal inputs. Over a 2- to 3-wk developmental window, the majority of these inputs are eliminated, and the remaining inputs are strengthened. This period of refinement is followed by a critical period when visual experience changes the strength and connectivity of the retinogeniculate synapse. Visual deprivation of mice by dark rearing from postnatal day (P)20 results in a dramatic weakening of synaptic strength and recruitment of additional inputs. In the present study we asked whether experience-dependent plasticity at the retinogeniculate synapse represents a homeostatic response to changing visual environment. We found that visual experience starting at P20 following visual deprivation from birth results in weakening of existing retinal inputs onto relay neurons without significant changes in input number, consistent with homeostatic synaptic scaling of retinal inputs. On the other hand, the recruitment of new inputs to the retinogeniculate synapse requires previous visual experience prior to the critical period. Taken together, these findings suggest that diverse forms of homeostatic plasticity drive experience-dependent remodeling at the retinogeniculate synapse. PMID:24848465

  3. Spike synchrony generated by modulatory common input through NMDA-type synapses.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Nobuhiko; von der Heydt, Rüdiger; Niebur, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    Common excitatory input to neurons increases their firing rates and the strength of the spike correlation (synchrony) between them. Little is known, however, about the synchronizing effects of modulatory common input. Here, we show that modulatory common input with the slow synaptic kinetics of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors enhances firing rates and also produces synchrony. Tight synchrony (correlations on the order of milliseconds) always increases with modulatory strength. Unexpectedly, the relationship between strength of modulation and strength of loose synchrony (tens of milliseconds) is not monotonic: The strongest loose synchrony is obtained for intermediate modulatory amplitudes. This finding explains recent neurophysiological results showing that in cortical areas V1 and V2, presumed modulatory top-down input due to contour grouping increases (loose and tight) synchrony but that additional modulatory input due to top-down attention does not change tight synchrony and actually decreases loose synchrony. These neurophysiological findings are understood from our model of integrate-and-fire neurons under the assumption that contour grouping as well as attention lead to additive modulatory common input through NMDA-type synapses. In contrast, circuits with common projections through model α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors did not exhibit the paradoxical decrease of synchrony with increased input. Our results suggest that NMDA receptors play a critical role in top-down response modulation in the visual cortex. PMID:27486111

  4. Input to the PRAST computer code used in the SRS probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kearnaghan, D.P.

    1992-10-15

    The PRAST (Production Reactor Algorithm for Source Terms) computer code was developed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company and Science Application International Corporation for the quantification of source terms for the SRS Savannah River Site (SRS) Reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment. PRAST requires as input a set of release fractions, decontamination factors, transfer fractions and source term characteristics that accurately reflect the conditions that are evaluated by PRAST. This document links the analyses which form the basis for the PRAST input parameters. In addition, it gives the distribution of the input parameters that are uncertain and considered to be important to the evaluation of the source terms to the environment.

  5. Additional risk of end-of-the-pipe geoengineering technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohle, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Humans are engineers, even the artists who engineer the surface of the globe. Should humans endeavour to engineer the Earth to counter climate change hazards? Striving towards 'global sustainability' will require to adjust the current production and consumption patterns. Contrary to an approach of global sustainability, 'geoengineering' deploys a 'technology fix' for the same purpose. Humans are much inclined to look for technological fixes for problems because well engineered technological methods have created modern societies. Thus, it seems obvious to apply an engineering solution to climate change issues too. In particular, as air pollution causing acid rains has been reduced by cleaner combustion processes or ozone destructing chemical coolants have been replaced by other substances. Common to these approaches was to reduce inputs into global or regional systems by withholding emission, replacing substances or limiting use cases for certain substances. Thus, the selected approach was a technological fix or regulatory measure targeting the 'start of the pipe'. However applying a 'start of the pipe' approach to climate change faces the issue that mankind should reduce inputs were its hurts, namely reducing radically energy that is produced from burning fossil fuels. Capping burning of fossil fuels would be disruptive for the economic structures or the consumption pattern of the developed and developing industrialised societies. Facing that dilemma, affordable geoengineering looks tempting for some. However geoengineering technologies, which counter climate change by other means than carbon capture at combustion, are of a different nature than the technological fixes and negotiated regulatory actions, which so far have been applied to limit threats to regional and global systems. Most of the proposed technologies target other parts of the climate system but the carbon-dioxide input into the atmosphere. Therefore, many geoengineering technologies differ

  6. Effects of heat input on the low power Nd:YAG pulse laser conduction weldability of magnesium alloy AZ61

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Dong; Shen, Jun; Lai, Shiqiang; Chen, Jie; Xu, Nan; Liu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The effects of heat input on the low power Nd:YAG pulse laser conduction weldability of magnesium alloy AZ61 plates were investigated. The results show that for a hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy plate laser conduction welding, the penetration depth and area of welds cross-section increased with an increase of the heat input. The microstructure of a band zone, which is located in the fusion zone (FZ) and close to the fusion boundary, evolved with an increase of the heat input. Moreover, an increase of the heat input increased the tendency of the formation of solidification cracking and liquation cracking. The porosities and average diameters of pores increased with an increase of the heat input but reduced sharply when a relatively large heat input was achieved. In addition, the degree of formation of craters increased linearly with an increase of the heat input.

  7. Role of sensory input in the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Fantino, M

    1984-01-01

    The role of the sensory input involved in the control of the food intake is briefly reviewed. Signals from mouth and throat, as well as signals from the gastrointestinal tract and the liver, are necessary but none of them are sufficient to induce satiation. The oral cues initiated by the food intake have a dual action on the feeding behavior. They first stimulate the intake in the hungry subjects. They sustain it until the amount of food ingested reaches the level necessary to equilibrate the energy balance. Finally, they participate, with the sensory input from the gastrointestinal tract, in the process inhibiting the food intake. The hedonic hypothesis of the food intake control is an attempt to explain this dual action of the peripheral alimentary analyzer in this homeostatic behavior. It was proposed that the alimentary pleasure or displeasure brought by alimentary stimuli acts as a drive for the food intake behavior. Indeed, in normal human subjects, the affective component of the alimentary sensations is not constant, but depends on the subjects' internal state. From pleasant, in subjects requiring some energy supply for long-term or short-term energy regulation, alimentary sensations become less pleasant or unpleasant in satiated subjects or in overfed subjects. This change of the affective component of a peripheral sensation, according to the internal state, was called: negative alimentary alliesthesia. Alliesthesia is a specific and reproducible phenomenon. It has been shown that the internal signal which induces negative alimentary alliesthesia depends on the carbohydrate concentration into the gastrointestinal tract, mainly into the duodenum. This signal may provide information related to the energy content of the ingested food. The neural or humoral nature of the transmission of this information from the gut to the brain is discussed. A neural link possibly involves the enteric glucidoreceptors recently described. In conclusion, the validity and the

  8. Role of sensory input in the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Fantino, M

    1984-01-01

    The role of the sensory input involved in the control of the food intake is briefly reviewed. Signals from mouth and throat, as well as signals from the gastrointestinal tract and the liver, are necessary but none of them are sufficient to induce satiation. The oral cues initiated by the food intake have a dual action on the feeding behavior. They first stimulate the intake in the hungry subjects. They sustain it until the amount of food ingested reaches the level necessary to equilibrate the energy balance. Finally, they participate, with the sensory input from the gastrointestinal tract, in the process inhibiting the food intake. The hedonic hypothesis of the food intake control is an attempt to explain this dual action of the peripheral alimentary analyzer in this homeostatic behavior. It was proposed that the alimentary pleasure or displeasure brought by alimentary stimuli acts as a drive for the food intake behavior. Indeed, in normal human subjects, the affective component of the alimentary sensations is not constant, but depends on the subjects' internal state. From pleasant, in subjects requiring some energy supply for long-term or short-term energy regulation, alimentary sensations become less pleasant or unpleasant in satiated subjects or in overfed subjects. This change of the affective component of a peripheral sensation, according to the internal state, was called: negative alimentary alliesthesia. Alliesthesia is a specific and reproducible phenomenon. It has been shown that the internal signal which induces negative alimentary alliesthesia depends on the carbohydrate concentration into the gastrointestinal tract, mainly into the duodenum. This signal may provide information related to the energy content of the ingested food. The neural or humoral nature of the transmission of this information from the gut to the brain is discussed. A neural link possibly involves the enteric glucidoreceptors recently described. In conclusion, the validity and the

  9. 10 CFR 55.7 - Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional requirements. 55.7 Section 55.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES General Provisions § 55.7 Additional requirements. The... health and to minimize danger to life or property....

  10. 10 CFR 81.50 - Additional licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional licenses. 81.50 Section 81.50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE GRANTING OF PATENT LICENSES Nrc-Owned Inventions-Patents and Applications § 81.50 Additional licenses. Subject to any outstanding licenses,...

  11. Inputs to combination-sensitive neurons of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J J; Mittmann, D H; Grose, C D

    1999-07-12

    In the mustached bat, combination-sensitive neurons display integrative responses to combinations of acoustic elements in biosonar or social vocalizations. One type of combination-sensitive neuron responds to multiple harmonics of the frequency-modulated (FM) components in the sonar pulse and echo of the bat. These neurons, termed FM-FM neurons, are sensitive to the pulse-echo delay and may encode the distance of sonar targets. FM-FM neurons are common in high-frequency regions of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) and may be created there. If so, they must receive low-frequency inputs in addition to the expected high-frequency inputs. We placed single deposits of a tracer at FM-FM recording sites in the ICC and then analyzed retrograde labeling in the brainstem and midbrain. We were particularly interested in labeling patterns suggestive of low-frequency input to these FM-FM neurons. In most nuclei containing labeled cells, there was a single focus of labeling in regions thought to be responsive to high-frequency sounds. More complex labeling patterns were observed in three nuclei. In the anteroventral cochlear nucleus, labeling in the anterior and marginal cell divisions occurred in regions thought to respond to low-frequency sounds. This labeling comprised 6% of total brainstem labeled cells. Labeling in the intermediate nucleus of the lateral lemniscus and the magnocellular part of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus together comprised nearly 40% of all labeled cells. In both nuclei, multiple foci of labeling occurred. These different foci may represent groups of cells tuned to different frequency bands. Thus, one or more of these three nuclei may provide low-frequency input to high-frequency-sensitive cells in the ICC, creating FM-FM responses. We also examined whether ICC neurons responsive to lower frequencies project to high-frequency-sensitive ICC regions; only 0.15% of labeling originated from these lower frequency

  12. Characterization of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, J A; Garboczi, E J; Stutzman, P E; Ferraris, C F; Watson, S S; Peltz, M A

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical parts, such as those found in aerospace components. The production of AM parts with consistent and predictable properties requires input materials (e.g., metal powders) with known and repeatable characteristics, which in turn requires standardized measurement methods for powder properties. First, based on our previous work, we assess the applicability of current standardized methods for powder characterization for metal AM powders. Then we present the results of systematic studies carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to structure and chemistry, including X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed. The results of these analyses show how virgin powder changes after being exposed to and recycled from one or more Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing build cycles. In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process.

  13. Characterization of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, JA; Garboczi, EJ; Stutzman, PE; Ferraris, CF; Watson, SS; Peltz, MA

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques1 can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical parts, such as those found in aerospace components. The production of AM parts with consistent and predictable properties requires input materials (e.g., metal powders) with known and repeatable characteristics, which in turn requires standardized measurement methods for powder properties. First, based on our previous work, we assess the applicability of current standardized methods for powder characterization for metal AM powders. Then we present the results of systematic studies carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to structure and chemistry, including X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed. The results of these analyses show how virgin powder changes after being exposed to and recycled from one or more Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing build cycles. In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process. PMID:26601040

  14. Hospital Quality, Efficiency, and Input Slack Differentials

    PubMed Central

    Valdmanis, Vivian G; Rosko, Michael D; Mutter, Ryan L

    2008-01-01

    Objective To use an advance in data envelopment analysis (DEA) called congestion analysis to assess the trade-offs between quality and efficiency in U.S. hospitals. Study Setting Urban U.S. hospitals in 34 states operating in 2004. Study Design and Data Collection Input and output data from 1,377 urban hospitals were taken from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and the Medicare Cost Reports. Nurse-sensitive measures of quality came from the application of the Patient Safety Indicator (PSI) module of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Quality Indicator software to State Inpatient Databases (SID) provided by the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). Data Analysis In the first step of the study, hospitals’ relative output-based efficiency was determined in order to obtain a measure of congestion (i.e., the productivity loss due to the occurrence of patient safety events). The outputs were adjusted to account for this productivity loss, and a second DEA was performed to obtain input slack values. Differences in slack values between unadjusted and adjusted outputs were used to measure either relative inefficiency or a need for quality improvement. Principal Findings Overall, the hospitals in our sample could increase the total amount of outputs produced by an average of 26 percent by eliminating inefficiency. About 3 percent of this inefficiency can be attributed to congestion. Analysis of subsamples showed that teaching hospitals experienced no congestion loss. We found that quality of care could be improved by increasing the number of labor inputs in low-quality hospitals, whereas high-quality hospitals tended to have slack on personnel. Conclusions Results suggest that reallocation of resources could increase the relative quality among hospitals in our sample. Further, higher quality in some dimensions of care need not be achieved as a result of higher costs or through reduced access to health care. PMID:18783457

  15. Incorporating Community Input into the SWEET Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, R. G.

    2006-05-01

    The Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) includes a comprehensive set of ontologies that are expandable by specialized user communities. SWEET provides shared understanding of concepts and relations that cross multiple Earth system science disciplines (such as nitrogen, conduction, pressure). A procedure has been established to elicit community input, to expand or edit the ontologies, and to align and map SWEET elements to concepts in other ontologies. The process includes a discussion wiki, ontology alignment tools, and community workshops and oversight committees. SWEET is being expanded to the entire planetary system (including solid Earth and heliosphere) based on a NASA ROSE/ACCESS grant.

  16. Intelligent Graph Layout Using Many Users' Input.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoru; Che, Limei; Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for graph drawing utilizing layouts of many sub-graphs supplied by a large group of people in a crowd sourcing manner. We developed an algorithm based on Laplacian constrained distance embedding to merge subgraphs submitted by different users, while attempting to maintain the topological information of the individual input layouts. To facilitate collection of layouts from many people, a light-weight interactive system has been designed to enable convenient dynamic viewing, modification and traversing between layouts. Compared with other existing graph layout algorithms, our approach can achieve more aesthetic and meaningful layouts with high user preference.

  17. Modelling sediment input in large river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, U.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion and sediment redistribution play a pivotal role in the terrestrial ecosystem as they directly influence soil functions and water quality. In particular surface waters are threatened by emissions of nutrients and contaminants via erosion. The sustainable management of sediments is thus a key challenge in river basin management. Beside the planning and implementation of mitigation measures typically focusing on small and mesoscale catchments, the knowledge of sediment emissions and associated substances in large drainage basins is of utmost importance for water quality protection of large rivers and the seas. The objective of this study was thus to quantify the sediment input into the large drainage basins of Germany (Rhine, Elbe, Odra, Weser, Ems, Danube) as a basis for nutrient and contaminant emissions via erosion. The sediment input was quantified for all watersheds of Germany and added up along the flow paths of the river systems. Due to the large scale, sediment production within the watersheds was estimated based on the USLE for cultivated land and naturally covered areas and on specific erosion rates for mountainous areas without vegetation cover. To quantify the sediment delivery ratio a model approach was developed using data on calculated sediment production rates and long term sediment loads observed at monitoring stations of 13 watersheds located in different landscape regions of Germany. A variety of morphological parameters and catchment properties such as slope, drainage density, share of morphological sinks, hypsometric integral, flow distance between sediment source areas and the next stream as well as soil and land use properties were tested to explain the variation in the sediment delivery ratios for the 13 watersheds. The sediment input into streams is mainly controlled by the location of sediment source areas and the morphology along the flow pathways to surface waters. Thus, this complex interaction of spatially distributed catchment

  18. Lattices of processes in graphs with inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhbazyan, K.V.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a continuation of others work, presenting a detailed analysis of finite lattices of processes in graphs with input nodes. Lattices of processes in such graphs are studied by representing the lattices in the form of an algebra of pairs. We define the algebra of pairs somewhat generalizing the definition. Let K and D be bounded distributive lattices. A sublattice {delta} {contained_in} K x D is called an algebra of pairs if for all K {element_of} K we have (K, 1{sub D}) {element_of} {delta} and for all d {element_of} D we have (O{sub K}).

  19. Input-output-controlled nonlinear equation solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    To upgrade the efficiency and stability of the successive substitution (SS) and Newton-Raphson (NR) schemes, the concept of input-output-controlled solvers (IOCS) is introduced. By employing the formal properties of the constrained version of the SS and NR schemes, the IOCS algorithm can handle indefiniteness of the system Jacobian, can maintain iterate monotonicity, and provide for separate control of load incrementation and iterate excursions, as well as having other features. To illustrate the algorithmic properties, the results for several benchmark examples are presented. These define the associated numerical efficiency and stability of the IOCS.

  20. The Effects of Pre Modified Input, Interactionally Modified Input, and Modified Output on EFL Learners' Comprehension of New Vocabularies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maleki, Zinat; Pazhakh, AbdolReza

    2012-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effects of premodified input, interactionally modified input and modified output on 80 EFL learners' comprehension of new words. The subjects were randomly assigned into four groups of pre modified input, interactionally modified input, modified output and unmodified (control) groups. Each group…

  1. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  2. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  3. Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jickells, Tim D.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact T Jickells (1), K. Altieri (2), D. Capone (3), E. Buitenhuis (1), R. Duce (4), F. Dentener (5), K. Fennel (6), J. Galloway (7), M. Kanakidou (8), J. LaRoche (9), K. Lee (10), P. Liss (1), J. Middleburg (11), K. Moore (12), S. Nickovic (13), G. Okin (14), A. Oschilies (15), J. Prospero (16), M. Sarin (17), S. Seitzinger (18), J. Scharples (19), P. Suntharalingram (1), M. Uematsu (20), L. Zamora (21) Atmospheric nitrogen inputs to the ocean have been identified as an important source of nitrogen to the oceans which has increased greatly as a result of human activity. The significance of atmospheric inputs for ocean biogeochemistry were evaluated in a seminal paper by Duce et al., 2008 (Science 320, 893-7). In this presentation we will update the Duce et al 2008 study estimating the impact of atmospheric deposition on the oceans. We will summarise the latest model estimates of total atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the ocean, their chemical form (nitrate, ammonium and organic nitrogen) and spatial distribution from the TM4 model. The model estimates are somewhat smaller than the Duce et al estimate, but with similar spatial distributions. We will compare these flux estimates with a new estimate of the impact of fluvial nitrogen inputs on the open ocean (Sharples submitted) which estimates some transfer of fluvial nitrogen to the open ocean, particularly at low latitudes, compared to the complete trapping of fluvial inputs on the continental shelf assumed by Duce et al. We will then estimate the impact of atmospheric deposition on ocean primary productivity and N2O emissions from the oceans using the PlankTOM10 model. The impacts of atmospheric deposition we estimate on ocean productivity here are smaller than those predicted by Duce et al impacts, consistent with the smaller atmospheric deposition estimates. However, the atmospheric input is still larger than the estimated fluvial inputs to the open ocean

  4. Water resources and environmental input-output analysis and its key study issues: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Z.; Xu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Used to study the material and energy flow in socioeconomic system, Input-Output Analysis(IOA) had been an effective analysis tool since its appearance. The research fields of Input-Output Analysis were increasingly expanded and studied in depth with the development of fundamental theory. In this paper, starting with introduction of theory development, the water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been specifically reviewed, and two key study issues mentioned as well. Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis whose proposal and development were introduced firstly could be regard as the effective complements of traditional IOA theory. Because of the hypotheses of homogeneity, stability and proportionality, Input-Occupancy-Output Analysis and Grey Input-Output Analysis always had been restricted in practical application inevitably. In the applied study aspect, with investigation of abundant literatures, research of water resources input-output analysis and environmental input-output analysis had been comprehensively reviewed and analyzed. The regional water resources flow between different economic sectors had been systematically analyzed and stated, and several types of environmental input-output analysis models combined with other effective analysis tools concluded. In two perspectives in terms of external and inland aspect, the development of water resources and environmental input-output analysis model had been explained, and several typical study cases in recent years listed respectively. By the aid of sufficient literature analysis, the internal development tendency and study hotspot had also been summarized. In recent years, Chinese literatures reporting water resources consumption analysis and virtue water study had occupied a large share. Water resources consumption analysis had always been the emphasis of inland water resources IOA. Virtue water study had been considered as the new hotspot of

  5. The role of chemical additives to the phase change process of CaCl2.6H2O to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutjahja, I. M.; U, S. Rahayu A.; Kurniati, Nia; Pallitine, Ivyalentine D.; Kurnia, D.

    2016-08-01

    CaCl2.6H2O is one of salt hydrate based phase change material (PCM) which is suitable for room air-temperature stabilizer because it has the melting temperature just above the human comfort zone temperature (Tm ∼⃒ 29 oC) and a relatively large heat entalphy (AH ∼⃒ 190 kJ/kg). This paper reports the role of the type of chemical additives to PCM CaCl2.6H2O to the phase change process throughout the solidification process or heat release in order to optimize its performance as latent heat energy storage system. In this research we used several kinds of chemical additive, namely SrCl2.6H2O (1.0 wt%), BaCO3 (0.5 wt%), and K2CO3 (0.5 wt%). In terms of its latent time for phase change process the order the effectiveness of those chemical additives are reduced from SrCl2.6H2O, BaCO3and K2CO3. We found that this is also related to their role in suppression supercooling and phase separation effects which occurs during crystallization process of CaCl2.6H2O.

  6. Electrochemical Reduction of Ag2VP2O8 Composite Electrodes Visualized via In situ Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD). Unexpected Conductive Additive Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshenbaum, Kevin C.; Bock, David C.; Zhong, Zhong; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther

    2015-07-29

    In our study, we characterize the deposition of silver metal nanoparticles formed during discharge of Li/Ag2VP2O8 cells with composite cathodes containing conductive carbon additive. Using in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) of an intact battery, the location and distribution of silver metal nanoparticles generated upon reduction-displacement deposition within an Ag2VP2O8 cathode containing a pre-existing percolation network can be observed for the first time. Our study yielded unexpected results where higher rate initial discharge generated a more effective conductive matrix. This stands in contrast to cells with cathodes with no conductive additive where a low rate initial discharge proved more effective. Our results provide evidence that using conductive additives in conjunction with an in situ reduction-displacement deposition of silver metal provides a path toward the ultimate goal of complete electrical contact and full utilization of all electroactive particles.

  7. Signalling through mechanical inputs: a coordinated process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Labouesse, Michel

    2012-07-01

    There is growing awareness that mechanical forces - in parallel to electrical or chemical inputs - have a central role in driving development and influencing the outcome of many diseases. However, we still have an incomplete understanding of how such forces function in coordination with each other and with other signalling inputs in vivo. Mechanical forces, which are generated throughout the organism, can produce signals through force-sensitive processes. Here, we first explore the mechanisms through which forces can be generated and the cellular responses to forces by discussing several examples from animal development. We then go on to examine the mechanotransduction-induced signalling processes that have been identified in vivo. Finally, we discuss what is known about the specificity of the responses to different forces, the mechanisms that might stabilize cells in response to such forces, and the crosstalk between mechanical forces and chemical signalling. Where known, we mention kinetic parameters that characterize forces and their responses. The multi-layered regulatory control of force generation, force response and force adaptation should be viewed as a well-integrated aspect in the greater biological signalling systems.

  8. Input-output dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annoni, Jennifer; Jovanovic, Mihailo; Nichols, Joseph; Seiler, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain reduced-order models for fluid flows that can be used for control design. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamic models provide accurate characterizations of complex flow dynamics but are not suitable for control design due to their prohibitive computational complexity. A variety of methods, including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), can be used to extract the dominant flow structures and obtain reduced-order models. In this presentation, we introduce an extension to DMD that can handle problems with inputs and outputs. The proposed method, termed input-output dynamic mode decomposition (IODMD), utilizes a subspace identification technique to obtain models of low-complexity. We show that, relative to standard DMD, the introduction of the external forcing in IODMD provides robustness with respect to small disturbances and noise. We use the linearized Navier-Stokes equations in a channel flow to demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach and to provide a comparison with standard techniques for obtaining reduced-order dynamical representations. NSF Career Grant No. NSFCMMI-1254129.

  9. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  10. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  11. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  12. Extraction of a series of novel damage sensitive features derived from the continuous wavelet transform of input and output acceleration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balafas, Konstantinos; Kiremidjian, Anne S.

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a series of novel Damage Sensitive Features for earthquake damage estimation. The features take into account input (ground motion) and output acceleration (structure response) measurements. The Continuous Wavelet Transform is applied to both acceleration signals in order to obtain both time domain and frequency domain resolution. An algorithm that has been proposed for Maximum Entropy Deconvolution is applied to the Continuous Wavelet Transforms in order to obtain a matrix that relates the output wavelet coefficients to the input ones. The Damage Sensitive Features are then derived through statistical processing of the resulting matrix. This algorithm has been applied on data acquired from shake table tests where the structures were subjected to progressive damage. The proposed features are compared to response quantities that are indicative of damage (such as the hysteretic energy dissipated) and show high correlation with the extent of damage. The data utilized has not been pre-processed, illustrating the robustness of the algorithm against sensor noise. The proposed algorithm has several advantages: Minimal input and knowledge of the structure is required. More information on the structure's state is extracted through use of both the input and output signals than when only output signal is considered. Only two acceleration measurements are required to obtain a damage forecast utilizing primarily the strong motion recordings, resulting in easier sensor deployment. The use of strong motion recordings allows for information delivery immediately after an earthquake without additional data collection.

  13. Integration of aortic nerve inputs in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Mifflin, S W

    2000-01-01

    The integration of arterial baroreceptor afferent inputs was studied in renal wrap hypertensive (HT) and normotensive (NT) rats. In anesthetized and paralyzed rats, aortic nerve (AN)-evoked depressor responses were reduced in HT compared with NT rats (P<0.05). We tested the hypothesis that the attenuated baroreflex was associated with altered integration of baroreceptor inputs within the nucleus of the solitary tract. Based on onset latency and the ability of monosynaptic neurons (MSNs) to respond to each of 2 AN stimuli separated by 5 ms, cells in HT and NT rats were divided into 3 groups: short-latency MSNs (SLMSNs), long-latency MSNs (LLMSNs), and polysynaptic neurons (PSNs). A higher percentage of PSNs (73% versus 61%) and a lower percentage of SLMSNs (20% versus 27%) or LLMSNs (7% versus 12%) were found in HT rats (P<0.05). In addition, in HT compared with NT rats, the AN onset latency was greater in PSNs (29. 9+/-1.1 versus 26.7+/-0.8 ms) but not in SLMSNs (5.0+/-0.5 versus 5. 0+/-0.3 ms) or LLMSNs (22.9+/-1.2 versus 24.1+/-0.7 ms) (P<0.05). Finally, in HT compared with NT rats, the number of PSNs responding to a single AN stimulus with multiple action potentials was increased (40% versus 19%) (P<0.05). This was not observed in SLMSNs (26% versus 13%) or LLMSNs (12% versus 18%). The results indicate that renal wrap hypertension is associated with reduced AN-evoked depressor responses. There also were alterations in the integration of AN afferent inputs within the nucleus of the solitary tract, and these alterations were most marked in the PSN population.

  14. A note on scrap in the 1992 U.S. input-output tables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swisko, George M.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction A key concern of industrial ecology and life cycle analysis is the disposal and recycling of scrap. One might conclude that the U.S. input-output tables are appropriate tools for analyzing scrap flows. Duchin, for instance, has suggested using input-output analysis for industrial ecology, indicating that input-output economics can trace the stocks and flows of energy and other materials from extraction through production and consumption to recycling or disposal. Lave and others use input-output tables to design life cycle assessment models for studying product design, materials use, and recycling strategies, even with the knowledge that these tables suffer from a lack of comprehensive and detailed data that may never be resolved. Although input-output tables can offer general guidance about the interdependence of economic and environmental processes, data reporting by industry and the economic concepts underlying these tables pose problems for rigorous material flow examinations. This is especially true for analyzing the output of scrap and scrap flows in the United States and estimating the amount of scrap that can be recycled. To show how data reporting has affected the values of scrap in recent input-output tables, this paper focuses on metal scrap generated in manufacturing. The paper also briefly discusses scrap that is not included in the input-output tables and some economic concepts that limit the analysis of scrap flows.

  15. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGES

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  16. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  17. Direct Neutron Capture Calculations with Covariant Density Functional Theory Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Sheng; Peng, Jin-Peng; Smith, Michael S.; Arbanas, Goran; Kozub, Ray L.

    2014-09-01

    Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculate the direct capture cross sections for E1 transitions using nuclear structure information from a covariant density functional theory as input for the FRESCO coupled-channels reaction code. We find good agreement of our predictions with experimental cross section data on the double closed-shell targets 16O, 48Ca, and 90Zr, and the exotic nucleus 36S. Extensions of the technique for unstable nuclei and for large-scale calculations will be discussed. Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculate the direct capture cross sections for E1 transitions using nuclear structure information from a covariant density functional theory as input for the FRESCO coupled-channels reaction code. We find good agreement of our predictions with experimental cross section data on the double closed-shell targets 16O, 48Ca, and 90Zr, and the exotic nucleus 36S. Extensions of the technique for unstable nuclei and for large-scale calculations will be discussed. Supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  18. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  19. Code System for Generation of Input Data for MCNP.

    1998-07-16

    Version 00 The MSM-SOURCE code was designed for quick and easy estimations of basic stopping characteristics of proton transmission, for generation of the source definition (SDEF) portion of the input data for MCNP (for 3b- and 4- versions) [2], simulating the set of single neutron sources, produced in the sample during the proton transmission. It does not generate the ful MCNP input file. The results of calculations well reproduce the experimental data [3]. It permitsmore » one to extend the possibilities of the MCNP code for consideration of secondary neutrons from the proton interaction with nuclei of the sample substance. The MSM-SOURCE code is applicable for calculations of the proton transport for the incident energies from 0.1 to 1 GeV and various targets 12 < A < 238. This code is based of the Moving Source Model (MSM) (using the original parametrization [3],[4]) and Bethe stopping theory with the relativistic corrections for protons. It allows the estimations of the proton range, the changes of the proton current and the neutron production versus the depth. The double differential spectra and the multiplicities of nucleons, produced in the primary proton-induced reactions, are obtained. For the evaluation of inelastic cross section the original parametrization is used [4].« less

  20. Low input voltage switching amplifiers for piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Zhu, Huiyu; Song, Chunping; Huang, Weixing; Cheng, Danling

    2002-07-01

    The Inertially Stabilized Rifle is a new stabilized rifle system that can eliminate the disturbances induced by the shooter. Recurve actuator is used in this system to provide the precise movement of the rifle barrel. In such a portable device, only low voltage electrical sources are available yet the piezoelectric actuator needs high voltage to drive the actuator. The actuators consume little real power but a large amount of reactive power. Furthermore, the piezoelectric actuators are present an almost purely capacitive load. In this paper, we describe the development of a low input voltage amplifier for a high voltage piezoelectric actuator. This amplifier is based on switching technology so it efficiently handles the regenerative energy from the piezoelectric actuator. This amplifier consists of two stages. The first stage is a flyback converter which boosts the (low) input voltage to the maximum voltage required by the piezoelectric actuator. The second stage is a half-bridge amplifier which delivers the output voltage to the actuator as commanded by the reference signal. The basic structure of the amplifier is described, and its performance is characterized in terms of bandwidth, distortion, and efficiency.

  1. Synchronized amplification of local information transmission by peripheral retinal input

    PubMed Central

    Jadzinsky, Pablo D; Baccus, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimuli have varying statistics influenced by both the environment and by active sensing behaviors that rapidly and globally change the sensory input. Consequently, sensory systems often adjust their neural code to the expected statistics of their sensory input to transmit novel sensory information. Here, we show that sudden peripheral motion amplifies and accelerates information transmission in salamander ganglion cells in a 50 ms time window. Underlying this gating of information is a transient increase in adaptation to contrast, enhancing sensitivity to a broader range of stimuli. Using a model and natural images, we show that this effect coincides with an expected increase in information in bipolar cells after a global image shift. Our findings reveal the dynamic allocation of energy resources to increase neural activity at times of expected high information content, a principle of adaptation that balances the competing requirements of conserving spikes and transmitting information. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09266.001 PMID:26568312

  2. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold. PMID:26731691

  3. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input

    PubMed Central

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha-1 yr-1) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold. PMID:26731691

  4. The Sensitivity of Moss-Associated Nitrogen Fixation towards Repeated Nitrogen Input.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N2) fixation is a major source of available N in ecosystems that receive low amounts of atmospheric N deposition. In boreal forest and subarctic tundra, the feather moss Hylocomium splendens is colonized by N2 fixing cyanobacteria that could contribute fundamentally to increase the N pool in these ecosystems. However, N2 fixation in mosses is inhibited by N input. Although this has been shown previously, the ability of N2 fixation to grow less sensitive towards repeated, increased N inputs remains unknown. Here, we tested if N2 fixation in H. splendens can recover from increased N input depending on the N load (0, 5, 20, 80, 320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) after a period of N deprivation, and if sensitivity towards increased N input can decrease after repeated N additions. Nitrogen fixation in the moss was inhibited by the highest N addition, but was promoted by adding 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), and increased in all treatments during a short period of N deprivation. The sensitivity of N2 fixation towards repeated N additions seem to decrease in the 20 and 80 kg N additions, but increased in the highest N addition (320 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)). Recovery of N in leachate samples increased with increasing N loads, suggesting low retention capabilities of mosses if N input is above 5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity towards repeated N additions is likely to decrease if N input does not exceed a certain threshold.

  5. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and natural…

  6. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  7. Adenosine inhibits glutamatergic input to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, J. M.; Ferrari, L. L.; Keating, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous homeostatic sleep factor that accumulates during waking and inhibits wake-active neurons to promote sleep. It has been specifically hypothesized that adenosine decreases wakefulness and promotes sleep recovery by directly inhibiting wake-active neurons of the basal forebrain (BF), particularly BF cholinergic neurons. We previously showed that adenosine directly inhibits BF cholinergic neurons. Here, we investigated 1) how adenosine modulates glutamatergic input to BF cholinergic neurons and 2) how adenosine uptake and adenosine metabolism are involved in regulating extracellular levels of adenosine. Our experiments were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. We found that in BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine reduced the amplitude of AMPA-mediated evoked glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs through presynaptic A1 receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that in addition to directly inhibiting BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine depresses excitatory inputs to these neurons. It is therefore possible that both direct and indirect inhibition may synergistically contribute to the sleep-promoting effects of adenosine in the BF. We also found that blocking the influx of adenosine through the equilibrative nucleoside transporters or inhibiting adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase increased endogenous adenosine inhibitory tone, suggesting a possible mechanism through which adenosine extracellular levels in the basal forebrain are regulated. PMID:22357797

  8. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  9. REGRESSION ESTIMATES FOR TOPOLOGICAL-HYDROGRAPH INPUT.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, Michael R.; Guertin, D. Phillip; Troutman, Brent M.

    1988-01-01

    Physiographic, hydrologic, and rainfall data from 18 small drainage basins in semiarid, central Wyoming were used to calibrate topological, unit-hydrograph models for celerity, the average rate of travel of a flood wave through the basin. The data set consisted of basin characteristics and hydrologic data for the 18 basins and rainfall data for 68 storms. Calibrated values of celerity and peak discharges subsequently were regressed as a function of the basin characteristics and excess rainfall volume. Predicted values obtained in this way can be used as input for estimating hydrographs in ungaged basins. The regression models included ordinary least-squares and seemingly unrelated regression. This latter regression model jointly estimated the celerity and peak discharge.

  10. Auto Draw from Excel Input Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Goullioud, Renaud; Cox, Brian; Grimes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The design process often involves the use of Excel files during project development. To facilitate communications of the information in the Excel files, drawings are often generated. During the design process, the Excel files are updated often to reflect new input. The problem is that the drawings often lag the updates, often leading to confusion of the current state of the design. The use of this program allows visualization of complex data in a format that is more easily understandable than pages of numbers. Because the graphical output can be updated automatically, the manual labor of diagram drawing can be eliminated. The more frequent update of system diagrams can reduce confusion and reduce errors and is likely to uncover symmetric problems earlier in the design cycle, thus reducing rework and redesign.

  11. Acoustic input impedance measurements on brass instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Robert W., Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Measurement of the acoustic input impedance of a brass instrument can reveal something about the instrument's intonation, its reasonable playing range, its tone color, and perhaps whether the mouthpiece used for the impedance measurement is appropriate for the instrument. Such measurements are made at sound-presssure levels much lower than those encountered under playing conditions. Thus, impedance measurements may offer the only feasible way to infer something about the playing characteristics of instruments, typically museum specimens, that are too rare or too fragile to be played. In this paper the effects of some of the available choices of sound source and stimulus signal on measurement accuracy will be explored. Driver-transducer nonlinearity, source impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, and any necessary signal processing will be discussed.

  12. User's manual for master: Modeling of aerodynamic surfaces by 3-dimensional explicit representation. [input to three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    A system of computer programs was developed to model general three dimensional surfaces. Surfaces are modeled as sets of parametric bicubic patches. There are also capabilities to transform coordinates, to compute mesh/surface intersection normals, and to format input data for a transonic potential flow analysis. A graphical display of surface models and intersection normals is available. There are additional capabilities to regulate point spacing on input curves and to compute surface/surface intersection curves. Input and output data formats are described; detailed suggestions are given for user input. Instructions for execution are given, and examples are shown.

  13. Input and output constraints affecting irrigation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, G.

    1981-05-01

    In many of the developing countries the expansion of irrigated agriculture is used as a major development tool for bringing about increases in agricultural output, rural economic growth and income distribution. Apart from constraints imposed by water availability, the major limitations considered to any acceleration of such programs are usually thought to be those of costs and financial resources. However, as is shown on the basis of empirical data drawn from Mexico, in reality the feasibility and effectiveness of such development programs is even more constrained by the lack of specialized physical and human factors on the input and market limitations on the output side. On the input side, the limited availability of complementary factors such as, for example, truly functioning credit systems for small-scale farmers or effective agricultural extension services impose long-term constraints on development. On the output side the limited availability, high risk, and relatively slow growth of markets for high-value crops sharply reduce the usually hoped-for and projected profitable crop mix that would warrant the frequently high costs of irrigation investments. Three conclusions are drawn: (1) Factors in limited supply have to be shadow-priced to reflect their high opportunity costs in alternative uses. (2) Re-allocation of financial resources from immediate construction of projects to longer-term increase in the supply of scarce, highly-trained manpower resources are necessary in order to optimize development over time. (3) Inclusion of high-value, high-income producing crops in the benefit-cost analysis of new projects is inappropriate if these crops could potentially be grown in already existing projects.

  14. The IVS data input to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Alef, Walter; Amagai, Jun; Andersen, Per Helge; Andreeva, Tatiana; Artz, Thomas; Bachmann, Sabine; Barache, Christophe; Baudry, Alain; Bauernfeind, Erhard; Baver, Karen; Beaudoin, Christopher; Behrend, Dirk; Bellanger, Antoine; Berdnikov, Anton; Bergman, Per; Bernhart, Simone; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bianco, Giuseppe; Bielmaier, Ewald; Boboltz, David; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boer, Armin; Bolotin, Sergei; Bougeard, Mireille; Bourda, Geraldine; Buttaccio, Salvo; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Cappallo, Roger; Carlson, Brent; Carter, Merri Sue; Charlot, Patrick; Chen, Chenyu; Chen, Maozheng; Cho, Jungho; Clark, Thomas; Collioud, Arnaud; Colomer, Francisco; Colucci, Giuseppe; Combrinck, Ludwig; Conway, John; Corey, Brian; Curtis, Ronald; Dassing, Reiner; Davis, Maria; de-Vicente, Pablo; De Witt, Aletha; Diakov, Alexey; Dickey, John; Diegel, Irv; Doi, Koichiro; Drewes, Hermann; Dube, Maurice; Elgered, Gunnar; Engelhardt, Gerald; Evangelista, Mark; Fan, Qingyuan; Fedotov, Leonid; Fey, Alan; Figueroa, Ricardo; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Gambis, Daniel; Garcia-Espada, Susana; Gaume, Ralph; Gaylard, Michael; Geiger, Nicole; Gipson, John; Gomez, Frank; Gomez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Gordon, David; Govind, Ramesh; Gubanov, Vadim; Gulyaev, Sergei; Haas, Ruediger; Hall, David; Halsig, Sebastian; Hammargren, Roger; Hase, Hayo; Heinkelmann, Robert; Helldner, Leif; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed; Hobiger, Thomas; Holst, Christoph; Hong, Xiaoyu; Honma, Mareki; Huang, Xinyong; Hugentobler, Urs; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Iddink, Andreas; Ihde, Johannes; Ilijin, Gennadiy; Ipatov, Alexander; Ipatova, Irina; Ishihara, Misao; Ivanov, D. V.; Jacobs, Chris; Jike, Takaaki; Johansson, Karl-Ake; Johnson, Heidi; Johnston, Kenneth; Ju, Hyunhee; Karasawa, Masao; Kaufmann, Pierre; Kawabata, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Eiji; Kaydanovsky, Michael; Kharinov, Mikhail; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kokado, Kensuke; Kondo, Tetsuro; Korkin, Edward; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Krasna, Hana; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Kurdubov, Sergey; Kurihara, Shinobu; Kuroda, Jiro; Kwak, Younghee; La Porta, Laura; Labelle, Ruth; Lamb, Doug; Lambert, Sébastien; Langkaas, Line; Lanotte, Roberto; Lavrov, Alexey; Le Bail, Karine; Leek, Judith; Li, Bing; Li, Huihua; Li, Jinling; Liang, Shiguang; Lindqvist, Michael; Liu, Xiang; Loesler, Michael; Long, Jim; Lonsdale, Colin; Lovell, Jim; Lowe, Stephen; Lucena, Antonio; Luzum, Brian; Ma, Chopo; Ma, Jun; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Machida, Morito; MacMillan, Dan; Madzak, Matthias; Malkin, Zinovy; Manabe, Seiji; Mantovani, Franco; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Marshalov, Dmitry; Mathiassen, Geir; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; McCarthy, Dennis; Melnikov, Alexey; Michailov, Andrey; Miller, Natalia; Mitchell, Donald; Mora-Diaz, Julian Andres; Mueskens, Arno; Mukai, Yasuko; Nanni, Mauro; Natusch, Tim; Negusini, Monia; Neidhardt, Alexander; Nickola, Marisa; Nicolson, George; Niell, Arthur; Nikitin, Pavel; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Nishikawa, Takashi; Noll, Carey; Nozawa, Kentarou; Ogaja, Clement; Oh, Hongjong; Olofsson, Hans; Opseth, Per Erik; Orfei, Sandro; Pacione, Rosa; Pazamickas, Katherine; Petrachenko, William; Pettersson, Lars; Pino, Pedro; Plank, Lucia; Ploetz, Christian; Poirier, Michael; Poutanen, Markku; Qian, Zhihan; Quick, Jonathan; Rahimov, Ismail; Redmond, Jay; Reid, Brett; Reynolds, John; Richter, Bernd; Rioja, Maria; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Ruszczyk, Chester; Salnikov, Alexander; Sarti, Pierguido; Schatz, Raimund; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Schiavone, Francesco; Schreiber, Ulrich; Schuh, Harald; Schwarz, Walter; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Searle, Anthony; Sekido, Mamoru; Seitz, Manuela; Shao, Minghui; Shibuya, Kazuo; Shu, Fengchun; Sieber, Moritz; Skjaeveland, Asmund; Skurikhina, Elena; Smolentsev, Sergey; Smythe, Dan; Sousa, Don; Sovers, Ojars; Stanford, Laura; Stanghellini, Carlo; Steppe, Alan; Strand, Rich; Sun, Jing; Surkis, Igor; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Tanir, Emine; Tao, An; Tateyama, Claudio; Teke, Kamil; Thomas, Cynthia; Thorandt, Volkmar; Thornton, Bruce; Tierno Ros, Claudia; Titov, Oleg; Titus, Mike; Tomasi, Paolo; Tornatore, Vincenza; Trigilio, Corrado; Trofimov, Dmitriy; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Tuccari, Gino; Tzioumis, Tasso; Ujihara, Hideki; Ullrich, Dieter; Uunila, Minttu; Venturi, Tiziana; Vespe, Francesco; Vityazev, Veniamin; Volvach, Alexandr; Vytnov, Alexander; Wang, Guangli; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Na; Wang, Shiqiang; Wei, Wenren; Weston, Stuart; Whitney, Alan; Wojdziak, Reiner; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Yang, Wenjun; Ye, Shuhua; Yi, Sangoh; Yusup, Aili; Zapata, Octavio; Zeitlhoefler, Reinhard; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Zhao, Rongbing; Zheng, Weimin; Zhou, Ruixian; Zubko, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a primary space-geodetic technique for determining precise coordinates on the Earth, for monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and for deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The datasets published here are the results of individual Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions in the form of normal equations in SINEX 2.0 format (http://www.iers.org/IERS/EN/Organization/AnalysisCoordinator/SinexFormat/sinex.html, the SINEX 2.0 description is attached as pdf) provided by IVS as the input for the next release of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRF): ITRF2014. This is a new version of the ITRF2008 release (Bockmann et al., 2009). For each session/ file, the normal equation systems contain elements for the coordinate components of all stations having participated in the respective session as well as for the Earth orientation parameters (x-pole, y-pole, UT1 and its time derivatives plus offset to the IAU2006 precession-nutation components dX, dY (https://www.iau.org/static/resolutions/IAU2006_Resol1.pdf). The terrestrial part is free of datum. The data sets are the result of a weighted combination of the input of several IVS Analysis Centers. The IVS contribution for ITRF2014 is described in Bachmann et al (2015), Schuh and Behrend (2012) provide a general overview on the VLBI method, details on the internal data handling can be found at Behrend (2013).

  15. Selection of LCTV operating curves for input and filter. [Liquid Crystal TeleVision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Lacroix, Jennifer L.; Rajan, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid crystal television (LCTV) SLM's phase, amplitude, and polarization all influence our selection of operating curves for input and filter. With its continuum of drive voltage, the LCTV permits grey-level control in both locations. Selection of an optimum curve depends on expected variations in signal amplitude, presence of input scene structured noise, and other factors. Using modulators obtained from a commercially available projection LCTV, and with no specifically added input noise present, we have obtained laboratory results in which the ratio of peak intensity to correlator system noise exceeded 100:1. Unfortunately, it was massively inefficient to implement the algorithm which had been developed as the abstract for this paper was submitted. Fortunately, we have quite recently developed two insights that will speed it by several orders of magnitude, and we shall report that result in the future. We will also extend the work to include clutter objects and additive input scene noise.

  16. Evaluating the uncertainty of input quantities in measurement models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possolo, Antonio; Elster, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) gives guidance about how values and uncertainties should be assigned to the input quantities that appear in measurement models. This contribution offers a concrete proposal for how that guidance may be updated in light of the advances in the evaluation and expression of measurement uncertainty that were made in the course of the twenty years that have elapsed since the publication of the GUM, and also considering situations that the GUM does not yet contemplate. Our motivation is the ongoing conversation about a new edition of the GUM. While generally we favour a Bayesian approach to uncertainty evaluation, we also recognize the value that other approaches may bring to the problems considered here, and focus on methods for uncertainty evaluation and propagation that are widely applicable, including to cases that the GUM has not yet addressed. In addition to Bayesian methods, we discuss maximum-likelihood estimation, robust statistical methods, and measurement models where values of nominal properties play the same role that input quantities play in traditional models. We illustrate these general-purpose techniques in concrete examples, employing data sets that are realistic but that also are of conveniently small sizes. The supplementary material available online lists the R computer code that we have used to produce these examples (stacks.iop.org/Met/51/3/339/mmedia). Although we strive to stay close to clause 4 of the GUM, which addresses the evaluation of uncertainty for input quantities, we depart from it as we review the classes of measurement models that we believe are generally useful in contemporary measurement science. We also considerably expand and update the treatment that the GUM gives to Type B evaluations of uncertainty: reviewing the state-of-the-art, disciplined approach to the elicitation of expert knowledge, and its encapsulation in probability distributions that are usable in

  17. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  18. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  19. How Much Input Is Enough? Correlating Comprehension and Child Language Input in an Endangered Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meakins, Felicity; Wigglesworth, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    In situations of language endangerment, the ability to understand a language tends to persevere longer than the ability to speak it. As a result, the possibility of language revival remains high even when few speakers remain. Nonetheless, this potential requires that those with high levels of comprehension received sufficient input as children for…

  20. A circuit design for multi-inputs stateful OR gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Wang, Xiaoping; Wan, Haibo; Yang, Ran; Zheng, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The in situ logic operation on memristor memory has attracted researchers' attention. In this brief, a new circuit structure that performs a stateful OR logic operation is proposed. When our OR logic is operated in series with other logic operations (IMP, AND), only two voltages should to be changed while three voltages are necessary in the previous one-step OR logic operation. In addition, this circuit structure can be extended to multi-inputs OR operation to perfect the family of logic operations on memristive memory in nanocrossbar based networks. The proposed OR gate can enable fast logic operation, reduce the number of required memristors and the sequential steps. Through analysis and simulation, the feasibility of OR operation is demonstrated and the appropriate parameters are obtained.

  1. Comparison of pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics among different input pulse shapes in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Suchi; Das, Narottam; Nordholm, Sven; Razaghi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics for different input optical pulse shapes with different energy levels in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). A finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) is used to solve the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation (MNLSE) for the simulation of nonlinear optical pulse propagation and gain saturation characteristics in the SOAs. In this MNLSE, the gain spectrum dynamics, gain saturation are taken into account those are depend on the carrier depletion, carrier heating, spectral hole-burning, group velocity dispersion, self-phase modulation and two photon absorption. From this simulation, we obtained the output waveforms and spectra for different input pulse shapes considering different input energy levels. It has shown that the output pulse shape has changed due to the variation of input parameters, such as input pulse shape, input pulse width, and input pulse energy levels. It also shown clearly that the peak position of the output waveforms are shifted toward the leading edge which is due to the gain saturation of the SOA. We also compared the gain saturation characteristics in the SOA for different input pulse shapes.

  2. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  3. Toward an inventory of nitrogen input to the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate accounting of nitrogen inputs is increasingly necessary for policy decisions related to aquatic nutrient pollution. Here we synthesize available data to provide the first integrated estimates of the amount and uncertainty of nitrogen inputs to the United States. Abou...

  4. Consistent responses of soil microbial communities to elevated nutrient inputs in grasslands across the globe

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Jonathan W.; Jones, Stuart E.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Barberán, Albert; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Firn, Jennifer L.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Knops, Johannes M. H.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; La Pierre, Kimberly; Risch, Anita C.; Seabloom, Eric W.; Schütz, Martin; Steenbock, Christopher; Stevens, Carly J.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Soil microorganisms are critical to ecosystem functioning and the maintenance of soil fertility. However, despite global increases in the inputs of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to ecosystems due to human activities, we lack a predictive understanding of how microbial communities respond to elevated nutrient inputs across environmental gradients. Here we used high-throughput sequencing of marker genes to elucidate the responses of soil fungal, archaeal, and bacterial communities using an N and P addition experiment replicated at 25 globally distributed grassland sites. We also sequenced metagenomes from a subset of the sites to determine how the functional attributes of bacterial communities change in response to elevated nutrients. Despite strong compositional differences across sites, microbial communities shifted in a consistent manner with N or P additions, and the magnitude of these shifts was related to the magnitude of plant community responses to nutrient inputs. Mycorrhizal fungi and methanogenic archaea decreased in relative abundance with nutrient additions, as did the relative abundances of oligotrophic bacterial taxa. The metagenomic data provided additional evidence for this shift in bacterial life history strategies because nutrient additions decreased the average genome sizes of the bacterial community members and elicited changes in the relative abundances of representative functional genes. Our results suggest that elevated N and P inputs lead to predictable shifts in the taxonomic and functional traits of soil microbial communities, including increases in the relative abundances of faster-growing, copiotrophic bacterial taxa, with these shifts likely to impact belowground ecosystems worldwide. PMID:26283343

  5. Consistent responses of soil microbial communities to elevated nutrient inputs in grasslands across the globe.

    PubMed

    Leff, Jonathan W; Jones, Stuart E; Prober, Suzanne M; Barberán, Albert; Borer, Elizabeth T; Firn, Jennifer L; Harpole, W Stanley; Hobbie, Sarah E; Hofmockel, Kirsten S; Knops, Johannes M H; McCulley, Rebecca L; La Pierre, Kimberly; Risch, Anita C; Seabloom, Eric W; Schütz, Martin; Steenbock, Christopher; Stevens, Carly J; Fierer, Noah

    2015-09-01

    Soil microorganisms are critical to ecosystem functioning and the maintenance of soil fertility. However, despite global increases in the inputs of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to ecosystems due to human activities, we lack a predictive understanding of how microbial communities respond to elevated nutrient inputs across environmental gradients. Here we used high-throughput sequencing of marker genes to elucidate the responses of soil fungal, archaeal, and bacterial communities using an N and P addition experiment replicated at 25 globally distributed grassland sites. We also sequenced metagenomes from a subset of the sites to determine how the functional attributes of bacterial communities change in response to elevated nutrients. Despite strong compositional differences across sites, microbial communities shifted in a consistent manner with N or P additions, and the magnitude of these shifts was related to the magnitude of plant community responses to nutrient inputs. Mycorrhizal fungi and methanogenic archaea decreased in relative abundance with nutrient additions, as did the relative abundances of oligotrophic bacterial taxa. The metagenomic data provided additional evidence for this shift in bacterial life history strategies because nutrient additions decreased the average genome sizes of the bacterial community members and elicited changes in the relative abundances of representative functional genes. Our results suggest that elevated N and P inputs lead to predictable shifts in the taxonomic and functional traits of soil microbial communities, including increases in the relative abundances of faster-growing, copiotrophic bacterial taxa, with these shifts likely to impact belowground ecosystems worldwide.

  6. Variation in active and passive resource inputs to experimental pools: mechanisms and possible consequences for food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, Johanna M.; Pletcher, Leanna T.; Vonesh, James R.

    2010-01-01

    1. Cross-ecosystem movements of resources, including detritus, nutrients and living prey, can strongly influence food web dynamics in recipient habitats. Variation in resource inputs is thought to be driven by factors external to the recipient habitat (e.g. donor habitat productivity and boundary conditions). However, inputs of or by ‘active’ living resources may be strongly influenced by recipient habitat quality when organisms exhibit behavioural habitat selection when crossing ecosystem boundaries. 2. To examine whether behavioural responses to recipient habitat quality alter the relative inputs of ‘active’ living and ‘passive’ detrital resources to recipient food webs, we manipulated the presence of caged predatory fish and measured biomass, energy and organic content of inputs to outdoor experimental pools of adult aquatic insects, frog eggs, terrestrial plant matter and terrestrial arthropods. 3. Caged fish reduced the biomass, energy and organic matter donated to pools by tree frog eggs by ∼70%, but did not alter insect colonisation or passive allochthonous inputs of terrestrial arthropods and plant material. Terrestrial plant matter and adult aquatic insects provided the most energy and organic matter inputs to the pools (40–50%), while terrestrial arthropods provided the least (7%). Inputs of frog egg were relatively small but varied considerably among pools and over time (3%, range = 0–20%). Absolute and proportional amounts varied by input type. 4. Aquatic predators can strongly affect the magnitude of active, but not passive, inputs and that the effect of recipient habitat quality on active inputs is variable. Furthermore, some active inputs (i.e. aquatic insect colonists) can provide similar amounts of energy and organic matter as passive inputs of terrestrial plant matter, which are well known to be important. Because inputs differ in quality and the trophic level they subsidise, proportional changes in input type could have

  7. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  8. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  9. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  10. Variability of aboveground litter inputs alters soil physicochemical and biological processes: a meta-analysis of litterfall-manipulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, L.; Sayer, E. J.

    2013-03-01

    Global change has been shown to greatly alter the amount of aboveground litter inputs to soil, which could cause substantial cascading effects on belowground biogeochemical cyling. Although having been studied extensively, there is uncertainty about how changes in aboveground litter inputs affect soil carbon and nutrient turnover and transformation. Here, we conducted a comprehensive compilation of 68 studies on litter addition or removal experiments, and used meta-analysis to assess the responses of soil physicochemical properties and carbon and nutrient cycling under changed aboveground litter inputs. Our results suggested that litter addition or removal could significantly alter soil temperature and moisture, but not soil pH. Litter inputs were more crucial in buffering soil temperature and moisture fluctuations in grassland than in forest. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass carbon and total carbon in the mineral soil increased with increasing litter inputs, suggesting that soil acted as a~net carbon sink although carbon loss and transformation increased with increasing litter inputs. Total nitrogen and the C : N ratio in the mineral soil increased with increased litter inputs. However, there was no correlation between litter inputs and extractable inorganic nitrogen in the mineral soil. Compared to other ecosystems, tropical and subtropical forests are more sensitive to variation in litter inputs. Increased or decreased litter inputs altered the turnover and accumulation of soil carbon and nutrient in tropical and subtropical forests more substantially over a shorter time period compared to other ecosystems. Overall, our study suggested that, although the magnitude of responses differed greatly among ecosystems, increased litter inputs generally accelerated the decomposition and accumulation of carbon and nutrients in soil, and decreased litter inputs reduced them.

  11. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  12. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  13. Low-cost, low-input RNA-seq protocols perform nearly as well as high-input protocols

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of protocols extending RNA-sequencing to the single-cell regime have been published. However, we were concerned that the additional steps to deal with such minute quantities of input sample would introduce serious biases that would make analysis of the data using existing approaches invalid. In this study, we performed a critical evaluation of several of these low-volume RNA-seq protocols, and found that they performed slightly less well in per-gene linearity of response, but with at least two orders of magnitude less sample required. We also explored a simple modification to one of these protocols that, for many samples, reduced the cost of library preparation to approximately $20/sample. PMID:25834775

  14. 7 CFR 3430.307 - Coordination and stakeholder input requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Coordination and stakeholder input requirements. 3430.307 Section 3430.307 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL... and stakeholder input requirements. (a) Stakeholder input. In making grants under this Part,...

  15. 7 CFR 3430.307 - Coordination and stakeholder input requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Coordination and stakeholder input requirements. 3430.307 Section 3430.307 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL... and stakeholder input requirements. (a) Stakeholder input. In making grants under this Part,...

  16. 7 CFR 3430.307 - Coordination and stakeholder input requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Coordination and stakeholder input requirements. 3430.307 Section 3430.307 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL... and stakeholder input requirements. (a) Stakeholder input. In making grants under this Part,...

  17. 7 CFR 3430.307 - Coordination and stakeholder input requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Coordination and stakeholder input requirements. 3430.307 Section 3430.307 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL... and stakeholder input requirements. (a) Stakeholder input. In making grants under this Part,...

  18. Comparison of Linear Microinstability Calculations of Varying Input Realism

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt

    2003-09-08

    The effect of varying ''input realism'' or varying completeness of the input data for linear microinstability calculations, in particular on the critical value of the ion temperature gradient for the ion temperature gradient mode, is investigated using gyrokinetic and gyrofluid approaches. The calculations show that varying input realism can have a substantial quantitative effect on the results.

  19. Analysis of Stochastic Response of Neural Networks with Stochastic Input

    1996-10-10

    Software permits the user to extend capability of his/her neural network to include probablistic characteristics of input parameter. User inputs topology and weights associated with neural network along with distributional characteristics of input parameters. Network response is provided via a cumulative density function of network response variable.

  20. Watershed processing of atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyl inputs.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Amy A; Totten, Lisa A; Cavallo, Gregory I; Yagecic, John R

    2007-04-01

    Indirect atmospheric deposition of PCBs was examined in subwatersheds of the Delaware River Estuary. Tributary PCB loads and atmospheric PCB concentrations were used to understand the pass-through efficiencies for nine rivers/ creeks for which PCB inputs appeared to be dominated by atmospheric deposition. The pass-through efficiency, E, was calculated from tributary loads and atmospheric deposition fluxes. Unfortunately, uncertainties in the gaseous and dry particle deposition velocities, vg and vd, respectively, render the calculated atmospheric deposition fluxes highly uncertain. In order to circumvent this problem, export of PCBs from the watershed was related directly to atmospheric PCB concentrations via a new mass transfer coefficient, the watershed delivery rate or vws, which describes the process by which the watershed transfers PCBs from the airto the River's main stem. vws increases with increasing chlorination and is significantly correlated with vapor pressure. This trend suggests that the transfer of PCBs from the atmosphere to the River via the watershed is more efficient for high molecular weight PCBs than for low molecular weight PCBs. This may indicate that the selected watersheds are at or close to equilibrium with respect to gaseous exchange of PCBs, such that lower molecular weight congeners undergo substantial revolatilization after deposition. The magnitude of the pass-through efficiency, E, depends on the deposition velocities used to calculate the atmospheric deposition flux, but when congener-specific deposition velocities are used, E is independent of vapor pressure and is relatively constant at about 3%. PMID:17438783