Science.gov

Sample records for additional experimental evidence

  1. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  2. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  3. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY SUPERHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS THROUGH H ATOM ADDITION AND THEIR CATALYTIC ROLE IN H{sub 2} FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thrower, J. D.; Jorgensen, B.; Friis, E. E.; Baouche, S.; Luntz, A. C.; Andersen, M.; Hammer, B.; Hornekaer, L.; Mennella, V.

    2012-06-10

    Mass spectrometry measurements show the formation of highly superhydrogenated derivatives of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule coronene through H atom addition reactions. The observed product mass distribution provides evidence also for abstraction reactions resulting in H{sub 2} formation, in agreement with recent IR measurements. Complementary density functional theory calculations confirm the stability of the observed superhydrogenated species toward spontaneous H and H{sub 2} loss indicating that abstraction reactions may be the dominant route to H{sub 2} formation involving neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The results indicate that highly superhydrogenated PAHs could well be formed and could act as efficient catalysts for H{sub 2} formation in the interstellar medium in low UV flux regions.

  4. Theoretical and experimental investigation of additive drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibulkin, Merwin

    1954-01-01

    The significance of additive drag is discussed and equations for determining its approximate value are derived for annular and open-nose inlets. Charts are presented giving values of additive drag coefficient over a range of free-stream Mach numbers for open and for annular-nose inlets with conical flow at the inlet. The effects on additive drag of variable inlet-total-pressure recovery and static pressures on the centerbody are investigated and an analytical method of predicting the variation of pressure on the centerbody with mass-flow ratio is given. Experimental additive-drag values are presented for a series of 20 degree and 25 degree cone half-angle inlets and one open-nose inlet operating at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.8 and 1.6. A comparison with the theoretical values of additive drag shows excellent agreement for the open-nose inlet and moderately good agreement for the annular inlets. (author)

  5. Sexually antagonistic genes: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Rice, W R

    1992-06-01

    When selection differs between the sexes, a mutation beneficial to one sex may be harmful to the other (sexually antagonistic). Because the sexes share a common gene pool, selection in one sex can interfere with the other's adaptive evolution. Theory predicts that sexually antagonistic mutations should accumulate in tight linkage with a new sex-determining gene, even when the harm to benefit ratio is high. Genetic markers and artificial selection were used to make a pair of autosomal genes segregate like a new pair of sex-determining genes in a Drosophila melanogaster model system. A 29-generation study provides experimental evidence that sexually antagonistic genes may be common in nature and will accumulate in response to a new sex-determining gene. PMID:1604317

  6. Experimental Evidence on Iterated Reasoning in Games

    PubMed Central

    Grehl, Sascha; Tutić, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence on two forms of iterated reasoning in games, i.e. backward induction and interactive knowledge. Besides reliable estimates of the cognitive skills of the subjects, our design allows us to disentangle two possible explanations for the observed limits in performed iterated reasoning: Restrictions in subjects’ cognitive abilities and their beliefs concerning the rationality of co-players. In comparison to previous literature, our estimates regarding subjects’ skills in iterated reasoning are quite pessimistic. Also, we find that beliefs concerning the rationality of co-players are completely irrelevant in explaining the observed limited amount of iterated reasoning in the dirty faces game. In addition, it is demonstrated that skills in backward induction are a solid predictor for skills in iterated knowledge, which points to some generalized ability of the subjects in iterated reasoning. PMID:26312486

  7. Experimental evidence of quantum randomness incomputability

    SciTech Connect

    Calude, Cristian S.; Dinneen, Michael J.; Dumitrescu, Monica; Svozil, Karl

    2010-08-15

    In contrast with software-generated randomness (called pseudo-randomness), quantum randomness can be proven incomputable; that is, it is not exactly reproducible by any algorithm. We provide experimental evidence of incomputability--an asymptotic property--of quantum randomness by performing finite tests of randomness inspired by algorithmic information theory.

  8. Experimental evidence for Abraham pressure of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; She, Weilong; Peng, Nan; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    The question of how much momentum light carries in media has been debated for over a century. Two rivalling theories, one from 1908 by Hermann Minkowski and the other from 1909 by Max Abraham, predict the exact opposite when light enters an optical material: a pulling force in Minkowski's case and a pushing force in Abraham's. Most experimental tests have agreed with Minkowski's theory, but here we report the first quantitative experimental evidence for Abraham's pushing pressure of light. Our results matter in optofluidics and optomechanics, and wherever light exerts mechanical pressure.

  9. 20 CFR 725.410 - Submission of additional evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Submission of additional evidence. (a) After the district director completes the development of medical... the claim was filed by, or on behalf of, a miner, the schedule shall contain a summary of the complete... employer other than the employer who last employed the claimant as a miner, the district director...

  10. Is there evidence for additional neutrino species from cosmology?

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Verde, Licia E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that recent cosmological and flavor-oscillation data favor the existence of additional neutrino species beyond the three predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. We apply Bayesian model selection to determine whether there is indeed any evidence from current cosmological datasets for the standard cosmological model to be extended to include additional neutrino flavors. The datasets employed include cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing power spectra, and measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale and the Hubble constant. We also consider other extensions to the standard neutrino model, such as massive neutrinos, and possible degeneracies with other cosmological parameters. The Bayesian evidence indicates that current cosmological data do not require any non-standard neutrino properties.

  11. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  12. Eating disorder diagnostic scale: additional evidence of reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Stice, Eric; Fisher, Melissa; Martinez, Erin

    2004-03-01

    The authors conducted 4 studies investigating the reliability and validity of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (HDDS; E. Stice, C. F. Telch, & S. L. Rizvi, 2000), a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Study 1 found that the HDDS showed criterion validity with interview-based diagnoses, convergent validity with risk factors for eating pathology, and internal consistency. Studies 2 and 3 found that the EDDS was sufficiently sensitive to detect the effects of eating disorder prevention programs. Regarding predictive validity, Studies 3 and 4 found that the EDDS predicted response to a prevention program and future onset of eating pathology and depression. Results provide additional evidence of the reliability and validity of this scale and suggest it may be useful in clinical and research applications. PMID:15023093

  13. A Simple Experimental Setup for Teaching Additive Colors with Arduino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Paulo Simeão; Hahn, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    The result of additive colors is always fascinating to young students. When we teach this topic to 14- to 16-year-old students, they do not usually notice we use maximum light quantities of red (R), green (G), and blue (B) to obtain yellow, magenta, and cyan colors in order to build the well-known additive color diagram of Fig. 1. But how about using different light intensities for R, G, and B? What colors do we get? This problem of color mixing has been intensively discussed for decades by several authors, as pointed out by Ruiz's "Color Addition and Subtraction Apps" work and the references included therein. An early LED demonstrator for additive color mixing dates back to 1985, and apps to illustrate color mixing are available online. In this work, we describe an experimental setup making use of a microcontroller device: the Arduino Uno. This setup is designed as a game in order to improve students' understanding of color mixing.

  14. Experimental evidence of electromagnetic pollution of ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    multiple low orbiting satellites have confirmed a significant increase in their intensity over the populated areas of Europe and Asia. Recently, there are many experimental evidences of the existence of power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) in the ionosphere. Their spectra consist of succession of 50 (60) Hz harmonics which is accompanied by a set of lines separated by 50 (60) or 100 (120) Hz - the central frequency of which is shifted to high frequency. These lines cover rather wide band - according to the available experimental data, their central frequencies are observed from ~1.5 - 3 kHz up to 15 kHz, and recently the main mains frequencies are also observed. The examples of power line harmonic radiation, which were detected by “Sich-1M”, “Chibis-M” and “Demeter” satellites, have been presented and discussed. The available experimental data, as well as theoretical estimations, allow us with a high degree of certainty to say that the permanent satellite monitoring of the ionospheric and magnetospheric anthropogenic EM perturbations is necessary for: a) objective assessment and prediction of the space weather conditions; b) evaluation of the daily or seasonal changes in the level of energy consumption; c) construction of a map for estimation of near space EM pollution. This study is partially supported by SSAU contract N 4-03/13.

  15. Experimental Evidence of Chaos from Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Gale, Ella

    Until now, most memristor-based chaotic circuits proposed in the literature are based on mathematical models which assume ideal characteristics such as piecewise-linear or cubic nonlinearities. The idea, illustrated here and originating from the experimental approach for device characterization, is to realize a chaotic system exploiting the nonlinearity of only one memristor with a very simple experimental set-up using feedback. In this way, a simple circuit is obtained and chaos is experimentally observed and is confirmed by the calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. Numerical results using the Strukov model support the existence of robust chaos in our circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of chaos in a real memristor circuit and suggests that memristors are well placed for hardware encryption.

  16. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  17. Experimental Evidence for a Wave Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin

    1997-04-01

    I have previously reported (see Wagner Web Site) slow moving, charge and matter separating, longitudinal waves, threading through matter and space. The waves I report are apparently produced by oscillating sources such as the sun and the planets, electromagnetic sources, and experimentally using electromagnetic sources. Experimentally the excited wavelengths are found to be close to the dimensions of the electromagnetic source regardless of its frequency. Oscillations of these waves can explain the solar cycle and determine planet and other satellite locations: r=r0exp(0.625N) where N is an integer for a particular planet or satellite of a planet and r0 is the radius of the sun or planet when the satellites were placed. This equation describes waves that are speeding up as the density of the medium (dark matter?) decreases moving away from the source. These waves are found experimentally to produce standing waves around any source apparently due to special reflection from the medium. These observations are consistent with the idea that these waves produce a pattern around a star with matter tending to collect only at specific locations(N) to produce satellites.

  18. Dichlorvos carcinogenicity: an assessment of the weight of experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Mennear, J H

    1994-12-01

    After 30 years of experience with human exposure to dichlorvos (DDVP) in the home, workplace, and sickroom, the U.S. EPA has published its intent to revoke the food additive registration of this cholinesterase-inhibiting insecticide. The basis for the Agency action is the result of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) toxicology and carcinogenesis study of DDVP in rats and mice (NTP Technical Report No. 342, September 1989). In those experiments the NTP considered the result in the female mouse portion of the study to afford unequivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. The NTP considered the interpretations of the male and female rat and the male mouse studies to be less than clear. Despite the NTP interpretation, the EPA considers the male rat data (increased incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia) to be sufficient to warrant the regulatory change. The purpose of this report is to summarize a review of the interpretation of the NTP data and to assess the predictive validity of the results relative to potential human health impact. Critical review of experimental data indicates that the evidence for a carcinogenic effect of DDVP in animals is equivocal. Further, DDVP possess no in vivo mutagenic activity in mammalian assay systems and it bears no significant structural similarity to known carcinogens. Therefore, a weight-of-the-evidence analysis leads to the conclusion that DDVP poses neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic risks to humans exposed under normal conditions of use of foreseeable conditions of misuse. PMID:7724838

  19. A Simple Experimental Setup for Teaching Additive Colors with Arduino

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Paulo Simeão; Hahn, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The result of additive colors is always fascinating to young students. When we teach this topic to 14- to 16-year-old students, they do not usually notice we use maximum light quantities of red (R), green (G), and blue (B) to obtain yellow, magenta, and cyan colors in order to build the well-known additive color diagram of Fig. 1. But how about…

  20. Experimental evidence of condensation-driven airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P.; Hodnett, M.; Poveda, G.; Burgos Salcedo, J. D.; Peña, C.

    2015-10-01

    The dominant "convection" model of atmospheric circulation is based on the premise that hot air expands and rises, to be replaced by colder air, thereby creating horizontal surface winds. A recent theory put forward by Makarieva and Gorshkov (2007, 2013) maintains that the primary motive force of atmospheric circulation derives from the intense condensation and sharp pressure reduction that is associated with regions where a high rate of evapotranspiration from natural closed-canopy forests provides the "fuel" for cloud formation. The net result of the "biotic pump" theory is that moist air flows from ocean to land, drawn in by the pressure changes associated with a high rate of condensation. To test the physics underpinning the biotic pump theory, namely that condensation of water vapour, at a sufficiently high rate, results in an uni-directional airflow, a 5 m tall experimental apparatus was designed and built, in which a 20 m3 body of atmospheric air is enclosed inside an annular 14 m long space (a "square donut") around which it can circulate freely, allowing for rotary air flows. One vertical side of the apparatus contains some 17 m of copper refrigeration coils, which cause condensation. The apparatus contains a series of sensors measuring temperature, humidity and barometric pressure every five seconds, and air flow every second. The laws of Newtonian physics are used in calculating the rate of condensation inside the apparatus. The results of more than one hundred experiments show a highly significant correlation, with r2 > 0.9, of airflow and the rate of condensation. The rotary air flows created appear to be consistent both in direction and velocity with the biotic pump hypothesis, the critical factor being the rate change in the partial pressure of water vapour in the enclosed body of atmospheric air. Air density changes, in terms of kinetic energy, are found to be orders of magnitude smaller than the kinetic energy of partial pressure change. The

  1. Reconciling Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence on the Impact of Full-Day Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Chloe

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how to interpret evidence on the impact of full-day kindergarten resulting from different study designs, and provides guidance on how this evidence taken in tandem may inform the design and implementation of full-day kindergarten policies. Incorporating both experimental and quasi-experimental estimates on…

  2. Female Rose Bitterling Prefer MHC-Dissimilar Males: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, Martin; Spence, Rowena; Bryjová, Anna; Bryja, Josef; Smith, Carl

    2012-01-01

    The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to “good allele” models of sexual selection, “compatible allele” models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus) demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC. PMID:22815816

  3. Experimental evidence for lattice effects in high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.J.L.; Kwei, G.H.; Thompson, J.D.

    1994-01-18

    We present an overview of the experimental evidence for a role of the lattice in the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. It appears unlikely that a solely conventional electron-phonon interaction produces the pairing. However, there is ample evidence of strong electron and spin to lattice coupling and observations of a response of the lattice to the electronic state. We draw attention to the importance of the local structure in discussions of lattice effects in high-{Tc} superconductivity.

  4. Rotational grazing on rangelands: Reconciliation of perception and experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of overwhelming experimental evidence to the contrary, rotational grazing continues to be promoted and implemented as the only viable grazing strategy. The goals of this synthesis are to 1) reevaluate the complexity, underlying assumptions, and ecological processes of grazed ecosystems, 2) ...

  5. Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors…

  6. 20 CFR 416.805 - When additional evidence may be required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When additional evidence may be required. 416.805 Section 416.805 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determination of Age § 416.805 When additional evidence may...

  7. Experimental evidence of contagious yawning in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Swartwood, Lexington; Militello, Janine; Sackett, Serena

    2015-09-01

    Experimental evidence of contagious yawning has only been documented in four mammalian species. Here, we report the results from two separate experimental studies designed to investigate the presence of contagious yawning in a social parrot, the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus). In Study 1, birds were paired in adjacent cages with and without visual barriers, and the temporal association of yawning was assessed between visual conditions. In Study 2, the same birds were exposed to video stimuli of both conspecific yawns and control behavior, and yawning frequency was compared between conditions. Results from both studies demonstrate that yawning is contagious. To date, this is the first experimental evidence of contagious yawning in a non-mammalian species. We propose that future research could use budgerigars to explore questions related to basic forms of empathic processing. PMID:26012708

  8. Experimental evidence of replica symmetry breaking in random lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofraniha, N.; Viola, I.; di Maria, F.; Barbarella, G.; Gigli, G.; Leuzzi, L.; Conti, C.

    2015-01-01

    Spin-glass theory is one of the leading paradigms of complex physics and describes condensed matter, neural networks and biological systems, ultracold atoms, random photonics and many other research fields. According to this theory, identical systems under identical conditions may reach different states. This effect is known as replica symmetry breaking and is revealed by the shape of the probability distribution function of an order parameter named the Parisi overlap. However, a direct experimental evidence in any field of research is still missing. Here we investigate pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in random lasers, we introduce and measure the analogue of the Parisi overlap in independent experimental realizations of the same disordered sample, and we find that the distribution function yields evidence of a transition to a glassy light phase compatible with a replica symmetry breaking.

  9. Experimental Evidence for LENR in a Polarized Pd/D Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpak, S.

    2005-03-01

    Experimental evidence in support of claims that excess enthalpy production in a polarized Pd/D lattice is of a nuclear origin is questioned on various grounds, eg marginal intensity and difficulty in reproducing. Here, evidence is presented that is 100% reproducible and of sufficient intensity to be well outside of experimental errors. In addition to the thermal behavior, the nuclear manifestations include: X-ray emission; tritium production; and, when an operating cell is placed in an external electric field, fusion to create heavier metals such as Ca, Al, Mg, and Zn.

  10. Experimental evidence of hyperbolic heat conduction in processed meat

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.; Vedavarz, A.; Moallemi, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to present experimental evidence of the wave nature of heat propagation in processed meat and to demonstrate that the hyperbolic heat conduction model is an accurate representation, on a macroscopic level, of the heat conduction process in such biological material. The value of the characteristic thermal time of a specific material, processed bologna meat, is determined experimentally. As a part of the work different thermophysical properties are also measured. The measured temperature distributions in the samples are compared with the Fourier results and significant deviation between the two is observed, especially during the initial stages of the transient conduction process. The measured values are found to match the theoretical non-Fourier hyperbolic predictions very well. The superposition of waves occurring inside the meat sample due to the hyperbolic nature of heat conduction is also proved experimentally. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  12. Chemicals and cancer in humans: first evidence in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J

    1993-01-01

    Certain human diseases have been traced to exposure to environmental and occupational chemicals. In many instances the first evidence of potential adverse effects came from experimental studies and were subsequently discovered in humans. Associations of human cancers, as a diverse group of diseases, and chemicals have been made since the middle 1700s. Since then, nearly 100 chemicals, mixtures of chemicals, or exposure circumstances are now recognized as being or strongly implicated as being carcinogenic to humans. Of the less than 1000 agents evaluated adequately for carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, a varying spectrum of data from studies on humans are available for only about 20-25%. So far, more than 60 agents are linked unequivocally as causing cancer in humans, and another 50 or so are strongly suspected of being carcinogenic to humans. Not all of these have been or can be evaluated in animals because some are industrial processes or "occupations," some are environmental and cultural risk factors, and some are mixtures of agents. For those that can be studied experimentally, the qualitative concordance between humans and animals approaches unity, and in every case there is at least one common organ site of cancer in both species. The evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals preceded that observed in humans for nearly 30 agents and is the subject of this paper. PMID:8354167

  13. Auger Recombination in Indium Gallium Nitride: Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krames, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Progress in InGaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) technology has resulted in white-light emitters with efficiencies far exceeding those of conventional light sources such as tungsten-filament-based incandescence and mercury-vapor based fluorescence. Indeed, by now efficacies exceeding 150 lumens per Watt for InGaN-based phosphor-converted white LEDs are claimed, which represent a 90% energy savings compared to the conventional incandescent (i.e., ``light bulb'') solution. However, these high performance levels are obtained under conditions of very low forward current-density for the InGaN LED and do not represent true operating conditions (nor cost-effective utilization) for the device. In order to reduce the cost (and thus increase market penetration of) solid-state lighting, more lumens per unit of semiconductor area are required which in practice necessitates higher drive current densities. Unfortunately, at these higher driver current densities, the internal quantum efficiency of InGaN-based LEDs is observed to decrease significantly. In the fall of 2007, researchers at the Advanced Laboratories of Philips Lumileds were the first to propose Auger recombination as the root-cause mechanism in InGaN which was behind this ``efficiency droop'' [1]. They further proposed to circumvent the problem by employing InGaN-based active region designs that maintain low carrier density, and demonstrated an LED device design that reaches a maximum quantum efficiency above 200 A/cm2, compared to ˜1-10 A/cm^2 for typical multiple-quantum-well heterostructures [2]. In this talk we will review the experimental evidence for Auger recombination in InGaN, beginning with the early work from 2007 and then considering additional work from more recent efforts to better understand the details behind this loss mechanism. [4pt] [1] Y. C. Shen, G. O. M"uller, S. Watanabe, N. F. Gardner, A. Munkholm, and M. R. Krames, ``Auger recombination in InGaN measured by photoluminescence'', Appl. Phys

  14. The tripole vortex: Experimental evidence and explicit solutions.

    PubMed

    Kizner, Ziv; Khvoles, Ruvim

    2004-01-01

    Based on experimental evidence, explicit vorticity-distributed solutions to the Euler equations in two dimensions are constructed describing the tripole vortex. The vortex form and the solution outside the region of nonzero vorticity are derived analytically, while the interior is solved numerically. The continuous-vorticity solution reproduces the main features of the tripoles observed in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations-their shape, flow pattern, and the form of the nonlinear vorticity vs streamfunction relation. The approach followed in the construction of a tripole proves to be beneficial in the search for higher-order multipoles, an example being a smooth quadrupole solution. PMID:15324169

  15. Sleep Duration and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Epidemiologic and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Covassin, Naima; Singh, Prachi

    2016-03-01

    Inadequate sleep is increasingly pervasive, and the impact on health remains to be fully understood. The cardiovascular consequences alone appear to be substantial. This review summarizes epidemiologic evidence regarding the association between extremes of sleep duration and the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular diseases. The adverse effects of experimental sleep loss on physiological functions are discussed, along with cardiovascular risk factors that may underlie the association with increased morbidity and mortality. Current data support the concept that inadequate sleep duration confers heightened cardiovascular risk. Thus implementation of preventative strategies may reduce the potential disease burden associated with this high-risk behavior. PMID:26972035

  16. Experimental Evidence for Dark Excitons in Monolayer WSe_{2}.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; You, Yumeng; Zhao, Shu Yang Frank; Heinz, Tony F

    2015-12-18

    Transition metal dichalcogenides in the class MX_{2} (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se) have been identified as direct-gap semiconductors in the monolayer limit. Here, we examine light emission of monolayer WSe_{2} using temperature-dependent photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. We present experimental evidence for the existence of an optically forbidden dark state of the band-gap exciton that lies tens of meV below the optically bright state. The presence of the dark state is manifest in the strong quenching of light emission observed at reduced temperatures. The experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of spin-polarized conduction and valence bands at the K point of the Brillouin zone, with the minimum gap occurring between bands of opposite electron spin. PMID:26722944

  17. Experimental evidence for compositional syntax in bird calls.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshitaka N; Wheatcroft, David; Griesser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Human language can express limitless meanings from a finite set of words based on combinatorial rules (i.e., compositional syntax). Although animal vocalizations may be comprised of different basic elements (notes), it remains unknown whether compositional syntax has also evolved in animals. Here we report the first experimental evidence for compositional syntax in a wild animal species, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor). Tits have over ten different notes in their vocal repertoire and use them either solely or in combination with other notes. Experiments reveal that receivers extract different meanings from 'ABC' (scan for danger) and 'D' notes (approach the caller), and a compound meaning from 'ABC-D' combinations. However, receivers rarely scan and approach when note ordering is artificially reversed ('D-ABC'). Thus, compositional syntax is not unique to human language but may have evolved independently in animals as one of the basic mechanisms of information transmission. PMID:26954097

  18. Experimental evidence for compositional syntax in bird calls

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshitaka N.; Wheatcroft, David; Griesser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Human language can express limitless meanings from a finite set of words based on combinatorial rules (i.e., compositional syntax). Although animal vocalizations may be comprised of different basic elements (notes), it remains unknown whether compositional syntax has also evolved in animals. Here we report the first experimental evidence for compositional syntax in a wild animal species, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor). Tits have over ten different notes in their vocal repertoire and use them either solely or in combination with other notes. Experiments reveal that receivers extract different meanings from ‘ABC' (scan for danger) and ‘D' notes (approach the caller), and a compound meaning from ‘ABC–D' combinations. However, receivers rarely scan and approach when note ordering is artificially reversed (‘D–ABC'). Thus, compositional syntax is not unique to human language but may have evolved independently in animals as one of the basic mechanisms of information transmission. PMID:26954097

  19. Experimental evidence of the double-porosity effects in geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ngoc, Tien; Lewandowska, Jolanta; Bertin, Henri

    2014-06-01

    Double-porosity is an important characteristic of microstructure in a large range of geomaterials. It designs porous media with connected fissures/fractures or aggregated soils. The origin of double-porosity can be natural or/and it can result from mechanical, chemical or biological damage. The presence of double-porosity can significantly affect the behaviour of geomaterials. In this paper we provide an experimental evidence of the double-porosity effects by performing laboratory experiments. Series of tracer dispersion experiments (in saturated and unsaturated steady-state water flow conditions) in a physical model of double-porosity geomaterial were carried out. For the comparative purposes, experiments of the same type were also performed in a singleporosity model medium. The results clearly showed that the double-porosity microstructure leads to the non-Fickian behaviour of the tracer (early breakthrough and long tail) in both saturated and unsaturated cases.

  20. INSTITUTIONS AND BEHAVIOR: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE ON THE EFFECTS OF DEMOCRACY

    PubMed Central

    Bó, Pedro Dal; Foster, Andrew; Putterman, Louis

    2013-01-01

    A novel experiment is used to show that the effect of a policy on the level of cooperation is greater when it is chosen democratically by the subjects than when it is exogenously imposed. In contrast to the previous literature, our experimental design allows us to control for selection effects (e.g. those who choose the policy may be affected differently by it). Our finding implies that democratic institutions may affect behavior directly in addition to having effects through the choice of policies. Our findings have implications for the generalizability of the results of randomized policy interventions. PMID:25076785

  1. 43 CFR 3741.3 - Additional evidence required with application for patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional evidence required with application for patent. 3741.3 Section 3741.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) PUBLIC LAW 585; MULTIPLE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT...

  2. 43 CFR 3741.3 - Additional evidence required with application for patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional evidence required with application for patent. 3741.3 Section 3741.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) PUBLIC LAW 585; MULTIPLE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT...

  3. 20 CFR 10.120 - May a claimant submit additional evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a claimant submit additional evidence? 10.120 Section 10.120 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION...

  4. 20 CFR 10.120 - May a claimant submit additional evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true May a claimant submit additional evidence? 10.120 Section 10.120 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION...

  5. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  6. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  7. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  8. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  9. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  10. 30 CFR 1210.206 - Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to ONRR?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to ONRR? 1210.206 Section 1210.206 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue FORMS AND REPORTS Production and...

  11. 38 CFR 20.709 - Rule 709. Procurement of additional evidence following a hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 709. Procurement of additional evidence following a hearing. 20.709 Section 20.709 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Hearings on Appeal § 20.709 Rule 709. Procurement...

  12. Experimental evidence that sperm maturation drives protandry in an ectotherm.

    PubMed

    Breedveld, Merel C; Fitze, Patrick S

    2016-09-01

    Protandry, i.e., the earlier arrival to breeding areas of males than females, has attracted a lot of scientific attention. However, evidence for the evolutionary hypotheses of protandry is surprisingly scarce. Here, we experimentally manipulate the time of emergence from hibernation of males, relative to females, in the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara. We test whether the timing of emergence affects sperm maturation and mating success, to disentangle among proposed selective advantages of protandry. Our results experimentally demonstrate that the timing of emergence affects the date of sperm presence. Moreover, the degree of protandry affected whether males had sperm upon their first encounter with females, but it did not affect the probability of copulating. Mating occurred independent of male fertility and mating during infertility was least common in early emerging males. Early emergence from hibernation by males, relative to females, thus increases the male's chance of fertilising eggs and later emergence from hibernation by females reduces the female's probability of mating with infertile males. These results point to direct reproductive benefits of protandry in males and females, where earlier emergence is predicted to increase the male's opportunities to inseminate mates, and later emergence reduces the female's probability of copulating with infertile males. This suggests that protandry evolved due to the time required for sperm maturation after emergence from hibernation. PMID:27259749

  13. Experimental evidence for action imitation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Abramson, José Z; Hernández-Lloreda, Victoria; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Comparative experimental studies of imitative learning have focused mainly on primates and birds. However, cetaceans are promising candidates to display imitative learning as they have evolved in socioecological settings that have selected for large brains, complex sociality, and coordinated predatory tactics. Here we tested imitative learning in killer whales, Orcinus orca. We used a 'do-as-other-does' paradigm in which 3 subjects witnessed a conspecific demonstrator's performance that included 15 familiar and 4 novel behaviours. The three subjects (1) learned the copy command signal 'Do that' very quickly, that is, 20 trials on average; (2) copied 100 % of the demonstrator's familiar and novel actions; (3) achieved full matches in the first attempt for 8-13 familiar behaviours (out of 15) and for the 2 novel behaviours (out of 2) in one subject; and (4) took no longer than 8 trials to accurately copy any familiar behaviour, and no longer than 16 trials to copy any novel behaviour. This study provides experimental evidence for body imitation, including production imitation, in killer whales that is comparable to that observed in dolphins tested under similar conditions. These findings suggest that imitative learning may underpin some of the group-specific traditions reported in killer whales in the field. PMID:22875725

  14. Experimental evidence for deterministic chaos in thermal pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C.S.; Thomas, J.F.; Richards, G.A.; Narayanaswami, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    Given the existence of chaotic oscillations in reacting chemical systems, it is reasonable to ask whether or not similar phenomena can occur in combustion. In this paper, the authors present experimental evidence that kinetically driven chaos occurs in a highly simplified thermal pulse combustor. The combustor is a well-stirred reactor with a tailpipe extending from one end. Fuel and air are injected into the combustion chamber through orifices in the end opposite the tailpipe. Propane with the fuel used in all cases. From the experimental data analyses, it is clear that deterministic chaos is an important factor in thermal pulse combustor dynamics. While the authors have only observed such behavior in this particular type combustor to date, they infer from their understanding of the origins of the chaos that it is likely to exist in other pulse combustors and even nonpulsing combustion. They speculate that realization of the importance of chaos in affecting flame stability could lead to significant changes in combustor design and control.

  15. Experimental Evidence for Phonemic Contrasts in a Nonhuman Vocal System.

    PubMed

    Engesser, Sabrina; Crane, Jodie M S; Savage, James L; Russell, Andrew F; Townsend, Simon W

    2015-06-01

    The ability to generate new meaning by rearranging combinations of meaningless sounds is a fundamental component of language. Although animal vocalizations often comprise combinations of meaningless acoustic elements, evidence that rearranging such combinations generates functionally distinct meaning is lacking. Here, we provide evidence for this basic ability in calls of the chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps), a highly cooperative bird of the Australian arid zone. Using acoustic analyses, natural observations, and a series of controlled playback experiments, we demonstrate that this species uses the same acoustic elements (A and B) in different arrangements (AB or BAB) to create two functionally distinct vocalizations. Specifically, the addition or omission of a contextually meaningless acoustic element at a single position generates a phoneme-like contrast that is sufficient to distinguish the meaning between the two calls. Our results indicate that the capacity to rearrange meaningless sounds in order to create new signals occurs outside of humans. We suggest that phonemic contrasts represent a rudimentary form of phoneme structure and a potential early step towards the generative phonemic system of human language. PMID:26121619

  16. Experimental Evidence for Phonemic Contrasts in a Nonhuman Vocal System

    PubMed Central

    Savage, James L.; Russell, Andrew F.; Townsend, Simon W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to generate new meaning by rearranging combinations of meaningless sounds is a fundamental component of language. Although animal vocalizations often comprise combinations of meaningless acoustic elements, evidence that rearranging such combinations generates functionally distinct meaning is lacking. Here, we provide evidence for this basic ability in calls of the chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps), a highly cooperative bird of the Australian arid zone. Using acoustic analyses, natural observations, and a series of controlled playback experiments, we demonstrate that this species uses the same acoustic elements (A and B) in different arrangements (AB or BAB) to create two functionally distinct vocalizations. Specifically, the addition or omission of a contextually meaningless acoustic element at a single position generates a phoneme-like contrast that is sufficient to distinguish the meaning between the two calls. Our results indicate that the capacity to rearrange meaningless sounds in order to create new signals occurs outside of humans. We suggest that phonemic contrasts represent a rudimentary form of phoneme structure and a potential early step towards the generative phonemic system of human language. PMID:26121619

  17. Origin of Aphyric Phonolitic Magmas: Natural Evidences and Experimental Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Freda, C.; Gaeta, M.

    2010-12-01

    Large explosive phonolitic eruptions are commonly characterised by aphyric juvenile eruptive products. Taking into account the low density contrast among phonolitic composition and settling phases (i.e., feldspar and leucite), the almost complete lack of crystals in these differentiated compositions rises the question of which process could produce such an efficient crystal-melt separation. Seeking for an answer, we have investigated crystallization in presence of a thermal gradient as a possible mechanism for crystal-melt separation, considering both chemical and physical effects acting on a variably crystallized system. Using a natural tephri-phonolitic composition as starting material (M.te Aguzzo scoria cone, Sabatini Volcanic District, Central Italy), we have reproduced thermal gradient-driven crystallization in order to simulate the crystallization process in a thermally zoned magma chamber. Crystallization degree (paragenesis made of clinopyroxene±feldspars±leucite) as well as melt composition varies along the thermal gradient. In particular, melt composition ranges from the tephri-phonolitic starting composition at the bottom of the charge (hottest and aphyric zone) to phonolitic at the top (cooler and heterogeneously-crystallised zone). Backscattered images of experimental products clearly evidence: i) the aphyric tephri-phonolitic melt region at the bottom of the charge; ii) a drop-shaped crystal clustering in the middle zone; and iii) large aphyric belt and pockets (up to 100 µm wide) of phonolitic melt, with large deformed-shaped sanidine occurring at their margin, at the charge top region. The latter two features, resulting from solid-melt displacements, suggest that the segregation of phonolitic melt can be related to crystal sinking and compaction. On the other hand, the compositional variability of the melt along the thermal gradient is directly related to the crystallization degree, indicating that chemical diffusion and thermal migration have

  18. Semantics guide infants' vowel learning: Computational and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Ter Schure, S M M; Junge, C M M; Boersma, P P G

    2016-05-01

    In their first year, infants' perceptual abilities zoom in on only those speech sound contrasts that are relevant for their language. Infants' lexicons do not yet contain sufficient minimal pairs to explain this phonetic categorization process. Therefore, researchers suggested a bottom-up learning mechanism: infants create categories aligned with the frequency distributions of sounds in their input. Recent evidence shows that this bottom-up mechanism may be complemented by the semantic context in which speech sounds occur, such as simultaneously present objects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether discrimination of a non-native vowel contrast improves when sounds from the contrast were paired consistently or randomly with two distinct visually presented objects, while the distribution of speech tokens suggested a single broad category. This was assessed in two ways: computationally, namely in a neural network simulation, and experimentally, namely in a group of 8-month-old infants. The neural network, trained with a large set of sound-meaning pairs, revealed that two categories emerge only if sounds are consistently paired with objects. A group of 49 real 8-month-old infants did not immediately show sensitivity to the pairing condition; a later test at 18 months with some of the same infants, however, showed that this sensitivity at 8 months interacted with their vocabulary size at 18 months. This interaction can be explained by the idea that infants with larger future vocabularies are more positively influenced by consistent training (and/or more negatively influenced by inconsistent training) than infants with smaller future vocabularies. This suggests that consistent pairing with distinct visual objects can help infants to discriminate speech sounds even when the auditory information does not signal a distinction. Together our results give computational as well as experimental support for the idea that semantic context plays a role in disambiguating

  19. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs. PMID:26381440

  20. NEW EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCES ABOUT THE FORMATION AND CONSUMPTION OF KETOHYDROPEROXIDES

    PubMed Central

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Zhou, Zhongyue; Deng, Liulin; Guo, Huijun; Xie, Mingfeng; Qi, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The formation of hydroperoxides postulated in all the kinetic models for the low temperature oxidation of alkanes have been experimentally proved thanks to a new type of apparatus associating a quartz jet-stirred reactor through a molecular-beam sampling system to a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. This apparatus has been used to investigate the low-temperature oxidation of n-butane and has allowed demonstrating the formation of different types of alkylhydroperoxides, namely methylhydroperoxide, ethylhydroperoxide and butylhydroperoxide, and of C4 alkylhydroperoxides including a carbonyl function (ketohydroperoxides). In addition, the formation of products deriving from these ketohydroperoxides, such as C4 molecules including either two carbonyl groups or one carbonyl and one alcohol functions, has been observed. Simulations using a detailed kinetic model have been performed to support some of the assumptions made in this work. PMID:23700382

  1. Mining experimental evidence of molecular function claims from the literature

    PubMed Central

    Crangle, Colleen E.; Cherry, J. Michael; Hong, Eurie L.; Zbyslaw, Alex; Wong, Limsoon

    2011-01-01

    Motivation The rate at which gene-related findings appear in the scientific literature makes it difficult if not impossible for biomedical scientists to keep fully informed and up to date. The importance of these findings argues for the development of automated methods that can find, extract and summarize this information. This article reports on methods for determining the molecular function claims that are being made in a scientific article, specifically those that are backed by experimental evidence. Results The most significant result is that for molecular function claims based on direct assays, our methods achieved recall of 70.7% and precision of 65.7%. Furthermore, our methods correctly identified in the text 44.6% of the specific molecular function claims backed up by direct assays, but with a precision of only 0.92%, a disappointing outcome that led to an examination of the different kinds of errors. These results were based on an analysis of 1823 articles from the literature of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). Availability The annotation files for S.cerevisiae are available from ftp://genome-ftp.stanford.edu/pub/yeast/data_download/literature_curation/gene_association.sgd.gz. The draft protocol vocabulary is available by request from the first author. Contact crangle@converspeech.com PMID:17942445

  2. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome - additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Koenighofer, M; Hung, C Y; McCauley, J L; Dallman, J; Back, E J; Mihalek, I; Gripp, K W; Sol-Church, K; Rusconi, P; Zhang, Z; Shi, G-X; Andres, D A; Bodamer, O A

    2016-03-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in 1 of 16 proteins in the RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins; however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. PMID:25959749

  3. Experimental evidence for bedrock erosion by suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Brun, F.; Lo, D. Y.; Omerdin, K.; Lamb, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Fluvial bedrock incision influences channel evolution and sets the pace of landscape lowering. Bedrock incision often occurs via abrasion, and existing theory is divided on the erosional efficiency of sediment transported in suspension versus bed load, due in part to a lack of data to test model predictions. This represents a major knowledge gap as suspended sediment can account for the majority of the total fluvial sediment load, and untested models make opposite predictions of bedrock erosion in steep channels and during large floods. We performed controlled abrasion mill experiments examining suspended and bed load erosion, making use of an erodible polyurethane foam substrate as a bedrock analog to overcome previous experimental limitations and allow for measureable suspension erosion. Our results show foam erodes similar to natural rock, where erodibility is a function of tensile strength and density. To explore the role of the mode of sediment transport on erosion, we varied sediment size from gravel (42 mm diameter) to medium sand (0.4 mm diameter), while holding fixed hydraulics, sediment load, and substrate strength. Under these conditions, volumetric erosion rates decreased across the bed load (~101 - 103 cm3/hr) to suspended load (~0.01 - 100 cm3/hr) transition due to lower near-bed sediment concentrations (~25 g/l vs. 115 g/l), slower settling velocity (0.09 m/s vs. 0.49 m/s), and viscous damping of impacts (for particle Stokes numbers less than ~75) for suspended particles. Our results provide direct experimental evidence of erosion by suspended load, and upscaling results to field scale shows suspension erosion can outpace bed load erosion by up to a factor ~4 during large floods which suspend coarse sand and gravel, and where suspended sediment dominates the total load. These results imply that suspension erosion may also dominate on very steep slopes where commonly used bedrock incision models (which ignore suspension erosion) predict zero erosion

  4. Self-Organization of Blood Pressure Regulation: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Levrard, Thibaud; Courcinous, Sandrine; Victor, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure regulation is a prime example of homeostatic regulation. However, some characteristics of the cardiovascular system better match a non-linear self-organized system than a homeostatic one. To determine whether blood pressure regulation is self-organized, we repeated the seminal demonstration of self-organized control of movement, but applied it to the cardiovascular system. We looked for two distinctive features peculiar to self-organization: non-equilibrium phase transitions and hysteresis in their occurrence when the system is challenged. We challenged the cardiovascular system by means of slow, 20-min Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down tilt table tests in random order. We continuously determined the phase between oscillations at the breathing frequency of Total Peripheral Resistances and Heart Rate Variability by means of cross-spectral analysis. We looked for a significant phase drift during these procedures, which signed a non-equilibrium phase transition. We determined at which head-up tilt angle it occurred. We checked that this angle was significantly different between Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down to demonstrate hysteresis. We observed a significant non-equilibrium phase transition in nine healthy volunteers out of 11 with significant hysteresis (48.1 ± 7.5° and 21.8 ± 3.9° during Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down, respectively, p < 0.05). Our study shows experimental evidence of self-organized short-term blood pressure regulation. It provides new insights into blood pressure regulation and its related disorders. PMID:27065880

  5. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment. PMID:19074573

  6. Experimental evidence that wildflower strips increase pollinator visits to crops.

    PubMed

    Feltham, Hannah; Park, Kirsty; Minderman, Jeroen; Goulson, Dave

    2015-08-01

    Wild bees provide a free and potentially diverse ecosystem service to farmers growing pollination-dependent crops. While many crops benefit from insect pollination, soft fruit crops, including strawberries are highly dependent on this ecosystem service to produce viable fruit. However, as a result of intensive farming practices and declining pollinator populations, farmers are increasingly turning to commercially reared bees to ensure that crops are adequately pollinated throughout the season. Wildflower strips are a commonly used measure aimed at the conservation of wild pollinators. It has been suggested that commercial crops may also benefit from the presence of noncrop flowers; however, the efficacy and economic benefits of sowing flower strips for crops remain relatively unstudied. In a study system that utilizes both wild and commercial pollinators, we test whether wildflower strips increase the number of visits to adjacent commercial strawberry crops by pollinating insects. We quantified this by experimentally sowing wildflower strips approximately 20 meters away from the crop and recording the number of pollinator visits to crops with, and without, flower strips. Between June and August 2013, we walked 292 crop transects at six farms in Scotland, recording a total of 2826 pollinators. On average, the frequency of pollinator visits was 25% higher for crops with adjacent flower strips compared to those without, with a combination of wild and commercial bumblebees (Bombus spp.) accounting for 67% of all pollinators observed. This effect was independent of other confounding effects, such as the number of flowers on the crop, date, and temperature. Synthesis and applications. This study provides evidence that soft fruit farmers can increase the number of pollinators that visit their crops by sowing inexpensive flower seed mixes nearby. By investing in this management option, farmers have the potential to increase and sustain pollinator populations over time

  7. Experimental evidence that wildflower strips increase pollinator visits to crops

    PubMed Central

    Feltham, Hannah; Park, Kirsty; Minderman, Jeroen; Goulson, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Wild bees provide a free and potentially diverse ecosystem service to farmers growing pollination-dependent crops. While many crops benefit from insect pollination, soft fruit crops, including strawberries are highly dependent on this ecosystem service to produce viable fruit. However, as a result of intensive farming practices and declining pollinator populations, farmers are increasingly turning to commercially reared bees to ensure that crops are adequately pollinated throughout the season. Wildflower strips are a commonly used measure aimed at the conservation of wild pollinators. It has been suggested that commercial crops may also benefit from the presence of noncrop flowers; however, the efficacy and economic benefits of sowing flower strips for crops remain relatively unstudied. In a study system that utilizes both wild and commercial pollinators, we test whether wildflower strips increase the number of visits to adjacent commercial strawberry crops by pollinating insects. We quantified this by experimentally sowing wildflower strips approximately 20 meters away from the crop and recording the number of pollinator visits to crops with, and without, flower strips. Between June and August 2013, we walked 292 crop transects at six farms in Scotland, recording a total of 2826 pollinators. On average, the frequency of pollinator visits was 25% higher for crops with adjacent flower strips compared to those without, with a combination of wild and commercial bumblebees (Bombus spp.) accounting for 67% of all pollinators observed. This effect was independent of other confounding effects, such as the number of flowers on the crop, date, and temperature. Synthesis and applications. This study provides evidence that soft fruit farmers can increase the number of pollinators that visit their crops by sowing inexpensive flower seed mixes nearby. By investing in this management option, farmers have the potential to increase and sustain pollinator populations over time

  8. Rotational grazing on rangelands: Reconciliation of perception and experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experimental evaluation of grazing systems represents a highly visible and lengthy chapter in the history of the rangeland profession. Although experimentation has largely concluded, contrasting interpretations still remain regarding the potential benefits of rotational grazing systems on rangel...

  9. An Experimental Investigation of the Influence of the Lubricant Viscosity and Additives on Gear Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2005-01-01

    The influence of lubricant viscosity and additives on the average wear rate of spur gear pairs was investigated experimentally. The gear specimens of a comprehensive gear durability test program that made use of seven lubricants covering a range of viscosities were examined to measure gear tooth wear. The measured wear was related to the as-manufactured surface roughness, the elastohydrodynamic film thickness, and the experimentally determined contact fatigue lives of the same specimens. In general, the wear rate was found to be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the lubricant and to the lambda ratio (also sometimes called the specific film thickness). The data also show an exponential trend between the average wear rates and the surface fatigue lives. Lubricants with similar viscosities but differing additives and compositions had somewhat differing gear surface fatigue lives and wear rates.

  10. Augmenting a Waste Glass Mixture Experiment Study with Additional Glass Components and Experimental Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F. ); Cooley, Scott K. ); Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D. ); Edwards, Tommy B.

    2002-01-01

    A glass composition variation study (CVS) for high-level waste (HLW) stored in Idaho is being statistically designed and performed in phases over several years. The purpose of the CVS is to investigate and model how HLW-glass properties depend on glass composition. The resulting glass property-composition models will be used to develop desirable glass formulations and for other purposes. Phases 1 and 2 of the CVS have been completed and are briefly described. This paper focuses on the CVS Phase 3 experimental design, which was chosen to augment the Phase 1 and 2 data with additional data points, as well as to account for additional glass components not studied in Phases 1 and/or 2. In total, 16 glass components were varied in the Phase 3 experimental design. The paper describes how these Phase 3 experimental design augmentation challenges were addressed using the previous data, preliminary property-composition models, and statistical mixture experiment and optimal experimental design methods and software.

  11. An experimental survey of additives for improving dehydrogenation properties of magnesium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengshang; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sun, Pei

    2015-03-01

    The use of a wide range of additives has been known as an important method for improving hydrogen storage properties of MgH2. There is a lack of a standard methodology, however, that can be used to select or compare the effectiveness of different additives. A systematic experimental survey was carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. MgH2 with various additives were prepared by using a high-energy-high-pressure planetary ball milling method and characterized by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. The results showed that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Additives such as Al, In, Sn, Si showed minor effects on the kinetics of the dehydrogenation of MgH2, while exhibiting moderate thermodynamic destabilizing effects. In combination, MgH2 with both kinetic and thermodynamic additives, such as the MgH2-In-TiMn2 system, exhibited a drastically decreased dehydrogenation temperature.

  12. The guanidine and maleic acid (1:1) complex. The additional theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marek; Dudzic, Damian

    2012-04-01

    On the basis of experimental literature data the theoretical studies for guanidinium and maleic acid complex with using DFT method are performed. In these studies the experimental X-ray data for two different forms of investigated crystal were used. During the geometry optimization process one equilibrium structure was found, only. According to this result the infrared spectrum for one theoretical molecule was calculated. On the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis the clear-cut assignments of observed bands were performed. For the calculated molecule with energy minimum the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were obtained and graphically illustrated. The energy difference (GAP) between HOMO and LUMO was analyzed. Additionally, the nonlinear properties of this molecule were calculated. The α and β (first and second order) hyperpolarizability values are obtained. On the basis of these results the title crystal was classified as new second order NLO generator.

  13. Thyroid-hormone-disrupting chemicals: evidence for dose-dependent additivity or synergism.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Kevin M; Craft, Elena S; Hedge, Joan M; Gennings, Chris; Simmons, Jane E; Carchman, Richard A; Carter, W Hans; DeVito, Michael J

    2005-11-01

    ) and the experimentally observed mixture response (the empirical model). A likelihood-ratio test revealed statistically significant departure from dose additivity. There was no deviation from additivity at the lowest doses of the mixture, but there was a greater-than-additive effect at the three highest mixtures doses. At high doses the additivity model underpredicted the empirical effects by 2- to 3-fold. These are the first results to suggest dose-dependent additivity and synergism in TDCs that may act via different mechanisms in a complex mixture. The results imply that cumulative risk approaches be considered when assessing the risk of exposure to chemical mixtures that contain TDCs. PMID:16263510

  14. Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Williams, M; Reeves, L; Meyer, R; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature pertaining to IgE and non IgE-mediated food allergy, there is a paucity of information on non-immune mediated reactions to foods, other than metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. Food additives and naturally occurring 'food chemicals' have long been reported as having the potential to provoke symptoms in those who are more sensitive to their effects. Diets low in 'food chemicals' gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and their popularity remains, although the evidence of their efficacy is very limited. This review focuses on the available evidence for the role and likely adverse effects of both added and natural 'food chemicals' including benzoate, sulphite, monosodium glutamate, vaso-active or biogenic amines and salicylate. Studies assessing the efficacy of the restriction of these substances in the diet have mainly been undertaken in adults, but the paper will also touch on the use of such diets in children. The difficulty of reviewing the available evidence is that few of the studies have been controlled and, for many, considerable time has elapsed since their publication. Meanwhile dietary patterns and habits have changed hugely in the interim, so the conclusions may not be relevant for our current dietary norms. The conclusion of the review is that there may be some benefit in the removal of an additive or a group of foods high in natural food chemicals from the diet for a limited period for certain individuals, providing the diagnostic pathway is followed and the foods are reintroduced back into the diet to assess for the efficacy of removal. However diets involving the removal of multiple additives and food chemicals have the very great potential to lead to nutritional deficiency especially in the paediatric population. Any dietary intervention, whether for the purposes of diagnosis or management of food allergy or food intolerance, should be adapted to the individual's dietary habits and a suitably

  15. Education and Cognitive Development: The Evidence from Experimental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Donald; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Reports the results of a series of experimental studies and a sociodemographic survey designed to determine the relative influence of age and educational experience in the development of cognitive skills as manifested in formal, psychological experiments. (CM)

  16. Experimental additions of aluminum sulfateand ammonium nitrate to in situ mesocosms toreduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystinconcentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Theodore D.; Wilhelm, Frank M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitrogen additions to increase the total nitrogen:total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratio may reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration in reservoirs. In systems where TP is >100 μg/L, however, nitrogen additions to increase the TN:TP ratio could cause ammonia, nitrate, or nitrite toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Reducing phosphorus via aluminum sulfate (alum) may be needed prior to nitrogen additions aimed at increasing the TN:TP ratio.We experimentally tested this sequential management approach in large in situ mesocosms (70.7 m3) to examine effects on cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration. Because alum removes nutrients and most seston from the water column, alum treatment reduced both TN and TP, leaving post-treatment TN:TP ratios similar to pre-treatment ratios. Cyanobacterial biovolume was reduced after alum addition, but the percent composition (i.e., relative) cyanobacterial abundance remained unchanged. A single ammonium nitrate (nitrogen) addition increased the TN:TP ratio 7-fold. After the TN:TP ratio was >50 (by weight), cyanobacterial biovolume and abundance were reduced, and chrysophyte and cryptophyte biovolume and abundance increased compared to the alum treatment. Microcystin was not detectable until the TN:TP ratio was <50. Although both treatments reduced cyanobacteria, only the nitrogen treatment seemed to stimulate energy flow from primary producers to zooplankton, which suggests that combining alum and nitrogen treatments may be a viable in-lake management strategy to reduce cyanobacteria and possibly microcystin concentrations in high-phosphorus systems. Additional studies are needed to define best management practices before combined alum and nitrogen additions are implemented as a reservoir management strategy.

  17. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of environmental compounds. A regulatory assumption is that the mixtures of chemicals act in an additive manner. However, this assumption requires experimental validation. Traditional experimental designs (full factorial) require a large number of e...

  18. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (< 0.5 cm thick) that accommodate inelastic shear and compaction of inter-granular volume. Measurements of porosity and grain size from non-deformed samples are used to define a set of capped strength envelopes for the Wingate Sandstone. These strength envelopes reveal that compactional deformation bands require at least ca. 0.7 GPa (and potentially more than 2.3 GPa) of effective mean stress in order to nucleate within this sandstone. We find that the most plausible geologic process capable of generating these required magnitudes of mean stress is a meteoritic impact. Therefore the compactional deformation bands observed within the Wingate Sandstone are additional evidence of an impact event at Upheaval Dome and support a post-Wingate (post-Early Jurassic) age for this impact.

  19. Warming and drying of the eastern Mediterranean: Additional evidence from trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shohami, David; Dayan, Uri; Morin, Efrat

    2011-11-01

    The climate of the eastern Mediterranean (EM), at the transition zone between the Mediterranean climate and the semi-arid/arid climate, has been studied for a 39-year period to determine whether climate changes have taken place. A thorough trend analysis using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test with Sen's slope estimator has been applied to ground station measurements, atmospheric reanalysis data, synoptic classification data and global data sets for the years 1964-2003. In addition, changes in atmospheric regional patterns between the first and last twenty years were determined by visual comparisons of their composite mean. The main findings of the analysis are: 1) changes of atmospheric conditions during summer and the transitional seasons (mainly autumn) support a warmer climate over the EM and this change is already statistically evident in surface temperatures having exhibited positive trends of 0.2-1°C/decade; 2) changes of atmospheric conditions during winter and the transitional seasons support drier conditions due to reduction in cyclogenesis and specific humidity over the EM, but this change is not yet statistically evident in surface station rain data, presumably because of the high natural precipitation variance masking such a change. The overall conclusion of this study is that the EM region is under climate change leading to warmer and drier conditions.

  20. An Additional Baurusuchid from the Cretaceous of Brazil with Evidence of Interspecific Predation among Crocodyliformes

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Pedro L.; Montefeltro, Felipe C.; Norell, Mark A.; Langer, Max C.

    2014-01-01

    A new Baurusuchidae (Crocodyliformes, Mesoeucrocodylia), Aplestosuchus sordidus, is described based on a nearly complete skeleton collected in deposits of the Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group, Late Cretaceous) of Brazil. The nesting of the new taxon within Baurusuchidae can be ensured based on several exclusive skull features of this clade, such as the quadrate depression, medial approximation of the prefrontals, rostral extension of palatines (not reaching the level of the rostral margin of suborbital fenestrae), cylindrical dorsal portion of palatine bar, ridge on the ectopterygoid-jugal articulation, and supraoccipital with restricted thin transversal exposure in the caudalmost part of the skull roof. A newly proposed phylogeny of Baurusuchidae encompasses A. sordidus and recently described forms, suggesting its sixter-taxon relationship to Baurusuchus albertoi, within Baurusuchinae. Additionally, the remains of a sphagesaurid crocodyliform were preserved in the abdominal cavity of the new baurusuchid. Direct fossil evidence of behavioral interaction among fossil crocodyliforms is rare and mostly restricted to bite marks resulting from predation, as well as possible conspecific male-to-male aggression. This is the first time that a direct and unmistaken evidence of predation between different taxa of this group is recorded as fossils. This discovery confirms that baurusuchids were top predators of their time, with sphagesaurids occupying a lower trophic position, possibly with a more generalist diet. PMID:24809508

  1. Improving wound care simulation with the addition of odor: a descriptive, quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Donna W; Neil, Janice A; Bryant, Elizabeth T

    2008-08-01

    Improving problem-solving skills and expertise in complex clinical care provision requires engaging students in the learning process--a challenging goal when clinical practicums and supervisors are limited. High-fidelity simulation has created many new opportunities for educating healthcare professionals. Because addressing malodorous wounds is a common problem that may be difficult to "teach," a descriptive, quasi-experimental simulation study was conducted. Following completion of a wound care simulation and Laerdal's Simulation Experience Evaluation Tool by 137 undergraduate nursing students, 50 control subjects were randomly selected and 49 volunteer students (experimental group) participated in a wound care simulation after one of three cheeses with a strong odor was added to simulate a malodorous wound. Compared to the control group, study group responses were significantly better (P <0.001) for eight of the 12 survey variables tested and indicated the addition of odor was beneficial in enhancing the perceived realism and value of the simulation. Students responded that the addition of odor in the simulation laboratory improved realism and they felt better prepared to handle malodorous wounds in a clinical setting. An unanticipated outcome was the enhanced feeling of involvement associated with paired care teams as opposed to working in larger groups. The results of this study indicate that wound care education outcomes improve when nursing students are able to practice using a multi-sensorial wound care simulation model. PMID:18716340

  2. Additional evidence of EUV blank defects first seen by wafer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, Rik; Van den Heuvel, Dieter; Bret, Tristan; Hofmann, Thorsten; Magana, John; Aharonson, Israel; Meshulach, Doron; Hendrickx, Eric; Ronse, Kurt

    2011-11-01

    First experimental evidence is given that a second generation blank inspection tool has missed a number of printing reticle defects caused by an imperfection of its EUV mirror, i.e., so-called multi-layer defects (ML-defects). This work continued to use a combination of blank inspection (BI), patterned mask inspection (PMI) and wafer inspection (WI) to find as many as possible printing defects on EUV reticles. The application of more advanced wafer inspection, combined with a separate repeater analysis for each of the multiple focus conditions used for exposure on the ASML Alpha Demo Tool (ADT) at IMEC, has allowed to increase the detection capability for printing ML-defects. It exploits the previous finding that ML-defects may have a through-focus printing behavior. They cause a different grade of CD impact on the pattern in their neighborhood, depending on the focus condition. Subsequent reticle review is done on the corresponding locations with both SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscope). This review methodology has allowed achieving clear evidence of printing ML defects missed by this BI tool, despite of a too high nuisance rate, reported before. This establishes a next step in the investigation how essential actinic blank inspection (ABI) is. Presently it is the only known technique whose detection capability is considered independent from the presence of a (residual) distortion of the multi-layer at the top surface. This is considered an important asset for blank inspection, because the printability of a ML-defect in EUV lithography is determined by the distortion throughout the multilayer, not that at the top surface.

  3. Bilateral oligopoly in pollution permit markets - experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We experimentally investigate behavior in a bilateral oligopoly using a supply function equilibria model (Klemper and Meyer 1989; Hendricks and McAfee 2010; Malueg and Yates 2009). We focus on the role that market size and the degree of firm heterogeneity have on the market equilibrium. Our results ...

  4. Experimental evidence of antiphase population dynamics in lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Eduardo; Calderon, Oscar G.; Guerra, J.M.

    2005-10-15

    We report a direct experimental observation of antiphase oscillations in population dynamics in lasers. We show that these population oscillations are intrinsically related to the well-known antiphase polarization dynamics, i.e., the antiphase oscillations of two orthogonal polarization laser field states. We have used a class B Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser.

  5. Bilateral oligopoly in pollution permit markets: experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We experimentally investigate behavior in a bilateral oligopoly using a supply function equilibria model (Klemper and Meyer 1989; Hendricks and McAfee 2010; Malueg and Yates 2009). We focus on the role that market size and the degree of firm heterogeneity have on the market equilibrium. Our results ...

  6. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  7. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France-both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity. PMID:19484211

  8. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France—both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity.

  9. Experimental study of combustion characteristics of nanoscale metal and metal oxide additives in biofuel (ethanol)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the combustion behavior of nano-aluminum (n-Al) and nano-aluminum oxide (n-Al2O3) particles stably suspended in biofuel (ethanol) as a secondary energy carrier was conducted. The heat of combustion (HoC) was studied using a modified static bomb calorimeter system. Combustion element composition and surface morphology were evaluated using a SEM/EDS system. N-Al and n-Al2O3 particles of 50- and 36-nm diameters, respectively, were utilized in this investigation. Combustion experiments were performed with volume fractions of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10% for n-Al, and 0.5, 1, 3, and 5% for n-Al2O3. The results indicate that the amount of heat released from ethanol combustion increases almost linearly with n-Al concentration. N-Al volume fractions of 1 and 3% did not show enhancement in the average volumetric HoC, but higher volume fractions of 5, 7, and 10% increased the volumetric HoC by 5.82, 8.65, and 15.31%, respectively. N-Al2O3 and heavily passivated n-Al additives did not participate in combustion reactively, and there was no contribution from Al2O3 to the HoC in the tests. A combustion model that utilized Chemical Equilibrium with Applications was conducted as well and was shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21711760

  10. Phosphate retention in an agricultural stream using experimental additions of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrae, M. L.; English, M. C.; Schiff, S. L.; Stone, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    In-stream experiments involving additions of phosphate were conducted to determine the soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) retention potential of a perennial first-order stream that drains a 2·7 km2 agricultural catchment in southern Ontario. SRP retention was determined in relation to highly elevated SRP concentrations under low flow conditions. Point source treatments of phosphate were added to three reaches of this stream during two time periods when baseline SRP concentrations were notably different (early summer and early autumn). The reaches selected varied with respect to streambed shape and gradient, direction of groundwater flow, and channel vegetation type and density. One of the three experimental stream reaches was dredged between the two sampling periods, so that all vegetation and the top 25 cm of sediments were removed.SRP retention in the stream ranged from 0·8 to 24·1 µg m-2 s-1. Dredging the stream sediments did not alter the ability of the stream to remove SRP from the water column. SRP retention over the experimental reaches was generally 5-10% of the elevated concentration (0·7-4·2 mg l-1, a factor of 8-53 above pre-experiment conditions), although low-flow conditions in the stream were conducive to retention by stream sediments. Copyright

  11. Strategic sophistication of individuals and teams. Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Matthias; Czermak, Simon; Feri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many important decisions require strategic sophistication. We examine experimentally whether teams act more strategically than individuals. We let individuals and teams make choices in simple games, and also elicit first- and second-order beliefs. We find that teams play the Nash equilibrium strategy significantly more often, and their choices are more often a best response to stated first order beliefs. Distributional preferences make equilibrium play less likely. Using a mixture model, the estimated probability to play strategically is 62% for teams, but only 40% for individuals. A model of noisy introspection reveals that teams differ from individuals in higher order beliefs. PMID:24926100

  12. Experimental evidence of warm electron populations in magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, B. B. Han, Jeon G.; Kim, Hye R.; Ishikawa, K.; Hori, M.

    2015-01-21

    This work report on the results obtained using the Langmuir probe (LP) measurements in high-power dc magnetron sputtering discharges. Data show clear evidence of two electron components, such as warm and bulk electrons, in the sputtering plasma in a magnetic trap. We have also used optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic method along with LP to investigate the plasma production. Data show that there is a presence of low-frequency oscillations in the 2–3 MHz range, which are expected to be generated by high-frequency waves. Analysis also suggests that the warm electrons, in the plasmas, can be formed due to the collisionless Landau damping of the bulk electrons.

  13. Predicting the Unpredictable: 75 Years of Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radin, Dean I.

    2011-11-01

    From time immemorial, people have reported foreknowledge of future events. To determine whether such experiences are best understood via conventional explanations, or whether a retrocausal phenomenon might be involved in some instances, researchers have conducted hundreds of controlled laboratory experiments over the past 75 years. These studies fall into four general classes, and each class has generated repeatable evidence consistent with retrocausation. The statistical results for a class of forced-choice studies is associated with odds against chance of about 1024; for a class of free-response studies, odds about 1020; for psychophysiological-based studies, odds about 1017; and for implicit decision studies, odds about 1010. Effect sizes observed in the latter three classes are nearly identical, indicating replication of similar underlying effects. These effects are also in close agreement with the average effect size across 25,000 conventional social psychology experiments conducted over the last century, suggesting that retrocausal phenomena may not be especially unique, at least not in terms of the magnitude of effect. Bayesian analyses of the most recent classes of experiments confirm that the evidence is strongly in favor of a genuine effect, with Bayes Factors ranging from 13,669 to 1 for implicit decision experiments, to 2.9×1013 to 1 for psychophysiological designs. For the two most recent classes of studies examining retrocausal effects via unconscious physiological or behavioral measures, 85 of 101 studies (84%) reported by 25 different laboratories from the United States, Italy, Spain, Holland, Austria, Sweden, England, Scotland, Iran, Japan, and Australia, have produced results in the direction predicted by a retrocausal effect (odds against chance = 1.3×1012, via a sign test). Assessment of the methodologies used in these studies has not identified plausible conventional alternatives for the observed outcomes, suggesting the existence of a

  14. Aleutian lead isotopic data: additional evidence for the evolution of lithospheric plumbing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.D.; Marsh, B.D.

    1987-07-01

    Lead isotopic ratios and concentrations have been measured in lavas from the Aleutian volcanic centers of Adak (12) and Atka (12). Lead contents in lavas from Atka increase four-fold over the compositional range of the volcanic suite. In contrast, Adak lavas have concentration levels of 0.6-13 ppm and display no simple correlation with SiO/sub 2/. The lead isotopic data alone can be explained by three different processes. Model 1 assigns lead isotopic differences to original magma source heterogeneity. According to Model 2, the isotopic ratios of a primary, non-radiogenic component from the mantle are elevated by the addition of an isotopically enriched slab-derived component. In contrast, Model 3 assumes a primary radiogenic magma produced by melting of the slab is contaminated by a non-radiogenic lithospheric component during conduit formation. Because these models all adequately explain the lead isotopic data, supplementary geologic, petrographic, geochemical and isotopic data must be used to select the most likely model. Careful consideration of the evidence suggests Model 3 best explains their extensive lead isotopic data as well as other characteristics of Aleutian lavas. The authors study suggests detailed isotopic studies of individual volcanic centers can be extremely useful in understanding the complex processes of magma generation, extraction, ascent and evolution.

  15. Additional evidence on the use of personal ornaments in the Middle Paleolithic of North Africa

    PubMed Central

    d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Barton, Nick; Bouzouggar, Abdeljalil; Mienis, Henk; Richter, Daniel; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; McPherron, Shannon P.; Lozouet, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Recent investigations into the origins of symbolism indicate that personal ornaments in the form of perforated marine shell beads were used in the Near East, North Africa, and SubSaharan Africa at least 35 ka earlier than any personal ornaments in Europe. Together with instances of pigment use, engravings, and formal bone tools, personal ornaments are used to support an early emergence of behavioral modernity in Africa, associated with the origin of our species and significantly predating the timing for its dispersal out of Africa. Criticisms have been leveled at the low numbers of recovered shells, the lack of secure dating evidence, and the fact that documented examples were not deliberately shaped. In this paper, we report on 25 additional shell beads from four Moroccan Middle Paleolithic sites. We review their stratigraphic and chronological contexts and address the issue of these shells having been deliberately modified and used. We detail the results of comparative analyses of modern, fossil, and archaeological assemblages and microscopic examinations of the Moroccan material. We conclude that Nassarius shells were consistently used for personal ornamentation in this region at the end of the last interglacial. Absence of ornaments at Middle Paleolithic sites postdating Marine Isotope Stage 5 raises the question of the possible role of climatic changes in the disappearance of this hallmark of symbolic behavior before its reinvention 40 ka ago. Our results suggest that further inquiry is necessary into the mechanisms of cultural transmission within early Homo sapiens populations. PMID:19717433

  16. Insight of scent: experimental evidence of olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans).

    PubMed

    Mardon, J; Nesterova, A P; Traugott, J; Saunders, S M; Bonadonna, F

    2010-02-15

    Wandering albatrosses routinely forage over thousands of kilometres of open ocean, but the sensory mechanisms used in the food search itself have not been completely elucidated. Recent telemetry studies show that some spatial behaviours of the species are consistent with the 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis which proposes that birds use a combination of olfactory and visual cues while foraging at sea. The 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis, however, still suffers from a lack of experimental evidence, particularly regarding the olfactory capabilities of wandering albatrosses. As an initial step to test the hypothesis, we carried out behavioural experiments exploring the sensory capabilities of adult wandering albatrosses at a breeding colony. Three two-choice tests were designed to investigate the birds' response to olfactory and visual stimuli, individually or in combination. Perception of the different stimuli was assessed by comparing the amount of exploration directed towards an 'experimental' display or a 'control' display. Our results indicate that birds were able to perceive the three types of stimulus presented: olfactory, visual and combined. Moreover, olfactory and visual cues were found to have additional effects on the exploratory behaviours of males. This simple experimental demonstration of reasonable olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross supports the 'multimodal foraging strategy' and is consistent with recent hypotheses of the evolutionary history of procellariiforms. PMID:20118306

  17. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  18. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey I; Voll, Lars B; Psakhie, Sergey G; Popov, Valentin L

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting ("periodic rolling"). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  19. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  20. Experimental Evidence of Fermi-Luttinger Liquid State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debray, Philippe; Muhammad, Mustafa; Herbert, Steven; Newrock, Richard

    2008-03-01

    We have measured Coulomb drag between spatially separated parallel quantum wires, made on AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures by the split-gate technique, in the absence of tunneling to experimentally probe drag by small forward momentum transfer. Drag between wires of lengths 500 and 300 nm was measured in the one-dimensional transport regime at temperatures in the range 30 mK -- 1.2 K. We have observed both positive and negative drag. The temperature dependence of drag of both types is in excellent agreement with that predicted by the recently proposed Fermi-Luttinger liquid (FLL) theory that takes into account the curvature in the fermionic dispersion. Positive drag occurs when the curvature is positive, while negative drag occurs when it is negative.

  1. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies. PMID:27442516

  2. Experimental evidence for radiation pressure on a macroscopic dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segundo, C.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2003-09-01

    We have detected acoustic signals produced by laser pulses on a macroscopic glass slab, obtaining amplitudes, as function of the angle of incidence, denoted as Hp and Hs depending on the polarization orientations of the pulsed pumping laser, p and s, respectively. The relative behaviour of these curves is related to radiation pressure rather than pure absorption, in the same manner as predicted theoretically in the literature [A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Dover Publications, New York, 1891; Phys. Rep. 52 (1979) 133; Opt. Commun. 58 (1986) 59]. In a second experiment, based on a CW Michelson interferometer, where one of the mirrors is a glass slab pumped at the Brewster angle with the pulsed beam, we verified qualitatively the relationship observed for the Hp and Hs acoustic experimental data.

  3. Experimental evidence for the thermophilicity of ancestral life

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Satoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kimura, Mitsuo; Nemoto, Naoki; Mase, Tomoko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical studies have focused on the environmental temperature of the universal common ancestor of life with conflicting conclusions. Here we provide experimental support for the existence of a thermophilic universal common ancestor. We present the thermal stabilities and catalytic efficiencies of nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDK), designed using the information contained in predictive phylogenetic trees, that seem to represent the last common ancestors of Archaea and of Bacteria. These enzymes display extreme thermal stabilities, suggesting thermophilic ancestries for Archaea and Bacteria. The results are robust to the uncertainties associated with the sequence predictions and to the tree topologies used to infer the ancestral sequences. Moreover, mutagenesis experiments suggest that the universal ancestor also possessed a very thermostable NDK. Because, as we show, the stability of an NDK is directly related to the environmental temperature of its host organism, our results indicate that the last common ancestor of extant life was a thermophile that flourished at a very high temperature. PMID:23776221

  4. GEOMORPHOLOGY. Experimental evidence for hillslope control of landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, K E; Roering, J J; Ellis, C

    2015-07-01

    Landscape evolution theory suggests that climate sets the scale of landscape dissection by modulating the competition between diffusive processes that sculpt convex hillslopes and advective processes that carve concave valleys. However, the link between the relative dominance of hillslope and valley transport processes and landscape scale is difficult to demonstrate in natural landscapes due to the episodic nature of erosion. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments combining diffusive and advective processes in an eroding landscape. We demonstrate that rainsplash-driven disturbances in our experiments are a robust proxy for hillslope transport, such that increasing hillslope transport efficiency decreases drainage density. Our experimental results demonstrate how the coupling of climate-driven hillslope- and valley-forming processes, such as bioturbation and runoff, dictates the scale of eroding landscapes. PMID:26138970

  5. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies. PMID:27442516

  6. Experimental evidence of homonuclear bonds in amorphous GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuemei; Chu, Wei-Kan; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    Although GaN is an important semiconductor material, its amorphous structures are not well understood. Currently, theoretical atomistic structural models which contradict each other, are proposed for the chemical short-range order of amorphous GaN: one characterizes amorphous GaN networks as highly chemically ordered, consisting of heteronuclear Ga-N atomic bonds; and the other predicts the existence of a large number of homonuclear bonds within the first coordination shell. In the present study, we examine amorphous structures of GaN via radial distribution functions obtained by electron diffraction techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that amorphous GaN networks consist of heterononuclear Ga-N bonds, as well as homonuclear Ga-Ga and N-N bonds.

  7. Responses of Bog Vegetation and CO2 Exchange to Experimental N and PK Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutinen, S.; Bubier, J. L.; Shrestha, P.; Smith, R.; Moore, T.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to alter the structure and functioning of nutrient poor wetland ecosystems. It is important to quantify the effect of N input on ecosystem carbon (C) sequestration in these globally important C storages. We address this issue at the temperate Mer Bleue bog, ON, Canada. After 6 years of experimental fertilization, we saw that high N deposition can change mixed Sphagnum and dwarf shrub dominated communities to taller and denser dwarf shrub communities that are losing moss cover, and which might have even lower net C uptake. Now, after 8 years of fertilization and with new treatments we quantify the relationship between the plant community structure and ecosystem CO2 exchange. Three levels of N fertilization were applied with or without phosphorus and potassium (PK) into triplicate plots. We measured light saturated net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), and its components ecosystem respiration and gross photosynthesis using clear and dark chambers (May-August). Vegetation characteristics were quantified by measuring foliage cover (LAI), amount of woody and foliar biomass, and abundance of moss species (point interception technique), moss growth (cranked wires) and green area of vascular leaves and moss. Addition of PK fertilizer did not alter NEE or its components relative to the control. The 8-year low N addition alone and with PK, and the 4-year fertilization with high N levels resulted in the highest net ecosystem CO2 uptake relative to the control. The ecosystem respiration increased with increasing N input rate. All levels of N fertilization resulted in higher gross photosynthesis than the control, but there was no increasing trend with increasing N input. Vascular foliage increased, while moss cover drastically decreased with increasing levels of N fertilization. At the highest level of N (and PK) addition woody biomass increased at the expense of leaf increment. Dependencies of ecosystem CO2 exchange on the

  8. Experimental evidence of indirect transmission of Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Marois, Corinne; Picault, Jean-Paul; Kobisch, Marylène; Kempf, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse experimental transmission of Mycoplasma synoviae, an avian pathogen. Three experiments using specific pathogen-free day-old chicks placed in isolators were conducted. In the first experiment, the birds were introduced in an isolator previously contaminated with a M. synoviae broth culture. After 34 days, these birds were eliminated and, for the second trial, the chicks were introduced in the same isolator without disinfecting. In the third assay, the chicks were placed in an isolator containing a mixture of food, feathers and dust collected less than an hour earlier from a M. synoviae infected laying hen flock. In the second and third experiments in order to exacerbate the M. synoviae infection, the birds were inoculated with infectious bronchitis (IB) virus. The presence of M. synoviae in the environment and in tracheal swabs was monitored by culture, a multiplex PCR (mPCR) detecting M. synoviae and Mycoplasma 16S rDNA and a multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR) detecting the M. synoviae mRNA coding for a membrane protein and Mycoplasma 16S rRNA. In in vitro experimental conditions, M. synoviae mRNA and 16S rRNA were detected up to 20 min and 23 h respectively after mycoplasma death. In the first assay, the first infected bird was detected on the 13th day. In the second trial, culturable M. synoviae or viable M. synoviae were detected in the isolator for 3 or 4 to 5 days respectively after depopulation of the birds of the first assay whereas the first culture positive tracheal swabs were detected on the 33rd day, after IB inoculation. In the third experiment, the first infected birds were detected on the 54th day. Thus, the different assays showed that M. synoviae contaminated material (dust, feathers and food) can infect chicks, sometimes after remarkably long silent periods. PMID:16120251

  9. Experimental evidence of energetic neutrals production in an ion diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Y. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents several experimental proofs of the formation of energetic charge-exchange neutrals in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode with a graphite cathode. The energetic neutrals are thought to be produced as a result of charge exchange process between accelerated ions and stationary neutral molecules. The experiments have been carried out using both a diode with externally applied magnetic insulation (single-pulse mode: 100 ns, 250-300 kV) and a diode with self-magnetic insulation (double-pulse mode: 300-500 ns, 100-150 kV (negative pulse); 120 ns, 250-300 kV (positive pulse)). The motivation for looking at the neutral component of the ion beam came when we compared two independent methods to measure the energy density of the beam. A quantitative comparison of infrared measurements with signals from Faraday cups and diode voltage was made to assess the presence of neutral atoms in the ion beam. As another proof of charge-exchange effects in ion diode we present the results of statistical analysis of diode performance. It was found that the shot-to shot variation of the energy density in a set of 50-100 shots does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20-30%; suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. Moreover, the pressure in the zone of ion beam energy dissipation exceeds the results stated in cited references. The difference between our experimental data and results stated by other authors we attribute to the presence of a low-energy charge-exchange neutral component in the ion beam.

  10. Implicit negotiation beliefs and performance: experimental and longitudinal evidence.

    PubMed

    Kray, Laura J; Haselhuhn, Michael P

    2007-07-01

    The authors argue that implicit negotiation beliefs, which speak to the expected malleability of negotiating ability, affect performance in dyadic negotiations. They expected negotiators who believe negotiating attributes are malleable (incremental theorists) to outperform negotiators who believe negotiating attributes are fixed (entity theorists). In Study 1, they gathered evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for the implicit negotiation belief construct. In Study 2, they examined the impact of implicit beliefs on the achievement goals that negotiators pursue. In Study 3, they explored the causal role of implicit beliefs on negotiation performance by manipulating negotiators' implicit beliefs within dyads. They also identified perceived ability as a moderator of the link between implicit negotiation beliefs and performance. In Study 4, they measured negotiators' beliefs in a classroom setting and examined how these beliefs affected negotiation performance and overall performance in the course 15 weeks later. Across all performance measures, incremental theorists outperformed entity theorists. Consistent with the authors' hypotheses, incremental theorists captured more of the bargaining surplus and were more integrative than their entity theorist counterparts, suggesting implicit theories are important determinants of how negotiators perform. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:17605588

  11. Additional evidence for bone technology in the southern African Middle Stone Age.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, Francesco; Henshilwood, Christopher S

    2007-02-01

    Few Middle Stone Age sites have yielded convincing evidence for a complex bone technology, a behavior often associated with the emergence of modern cultures. Here, we review the published evidence for Middle Stone Age bone tools from southern Africa, analyze an additional nine bone artifacts recently recovered from Middle Stone Age levels at Blombos Cave, describe an unpublished bone tool from probable Middle Stone Age levels at Peers Cave, examine a single bone awl found at Blombosch Sands (an open site near Blombos Cave), and reappraise marked bone artifacts and a bone point recovered from Klasies River. To determine the chronological and cultural attribution of these artifacts, document bone-manufacturing techniques associated with the southern African MSA, and discuss the symbolic significance of the markings present on some of these objects we use (1) available contextual information; (2) morphometric comparison of Later Stone Age, Modern San, and purported Middle Stone Age projectile points; (3) analysis of the carbon/nitrogen content of bone tools and faunal remains from Peers and Blombos caves; and (4) microscopic analysis of traces of manufacture and use. Previously undescribed bone artifacts from Blombos Cave include a massive point manufactured on weathered bone, two complete awls and two awl tips manufactured on small-sized mammal and bird bone, a probable projectile point with a tang manufactured by knapping and scraping, a shaft fragment modified by percussion, used as retoucher and bearing a set of incised lines on the middle of the periosteal surface, and two fragments with possible engravings. The point from Peers Cave can be assigned to the Middle Stone Age and bears tiny markings reminiscent of those recorded on projectile points from Blombos and used as marks of ownership on San arrow points. The awl from Blombosch Sands and the bone point from Klasies River can be attributed to the Later Stone Age. Two notched objects from Klasies are

  12. Experimental evidence of a delta-shock in nonlinear chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    We report about a new type of composition front in nonlinear chromatography that is called delta-shock, which has to be added to the family of classical transitions, i.e. simple waves, shocks and semi-shocks. Recently, the occurrence of delta-shocks in the case of mixed competitive-cooperative isotherms of the following type n{sub i} = H{sub i}c{sub i}/1 = K{sub 1}c{sub 1} + K{sub 2}c{sub 2} (i = 1,2), (with H{sub 2} > H{sub 1}, where components 1 and 2 have anti-Langmuir and Langmuir adsorption behavior, respectively) was predicted theoretically and their behavior was analyzed in the frame of the equilibrium theory of chromatography. The delta-shock can be viewed as a growing traveling spike superimposed to the discontinuity separating the initial and the feed state, which propagates along the column at constant speed and constant rate of growth. In this work we complement these findings from an experimental point of view. The binary system consisting of phenetole (component 1) and 4-tert-butylphenol (component 2) in methanol-water (about 2:1, v/v) on a Zorbax 300StableBond-C18 column from Agilent has been shown, through a series of overloaded pulse experiments and of frontal analysis experiments with the pure compounds, to be subject to the competitive-cooperative isotherm of the type above, up to rather large concentrations. This system does exhibit adelta-shock when the operating conditions are chosen according to theory, namely when phenetole initially saturating the column is displaced by 4-tert-butylphenol, both at high concentrations (the minimum concentrations exhibiting a fully developed delta-shock in this series of experiments were c{sub 1} = 20 g/L and c{sub 2} = 75 g/L). The propagation of the delta-shock matches the theoretical predictions in terms of both the effect of concentration and the effect of column length. This is the first experimental observation ever of adelta-shock in chromatography. It is noteworthy that the proof of the occurrence of

  13. Physical description of boundary-layer transition: Experimental evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of understanding the origins of turbulent flow and transition to turbulent flow are the most important unsolved problems of fluid mechanics and aerodynamics. It is well known that the stability, transition, and turbulent characteristics of bounded shear layers are fundamentally different from those of free shear layers. Likewise, the stability, transition, and turbulent characteristics of open systems are fundamentally different from those of closed systems. Because of the influence of indigenous disturbances, surface geometry and roughness, sound, heat transfer, and ablation, it is not possible to develop general prediction schemes for transition location and the nature of turbulent structures in boundary-layer flows. At the present time no mathematical model exists that can predict the transition Reynolds number on a flat plate. The recent progress in this area is encouraging, in that a number of distinct transition mechanisms have been found experimentally. The theoretical work finds them to be amplitude and Reynolds-number dependent. The theory remains rather incomplete with regard to predicting transition. Amplitude and spectral characteristics of the disturbances inside the laminar viscous layer strongly influence which type of transition occurs. The major need in this area is to understand how freestream disturbances are entrained into the boundary layer, i.e., to answer the question of receptivity. We refer receptivity to the mechanism(s) that cause freestream disturbances to enter the boundary layer and create the initial amplitudes for unstable waves.

  14. [Is it possible a bioethics based on the experimental evidence?].

    PubMed

    Pastor, Luis Miguel

    2013-01-01

    For years there are different types of criticism about principialist bioethics. One alternative that has been proposed is to introduce empirical evidence within the bioethical discourse to make it less formal, less theoretical and closer to reality. In this paper we analyze first in synthetic form diverse alternative proposals to make an empirical bioethics. Some of them are strongly naturalistic while others aim to provide empirical data only for correct or improve bioethical work. Most of them are not shown in favor of maintaining a complete separation between facts and values, between what is and what ought to be. With different nuances these proposals of moderate naturalism make ethical judgments depend normative social opinion resulting into a certain social naturalism. Against these proposals we think to make a bioethics in that relates the empirical facts with ethical duties, we must rediscover empirical reality of human action. Only from it and, in particular, from the activity of discernment that makes practical reason, when judged on the object of his action, it is possible to integrate the mere descriptive facts with ethical judgments of character prescriptive. In conclusion we think that it is not possible to perform bioethics a mode of empirical science, as this would be contrary to natural reason, leading to a sort of scientific reductionism. At the same time we believe that empirical data are important in the development of bioethics and to enhance and improve the innate ability of human reason to discern good. From this discernment could develop a bioethics from the perspective of ethical agents themselves, avoiding the extremes of an excessive normative rationalism, accepting empirical data and not falling into a simple pragmatism. PMID:24206254

  15. Gender differences in cooperation: experimental evidence on high school students.

    PubMed

    Molina, J Alberto; Giménez-Nadal, J Ignacio; Cuesta, José A; Gracia-Lazaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir; Sanchez, Angel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of cooperation among unrelated human subjects is a long-standing conundrum that has been amply studied both theoretically and experimentally. Within the question, a less explored issue relates to the gender dependence of cooperation, which can be traced back to Darwin, who stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Indeed, gender has been shown to be relevant in several game theoretical paradigms of social cooperativeness, including prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and ultimatum/dictator games, but there is no consensus as to which gender is more cooperative. We here contribute to this literature by analyzing the role of gender in a repeated Prisoners' Dilemma played by Spanish high-school students in both a square lattice and a heterogeneous network. While the experiment was conducted to shed light on the influence of networks on the emergence of cooperation, we benefit from the availability of a large dataset of more 1200 participants. We applied different standard econometric techniques to this dataset, including Ordinary Least Squares and Linear Probability models including random effects. All our analyses indicate that being male is negatively associated with the level of cooperation, this association being statistically significant at standard levels. We also obtain a gender difference in the level of cooperation when we control for the unobserved heterogeneity of individuals, which indicates that the gender gap in cooperation favoring female students is present after netting out this effect from other socio-demographics factors not controlled for in the experiment, and from gender differences in risk, social and competitive preferences. PMID:24367608

  16. Additive Effect of rPb27 Immunization and Chemotherapy in Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Viviane C.; Martins, Estefânia M. N.; Boeloni, Jankerle N.; Coitinho, Juliana B.; Serakides, Rogéria; Goes, Alfredo M.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, PCM, the major systemic mycosis in Latin America, is caused by the termally dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and requires extended periods of chemotherapy with a significant frequency of relapsing disease. The search for new alternatives of treatment is necessary. rPb27 is an antigenic protein from P. brasiliensis that already showed a significant protective activity as a vaccine for PCM in experimental models. The cDNA of rPb27 was subcloned into a pET-DEST 42 plasmid, expressed in E. coli with a his-tag and purified by affinity chromatography. Immunization with this recombinant protein and chemotherapy were used together in an attempt to improve treatment of PCM. For this, BALB/c mice were challenged with pathogenic P. brasiliensis strain and after immunized with rPb27, in the presence of Corynebacterium parvum and Al(OH)3, some groups were also treated with fluconazole. After 40 days of treatment, the combined drug/rPb27 administration controlled PCM in the liver and spleen, with long lasting protection, and largely preserved tissues structures of these organs. Additionally, in the lungs after 40 days of treatment there was a significant reduction in the fungal load and size of lesions. At the same time, the levels of TNF-α were higher than infected-only mice. Moreover, significant levels of anti-rPb27 specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b isotypes were detected in the sera of mice immunized with rPb27 fluconazole treated or not. These results showed an additive protective effect of rPb27 immunization and chemotherapy, suggesting that an rPb27-based vaccine can be used to enhance PCM antifungal treatment. PMID:21423771

  17. Additive effect of rPb27 immunization and chemotherapy in experimental paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Viviane C; Martins, Estefânia M N; Boeloni, Jankerle N; Coitinho, Juliana B; Serakides, Rogéria; Goes, Alfredo M

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, PCM, the major systemic mycosis in Latin America, is caused by the termally dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and requires extended periods of chemotherapy with a significant frequency of relapsing disease. The search for new alternatives of treatment is necessary. rPb27 is an antigenic protein from P. brasiliensis that already showed a significant protective activity as a vaccine for PCM in experimental models. The cDNA of rPb27 was subcloned into a pET-DEST 42 plasmid, expressed in E. coli with a his-tag and purified by affinity chromatography. Immunization with this recombinant protein and chemotherapy were used together in an attempt to improve treatment of PCM. For this, BALB/c mice were challenged with pathogenic P. brasiliensis strain and after immunized with rPb27, in the presence of Corynebacterium parvum and Al(OH)(3), some groups were also treated with fluconazole. After 40 days of treatment, the combined drug/rPb27 administration controlled PCM in the liver and spleen, with long lasting protection, and largely preserved tissues structures of these organs. Additionally, in the lungs after 40 days of treatment there was a significant reduction in the fungal load and size of lesions. At the same time, the levels of TNF-α were higher than infected-only mice. Moreover, significant levels of anti-rPb27 specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b isotypes were detected in the sera of mice immunized with rPb27 fluconazole treated or not. These results showed an additive protective effect of rPb27 immunization and chemotherapy, suggesting that an rPb27-based vaccine can be used to enhance PCM antifungal treatment. PMID:21423771

  18. Relations among Parental Alcoholism, Eating Disorders, and Substance Abuse in Nonclinical College Women: Additional Evidence against the Uniformity Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Laurie B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The relationship of parental alcoholism to eating disorder symptomology and substance abuse in a nonclinical sample of college women was examined. In addition, differences among adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs) related to level of distress concerning parental alcohol use was examined. Results add additional evidence to the notion that not all…

  19. COMPARISON FRICTION: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FROM MEDICARE DRUG PLANS*

    PubMed Central

    Kling, Jeffrey R.; Mullainathan, Sendhil; Shafir, Eldar; Vermeulen, Lee; Wrobel, Marian V.

    2011-01-01

    Consumers need information to compare alternatives for markets to function efficiently. Recognizing this, public policies often pair competition with easy access to comparative information. The implicit assumption is that comparison friction—the wedge between the availability of comparative information and consumers’ use of it—is inconsequential because information is readily available and consumers will access this information and make effective choices. We examine the extent of comparison friction in the market for Medicare Part D prescription drug plans in the United States. In a randomized field experiment, an intervention group received a letter with personalized cost information. That information was readily available for free and widely advertised. However, this additional step—providing the information rather than having consumers actively access it—had an impact. Plan switching was 28 percent in the intervention group, versus 17 percent in the comparison group, and the intervention caused an average decline in predicted consumer cost of about $100 per year among letter recipients—roughly 5 percent of the cost in the comparison group. Our results suggest that comparison friction can be large even when the cost of acquiring information is small, and may be relevant for a wide range of public policies that incorporate consumer choice. PMID:22454838

  20. Comparison friction: experimental evidence from medicare drug plans.

    PubMed

    Kling, Jeffrey R; Mullainathan, Sendhil; Shafir, Eldar; Vermeulen, Lee C; Wrobel, Marian V

    2012-01-01

    Consumers need information to compare alternatives for markets to function efficiently. Recognizing this, public policies often pair competition with easy access to comparative information. The implicit assumption is that comparison friction—the wedge between the availability of comparative information and consumers' use of it—is inconsequential because when information is readily available, consumers will access this information and make effective choices. We examine the extent of comparison friction in the market for Medicare Part D prescription drug plans in the United States. In a randomized field experiment, an intervention group received a letter with personalized cost information. That information was readily available for free and widely advertised. However, this additional step—providing the information rather than having consumers actively access it—had an impact. Plan switching was 28% in the intervention group, versus 17% in the comparison group, and the intervention caused an average decline in predicted consumer cost of about $100 a year among letter recipients—roughly 5% of the cost in the comparison group. Our results suggest that comparison friction can be large even when the cost of acquiring information is small and may be relevant for a wide range of public policies that incorporate consumer choice. PMID:22454838

  1. Experimental evidence of dipolar interaction in bilayer nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambano, A. J.; Oguchi, H.; Takeuchi, I.; Liu, J. P.; Lofland, S. E.; Bendersky, L. A.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z. L.

    2011-06-01

    We use magnetic thin film hard/non/soft-magnetic trilayer systems to probe the nature of the hard-soft phase interaction and the role played by dipolar fields in one-dimensional ( d) magnetic systems. We have systematically investigated six wedge samples where the thickness of a Cu spacer layer ( t Cu) was gradually changed to create a varying interfacial effect on the interaction between a CoPt hard layer and a Fe soft layer. Magneto-optical Kerr effect was used to obtain the magnetization loops at 28 points on each sample, and the nucleation field ( H N ) as a function of t Cu was employed to characterize the layer interaction as a function of t Cu. H N ( t Cu) show a RKKY oscillatory behavior in addition to a non-negligible dipolar contribution, which had an exponential dependence. The dipolar term, which cannot be always neglected, is affected by the interface roughness and also by the CoPt crystallinity. Therefore, we cannot always consider exchange coupling to be the dominant interaction in one- d hard-soft magnetic bilayer systems, particularly, during magnetic reversal.

  2. Biomechanical investigation into the structural design of porous additive manufactured cages using numerical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-I; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Chen, San-Yuan; Wu, Tsung-Han; Huang, Chih-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    Traditional solid cages have been widely used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery. However, solid cages significantly affect the loading mechanism of the human spine due to their extremely high structural stiffness. Previous studies proposed and investigated porous additive manufactured (AM) cages; however, their biomechanical performances were analyzed using oversimplified bone-implant numerical models. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the outer shape and inner porous structure of the AM cages. The outer shape of the AM cages was discovered using a simulation-based genetic algorithm; their inner porous structure was subsequently analyzed parametrically using T10-S1 multilevel spine models. Finally, six types of the AM cages, which were manufactured using selective laser melting, were tested to validate the numerical outcomes. The subsidence resistance of the optimum design was superior to the conventional cage designs. A porous AM cage with a pillar diameter of 0.4mm, a pillar angle of 40°, and a porosity of between 69% and 80% revealed better biomechanical performances. Both the numerical and experimental outcomes can help surgeons to understand the biomechanics of PLIF surgery combined with the use of AM cages. PMID:27392226

  3. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  4. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  5. Cenozoic right-lateral slip on the Great Glen Fault, Scotland: Additional Evidence and Possible Causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, E.; Cobbold, P. R.; Zanella, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Great Glen Fault (GGF) trends NNE-SSW across all of Northern Scotland, separating two Neoproterozoic supergroups (Moine and Dalradian). The GGF developed as a left-lateral fault during the Caledonian Orogeny (Ordovician to Early Devonian). However, according to previous studies (involving seismic data from the Moray Firth and analyses of Tertiary dyke swarms in NW Scotland), the GGF reactivated right-laterally in the Tertiary. Here we present additional evidence for this later phase, from a study of Jurassic outcrops along the GGF and the nearby Helmsdale Fault. At Eathie and Shandwick, on the NE coast of Scotland, Jurassic strata of marine origin (mostly shale) crop out along the GGF, in contact with Neoproterozoic basement or Devonian Old Red Sandstone. Minor folds and faults in these outcrops indicate post-depositional right-lateral slip, under transpression. In the shale, we have also found bedding-parallel calcite veins ('beef' and 'cone-in-cone'). If these veins provide evidence for overpressure development and maturation of organic matter at significant depth (as they do in other basins), the host sediment must have accumulated deeper offshore in the Moray Firth. Therefore, the Jurassic strata at Eathie and Shandwick must have been subject to Cenozoic exhumation during right-lateral displacement along the GGF. At Helmsdale, according to previous studies, the Jurassic 'Boulder Beds' accumulated during a period of normal faulting on the Helmsdale Fault. There the sedimentary facies are more proximal than those at Eathie and Shandwick and abundant conglomerate contains Devonian clasts but no 'beef'. However we have found steep calcite veins, which cut the entire Jurassic sequence. Their sigmoidal shapes indicate left-lateral slip along the Helmsdale fault zone. Such a motion is compatible with right-lateral displacement on the GGF. Indeed, according to previous studies, folds between the Helmsdale Fault and the GGF may have developed as a result of opposing

  6. Kinks in subducted slabs: Petrological evidence points to additional hindrance to the exhumation of UHP rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, T.; Klemd, R.; Scherer, E. E.; Rondenay, S.; Gao, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sudden changes in the dip of subducted oceanic plates have been resolved by seismic imaging [1, 2]. Such kinking often coincides with the seismic disappearance of the low-velocity subducted oceanic crust, i.e., at a depth where eclogitization (dehydration) of the upper oceanic crust is nearly complete and the oceanic crust becomes almost seismically indistinguishable from mantle peridotite. We present petrological evidence for this phenomenon derived from oceanic blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks from the Chinese Tianshan. The peak-metamorphic conditions of the samples range between 330 and 580°C at 1.5 to 2.3 GPa. Such a wide range of peak conditions for intercalated high- and ultrahigh-pressure rocks has also been reported from other Tianshan localities. These observations suggest that the rocks were derived from different depths within the subduction zone and later juxtaposed during exhumation within the subduction channel. Multi-point Lu-Hf isochrons from four high-pressure rocks yield consistent garnet-growth ages of around ~315 Ma, confirming that the eclogite-facies metamorphism of the Tianshan high-pressure rocks resulted from a single subduction event in the Late Carboniferous. These ages, in conjunction with the ~311 Ma cluster of 40Ar-39Ar and Rb-Sr white mica ages from the same localities imply rapid exhumation. Previously reported peak P-T estimates from UHP metasediments and eclogites all lie on a lower geothermal gradient—and thus on a colder P-T path at the slab-wedge interface—than that defined by the HP eclogites and meta-volcaniclastic rocks studied here. This suggests that the slab-subduction angle steepened sharply at approximately 90 km depth, just between the depths at which the HP and UHP rocks equilibrated. The increase in subduction angle may result from a greater slab pull resulting from eclogitization densification. An additional factor may be an ephemeral weakening of the slab as it undergoes eclogitization reactions [3, 4]. We

  7. Modeling, Simulation, Additive Manufacturing, and Experimental Evaluation of Solid and Porous NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri Andani, Mohsen

    In recent years, shape memory alloys (SMAs) have entered a wide range of engineering applications in fields such as aerospace and medical applications. Nickel-titanium (NiTi) is the most commonly used SMAs due to its excellent functional characteristics (shape memory effect and superelasticity behavior). These properties are based on a solid-solid phase transformation between martensite and austenite. Beside these two characteristics, low stiffness, biocompatibility and corrosion properties of NiTi make it an attractive candidate for biomedical applications (e.g., bone plates, bone screws, and vascular stents). It is well know that manufacturing and processing of NiTi is very challenging. The functional properties of NiTi are significantly affected by the impurity level and due to the high titanium content, NiTi are highly reactive. Therefore, high temperature processed parts through methods such as melting and casting which result in increased impurity levels have inadequate structural and functional properties. Furthermore, high ductility and elasticity of NiTi, adhesion, work hardening and spring back effects make machining quite challenging. These unfavorable effects for machining cause significant tool wear along with decreasing the quality of work piece. Recently, additive manufacturing (AM) has gained significant attention for manufacturing NiTi. Since AM can create a part directly from CAD data, it is predicted that AM can overcome most of the manufacturing difficulties. This technique provides the possibility of fabricating highly complex parts, which cannot be processed by any other methods. Curved holes, designed porosity, and lattice like structures are some examples of mentioned complex parts. This work investigates manufacturing superelastic NiTi by selective laser melting (SLM) technique (using PXM by Phenix/3D Systems). An extended experimental study is conducted on the effect of subsequent heat treatments with different aging conditions on phase

  8. Experimental Study of Disruption of Columnar Grains During Rapid Solidification in Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manogharan, Guha; Yelamanchi, Bharat; Aman, Ronald; Mahbooba, Zaynab

    2016-03-01

    Over the years, many studies have been conducted to study and analyze the grain structures of metal alloys during additive manufacturing to improve mechanical properties. In particular, columnar grains are observed predominantly during rapid solidification of molten metal. This leads to lower mechanical properties and requires expensive secondary heat-treatment processes. This study is aimed at disrupting the formation of columnar grain growth during rapid solidification using ultrasonic vibration and analyzes the effects on grain structure and mechanical properties. A gas-metal arc welder mounted on a Rep-Rap-based low-cost metal 3 Dimension printer was used to deposit ER70S-6 mild steel layers on a plate. A contact-type ultrasonic transducer with a control system to vary the frequency and power of the vibration was used. The effects of ultrasonic vibration were determined from the statistical analysis of microstructure and micro-indentation techniques on the deposited layer and heat-affected zone. It was found that both frequency and interaction between frequency and power had significant impact on the refinement of average grain size up to 10.64% and increased the number of grains by approximately 41.78%. Analysis of micro-indentation tests showed that there was an increase of approximately 14.30% in micro-hardness due to the applied frequency during rapid solidification. A pole diagram shows that application of vibration causes randomization of grain orientation. Along with the results from this study, further efforts in modeling and experimentation of multi-directional vibrations would lead to a better understanding of disrupting columnar grains in applications that use mechanical vibrations, such as welding, directed energy deposition, brazing, etc.

  9. Photorespiratory Bypasses Lead to Increased Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana: Are Predictions Consistent with Experimental Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Georg; Küken, Anika; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Arguably, the biggest challenge of modern plant systems biology lies in predicting the performance of plant species, and crops in particular, upon different intracellular and external perturbations. Recently, an increased growth of Arabidopsis thaliana plants was achieved by introducing two different photorespiratory bypasses via metabolic engineering. Here, we investigate the extent to which these findings match the predictions from constraint-based modeling. To determine the effect of the employed metabolic network model on the predictions, we perform a comparative analysis involving three state-of-the-art metabolic reconstructions of A. thaliana. In addition, we investigate three scenarios with respect to experimental findings on the ratios of the carboxylation and oxygenation reactions of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). We demonstrate that the condition-dependent growth phenotypes of one of the engineered bypasses can be qualitatively reproduced by each reconstruction, particularly upon considering the additional constraints with respect to the ratio of fluxes for the RuBisCO reactions. Moreover, our results lend support for the hypothesis of a reduced photorespiration in the engineered plants, and indicate that specific changes in CO2 exchange as well as in the proxies for co-factor turnover are associated with the predicted growth increase in the engineered plants. We discuss our findings with respect to the structure of the used models, the modeling approaches taken, and the available experimental evidence. Our study sets the ground for investigating other strategies for increase of plant biomass by insertion of synthetic reactions. PMID:27092301

  10. Bisphenol A and Reproductive Health: Update of Experimental and Human Evidence, 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Jackye; Vrooman, Lisa; Ricke, William A.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Ehrlich, Shelley; Hauser, Russ; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Taylor, Hugh S.; Swan, Shanna H.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, an expert panel reviewed associations between bisphenol A (BPA) exposure and reproductive health outcomes. Since then, new studies have been conducted on the impact of BPA on reproduction. Objective: In this review, we summarize data obtained since 2007, focusing on a) findings from human and animal studies, b) the effects of BPA on a variety of reproductive end points, and c) mechanisms of BPA action. Methods: We reviewed the literature published from 2007 to 2013 using a PubMed search based on keywords related to BPA and male and female reproduction. Discussion: Because BPA has been reported to affect the onset of meiosis in both animal and in vitro models, interfere with germ cell nest breakdown in animal models, accelerate follicle transition in several animal species, alter steroidogenesis in multiple animal models and women, and reduce oocyte quality in animal models and women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF), we consider it an ovarian toxicant. In addition, strong evidence suggests that BPA is a uterine toxicant because it impaired uterine endometrial proliferation, decreased uterine receptivity, and increased implantation failure in animal models. BPA exposure may be associated with adverse birth outcomes, hyperandrogenism, sexual dysfunction, and impaired implantation in humans, but additional studies are required to confirm these associations. Studies also suggest that BPA may be a testicular toxicant in animal models, but the data in humans are equivocal. Finally, insufficient evidence exists regarding effects of BPA on the oviduct, the placenta, and pubertal development. Conclusion: Based on reports that BPA impacts female reproduction and has the potential to affect male reproductive systems in humans and animals, we conclude that BPA is a reproductive toxicant. Citation: Peretz J, Vrooman L, Ricke WA, Hunt PA, Ehrlich S, Hauser R, Padmanabhan V, Taylor HS, Swan SH, VandeVoort CA, Flaws JA. 2014. Bisphenol A and reproductive

  11. 38 CFR 20.304 - Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal. 20.304 Section 20.304 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Filing § 20.304 Rule 304. Filing...

  12. Evidence for dose-additive effects of a type II pyrethroid mixture. In vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Ares, I; Ramos, E; Castellano, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Larrañaga, M R; Anadón, A; Martínez, M A

    2015-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of pyrethroid insecticides that led to common exposure in the population, few studies have been conducted to quantitatively assess dose-additive effects of pyrethroids using a funcional measure involved in the common toxic mode of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potency and efficacy of 6 Type II pyretroids (α-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, cyphenothrin and esfenvalerate) to evoke induction of both nitric oxide and lipid peroxides levels measured as malondialdehyde in three in vitro models (SH-SY5Y, HepG2 and Caco-2 human cells) as well as to test the hypothesis of dose additivity for mixtures of these same 6 pyrethroids. Concentration-responses for 6 pyrethroids were determined as well as the response to mixtures of all 6 pyrethroids. Additivity was tested assuming a dose-additive model. The human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line was the most sensitive in vitro model. The rank order of potency for cell SH-SY5Y viability MTT assay was deltamethrin>cyphenothrin>λ-cyhalothrin>cyfluthrin>esfenvalerate>α-cypermethrin. When 6 pyrethroids were present in the mixture at an equitoxic mixing ratio, the action on nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxides measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) production was consistent with a dose-additive model. The results of the present study are consistent with previous reports of additivity of pyrethroids in vivo e in vitro. PMID:25688004

  13. Evidence for chaos in an experimental time series from serrated plastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkadesan, S.; Valsakumar, M. C.; Murthy, K. P. N.; Rajasekar, S.

    1996-07-01

    An experimental time series from a tensile test of an Al-Mg alloy in the serrated plastic flow domain is analyzed for signature of chaos. We employ state space reconstruction by embedding of time delay vectors. The minimum embedding dimension is found to be 4 and the largest Lyapunov exponent is positive, thereby providing prima facie evidence for chaos in an experimental time series of serrated plastic flow data.

  14. Neurobehavioral deficits in Persian Gulf veterans: additional evidence from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Storzbach, D; Rohlman, D S; Anger, W K; Binder, L M; Campbell, K A

    2001-01-01

    Reports of low-concentration nerve gas exposures during the Gulf War (GW) have spurred concern about possible health consequences and symptoms reported by many returning veterans. The Portland Environmental Hazards Research Center is studying veterans from the northwest United States who report persistent, unexplained "Gulf War" symptoms (cases) and those who do not report those symptoms (controls). An epidemiological survey focused on exposures and symptoms was mailed to a random sample of GW veterans from Oregon and southwestern Washington. Volunteers recruited from survey respondents agreed to undergo a thorough medical examination and psychological and neurobehavioral assessment. Persistent symptoms with no medical explanation associated with Persian Gulf service (e.g., fatigue, muscle pain, memory deficits) beginning during or after the war qualified respondents as cases. The 239 cases with unexplained symptoms and the 112 controls without symptoms were administered a computerized assessment battery of 12 psychosocial and 6 neurobehavioral tests. Replicating and extending previous interim findings, a subgroup of veterans emerged from the initial analysis in the form of extreme outliers which produced a visually and quantitatively obvious bimodal distribution. This led, as it had previously, to analyses of the outliers as a separate group (labeled "slow ODTP"), which confirmed the initial findings of neurobehavioral differences between the outliers and the other cases and controls and provided more convincing evidence that the majority of cases who report neurobehavioral symptoms have no objective evidence of neurobehavioral deficits. However, the larger group of symptomatic veterans do have highly significant and compelling evidence of psychological distress based on scores from 11 separate psychological tests. Whereas the cases differed from the controls by poorer neurobehavioral test performance, extraction of the slow ODTP participants (almost all cases

  15. Evidence That Certain Waste Tank Headspace Vapor Samples Were Contaminated by Semivolatile Polymer Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-09

    Vapor samples collected from the headspaces of the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks in 1994 and 1995 using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) were reported to contain trace levels of phthalates, antioxidants, and certain other industrial chemicals that did not have a logical origin in the waste. This report examines the evidence these chemicals were sampling artifacts (contamination) and identifies the chemicals reported as headspace constituents that may instead have been contaminants. Specific recommendations are given regarding the marking of certain chemicals as suspect on the basis they were sampling manifold contaminants.

  16. Additivity of semantic and phonological effects: Evidence from speech production in Mandarin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuebing; Zhang, Qingfang; Damian, Markus F

    2016-11-01

    A number of previous studies using picture-word interference (PWI) tasks conducted with speakers of Western languages have demonstrated non-additive effects of semantic and form overlap between pictures and words, which may indicate underlying non-discrete processing stages in lexical retrieval. The present study used Mandarin speakers and presented Chinese characters as distractors. In two experiments, we crossed semantic relatedness with "pure" phonological (i.e., orthographically unrelated) relatedness and found statistically additive effects. In a third experiment, semantic relatedness was crossed with orthographic overlap (phonological overlap was avoided), and once again we found an additive pattern. The results are discussed with regard to possible cross-linguistic differences between Western and non-Western languages in terms of phonological encoding, as well as concerning the locus of relatedness effects in PWI tasks. PMID:26730809

  17. The fishermen were right: experimental evidence for tributary refuge hypothesis during floods.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Itsuro; Kanazawa, Yukiyo; Tanaka, Yuuki

    2013-05-01

    Fishermen often anecdotally report an unexpected increase of fish caught in small tributary streams during floods, presumably due to refuge-seeking behavior from the main stem. From a population perspective, this implies the significance of refuge habitats and connectivity for population viability against natural disturbances. Despite the plausibility, however, surprisingly few studies have examined the tributary refuge hypothesis, mainly due to the difficulty in field survey during floods. Here, we made use of a large-scale controlled flood to assess whether fishes move into tributaries during flooding in the main stem. A planned water release from the Satsunai River Dam located on Hokkaido Island in Japan rapidly increased the main stem discharge by more than 20-fold. Before, during, and after flooding censuses in four tributaries provided evidence of the refuge-seeking behavior of fishes from the main stem. For example, more than 10 Dolly Varden char, a salmonid fish, were caught in a tributary during the flood, even though almost no individuals were captured before or after the flood. The fish responded immediately to the flooding, suggesting the need for studies during disturbances. In addition, the likelihood of refuge movements varied among tributaries, suggesting the importance of local environmental differences between tributary and the main stem habitats. This is the first study to experimentally confirm the tributary refuge hypothesis, and underscores the roles of habitat diversity and connectivity during disturbances, even though some habitats are not used during normal conditions. PMID:23646942

  18. Experimental evidence of dual emission in a negatively solvatochromic push-pull pyridinium derivative.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, B; Cesaretti, A; Fortuna, C G; Spalletti, A; Elisei, F

    2015-01-21

    We report here experimental evidence of dual emission in a cationic push-pull system (bearing a methyl pyridinium group as an electron acceptor and a diphenylamino group as an electron donor), which shows negative solvatochromism. An intriguing blue shift and enlargement of the fluorescence band upon increasing the solvent polarity have suggested a possible contribution of an upper excited state to the stationary emission. Ultrafast transient absorption has indeed revealed the presence of an intermediate transient species in some solvents. The investigation of the fluorescence properties at low temperatures and in the rigid matrix has given a clear indication of this additional emission at shorter wavelengths. Femtosecond up-conversion measurements have shown interesting rise-decay dynamics in the kinetics and two well distinguished emission bands characterized by different deactivations. A single isoemissive point in the time-resolved area-normalized spectra has unambiguously pointed out the presence of two consecutive emissive species: the locally excited and the intramolecular charge transfer excited states. PMID:25474173

  19. Additional Validity Evidence and Across-Group Equivalency of the "HOPE Teacher Rating Scale"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Scott J.; Gentry, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The "HOPE Scale" was developed to identify academic and social components of giftedness and talent in elementary-aged students with particular attention to students from low-income and/or culturally diverse families. Based on previous findings, additional research was conducted on revisions made to the "HOPE Scale". Items were added, and 71…

  20. Electric field driven fractal growth in polymer electrolyte composites: Experimental evidence of theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Anit; Chandra, Amita

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electric field on the diffusion limited aggregation has been observed experimentally. The observation provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical model proposed by Zhi-Jie Tan et al. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 112]. Most strikingly, a transition from a disordered ramified pattern to an ordered pattern (chain-like growth) has been observed. The growth is governed by diffusion, convection and migration in an electric field which give rise to the different patterns. This Letter can also be considered as an experimental evidence of computer simulated fractal growth given by Huang and Hibbert [Physica A 233 (1996) 888].

  1. Additional evidence of far transfer of scientific reasoning skills acquired in a CLASP reformed physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Wendell H.; Lynch, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The introductory physics course taken by biological science majors at UC Davis, Physics 7, was radically reformed 16 years ago in order to explicitly emphasize the development of scientific reasoning skills in all elements of the course. We have previously seen evidence of increased performance on the biological and physical science portions of the MCAT exam, in a rigorous systemic physiology course, and higher graduating GPAs for students who took Physics 7 rather than a traditionally taught introductory physics course. We report here on the increased performance by a group of biological-science majors in a general chemistry course who took the first quarter of Physics 7 prior to beginning the chemistry course sequence compared to a similar group who began taking physics after completing the first two quarters of general chemistry.

  2. Kaon properties in dense nuclear matter: are there experimental evidences of in medio effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Mangiarotti, A.

    2009-06-03

    Beyond the general interest for nuclear matter theory, the K{sup -} in medio mass modification could have important astrophysical consequences. Experimental evidences of how a nuclear medium affects K{sup +} and K{sup -} properties will be summarised. To reach a firm conclusion about the K{sup -}, the missing information on the flow will be shown to be still relevant.

  3. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from India. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from India"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Karthik Muralidharan (Harvard University) and Venkatesh Sundararaman (The World Bank) present findings from a randomized experiment conducted in India to…

  4. Experimental evidence of the decrease of kinetic energy of hadrons in passing through atomic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Hadrons with kinetic energies higher than the pion production threshold lose their kinetic energies monotonically in traversing atomic nuclei, due to the strong interactions in nuclear matter. This phenomenon is a crude analogy to the energy loss of charged particles in their passage through materials. Experimental evidence is presented.

  5. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Kenya. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Kenya"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Paul Glewwe (University of Minnesota), Nauman Illias (The Brattle Group), and Michael Kremer (Harvard University) review findings from recent research in…

  6. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Recent Experimental Evidence from Kenya. Working Paper 2008-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glewwe, Paul; Ilias, Nauman; Kremer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent evidence on the impact of a teacher incentives program in Kenya. The results are based on a randomized trial, which removes many sources of bias that can arise in analyses of non-experimental data. One hundred schools in a rural area were randomly divided into 50 that participated in a teacher incentives program and 50…

  7. Experimental study of combustion of decane, dodecane and hexadecane with polymeric and nano-particle additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamari, Mohsen; Ratner, Albert

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that adding combustible nano-particles could have promising effects on increasing burning rate of liquid fuels. Combustible nano-particles could enhance the heat conduction and mixing within the droplet. Polymers have also higher burning rate than regular hydrocarbon fuels because of having the flame closer to the droplet surface. Therefore adding polymeric additive could have the potential to increase the burning rate. In this study, combustion of stationary fuel droplets of n-Decane, n-Dodecane and n-Hexadecane doped with different percentages of a long chain polymer and also a very fine nano carbon was examined and compared with the pure hydrocarbon behavior. In contrast with hydrocarbon droplets with no polymer addition, several zones of combustion including a slow and steady burning zone, a strong swelling zone and a final fast and fairly steady combustion zone were also detected. In addition, increasing polymer percentage resulted in a more extended swelling zone and shorter slow burning zone in addition to a shorter total burning time. Addition of nano-particles also resulted in an overall increased burning rate and shortened burning time which is due to enhanced heat conduction within the droplet.

  8. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, J. Preston

    Reported are findings of a study involving 46 families in which the effect of the Feingold (additive free) diet on hyperactivity in preschool and elementary age children was investigated. Eleven sections cover the following project components: introduction (definition of hyperactivity and the B. Feingold hypothesis), methodology, demographic…

  9. Teaching Young Children Decomposition Strategies to Solve Addition Problems: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Zi-Juan

    2012-01-01

    The ability to count has traditionally been considered an important milestone in children's development of number sense. However, using counting (e.g., counting on, counting all) strategies to solve addition problems is not the best way for children to achieve their full mathematical potential and to prepare them to develop more complex and…

  10. Processing of multi-digit additions in high math-anxious individuals: psychophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the time course of neural processing of multi-digit additions in high- (HMA) and low-math anxious (LMA) individuals. Seventeen HMA and 17 LMA individuals were presented with two-digit additions and were asked to perform a verification task. Behavioral data showed that HMA individuals were slower and more error prone than their LMA peers, and that incorrect solutions were solved more slowly and less accurately than correct ones. Moreover, HMA individuals tended to need more time and commit more errors when having to verify incorrect solutions than correct ones. ERPs time-locked to the presentation of the addends (calculation phase) and to the presentation of the proposed solution (verification phase) were also analyzed. In both phases, a P2 component of larger amplitude was found for HMA individuals than for their LMA peers. Because the P2 component is considered to be a biomarker of the mobilization of attentional resources toward emotionally negative stimuli, these results suggest that HMA individuals may have invested more attentional resources both when processing the addends (calculation phase) and when they had to report whether the proposed solution was correct or not (verification phase), as compared to their LMA peers. Moreover, in the verification phase, LMA individuals showed a larger late positive component (LPC) for incorrect solutions at parietal electrodes than their HMA counterparts. The smaller LPC shown by HMA individuals when verifying incorrect solutions suggests that these solutions may have been appeared more plausible to them than to their LMA counterparts. PMID:26347705

  11. RESPONSE OF BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN MERL EXPERIMENTAL ECOSYSTEMS TO LOW LEVEL, CHRONIC ADDITIONS OF NO. 2 FUEL OIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The macrofauna and meiofauna of three oiled and three control experimental ecosystems at the Marine Ecosystems Research Laboratory were followed for 25 weeks of semi-continuous additions of an oil-water dispersion of No. 2 fuel oil. Water column hydrocarbon levels were maintained...

  12. Geochemical evidence for airborne dust additions to soils in Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Johnson, D.L.; Reheis, M.; Beann, J.; Skipp, G.; Fisher, E.; Jones, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that dust plays important roles in climate change, biogeochemical cycles, nutrient supply to ecosystems, and soil formation. In Channel Islands National Park, California, soils are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols and Mollisols with vertic properties. The soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich horizons. Silt mantles contain minerals that are rare or absent in the volcanic rocks that dominate these islands. Immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) and rare-earth elements show that the basalt and andesite on the islands have a composition intermediate between upper-continental crust and oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt fractions and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantle have compositions closer to average upper-continental crust and very similar to Mojave Desert dust. Island shelves, exposed during the last glacial period, could have provided a source of eolian sediment for the silt mantles, but this is not supported by mineralogical data. We hypothesize that a more likely source for the silt-rich mantles is airborne dust from mainland California and Baja California, either from the Mojave Desert or from the continental shelf during glacial low stands of sea. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. The eolian silt mantles constitute an important medium of plant growth and provide evidence that abundant eolian silt and clay may be delivered to the eastern Pacific Ocean from inland desert sources. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  13. Indolyne Experimental and Computational Studies: Synthetic Applications and Origins of Selectivities of Nucleophilic Additions

    PubMed Central

    Im, G-Yoon J.; Bronner, Sarah M.; Goetz, Adam E.; Paton, Robert S.; Cheong, Paul H.-Y.; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient syntheses of 4,5-, 5,6-, and 6,7-indolyne precursors beginning from commercially available hydroxyindole derivatives are reported. The synthetic routes are versatile and allow access to indolyne precursors that remain unsubstituted on the pyrrole ring. Indolynes can be generated under mild fluoride-mediated conditions, trapped by a variety of nucleophilic reagents, and used to access a number of novel substituted indoles. Nucleophilic addition reactions to indolynes proceed with varying degrees of regioselectivity; distortion energies control regioselectivity and provide a simple model to predict the regioselectivity in the nucleophilic additions to indolynes and other unsymmetrical arynes. This model has led to the design of a substituted 4,5-indolyne that exhibits enhanced nucleophilic regioselectivity. PMID:21114321

  14. Shock-implanted noble gases. II - Additional experimental studies and recognition in naturally shocked terrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D.; Horz, F.; Johnson, P.

    1989-06-01

    The process by which ambient gases can be implanted into silicates by shocks was investigated by analyzing the noble-gas content of several experimentally and naturally shocked silicate samples. The retentivity of shock-implanted gas during stepwise heating in the laboratory was defined in terms of two parameters, namely, the activation energy for diffusion and the extraction temperature at which 50 percent of the gas is released, both of which correlate with the shock pressure. The experiments indicate that, with increasing shock pressure, gas implantation occurs through an increasing production of microcracks/defects in the silicate lattice. The degree of annealing of these defects control the degree of diffusive loss of implanted gas.

  15. No Serological Evidence that Harbour Porpoises Are Additional Hosts of Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bodewes, Rogier; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; van Elk, Cornelis E.; Bunskoek, Paulien E.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Smits, Saskia L.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses circulate among humans causing epidemics almost annually. While various hosts for influenza A viruses exist, influenza B viruses have been detected only in humans and seals. However, recurrent infections of seals in Dutch coastal waters with influenza B viruses that are antigenetically distinct from influenza B viruses circulating among humans suggest that influenza B viruses have been introduced into this seal population by another, non-human, host. Harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are sympatric with seals in these waters and are also occasionally in close contact with humans after stranding and subsequent rehabilitation. In addition, virus attachment studies demonstrated that influenza B viruses can bind to cells of the respiratory tract of these animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that harbour porpoises might be a reservoir of influenza B viruses. In the present study, an unique set of serum samples from 79 harbour porpoises, stranded alive on the Dutch coast between 2003 and 2013, was tested for the presence of antibodies against influenza B viruses by use of the hemagglutination inhibition test and for antibodies against influenza A viruses by use of a competitive influenza A nucleoprotein ELISA. No antibodies were detected against either virus, suggesting that influenza A and B virus infections of harbour porpoises in Dutch coastal waters are not common, which was supported by statistical analysis of the dataset. PMID:24551217

  16. No serological evidence that harbour porpoises are additional hosts of influenza B viruses.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, Rogier; van de Bildt, Marco W G; van Elk, Cornelis E; Bunskoek, Paulien E; van de Vijver, David A M C; Smits, Saskia L; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses circulate among humans causing epidemics almost annually. While various hosts for influenza A viruses exist, influenza B viruses have been detected only in humans and seals. However, recurrent infections of seals in Dutch coastal waters with influenza B viruses that are antigenetically distinct from influenza B viruses circulating among humans suggest that influenza B viruses have been introduced into this seal population by another, non-human, host. Harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are sympatric with seals in these waters and are also occasionally in close contact with humans after stranding and subsequent rehabilitation. In addition, virus attachment studies demonstrated that influenza B viruses can bind to cells of the respiratory tract of these animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that harbour porpoises might be a reservoir of influenza B viruses. In the present study, an unique set of serum samples from 79 harbour porpoises, stranded alive on the Dutch coast between 2003 and 2013, was tested for the presence of antibodies against influenza B viruses by use of the hemagglutination inhibition test and for antibodies against influenza A viruses by use of a competitive influenza A nucleoprotein ELISA. No antibodies were detected against either virus, suggesting that influenza A and B virus infections of harbour porpoises in Dutch coastal waters are not common, which was supported by statistical analysis of the dataset. PMID:24551217

  17. Review of experimental additions of rhodamine wt dye into reactive aquatic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W. )

    1988-09-01

    The fluorescent dye rhodamine WT is routinely used in hydrologic studies. It is also being used in field studies of the potential addition or loss of other chemical components to aquatic systems; for example, the determination of atmospheric oxygen transfer to streams or the study of solute transport in an acidic and metal-rich stream. Although rhodamine WT is considered appropriate environmentally as a tracer, toxicological concerns have been raised as the result of laboratory experiments. Smart (1984) placed these concerns in the environmental perspective. Steinheimer and Johnson (1986) have shown that an environmental hazard does not exist when following customary dye-study practices. Additional work by Abidi et al (1986) also has lessened the concerns regarding potential environmental hazards. Because this dye is generally considered effective and nonhazardous, it has been tested in environments in which its stability may be questioned a priori. An appreciable body of knowledge is now growing regarding the chemical fate of rhodamine WT dye in aquatic systems. Smart and Laidlaw (1977) previously presented an extensive evaluation of fluorescent dye properties in natural waters. Their survey included consideration of the impact of temperature, pH, salinity, chlorine, photochemical decay, chemical decay, and biodegradation. This presentation is a review of selected recent evaluations of rhodamine WT in reactive environments that were acidic or that presented significant opportunity for dye sorption onto solids.

  18. A new analysis of the WASP-3 system: no evidence for an additional companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Gregorio, J.; Boué, G.; Mortier, A.; Boisse, I.; Oshagh, M.; Maturi, M.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the problem concerning the presence of additional bodies gravitationally bound with the WASP-3 system. We present eight new transits of this planet gathered between 2009 May and 2011 September by using the 30-cm telescope at the Crow Observatory-Portalegre, and analyse all the photometric and radial velocity data published so far. We did not observe significant periodicities in the Fourier spectrum of the observed minus calculated (O - C) transit timing and radial velocity diagrams (the highest peak having false-alarm probabilities of 56 and 31 per cent, respectively) or long-term trends. Combining all the available information, we conclude that the radial velocity and transit timing techniques exclude, at 99 per cent confidence limit, any perturber more massive than M ≳ 100 Mearth with periods up to 10 times the period of the inner planet. We also investigate the possible presence of an exomoon in this system and determine that considering the scatter of the O - C transit timing residuals a coplanar exomoon would likely produce detectable transits. This hypothesis is however apparently ruled out by observations conducted by other researchers. In the case where the orbit of the moon is not coplanar, the accuracy of our transit timing and transit duration measurements prevents any significant statement. Interestingly, on the basis of our reanalysis of SOPHIE data we noted that WASP-3 passed from a less active (logR HK '=-4.95) to a more active (logR HK '=-4.8) state during the 3 yr monitoring period spanned by the observations. Despite the fact that no clear spot crossing has been reported for this system, this analysis suggests a more intensive monitoring of the activity level of this star in order to understand its impact on photometric and radial velocity measurements.

  19. Experimental evidence for the K-LM radiative Auger effect in medium-mass atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herren, Ch.; Dousse, J.-Cl.

    1997-10-01

    High-resolution measurements of the Kα1,2 low-energy satellites were performed for the elements 42Mo, 44Ru, 46Pd, 48Cd, and 50Sn. The photoinduced x-ray spectra were measured using a high-resolution transmission-type bent-crystal spectrometer in modified DuMond slit geometry. Experimental evidence for the K-LM radiative Auger effect (RAE) in solid medium-mass atoms was found and particular groups of the K-LM RAE transitions were identified. The experimental intensity ratios I(K-LM RAE) / I(Kα1,2) as well as the relative intensity of the K-L3M4,5 transition group were extracted from the measured spectra. A comparison of the experimental results with relativistic Hartree-Fock theoretical predictions from Scofield shows a good agreement. The experimental energies of the K-LM RAE edges are compared with calculated Auger transition energies.

  20. Role of Oxidative Stress in Refractory Epilepsy: Evidence in Patients and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Rodriguez, Noemi; Huerta-Gertrudis, Bernardino; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Bandala, Cindy; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress, a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with systemic diseases, and diseases affecting the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder with refractoriness to drug therapy at about 30%. Currently, experimental evidence supports the involvement of oxidative stress in seizures, in the process of their generation, and in the mechanisms associated with refractoriness to drug therapy. Hence, the aim of this review is to present information in order to facilitate the handling of this evidence and determine the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this pathology. PMID:23344052

  1. Experimental evidence of the superfocusing effect for axially channeled MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motapothula, M.; Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2016-08-01

    Sub-Ångström focusing of megaelectronvolt (MeV) ions within axial channels was predicted over 10 years ago, but evidence proved elusive. We present experimental angular distributions of axially channeled MeV protons in a 55-nm-thick (001) silicon membrane through which multiple scattering is negligible. Fine angular structure is in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations based on three interaction potentials, providing indirect evidence of the existence of the superfocusing effect with flux enhancement of around 800 within a focused beam width of ˜20 pm .

  2. Impact of methylene blue in addition to norepinephrine on the intestinal microcirculation in experimental septic shock.

    PubMed

    Nantais, Jordan; Dumbarton, Tristan C; Farah, Nizam; Maxan, Alexander; Zhou, Juan; Minor, Samuel; Lehmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been used with some success as a treatment for the vasoplegia of vasopressor-refractory septic shock. The putative mechanism of action of MB is the inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide within the microvasculature and improved responsiveness to endogenous catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE)). However, to date, no study has demonstrated the microcirculatory effect of methylene blue in septic shock. The objective of this randomized, controlled, animal study was to show, in an experimentally-induced, septic shock model in rats, the effects of MB and NE on global hemodynamics and the microcirculation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was drastically reduced following bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) administration in animals not receiving vasopressors. Only the combination of NE + MB restored MAP to control levels by the end of the three hour experiment. Intravital microscopy of the microcirculation was performed in the terminal ileum in order to examine functional capillary density in intestinal muscle layers and the mucosa, as well as leukocyte activation in venules (rolling, adhesion to the endothelium). Untreated LPS animals showed a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion and a decrease in capillary perfusion in the intestinal microcirculation. In groups receiving NE or NE+MB, we observed a significant decrease in leukocyte adhesion and improved functional capillary density, indicating that microvasculature function was improved. This study suggests that methylene blue may be able to improve hemodynamics while preserving microvascular function in septic shock. PMID:25227191

  3. Combined ab initio molecular dynamics and experimental studies of carbon atom addition to benzene.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael L; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Schreiner, Peter R

    2014-04-17

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was used to explore the reactions between triplet and singlet carbon atoms with benzene. The computations reveal that, in the singlet C atom reaction, products are very exothermic where nearly every collision yields a product that is determined by the initial encounter geometry. The singlet C atom reaction does not follow the minimum energy path because the bimolecular reaction is controlled by dynamics (i.e., initial orientation of encounter). On the other hand, in a 10 K solid Ar matrix, ground state C((3)P) atoms do tend to follow RRKM kinetics. Thus, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) results indicate that a significant fraction of C-H insertion occurs to form phenylcarbene whereas, in marked contrast to previous theoretical and experimental conclusions, the Ar matrix isolation studies indicate a large fraction of direct cycloheptatetraene formation, without the intermediacy of phenylcarbene. The AIMD calculations are more consistent with vaporized carbon atom experiments where labeling studies indicate the initial formation of phenylcarbene. This underlines that the availability of thermodynamic sinks can completely alter the observed reaction dynamics. PMID:24661002

  4. Additional weight load increases freezing of gait episodes in Parkinson's disease; an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Senja H G; Nonnekes, Jorik; van Bon, Geert; Snijders, Anke H; Duysens, Jacques; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Oude Nijhuis, Lars B

    2014-05-01

    Freezing of gait is an episodic gait disorder,characterized by the inability to generate effective forward stepping movements. The pathophysiology underlying freezing of gait remains insufficiently understood, and this hampers the development of better treatment strategies.Preliminary evidence suggests that impaired force control during walking may contribute to freezing episodes, with difficulty to unload the swing leg and initiate the swing phase. Here, we used external loading to manipulate force control and to investigate its influence on freezing of gait.Twelve Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait performed three contrasting tasks: (1) loaded gait while wearing a belt fortified with lead weights; (2) weight supported gait using a parachute harness connected to a rigid metal cable running above the gait trajectory; and (3)normal gait. Gait tasks were used to provoke freezing episodes, including rapid 360° turns. Freezing episodes were quantified using blinded, videotaped clinical assessment. Furthermore, ground reaction forces and body kinematics were recorded. Loading significantly increased the mean number of freezing episodes per trial compared to the normal gait condition (P<0.05), but the effect of weight support was not consistent. Loading particularly increased the number of freezing episodes during rapid short steps. Step length was significantly smaller during loaded gait compared to normal gait (P<0.05), but changes in anticipatory postural adjustments were not different.Our results may point to impaired force control playing a key role in freezing of gait. Future studies should further investigate the mechanism, i.e., the contribution of deficient load feedback, and evaluate which forms of weight support might offer treatment opportunities. PMID:24658705

  5. Freshwater ecology. Experimental nutrient additions accelerate terrestrial carbon loss from stream ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rosemond, Amy D; Benstead, Jonathan P; Bumpers, Phillip M; Gulis, Vladislav; Kominoski, John S; Manning, David W P; Suberkropp, Keller; Wallace, J Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient pollution of freshwater ecosystems results in predictable increases in carbon (C) sequestration by algae. Tests of nutrient enrichment on the fates of terrestrial organic C, which supports riverine food webs and is a source of CO2, are lacking. Using whole-stream nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions spanning the equivalent of 27 years, we found that average terrestrial organic C residence time was reduced by ~50% as compared to reference conditions as a result of nutrient pollution. Annual inputs of terrestrial organic C were rapidly depleted via release of detrital food webs from N and P co-limitation. This magnitude of terrestrial C loss can potentially exceed predicted algal C gains with nutrient enrichment across large parts of river networks, diminishing associated ecosystem services. PMID:25745171

  6. Island of Rare Earth Nuclei with Tetrahedral and Octahedral Symmetries: Possible Experimental Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, J.; Dubray, N.; Pangon, V.; Dobaczewski, J.; Olbratowski, P.; Schunck, N.

    2006-08-18

    Calculations using realistic mean-field methods suggest the existence of nuclear shapes with tetrahedral T{sub d} and/or octahedral O{sub h} symmetries sometimes at only a few hundreds of keV above the ground states in some rare earth nuclei around {sup 156}Gd and {sup 160}Yb. The underlying single-particle spectra manifest exotic fourfold rather than Kramers's twofold degeneracies. The associated shell gaps are very strong, leading to a new form of shape coexistence in many rare earth nuclei. We present possible experimental evidence of the new symmetries based on the published experimental results--although an unambiguous confirmation will require dedicated experiments.

  7. Experimental Evidence of the Origin of Nanophase Separation in Low Hole-Doped Colossal Magnetoresistant Manganites.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gil, Raquel; Ruiz-González, M Luisa; González-Merchante, Daniel; Alonso, José M; Hernando, Antonio; Trasobares, Susana; Vallet-Regí, María; Rojo, Juan M; González-Calbet, José M

    2016-01-13

    While being key to understanding their intriguing physical properties, the origin of nanophase separation in manganites and other strongly correlated materials is still unclear. Here, experimental evidence is offered for the origin of the controverted phase separation mechanism in the representative La1-xCaxMnO3 system. For low hole densities, direct evidence of Mn(4+) holes localization around Ca(2+) ions is experimentally provided by means of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. These localized holes give rise to the segregated nanoclusters, within which double exchange hopping between Mn(3+) and Mn(4+) remains restricted, accounting for the insulating character of perovskites with low hole density. This localization is explained in terms of a simple model in which Mn(4+) holes are bound to substitutional divalent Ca(2+) ions. PMID:26683223

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigation of design for multioptical-axis freeform progressive addition lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, HuaZhong; Chen, JiaBi; Zhu, TianFen; Wei, YeFei; Fu, DongXiang

    2015-11-01

    A freeform progressive addition lens (PAL) provides a good solution to correct presbyopia and prevent juvenile myopia by distributing pupils' optical powers of distance zone, near zone, and intermediate zone and is more widely adopted in the present optometric study. However, there is still a lack of a single-optical-axis system for the design of a PAL. This paper focuses on the research for an approach for designing a freeform PAL. A multioptical-axis system based on real viewing conditions using the eyes is employed for the representation of the freeform surface. We filled small pupils in the intermediate zone as a progressive corridor and the distance- and near-vision portions were defined as the standard spherical surfaces delimited by quadratic curves. Three freeform PALs with a spherical surface as the front side and a freeform surface as the backside were designed. We demonstrate the fabrication and measurement technologies for the PAL surface using computer numerical control machine tools from Schneider Smart and a Visionix VM-2000 Lens Power Mapper. Surface power and astigmatic values were obtained. Preliminary results showed that the approach for the design and fabrication is helpful to advance the design procedure optimization and mass production of PALs in optometry.

  9. Experimental rivers: from braided to meandering by addition of cohesive floodplain material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dijk, W. M.; van de Lageweg, W. I.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    Braided rivers are relatively easily formed in the laboratory, whereas self-formed meandering rivers have proven very difficult to form. Our objective is to create self-formed dynamic braided and meandering rivers in a laboratory, and to quantitatively compare the resulting morphology and deposits. We applied a transverse moving inlet funnel for flow and sediment at the upstream boundary, mimicking meanders migrating into the control section. Conditions in the meandering and braided experiment were exactly equal except that slightly cohesive silt-sized silica flour was added to the feed sediment of the meandering channel. This was to test the hypotheses that 1) meandering rivers have relatively narrower and deeper channels due to bank cohesion, and 2) floodplain-filling sediment fills potential chute channels that would otherwise lead to braiding. Our experiments were conducted in a flume of 10x6 meter, which was split up into two separate fluvial plains (each 10x3 m). The parallel setups have identical cycled discharge regimes with a longer duration low flow and a shorter duration high flow simulating floods. The bed sediment consisted of a poorly sorted sediment mixture ranging from fine sand to fine gravel. The evolution was recorded by high-resolution line-laser scanning and digital Single Lens Reflex (SLR) camera used for channel-floodplain segmentation and particle size estimation. In agreement with earlier work, the experimental river without silica flour evolves from alternate bars to a fully braided river. With silica flour added to the feed, a meandering system evolved with frequent chute cut-offs that nevertheless remained mostly single-thread. The silica flour introduces cohesive self-formed floodplains, causes narrower channels and fills potential chutes. Large bends developed with scroll bar complexes and sinuosity reached maxima of 1.4. In contrast, the non-cohesive experiment is dominated by much more rapid channel shifting and displacement, so that

  10. The Development of Experimentation and Evidence Evaluation Skills at Preschool Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekny, Jeanette; Grube, Dietmar; Maehler, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Researchers taking a domain-general approach to the development of scientific reasoning long thought that the ability to engage in scientific reasoning did not develop until adolescence. However, more recent studies have shown that preschool children already have a basic ability to evaluate evidence and a basic understanding of experimentation. Data providing insights into when exactly in the preschool years significant gains in these abilities occur are scarce. Drawing on a sample of 138 preschool children, this longitudinal study therefore examined how children's ability to evaluate evidence and their understanding of experimentation develop between the ages of four and six. Findings showed that the ability to evaluate evidence was already well developed at age four and increased steadily and significantly over time as long as the pattern of covariation was perfect. In the case of imperfect covariation, the proportion of correct answers was low over the period of observation, but showed a significant increase between the ages of four and five. If the data did not allow relationship between variables to be inferred, the proportion of correct answers was low, with a significant increase between the ages of five and six. The children's understanding of experimentation increased significantly between the ages of five and six. The implications of these findings for age-appropriate science programs in preschool are discussed.

  11. D-optimal experimental designs to test for departure from additivity in a fixed-ratio mixture ray.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Todd; Gennings, Chris; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Herr, David W

    2005-12-01

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture may be prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. Using a mixture of chemicals with a fixed ratio (mixture ray) results in an economical design that allows estimation of additivity or nonadditive interaction for a mixture of interest. This methodology is extended easily to a mixture with a large number of chemicals. Optimal experimental conditions can be chosen that result in increased power to detect departures from additivity. Although these designs are used widely for linear models, optimal designs for nonlinear threshold models are less well known. In the present work, the use of D-optimal designs is demonstrated for nonlinear threshold models applied to a fixed-ratio mixture ray. For a fixed sample size, this design criterion selects the experimental doses and number of subjects per dose level that result in minimum variance of the model parameters and thus increased power to detect departures from additivity. An optimal design is illustrated for a 2:1 ratio (chlorpyrifos:carbaryl) mixture experiment. For this example, and in general, the optimal designs for the nonlinear threshold model depend on prior specification of the slope and dose threshold parameters. Use of a D-optimal criterion produces experimental designs with increased power, whereas standard nonoptimal designs with equally spaced dose groups may result in low power if the active range or threshold is missed. PMID:16162847

  12. Additional evidence that rosacea pathogenesis may involve demodex: new information from the topical efficacy of ivermectin and praziquantel.

    PubMed

    Abokwidir, Manal; Fleischer, Alan B

    2015-09-01

    Additional evidence that Demodex folliculorum may contribute to the pathogenesis of papulopustular rosacea are new studies of two topical antiparasitic agents. Ivermectin and praziquantel have recently been shown to be effective in decreasing the severity of papulopustular rosacea. These two agents significantly differ in molecular structure, but yield similar antiparasitic mechanisms of action. Higher numbers of Demodex mites are found in the skin of patients with rosacea than in people with normal skin. If Demodex play a role in pathogenesis, then hypersensitivity to the mites, their flora, or their products could explain the observed efficacy of antidemodectic therapy. PMID:26437294

  13. Experimental evidence for inherent Lévy search behaviour in foraging animals.

    PubMed

    Kölzsch, Andrea; Alzate, Adriana; Bartumeus, Frederic; de Jager, Monique; Weerman, Ellen J; Hengeveld, Geerten M; Naguib, Marc; Nolet, Bart A; van de Koppel, Johan

    2015-05-22

    Recently, Lévy walks have been put forward as a new paradigm for animal search and many cases have been made for its presence in nature. However, it remains debated whether Lévy walks are an inherent behavioural strategy or emerge from the animal reacting to its habitat. Here, we demonstrate signatures of Lévy behaviour in the search movement of mud snails (Hydrobia ulvae) based on a novel, direct assessment of movement properties in an experimental set-up using different food distributions. Our experimental data uncovered clusters of small movement steps alternating with long moves independent of food encounter and landscape complexity. Moreover, size distributions of these clusters followed truncated power laws. These two findings are characteristic signatures of mechanisms underlying inherent Lévy-like movement. Thus, our study provides clear experimental evidence that such multi-scale movement is an inherent behaviour rather than resulting from the animal interacting with its environment. PMID:25904671

  14. Experimental evidence for inherent Lévy search behaviour in foraging animals

    PubMed Central

    Kölzsch, Andrea; Alzate, Adriana; Bartumeus, Frederic; de Jager, Monique; Weerman, Ellen J.; Hengeveld, Geerten M.; Naguib, Marc; Nolet, Bart A.; van de Koppel, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Lévy walks have been put forward as a new paradigm for animal search and many cases have been made for its presence in nature. However, it remains debated whether Lévy walks are an inherent behavioural strategy or emerge from the animal reacting to its habitat. Here, we demonstrate signatures of Lévy behaviour in the search movement of mud snails (Hydrobia ulvae) based on a novel, direct assessment of movement properties in an experimental set-up using different food distributions. Our experimental data uncovered clusters of small movement steps alternating with long moves independent of food encounter and landscape complexity. Moreover, size distributions of these clusters followed truncated power laws. These two findings are characteristic signatures of mechanisms underlying inherent Lévy-like movement. Thus, our study provides clear experimental evidence that such multi-scale movement is an inherent behaviour rather than resulting from the animal interacting with its environment. PMID:25904671

  15. Experimental investigations of the swirling flow in the conical diffuser using flow-feedback control technique with additional energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tǎnasǎ, C.; Bosioc, A. I.; Susan-Resiga, R. F.; Muntean, S.

    2012-11-01

    The previous experimental and numerical investigations of decelerated swirling flows in conical diffusers have demonstrated that water injection along to the axis mitigates the pressure fluctuations associated to the precessing vortex rope [1]. However, for swirling flows similar to Francis turbines operated at partial discharge, the water jet becomes effective when the jet discharge is larger than 10% from the turbine discharge, leading to large volumetric losses when the jet is supplied from upstream the runner. As a result, it was introduced a new approach for supplying the jet by using a fraction of the discharge collected downstream the conical diffuser [2]. This is called flow-feedback control technique (FFCT) and it was investigated experimentally in order to assess its capability [3]. The FFCT approach not requires additional energy to supply the jet. Consequently, the turbine efficiency is not diminished due to the volumetric losses injected even if around 10% of the main flow is used. However, the equivalent amplitude of the pressure pulsations associated to the vortex rope decreases with 30% if 10% jet discharge is applied [3]. Using 12% water jet discharge from upstream then the equivalent amplitude of the pressure pulsations is mitigated with 70% according to Bosioc et al. [4]. In our case, an extra 2% jet discharge is required in order to obtain similar results with FFCT. This extra discharge is provided using an additional energy source. Therefore, the paper presents experimental investigation performed with FFCT with additional energy source. The experimental results obtained with this technique are compared against FFCT and the swirling flow with vortex rope, respectively.

  16. One component metal sintering additive for {beta}-SiC based on thermodynamic calculation and experimental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Noviyanto, Alfian; Yoon, Dang-Hyok

    2011-08-15

    Graphical abstract: . Standard Gibbs formation free energies vs. temperature for various metal carbides. The heavy line represents the standard Gibbs free energy for {beta}-SiC. The hatched area denotes the typical liquid phase hot pressing temperature of {beta}-SiC (1973-2123 K). Highlights: {yields} Various metal elements were examined as a sintering additive for {beta}-SiC. {yields} Al and Mg enhanced the density significantly without decomposing {beta}-SiC, as predicted by thermodynamic simulation. {yields} Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W additives formed metal carbide and/or silicide compounds by decomposing {beta}-SiC. {yields} This approach would be useful for selecting effective sintering additive for high temperature ceramics. -- Abstract: Various types of metals were examined as sintering additives for {beta}-SiC by considering the standard Gibbs formation free energy and vapor pressure under hot pressing conditions (1973-2123 K), particularly for applications in nuclear reactors. Metallic elements having the low long-term activation under neutron irradiation condition, such as Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W, as well as widely used elements, Al, Mg and B, were considered. The conclusions drawn from thermodynamic considerations were compared with the experimental observations. Al and Mg were found to be effective sintering additives, whereas the others were not due to the formation of metal carbides or silicides from the decomposition of SiC under hot pressing conditions.

  17. Stimulus modality and working memory performance in Greek children with reading disabilities: additional evidence for the pictorial superiority hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Constantinidou, Fofi; Evripidou, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of stimulus presentation modality on working memory performance in children with reading disabilities (RD) and in typically developing children (TDC), all native speakers of Greek. It was hypothesized that the visual presentation of common objects would result in improved learning and recall performance as compared to the auditory presentation of stimuli. Twenty children, ages 10-12, diagnosed with RD were matched to 20 TDC age peers. The experimental tasks implemented a multitrial verbal learning paradigm incorporating three modalities: auditory, visual, and auditory plus visual. Significant group differences were noted on language, verbal and nonverbal memory, and measures of executive abilities. A mixed-model MANOVA indicated that children with RD had a slower learning curve and recalled fewer words than TDC across experimental modalities. Both groups of participants benefited from the visual presentation of objects; however, children with RD showed the greatest gains during this condition. In conclusion, working memory for common verbal items is impaired in children with RD; however, performance can be facilitated, and learning efficiency maximized, when information is presented visually. The results provide further evidence for the pictorial superiority hypothesis and the theory that pictorial presentation of verbal stimuli is adequate for dual coding. PMID:21942734

  18. Characterization of the Kootenai River Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Community before and after Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2003-2006. [Chapter 3

    SciTech Connect

    Holderman, Charlie

    2009-02-19

    The Kootenai River ecosystem has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam, completed in 1972 on the river near Libby Montana. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel, eliminating nutrient production and habitat diversity crucial to the functioning of a large river-floodplain ecosystem. Libby Dam continues to create large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows, and greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches. These changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to this artificial loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the Kootenay Lake's North Arm in 1992, the South Arm in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes the macroinvertebrate community in the Kootenai River and its response to experimental nutrient addition during 2005 and 2006. This report also provides an initial evaluation of cascading trophic interactions in response to nutrient addition. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 12 sites along a 325 km section of the Kootenai River, representing an upriver unimpounded reference reach, treatment and control canyon reach sites, and braided and meandering reach sites, all downstream from Libby Dam. Principle component analysis revealed that richness explained the greatest amount of variability in response to nutrient addition as did taxa from Acari, Coleoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. Analysis of variance revealed that nutrient addition had a significant

  19. Experimental evidence for the acceleration of thermal electrons by ion cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, A. J.; Sojka, J. J.; Wrenn, G. L.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the acceleration of thermal electrons by large amplitude ion cyclotron waves (ICWs). The wave power in the ULF range near the helium gyrofrequency is compared with the distribution function of low energy electrons measured by GEOS satellite instruments. This comparison shows that electrons are accelerated near the geomagnetic equator along field lines, at times when the ICW energy is large and the cold plasma density is below a threshold value. It is suggested that these accelerated electrons can account for the ELF emissions, modulated at the ICW frequency, observed by Wehrlin (1981). A very efficient acceleration of thermal electrons along field lines results from other ULF events having frequencies close to the proton gyrofrequency. Evidence for this lies in the fact that medium energy protons having large temperature anisotropies in the 100-500 eV range are responsible for the ICW wave generation.

  20. Experimental additions of aluminum sulfate and ammonium nitrate to in situ mesocosms to reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Ted D.; Wilhelm, Frank M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitrogen additions to increase the total nitrogen:total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratio may reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration in reservoirs. In systems where TP is >100 μg/L, however, nitrogen additions to increase the TN:TP ratio could cause ammonia, nitrate, or nitrite toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Reducing phosphorus via aluminum sulfate (alum) may be needed prior to nitrogen additions aimed at increasing the TN:TP ratio. We experimentally tested this sequential management approach in large in situ mesocosms (70.7 m3) to examine effects on cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration. Because alum removes nutrients and most seston from the water column, alum treatment reduced both TN and TP, leaving post-treatment TN:TP ratios similar to pre-treatment ratios. Cyanobacterial biovolume was reduced after alum addition, but the percent composition (i.e., relative) cyanobacterial abundance remained unchanged. A single ammonium nitrate (nitrogen) addition increased the TN:TP ratio 7-fold. After the TN:TP ratio was >50 (by weight), cyanobacterial biovolume and abundance were reduced, and chrysophyte and cryptophyte biovolume and abundance increased compared to the alum treatment. Microcystin was not detectable until the TN:TP ratio was <50. Although both treatments reduced cyanobacteria, only the nitrogen treatment seemed to stimulate energy flow from primary producers to zooplankton, which suggests that combining alum and nitrogen treatments may be a viable in-lake management strategy to reduce cyanobacteria and possibly microcystin concentrations in high-phosphorus systems. Additional studies are needed to define best management practices before combined alum and nitrogen additions are implemented as a reservoir management strategy.

  1. Experimental evidence for the stability of the depletion zone around a growing protein crystal under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Otálora, F; Novella, M L; Gavira, J A; Thomas, B R; García Ruiz, J M

    2001-03-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the first time for the development and time evolution of concentration-depletion zones around protein crystals growing in microgravity and gelled on-ground experiments. Crystal motion and buoyancy-driven fluid movements as a result of residual accelerations and g-jitters are demonstrated to have an adverse effect on the stability of these depletion zones, provoking the breakdown of their radial symmetry. These findings may explain some of the controversial results reported on the quality of single crystals grown under microgravity in previous space missions. PMID:11223518

  2. Experimental evidence of Ga-vacancy induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in GaN films

    SciTech Connect

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Kalghatgi, A. T.; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.

    2011-10-17

    We have grown Ga deficient GaN epitaxial films on (0001) sapphire substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and report the experimental evidence of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. The observed yellow emission peak in room temperature photoluminescence spectra and the peak positioning at 300 cm{sup -1} in Raman spectra confirms the existence of Ga vacancies. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements further confirmed the formation of Ga vacancies; since the N/Ga is found to be >1. The ferromagnetism is believed to originate from the polarization of the unpaired 2p electrons of N surrounding the Ga vacancy.

  3. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording

    PubMed Central

    Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Observer bias and other “experimenter effects” occur when researchers’ expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work “blind,” meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind. PMID:26154287

  4. Experimental evidence for chirality in the odd-A 105Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, J.; Joshi, P.; Starosta, K.; Dimitrov, V. I.; Fossan, D. B.; Molnár, J.; Sohler, D.; Wadsworth, R.; Algora, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Curien, D.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Duchene, G.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Koike, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Paul, E. S.; Raddon, P. M.; Rainovski, G.; Scheurer, J. N.; Simons, A. J.; Vaman, C.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Zolnai, L.; Frauendorf, S.

    2004-09-01

    High-spin states in 105Rh were populated by the 96Zr(13C, p3n) reaction at beam energies of 51 and 58 MeV, and studied using the EUROBALL IV γ-ray spectrometer and the DIAMANT charged particle array. A pair of nearly degenerate ΔI = 1 three-quasiparticle bands with the same spins and parity have been observed. Comparison of the experimental results with tilted axis cranking calculations confirms the chiral character of the two bands, while arguments based on the excitation of particles within the πg9 / 2 ν(h11 / 2) 2 configuration of the yrast band and comparison with the previously observed γ band exclude the other possible interpretations. This is the first experimental evidence for three-quasiparticle chiral structure in the A ∼ 100 region, and the first simultaneous observation of a γ band and chiral partner bands in one nucleus.

  5. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Head, Megan L; Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind. PMID:26154287

  6. Comparison of ordered and disordered silicon nanowire arrays: experimental evidence of photonic crystal modes.

    PubMed

    Dhindsa, Navneet; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally compared the reflectance between ordered and disordered silicon nanowires to observe the evidence of photonic crystal modes. For similar diameters, the resonance peaks for the ordered nanowires at a spacing of 400 nm was at a shorter wavelength than the disordered nanowires, consistent to the excitation of photonic crystal modes. Furthermore, the resonant wavelength didn't shift while changing the density of the disordered nanowires, whereas there was a significant shift observed in the ordered ones. At an ordered spacing of 800 nm, the resonance wavelength approached that of the disordered structures, indicating that the ordered structures were starting to behave like individual waveguides. To our knowledge, this is the first direct experimental observation of photonic crystal modes in vertical periodic silicon nanowire arrays. PMID:27128070

  7. Experimental evidence of deterministic coherence resonance in coupled chaotic systems with frequency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vellisca, M. A.; Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present the experimental evidence of deterministic coherence resonance in unidirectionally coupled two and three Rössler electronic oscillators with mismatch between their natural frequencies. The regularity in both the amplitude and the phase of chaotic fluctuations is experimentally proven by the analyses of normalized standard deviations of the peak amplitude and interpeak interval and Lyapunov exponents. The resonant chaos suppression appears when the coupling strength is increased and the oscillators are in phase synchronization. In two coupled oscillators, the coherence enhancement is associated with negative third and fourth Lyapunov exponents, while the largest first and second exponents remain positive. Distinctly, in three oscillators coupled in a ring, all exponents become negative, giving rise to periodicity. Numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experiments.

  8. Experimental and theoretical evidence for an ionic crystal of ammonia at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninet, S.; Datchi, F.; Dumas, P.; Mezouar, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mafety, A.; Pickard, C. J.; Needs, R. J.; Saitta, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    We report experimental and theoretical evidence that solid molecular ammonia becomes unstable at room temperature and high pressures and transforms into an ionic crystalline form. This material has been characterized in both hydrogenated (NH3) and deuterated (ND3) ammonia samples up to about 180 and 200 GPa, respectively, by infrared absorption, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The presence of a new strong infrared absorption band centered at 2500 cm-1 in NH3 (1900 cm-1 in ND3) is in line with previous theoretical predictions regarding the ionization of ammonia molecules into NH2- and NH4+ ions. The experimental data suggest the coexistence of two crystalline ionic forms, which our ab initio structure searches predict to be the most stable at the relevant pressures. The ionic crystalline form of ammonia appears stable at low temperatures, which contrasts with the behavior of water in which no equivalent crystalline ionic phase has been found.

  9. Poverty, inequality, and increased consumption of high calorie food: Experimental evidence for a causal link.

    PubMed

    Bratanova, Boyka; Loughnan, Steve; Klein, Olivier; Claassen, Almudena; Wood, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Rising obesity represents a serious, global problem. It is now well established that obesity is associated with poverty and wealth inequality, suggesting that these factors may promote caloric intake. Whereas previous work has examined these links from an epidemiological perspective, the current paper examined them experimentally. In Study 1 we found that people experimentally induced to view themselves as poor (v. wealthy) exhibited increased calorie intake. In Study 2, participants who believed that they were poorer or wealthier than their interaction partners exhibited higher levels of anxiety compared to those in an equal partners condition; this anxiety in turn led to increased calorie consumption for people who had a strong need to belong. The findings provide causal evidence for the poverty-intake and inequality-intake links. Further, we identify social anxiety and a strong need to belong as important social psychological factors linking inequality to increased calorie intake. PMID:26809142

  10. Experimental evidence of high-frequency complete elastic bandgap in pillar-based phononic slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-12-08

    We present strong experimental evidence for the existence of a complete phononic bandgap, for Lamb waves, in the high frequency regime (i.e., 800 MHz) for a pillar-based phononic crystal (PnC) membrane with a triangular lattice of gold pillars on top. The membrane is composed of an aluminum nitride film stacked on thin molybdenum and silicon layers. Experimental characterization shows a large attenuation of at least 20 dB in the three major crystallographic directions of the PnC lattice in the frequency range of 760 MHz–820 MHz, which is in agreement with our finite element simulations of the PnC bandgap. The results of experiments are analyzed and the physics behind the attenuation in different spectral windows is explained methodically by assessing the type of Bloch modes and the in-plane symmetry of the displacement profile.

  11. Experimental evidence that brighter males sire more extra-pair young in tree swallows.

    PubMed

    Whittingham, Linda A; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-08-01

    Across taxa, extra-pair mating is widespread among socially monogamous species, but few studies have identified male ornamental traits associated with extra-pair mating success, and even fewer studies have experimentally manipulated male traits to determine whether they are related directly to paternity. As a consequence, there is little experimental evidence to support the widespread hypothesis that females choose more ornamented males as extra-pair mates. Here, we conducted an experimental study of the relationship between male plumage colour and fertilization success in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), which have one of the highest levels of extra-pair mating in birds. In this study, we experimentally dulled the bright blue plumage on the back of males (with nontoxic ink markers) early in the breeding season prior to most mating. Compared with control males, dulled males sired fewer extra-pair young, and, as a result, fewer young overall. Among untreated males, brighter blue males also sired more extra-pair young, and in paired comparisons, extra-pair sires had brighter blue plumage than the within-pair male they cuckolded. These results, together with previous work on tree swallows, suggest that extra-pair mating behaviour is driven by benefits to both males and females. PMID:27105297

  12. Experimental evidence of a symbiosis between red-cockaded woodpeckers and fungi.

    PubMed

    Jusino, Michelle A; Lindner, Daniel L; Banik, Mark T; Rose, Kevin R; Walters, Jeffrey R

    2016-03-30

    Primary cavity excavators, such as woodpeckers, are ecosystem engineers in many systems. Associations between cavity excavators and fungi have long been hypothesized to facilitate cavity excavation, but these relationships have not been experimentally verified. Fungi may help excavators by softening wood, while excavators may facilitate fungal dispersal. Here we demonstrate that excavators facilitate fungal dispersal and thus we report the first experimental evidence of a symbiosis between fungi and a cavity excavator, the red-cockaded woodpecker (RCW,Picoides borealis). Swab samples of birds showed that RCWs carry fungal communities similar to those found in their completed excavations. A 26-month field experiment using human-made aseptically drilled excavations in live trees, half of which were inaccessible to RCWs, demonstrated that RCWs directly alter fungal colonization and community composition. Experimental excavations that were accessible to RCWs contained fungal communities similar to natural RCW excavations, whereas inaccessible experimental excavations contained significantly different fungal communities. Our work demonstrates a complex symbiosis between cavity excavators and communities of fungi, with implications for forest ecology, wildlife management, and conservation. PMID:27009222

  13. Behavioural response of adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) to predator and conspecific alarm cues: evidence of additive effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di Rocco, Richard T; Imre, Istvan; Johnson, Nicholas; Brown, Grant B

    2015-01-01

    Sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus, an invasive pest in the Upper Great Lakes, avoid odours that represent danger in their habitat. These odours include conspecific alarm cues and predator cues, like 2-phenylethylamine hydrochloride (PEA HCl), which is found in the urine of mammalian predators. Whether conspecific alarm cues and predator cues function additively or synergistically when mixed together is unknown. The objectives of this experimental study were to determine if the avoidance response of sea lamprey to PEA HCl is proportional to the concentration delivered, and if the avoidance response to the combination of a predator cue (PEA HCl) and sea lamprey alarm cue is additive. To accomplish the first objective, groups of ten sea lampreys were placed in an artificial stream channel and presented with stepwise concentrations of PEA HCl ranging from 5 × 10−8 to 5 × 10−10 M and a deionized water control. Sea lampreys exhibited an increase in their avoidance behaviour in response to increasing concentrations of PEA HCl. To accomplish the second objective, sea lampreys were exposed to PEA HCl, conspecific alarm cue and a combination of the two. Sea lampreys responded to the combination of predator cue and conspecific alarm cue in an additive manner.

  14. Linking process, structure, property, and performance for metal-based additive manufacturing: computational approaches with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Cheng, Puikei; Kafka, Orion L.; Wagner, Gregory J.; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) methods for rapid prototyping of 3D materials (3D printing) have become increasingly popular with a particular recent emphasis on those methods used for metallic materials. These processes typically involve an accumulation of cyclic phase changes. The widespread interest in these methods is largely stimulated by their unique ability to create components of considerable complexity. However, modeling such processes is exceedingly difficult due to the highly localized and drastic material evolution that often occurs over the course of the manufacture time of each component. Final product characterization and validation are currently driven primarily by experimental means as a result of the lack of robust modeling procedures. In the present work, the authors discuss primary detrimental hurdles that have plagued effective modeling of AM methods for metallic materials while also providing logical speculation into preferable research directions for overcoming these hurdles. The primary focus of this work encompasses the specific areas of high-performance computing, multiscale modeling, materials characterization, process modeling, experimentation, and validation for final product performance of additively manufactured metallic components.

  15. Experimental study on the characteristics of ventilated cavitation around an underwater navigating body influenced by turbulent drag-reducing additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, ChenXing; Li, FengChen

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a new control strategy for turbulent drag reduction involving ventilated cavitation is proposed. The configurational and hydrodynamic characteristics of ventilated cavities influenced by turbulent drag-reducing additives were experimentally studied in water tunnel. The test model was fixed in the water tunnel by a strut in the aft-part. Aqueous solutions of CTAC/NaSal (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride/sodium salicylate) with weight concentrations of 100, 200, 400 and 600 ppm (part per million), respectively, were injected into the ventilated air cavity from the edge of the cavitator with accurate control by an injection pump. The cavity configurations were recorded by a high-speed CCD camera. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the test model were measured by a six-component balance. Experimental results show that, within the presently tested cases, the lengths of cavity influenced by drag-reducing solution are smaller than normal condition (ventilated cavity) in water, but the asymmetry of the cavity is improved. The drag resisted by the test model is reduced dramatically (the maximum drag reduction can reach to 80%) and the re-entrant jet is more complex after the CTAC solution is injected into the cavity. Turbulent drag-reducing additives have the potential in enhancement of supercavitating asymmetry and further drag reduction.

  16. Experimental Evidence Linking Elevated CO2, Rhizosphere C/N Stoichiometry and Microbial Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.; LeCain, D. R.; Morgan, J.

    2012-12-01

    expected to be more efficient in their C use. Decreasing the C/N ratio of roots decreased SOM respiration and increased the efficiency of SOM-consuming microbes. Direct N additions had a similar but stronger effect. Increased C efficiency with greater nutrient availability is consistent with theoretical expectations of C utilization under nutrient limitation. Notably, the response of C use to N treatments occurred only under eCO2 conditions. This functional contrast was supported by differential responses of microbial PLFA profiles to N treatments under CO2 treatments. Together, these results suggest that the eCO2 environment was more conducive to N limitation, via changes in microbial community structure and function. Our results provide direct experimental evidence of plant-mediated alteration of decomposer C efficiency due to changes in atmospheric CO2 and N availability from both plant and soil sources. An increase in SOM-consuming microbes efficiency in an eCO2 world is likely to have important ecosystem-level implications as it could enhance the amount of C that remains in soil relative to the amount released to the atmosphere. The interactive effects of CO2 and N treatments suggest that microbial efficiency will be more sensitive to changes in nutrient status under the future eCO2 atmosphere.

  17. Evidence of alkali rich melt reactions with mantle peridotite : Natural observations and experimental analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, T. B.; Milke, R.; Wunder, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Heldburg Phonolite, (Thuringia, Germany) is peculiar in its nature due to its absence of a Eu anomaly, and hence lack of feldspar fractionation, as well as the presence of spinel lherzolite xenocrysts. These observations suggest a higher than normal (mantle) pressure of origin, and its potential as a metasomatic agent at depth is explored in this work. Disequilibrium between the phonolite and its entrained upper mantle xenocrysts resulted in the development of secondary reaction rim assemblages of; (1) phlogopite + minor diopside around olivine, (2) pargasitic amphibole, phlogopite and minor diopside around orthopyroxene. We document both the natural rims and the attempts to reproduce them under experimental conditions, in order to elucidate the likely origin of the phonolite and its efficacy for metasomatising the upper mantle. Platinum capsules were loaded with mixtures of crushed mineral separates, (of pure synthetic forsterite, San Carlos olivine, synthetic enstatite or a natural enstatite from Kilosa, Tanzania) with a synthetic Fe-free phonolite melt in a 16:84% weight ratio, respectively. Experiments were run in a piston cylinder apparatus with CaF2 as the pressure medium. In addition to varying PT conditions, a wide range of water contents were tested (0-14wt%). It was found that pressures of 10-14 kbar, and temperatures of 900-1000°C, satisfy the conditions at which the reactions can form, thus, it is likely that the phonolite existed at upper mantle conditions. Water must be present to stabilize the desired hydrous phases, with >6wt% required at 900°C and 10 kbar. The destabilization of feldspar is also essential to the process, hence higher water contents are needed at the lowest PT conditions compared to 4-5 wt. % H2O at greater PT. The formation of amphibole around enstatite appears to be affected by sluggish reaction kinetics and the orientation of the host pyroxene, sometimes leading to diopside single rims. Furthermore we note some of the

  18. Experimental evidence for a liquid-liquid crossover in deeply cooled confined water.

    PubMed

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-21

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis. PMID:25479506

  19. Delayed school start times and adolescent sleep: A systematic review of the experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Minges, Karl E; Redeker, Nancy S

    2016-08-01

    Many schools have instituted later morning start times to improve sleep, academic, and other outcomes in response to the mismatch between youth circadian rhythms and early morning start times. However, there has been no systematic synthesis of the evidence on the effects of this practice. To examine the impact of delayed school start time on students' sleep, health, and academic outcomes, electronic databases were systematically searched and data were extracted using the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Six studies satisfied selection criteria and used pre-post, no control (n = 3), randomized controlled trial (n = 2), and quasi-experimental (n = 1) designs. School start times were delayed 25-60 min, and correspondingly, total sleep time increased from 25 to 77 min per weeknight. Some studies revealed reduced daytime sleepiness, depression, caffeine use, tardiness to class, and trouble staying awake. Overall, the evidence supports recent non-experimental study findings and calls for policy that advocates for delayed school start time to improve sleep. This presents a potential long-term solution to chronic sleep restriction during adolescence. However, there is a need for rigorous randomized study designs and reporting of consistent outcomes, including objective sleep measures and consistent measures of health and academic performance. PMID:26545246

  20. Oxytocin and Major Depressive Disorder: Experimental and Clinical Evidence for Links to Aetiology and Possible Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, David A.; Neumann, Inga D.

    2010-01-01

    Affective disorders represent the most common psychiatric diseases, with substantial co-morbidity existing between major depressive disorders (MDD) and anxiety disorders. The lack of truly novel acting compounds has led to non-monoaminergic based research and hypotheses in recent years. The large number of brain neuropeptides, characterized by discrete synthesis sites and multiple receptors, represent likely research candidates for novel therapeutic targets. The present review summarises the available preclinical and human evidence regarding the neuropeptide, oxytocin, and its implications in the aetiology and treatment of MDD. While the evidence is not conclusive at present additional studies are warranted to determine whether OXT may be of therapeutic benefit in subsets of MDD patients such as those with comorbid anxiety symptoms and low levels of social attachment.

  1. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, David. A.; Jones, Scott B.; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T.; Smith, Andrew R.; Jones, Davey L.; Marshall, Miles R.; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction. PMID:26804897

  2. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, David A; Jones, Scott B; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T; Smith, Andrew R; Jones, Davey L; Marshall, Miles R; Emmett, Bridget A

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction. PMID:26804897

  3. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, David. A.; Jones, Scott B.; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T.; Smith, Andrew R.; Jones, Davey L.; Marshall, Miles R.; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction.

  4. Experimental evidence for state-dependent nest weight in the blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R

    2009-05-01

    Parental investment in reproduction is generally limited by food availability, and so avian life-history research has traditionally focused on the brood rearing phase, when food requirements are greatest. Only relatively recently has the focus extended to the incubation phase, and even more recently to the nest-building phase, where observational and comparative evidence suggest that avian nest building is an energetically expensive and time-consuming activity. We aimed to experimentally test the limitations on this cost in a hole-breeding passerine, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), by providing supplementary food to experimental pairs during the nest-building period. In comparison with control females, that did not receive supplementary food, experimental females constructed heavier nests, with greater amounts of moss base but similar amounts of cup lining, despite there being no differences in the time taken to build the nest. This study provides empirical support for the hypothesis that avian nest building is a costly behaviour, limited by food availability. PMID:19429209

  5. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Bestion, Elvire; Teyssier, Aimeric; Richard, Murielle; Clobert, Jean; Cote, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates. PMID:26501958

  6. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Bestion, Elvire; Teyssier, Aimeric; Richard, Murielle; Clobert, Jean; Cote, Julien

    2015-10-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates. PMID:26501958

  7. Experimental evidence for self-organized criticality in tokamak plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, T. L.; Moyer, R. A.; Groebner, R.; Doyle, E. J.; Lehmer, R.; Peebles, W. A.; Rettig, C. L.

    1999-03-01

    Measurements of plasma turbulence spectra and particle flux from the DIII-D tokamak exhibit significant agreement with predictions of self-organized criticality (SOC) modeling. Power spectra of density ñ, potential g˜f, and particle flux Γ, are observed to have three regions of frequency dependence: f0, f-1 and f-4. In addition, the particle flux probability distribution displays a Γ-1 scaling over two decades in Γ. These results provide the first evidence that the plasma is in a state consistent with SOC models and place a constraint on plasma transport models.

  8. Experimental Evidence of Weak Excluded Volume Effects for Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Damini; Miller, Jeremy J.; Muralidhar, Abhiram; Mahshid, Sara; Reisner, Walter; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    In the classical de Gennes picture of weak polymer nanochannel confinement, the polymer contour is envisioned as divided into a series of isometric blobs. Strong excluded volume interactions are present both within a blob and between blobs. In contrast, for semiflexible polymers like DNA, excluded volume interactions are of borderline strength within a blob but appreciable between blobs, giving rise to a chain description consisting of a string of anisometric blobs. We present experimental validation of this subtle effect of excluded volume for DNA nanochannel confinement by performing measurements of variance in chain extension of T4 DNA molecules as a function of effective nanochannel size (305-453 nm). Additionally, we show an approach to systematically reduce the effect of molecular weight dispersity of DNA samples, a typical experimental artifact, by combining confinement spectroscopy with simulations.

  9. Linkages Between Biotic and Abiotic Belowground Processes in a Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Responses to Experimental Nitrogen and Water Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, P. S.; Marion, G. M.; Young, A. C.; Glanzmann, I.; Stevenson, B.; Arnone, J. A.; Nowak, R. S.

    2007-05-01

    Fine roots play a critical role in nutrient acquisition and water uptake. Yet it is unclear how fine roots in arid environments respond to increased nitrogen deposition and rainfall, two important global change factors in arid lands in the southwestern United States. In addition it is unclear how changes in root activity may impact soil CO2 concentrations, an important parameter affecting carbonate dynamics. We measured fine root length density (RLD) and soil CO2 concentrations for two years in experimentally manipulated plots in a Mojave Desert ecosystem. The study was conducted at the Mojave Global Change Facility located at the Nevada Test Site 60 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The treatments included: 1) three 25 mm water additions during the summer, 2) one nitrogen addition in the fall equivalent to 40 kg per hectare per year, 3) a combined water and nitrogen addition and, 4) untreated controls. Root data were collected using minirhizotron imaging approximately every 90 days underneath shrubs and intershrub areas. Soil CO2 concentrations were collected at the same sampling times and locations at 10, 40 and 90 cm depth using gas wells. The RLD showed clear seasonal patterns with the fastest increase in RLD occurring between February and April. During the winter the increase in RLD was higher underneath shrubs than in intershrub areas but during the summer months increases in RLD were similar under shrubs and in intershrub areas. Water additions slightly increased root mortality during the summer but this increase in mortality was not large enough to cause consistent differences in RLD between control and irrigated plots. Nitrogen addition had no effect on root dynamics in any of the plots. In contrast to RLD, irrigation consistently increased soil CO2 concentrations at all depths during the summer even when roots were not actively growing anymore. We speculate that the increased mortality under irrigation causes increased heterotrophic respiration which may

  10. The role of barrier membranes for guided bone regeneration and restoration of large bone defects: current experimental and clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of large bone defects represents a great challenge in orthopedic and craniomaxillofacial surgery. Although there are several methods for bone reconstruction, they all have specific indications and limitations. The concept of using barrier membranes for restoration of bone defects has been developed in an effort to simplify their treatment by offering a sinlge-staged procedure. Research on this field of bone regeneration is ongoing, with evidence being mainly attained from preclinical studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current experimental and clinical evidence on the use of barrier membranes for restoration of bone defects in maxillofacial and orthopedic surgery. Although there are a few promising preliminary human studies, before clinical applications can be recommended, future research should aim to establish the 'ideal' barrier membrane and delineate the need for additional bone grafting materials aiming to 'mimic' or even accelerate the normal process of bone formation. Reproducible results and long-term observations with barrier membranes in animal studies, and particularly in large animal models, are required as well as well-designed clinical studies to evaluate their safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness. PMID:22834465

  11. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  12. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-09-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  13. Enjoyment: A Conceptual Exploration and Overview of Experimental Evidence in the Context of Games for Health.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, Rik; van 't Riet, Jonathan; Short, Camille E

    2016-02-01

    Enjoyment is consistently noted as important for engaging audiences in games for health. However, as a term, enjoyment is often used interchangeably with a host of other terms, some of which overlap conceptually. This obscures what does and what does not constitute enjoyment, and in turn slows scientific progress by making the study of enjoyment and the synthesis of enjoyment-related research difficult. This article is aimed at improving our understanding of enjoyment by distinguishing enjoyment from other important constructs, such as fun and engagement, and by providing an overview of the experimental evidence on the determinants of enjoyment in videogames. Competence, narrative transportation, and relevance are identified as key factors related to enjoyment, and future studies examining these factors using games for health are recommended. PMID:26699455

  14. First experimental evidence of the feasibility of multi-color magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmer, J.; Halkola, A.; Gleich, B.; Schmale, I.; Borgert, J.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a new approach to visualizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is capable of 3D real-time in vivo imaging of particles injected into the blood stream and is a candidate for medical imaging applications. To date, only one particle type has been imaged at a time, however, the ability to separate signals acquired simultaneously from different particle types or from particles in different environments would substantially increase the scope of the method. Different colors could be assigned to different signal sources to allow for visualization in a single image. Successful signal separation has been reported in spectroscopic experiments, but it was unclear how well separation would work in conjunction with spatial encoding in an imaging experiment. This work presents experimental evidence of the separability of signals from different particle types and aggregation states (fluid versus powder) using a ‘multi-color’ reconstruction approach. Several mechanisms are discussed that may form the basis for successful signal separation.

  15. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the central nervous system: evidence from experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, V F H; Bøgh, I B; Lykkesfeldt, J

    2014-03-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) is a major acute complication in type 1 as well as in type 2 diabetes, particularly during intensive insulin therapy. The brain plays a central role in the counter-regulatory response by eliciting parasympathetic and sympathetic hormone responses to restore normoglycaemia. Brain glucose concentrations, being approximately 15-20% of the blood glucose concentration in humans, are rigorously maintained during hypoglycaemia through adaptions such as increased cerebral glucose transport, decreased cerebral glucose utilisation and, possibly, by using central nervous system glycogen as a glucose reserve. However, during sustained hypoglycaemia, the brain cannot maintain a sufficient glucose influx and, as the cerebral hypoglycaemia becomes severe, electroencephalogram changes, oxidative stress and regional neuronal death ensues. With particular focus on evidence from experimental studies on nondiabetic IIH, this review outlines the central mechanisms behind the counter-regulatory response to IIH, as well as cerebral adaption to avoid sequelae of cerebral neuroglycopaenia, including seizures and coma. PMID:24428753

  16. Hypertension and Dementia: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence Revealing a Detrimental Relationship.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension and dementia represent two major public health challenges worldwide, notably in the elderly population. Although these two conditions have classically been recognized as two distinct diseases, mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that hypertension and dementia are strictly intertwined. Here, we briefly report how hypertension profoundly affects brain homeostasis, both at the structural and functional level. Chronic high blood pressure modifies the cerebral vasculature, increasing the risk of Aβ clearance impairment. The latter, excluding genetic etiologies, is considered one of the main causes of Aβ deposition in the brain. Studies have shown that hypertension induces cerebral arterial stiffening and microvascular dysfunction, thus contributing to dementia pathophysiology. This review examines the existing and the updated literature which has attempted to explain and clarify the relationship between hypertension and dementia at the pathophysiological level. PMID:27005613

  17. Hypertension and Dementia: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence Revealing a Detrimental Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension and dementia represent two major public health challenges worldwide, notably in the elderly population. Although these two conditions have classically been recognized as two distinct diseases, mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that hypertension and dementia are strictly intertwined. Here, we briefly report how hypertension profoundly affects brain homeostasis, both at the structural and functional level. Chronic high blood pressure modifies the cerebral vasculature, increasing the risk of Aβ clearance impairment. The latter, excluding genetic etiologies, is considered one of the main causes of Aβ deposition in the brain. Studies have shown that hypertension induces cerebral arterial stiffening and microvascular dysfunction, thus contributing to dementia pathophysiology. This review examines the existing and the updated literature which has attempted to explain and clarify the relationship between hypertension and dementia at the pathophysiological level. PMID:27005613

  18. Experimental evidence for alleviating nociceptive hypersensitivity by single application of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Dong, Fei; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The single application of high-concentration of capsaicin has been used as an analgesic therapy of persistent pain. However, its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain to be further evaluated with experimental approaches. The present study provided evidence showing that the single application of capsaicin dose-dependently alleviated nociceptive hypersensitivity, and reduced the action potential firing in small-diameter neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats and mice. Pre-treatment with capsaicin reduced formalin-induced acute nocifensive behavior after a brief hyperalgesia in rats and mice. The inhibitory effects of capsaicin were calcium-dependent, and mediated by the capsaicin receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1). We further found that capsaicin exerted inhibitory effects on the persistent nociceptive hypersensitivity induced by peripheral inflammation and nerve injury. Thus, these results support the long-lasting and inhibitory effects of topical capsaicin on persistent pain, and the clinic use of capsaicin as a pain therapy. PMID:25896608

  19. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation. PMID:25267469

  20. The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change as a Gateway Belief: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Sander L.; Leiserowitz, Anthony A.; Feinberg, Geoffrey D.; Maibach, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently widespread public misunderstanding about the degree of scientific consensus on human-caused climate change, both in the US as well as internationally. Moreover, previous research has identified important associations between public perceptions of the scientific consensus, belief in climate change and support for climate policy. This paper extends this line of research by advancing and providing experimental evidence for a “gateway belief model” (GBM). Using national data (N = 1104) from a consensus-message experiment, we find that increasing public perceptions of the scientific consensus is significantly and causally associated with an increase in the belief that climate change is happening, human-caused and a worrisome threat. In turn, changes in these key beliefs are predictive of increased support for public action. In short, we find that perceived scientific agreement is an important gateway belief, ultimately influencing public responses to climate change. PMID:25714347

  1. BFS Simulation and Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Ti Additions on the Structure of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Ferrante,John; Garg, Anita; Honecy, Frank S.; Amador, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloy energetics is applied to the study of ternary additions to NiAl. A description of the method and its application to alloy design is given. Two different approaches are used in the analysis of the effect of Ti additions to NiAl. First, a thorough analytical study is performed, where the energy of formation, lattice parameter and bulk modulus are calculated for a large number of possible atomic distributions of Ni, Al and Ti. Substitutional site preference schemes and formation of precipitates are thus predicted and analyzed. The second approach used consists of the determination of temperature effects on the final results, as obtained by performing a number of large scale numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo-Metropolis procedure and BFS for the calculation of the energy at every step in the simulation. The results indicate a sharp preference of Ti for Al sites in Ni-rich NiAl alloys and the formation of ternary Heusler precipitates beyond the predicted solubility limit of 5 at. % Ti. Experimental analysis of three Ni-Al-Ti alloys confirms the theoretical predictions.

  2. Shifts in the phylogenetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in response to experimental nitrogen and carbon dioxide additions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-09-01

    Global N inputs and atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased as a result of human activities, and are predicted to increase along with population growth, with potentially negative effects on biodiversity. Using taxonomic and phylogenetic measures, we examined the response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to experimental manipulations of N and CO2 at the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment. No significant interactions between N and CO2 were observed, but individual effects of N and CO2 were found. Elevated CO2 resulted in changes in phylogenetic similarity, and a shift to phylogenetic clustering of AMF communities. N addition resulted in higher phylogenetic diversity and evenness, with no shifts in community composition and no significant signal for phylogenetic clustering. N addition resulted in an increase in both available N and the N:P ratio in N-amended plots, which suggests that changing patterns of nutrient limitation could have lead to altered species interactions. These findings suggest that elevated levels of N and CO2 altered patterns of AMF community assembly, with potential effects on ecosystem function. PMID:25990297

  3. Atomistic Simulations and Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Ti Additions on the Structure of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Ferrante, John; Garg, Anita; Amador, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    The Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) semiempirical method for alloy energetics is applied to the study of ternary additions to NiAl alloys. A detailed description of the method and its application to alloy design is given. Two different approaches are used in the analysis of the effect of Ti additions to NiAl. First, a thorough analytical study is performed, where the energy of formation, lattice parameter and bulk modulus are calculated for hundreds of possible atomic distributions of Ni, Al and Ti. Substitutional site preference schemes and formation of precipitates are thus predicted and analyzed. The second approach used consists of the determination of temperature effects on the final results, as obtained by performing a number of large scale numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo - Metropolis procedure and BFS for the calculation of the energy at every step in the simulation. The results indicate a sharp preference of Ti for Al sites in Ni-rich NiAl alloys and the formation of ternary Heusler precipitates beyond the predicted solubility limit of 5 at. % Ti. Experimental analysis of three NiAl+Ti alloys confirms the theoretical predictions.

  4. Plant functional traits mediate reproductive phenology and success in response to experimental warming and snow addition in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Dorji, Tsechoe; Totland, Orjan; Moe, Stein R; Hopping, Kelly A; Pan, Jianbin; Klein, Julia A

    2013-02-01

    Global climate change is predicted to have large impacts on the phenology and reproduction of alpine plants, which will have important implications for plant demography and community interactions, trophic dynamics, ecosystem energy balance, and human livelihoods. In this article we report results of a 3-year, fully factorial experimental study exploring how warming, snow addition, and their combination affect reproductive phenology, effort, and success of four alpine plant species belonging to three different life forms in a semiarid, alpine meadow ecosystem on the central Tibetan Plateau. Our results indicate that warming and snow addition change reproductive phenology and success, but responses are not uniform across species. Moreover, traits associated with resource acquisition, such as rooting depth and life history (early vs. late flowering), mediate plant phenology, and reproductive responses to changing climatic conditions. Specifically, we found that warming delayed the reproductive phenology and decreased number of inflorescences of Kobresia pygmaea C. B. Clarke, a shallow-rooted, early-flowering plant, which may be mainly constrained by upper-soil moisture availability. Because K. pygmaea is the dominant species in the alpine meadow ecosystem, these results may have important implications for ecosystem dynamics and for pastoralists and wildlife in the region. PMID:23504784

  5. Predictors of victim disclosure in child sexual abuse: Additional evidence from a sample of incarcerated adult sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Benoit; Wortley, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The under-reporting of child sexual abuse by victims is a serious problem that may prolong the suffering of victims and leave perpetrators free to continue offending. Yet empirical evidence indicates that victim disclosure rates are low. In this study, we perform regression analysis with a sample of 369 adult child sexual offenders to examine potential predictors of victim disclosure. Specifically, we extend the range of previously examined potential predictors of victim disclosure and investigate interaction effects in order to better capture under which circumstances victim disclosure is more likely. The current study differs from previous studies in that it examines the impact of victim and offense variables on victim disclosure from the perspective of the offender. In line with previous studies, we found that disclosure increased with the age of the victim and if penetration had occurred. In addition, we found that disclosure increased when the victim came from a non-dysfunctional family and resisted the abuse. The presence of an interaction effect highlighted the impact of the situation on victim disclosure. This effect indicated that as victims get older, they are more likely to disclose the abuse when they are not living with the offender at the time of abuse, but less likely to do so when they are living with the offender at the time of abuse. These findings are discussed in relation to previous studies and the need to facilitate victim disclosure. PMID:25812798

  6. Speciation in caves: experimental evidence that permanent darkness promotes reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo

    2011-12-23

    Divergent selection through biotic factors like predation or parasitism can promote reproductive isolation even in the absence of geographical barriers. On the other hand, evidence for a role of adaptation to abiotic factors during ecological speciation in animals is scant. In particular, the role played by perpetual darkness in establishing reproductive isolation in cave animals (troglobites) remains elusive. We focused on two reproductively isolated ecotypes (surface- and cave-dwelling) of the widespread livebearer Poecilia mexicana, and raised offspring of wild-caught females to sexual maturity in a 12-month common-garden experiment. Fish were reared in light or darkness combined with high- or low-food conditions. Females, but not males, of the surface ecotype suffered from almost complete reproductive failure in darkness, especially in the low-food treatment. Furthermore, surface fish suffered from a significantly higher rate of spontaneous, stress-related infection with bacterial columnaris disease. This experimental evidence for strong selection by permanent darkness on non-adapted surface-dwelling animals adds depth to our understanding of the selective forces establishing and maintaining reproductive isolation in cave faunas. PMID:21561964

  7. Developmental neurotoxicity of ortho-phthalate diesters: review of human and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Miodovnik, Amir; Edwards, Andrea; Bellinger, David C; Hauser, Russ

    2014-03-01

    Ortho-phthalate diesters, or phthalates, are widely used synthetic chemicals found primarily in consumer products and polyvinyl chloride plastics. Experimental evidence suggests that several phthalates possess antiandrogenic properties and may disrupt endocrine pathways resulting in abnormal reproductive outcomes. Low-level exposure to phthalates has been well documented in humans, with higher levels found in children and women of childbearing age. Recent epidemiologic studies postulate that prenatal exposure to measurable urine phthalate concentrations may be associated with altered genital and pubertal development in infants and children. This review addresses the emerging evidence that some phthalates may have an adverse impact on the developing brain. The supporting animal studies and proposed mechanisms underlying the deleterious properties of phthalates in relation to neurodevelopmental outcomes are also discussed. While the observed associations are based on limited studies with a broad range of endpoints, the implications of such outcomes are of concern from a public health standpoint and merit further investigation given the widespread nature of the exposure. PMID:24486776

  8. Evidence of Rapidly Warming Rivers in the UK from an Extensive Additive Modelling Study at the National Scale Using R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    River water temperature data exhibit non-linear behaviour over the past 50 or so years. Standard techniques for identifying and quantifying trends have centred around the use of linear regression and Mann-Kendall and Thiel-Sen procedures. Observational data from UK rivers suggest that temperatures are far more variable then assumed under these statistical models. In a national-scale assessment of the response of riverine systems to global climatic change, an additive model framework was employed to model patterns in water temperatures from a large database of temporal observational data. Models were developed using R, which allowed for the deployment of cutting-edge additive modelling techniques to describe trends at 2773 sites across England and Wales, UK. At a subset of sites, additive models were used to model long-term trends, trends within seasons and the long-term variation in the seasonal pattern of water temperatures. Changes in water temperature have important consequences for aquatic ecology, with some species being particularly sensitive even to small shifts in temperature during some or all of their lifecycle. While there are many studies reporting increasing regional and global air temperatures, evidence for changes in river water temperature has thus far been site specific and/or from sites heavily influenced by human activities that could themselves lead to warming. Here I present selected results from a national-scale assessment of changing river water temperatures, covering the whole of England and Wales, comprising data from 2,773 locations. Positive trends in water temperature were observed at 86% of sites. At a subset of sites, seasonal trend models were developed, which showed that 90% of locations demonstrated statistically significant increases in water temperature during Autumn and Winter periods. Multivariate smoothers, that allow for within-year and longer-term trend interactions in time, suggest that periods of warmer waters now extend

  9. Role of Chronic Inflammation in Myopia Progression: Clinical Evidence and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yao; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Wan, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Prevention and treatment of myopia is an important public problem worldwide. We found a higher incidence of myopia among patients with inflammatory diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (7.9%), uveitis (3.7%), or systemic lupus erythematosus (3.5%) compared to those without inflammatory diseases (p<0.001) using data from children (<18years old) in the National Health Insurance Research database. We then examined the inhibition of myopia by atropine in Syrian hamsters with monocular form deprivation (MFD), an experimental myopia model. We found atropine downregulated inflammation in MFD eyes. The expression levels of c-Fos, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were upregulated in myopic eyes and downregulated upon treatment with atropine. The relationship between the inflammatory response and myopia was investigated by treating MFD hamsters with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CSA) or the inflammatory stimulators lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN). Myopia progression was slowed by CSA application but was enhanced by LPS and PGN administration. The levels of c-Fos, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α were upregulated in LPS- and PGN-treated eyes and downregulated by CSA treatment. These findings provide clinical and experimental evidence that inflammation plays a crucial role in the development of myopia. PMID:27470424

  10. Lightning injury as a blast injury of skull, brain, and visceral lesions: clinical and experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, M; Hosoda, Y; Fujishiro, Y; Tuyuki, A; Kikuchi, K; Obara, H; Kitagawa, N; Ishikawa, T

    2001-12-01

    The present study attempts to better understand the mechanism of injuries associated with direct lightning strikes. We reviewed the records of 256 individuals struck by lightning between 1965 and 1999, including 56 people who were killed. Basal skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage, pulmonary haemorrhage, or solid organ rupture was suspected in three men who died. Generally these lesions have been attributed to current flow or falling after being struck. However, examination of surface injuries sustained suggested that the true cause was concussion secondary to blast injury resulting from vaporization of water on the body surface by a surface flashover spark. To investigate this hypothesis, an experimental model of a lightning strike was created in the rat. Saline-soaked blotting paper was used to simulate wet clothing or skin, and an artificial lightning impulse was applied. The resultant lesions were consistent with our hypothesis that the blast was reinforced by the concussive effect of water vaporization. The concordance between the clinical and experimental evidence argues strongly for blast injury as an important source of morbidity and mortality in lightning strikes. PMID:11806503

  11. Genetic and experimental evidence for cross-species infection by swine hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Meng, X J; Halbur, P G; Shapiro, M S; Govindarajan, S; Bruna, J D; Mushahwar, I K; Purcell, R H; Emerson, S U

    1998-12-01

    Prior to the recent discovery of the swine hepatitis E virus (swine HEV) in pigs from the midwestern United States, HEV was not considered endemic to this country. Since swine HEV is antigenically and genetically related to human strains of HEV, it was important to characterize this new virus further. The infectivity titer of a pool of swine HEV in pigs was determined in order to prepare a standardized reagent and to evaluate the dose response in pigs. Although the sequence of swine HEV varied extensively from those of most human strains of HEV, it was very closely related to the two strains of human HEV (US-1 and US-2) isolated in the United States. The U.S. strains which were recently recovered from two patients with clinical hepatitis E in the United States shared >/=97% amino acid identity with swine HEV in open reading frames 1 and 2. Phylogenetic analyses of different regions of the genome revealed that swine HEV and the U.S. strains grouped together and formed a distinct branch. These results suggested that swine HEV may infect humans. When we inoculated rhesus monkeys and a chimpanzee, experimental surrogates of humans, with swine HEV, the primates became infected. Furthermore, in a reciprocal experiment, specific-pathogen-free pigs were experimentally infected with the US-2 strain of human HEV that is genetically similar to swine HEV. These results provided experimental evidence for cross-species infection by the swine virus. Thus, humans appear to be at risk of infection with swine HEV or closely related viruses. PMID:9811705

  12. The benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization: evidence from an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bresciani, Sabrina; Eppler, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    A great corpus of studies reports empirical evidence of how information visualization supports comprehension and analysis of data. The benefits of visualization for synchronous group knowledge work, however, have not been addressed extensively. Anecdotal evidence and use cases illustrate the benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization, but very few empirical studies have rigorously examined the impact of visualization on group knowledge work. We have consequently designed and conducted an experiment in which we have analyzed the impact of visualization on knowledge sharing in situated work groups. Our experimental study consists of evaluating the performance of 131 subjects (all experienced managers) in groups of 5 (for a total of 26 groups), working together on a real-life knowledge sharing task. We compare (1) the control condition (no visualization provided), with two visualization supports: (2) optimal and (3) suboptimal visualization (based on a previous survey). The facilitator of each group was asked to populate the provided interactive visual template with insights from the group, and to organize the contributions according to the group consensus. We have evaluated the results through both objective and subjective measures. Our statistical analysis clearly shows that interactive visualization has a statistically significant, objective and positive impact on the outcomes of knowledge sharing, but that the subjects seem not to be aware of this. In particular, groups supported by visualization achieved higher productivity, higher quality of outcome and greater knowledge gains. No statistically significant results could be found between an optimal and a suboptimal visualization though (as classified by the pre-experiment survey). Subjects also did not seem to be aware of the benefits that the visualizations provided as no difference between the visualization and the control conditions was found for the self-reported measures of satisfaction

  13. Experimental evidence of transport of pesticides through field soils - a review

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, M.

    1996-01-01

    Much information is available in the literature about pesticide transport through soils at the field scale. The purpose of this study is to review the literature with a focus on pesticide leaching to groundwater. The literature was compiled and discussed with respect to different factors that influence pesticide leaching. Pesticide leaching below the root zone has been demonstrated in sandy as well as in loamy soils. Particularly in loamy soils, there is evidence that even strongly adsorbing chemicals can move along preferential flow pathways and that the travel times of pesticides are comparable to those of conservative solutes. The amounts of pesticides leached below the root zone by worst case rainfall events depend on the chemical properties and can reach up to 5% of the applied mass. When there is no heavy rainfall shortly following application of chemicals, the mass annually leached below the root zone is in the range of <0.1 to 1%, occasionally it can reach up to 4%. Although a direct comparison cannot be made, the mass lost by leaching seems generally to be smaller than that lost by runoff, depending of course on the slope of the fields. Several factors that affect pesticide leaching, such as surface preparation, soil structure, soil water content, type of irrigation, pesticide formulation, time of application and rainfall events, are discussed with support of experimental evidence. While some factors showed inconsistent effects, others show promise in controlling leaching mechanisms. These latter factors include initial water content, surface preparation, and time of pesticide application. Based on the reviewed literature recommendations were made for future research activities. 172 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  14. Biparental incubation-scheduling: no experimental evidence for major energetic constraints

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Will; Rutten, Anne L.; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Incubation is energetically demanding, but it is debated whether these demands constrain incubation-scheduling (i.e., the length, constancy, and timing of incubation bouts) in cases where both parents incubate. Using 2 methods, we experimentally reduced the energetic demands of incubation in the semipalmated sandpiper, a biparental shorebird breeding in the harsh conditions of the high Arctic. First, we decreased the demands of incubation for 1 parent only by exchanging 1 of the 4 eggs for an artificial egg that heated up when the focal bird incubated. Second, we reanalyzed the data from the only published experimental study that has explicitly tested energetic constraints on incubation-scheduling in a biparentally incubating species (Cresswell et al. 2003). In this experiment, the energetic demands of incubation were decreased for both parents by insulating the nest cup. We expected that the treated birds, in both experiments, would change the length of their incubation bouts, if biparental incubation-scheduling is energetically constrained. However, we found no evidence that heating or insulation of the nest affected the length of incubation bouts: the combined effect of both experiments was an increase in bout length of 3.6min (95% CI: −33 to 40), which is equivalent to a 0.5% increase in the length of the average incubation bout. These results demonstrate that the observed biparental incubation-scheduling in semipalmated sandpipers is not primarily driven by energetic constraints and therefore by the state of the incubating bird, implying that we still do not understand the factors driving biparental incubation-scheduling. PMID:25713473

  15. Lanthanide humic substances complexation. I. Experimental evidence for a lanthanide contraction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2006-03-01

    The interaction of the lanthanides (Ln) with humic substances (HS) was investigated with a novel chemical speciation tool, Capillary Electrophoresis-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS). By using an EDTA-ligand competition method, a bi-modal species distribution of LnEDTA and LnHS is attained, separated by CE, and detected online by sector field ICP-MS. We quantified the binding of all 14 rare earth elements (REEs), Sc and Y with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid under environmental conditions (pH 6-9, 0.001-0.1 mol L -1 NaNO 3, 1-1000 nmol L -1 Ln, 10-20 mg L -1 HS). Conditional binding constants for REE-HS interaction ( Kc) ranged from 8.9 < log Kc < 16.5 under all experimental conditions, and display a lanthanide contraction effect, ΔLKc: a gradual increase in Kc from La to Lu by 2-3 orders of magnitude as a function of decreasing ionic radius. HS polyelectrolyte effects cause Kc to increase with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. ΔLKc increases significantly with increasing pH, and likely with decreasing ionic strength. Based on a strong correlation between ΔLKc values and denticity for organic acids, we suggest that HS form a range of tri- to tetra-dentate complexes under environmental conditions. These results confirm HS to be a strong complexing agent for Ln, and show rigorous experimental evidence for potential REE fractionation by HS complexation.

  16. Transanal total mesorectal excision: a systematic review of the experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Araujo, S E; Crawshaw, B; Mendes, C R; Delaney, C P

    2015-02-01

    Achieving a clear distal or circumferential resection margins with laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) may be laborious, especially in obese males and when operating on advanced distal rectal tumors with a poor response to neoadjuvant treatment. Transanal (TaTME) is a new natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery modality in which the rectum is mobilized transanally using endoscopic techniques with or without laparoscopic assistance. We conducted a comprehensive systematic review of publications on this new technique in PubMed and Embase databases from January, 2008, to July, 2014. Experimental and clinical studies written in English were included. Experimental research with TaTME was done on pigs with and without survival models and on human cadavers. In these studies, laparoscopic or transgastric assistance was frequently used resulting in an easier upper rectal dissection and in a longer rectal specimen. To date, 150 patients in 16 clinical studies have undergone TaTME. In all but 15 cases, transabdominal assistance was used. A rigid transanal endoscopic operations/transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEO/TEM) platform was used in 37 patients. Rectal adenocarcinoma was the indication in all except for nine cases of benign diseases. Operative times ranged from 90 to 460 min. TME quality was deemed intact, satisfactory, or complete. Involvement in circumferential resection margins was detected in 16 (11.8 %) patients. The mean lymph node harvest was equal or greater than 12 in all studies. Regarding morbidity, pneumoretroperitoneum, damage to the urethra, and air embolism were reported intraoperatively. Mean hospital stay varied from 4 to 14 days. Postoperative complications occurred in 34 (22.7 %) patients. TaTME with TEM is feasible in selected cases. Oncologic safety parameters seem to be adequate although the evidence relies on small retrospective series conducted by highly trained surgeons. Further studies are expected. PMID:25380741

  17. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    with different polarity. As shown by the spin labeling ESR experiment, molecules modeling SDZ were promptly bound to non-hydrolysable network of soil organic matter only via the aromatic amines that was accompanied by a prompt enlargement of humic particles binding aromatic amines, whereas binding of decomposition products of SDZ to humic acids of soil via the aliphatic amines was not observable. The ESR spectra obviously showed a single-phase process of covalent binding of the aromatic amines. Repeated washouts of labeled soil samples using distil water and ultrafiltration through the membrane of 5000 MWCO PES confirmed irreversible binding of the aromatic amines, and showed that via the aliphatic amines, binding of SDZ or decomposition products of SDZ to soil might also occur but reversibly and only to small soil molecules, which don't enter into the composition of non-hydrolysable part of soil organic matter. SL ESR experiments of different soils at the presence of Laccase highlighted that covalent binding of the aromatic amines to humic particles occurred in the specific hydrophobic areas of soil found as depleted in oxygen. All measured data evidenced that first, SDZ might be decomposed that allowed for measuring the same change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic matter influenced by both aromatic and aliphatic amines as in the experiment of the interaction of soil with SDZ. Second, a decomposition product of SDZ with the aromatic amine might be bound to non-hydrolysable parts of soil organic matter under specific anaerobic conditions only via 1,4 - nucleophilic addition, Michael-type addition. Gulkowska, A., Thalmann, B., D., Hollender, J., & Krauss, M. (2014). Chemosphere, 107, 366 - 372. Müller, T., Rosendahl, I., Focks, A., Siemens, J., Klasmeier, J., & Matthies. (2013). Environmental Pollution, 172,180 - 185. Nowak, K.M., Miltner, A., Gehre, M., Schaeffer, A., & Kaestner, M. (2011). Environmental Science & Technology 45, 999 - 1006. Weber, E.J., Spidle

  18. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    with different polarity. As shown by the spin labeling ESR experiment, molecules modeling SDZ were promptly bound to non-hydrolysable network of soil organic matter only via the aromatic amines that was accompanied by a prompt enlargement of humic particles binding aromatic amines, whereas binding of decomposition products of SDZ to humic acids of soil via the aliphatic amines was not observable. The ESR spectra obviously showed a single-phase process of covalent binding of the aromatic amines. Repeated washouts of labeled soil samples using distil water and ultrafiltration through the membrane of 5000 MWCO PES confirmed irreversible binding of the aromatic amines, and showed that via the aliphatic amines, binding of SDZ or decomposition products of SDZ to soil might also occur but reversibly and only to small soil molecules, which don't enter into the composition of non-hydrolysable part of soil organic matter. SL ESR experiments of different soils at the presence of Laccase highlighted that covalent binding of the aromatic amines to humic particles occurred in the specific hydrophobic areas of soil found as depleted in oxygen. All measured data evidenced that first, SDZ might be decomposed that allowed for measuring the same change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic matter influenced by both aromatic and aliphatic amines as in the experiment of the interaction of soil with SDZ. Second, a decomposition product of SDZ with the aromatic amine might be bound to non-hydrolysable parts of soil organic matter under specific anaerobic conditions only via 1,4 - nucleophilic addition, Michael-type addition. Gulkowska, A., Thalmann, B., D., Hollender, J., & Krauss, M. (2014). Chemosphere, 107, 366 - 372. Müller, T., Rosendahl, I., Focks, A., Siemens, J., Klasmeier, J., & Matthies. (2013). Environmental Pollution, 172,180 - 185. Nowak, K.M., Miltner, A., Gehre, M., Schaeffer, A., & Kaestner, M. (2011). Environmental Science & Technology 45, 999 - 1006. Weber, E.J., Spidle

  19. Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Adam D I; Guillory, Jamie E; Hancock, Jeffrey T

    2014-06-17

    Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others' positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people. PMID:24889601

  20. Experimental Evidence for an Eco-Evolutionary Coupling between Local Adaptation and Intraspecific Competition.

    PubMed

    Siepielski, Adam M; Nemirov, Alex; Cattivera, Matthew; Nickerson, Avery

    2016-04-01

    Determining how adaptive evolution can be coupled to ecological processes is key for developing a more integrative understanding of the demographic factors that regulate populations. Intraspecific competition is an especially important ecological process because it generates negative density dependence in demographic rates. Although ecological factors are most often investigated to determine the strength of density dependence, evolutionary processes such as local adaptation could also feed back to shape variation in the strength of density dependence among populations. Using an experimental approach with damselflies, a predaceous aquatic insect, we find evidence that both density-dependent intraspecific competition and local adaptation can reduce per capita growth rates. In some cases, the effects of local adaptation on reducing per capita growth rates exceeded the ecological competitive effects of a doubling of density. However, we also found that these ecological and evolutionary properties of populations are coupled, and we offer two interpretations of the causes underlying this pattern: (1) the strength of density-dependent competition depends on the extent of local adaptation, or (2) the extent of local adaptation is shaped by the strength of density-dependent competition. Regardless of the underlying causal pathway, these results show how eco-evolutionary dynamics can affect a key demographic process regulating populations. PMID:27028073

  1. Bacteria are not too small for spatial sensing of chemical gradients: An experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Thar, Roland; Kühl, Michael

    2003-01-01

    By analyzing the chemotactic behavior of a recently described marine bacterial species, we provide experimental evidence that bacteria are not too small for sensing chemical gradients spatially. The bipolar flagellated vibrioid bacteria (typical size 2 × 6 μm) exhibit a unique motility pattern as they translate along as well as rotate around their short axis, i.e., the pathways of the cell poles describe a double helix. The natural habitat of the bacteria is characterized by steep oxygen gradients where they accumulate in a band at their preferred oxygen concentration of ≈2 μM. Single cells leaving the band toward the oxic region typically return to the band within 16 s following a U-shaped track. A detailed analysis of the tracks reveals that the cells must be able to sense the oxygen gradient perpendicular to their swimming direction. Thus, they can detect oxygen gradients along a distance of ≈5 μm corresponding to the extension of their long axis. The observed behavior can be explained by the presence of two independent sensor regions at either cell pole that modulate the rotation speed of the polar flagellar bundles, i.e., the flagellar bundle at the cell pole exposed to higher oxygen concentration is rotating faster than the other bundle. A mathematical model based on these assumptions reproduces the observed swimming behavior of the bacteria. PMID:12719518

  2. Spontaneous Time Symmetry Breaking in System with Mixed Strategy Nash Equilibrium: Evidences in Experimental Economics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijian; Xu, Bin; Zhejiang Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    In social science, laboratory experiment with human subjects' interaction is a standard test-bed for studying social processes in micro level. Usually, as in physics, the processes near equilibrium are suggested as stochastic processes with time-reversal symmetry (TRS). To the best of our knowledge, near equilibrium, the breaking time symmetry, as well as the existence of robust time anti-symmetry processes, has not been reported clearly in experimental economics till now. By employing Markov transition method to analysis the data from human subject 2x2 Games with wide parameters and mixed Nash equilibrium, we study the time symmetry of the social interaction process near Nash equilibrium. We find that, the time symmetry is broken, and there exists a robust time anti-symmetry processes. We also report the weight of the time anti-symmetry processes in the total processes of each the games. Evidences in laboratory marketing experiments, at the same time, are provided as one-dimension cases. In these cases, time anti-symmetry cycles can also be captured. The proposition of time anti-symmetry processes is small, but the cycles are distinguishable.

  3. Self-deception as self-signalling: a model and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mijović-Prelec, Danica; Prelec, Draz̆en

    2010-01-01

    Self-deception has long been the subject of speculation and controversy in psychology, evolutionary biology and philosophy. According to an influential ‘deflationary’ view, the concept is an over-interpretation of what is in reality an instance of motivationally biased judgement. The opposite view takes the interpersonal deception analogy seriously, and holds that some part of the self actively manipulates information so as to mislead the other part. Building on an earlier self-signalling model of Bodner and Prelec, we present a game-theoretic model of self-deception. We propose that two distinct mechanisms collaborate to produce overt expressions of belief: a mechanism responsible for action selection (including verbal statements) and an interpretive mechanism that draws inferences from actions and generates emotional responses consistent with the inferences. The model distinguishes between two modes of self-deception, depending on whether the self-deceived individual regards his own statements as fully credible. The paper concludes with a new experimental study showing that self-deceptive judgements can be reliably and repeatedly elicited with financial incentives in a categorization task, and that the degree of self-deception varies with incentives. The study also finds evidence of the two forms of self-deception. The psychological benefits of self-deception, as measured by confidence, peak at moderate levels. PMID:20026461

  4. Experimental evidence of lateral flow in unsaturated homogeneous isotropic sloping soil due to rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinai, G.; Dirksen, C.

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes laboratory experimental evidence for lateral flow in the top layer of unsaturated sloping soil due to rainfall. Water was applied uniformly on horizontal and V-shaped surfaces of fine sand, at rates about 100 times smaller than the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Flow regimes near the surface and in the soil bulk were studied by using dyes. Streamlines and streak lines and wetting fronts were visually studied and photographed through a vertical glass wall. Near wetting fronts the flow direction was always perpendicular to the fronts owing to dominant matrix potential gradients. Thus, during early wetting of dry sloping sand, the flow direction is directed upslope. Far above a wetting front the flow was vertical due to the dominance of gravity. Downslope flow was observed during decreasing rainfall and dry periods. The lateral movement was largest near the soil surface and decayed with soil depth. Unstable downslope lateral flow close to the soil surface was attributed to non-Darcian flow due to variable temporal and spatial raindrop distributions. The experiments verify the theory that predicts unsaturated downslope lateral flow in sloping soil due to rainfall dynamics only, without apparent soil texture difference or anisotropy. This phenomenon could have significant implications for hillside hydrology, desert agriculture, irrigation management, etc., as well as for the basic mechanisms of surface runoff and erosion.

  5. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  6. Experimental evidence for non-Abelian gauge potentials in twisted graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Qiao, Jia-Bin; Zuo, Wei-Jie; Li, Wen-Tian; He, Lin

    2015-08-01

    Non-Abelian gauge potentials are quite relevant in subatomic physics, but they are relatively rare in a condensed matter context. Here we report the experimental evidence for non-Abelian gauge potentials in twisted graphene bilayers by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. At a magic twisted angle, θ ≈(1.11±0.05 ) ∘ , a pronounced sharp peak, which arises from the nondispersive flat bands at the charge neutrality point, is observed in the tunneling density of states due to the action of the non-Abelian gauge fields. Moreover, we observe confined electronic states in the twisted bilayer, as manifested by regularly spaced tunneling peaks with energy spacing δ E ≈vF/D ≈70 meV (here vF is the Fermi velocity of graphene and D is the period of the moiré patterns). This indicates that the non-Abelian gauge potentials in twisted graphene bilayers confine low-energy electrons into a triangular array of quantum dots following the modulation of the moiré patterns. Our results also directly demonstrate that the Fermi velocity in twisted bilayers can be tuned from about 106m /s to zero by simply reducing the twisted angle of about 2∘.

  7. Experimental evidence of spatial memory and home range affinity in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The role of spatial memory in the movement of animals through landscapes remains elusive. To examine spatial memory and home range affinity of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Minnesota during 1995–2007, I translocated 17 adult does with known home ranges to unfamiliar sites and radio-tracked them after their release. Twelve does wearing transmitting radio-collars returned to their home ranges. Death and collar expiration precluded determination of whether the remaining five does would have returned to home ranges. Three of five does wearing global positioning system collars traveled throughout hundreds of square kilometres, circling, backtracking, and returning to release sites, while two others exhibited directional movement for tens of kilometres. Four does that survived to parturition stopped traveling and moved at hourly rates similar to those of control does during the first three weeks of the typical fawn-rearing period, but continued traveling later. Their aberrant extensive travel before and after interruption by parturition suggests that they recognized they were in unfamiliar areas, demonstrating both their capacity and propensity to search for and occupy the familiar space of their individual home ranges. Their successful return to home ranges provided experimental evidence of spatial memory and further elucidated its pervasive role in White-tailed Deer spatial ecology.

  8. Smectite clays in Mars soil - Evidence for their presence and role in Viking biology experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Rishpon, J.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of smectite clays in Martian soils is reviewed and results of experiments with certain active clays simulating the Viking biology experiments are reported. Analyses of Martian soil composition by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and dust storm spectroscopy and Martian geological history strongly suggest the presence of a mixture of weathered ferro-silicate minerals, mainly nontronite and montmorillonite, accompanied by soluble sulphate salts, as major constituents. Samples of montmorillonite and nontronite incubated with (C-14)-formate or the radioactive nutrient medium solution used in the Viking Labeled Release experiment, were found to produce patterns of release of radioactive gas very similar to those observed in the Viking experiments, indicating the iron-catalyzed decomposition of formate as the reaction responsible for the Viking results. The experimental results of Hubbard (1979) simulating the results of the Viking Pyrolytic Release experiment using iron montmorillonites are pointed out, and it is concluded that many of the results of the Viking biology experiments can be explained in terms of the surface activity of smectite clays in catalysis and adsorption.

  9. Evidence for effects of chronic lead exposure on blood pressure in experimental animals: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Victery, W.

    1988-06-01

    Information obtained in a number of experimental studies conducted over the last 40 years on the effects of lead on blood pressure is reviewed. Differences in animal species, age at beginning of exposure, level of lead exposure, indices of lead burden, and blood pressure effects on each study are reported. In several of the high-dose experiments, hypertension was observed, but nephrotoxicity of lead may have contributed to its development. Moreover, in other high-dose experiments, no hypertension was observed, and in at least one experiment, the evidence suggested that lead could reduce an elevated blood pressure. In contrast, the lower dose experiments consistently demonstrated a hypertensive effect. Overall, the data suggest a biphasic dose response. Establishment of an appropriate animal model to study blood pressure effects of lead will require careful assessment of dietary interactions with lead, unstressed blood pressure monitoring with standardized techniques, and documentation of biologically effective lead burden. Future research should examine lead exposure at more environmentally appropriate levels in order to determine the validity of associating this pollutant with blood pressure effects in human population.

  10. Experimental evidence of O-H—S hydrogen bonding in supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Himansu S.; Chakraborty, Shamik; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2008-11-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the O-H—S hydrogen bonding in the complexes of simple model compounds of methionine (dimethyl sulphide) and tyrosine (phenol, p-cresol, and 2-naphthol). The complexes were formed in the supersonic jet and were detected using resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. In all the complexes, the band origins for the S1-S0 electronic transition were redshifted relative to that of their respective monomers. The resonant ion depletion IR spectra of all the complexes show redshifts of 123-140 cm-1 in the O-H stretching frequency, indicating that the OH group acts as the hydrogen bond donor and sulfur as an acceptor. The density functional theory calculations also predict the stable structures in support of this and predict the redshifted O-H stretching frequency in the complex. The atoms-in-molecules and natural bond orbital calculations confirm the O-H—S hydrogen bonding interaction. The significant finding of this study is that the magnitudes of redshifts in the O-H stretch in the O-H—S hydrogen bonded complexes reported here are comparable to those reported for the O-H—O hydrogen bonded complexes where H2O acts as the H-bond acceptor, which suggests that the OH-S interaction is perhaps as strong as the OH-O interaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report on the O-H—S hydrogen bonded complexes.

  11. Proprioceptive Dysfunction in Focal Dystonia: From Experimental Evidence to Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Fiorio, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia–thalamic–frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception. We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, which is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: (i) processing of vibratory input, (ii) temporal discrimination of two passive movements, (iii) multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs, and (iv) motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input. PMID:25538612

  12. Experimental evidence for the formation of liquid saline water on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Erik; Martínez, Germán M; Elliott, Harvey M; Rennó, Nilton O

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for deliquescence of perchlorate salts has been discovered in the Martian polar region while possible brine flows have been observed in the equatorial region. This appears to contradict the idea that bulk deliquescence is too slow to occur during the short periods of the Martian diurnal cycle during which conditions are favorable for it. We conduct laboratory experiments to study the formation of liquid brines at Mars environmental conditions. We find that when water vapor is the only source of water, bulk deliquescence of perchlorates is not rapid enough to occur during the short periods of the day during which the temperature is above the salts' eutectic value, and the humidity is above the salts' deliquescence value. However, when the salts are in contact with water ice, liquid brine forms in minutes, indicating that aqueous solutions could form temporarily where salts and ice coexist on the Martian surface and in the shallow subsurface. Key Points The formation of brines at Martian conditions was studied experimentally Bulk deliquescence from water vapor is too slow to occur diurnally on Mars Brines form in minutes when salts are placed in direct contact with ice PMID:25821267

  13. First experimental evidence of the feasibility of multi-color magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmer, J; Halkola, A; Gleich, B; Schmale, I; Borgert, J

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a new approach to visualizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is capable of 3D real-time in vivo imaging of particles injected into the blood stream and is a candidate for medical imaging applications. To date, only one particle type has been imaged at a time, however, the ability to separate signals acquired simultaneously from different particle types or from particles in different environments would substantially increase the scope of the method. Different colors could be assigned to different signal sources to allow for visualization in a single image. Successful signal separation has been reported in spectroscopic experiments, but it was unclear how well separation would work in conjunction with spatial encoding in an imaging experiment. This work presents experimental evidence of the separability of signals from different particle types and aggregation states (fluid versus powder) using a 'multi-color' reconstruction approach. Several mechanisms are discussed that may form the basis for successful signal separation. PMID:25658130

  14. Experimental evidence for paternal effects on offspring growth rate in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus)

    PubMed Central

    Eilertsen, Eirik Mack; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Liljedal, Ståle; Rudolfsen, Geir; Folstad, Ivar

    2008-01-01

    Sexual selection theory predicts that females should choose males that signal viability and quality. However, few studies have found fitness benefits among females mating with highly ornamented males. Here, we use Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a teleost fish with no parental care, to investigate whether females could gain fitness benefits by mating with highly ornamented and large-sized males. Carotenoid-based coloration signalled by males during spawning is believed to be an indicator of good genes for this species. Paternal effects on offspring size (body length and dry body mass) were examined experimentally by crossing eggs and sperm in vitro from 12 females and 24 males in a split-brood design and raising larvae to 30 days past hatching. We clearly demonstrated that there was a relationship between offspring size and paternal coloration. However, a negative interaction between paternal length and coloration was evident for offspring length, indicating that positive effects of paternal coloration were only present for smaller males. Thus, the red spawning coloration of the male Arctic charr seems to be an indicator of good genes, but the effect of paternal coloration on offspring length, an indicator of ‘offspring quality’, is size dependent. PMID:18782751

  15. Infectivity of DWV associated to flower pollen: experimental evidence of a horizontal transmission route.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maurizio; Carrozza, Maria Luisa; Luisi, Elena; Forzan, Mario; Giusti, Matteo; Sagona, Simona; Tolari, Francesco; Felicioli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a honeybee pathogen whose presence is generally associated with infestation of the colony by the mite Varroa destructor, leading to the onset of infections responsible for the collapse of the bee colony. DWV contaminates bee products such as royal jelly, bee-bread and honey stored within the infected hive. Outside the hive, DWV has been found in pollen loads collected directly from infected as well as uninfected forager bees. It has been shown that the introduction of virus-contaminated pollen into a DWV-free hive results in the production of virus-contaminated food, whose role in the development of infected bees from virus-free eggs has been experimentally demonstrated. The aim of this study was twofold: (i) to ascertain the presence of DWV on pollen collected directly from flowers visited by honeybees and then quantify the viral load and (ii) determine whether the virus associated with pollen is infective. The results of our investigation provide evidence that DWV is present on pollen sampled directly from visited flowers and that, following injection in individuals belonging to the pollinator species Apis mellifera, it is able to establish an active infection, as indicated by the presence of replicating virus in the head of the injected bees. We also provide the first indication that the pollinator species Osmia cornuta is susceptible to DWV infection. PMID:25419704

  16. Field experimental evidence that stochastic processes predominate in the initial assembly of bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yi-Qi; Zhao, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2016-06-01

    To assess the relative importance of environmental selection, dispersal and stochastic processes in structuring ecological communities, we conducted a bacterial community assembly experiment using microcosms filled with sterile liquid medium under field conditions in the Inner Mongolian grasslands. Multiple replicate microcosms containing different carbon substrates were placed at nine locations across three spatial scales (10, 300 and 10 000 m distance between locations) in such a way that the environment of microcosms varies independently of the geographical distance. The operational taxonomic units within the experimental communities were assessed via the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques on the 10th and 17th days after the onset of the experiment. We found no evidence of distance decay in community similarity, and communities within a given location were more similar to each other regardless of environment than communities at other locations within the same spatial scale. Variance partitioning indicated that location explained more compositional variation in microbial communities than environment, particularly on the 17th day, despite that environment and location in combination could only explain less than half of the total variation. These results suggest that bacterial dispersal is not limited by distance in this experiment, and community assembly in microcosms is not environmentally determined but governed by stochastic processes. PMID:25809418

  17. Regulation of Sclerostin Production in Human Male Osteocytes by Androgens: Experimental and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Andrea; De Toni, Luca; Speltra, Elena; Rocca, Maria Santa; Taglialavoro, Giuseppe; Ferlin, Alberto; Foresta, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    In this study we aimed to elucidate a possible role of T in the regulation of sclerostin, a glycoprotein secreted by osteocytes known to regulate bone mass. To this end, we evaluated the effect of T stimulation on sclerostin production and gene expression in human cultured osteocytes. In addition, we evaluated serum sclerostin levels in a cohort of 20 hypogonadal male patients, compared with 20 age-matched eugonadal controls. Stimulation with DHT decreased sclerostin expression in cultured osteocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Confirming a direct androgen receptor-mediated effect on sclerostin production, flutamide coincubation and silencing of androgen receptor gene in osteocytes abolished the DHT effects. In addition, hypogonadal patients showed higher serum sclerostin levels with respect to controls (145.87 ± 50.83 pg/mL vs 84.02 ± 32.15 pg/mL; P < .001) and in both probands and controls, serum T levels were negatively correlated with sclerostin (R = -0.664, P = 0.007, and R = -0.447, P = .045, respectively). Finally, multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that T represented the only independent predictor of sclerostin levels. In conclusion, by showing a direct correlation between T and sclerostin, both in vivo and in vitro, this study adds further support to the emerging clinical and experimental studies focusing on sclerostin as a therapeutic target for osteoporosis treatment. PMID:26393301

  18. Experimental evidence for a new single-event upset (SEU) mode in a CMOS SRAM obtained from model verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Lo, R. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling of SEU has been done in a CMOS static RAM containing 1-micron-channel-length transistors fabricated from a p-well epilayer process using both circuit-simulation and numerical-simulation techniques. The modeling results have been experimentally verified with the aid of heavy-ion beams obtained from a three-stage tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Experimental evidence for a novel SEU mode in an ON n-channel device is presented.

  19. Experimental evidence and isotopomer analysis of mixotrophic glucose metabolism in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterotrophic fermentation using simple sugars such as glucose is an established and cost-effective method for synthesizing bioproducts from bacteria, yeast and algae. Organisms incapable of metabolizing glucose have limited applications as cell factories, often despite many other advantageous characteristics. Therefore, there is a clear need to investigate glucose metabolism in potential cell factories. One such organism, with a unique metabolic network and a propensity to synthesize highly reduced compounds as a large fraction of its biomass, is the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Pt). Although Pt has been engineered to metabolize glucose, conflicting lines of evidence leave it unresolved whether Pt can natively consume glucose. Results Isotope labeling experiments in which Pt was mixotrophically grown under light on 100% U-13C glucose and naturally abundant (~99% 12C) dissolved inorganic carbon resulted in proteinogenic amino acids with an average 13C-enrichment of 88%, thus providing convincing evidence of glucose uptake and metabolism. The dissolved inorganic carbon was largely incorporated through anaplerotic rather than photosynthetic fixation. Furthermore, an isotope labeling experiment utilizing 1-13C glucose and subsequent metabolic pathway analysis indicated that (i) the alternative Entner-Doudoroff and Phosphoketolase glycolytic pathways are active during glucose metabolism, and (ii) during mixotrophic growth, serine and glycine are largely synthesized from glyoxylate through photorespiratory reactions rather than from 3-phosphoglycerate. We validated the latter result for mixotrophic growth on glycerol by performing a 2-13C glycerol isotope labeling experiment. Additionally, gene expression assays showed that known, native glucose transporters in Pt are largely insensitive to glucose or light, whereas the gene encoding cytosolic fructose bisphosphate aldolase 3, an important glycolytic enzyme, is overexpressed in light but

  20. Effects of Experimental Nitrogen and Phosphorus Addition on Litter Decomposition in an Old-Growth Tropical Forest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Dong, Shaofeng; Liu, Lei; Ma, Chuan; Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Xiaomin; Mo, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    The responses of litter decomposition to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions were examined in an old-growth tropical forest in southern China to test the following hypotheses: (1) N addition would decrease litter decomposition; (2) P addition would increase litter decomposition, and (3) P addition would mitigate the inhibitive effect of N addition. Two kinds of leaf litter, Schima superba Chardn. & Champ. (S.S.) and Castanopsis chinensis Hance (C.C.), were studied using the litterbag technique. Four treatments were conducted at the following levels: control, N-addition (150 kg N ha−1 yr−1), P-addition (150 kg P ha−1 yr−1) and NP-addition (150 kg N ha−1 yr−1 plus 150 kg P ha−1 yr−1). While N addition significantly decreased the decomposition of both litters, P addition significantly inhibited decomposition of C.C., but did not affect the decomposition of S.S. The negative effect of N addition on litter decomposition might be related to the high N-saturation in this old-growth tropical forest; however, the negative effect of P addition might be due to the suppression of “microbial P mining”. Significant interaction between N and P addition was found on litter decomposition, which was reflected by the less negative effect in NP-addition plots than those in N-addition plots. Our results suggest that P addition may also have negative effect on litter decomposition and that P addition would mitigate the negative effect of N deposition on litter decomposition in tropical forests. PMID:24391895

  1. Can people really "laugh at themselves?"--experimental and correlational evidence.

    PubMed

    Beermann, Ursula; Ruch, Willibald

    2011-06-01

    Laughing at oneself is considered a core component of the sense of humor in the theories of several authors. In McGhee's (1996) eight-step-training program of the sense of humor, laughing at oneself constitutes one of the most difficult levels. However, until now, only little empirical evidence on laughing at oneself exists. Using a multimethod approach, in the current study, 70 psychology students and a total of 126 peers filled in the Sense of Humor Scale (SHS, McGhee, 1996), containing as a subscale "Laughing at oneself". In addition, the participants answered the Trait and State forms of the State-Trait-Cheerfulness-Inventory (STCI, Ruch, Köhler, & van Thriel, 1996; Ruch, Köhler, & van Thriel, 1997). They then were confronted with six distorted images of themselves. Facial responses of the participants were videotaped and analyzed using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman, Friesen, & Hager, 2002). Four indicators of exhilaration were examined: (a) experienced funniness, (b) AU12 smiles, (c) Duchenne displays, and (d) laughter. Furthermore, fake and masking smiles were studied. Results demonstrated that self- and peer reports of "laughing at oneself" converged moderately. All four indicators of exhilaration were shown, but funniness and laughter seemed to be the most strongly related indicators. Trait cheerfulness and (low) seriousness, and a cheerful mood state formed further characteristics of persons who laugh at themselves. PMID:21668102

  2. Experimental Evidence for Polybaric Intracrustal Differentiation of Primitive Arc Basalt beneath St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundy, Jon; Melekhova, Lena; Robertson, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present experimental phase equilibria for a primitive, high-Mg basalt from St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles. Experimental details were presented in Melekhova et al (Nature Geosci, 2013); the objective here is to compare experimental phase compositions to those of erupted lavas and cumulates from St. Vincent. Starting material with 4.5 wt% H2O is multiply-saturated with a lherzolite assemblage at 1.3 GPa and 1180 ° C, consistent with mantle wedge derivation. Experimental glasses from our study, in addition to those of Pichavant et al (GCA, 2002) and Pichavant & Macdonald (CMP 2007) on a similar high-Mg basalt, encompass a compositional range from high-magnesian basalt to dacite, with a systematic dependence on H2O content, temperature and pressure. We are able to match the glasses from individual experiments to different lava types, so as to constrain the differentiation depths at which these magmas could be generated from a high-Mg parent, as follows: Composition wt% H2OP (GPa) T (° C) High-Mg basalt 3.9-4.8 1.45-1.751180-1200 Low-Mg basalt 2.3-4.5 1.0-1.3 1065-1150 High alumina basalt 3.0-4.5 0.4 1050-1080 Basaltic andesite 0.6-4.5 0.7-1.0 1050-1130 Andesite 0.6 1.0 1060-1080 The fact that St. Vincent andesites (and some basaltic andesites) appear to derive from a low-H2O (0.6 wt%) parent suggest that they are products of partial melting of older, high-Mg gabbroic rocks, as 0.6 wt% H2O is approximately the amount that can be stored in amphibole-bearing gabbros. The higher H2O contents of parents for the other lava compositions is consistent with derivation by crystallization of basalts with H2O contents that accord with those of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from St. Vincent (Bouvier et al, J Petrol, 2008). The generation of evolved melts both by basalt crystallization and gabbro melting is consistent with the hot zone concept of Annen et al (J Petrol, 2006) wherein repeated intrusion of mantle-derived basalt simultaneously crystallize by cooling and melt

  3. Scientific Reasoning in Early and Middle Childhood: The Development of Domain-General Evidence Evaluation, Experimentation, and Hypothesis Generation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekny, Jeanette; Maehler, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    According to Klahr's (2000, 2005; Klahr & Dunbar, 1988) Scientific Discovery as Dual Search model, inquiry processes require three cognitive components: hypothesis generation, experimentation, and evidence evaluation. The aim of the present study was to investigate (a) when the ability to evaluate perfect covariation, imperfect…

  4. Addition of a Decision Point in Evidence-Based Practice Process Steps to Distinguish EBP, Research and Quality Improvement Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Mick, JoAnn

    2015-06-01

    This column shares the best evidence-based strategies and innovative ideas on how to facilitate the learning of EBP principles and processes by clinicians as well as nursing and interprofessional students. Guidelines for submission are available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741--6787. PMID:25773966

  5. Evidence of Experimental Vertical Transmission of Emerging Novel ECSA Genotype of Chikungunya Virus in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankita; Dash, Paban Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Shashi; Gopalan, Natarajan; Rao, Putcha Venkata Lakshmana; Parida, Man Mohan; Reiter, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has emerged as one of the most important arboviruses of public health significance in the past decade. The virus is mainly maintained through human-mosquito-human cycle. Other routes of transmission and the mechanism of maintenance of the virus in nature are not clearly known. Vertical transmission may be a mechanism of sustaining the virus during inter-epidemic periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine whether Aedes aegypti, a principal vector, is capable of vertically transmitting CHIKV or not. Methodology/Principal Findings Female Ae. aegypti were orally infected with a novel ECSA genotype of CHIKV in the 2nd gonotrophic cycle. On day 10 post infection, a non-infectious blood meal was provided to obtain another cycle of eggs. Larvae and adults developed from the eggs obtained following both infectious and non-infectious blood meal were tested for the presence of CHIKV specific RNA through real time RT-PCR. The results revealed that the larvae and adults developed from eggs derived from the infectious blood meal (2nd gonotrophic cycle) were negative for CHIKV RNA. However, the larvae and adults developed after subsequent non-infectious blood meal (3rd gonotrophic cycle) were positive with minimum filial infection rates of 28.2 (1∶35.5) and 20.2 (1∶49.5) respectively. Conclusion/Significance This study is the first to confirm experimental vertical transmission of emerging novel ECSA genotype of CHIKV in Ae. aegypti from India, indicating the possibilities of occurrence of this phenomenon in nature. This evidence may have important consequence for survival of CHIKV during adverse climatic conditions and inter-epidemic periods. PMID:25080107

  6. Euphol prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice: evidence for the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Rafael Cypriano; de Souza, Paula Roberta de Cezaro; Bento, Allisson Freire; Marcon, Rodrigo; Bicca, Maíra Assunção; Pianowski, Luiz Francisco; Calixto, João B

    2012-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe chronic T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), the existing therapy of which is only partially effective and is associated with undesirable side effects. Euphol, an alcohol tetracyclic triterpene, has a wide range of pharmacological properties and is considered to have anti-inflammatory action. However there are no reports about the effects and mechanisms of euphol in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an established model of MS. Here we report the effects and the underlying mechanisms of action of euphol in EAE. Euphol (1-10mg/kg) was administered orally at different time-points of EAE. Immunological and inflammatory responses were evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blot and flow cytometry assays. We provide evidence that euphol significantly attenuates neurological signs of EAE. These beneficial effects of euphol seem to be associated with the down-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of some pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the CNS. Furthermore, in vitro, euphol consistently inhibited the T cell-mediated immune response including the production of T(H)1 and T(H)17 cytokines in spleen cells of untreated EAE animals. Likewise, oral euphol treatment inhibited the infiltration of T(H)17 myelin-specific cells into the CNS through the adhesion molecule, lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1). Our findings reveal that oral administration of euphol consistently reduces and limits the severity and development of EAE. Therefore, euphol might represent a potential molecule of interest for the treatment of MS and other T(H)17 cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:22155310

  7. Designing a light fabric metamaterial being highly macroscopically tough under directional extension: first experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Isola, Francesco; Lekszycki, Tomasz; Pawlikowski, Marek; Grygoruk, Roman; Greco, Leopoldo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a metamaterial constructed with an isotropic material organized following a geometric structure which we call pantographic lattice. This relatively complex fabric was studied using a continuous model (which we call pantographic sheet) by Rivlin and Pipkin and includes two families of flexible fibers connected by internal pivots which are, in the reference configuration, orthogonal. A rectangular specimen having one side three times longer than the other is cut at 45° with respect to the fibers in reference configuration, and it is subjected to large-deformation plane-extension bias tests imposing a relative displacement of shorter sides. The continuum model used, the presented numerical models and the extraordinary advancements of the technology of 3D printing allowed for the design of some first experiments, whose preliminary results are shown and seem to be rather promising. Experimental evidence shows three distinct deformation regimes. In the first regime, the equilibrium total deformation energy depends quadratically on the relative displacement of terminal specimen sides: Applied resultant force depends linearly on relative displacement. In the second regime, the applied force varies nonlinearly on relative displacement, but the behavior remains elastic. In the third regime, damage phenomena start to occur until total failure, but the exerted resultant force continues to be increasing and reaches a value up to several times larger than the maximum shown in the linear regime before failure actually occurs. Moreover, the total energy needed to reach structural failure is larger than the maximum stored elastic energy. Finally, the volume occupied by the material in the fabric is a small fraction of the total volume, so that the ratio weight/resistance to extension is very advantageous. The results seem to require a refinement of the used theoretical and numerical methods to transform the presented concept into a promising technological

  8. Experimental Evidence for Cerenkov Emission of Whistler Waves by Electron Holes Associated with Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Goldman, M. V.; Zhang, X.; Hietala, H.; Krupar, V.; Newman, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    Whistler waves are a ubiquitous plasma phenomenon, observed in a variety of space and laboratory plasma environments. They play a key role in many important and diverse processes, such as particle acceleration in the radiation belts and auroral acceleration region, the dissipation of plasma turbulence at small scales below the inertial range, collisionless shock physics, and magnetic reconnection. In reconnection they may modify the reconnection rate and also whistler physics is crucial to enabling fast reconnection in the Hall reconnection model. Consequently, understanding how whistler waves are generated and how they subsequently interact with the plasma is a problem of wide importance and application. It is well known that whistlers can arise as a result of kinetic instabilities, which grow exponentially from noise as a consequence of unstable electron distributions, for example temperature anisotropy. This is used ubiquitously to predict where and when whistler waves are likely to exist and therefore be of importance in many plasma phenomena. Recently it has been demonstrated theoretically and via computer simulations that whistler waves may also arise via Cerenkov emission from electron hole quasi-particles [Goldman et al., PRL, 2014]. Such wave emission can arise even when the temperature anisotropy leads to damping; in this case the system is analogous to a damped forced oscillator. Here we present novel experimental analysis from THEMIS showing for the first time evidence consistent with the generation of whistlers via Cerenkov emission during magnetotail reconnection. By considering the electromagnetic properties of the electron holes, the amplitude, phase speed and frequency of the associated whistlers, and also the available sub-spin observations of the electron distribution function, we find that the data are best explained by the Cerenkov emission theory rather than by kinetic instabilities due to the electron temperature anisotropy. Whilst the

  9. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Safonova, E V; Mitrofanov, Yu P; Konchakov, R A; Yu Vinogradov, A; Kobelev, N P; Khonik, V A

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to [Formula: see text] near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals. PMID:27143564

  10. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2–3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  11. Life in varying environments: experimental evidence for delayed effects of juvenile environment on adult life history.

    PubMed

    Helle, Heikki; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio

    2012-05-01

    1. The effects of environment experienced during early development on phenotype as an adult has started to gain vast amounts of interest in various taxa. Some evidence on long-term effects of juvenile environment is available, but replicated experimental studies in wild animals are still lacking. 2. Here we report the first replicated experiment in wild mammals which examines the long-term effects of juvenile and adult environments on individual fitness (reproduction, survival and health). The early development of bank vole (Myodes glareolus) individuals took place in either food-supplemented or un-supplemented outdoor enclosures. After the summer, adult individuals were reciprocally changed to either a similar or opposite resource environment to overwinter. 3. Adult environment had an overriding effect on reproductive success of females so that females overwintering in food-supplemented enclosures had a higher probability of breeding and advanced the initiation of breeding. However, the characteristics of their litters were determined by juvenile environment: females initially grown in food-supplemented conditions subsequently produced larger litters with bigger pups and a male-biased sex ratio. 4. In males, individuals growing in un-supplemented conditions had the highest survival irrespective of adult environment during winter, whereas in females, neither the juvenile nor adult environments affected their survival significantly. The physiological condition of voles in spring, as determined by haematological parameters, was also differentially affected by juvenile (plasma proteins and male testosterone) and adult (haematocrit) environments. 5. Our results suggest that (i) life-history trajectories of voles are not strictly specialized to a certain environment and (ii) the plastic life-history responses to present conditions can actually be caused by delayed effects of the juvenile environment. More generally, the results are important for understanding

  12. Nitrate ammonification by Nautilia profundicola AmH: experimental evidence consistent with a free hydroxylamine intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Thomas E.; Campbell, Barbara J.; Kalis, Katie M.; Campbell, Mark A.; Klotz, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    The process of nitrate reduction via nitrite controls the fate and bioavailability of mineral nitrogen within ecosystems; i.e., whether it is retained as ammonium (ammonification) or lost as nitrous oxide or dinitrogen (denitrification). Here, we present experimental evidence for a novel pathway of microbial nitrate reduction, the reverse hydroxylamine:ubiquinone reductase module (reverse-HURM) pathway. Instead of a classical ammonia-forming nitrite reductase that performs a 6 electron-transfer process, the pathway is thought to employ two catalytic redox modules operating in sequence: the reverse-HURM reducing nitrite to hydroxylamine followed by a hydroxylamine reductase that converts hydroxylamine to ammonium. Experiments were performed on Nautilia profundicola strain AmH, whose genome sequence led to the reverse-HURM pathway proposal. N. profundicola produced ammonium from nitrate, which was assimilated into biomass. Furthermore, genes encoding the catalysts of the reverse-HURM pathway were preferentially expressed during growth of N. profundicola on nitrate as an electron acceptor relative to cultures grown on polysulfide as an electron acceptor. Finally, nitrate-grown cells of N. profundicola were able to rapidly and stoichiometrically convert high concentrations of hydroxylamine to ammonium in resting cell assays. These experiments are consistent with the reverse-HURM pathway and a free hydroxylamine intermediate, but could not definitively exclude direct nitrite reduction to ammonium by the reverse-HURM with hydroxylamine as an off-pathway product. N. profundicola and related organisms are models for a new pathway of nitrate ammonification that may have global impact due to the wide distribution of these organisms in hypoxic environments and symbiotic or pathogenic associations with animal hosts. PMID:23847604

  13. Experimental evidence that RNA recombination occurs in the Japanese encephalitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C.-K.; Chen, W.-J.

    2009-11-25

    Due to the lack of a proofreading function and error-repairing ability of genomic RNA, accumulated mutations are known to be a force driving viral evolution in the genus Flavivirus, including the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus. Based on sequencing data, RNA recombination was recently postulated to be another factor associated with genomic variations in these viruses. We herein provide experimental evidence to demonstrate the occurrence of RNA recombination in the JE virus using two local pure clones (T1P1-S1 and CJN-S1) respectively derived from the local strains, T1P1 and CJN. Based on results from a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay on the C/preM junction comprising a fragment of 868 nucleotides (nt 10-877), the recombinant progeny virus was primarily formed in BHK-21 cells that had been co-infected with the two clones used in this study. Nine of 20 recombinant forms of the JE virus had a crossover in the nt 123-323 region. Sequencing data derived from these recombinants revealed that no nucleotide deletion or insertion occurred in this region favoring crossovers, indicating that precisely, not aberrantly, homologous recombination was involved. With site-directed mutagenesis, three stem-loop secondary structures were destabilized and re-stabilized in sequence, leading to changes in the frequency of recombination. This suggests that the conformation, not the free energy, of the secondary structure is important in modulating RNA recombination of the virus. It was concluded that because RNA recombination generates genetic diversity in the JE virus, this must be considered particularly in studies of viral evolution, epidemiology, and possible vaccine safety.

  14. Supramolecular polymerisation in water; elucidating the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond interactions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization by IR and UV spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering, video files of optical microscopy imaging. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sm02843d Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Christianus M. A.; Baker, Matthew B.; Pijpers, Imke A. B.; Lafleur, René P. M.; Albertazzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the self-assembly of small molecules in water is crucial for the development of responsive, biocompatible soft materials. Here, a family of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivatives that comprise a BTA moiety connected to an amphiphilic chain is synthesised with the aim to elucidate the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions in the self-assembly of these BTAs. The amphiphilic chain consists of an alkyl chain with a length of 10, 11, or 12 methylene units, connected to a tetraethylene glycol (at the periphery). The results show that an undecyl spacer is the minimum length required for these BTAs to self-assemble into supramolecular polymers. Interestingly, exchange studies reveal only minor differences in exchange rates between BTAs containing undecyl or dodecyl spacers. Additionally, IR spectroscopy provides the first experimental evidence that hydrogen-bonding is operative and contributes to the stabilisation of the supramolecular polymers in water. PMID:26892482

  15. pH Transients in hydroxyapatite chromatography columns-experimental evidence and phenomenological modeling.

    PubMed

    Bankston, Theresa E; Dattolo, Laura; Carta, Giorgio

    2010-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) columns, widely used for chromatographic separation of proteins and other biomolecules because of their unique selectivity and ability to resolve complex mixtures, exhibit limited stability at acidic conditions requiring careful control of pH. Even with buffered solutions, however, unintended pH transients can occur when the salt concentration varies. For example, the pH temporarily decreases below the feed value when the salt concentration increases and increases above the feed value when the salt concentration is decreased. The intensity and duration of these transients depend on the particular buffer used and the magnitude of the salt concentration step, but in extreme cases the pH can drop by as much as 1.5 pH units creating conditions where the HAP stability is potentially compromised. This work examines the mechanisms leading to pH transients in HAP columns generated by salt steps. The pH excursions are similar to those observed for weak cation exchange columns, but are accompanied by a transient evolution of phosphate which temporarily decreases below the feed value when the salt concentration is increased and increases sharply when the salt concentration is reduced before returning to the feed value. A phenomenological model is developed to describe this behavior by considering the reversible uptake of sodium ions by the P-sites and binding of phosphate ions by the C-sites. The interplay of these two adsorption mechanisms results in complex pH patterns that are consistent with those observed experimentally. In addition to helping understand the underlying mechanisms, the model also provides a useful tool to predict the effects of different buffers and salt concentration and develop corrective measures that can reduce the intensity and duration of the pH transients such as the addition of unretained co-buffers. PMID:20193952

  16. A Four-Step and Four-Criteria Approach for Evaluating Evidence of Dose Addition in Chemical Mixture Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose addition is the most frequently-used component-based approach for predicting dose response for a mixture of toxicologically-similar chemicals and for statistical evaluation of whether the mixture response is consistent with dose additivity and therefore predictable from the ...

  17. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture are prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. However, recent advances in statistically-based experimental design have made it easier to evaluate interactions involving many chemicals...

  18. Evidence of apoptotic cell death after experimental traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rink, A.; Fung, K. M.; Trojanowski, J. Q.; Lee, V. M.; Neugebauer, E.; McIntosh, T. K.

    1995-01-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in many developmental and pathological processes of the central nervous system. However, the role of apoptosis in traumatic brain injury has not been determined. Using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) method, we detected many cells with extensive DNA fragmentation in different regions of the brains of rats subjected to experimental traumatic brain injury. Two types of TUNEL-positive cells were demonstrated by light and electron microscopy, including type I cells that displayed morphological features of necrotic cell death and type II cells that displayed morphological features of classic apoptotic cell death. TUNEL-positive cells were detectable for up to 72 hours after the initial injury. Gel electrophoresis of DNA extracted from affected areas of the injured brain containing both type I and II cells revealed only internucleosomal fragmentation at 185-bp intervals, a feature originally described in apoptotic cell death. These data suggest that apoptosis, in addition to necrotic cell death, occurs after traumatic brain injury, and that internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA may be associated with certain types of necrotic cell death. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7495282

  19. The neuronal norepinephrine transporter in experimental heart failure: evidence for a posttranscriptional downregulation.

    PubMed

    Backs, J; Haunstetter, A; Gerber, S H; Metz, J; Borst, M M; Strasser, R H; Kübler, W; Haass, M

    2001-03-01

    An impairment of norepinephrine (NE) re-uptake by the neuronal NE transporter (NET) has been shown to contribute to the increased cardiac net-release of NE in congestive heart failure (CHF). The present study investigated which mechanisms are involved in the impairment of NET. Rats with supracoronary aortic banding characterized by myocardial hypertrophy, elevated left ventricular end diastolic pressures and severe pulmonary congestion were used as an experimental model for CHF. Compared to sham-operated controls, aortic-banded rats had enhanced plasma NE concentrations and decreased cardiac NE stores. In isolated perfused hearts of aortic-banded rats, functional impairment of NET was indicated by a 37% reduction in [(3)H]-NE-uptake. In addition, pharmacological blockade of NET with desipramine led to a markedly attenuated increase in the overflow of endogenous NE from hearts of aortic-banded rats. Determination of cardiac NET protein and of NET mRNA in the left stellate ganglion by [(3)H]-desipramine binding and competitive RT-PCR, respectively, revealed a 41% reduction of binding sites but no difference in gene expression. The density of sympathetic nerve fibers within the heart was unchanged, as shown by glyoxylic acid-induced histofluorescence. In conclusion, as impairment of intracardiac NE re-uptake by a reduction of NET binding sites is neither mediated by a decreased NET gene expression nor by a loss of noradrenergic nerve terminals, a posttranscriptional downregulation of NET per neuron is suggested in CHF. PMID:11181015

  20. Processed meat and colorectal cancer: a review of epidemiologic and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Raphaëlle L.; Pierre, Fabrice; Corpet, Denis E.

    2008-01-01

    Processed meat intake may be involved in the etiology of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. The epidemiologic studies published to date conclude that the excess risk in the highest category of processed meat-eaters is comprised between 20 and 50% compared with non-eaters. In addition, the excess risk per gram of intake is clearly higher than that of fresh red meat. Several hypotheses, which are mainly based on studies carried out on red meat, may explain why processed meat intake is linked to cancer risk. Those that have been tested experimentally are (i) that high-fat diets could promote carcinogenesis via insulin resistance or fecal bile acids; (ii) that cooking meat at a high temperature forms carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (iii) that carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds are formed in meat and endogenously; (iv) that heme iron in red meat can promote carcinogenesis because it increases cell proliferation in the mucosa, through lipoperoxidation and/or cytotoxicity of fecal water. Nitrosation might increase the toxicity of heme in cured products. Solving this puzzle is a challenge that would permit to reduce cancer load by changing the processes rather than by banning processed meat. PMID:18444144

  1. Evidence-Based Communication Practices for Children with Visual Impairments and Additional Disabilities: An Examination of Single-Subject Design Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.; Grimmett, Eric S.; Summers, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This review examines practices for building effective communication strategies for children with visual impairments, including those with additional disabilities, that have been tested by single-subject design methodology. The authors found 30 studies that met the search criteria and grouped intervention strategies to align any evidence of the…

  2. Racemic R,S-venlafaxine hydrochloride-DNA interaction: Experimental and computational evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hadidi, Saba; Ghasemian, Zeinab; Taherpour, Avat(Arman)

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of racemic R,S-venlafaxine hydrochloride (rac-VEN) drug with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) was studied using various physico-chemical techniques and molecular docking at simulated physiological conditions (pH = 7.4). The fluorescence study shows that ct-DNA interacted with rac-VEN and quenched its intrinsic fluorescence in a static quenching process. These results are further supported by UV-Vis spectra. The binding constant of rac-VEN with ct-DNA (0.57 × 104) obtained from the spectroscopic techniques, which is more in keeping with the groove binding with DNA. Furthermore, the competition experiment using Hoechst33258 indicated that rac-VEN may bind to ct-DNA by a minor groove binding mode. In addition, iodide quenching effect on the fluorescence of rac-VEN before and after the interaction with ct-DNA is another evidence to groove binding. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the binding reaction. Molecular simulation studies carried out by using the AutoDock4 and Spartan10 programs. From the best docking map, we found that R and S-isomers fit in the A6T7T8/T19A18A17 region in minor groove of B-DNA. Finally, these results indicated that the docking of S-VEN-B-DNA is more stable than R-VEN-B-DNA.

  3. Formation of Quartz-Carbonate Veins: Evidence From Experimental Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Brine-Rock System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecky, D. R.; Kaszuba, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Quartz-carbonate veins are common in a variety of moderate temperature hydrothermal systems and ore deposits. Associated fluid inclusions have a wide range of compositions, including liquid carbon dioxide fillings. Examination of chemical and physical conditions which result precipitation of quartz and carbonate in veins raises several key questions about multiphase fluid processes and reaction rates. We have been experimentally investigating physical-chemical reaction processes of mixed brine-carbon dioxide fluids for the shallow crust. Synthetic arkose (microcline + oligoclase + quartz + biotite) plus argillaceous shale were reacted with 5.5 molal NaCl brine. The system was held at 200 C and 200 bars for 32 days to approach steady state, then injected with carbon dioxide and allowed to react for an additional 45 days. In a parallel experiment, the system was allowed to react for 77 days without injection of carbon dioxide. Trace ions initially absent from NaCl brine appeared in solution at mM (K, Ca, and silica) to uM (Mg, Al, Fe and Mn) quantities, reflecting reaction of brine with rock. Without carbon dioxide injection, the silica concentration (2.4 mM) was stable below calculated quartz solubility (3.9 mM). Injection of carbon dioxide resulted in decreased pH and increased silica concentration to a level near calculated chalcedony solubility (5.4 mM). Dissolution of silicate minerals is apparently coupled to the acidity, and concomitant inhibition of the precipitation of quartz (and other silicates). A significant increase in concentration of trace metals is consistent with in-situ pH decrease and increased carbon dioxide dissolved in brine. Multi-phase fluid reaction relationships between supercritical carbon dioxide and brine-rock systems allow formation of carbonate vein precipitates in substantial quantities. Brine and continued rock reactions provide a substantial reservoir for Ca, Mg and Fe components. A separate carbon dioxide liquid allows

  4. Pursuing Quality Evidence: Applying Single-Subject Quality Indicators to Non-Experimental Qualitative Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stodden, Robert A.; Yamamoto, Kathryn K.; Folk, Eric; Kong, Eran; Otsuji, Derek N.

    2013-01-01

    The need for quality evidence in support of strategies used while working with persons with autism and intellectual disability (ID) has been long been recognized by researchers and practitioners. The authors reviewed and applied a number of evidence-based indicators, developed through the "What Works Clearinghouse" (WWC), to the conduct…

  5. On the early emergence of reverse transcription: theoretical basis and experimental evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Valverde, V.; Hernandez, G.; Gariglio, P.; Fox, G. E.; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) was first discovered as an essential catalyst in the biological cycle of retroviruses. However, in the past years evidence has accumulated showing that RTs are involved in a surprisingly large number of RNA-mediated transpositional events that include both viral and nonviral genetic entities. Although it is probable that some RT-bearing genetic elements like the different types of AIDS viruses and the mammalian LINE family have arisen in recent geological times, the possibility that reverse transcription first took place in the early Archean is supported by (1) the hypothesis that RNA preceded DNA as cellular genetic material; (2) the existence of homologous regions of the subunit tau of the E. coli DNA polymerase III with the simian immunodeficiency virus RT, the hepatitis B virus RT, and the beta' subunit of the E. coli RNA polymerase (McHenry et al. 1988); (3) the presence of several conserved motifs, including a 14-amino-acid segment that consists of an Asp-Asp pair flanked by hydrophobic amino acids, which are found in all RTs and in most cellular and viral RNA polymerases. However, whether extant RTs descend from the primitive polymerase involved in the RNA-to-DNA transition remains unproven. Substrate specificity of the AMV and HIV-1 RTs can be modified in the presence of Mn2+, a cation which allows them to add ribonucleotides to an oligo (dG) primer in a template-dependent reaction. This change in specificity is comparable to that observed under similar conditions in other nucleic acid polymerases. This experimentally induced change in RT substrate specificity may explain previous observations on the misincorporation of ribonucleotides by the Maloney murine sarcoma virus RT in the minus and plus DNA of this retrovirus (Chen and Temin 1980). Our results also suggest that HIV-infected macrophages and T-cell cells may contain mixed polynucleotides containing both ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides. The evolutionary significance of these

  6. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ΔLK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4

  7. Experimental evidence for asymmetric mate preference and aggression: behavioral interactions in a woodrat (Neotoma) hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Female mate preferences may be under strong selection in zones of contact between closely related species because of greater variation in available mates and the potential costs of hybridization. We studied female mate preferences experimentally in a zone of secondary contact between Desert and Bryant’s Woodrat (Neotoma lepida and N. bryanti) in the southern foothills of the Sierra Nevada of California. We tested female preference for conspecific versus heterospecific males in paired choice trials in which females could interact freely with males, but males could not interact directly with each other. We compared preferences of females from both allopatric and sympatric sites. Results We did not find evidence of the process of reinforcement as assortative preferences were not stronger in sympatry than in allopatry. Mate preferences, however, were asymmetric, with N. lepida females mating preferentially with conspecifics and N. bryanti females showing no preference by species. Sympatric females were less likely to mate than allopatric females, due in part to an increase in aggressive interactions. However, even in the absence of aggression, courtship led to mating less often in sympatric females, suggesting they were choosier or had lower sexual motivation than allopatric females. Conclusions Patterns of mate choice in this woodrat system appear to be strongly impacted by body size and aggressive behavior. In particular, females of the smaller-bodied species rarely interact with the relatively large heterospecific males. In contrast females of the larger-bodied species accept the relatively small heterospecific males. For sympatric animals, rates of aggression were markedly higher than for allopatric animals and reduced affiliative and reproductive behavior in our trials. Sympatric animals are larger and more aggressive, traits that are likely under strong ecological selection across the sharp resource gradient that characterizes the contact zone

  8. Rare Earth Element - Humic Acid Interaction: Experimental Evidence for Kinetic and Equilibrium Fractionation in Aqueous Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonke, J. E.; Salters, V. J.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is well known for it's strong binding capacity for trace metals. In order to better predict the role of DOM in the speciation and transport of trace metals in the environment we coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE), a molecular separation technique, to a Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (SF-ICP-MS). The combination of these two techniques allows for the study of non-labile metal speciation in aquatic samples. By separating Rare Earth Element (REE) complexes with EDTA and Humic Acid's (i.e. ligand competition) we have been able to determine conditional equilibrium binding constants (Kc) and kinetic rate constants for all 14 REE's with Humic (HA) and Fulvic Acids (FA) as a function of pH (6-9) and ionic strength (IS, 0.01-0.1 mol/L). Assuming a 1:1 binding mechanism, logKc values for REE-FA varied from 9.0 (La) to 10.5 (Lu) at pH 6, 0.1 mol/L IS, and 11.7 (La) to 14.6 (Lu) at pH 9, 0.1 mol/L IS. LogKc values for REE-HA were 10.6 (La) to 12.2 (Lu) at pH 6, 0.1 mol/L IS and 13.2 (La) to 16.5 (Lu) at pH 9, 0.1 mol/L IS. Slightly higher values for Kc were obtained at 0.01 mol/L IS. The general observations of stronger REE-HA binding compared to REE-FA, and stronger binding with increasing pH and decreasing IS correlate with our current understanding of metal-DOM interactions (1). Both Kc's as well as kinetic rate constants increase with increasing REE mass number (decreasing ionic radius); a reflection of the well-known lanthanide contraction. This is the first comprehensive metal binding dataset between REE and DOM, and the first experimental evidence for differential equilibrium and kinetic binding behavior between REE's and DOM. The 30-1000 fold increase in binding strength of heavy REE's with DOM provides for a an equilibrium fractionation mechanism that may explain features of the global geochemical REE cycle such as fractionation related to weathering, estuarine mixing, and REE scavenging in the deep ocean

  9. Experimental evidence for enhanced top-down control of freshwater macrophytes with nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Elisabeth S; Nolet, Bart A

    2014-11-01

    The abundance of primary producers is controlled by bottom-up and top-down forces. Despite the fact that there is consensus that the abundance of freshwater macrophytes is strongly influenced by the availability of resources for plant growth, the importance of top-down control by vertebrate consumers is debated, because field studies yield contrasting results. We hypothesized that these bottom-up and top-down forces may interact, and that consumer impact on macrophyte abundance depends on the nutrient status of the water body. To test this hypothesis, experimental ponds with submerged vegetation containing a mixture of species were subjected to a fertilization treatment and we introduced consumers (mallard ducks, for 8 days) on half of the ponds in a full factorial design. Over the whole 66-day experiment fertilized ponds became dominated by Elodea nuttallii and ponds without extra nutrients by Chara globularis. Nutrient addition significantly increased plant N and P concentrations. There was a strong interactive effect of duck presence and pond nutrient status: macrophyte biomass was reduced (by 50%) after the presence of the ducks on fertilized ponds, but not in the unfertilized ponds. We conclude that nutrient availability interacts with top-down control of submerged vegetation. This may be explained by higher plant palatability at higher nutrient levels, either by a higher plant nutrient concentration or by a shift towards dominance of more palatable plant species, resulting in higher consumer pressure. Including nutrient availability may offer a framework to explain part of the contrasting field observations of consumer control of macrophyte abundance. PMID:25194349

  10. An Empirically Derived Approach to the Latent Structure of the Adult Attachment Interview: Additional Convergent and Discriminant Validity Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.; Marks, Michael J.; Fraley, R. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Building on studies examining the latent structure of attachment-related individual differences as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) via Principal Components Analysis, the current report further explores the validity of four AAI dimensions reported by Haydon, Roisman, and Burt (in press): dismissing states of mind, preoccupied states of mind, and inferred negative experience with maternal and paternal caregivers. Study 1 reports evidence of distinctive cognitive correlates of dismissing v. preoccupied states of mind with reaction time in an attachment Stroop task and the valence of endorsed self-descriptors, respectively. Study 2 replicates prior meta-analytic findings of generally trivial convergence between state of mind dimensions and self-reported avoidance and anxiety (i.e., Roisman, Holland, et al., 2007). Study 3 contrastively demonstrates moderate empirical overlap between inferred experience—but not state of mind—AAI scales and self-reported avoidance and anxiety when the latter were assessed at the level of specific caregivers. Taken together, these findings add to accumulating evidence that an empirically-driven approach to scaling adults on AAI dimensions (Haydon et al., in press; Roisman et al., 2007) aids in identifying theoretically anticipated and distinctive affective, behavioral, and cognitive correlates of dismissing versus preoccupied states of mind. PMID:21838649

  11. EXPERIMENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY : II. EFFECT OF THE ADDITION OF HEALTHY MICE TO A POPULATION SUFFERING FROM MOUSE TYPHOID.

    PubMed

    Amoss, H L

    1922-06-30

    1. A kind of mouse village was set up into which was introduced a small number of mice fed on a culture of so called mouse typhoid (Bacillus pestis cavice of the Bacillus paratyphosus B group) bacillus. The spread of the infection so induced to the cages, or "homes," of the other mice was left to accident through the attendant who fed the animals and cleaned the cages. That this means was likely to be sufficient was deduced from the epidemic reported by Lynch. A spot map was kept throughout the experiments which extended from 1919 into 1922. 2. The first effect of the exposure of normal mice to a much smaller number of mice fed on the culture is to set up a sporadic, not an epidemic outbreak of mouse typhoid. This is the regularly recurring incident of the experiment as shown by low mortality and low cage attack rate. Such a sporadic prevalence is self-limited in time. 3. The introduction of fresh, normal mice into a community in which sporadic deaths are occurring leads regularly, not to the further extension of the sporadic deaths, but to an epidemic spread, as shown by high mortality and high cage attack rate. The epidemic begins with deaths among the new mice, but extends to the old mice which succumb later. The spread ceases and the wave subsides before all the mice have succumbed. A state of equilibrium between the infecting bacillus and the surviving mice is reached; no more deaths occur. The epidemic outbreak, therefore, is also self-limited in time. 4. If, now, another new addition of normal mice is brought into the potentially infected community, the events are reenacted; deaths occur among the new, another epidemic wave sweeps through the population, again claiming victims among the previous survivors. Through the replacement of the destroyed mice with fresh, normal mice, epidemic wave after wave is produced, until certain groups of old survivors are entirely wiped out. There seems to be no limit to this process, as there will always be survivors at

  12. Soil N2O fluxes along an elevation gradient of tropical montane forests under experimental nitrogen and phosphorus addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Anke; Matson, Amanda; Corre, Marife; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-10-01

    Nutrient deposition to tropical forests is increasing, which could affect soil fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), a powerful greenhouse gas. We assessed the effects of 35-56 months of moderate nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions on soil N2O fluxes and net soil N-cycling rates, and quantified the relative contributions of nitrification and denitrification to N2O fluxes. In 2008, a nutrient manipulation experiment was established along an elevation gradient (1000, 2000 and 3000 m) of montane forests in southern Ecuador. Treatments included control, N, P and N+P addition (with additions of 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 10 kg P ha-1 yr-1). Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured using static, vented chambers and N cycling was determined using the buried bag method. Measurements showed that denitrification was the main N2O source at all elevations, but that annual N2O emissions from control plots were low, and decreased along the elevation gradient (0.57 ± 0.26 to 0.05 ± 0.04 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1). We attributed the low fluxes to our sites’ conservative soil N cycling as well as gaseous N losses possibly being dominated by N2. Contrary to the first 21 months of the experiment, N addition did not affect N2O fluxes during the 35-56 month period, possibly due to low soil moisture contents during this time. With P addition, N2O fluxes and mineral N concentrations decreased during Months 35-56, presumably because plant P limitations were alleviated, increasing plant N uptake. Nitrogen plus phosphorus addition showed similar trends to N addition, but less pronounced given the counteracting effects of P addition. The combined results from this study (Months 1-21 and 35-56) showed that effects of N and P addition on soil N2O fluxes were not linear with time of exposure, highlighting the importance of long-term studies.

  13. Geochemical and mineralogical evidence for Sahara and Sahel dust additions to Quaternary soils on Lanzarote, eastern Canary Islands, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Skipp, G.; Prospero, J.M.; Patterson, D.; Bettis, E. Arthur, III

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the most important source of dust in the world today, and dust storms are frequent on the nearby Canary Islands. Previous workers have inferred that the Sahara is the most important source of dust to Canary Islands soils, with little contribution from the Sahel region. Soils overlying a late Quaternary basalt flow on Lanzarote, Canary Islands, contain, in addition to volcanic minerals, quartz and mica, exotic to the island's bedrock. Kaolinite in the soils also likely has an exotic origin. Trace-element geochemistry shows that the soils are derived from varying proportions of locally derived basalt and African dust. Major-element geochemistry, clay mineralogy and interpretation of satellite imagery suggest that dust additions to the Canary Islands come not only from the Sahara Desert, but also from the Sahel region. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: evidence for a graft-versus-autoimmunity effect.

    PubMed

    Van Wijmeersch, Bart; Sprangers, Ben; Rutgeerts, Omer; Lenaerts, Caroline; Landuyt, Willy; Waer, Mark; Billiau, An D; Dubois, Bénédicte

    2007-06-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is being explored in the treatment of severe multiple sclerosis (MS), and is based on the concept of "resetting" the immune system. The use of allogeneic HSCT may offer additional advantages, such as the replacement of the autoreactive immune compartment by healthy allogeneic cells and development of a graft-versus-autoimmunity (GVA) effect. However, in clinical practice, the genetic susceptibility to MS of allogeneic stem cell donors is generally unknown, and GVA may therefore be an important mechanism of action. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains were used to determine the roles of genetic susceptibility, level of donor-chimerism, and alloreactivity in the therapeutic potential of syngeneic versus allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) for EAE. After transplantation and EAE induction, animals were evaluated for clinical EAE and ex vivo myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific proliferation. Early after BMT, both syngeneic and allogeneic chimeras were protected from EAE development. On the longer term, allogeneic but not syngeneic BMT conferred protection, but this required high-level donor-chimerism from EAE-resistant donors. Importantly, when EAE-susceptible donors were used, robust protection from EAE was obtained when active alloreactivity, induced by donor lymphocyte infusions, was provided. Our findings indicate the requirement of a sufficient level of donor-chimerism from a nonsusceptible donor in the therapeutic effect of allogeneic BMT. Importantly, the data indicate that, independently of genetic susceptibility, active alloreactivity is associated with a GVA effect, thereby providing new evidence to support the potential role of allogeneic BMT in the treatment of MS. PMID:17531772

  15. Chemopreventive properties of 3,3'-diindolylmethane in breast cancer: evidence from experimental and human studies.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Ho, Emily; Strom, Meghan B

    2016-07-01

    Diet is a modifiable factor associated with the risk of several cancers, with convincing evidence showing a link between diet and breast cancer. The role of bioactive compounds of food origin, including those found in cruciferous vegetables, is an active area of research in cancer chemoprevention. This review focuses on 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), the major bioactive indole in crucifers. Research of the cancer-preventive activity of DIM has yielded basic mechanistic, animal, and human trial data. Further, this body of evidence is largely supported by observational studies. Bioactive DIM has demonstrated chemopreventive activity in all stages of breast cancer carcinogenesis. This review describes current evidence related to the metabolism and mechanisms of DIM involved in the prevention of breast cancer. Importantly, this review also focuses on current evidence from human observational and intervention trials that have contributed to a greater understanding of exposure estimates that will inform recommendations for DIM intake. PMID:27261275

  16. Experimental evaluation of water mist with metal chloride additives for suppressing CH4/air cup-burner flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianghong; Cong, Beihua

    2013-06-01

    In order to investigate the fire suppression effectiveness of water mist with metal chloride additives, ultrafine water mists of these salts with diameters about 10μm were introduced into CH4/air non-premixed flame in the cup burner. Results showed that these droplets hard to make itself to the flame front under the cup burner flow conditions functioned as a carrier of the vaporized solid particles or its decomposed materials. The metal chloride improved fire suppression efficacy of water mist which were affected by the type and concentration of metal chloride. On a mass basis, there is a fire suppression effectiveness relationship of MgCl2additive limits exist due to the associated limiting vapour pressure of the additive.

  17. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Appear in Grey Matter Additionally to White Matter Lesions during Experimental Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wierinckx, Anne; Bol, John G. J. M.; Binnekade, Rob; Tilders, Fred J. H.; Van Dam, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been mainly attributed to white matter (WM) pathology. However, recent evidence indicated the presence of grey matter (GM) lesions. One of the principal mediators of inflammatory processes is interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which is known to play a role in MS pathogenesis. It is unknown whether IL-1β is solely present in WM or also in GM lesions. Using an experimental MS model, we questioned whether IL-1β and the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) are present in GM in addition to affected WM regions. Methods The expression of IL-1β and IL-1ra in chronic-relapsing EAE (cr-EAE) rats was examined using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Rats were sacrificed at the peak of the first disease phase, the trough of the remission phase, and at the peak of the relapse. Histopathological characteristics of CNS lesions were studied using immunohistochemistry for PLP, CD68 and CD3 and Oil-Red O histochemistry. Results IL-1β and IL-ra expression appears to a similar extent in affected GM and WM regions in the brain and spinal cord of cr-EAE rats, particularly in perivascular and periventricular locations. IL-1β and IL-1ra expression was dedicated to macrophages and/or activated microglial cells, at sites of starting demyelination. The time-dependent expression of IL-1β and IL-1ra revealed that within the spinal cord IL-1β and IL-1ra mRNA remained present throughout the disease, whereas in the brain their expression disappeared during the relapse. Conclusions The appearance of IL-1β expressing cells in GM within the CNS during cr-EAE may explain the occurrence of several clinical deficits present in EAE and MS which cannot be attributed solely to the presence of IL-1β in WM. Endogenously produced IL-1ra seems not capable to counteract IL-1β-induced effects. We put forward that IL-1β may behold promise as a target to address GM, in addition to WM, related pathology in MS. PMID:24376764

  18. Metal-free α-Amination of Secondary Amines: Computational and Experimental Evidence for Azaquinone Methide and Azomethine Ylide Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, Arne; Richers, Matthew T.; Platonova, Alena Yu.; Zhang, Chen; Seidel, Daniel; Houk, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed a combined computational and experimental study to elucidate the mechanism of a metal-free α-amination of secondary amines. Calculations predicted azaquinone methides and azomethine ylides as the reactive intermediates and showed that iminium ions are unlikely to participate in these transformations. These results were confirmed by experimental deuterium labeling studies and the successful trapping of the postulated azomethine ylide and azaquinone methide intermediates. In addition, computed barrier heights for the rate-limiting step correlate qualitatively with experimental findings. PMID:23517448

  19. Thinking strings: additional evidence for personal ornament use in the Middle Stone Age at Blombos Cave, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Vanhaeren, Marian; d'Errico, Francesco; van Niekerk, Karen L; Henshilwood, Christopher S; Erasmus, Rudolph M

    2013-06-01

    Here we report on newly identified beads recovered from four Middle Stone Age levels at Blombos Cave and, in particular, on a cluster of 24 perforated Nassarius kraussianus shells that probably originate from a single beadwork. Contextual information, morphometric, technological and use-wear analysis of the 68 published beads and those recently found, coupled with experimental reproduction of wear patterns, allow us to reconstruct the most probable way in which the N. kraussianus shells were strung. The results reveal unexpected regularities but also variability through the various levels that we interpret as resulting from changes in beadwork manufacture and design over time. The Blombos Cave beads may document one of the first examples of changes in social norms affecting the production and design of symbolic material culture. PMID:23498114

  20. Counter-intuitive experimental evidence on the initiation of radical crack in ceramic thin films at the atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Chunqiang Li, Zhipeng; Lin, Songsheng

    2015-10-15

    The basic issue related to radial crack in ceramic thin films has received considerable attention due to the fact that the radial crack plays an important role in evaluating the toughness properties of ceramic materials. In this work, an atomic-scale new experimental evidence is clearly presented to reveal the counter-intuitive initiation, the nucleation and the propagation mechanism of the radial crack in Al-Cr-N ceramic thin films.

  1. Towards the evidence of a purely spatial Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in images: measurement scheme and first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaux, F.; Mougin-Sisini, J.; Moreau, P. A.; Lantz, E.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a scheme to evidence the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox for photons produced by spontaneous down conversion, from measurement of purely spatial correlations of photon positions both in the near- and in the far-field. Experimentally, quantum correlations have been measured in the far-field of parametric fluorescence created in a type II BBO crystal. Imaging is performed in the photon counting regime with an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera.

  2. Counter-intuitive experimental evidence on the initiation of radical crack in ceramic thin films at the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Li, Zhipeng; Lin, Songsheng

    2015-10-01

    The basic issue related to radial crack in ceramic thin films has received considerable attention due to the fact that the radial crack plays an important role in evaluating the toughness properties of ceramic materials. In this work, an atomic-scale new experimental evidence is clearly presented to reveal the counter-intuitive initiation, the nucleation and the propagation mechanism of the radial crack in Al-Cr-N ceramic thin films.

  3. Additional evidence for a dual-strategy model of reasoning: Probabilistic reasoning is more invariant than reasoning about logical validity.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Brisson, Janie; de Chantal, Pier-Luc

    2015-11-01

    One of the major debates concerning the nature of inferential reasoning is between counterexample-based strategies such as mental model theory and the statistical strategies underlying probabilistic models. The dual-strategy model proposed by Verschueren, Schaeken, and d'Ydewalle (2005a, 2005b) suggests that people might have access to both kinds of strategies. One of the postulates of this approach is that statistical strategies correspond to low-cost, intuitive modes of evaluation, whereas counterexample strategies are higher-cost and more variable in use. We examined this hypothesis by using a deductive-updating paradigm. The results of Study 1 showed that individual differences in strategy use predict different levels of deductive updating on inferences about logical validity. Study 2 demonstrated no such variation when explicitly probabilistic inferences were examined. Study 3 showed that presenting updating problems with probabilistic inferences modified performance on subsequent problems using logical validity, whereas the opposite was not true. These results provide clear evidence that the processes used to make probabilistic inferences are less subject to variation than those used to make inferences of logical validity. PMID:26148720

  4. Experimental and theoretical evidence for the chaotic dynamics of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agop, M.; Dimitriu, D. G.; Niculescu, O.; Poll, E.; Radu, V.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental results on the formation, dynamics and evolution towards chaos of complex space charge structures that emerge in front of a positively biased electrode immersed in a quiescent plasma. In certain experimental conditions, we managed to obtain the so-called multiple double layers (MDLs) with non-concentric configuration. Our experiments show that the interactions between each MDL's constituent entities are held responsible for the complex dynamics and eventually for its transition to chaos through cascades of spatio-temporal sub-harmonic bifurcations. Further, we build a theoretical model based on the fractal approximation (scale relativity theory) in order to reproduce the experimental results (plasma self-structuring and scenario of evolution to chaos). Comparing the experimental results with the theoretical ones, we observe a good correlation between them.

  5. Less is often more, but not always: additional evidence that familiarity breeds contempt and a call for future research.

    PubMed

    Norton, Michael I; Frost, Jeana H; Ariely, Dan

    2013-12-01

    Ullrich, Krueger, Brod, and Groschupf (2013)-using a replication of the trait paradigm from Norton, Frost, and Ariely (2007)-suggest that less information does not always equal greater liking. We first ground the current debate in a larger historical debate in social psychology regarding the merits of configural versus algebraic models of person perception. We next review (a) related research that has suggested that more information can in some cases lead to more liking and (b) a large body of "real world" data-from friendships, daters, married couples, employment, celebrities, and politics-that suggests that more information often leads to less liking. We then provide an additional replication of our "less is more" effect, using a slight variation of the trait-list paradigm. The existing data suggest a need for further integrative explorations of when familiarity leads to contempt or liking or has no effect. PMID:24295381

  6. Phylogeny of the Heelwalkers (Insecta: Mantophasmatodea) based on mtDNA sequences, with evidence for additional taxa in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Jakob; Klass, Klaus-Dieter; Picker, Mike D; Buder, Gerda

    2008-05-01

    We examined the phylogeny of Mantophasmatodea from southern Africa (South Africa, Namibia) using approx. 1300 bp of mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the genes encoding COI and 16S. The taxon sample comprised multiple specimens from eight described species (Namaquaphasma ookiepense, Austrophasma rawsonvillense, A. caledonense, A. gansbaaiense, Lobatophasma redelinghuysense, Hemilobophasma montaguense, Karoophasma botterkloofense, K. biedouwense) and four undescribed species of Austrophasmatidae; three specimens of Sclerophasma paresisense (Mantophasmatidae); and two specimens of Praedatophasma maraisi and one of Tyrannophasma gladiator (not yet convincingly assigned to any family). For outgroup comparison a broad selection from hemimetabolous insect orders was included. Equally weighted parsimony analyses of the combined COI+16S data sets with gaps in 16S scored as a fifth character state supported Austrophasmatidae and all species and genera of Mantophasmatodea as being monophyletic. Most species were highly supported with 98-100% bootstrap/7-39 Bremer support (BS), but K. biedouwense had moderate support (87/4) and A. caledonense low support (70/1). Mantophasmatodea, Austrophasmatidae, and a clade Tyrannophasma gladiator+Praedatophasma maraisi were all strongly supported (99-100/12-25), while relationships among the two latter clades and Mantophasmatidae remain ambiguous. Concerning the relationships among genera of Austrophasmatidae, support values are moderately high for some nodes, but not significant for others. We additionally calculated the partitioned BS values of COI and 16S for all nodes in the strict consensus of the combined tree. COI and 16S are highly congruent at the species level as well as at the base of Mantophasmatodea, but congruence is poor for most intergeneric relationships. In forthcoming studies, deeper relationships in the order should be additionally explored by nuclear genes, such as 18S and 28S, for a reduced sample of specimens

  7. Oblique fault systems crossing the Seattle Basin: Geophysical evidence for additional shallow fault systems in the central Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Chris G.; Keranen, Katie M.

    2012-03-01

    Upper plate seismicity in the Puget Lowland is more broadly distributed than mapped fault systems and presents a conundrum for understanding the active tectonics of the region. Although many previous studies have mapped faulting in the Puget Lowland from subsurface geophysical data, many of these efforts have focused specifically on mapping the structure of the Seattle Fault Zone and the South Whidbey Island Fault. The thick glacial sediments and extensive water bodies may conceal additional active faults away from these major structures. We map fault networks in Quaternary sediments broadly throughout the central Puget Lowland using existing marine multichannel seismic reflection data sets with widely distributed profiles to extend the results of previous work. We identify a NE-SW zone of recent high-angle faulting and shallow sediment deformation crossing the Seattle Uplift and the Seattle Basin that segments the Seattle Fault Zone and is distinct from previously mapped fault systems. Faults in this zone cut or deform sediments at the seafloor, and the zone trends across the central Puget Lowland at an oblique angle to major regional structures. Two additional zones of faulting trend NW-SE and cut through the Seattle Basin and the Kingston Arch, respectively. Aeromagnetic lineations extend the NE-SW trend of deformation across the Seattle Uplift and connect deformation of shallow sediment in the Puget Sound with deformation of shallow sediment in the Hood Canal. These oblique fault structures may partially control the wide distribution of seismicity within the central Puget Lowland and should be considered in seismic hazard assessments.

  8. Evidence for a resonant cyclotron interaction between runaway electrons and MHD modes in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li Erzhong; Zhou Ruijie; Hu Liqun

    2011-09-15

    In the past, the resonant cyclotron interaction between runaway electrons and lower hybrid waves via anomalous Doppler broadening was experimentally investigated, and it was shown to be able to create a barrier to the energy that could be reached by the runaway electrons [E. Li et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 621, 566 (2010)]. In this paper, to our knowledge for the first time, experimental evidence will be provided for a resonant cyclotron interaction between runaway electrons and magnetohydrodynamics modes in a stochastic magnetic field in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST), which has been theoretically proposed as a mechanism able to limit the maximum attainable energy by runaway electrons in tokamak plasmas [J. R. Martin-Solis and R. Sanchez, Phys. Plasmas 15, 112505 (2008)].

  9. Randomised Controlled Feasibility Trial of an Evidence-Informed Behavioural Intervention for Obese Adults with Additional Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sniehotta, Falko F.; Dombrowski, Stephan U.; Avenell, Alison; Johnston, Marie; McDonald, Suzanne; Murchie, Peter; Ramsay, Craig R.; Robertson, Kim; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Background Interventions for dietary and physical activity changes in obese adults may be less effective for participants with additional obesity-related risk factors and co-morbidities than for otherwise healthy individuals. This study aimed to test the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment, allocation, measurement, retention and intervention procedures of a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve physical activity and dietary practices amongst obese adults with additional obesity related risk factors. Method Pilot single centre open-labelled outcome assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial of obese (Body Mass Index (BMI)≥30 kg/m2) adults (age≥18 y) with obesity related co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension. Participants were randomly allocated to a manual-based group intervention or a leaflet control condition in accordance to a 2∶1 allocation ratio. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures, secondary outcomes included measures of body composition, physical activity, food intake and psychological process measures. Results Out of 806 potentially eligible individuals identified through list searches in two primary care general medical practices N = 81 participants (63% female; mean-age = 56.56(11.44); mean-BMI = 36.73(6.06)) with 2.35(1.47) co-morbidities were randomised. Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) was the only significant predictor of providing consent to take part in the study (higher chances of consent for invitees with lower levels of deprivation). Participant flowcharts, qualitative and quantitative feedback suggested good acceptance and feasibility of intervention procedures but 34.6% of randomised participants were lost to follow-up due to overly high measurement burden and sub-optimal retention procedures. Participants in the intervention group showed positive trends for most psychological, behavioural and body

  10. Effects of experimental fuel additions on fire intensity and severity: unexpected carbon resilience of a neotropical forest.

    PubMed

    Brando, Paulo M; Oliveria-Santos, Claudinei; Rocha, Wanderley; Cury, Roberta; Coe, Michael T

    2016-07-01

    Global changes and associated droughts, heat waves, logging activities, and forest fragmentation may intensify fires in Amazonia by altering forest microclimate and fuel dynamics. To isolate the effects of fuel loads on fire behavior and fire-induced changes in forest carbon cycling, we manipulated fine fuel loads in a fire experiment located in southeast Amazonia. We predicted that a 50% increase in fine fuel loads would disproportionally increase fire intensity and severity (i.e., tree mortality and losses in carbon stocks) due to multiplicative effects of fine fuel loads on the rate of fire spread, fuel consumption, and burned area. The experiment followed a fully replicated randomized block design (N = 6) comprised of unburned control plots and burned plots that were treated with and without fine fuel additions. The fuel addition treatment significantly increased burned area (+22%) and consequently canopy openness (+10%), fine fuel combustion (+5%), and mortality of individuals ≥5 cm in diameter at breast height (dbh; +37%). Surprisingly, we observed nonsignificant effects of the fuel addition treatment on fireline intensity, and no significant differences among the three treatments for (i) mortality of large trees (≥30 cm dbh), (ii) aboveground forest carbon stocks, and (iii) soil respiration. It was also surprising that postfire tree growth and wood increment were higher in the burned plots treated with fuels than in the unburned control. These results suggest that (i) fine fuel load accumulation increases the likelihood of larger understory fires and (ii) single, low-intensity fires weakly influence carbon cycling of this primary neotropical forest, although delayed postfire mortality of large trees may lower carbon stocks over the long term. Overall, our findings indicate that increased fine fuel loads alone are unlikely to create threshold conditions for high-intensity, catastrophic fires during nondrought years. PMID:26750627

  11. Persistence of Learning Gains from Computer Assisted Learning: Experimental Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mo, D.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; Huang, W.; Shi, Y.; Boswell, M.; Rozelle, S.

    2015-01-01

    Computer assisted learning (CAL) programs have been shown to be effective in improving educational outcomes. However, the existing studies on CAL have almost all been conducted over a short period of time. There is very little evidence on how the impact evolves over time. In response, we conducted a clustered randomized experiment involving 2741…

  12. Evidence for Tempo-Specific Timing in Music Using a Web-Based Experimental Setup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honing, Henkjan

    2006-01-01

    Perceptual invariance has been studied and found in several domains of cognition, including those of speech, motor behavior, and object motion. It has also been the topic of several studies in music perception. However, the existing perceptual studies present rather inconclusive evidence with regard to the perceptual invariance of expressive…

  13. Long-Term Effects of Teacher Performance Pay: Experimental Evidence from India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muralidharan, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    While the idea of teacher performance-pay is increasingly making its way into policy, the evidence on the effectiveness of such programs is both limited and mixed. The central questions in the literature on teacher performance pay to date have been whether teacher performance pay based on test scores can improve student achievement, and whether…

  14. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from India. Working Paper 2008-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muralidharan, Karthik; Sundararaman, Venkatesh

    2008-01-01

    Performance pay for teachers is frequently suggested as a way of improving educational outcomes in schools, but the empirical evidence to date on its effectiveness is limited and mixed. We present results from a randomized evaluation of a teacher incentive program implemented across a representative sample of government-run rural primary schools…

  15. Teacher Performance Pay: Experimental Evidence from India. NBER Working Paper No. 15323

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muralidharan, Karthik; Sundararaman, Venkatesh

    2009-01-01

    Performance pay for teachers is frequently suggested as a way of improving education outcomes in schools, but the theoretical predictions regarding its effectiveness are ambiguous and the empirical evidence to date is limited and mixed. We present results from a randomized evaluation of a teacher incentive program implemented across a large…

  16. What Makes an Effective Teacher? Quasi-Experimental Evidence. NBER Working Paper No. 16885

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavy, Victor

    2011-01-01

    This paper measures empirically the relationship between classroom teaching practices and student achievements. Based on primary- and middle-school data from Israel, I find very strong evidence that two important elements of teaching practices cause student achievements to improve. In particular, classroom teaching that emphasizes the instilment…

  17. Early Holocene human remains from the Argentinean Pampas: additional evidence for distinctive cranial morphology of early South Americans.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Héctor M; Perez, S Ivan; Politis, Gustavo G

    2010-10-01

    The cranial morphology of Early Holocene American human samples is characterized by a long and narrow cranial vault, whereas more recent samples exhibit a shorter and wider cranial vault. Two hypotheses have been proposed to account for the morphological differences between early and late-American samples: (a) the migratory hypothesis that suggests that the morphological variation between early and late American samples was the result of a variable number of migratory waves; and (b) the local diversification hypothesis, that is, the morphological differences between early and late American samples were mainly generated by local, random (genetic drift), and nonrandom factors (selection and phenotypic plasticity). We present the first craniometric study of three early skulls from the Argentinean Pampas, dated ∼8,000 cal. years BP (Arroyo Seco 2, Chocorí, and La Tigra), and one associated with mega-faunal remains (Fontezuelas skull). In addition, we studied several Late Holocene samples. We show that the skulls from the Argentinean Pampas are morphologically similar to other Early Holocene American skulls (i.e., Lagoa Santa from Brazil, Tequendama, Checua, and Aguazuque from Colombia, Lauricocha from Peru, and early Mexicans) that exhibit long and narrow cranial vaults. These samples differ from the Late Holocene American samples that exhibit a shorter and wider cranial vault. Our results underscore the important differences in cranial morphology between early and late-American samples. However, we emphasize the need for further studies to discuss alternative hypotheses regarding such differences. PMID:20623674

  18. Arrest Histories of High-Risk Gay and Bisexual Men in Miami: Unexpected Additional Evidence For Syndemic Theory†

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    Gay and bisexual men continue to suffer the highest burden of HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Since the beginning of the epidemic, substance abuse has been shown to be one of the strongest predictors of sexual risk behaviors and seroconversion among this population. Recent research has focused on additional aspects of health risk disparities among gay and bisexual men, including depression and other mental health problems, childhood sexual abuse, and adult victimization, suggesting that these men are impacted by a syndemic of health risks. The involvement of gay and bisexual men with the criminal justice system is largely absent from the literature. This article describes the nature, extent and predictors of the arrest histories of a sample of gay and bisexual substance users at very high risk for HIV infection and/or transmission. These histories are surprisingly extensive, and are strongly associated with poverty, severe mental distress, substance abuse and dependence, and victimization. The involvement of gay and bisexual men in the criminal justice system deserves a stronger research focus because of the unique challenges facing such men and also because arrests are yet another marker for a host of health risks among them. PMID:19283955

  19. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: matched longitudinal and experimental evidence#

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Todd A.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally-induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately −0.80. PMID:25702687

  20. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: Matched longitudinal and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately -0.80. PMID:25702687

  1. Methyl iodide oxidative addition to [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh3)]: an experimental and theoretical study of the stereochemistry of the products and the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Marrigje M; Conradie, Jeanet

    2011-08-28

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the oxidative addition and subsequent carbonyl insertion and deinsertion steps of the reaction of methyl iodide to a rhodium(I) acetylacetonato complex of the formula [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh(3))] (Hacac = acetylacetone). This process has been studied experimentally for many rhodium β-diketonato complexes, but, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic computational study of the complete reaction sequence. Experimental (1)H techniques complement the theoretical results on the stereochemistry of the reaction intermediates and products. (1)H NMR also revealed the existence of a second rhodium(III)-acyl product, which has not been previously observed in this reaction. The calculated Gibbs free energy of activation of the oxidative addition reaction is 71 kJ mol(-1), which is in agreement with the experimental value of 82(1) kJ mol(-1). The DFT-calculated oxidative addition corresponds to an associative S(N)2 nucleophilic attack by the rhodium metal centre on the methyl iodide, which is in agreement with calculated and experimental (in brackets) activation parameters of the reaction, 27 (38.8) kJ mol(-1) for ΔH((≠)) and -147 (-146) J K(-1) mol(-1) for ΔS((≠)). PMID:21761056

  2. Income Mobility Breeds Tolerance for Income Inequality: Cross-National and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Azim F; Wiwad, Dylan; Aknin, Lara B

    2016-05-01

    American politicians often justify income inequality by referencing the opportunities people have to move between economic stations. Though past research has shown associations between income mobility and resistance to wealth redistribution policies, no experimental work has tested whether perceptions of mobility influence tolerance for inequality. In this article, we present a cross-national comparison showing that income mobility is associated with tolerance for inequality and experimental work demonstrating that perceptions of higher mobility directly affect attitudes toward inequality. We find support for both the prospect of upward mobility and the view that peoples' economic station is the product of their own efforts, as mediating mechanisms. PMID:27217250

  3. Experimental evidence of the theoretical spatial frequency response of cubic phase mask wavefront coding imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, Manjunath; Bhakta, Vikrant R; Christensen, Marc P

    2012-01-16

    The optical transfer function of a cubic phase mask wavefront coding imaging system is experimentally measured across the entire range of defocus values encompassing the system's functional limits. The results are compared against mathematical expressions describing the spatial frequency response of these computational imagers. Experimental data shows that the observed modulation and phase transfer functions, available spatial frequency bandwidth and design range of this imaging system strongly agree with previously published mathematical analyses. An imaging system characterization application is also presented wherein it is shown that the phase transfer function is more robust than the modulation transfer function in estimating the strength of the cubic phase mask. PMID:22274533

  4. An experimental evidence-based computational paradigm for new logic-gates in neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, R.; Guberman, S.; Goldental, A.; Kanter, I.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new experimentally corroborated paradigm in which the functionality of the brain's logic-gates depends on the history of their activity, e.g. an OR-gate that turns into a XOR-gate over time. Our results are based on an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on circuits of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro. The underlying biological mechanism is the unavoidable increase of neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulations, which imposes a non-uniform gradual stretching of network delays.

  5. Experimental evidence of skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stebliy, Maxim E. Kolesnikov, Alexander G.; Davydenko, Alexander V.; Ognev, Alexey V.; Samardak, Alexander S.; Chebotkevich, Ludmila A.

    2015-05-07

    Formation and existence of magnetic skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks (Ta(3 nm)/[Co(0.37 nm)/Ni(0.58 nm)]{sub 10}){sub 2} with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are shown experimentally at room temperature. Magnetization reversal through the skyrmion state is studied using magnetic hysteresis measurements. An evolution of skyrmion configurations in the nanodisk structure is analyzed. Experimental methods and micromagnetic simulations help to understand the magnetization reversal processes occurring through the stable skyrmion-like configurations. Formation of the intermediate C-states during magnetization reversal is demonstrated. The skyrmion number for all possible spin configurations is calculated.

  6. When and why do territorial coalitions occur? Experimental evidence from a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Detto, Tanya; Jennions, Michael D; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2010-05-01

    Neighboring territory owners are often less aggressive toward each other than to strangers ("dear enemy" effect). There is, however, little evidence for territorial defense coalitions whereby a neighbor will temporarily leave his/her own territory, enter that of a neighbor, and cooperate in repelling a conspecific intruder. This is surprising, as theoreticians have long posited the existence of such coalitions and the circumstances under which they should evolve. Here we document territorial defense coalitions in the African fiddler crab Uca annulipes, which lives in large colonies wherein each male defends a burrow and its surrounding area against neighbors and "floaters" (burrowless males). Fights between a resident and a floater sometimes involve another male who has left his territory to fight the floater challenging his neighbor. Using simple experiments, we provide the first evidence of the rules determining when territorial coalitions form. Our results support recent models that suggest that these coalitions arise from by-product mutualism. PMID:20302425

  7. Exercise and Physical Activity in Mental Disorders: Clinical and Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zschucke, Elisabeth; Gaudlitz, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that exercise (EX) and physical activity (PA) can prevent or delay the onset of different mental disorders, and have therapeutic benefits when used as sole or adjunct treatment in mental disorders. This review summarizes studies that used EX interventions in patients with anxiety, affective, eating, and substance use disorders, as well as schizophrenia and dementia/mild cognitive impairment. Despite several decades of clinical evidence with EX interventions, controlled studies are sparse in most disorder groups. Preliminary evidence suggests that PA/EX can induce improvements in physical, subjective and disorder-specific clinical outcomes. Potential mechanisms of action are discussed, as well as implications for psychiatric research and practice. PMID:23412549

  8. Experimental evidence and the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cindro, N.; Freeman, R.M.; Haas, F.

    1986-04-01

    Recent data from C+O collisions are analyzed in terms of the Landau-Zener promotion in nuclei. Evidence for the presence of this mechanism in nuclear collisions is of considerable interest, since it provides a signature of single-particle orbitals in molecular-type potentials and, at the same time, paves the way to a microscopic understanding of the collision dynamics, in particular of the energy dissipation rate. The analyzed data are of two types: integrated cross sections and angular distributions of inelastically scattered particles. The first set of data shows structure qualitatively consistent with recent calculations of the Landau-Zener effect; for this set of data no other reasonable explanation is presently available. The second set of data, while consistent with the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion, is examined in terms of other possible explanations too. The combined data show evidence favoring the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  9. Teacher Pay for Performance: Experimental Evidence from the Project on Incentives in Teaching (POINT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Ballou, Dale; Hamilton, Laura; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Pepper, Matthew; Stecher, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a rigorous experiment examining the impact of pay for performance on student achievement and instructional practice. This study, conducted by the National Center on Performance Incentives in partnership with the RAND Corporation examines an experimental pay for performance program administered via a randomized…

  10. Mimicking Aphasic Semantic Errors in Normal Speech Production: Evidence from a Novel Experimental Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Catherine; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Semantic errors are commonly found in semantic dementia (SD) and some forms of stroke aphasia and provide insights into semantic processing and speech production. Low error rates are found in standard picture naming tasks in normal controls. In order to increase error rates and thus provide an experimental model of aphasic performance, this study…

  11. Evidence That Counts: 12 Teacher-Led Randomised Controlled Trials and Other Styles of Experimental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churches, Richard; McAleavy, Tony

    2016-01-01

    This publication contains 12 (A3 open-out) poster-style reports of teacher experimental research. The style of presentation parallels the type of preliminary reporting common at academic conferences and postgraduate events. At the same time, it aims to act as a form of short primer to introduce teachers to the basic options that there are when…

  12. Criminogenic Effects of the Prison Environment on Inmate Behavior: Some Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Scott D.; Gaes, Gerald G.

    2005-01-01

    The current study analyzed a subset of the experimental data collected by Berk, Ladd, Graziano, and Baek (2003) to test whether different intensities of incarceration make inmates more criminal while incarcerated. There were 561 male inmates whose equivalent classification scores indicated they had the same level of risk to commit institutional…

  13. EVIDENCE FOR EFFECTS OF CHRONIC LEAD EXPOSURE ON BLOOD PRESSURE IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information obtained in a number of experimental studies conducted over the last forty years on the effects of lead on blood pressure is reviewed. Differences in animal species, age at beginning of exposure, level of lead exposure, indices of lead burden, and blood pressure effec...

  14. Verb Form Indicates Discourse Segment Type in Biological Research Papers: Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Waard, Anita; Maat, Henk Pander

    2012-01-01

    Corpus studies suggest that verb tense is a differentiating feature between, on the one hand, text pertaining to experimental results (involving methods and results) and on the other hand, text pertaining to more abstract concepts (i.e. regarding background knowledge in a field, hypotheses, problems or claims). In this paper, we describe a user…

  15. Experimental Evidence for Dynamic Social Impact: The Emergence of Subcultures in Electronic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latane, Bibb; Bourgeois, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Presents results of experimental tests of Dynamic Social Impact Theory (DSIT) in which participants engaged in discussions over electronic mail. Finds support for the emergence of four group phenomena predicted by DSIT. Shows how, rewarded for being in the majority, individuals' choices resulted in the emergence of four forms of group level…

  16. Work Towards Experimental Evidence Of Hard X-Ray Photoionization In Highly Charged Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Kirby, K.; Lin, T.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Gokhale, P.; Kanter, E. P.; Dunford, R. W.; Seifert, S.; Young, L.; McDonald, J.; Schneider, D.

    2011-06-01

    Ions of almost any charge state can be produced through electron-impact ionization. Here we describe our first experiments designed to photoionize these highly charged ions with hard x-rays by pairing an electron and photon beam. A spectral line at 12.7(1) keV with an intensity corroborated by theory may be the first evidence of hard x-ray photoionization of a highly charged ion.

  17. Work toward experimental evidence of hard x-ray photoionization in highly charged krypton.

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; Gillaspy, J.D.; Gokhale, P.; Kanter, E.P.; Brickhouse, N.S.; Dunford, R.W.; Kirby, K.; Lin, T.; McDonald, J.; Schneider, D.; Seifert, S.; Young, L.

    2011-06-01

    Ions of almost any charge state can be produced through electron-impact ionization. Here we describe our first experiments designed to photoionize these highly charged ions with hard x-rays by pairing an electron and photon beam. A spectral line at 12.7(1) keV with an intensity corroborated by theory may be the first evidence of hard x-ray photoionization of a highly charged ion.

  18. Experimental evidence of resonant tunneling via localized DQW states in an asymmetric triple barrier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, Rober

    2003-04-01

    In this work we report on field-induced features appearing in the tunneling current traces of a biased asymmetric triple barrier resonant tunneling device in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. A theoretical model that satisfactorily explains the origin of these features is discussed. The reported data evidences the localized nature of the quantum states in thin layer asymmetric double-quantum-well structures.

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis: published evidences for disease subtypes, indications for patient subpopulations, and how to translate patient observations to murine experimental models.

    PubMed

    Mudde, Anne C A; Lexmond, Willem S; Blumberg, Richard S; Nurko, Samuel; Fiebiger, Edda

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus and commonly classified as a Th2-type allergy. Major advances in our understanding of the EoE pathophysiology have recently been made, but clinicians struggle with highly unpredictable therapy responses indicative of phenotypic diversity within the patient population. Here, we summarize evidences for the existence of EoE subpopulations based on diverse inflammatory characteristics of the esophageal tissue in EoE. Additionally, clinical characteristics of EoE patients support the concept of disease subtypes. We conclude that clinical and experimental evidences indicate that EoE is an umbrella term for conditions that are unified by esophageal eosinophilia but that several disease subgroups with various inflammatory esophageal patterns and/or different clinical features exist. We further discuss strategies to study the pathophysiologic differences as observed in EoE patients in murine experimental EoE. Going forward, models of EoE that faithfully mimic EoE subentities as defined in humans will be essential because mechanistic studies on triggers which regulate the onset of diverse EoE subpopulations are not feasible in patients. Understanding how and why different EoE phenotypes develop will be a first and fundamental step to establish strategies that integrate individual variations of the EoE pathology into personalized therapy. PMID:27458501

  20. Theoretical and experimental evidence of non-symmetric doubly localized rogue waves

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingsong; Guo, Lijuan; Zhang, Yongshuai; Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-01-01

    We present determinant expressions for vector rogue wave (RW) solutions of the Manakov system, a two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. As a special case, we generate a family of exact and non-symmetric RW solutions of the NLS equation up to third order, localized in both space and time. The derived non-symmetric doubly localized second-order solution is generated experimentally in a water wave flume for deep-water conditions. Experimental results, confirming the characteristic non-symmetric pattern of the solution, are in very good agreement with theory as well as with numerical simulations, based on the modified NLS equation, known to model accurately the dynamics of weakly nonlinear wave packets in deep water. PMID:25383023

  1. Experimental evidence of Xe incorporation in Schottky defects in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bès, René; Martin, Philippe; Vathonne, Emerson; Delorme, Rémy; Sabathier, Catherine; Freyss, Michel; Bertolus, Marjorie; Glatzel, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    We report here the direct experimental observation of the preferential xenon incorporation site in uranium dioxide and analyse how its incorporation evolves with the annealing temperature. We show that High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure in combination with first-principles calculations enable a precise determination of the Xe incorporation site. Our finding provides important insight for the understanding and modeling of noble gases behavior in nuclear oxide fuel.

  2. Experimental evidence of Xe incorporation in Schottky defects in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bès, René; Martin, Philippe Vathonne, Emerson; Delorme, Rémy; Sabathier, Catherine; Freyss, Michel; Bertolus, Marjorie; Glatzel, Pieter

    2015-03-16

    We report here the direct experimental observation of the preferential xenon incorporation site in uranium dioxide and analyse how its incorporation evolves with the annealing temperature. We show that High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure in combination with first-principles calculations enable a precise determination of the Xe incorporation site. Our finding provides important insight for the understanding and modeling of noble gases behavior in nuclear oxide fuel.

  3. Recent experimental evidence for the Los Alamos proton storage ring beam instability

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Johnson, D.

    1997-09-01

    The peak intensity of the PSR is limited by a fast transverse instability. In 1996 the authors started a project to upgrade the PSR to 200 {mu}A at 30 Hz, which requires operation above the instability threshold achieved with the present rf system. The authors have, therefore, resumed their experimental program to understand and control the instability. In this paper they will present their latest data.

  4. Investigation of a model vertical motion liquid damper: comparing numerical simulation and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Chris; Tabatabai, Habib; Buechel, Craig

    2005-05-01

    Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLD) are used to limit horizontal vibrations in structures, and offer practical alternatives to Tuned Mass Dampers (TMD). However, to our knowledge, liquid damping systems have not been developed to reduce vertical vibrations. In this work, we develop a model for a Vertical Motion Liquid Damper (VMLD), idealized as a discrete, two degree of freedom system. One degree of freedom represents the 'target' structure that is to be damped, and the other represents the approximate, one-dimensional motion of a liquid in a U-shaped tube. Internal losses due to the fluid oscillation serve to limit and control motions of the target structure. The U-shaped tube has a flexible joint such that one vertical portion and the horizontal portion of the tube remain fixed, and the remaining vertical portion of the tube is affixed to the vibrating structure, allowing the liquid to become excited. The equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's Equations, and are integrated using Runge-Kutta algorithms that are available in Matlab. An experimental model was built in the laboratory, consisting of a mass attached to the end of a cantilevered beam (corresponding to the target structure), and a U-tube made from PVC pipe. The various damping and stiffness parameters of the system were calibrated independently based on experimental data. Measured data from the experimental model show reasonable agreement with numerical simulations.

  5. Experimental evidence for strong stabilizing forces at high functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Francesco; Giometto, Andrea; Seymour, Mathew; Rinaldo, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Unveiling the mechanisms that promote coexistence in biological communities is a fundamental problem in ecology. Stable coexistence of many species is commonly observed in natural communities. Most of these natural communities, however, are composed of species from multiple trophic and functional groups, while theory and experiments on coexistence have been focusing on functionally similar species. Here, we investigated how functional diversity affects the stability of species coexistence and productivity in multispecies communities by characterizing experimentally all pairwise species interactions in a pool of 11 species of eukaryotes (10 protists and one rotifer) belonging to three different functional groups. Species within the same functional group showed stronger competitive interactions compared to among-functional group interactions. This often led to competitive exclusion between species that had higher functional relatedness, but only at low levels of species richness. Communities with higher functional diversity resulted in increased species coexistence and community biomass production. Our experimental findings and the results of a stochastic model tailored to the experimental interaction matrix suggest the emergence of strong stabilizing forces when species from different functional groups interact in a homogeneous environment. By combining theoretical analysis with experiments we could also disentangle the relationship between species richness and functional diversity, showing that functional diversity per se is a crucial driver of productivity and stability in multispecies community. PMID:26236847

  6. Impact of SOL plasma profiles on lower hybrid current drive: Experimental evidence, mitigation and modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Faust, I.; Wallace, G.; Bonoli, P.; Meneghini, O.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R.; Scott, S.; Harvey, R. W.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Lin, S. Y.; Yang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent progress in understanding and mitigating parasitic wave absorption in edge plasmas is presented. Experimental observations collected on Alcator C-Mod suggest multiple physics mechanisms are involved in such losses. Localized measurement of parametric decay instabilities (PDIs) has been performed using RF Langmuir probes. The divertor heat flux due to LH and ionization power loss have been evaluated quantitatively. We observe that the LHCD efficiency can be recovered when the SOL density profile is controlled by operating the tokamak at high current. The experimental progresses motivated a re-examination of the LHCD simulation model based on the ray-tracing/Fokker-Planck code (GENRAY/CQL3D). The effect of introducing a relatively small wave number broadening in the launched power spectrum and using 2D SOL density and temperature profiles was investigated. Comparison with C-Mod experiment indicates that the new model can explain the experimental trend over a wider density range including the density regime where disagreement was seen previously, suggesting that including realistic SOL geometry is a key to improve the simulation accuracy.

  7. Natural and experimental evidence of viscerotropic infection caused by Leishmania tropica from North Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Doha, Said A; Shehata, Magdi G; Fahmy, Adel R; Samy, Abdallah M

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected clinical form that is quite prevalent in Eastern North parts of the country in Sinai Peninsula. Leishmania tropica was identified by previous reports as the causative agent responsible for viscerotropic infections in-patients and experimental animals. Here, we reported the viscerotropic infections from naturally infected rodent Gerbillus pyramidum floweri collected from North-Sinai. Footpad and tail lesions, spleenomegaly, and malformed dark-colored spleen were the characteristic CL symptoms. The spleen of the rodent found positive to amastigote impression smear. ITS-1 DNA was sequenced and revealed 100% identity of the strain in the current study to the other L. tropica sequences identified from the patients with the suspected CL and inhabited the same study area. The current findings confirmed the susceptibility of gerbil to L. tropica, and raise the concerns for the role of rodents as accidental host suffering the infections. The susceptibility of wild and experimental rodents to the same L. tropica strain was also investigated; BALB/c and G. pyramidum were more susceptible to L. tropica (24.33 ± 4.37 and 25 ± 4.58 days post-infection, respectively). Similar viscerotropic pathologies were reported in experimental infection of only golden hamster (≈ 120 days post-infection), and G. p. floweri (≈ 160 days post-infection). PMID:25597157

  8. Infiltration on sloping surfaces: Laboratory experimental evidence and implications for infiltration modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla; Flammini, Alessia; Cifrodelli, Marco; Corradini, Corrado; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2015-04-01

    Infiltration on sloping surfaces occupies an important role in our understanding of surface and subsurface hydrology. Previous studies have provided conflicting results about the role of slope on infiltration. Here, our main objective is to highlight, by well-controlled experiments, the slope role in the absence of the conflicting contributions generated by other physical processes observed in previous studies under natural or laboratory conditions. The experimental program was designed to resolve some of the confounding factors such as lower impermeable boundary condition, range of rainfall rates relative to soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, surface sealing, and erosion of top soil. The experimental apparatus consists of a box containing a natural bare soil with slope angle γ chosen between 0° and 10°, two sensors of surface and deep flow, one probe for moisture content and an artificial rainfall generator. The primary experimental results suggest that under steady conditions and rainfall rate, r, greater than saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, the deep flow, Qd, decreases with increasing slope angle, γ, up to a value leading to Qd(γ = 1°)/Qd(γ = 10°) equal to ≈4 which is in contrast with the results provided in a few earlier papers. Furthermore, in sloping bare soils surface runoff is produced even for r < Ks. Finally, we discuss the link between Qd(γ) and the shear stress at the soil surface as a guideline in the determination of an effective saturated hydraulic conductivity to be incorporated in the existing horizontal infiltration models.

  9. Can exercise affect the course of inflammatory bowel disease? Experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Bilski, Jan; Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka; Brzozowski, Bartosz; Magierowski, Marcin; Zahradnik-Bilska, Janina; Wójcik, Dagmara; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Mach, Tomasz; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consisting of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are defined as idiopathic, chronic and relapsing intestinal disorders occurring in genetically predisposed individuals exposed to environmental risk factors such as diet and microbiome changes. Since conventional drug therapy is expensive and not fully efficient, there is a need for alternative remedies that can improve the outcome in patients suffering from IBD. Whether exercise, which has been proposed as adjunct therapy in IBD, can be beneficial in patients with IBD remains an intriguing question. In this review, we provide an overview of the effects of exercise on human IBD and experimental colitis in animal models that mimic human disease, although the information on exercise in human IBD are sparse and poorly understood. Moderate exercise can exert a beneficial ameliorating effect on IBD and improve the healing of experimental animal colitis due to the activity of protective myokines such as irisin released from working skeletal muscles. CD patients with higher levels of exercise were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. Moreover, voluntary exercise has been shown to exert a positive effect on IBD patients' mood, weight maintenance and osteoporosis. On the other hand, depending on its intensity and duration, exercise can evoke transient mild systemic inflammation and enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine release, thereby exacerbating the gastrointestinal symptoms. We discuss recent advances in the mechanism of voluntary and strenuous exercise affecting the outcome of IBD in patients and experimental animal models. PMID:27255494

  10. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  11. The impact of product information and trials on demand for smokeless tobacco and cigarettes: Evidence from experimental auctions

    PubMed Central

    Rousu, Matthew C.; O'Connor, Richard; Thrasher, James F; June, Kristie; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Pitcavage, James

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological and toxicological evidence suggests lower risk of smokeless tobacco (ST) products compared to cigarettes. Less is known, however, about consumer perceptions and use of novel forms of ST, including snus and dissolvable tobacco. Methods In this study, we conducted in-person experimental auctions in Buffalo, NY, Columbia, SC, and Selinsgrove, PA with 571 smokers to test the impact of information and product trials on smokers’ preferences. Auctions were conducted between November 2010-November 2011. Results We found no evidence of an impact of product trials on demand in our auctions. Anti-ST information increased demand for cigarettes when presented alone, but when presented with Pro-ST information it decreased demand for cigarettes. It did not decrease demand for ST products. Anti-smoking information increased demand for ST products, but did not affect cigarette demand. Conclusions These findings suggest that credible and effective communications about tobacco harm reduction should reinforce the negative effects of smoking. PMID:24321456

  12. Theoretical approaches and experimental evidence for liquid-vapor phase transitions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Mader, C.M.; Chappars, A.

    2001-01-01

    The leptodermous approximation is applied to nuclear systems for T > 0. The introduction of surface corrections leads to anomalous caloric curves and to negative heat capacities in the liquid-gas coexistence region. Clusterization in the vapor is described by associating surface energy to clusters according to Fisher's formula. The three-dimensional Ising model, a leptodermous system par excellence, does obey rigorously Fisher's scaling up to the critical point. Multifragmentation data from several experiments including the ISiS and EOS Collaborations, as well as compound nucleus fragment emission at much lower energy follow the same scaling, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of liquid-vapor coexistence.

  13. The influence of iron deficiency on the functioning of skeletal muscles: experimental evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Tkaczyszyn, Michał; Kasztura, Monika; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal and respiratory myopathy not only constitutes an important pathophysiological feature of heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but also contributes to debilitating symptomatology and predicts worse outcomes in these patients. Accumulated evidence from laboratory experiments, animal models, and interventional studies in sports medicine suggests that undisturbed systemic iron homeostasis significantly contributes to the effective functioning of skeletal muscles. In this review, we discuss the role of iron status for the functioning of skeletal muscle tissue, and highlight iron deficiency as an emerging therapeutic target in chronic diseases accompanied by a marked muscle dysfunction. PMID:26800032

  14. Experimental Evidence for a Light and Broad Scalar Resonance in D+ --> π-π+π+ Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-01-01

    From a sample of 1172+/-61 D+-->π-π+π+ decays, we find γ\\(D+-->π- π+π+\\)/γ\\(D+-->K-π+π+\\) = 0.0311+/-0.0018+0.0016-0.0026. Using a coherent amplitude analysis to fit the Dalitz plot of these decays, we find strong evidence that a scalar resonance of mass 478+24-23+/-17 MeV/c2 and width 324+42-40+/-21 MeV/c2 accounts for approximately half of all decays.

  15. Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations

    PubMed Central

    Kushnick, Geoff; Hanowell, Ben; Kim, Jun-Hong; Langstieh, Banrida; Magnano, Vittorio; Oláh, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Maternal care decision rules should evolve responsiveness to factors impinging on the fitness pay-offs of care. Because the caretaking environments common in industrialized and small-scale societies vary in predictable ways, we hypothesize that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour will also differ between these two types of populations. We used a factorial vignette experiment to elicit third-party judgements about likely caretaking decisions of a hypothetical mother and her child when various fitness-relevant factors (maternal age and access to resources, and offspring age, sex and quality) were varied systematically in seven populations—three industrialized and four small-scale. Despite considerable variation in responses, we found that three of five main effects, and the two severity effects, exhibited statistically significant industrialized/ small-scale population differences. All differences could be explained as adaptive solutions to industrialized versus small-scale caretaking environments. Further, we found gradients in the relationship between the population-specific estimates and national-level socio-economic indicators, further implicating important aspects of the variation in industrialized and small-scale caretaking environments in shaping heuristics. Although there is mounting evidence for a genetic component to human maternal behaviour, there is no current evidence for interpopulation variation in candidate genes. We nonetheless suggest that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour in diverse societies emerge via convergent evolution in response to similar selective pressures. PMID:26543577

  16. Understanding Counterfactuality: A Review of Experimental Evidence for the Dual Meaning of Counterfactuals

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwland, Mante S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cognitive and linguistic theories of counterfactual language comprehension assume that counterfactuals convey a dual meaning. Subjunctive‐counterfactual conditionals (e.g., ‘If Tom had studied hard, he would have passed the test’) express a supposition while implying the factual state of affairs (Tom has not studied hard and failed). The question of how counterfactual dual meaning plays out during language processing is currently gaining interest in psycholinguistics. Whereas numerous studies using offline measures of language processing consistently support counterfactual dual meaning, evidence coming from online studies is less conclusive. Here, we review the available studies that examine online counterfactual language comprehension through behavioural measurement (self‐paced reading times, eye‐tracking) and neuroimaging (electroencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging). While we argue that these studies do not offer direct evidence for the online computation of counterfactual dual meaning, they provide valuable information about the way counterfactual meaning unfolds in time and influences successive information processing. Further advances in research on counterfactual comprehension require more specific predictions about how counterfactual dual meaning impacts incremental sentence processing. PMID:27512408

  17. Experimental Evidence for Anomalous Retroactive Influences on Human Cognition and Affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bem, Daryl J.

    2011-11-01

    Six experiments are described that take well-established psychological effects on human cognition and affect and "time-reverse" them so that the individual's responses are obtained before the putatively causal stimulus events occur. Two of the experiments tested for the retroactive facilitation of recall: It is well known that rehearsing or practicing a set of verbal materials enhances an individual's ability to recall them on a subsequent test. In our experiments, participants were first shown 48 common words one at a time and were then asked to recall as many of those words as they could. They were then given practice exercises on a randomly selected subset of those words. The results show that participants recalled more of the words they later practiced than the control words they did not practice. Two experiments on retroactive priming provide evidence for retroactive influence on an individual's response times when judging the pleasantness or unpleasantness of visual stimuli. Finally, two experiments provide evidence for the retroactive habituation to emotionally arousing visual stimuli. Each of the six experiments yielded statistically significant results, with a combined z = 3.66, p = .0001, and an effect size (d) of 0.25. The six experiments are a subset of nine retroactive influence experiments reported in Bem [1] that yielded a combined z = 6.66, p = 1.34×10-11, and an effect size of 0.22.

  18. Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations.

    PubMed

    Kushnick, Geoff; Hanowell, Ben; Kim, Jun-Hong; Langstieh, Banrida; Magnano, Vittorio; Oláh, Katalin

    2015-06-01

    Maternal care decision rules should evolve responsiveness to factors impinging on the fitness pay-offs of care. Because the caretaking environments common in industrialized and small-scale societies vary in predictable ways, we hypothesize that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour will also differ between these two types of populations. We used a factorial vignette experiment to elicit third-party judgements about likely caretaking decisions of a hypothetical mother and her child when various fitness-relevant factors (maternal age and access to resources, and offspring age, sex and quality) were varied systematically in seven populations-three industrialized and four small-scale. Despite considerable variation in responses, we found that three of five main effects, and the two severity effects, exhibited statistically significant industrialized/ small-scale population differences. All differences could be explained as adaptive solutions to industrialized versus small-scale caretaking environments. Further, we found gradients in the relationship between the population-specific estimates and national-level socio-economic indicators, further implicating important aspects of the variation in industrialized and small-scale caretaking environments in shaping heuristics. Although there is mounting evidence for a genetic component to human maternal behaviour, there is no current evidence for interpopulation variation in candidate genes. We nonetheless suggest that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour in diverse societies emerge via convergent evolution in response to similar selective pressures. PMID:26543577

  19. Effects of Bisphenol A on ion channels: Experimental evidence and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Sergi; Ripoll, Cristina; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Fuentes, Esther; Quesada, Ivan; Nadal, Angel; Martinez-Pinna, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) produced in huge quantities in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. It is present in most humans in developed countries, acting as a xenoestrogen and it is considered an environmental risk factor associated to several diseases. Among the whole array of identified mechanisms by which BPA can interfere with physiological processes in living organisms, changes on ion channel activity is one of the most poorly understood. There is still little evidence about BPA regulation of ion channel expression and function. However, this information is key to understand how BPA disrupts excitable and non-excitable cells, including neurons, endocrine cells and muscle cells. This report is the result of a comprehensive literature review on the effects of BPA on ion channels. We conclude that there is evidence to say that these important molecules may be key end-points for EDCs acting as xenoestrogens. However, more research on channel-mediated BPA effects is needed. Particularly, mechanistic studies to unravel the pathophysiological actions of BPA on ion channels at environmentally relevant doses. PMID:26930576

  20. Renin-angiotensin system as a potential therapeutic target in stroke and retinopathy: experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Fouda, Abdelrahman Y; Artham, Sandeep; El-Remessy, Azza B; Fagan, Susan C

    2016-02-01

    As our knowledge expands, it is now clear that the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system (RAS) mediates functions other than regulating blood pressure (BP). The RAS plays a central role in the pathophysiology of different neurovascular unit disorders including stroke and retinopathy. Moreover, the beneficial actions of RAS modulation in brain and retina have been documented in experimental research, but not yet exploited clinically. The RAS is a complex system with distinct yet interconnected components. Understanding the different RAS components and their functions under brain and retinal pathological conditions is crucial to reap their benefits. The aim of the present review is to provide an experimental and clinical update on the role of RAS in the pathophysiology and treatment of stroke and retinopathy. Combining the evidence from both these disorders allows a unique opportunity to move both fields forward. PMID:26769658

  1. Does Teacher Evaluation Improve School Performance? Experimental Evidence from Chicago's Excellence in Teaching Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Matthew P.; Sartain, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Chicago Public Schools initiated the Excellence in Teaching Project, a teacher evaluation program designed to increase student learning by improving classroom instruction through structured principal-teacher dialogue. The pilot began in forty-four elementary schools in 2008-09 (cohort 1) and scaled up to include an additional forty-eight…

  2. Time-lag in extinction dynamics in experimental populations: evidence for a genetic Allee effect?

    PubMed

    Vercken, Elodie; Vincent, Flora; Mailleret, Ludovic; Ris, Nicolas; Tabone, Elisabeth; Fauvergue, Xavier

    2013-05-01

    1. Propagule pressure, i.e. the number of individuals introduced, is thought to be a major predictor of the establishment success of introduced populations in the field. Its influence in laboratory experimental systems has however been questioned. In fact, other factors involved in long-term population persistence, like habitat size, were usually found to explain most of the dynamics of experimental populations. 2. To better understand the respective influence of short- and long-term factors and their potential interaction on extinction dynamics in experimental systems, we investigated the influence of propagule pressure, habitat size and genetic background on the early dynamics of laboratory-based populations of a hymenopteran parasitoid. 3. The amount of demographic variance differed between establishment and persistence phase and was influenced by habitat size and genetic background (geographic strain), but independent of propagule pressure. In contrast, the probability of extinction within five generations depended on the genetic background and on the interaction between propagule pressure and habitat size. Vulnerability to extinction in small size habitats was increased when populations were founded with a small number of individuals, but this effect was delayed until the third to fifth generations. 4. These results indicate that demographic stochasticity is influential during population establishment, but is not affected by the genetic variability of propagules. On the other hand, extinction might be influenced by a genetic Allee effect triggered by the combination of low propagule pressure and genetic drift. Finally, we documented consistent differences between genetic backgrounds in both deterministic and stochastic population dynamics patterns, with major consequences on extinction risk and ultimately population establishment. PMID:23398653

  3. Experimental evidence for the conditions necessary to sustain meandering in coarse-bedded rivers

    PubMed Central

    Braudrick, Christian A.; Dietrich, William E.; Leverich, Glen T.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2009-01-01

    Meandering rivers are common on Earth and other planetary surfaces, yet the conditions necessary to maintain meandering channels are unclear. As a consequence, self-maintaining meandering channels with cutoffs have not been reproduced in the laboratory. Such experimental channels are needed to explore mechanisms controlling migration rate, sinuosity, floodplain formation, and planform morphodynamics and to test theories for wavelength and bend propagation. Here we report an experiment in which meandering with near-constant width was maintained during repeated cutoff and regeneration of meander bends. We found that elevated bank strength (provided by alfalfa sprouts) relative to the cohesionless bed material and the blocking of troughs (chutes) in the lee of point bars via suspended sediment deposition were the necessary ingredients to successful meandering. Varying flood discharge was not necessary. Scaling analysis shows that the experimental meander migration was fast compared to most natural channels. This high migration rate caused nearly all of the bedload sediment to exchange laterally, such that bar growth was primarily dependent on bank sediment supplied from upstream lateral migration. The high migration rate may have contributed to the relatively low sinuosity of 1.19, and this suggests that to obtain much higher sinuosity experiments at this scale may have to be conducted for several years. Although patience is required to evolve them, these experimental channels offer the opportunity to explore several fundamental issues about river morphodynamics. Our results also suggest that sand supply may be an essential control in restoring self-maintaining, actively shifting gravel-bedded meanders. PMID:19805077

  4. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  5. Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of Pure Ferric Fayalite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (magnetite ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a pure ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.

  6. Eliciting health care priorities in developing countries: experimental evidence from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Font, Joan Costa; Forns, Joan Rovira; Sato, Azusa

    2016-02-01

    Although some methods for eliciting preferences to assist participatory priority setting in health care in developed countries are available, the same is not true for poor communities in developing countries whose preferences are neglected in health policy making. Existing methods grounded on self-interested, monetary valuations that may be inappropriate for developing country settings where community care is provided through 'social allocation' mechanisms. This paper proposes and examines an alternative methodology for eliciting preferences for health care programmes specifically catered for rural and less literate populations but which is still applicable in urban communities. Specifically, the method simulates a realistic collective budget allocation experiment, to be implemented in both rural and urban communities in Guatemala. We report evidence revealing that participatory budget-like experiments are incentive compatible mechanisms suitable for revealing collective preferences, while simultaneously having the advantage of involving communities in health care reform processes. PMID:25841770

  7. Rapid communication: experimental evidence that juvenile pelagic jacks (Carangidae) respond behaviorally to DMSP.

    PubMed

    Debose, Jennifer L; Nevitt, Gabrielle A; Dittman, Andrew H

    2010-03-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is produced by marine algae and released during foraging activity by zooplankton and fish. Pelagic fishes depend on patchily distributed foraging opportunities, and DMSP may be an important signaling molecule for these events. We have previously shown that the abundance of carangid jacks is positively associated with elevated DMSP levels over coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that these fishes may use spatial and temporal variation in DMSP to locate foraging opportunities. Here, we extend this work by demonstrating that juveniles of two species of pelagic jack, crevalle jack, Caranx hippos, and bluefin trevally, C. melampygus, detect and respond to DMSP in a flow-through tank in the laboratory. Juveniles of these species showed elevated swimming activity in response to ecologically relevant concentrations of DMSP (10(-9) M). These results provide further evidence that this chemical may serve as a chemosensory cue for carangid species. PMID:20177745

  8. Experimental evidence showing that no mitotically active female germline progenitors exist in postnatal mouse ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zheng, Wenjing; Shen, Yan; Adhikari, Deepak; Ueno, Hiroo; Liu, Kui

    2012-01-01

    It has been generally accepted for more than half a century that, in most mammalian species, oocytes cannot renew themselves in postnatal or adult life, and that the number of oocytes is already fixed in fetal or neonatal ovaries. This assumption, however, has been challenged over the past decade. In this study, we have taken an endogenous genetic approach to this question and generated a multiple fluorescent Rosa26rbw/+;Ddx4-Cre germline reporter mouse model for in vivo and in vitro tracing of the development of female germline cell lineage. Through live cell imaging and de novo folliculogenesis experiments, we show that the Ddx4-expressing cells from postnatal mouse ovaries did not enter mitosis, nor did they contribute to oocytes during de novo folliculogenesis. Our results provide evidence that supports the traditional view that no postnatal follicular renewal occurs in mammals, and no mitotically active Ddx4-expressing female germline progenitors exist in postnatal mouse ovaries. PMID:22778414

  9. Evidence of experimental postcyclic transmission of Bothriocephalus acheilognathi in bonytail chub (Gila elegans)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, S.P.; Choudhury, A.; Cole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the role that predation of infected conspecific fish and postcyclic transmission might play in the life cycle of the Asian fish tapeworm, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) Yamaguti, 1934. Young-of-the-year (YOY) bonytail chub (Gila elegans) were exposed to copepods infected with B. acheilognathi and subsequently fed to subadult bonytail chub. Within 1 wk after consumption of the YOY chub, subadults were necropsied and found infected with gravid and nongravid tapeworms. This study provides evidence that postcyclic transfer of B. acheilognathi can occur. Postcyclic transmission may be an important life history trait of B. acheilognathi that merits consideration when studying the impact and distribution of this invasive and potentially pathogenic tapeworm. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2007.

  10. Experimental evidence of vocal recognition in young and adult black-legged kittiwakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulard, Hervé; Aubin, T.; White, J.F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Danchin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Individual recognition is required in most social interactions, and its presence has been confirmed in many species. In birds, vocal cues appear to be a major component of recognition. Curiously, vocal recognition seems absent or limited in some highly social species such as the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla. Using playback experiments, we found that kittiwake chicks recognized their parents vocally, this capacity being detectable as early as 20 days after hatching, the youngest age tested. Mates also recognized each other's long calls. Some birds reacted to their partner's voice when only a part of the long call was played back. Nevertheless, only about a third of the tested birds reacted to their mate's or parents' call and we were unable to detect recognition among neighbours. We discuss the low reactivity of kittiwakes in relation to their cliff-nesting habit and compare our results with evidence of vocal recognition in other larids. ?? 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  11. Sharks shape the geometry of a selfish seal herd: experimental evidence from seal decoys

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Alta; O'Riain, M. Justin

    2010-01-01

    Many animals respond to predation risk by forming groups. Evolutionary explanations for group formation in previously ungrouped, but loosely associated prey have typically evoked the selfish herd hypothesis. However, despite over 600 studies across a diverse array of taxa, the critical assumptions of this hypothesis have remained collectively untested, owing to several confounding problems in real predator–prey systems. To solve this, we manipulated the domains of danger of Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) decoys to provide evidence that a selfish reduction in a seals' domain of danger results in a proportional reduction in its predation risk from ambush shark attacks. This behaviour confers a survival advantage to individual seals within a group and explains the evolution of selfish herds in a prey species. These findings empirically elevate Hamilton's selfish herd hypothesis to more than a ‘theoretical curiosity’. PMID:19793737

  12. The Impact of Smoking Bans on Smoking and Consumer Behavior: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Boes, Stefan; Marti, Joachim; Maclean, Johanna Catherine

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we exploit the progressive implementation of smoking bans in public venues at the state level in Switzerland to evaluate both the direct effects on smoking and the potential unintended consequences of these legislations on consumer behaviors as measured by visiting restaurants/bars and discos ('going out'). Our results indicate that public venue smoking bans in Switzerland reduce smoking rates, but the findings do not emerge until 1 year following the ban. This pattern of results is consistent with delays in ban enforcement on the part of business owners, difficulties in changing addictive behaviors such as smoking, and/or learning on the part of smokers. We find evidence that smoking bans influence going-out behavior and there is substantial heterogeneity across venue and consumer characteristics. PMID:25251559

  13. Thioredoxin System Regulation in the Central Nervous System: Experimental Models and Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Gonsebatt, María E.; Guevara, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species produced continuously during oxidative metabolism are generated at very high rates in the brain. Therefore, defending against oxidative stress is an essential task within the brain. An important cellular system against oxidative stress is the thioredoxin system (TS). TS is composed of thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, and NADPH. This review focuses on the evidence gathered in recent investigations into the central nervous system, specifically the different brain regions in which the TS is expressed. Furthermore, we address the conditions that modulate the thioredoxin system in both, animal models and the postmortem brains of human patients associated with the most common neurodegenerative disorders, in which the thioredoxin system could play an important part. PMID:24723994

  14. Camera perspective bias in videotaped confessions: experimental evidence of its perceptual basis.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Jennifer J; Lassiter, G Daniel; Schmidt, Heather C; Snyder, Celeste J

    2006-12-01

    The camera perspective from which a criminal confession is videotaped influences later assessments of its voluntariness and the suspect's guilt. Previous research has suggested that this camera perspective bias is rooted in perceptual rather than conceptual processes, but these data are strictly correlational. In 3 experiments, the authors directly manipulated perceptual processing to provide stronger evidence of its mediational role. Prior to viewing a videotape of a simulated confession, participants were shown a photograph of the confessor's apparent victim. Participants in a perceptual interference condition were instructed to visualize the image of the victim in their minds while viewing the videotape; participants in a conceptual interference condition were instructed instead to rehearse an 8-digit number. Because mental imagery and actual perception draw on the same available resources, the authors anticipated that the former, but not the latter, interference task would disrupt the camera perspective bias, if indeed it were perceptually mediated. Results supported this conclusion. PMID:17154769

  15. Experimental evidence that keeping eggs dry is a mechanism for the antimicrobial effects of avian incubation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alba, Liliana; Oborn, Allison; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2010-12-01

    Avian incubation dramatically reduces the abundance and diversity of microbial assemblages on eggshells, and this effect has been hypothesized as an adaptive explanation for partial incubation, the bouts of incubation that some birds perform during the egg-laying period. However, the mechanisms for these antimicrobial effects are largely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that microbial inhibition is partly achieved through removal of liquid water, which generally enhances microbial growth, from eggshells, and experimentally tested this hypothesis in two ways. First, we placed the first- and second-laid eggs of tree swallow ( Tachycineta bicolor) clutches in unincubated holding nests with either ambient or increased water on eggshells. Second, we added water to eggshells in naturally partially incubated nests. We compared microbial growth on shells during a 5-day experimental period and found that, as predicted, both unincubated groups had higher microbial growth than naturally partially incubated controls, and that only in the absence of incubation did wetted eggs have higher microbial growth than unwetted eggs. Thus, we have shown that water increases microbial growth on eggshells and that incubation nullifies these effects, suggesting that removal of water from egg surfaces is one proximate mechanism for the antimicrobial effects of incubation.

  16. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: Experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F.; Nawrot, Martin P.

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors.

  17. Benthic Foraminifera as Proxies of Organic Flux: Experimental and Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zwaan, G. J.; Duijnstee, I. A. P.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Ernst, S. R.

    2003-04-01

    Food is one of the most important parameters in the marine realm, structuring faunal communities. Therefore, changing food flux from the mixed layer to the sea bottom is expected to be of great importance to the benthic community. In this poster we present data from 5 years of experimental work in which shallow and deeper water benthic foraminiferal associations were subjected to variable food fluxes, and even to artificial marine snow events. The experiments took place under well-controlled or well-monitored oxygen conditions. At the same time field research in the Adriatic Sea and the Levantine Basin suggests that variation in the input of nutrients greatly affects the benthic foraminiferal communities indeed, but mostly by variation of the oxygen content at the sea floor. This is confirmed by experiments. Deeper water assemblages, however, appear to be rather sensitive to changing food fluxes. In experiments with material from the Bay of Biscay high doses of organic matter result in significant response of the meiofauna: many microhabitat patterns shift to shallower depth. Some species, notably Epistominella exigua, respond after some weeks with increasing abundances; this suggests that they are good markers of eutrophic conditions. The main conclusion of experimental and field research is that short-term changes in associations are governed by the oxygen regime. Although on short time scales food does not have much effect in our experiments, it seems that on longer time scales food is of profound importance for structuring the foraminiferal community.

  18. Theoretical and experimental evidence for the post-cotunnite phase transition in zirconia at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke; Dekura, Haruhiko; Seto, Yusuke; Yagi, Takehiko

    2015-05-01

    A post-cotunnite phase transition in zirconia (ZrO2) at high pressure was investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. This study successfully demonstrated a cotunnite- to Fe2P-type phase transition. Static enthalpy difference (Δ H) calculations predicted the appearance of the Fe2P phase at 124 GPa (LDA) and 143 GPa (GGA), and experimental trials demonstrated the coexistence of the Fe2P and cotunnite phases at 175 GPa after heating to 3,000 K. Both phases were quenchable to ambient conditions. The volume of the Fe2P phase was slightly less (~Δ 0.6 %) than that of the cotunnite phase over the experimental pressure range, indicating that the Fe2P phase is the higher pressure phase. The coexistence of both phases in this study may be attributed to the slow kinetics of the phase transition resulting from the close structural relationship of the two phases. An Fe2P-type structural model can be derived by applying a simple operation to the cotunnite-type structure, consisting of a 1/2 shift of several zirconium arrangements parallel to the b-axis of the cotunnite-type unit cell. It is concluded that the high-pressure cotunnite-to-Fe2P phase transition may be a common trend in many dioxides.

  19. Experimental and clinical evidence for the protective role of progesterone in motoneuron degeneration and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Deniselle, M C; Garay, L; Meyer, M; Gargiulo-Monachelli, G; Labombarda, F; Gonzalez, S; Guennoun, R; Schumacher, M; De Nicola, Alejandro F

    2011-10-01

    Far beyond its role in reproduction, progesterone exerts neuro-protective, promyelinating, and anti-inflammatory effects in the nervous system. These effects are amplified under pathological conditions, implying that changes of the local environment sensitize nervous tissues to steroid therapy. The present survey covers our results of progesterone neuroprotection in a motoneuron neurodegeneration model and a neuroinflammation model. In the degenerating spinal cord of the Wobbler mouse, progesterone reverses the impaired expression of neurotrophins, increases enzymes of neurotransmission and metabolism, prevents oxidative damage of motoneurons and their vacuolar degeneration (paraptosis), and attenuates the development of mitochondrial abnormalities. After long-term treatment, progesterone also increases muscle strength and the survival of Wobbler mice. Subsequently, this review describes the effects of progesterone in mice with induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a commonly used model of multiple sclerosis. In EAE mice, progesterone attenuates the clinical severity, decreases demyelination and neuronal dysfunction, increases axonal counts, reduces the formation of amyloid precursor protein profiles, and decreases the aberrant expression of growth-associated proteins. These actions of progesterone may be due to multiple mechanisms, considering that classic nuclear receptors, extranuclear receptors, and membrane receptors are all expressed in the spinal cord. Although many aspects of progesterone action in humans remain unsolved, data provided by experimental models makes getting to this objective closer than previously expected. PMID:25961276

  20. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability.

    PubMed

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F; Nawrot, Martin P

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors. PMID:19391776

  1. Experimental evidence that livestock grazing intensity affects the activity of a generalist predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Nacho; Lambin, Xavier; Evans, Darren; Pakeman, Robin; Redpath, Steve

    2013-05-01

    Grazing by domestic ungulates has substantial impacts on ecosystem structure and composition. In grasslands of the northern hemisphere, livestock grazing limits populations of small mammals, which are a main food source for a variety of vertebrate predators. However, no experimental studies have described the impact of livestock grazing on vertebrate predators. We experimentally manipulated sheep and cattle grazing intensity in the Scottish uplands to test its impact on a relatively abundant small mammal, the field vole (Microtus agrestis), and its archetypal generalist predator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). We demonstrate that ungulate grazing had a strong consistent negative impact on both vole densities and indices of fox activity. Ungulate grazing did not substantially affect the relationship between fox activity and vole densities. However, the data suggested that, as grazing intensity increased i) fox activity indices tended to be higher when vole densities were low, and ii) the relationship between fox activity and vole density was weaker. All these patterns are surprising given the relative small scale of our experiment compared to large red fox territories in upland habitats of Britain, and suggest that domestic grazing intensity causes a strong response in the activity of generalist predators important for their conservation in grassland ecosystems.

  2. Theoretical and experimental evidence of level repulsion states and evanescent modes in sonic crystal stubbed waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Vasseur, J. O.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.; Hladky-Hennion, A. C.

    2012-02-01

    The complex band structures calculated using the extended plane wave expansion (EPWE) reveal the presence of evanescent modes in periodic systems, never predicted by the classical \\omega(\\vec {k}) methods, providing novel interpretations of several phenomena as well as a complete picture of the system. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally observe that in the ranges of frequencies where a deaf band is traditionally predicted, an evanescent mode with excitable symmetry appears, changing drastically the interpretation of the transmission properties. On the other hand, the simplicity of the sonic crystals in which only the longitudinal polarization can be excited is used to interpret, without loss of generality, the level repulsion between symmetric and antisymmetric bands in sonic crystals as the presence of an evanescent mode connecting both repelled bands. These evanescent modes, obtained using EPWE, explain both the attenuation produced in this range of frequencies and the transfer of symmetry from one band to the other in good agreement with both experimental results and multiple scattering predictions. Thus, the evanescent properties of the periodic system have been revealed to be necessary for the design of new acoustic and electromagnetic applications based on periodicity.

  3. Experimental evidence of population differences in reproductive investment conditional on environmental stochasticity.

    PubMed

    Gauthey, Zoé; Panserat, Stéphane; Elosegi, Arturo; Herman, Alexandre; Tentelier, Cédric; Labonne, Jacques

    2016-01-15

    Environmental stochasticity is expected to shape life histories of species, wherein organisms subjected to strong environmental variation should display adaptive response by being able to tune their reproductive investment. For riverine ecosystems, climate models forecast an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme events such as floods and droughts. The speed and the mechanisms by which organisms may adapt their reproductive investment are therefore of primary importance to understand how species will cope with such radical environmental changes. In the present study, we sampled spawners from two different populations of wild brown trout, originating from two environments with contrasting levels of flow stochasticity. We placed them in sympatry within an experimental channel during reproductive season. In one modality, water flow was maintained constant, whereas in another modality, water flow was highly variable. Reproductive investment of all individuals was monitored using weight and energetic plasma metabolite variation throughout the reproductive season. Only the populations originating from the most variable environment showed a plastic response to experimental manipulation of water flow, the females being able to reduce their weight variation (from 19.2% to 13.1%) and metabolites variations (from 84.2% to 18.6% for triglycerides for instance) under variable flow conditions. These results imply that mechanisms to cope with environmental stochasticity can differ between populations of the same species, where some populations can be plastic whereas other cannot. PMID:26406108

  4. Experimental Evidence of melt-brake at seismic rates in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Suppe, J.; Song, S.; Song, Y.; Yeh, E.; Dong, J.; Wang, C.; Yang, C.

    2011-12-01

    Frictional melts generated along seismic faults theoretically may act either as a lubricant or as a viscous brake. Present geological and geophysical evidence supports melt-lubrication, which is also in good agreement with extreme strength weakening in laboratory frictional experiments. On the contrary, the strengthening behavior of viscous melts at seismic rates is not well reported, especially in sedimentary rocks. Here we provide laboratory evidence of progressive increase in frictional resistance on sandstone at a slip rate of 1.3 m/s with melt generation. The produced melt/pseudotachylyte is observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and is in-situ analyzed with X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) in synchrotron radiation. These analytical results show that the formation of pseudotachylyte is composed of pulverized quartz grains suspending in amorphous melts from thermally decomposed clay minerals. The observation of TXM also indicates that the shapes of quartz grains in the slip zone vary from rounded in the central area to angular on the rim. In-situ microstructures and high frictional resistance of sandstones in experiments indicate that the dominant strengthening mechanism is possibly controlled by viscous melts with suspending quartz grains. The melt rheology at high slip rates is not well understood, but the frictional behavior of melt with nano-sized quartz grains appears to be rheopetic instead of melt lubrication and/or powder lubrication. Thus, it suggests that the first-time rupture of sedimentary faults is not lubricated by melts during earthquake; in contrast melts from thermally decomposed clay minerals with suspending quartz grains produced by faulting may be an important process for the dynamic strengthening of faults.

  5. Evidence evaluation: measure Z corresponds to human utility judgments better than measure L and optimal-experimental-design models.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Patrice; Marelli, Marco; D'Addario, Marco; Russo, Selena; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Evidence evaluation is a crucial process in many human activities, spanning from medical diagnosis to impression formation. The present experiments investigated which, if any, normative model best conforms to people's intuition about the value of the obtained evidence. Psychologists, epistemologists, and philosophers of science have proposed several models to account for people's intuition about the utility of the obtained evidence with respect either to a focal hypothesis or to a constellation of hypotheses. We pitted against each other the so-called optimal-experimental-design models (i.e., Bayesian diagnosticity, log₁₀ diagnosticity, information gain, Kullback-Leibler distance, probability gain, and impact) and measures L and Z to compare their ability to describe humans' intuition about the value of the obtained evidence. Participants received words-and-numbers scenarios concerning 2 hypotheses and binary features. They were asked to evaluate the utility of "yes" and "no" answers to questions about some features possessed in different proportions (i.e., the likelihoods) by 2 types of extraterrestrial creatures (corresponding to 2 mutually exclusive and exhaustive hypotheses). Participants evaluated either how an answer was helpful or how an answer decreased/increased their beliefs with respect either to a single hypothesis or to both hypotheses. We fitted mixed-effects models and used the Akaike information criterion and the Bayesian information criterion values to compare the competing models of the value of the obtained evidence. Overall, the experiments showed that measure Z was the best fitting model of participants' judgments of the value of obtained answers. We discussed the implications for the human hypothesis-evaluation process. PMID:24446753

  6. Experimental evidence of frequency and fluid effects in an icelandic basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelinet, Mathilde; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves; Schubnel, Alexandre; Geoffroy, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    An important area of geophysical research is based on the elastic properties variations in rocks. In the laboratory, the responses of the rock elastic velocities to stress changes in saturated or dry specimens have been studied extensively in the past using ultrasonic signals in the megahertz frequency range. However when seismic wave velocities are involved, a direct extrapolation from laboratory to field scale is not straightforward. Laboratory data are indeed obtained in the ultrasonic range, whereas field data from seismological methods are obtained at much lower frequencies (Hz). The interpretation of the seismic wave velocities, measured at the field scale, in terms of fluids and/or in terms of physical properties of the rock formation is complex. From a theoretical point of view, when cracks or pores are connected, stress can induce fluid flow from one inclusion to another; this is the squirt-flow effect. In saturated samples, several authors have shown that the measured velocities at high frequencies are generally faster than those predicted by the equations of Gassmann, which correspond to the low frequency limit of Biot's theory. In this study, we investigated the frequency and fluid effects through an experimental point of view. We conducted hydrostatic experiments on an icelandic basalt, characterized by a bimodal porosity (~1% of cracks and ~7 % of equant pores; the total porosity is ~8%). The bulk moduli were measured through two experimental methods: a classical one using ultrasonic P- and S-waves velocities (frequency 106 Hz), and a new one based on oscillation tests (frequency 10-2 Hz). Measurements have been performed in the pressure range of 0- 200 MPa, both for low frequency and high frequency. In dry conditions, no significant differences are observed between high and low frequency bulk moduli. However, in saturated conditions, two effects are highlighted: a physico-chemical effect emphasized by a difference between drained and dry moduli, and

  7. Molecular dynamics prediction and experimental evidence for density of normal and metastable liquid zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. P.; Yang, S. J.; Hu, L.; Wei, B.

    2016-06-01

    The density of normal and metastable undercooled liquid zirconium was predicted by performing molecular dynamics calculation with a system consisting of 4000 atoms and measured by electrostatic levitation experiments. The results show that the density increases linearly with the descending of temperature, including a maximum undercooling of 928 K. The density is 6.00 g cm-3 at the melting temperature, which agrees well with the experimental result of 6.06 g cm-3. Furthermore, the atomic number is increased to 32,000 on the basis of 4000 atoms and there appears only 0.02% difference. Besides, the pair distribution function was applied to display the atomic structure, which indicates the liquid structure change occurs at the first neighbor distance.

  8. Does changing behavioral intentions engender behavior change? A meta-analysis of the experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal

    2006-03-01

    Numerous theories in social and health psychology assume that intentions cause behaviors. However, most tests of the intention- behavior relation involve correlational studies that preclude causal inferences. In order to determine whether changes in behavioral intention engender behavior change, participants should be assigned randomly to a treatment that significantly increases the strength of respective intentions relative to a control condition, and differences in subsequent behavior should be compared. The present research obtained 47 experimental tests of intention-behavior relations that satisfied these criteria. Meta-analysis showed that a medium-to-large change in intention (d = 0.66) leads to a small-to-medium change in behavior (d = 0.36). The review also identified several conceptual factors, methodological features, and intervention characteristics that moderate intention-behavior consistency. PMID:16536643

  9. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR WATER FORMATION VIA OZONE HYDROGENATION ON DUST GRAINS AT 10 K

    SciTech Connect

    Mokrane, H.; Chaabouni, H.; Accolla, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.; Chehrouri, M.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2009-11-10

    The formation of water molecules from the reaction between ozone (O{sub 3}) and D-atoms is studied experimentally for the first time. Ozone is deposited on non-porous amorphous solid water ice (H{sub 2}O), and D-atoms are then sent onto the sample held at 10 K. HDO molecules are detected during the desorption of the whole substrate where isotope mixing takes place, indicating that water synthesis has occurred. The efficiency of water formation via hydrogenation of ozone is of the same order of magnitude as that found for reactions involving O-atoms or O{sub 2} molecules and exhibits no apparent activation barrier. These experiments validate the assumption made by models using ozone as one of the precursors of water formation via solid-state chemistry on interstellar dust grains.

  10. Adolescents' implicit theories predict desire for vengeance after peer conflicts: correlational and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Yeager, David S; Trzesniewski, Kali H; Tirri, Kirsi; Nokelainen, Petri; Dweck, Carol S

    2011-07-01

    Why do some adolescents respond to interpersonal conflicts vengefully, whereas others seek more positive solutions? Three studies investigated the role of implicit theories of personality in predicting violent or vengeful responses to peer conflicts among adolescents in Grades 9 and 10. They showed that a greater belief that traits are fixed (an entity theory) predicted a stronger desire for revenge after a variety of recalled peer conflicts (Study 1) and after a hypothetical conflict that specifically involved bullying (Study 2). Study 3 experimentally induced a belief in the potential for change (an incremental theory), which resulted in a reduced desire to seek revenge. This effect was mediated by changes in bad-person attributions about the perpetrators, feelings of shame and hatred, and the belief that vengeful ideation is an effective emotion-regulation strategy. Together, the findings illuminate the social-cognitive processes underlying reactions to conflict and suggest potential avenues for reducing violent retaliation in adolescents. PMID:21604865

  11. Evidence for distinct chronic wasting disease (CWD) strains in experimental CWD in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Perrott, Matthew R.; Sigurdson, Christina J.; Mason, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an evolving prion disease of cervids (deer, elk and moose) that has been recognized in North America and Korea. Infection of non-cervid reservoir or transport species in nature is not reported. However, the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is susceptible to CWD after experimental inoculation. Here, we report that infection of ferrets with either of two ferret CWD isolates by various routes of exposure has revealed biologically distinct strain-like properties distinguished by different clinical progression and survival period. The isolates of ferret CWD were also differentiated by the distribution of the infectious prion protein (PrPCWD) in the brain and periphery, and by the proteinase K sensitivity of PrPCWD. These findings suggest that diversity in prion conformers exists in CWD-infected cervids. PMID:21918005

  12. Experimental evidence needed to demonstrate inter- and trans-generational effects of ancestral experiences in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Brian G.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors routinely influence an organism’s biology. The inheritance or transmission of such influences to descendant generations would be an efficient mode of information transfer across generations. The developmental stage at which a specific environment is encountered by the ancestral generation, and the number of generations over which information about that environment is registered, determines an inter- vs. trans-generational effect of ancestral influence. This commentary will outline the distinction between these influences. While seductive in principle, inter- and trans-generational inheritance in mammals is a hotly debated area of research inquiry. We present constructive criticism of such inheritance, and suggest potential experimental avenues for reconciliation. Finally, epigenetic mechanisms present an avenue for gene regulation that is dynamic. We briefly discuss how such malleability affords the potential for a reversal of any detrimental environmental influences that might have adversely impacted ancestral or descendant generations. PMID:25154497

  13. Experimental evidence for shallow, slow-moving landslides activated by a decrease in ground temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, Tatsuya; Matsuura, Sumio; Okamoto, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    In order to understand the trigger mechanism of slow-moving landslides occurring in the early cold season from late autumn to winter, we investigated the effect of temperature on the shear strength of slip surface soils. Displacement-controlled and shear stress-controlled box shear experiments were performed on undisturbed slip zone soils under residual strength conditions. Test results conducted at temperatures from 9 to 25°C showed remarkable shear strength reductions with decreasing temperature. Creep-like slow shear displacements were induced by a decrease in temperature. These temperature-dependent shear behaviors are attributed to the rheological properties of hydrous smectite that dominantly compose the soil material along the failure surface. Our experimental results imply that ground temperature conditions influence slope instability, especially for shallow landslides occurring in smectite-bearing rock areas.

  14. Experimental evidence for proteins constituting virion components and particle morphogenesis of bacteriophage ZF40.

    PubMed

    Korol, Natalia; Van den Bossche, An; Romaniuk, Liudmyla; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Tovkach, Fedor

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophage ZF40 is the only currently available, temperate Myoviridae phage infecting the potato pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. Despite its unusual tail morphology, its major tail sheath and tube proteins remained uncharacterized after the initial genome annotation. Using ESI tandem mass-spectrometry, 24 structural proteins of the ZF40 virion were identified, with a sequence coverage ranging between 15.8% and 87.8%. The putative function of 16 proteins could be elucidated based on secondary structure analysis and conservative domain searches. The experimental annotation of 35% of the encoded gene products within the structural region of the genome represents a complete view of the virion structure, which can serve as the basis for future structural analysis as a model phage. PMID:26887841

  15. Direct experimental evidence of back-surface ion acceleration from laser-irradiated gold foils.

    PubMed

    Allen, Matthew; Patel, Pravesh K; Mackinnon, Andrew; Price, Dwight; Wilks, Scott; Morse, Edward

    2004-12-31

    Au foils were irradiated with a 100-TW, 100-fs laser at intensities greater than 10(20) W/cm2 producing proton beams with a total yield of approximately 10(11) and maximum proton energy of >9 MeV. Removing contamination from the back surface of Au foils with an Ar-ion sputter gun reduced the total yield of accelerated protons to less than 1% of the yield observed without removing contamination. Removing contamination from the front surface (laser-interaction side) of the target had no observable effect on the proton beam. We present a one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation that models the experiment. Both experimental and simulation results are consistent with the back-surface acceleration mechanism described in the text. PMID:15697987

  16. Experimental evidence for chick discrimination without recognition in a brood parasite host

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Recognition is considered a critical basis for discriminatory behaviours in animals. Theoretically, recognition and discrimination of parasitic chicks are not predicted to evolve in hosts of brood parasitic birds that evict nest-mates. Yet, an earlier study showed that host reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) of an evicting parasite, the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), can avoid the costs of prolonged care for unrelated young by deserting the cuckoo chick before it fledges. Desertion was not based on specific recognition of the parasite because hosts accept any chick cross-fostered into their nests. Thus, the mechanism of this adaptive host response remains enigmatic. Here, I show experimentally that the cue triggering this ‘discrimination without recognition’ behaviour is the duration of parental care. Neither the intensity of brood care nor the presence of a single-chick in the nest could explain desertions. Hosts responded similarly to foreign chicks, whether heterospecific or experimental conspecifics. The proposed mechanism of discrimination strikingly differs from those found in other parasite–host systems because hosts do not need an internal recognition template of the parasite's appearance to effectively discriminate. Thus, host defences against parasitic chicks may be based upon mechanisms qualitatively different from those operating against parasitic eggs. I also demonstrate that this discriminatory mechanism is non-costly in terms of recognition errors. Comparative data strongly suggest that parasites cannot counter-evolve any adaptation to mitigate effects of this host defence. These findings have crucial implications for the process and end-result of host–parasite arms races and our understanding of the cognitive basis of discriminatory mechanisms in general. PMID:17164201

  17. Isostaticity and Controlled Force Transmission in the Cytoskeleton: A Model Awaiting Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    A new model is proposed for force transmission through the cytoskeleton (CSK). A general discussion is first presented on the physical principles that underlie the modeling of this phenomenon. Some fundamental problems of conventional models—continuous and discrete—are examined. It is argued that mediation of focused forces is essential for good control over intracellular mechanical signals. The difficulties of conventional continuous models in describing such mediation are traced to a fundamental assumption rather than to their being continuous. Relevant advantages and disadvantages of continuous and discrete modeling are discussed. It is concluded that favoring discrete models is based on two misconceptions, which are clarified. The model proposed here is based on the idea that focused propagation of mechanical stimuli in frameworks over large distances (compared to the mesh size) can only occur when considerable regions of the CSK are isostatic. The concept of isostaticity is explained and a recently developed continuous isostaticity theory is briefly reviewed. The model enjoys several advantages: it leads to good control over force mediation; it explains nonuniform stresses and action at a distance; it is continuous, making it possible to model force propagation over long distances; and it enables prediction of individual force paths. To be isostatic, or nearly so, CSK networks must possess specific structural characteristics, and these are quantified. Finally, several experimental observations are interpreted using the new model and implications are discussed. It is also suggested that this approach may give insight into the dynamics of reorganization of the CSK. Many of the results are amenable to experimental measurements, providing a testing ground for the proposed picture, and generic experiments are suggested. PMID:16912215

  18. In-Situ and Experimental Evidence for Acidic Weathering of Rocks and Soils on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D.; Schroeder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH=0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low fluid-to-rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low fluid to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of FeO and MgO, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of FeO and MgO bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  19. The mechanics of sill inception, propagation and growth: Experimental evidence for rapid reduction in magmatic overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, J. L.; Boutelier, D.; Cruden, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    A model of magma propagation in the crust is presented using a series of analogue experiments, where dyed water is injected at a constant flux into layers of solidified gelatine. The gelatine layers are transparent and, when intruded, deform in an almost ideal-elastic manner under the experimental conditions (low gelatine concentration: 2.5 or 3 wt%, and low temperature: 5-10 °C). The upper gelatine layer was 1.0 to 1.5 times stiffer than the lower layer, with either a 'weak' or 'strong' interface strength between the gelatine layers. The gelatine is seeded with 20- 50 μm-diameter PMMA-RhB neutrally buoyant particles that are fluoresced by a pulsed, vertical laser sheet centred on the injection point. Digital image correlation (DIC) is used to calculate incremental strain and finite strain in the deforming host material as it is intruded. This is mapped in 2D for the developing experimental volcanic plumbing system that comprises a feeder dyke and sill. Since the gelatine deforms elastically, strain measurements correlate with stress. Our results indicate that, for constant magma flux, the moment of sill inception is characterised by a significant magmatic pressure decrease of up to ∼ 60%. This is evidenced by the rapid contraction of the feeder dyke at the moment the sill forms. Sill propagation is then controlled by the fracture properties of the weak interface, with fluid from the feeder dyke extracted to help grow the sill. Pressure drops during sill inception and growth are likely to be important in volcanic systems, where destabilisation of the magmatic plumbing system could trigger an eruption.

  20. Experimental evidence of statistical ensemble behavior in bed load sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathel, Siobhan L.; Furbish, David Jon; Schmeeckle, Mark W.

    2015-11-01

    A high-resolution data set obtained from high-speed imaging of coarse sand particles transported as bed load allows us to confidently describe the forms and qualities of the ensemble distributions of particle velocities, accelerations, hop distances, and traveltimes. Autocorrelation functions of frame-averaged values (and the decay of these functions) support the idea that the forms of these distributions become time invariant within the 5 s imaging interval. Distributions of streamwise and cross-stream particle velocities are exponential, consistent with previous experiments and theory. Importantly, streamwise particle velocities possess a "light" tail, where the largest velocities are limited by near-bed fluid velocities. Distributions of streamwise and cross-stream particle accelerations are Laplace in form and are centered on zero, consistent with equilibrium transport conditions. The majority of particle hops, measured start to stop, involve short displacements, and streamwise hop distances possess a Weibull distribution. In contrast to previous work, the distribution of traveltimes is exponential, consistent with a fixed temporal disentrainment rate. The Weibull distribution of hop distances is consistent with a decreasing spatial disentrainment rate and is related to the exponential distribution of traveltimes. By taking into account the effects of experimental censorship associated with a finite sampling window, the relationship between streamwise hop distances and traveltimes, Lx˜Tpα, likely involves an exponent of α ˜ 2. These experimental results—an exponential distribution of traveltimes Tp and a Weibull distribution of hop distances Lx with shape parameter k < 1—are consistent with a nonlinear relationship between these quantities with α > 1.

  1. The Catchment Isoscape: Theory and Experimental Evidence for the Isotopic Age of Water in a Critical Zone Observatory (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, C.; Thomas, E.; Sullivan, P. L.; Bhatt, G.; Yu, X.

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical controls for the 'Age' of water in upland watershed flow systems and present comprehensive experimental evidence to support the theory using stable isotopes of and at the Susquehanna/Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSH_CZO). In this context 'age' is defined as the time since water entered the watershed as precipitation. The paper first examines the theoretical basis for direct simulation of 'age' for environmental tracers in the unsaturated zone subject to dynamic flow and transport processes with mobile and immobile flow considered. The theory demonstrates that the residence time and age of an environmental tracer can be directly modeled without knowledge of the form of the underlying residence time distribution function and without adding any new parameters. On the physical side, the theory is applied to the apparent rapid attenuation of event and seasonal isotopic ratios with depth in the soil at the SSH_CZO. Comparison of the age model to experimental data provides evidence for the role of macropore-matrix flow partitioning during the non-growing cold season and root uptake from the immobile store during the growing season via transpiration and evaporation. Flow path changes during storm events are also inferred by comparing the distribution of groundwater and streamflow isotope histories.

  2. Experimental evidence for the basal generation place of the short-latency transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Moleti, A; Sisto, R; Lucertini, M

    2014-05-01

    Time-frequency analysis of the transient-evoked otoacoustic emission response was performed on a population of subjects affected by sensory-neural hearing loss characterized by a sharp audiometric profile, caused by firearm noise exposure (42 ears), and on a control population of normal-hearing subjects (84 ears). Time-frequency filtering permitted a careful evaluation of the relation between the audiometric profile and the spectral shape of the long- and short-latency otoacoustic components. Both filtered spectra closely follow the shape of the audiometric profile, with a frequency shift between them. The typical frequency shift was evaluated by averaging the otoacoustic spectra and the audiograms among groups of ears with the same cutoff frequency. Assuming that the otoacoustic emission source function depends on the local effectiveness of the cochlear amplifier, this experimental evidence suggests that the short-latency response is generated at a cochlear place displaced towards the base by about 0.5-1 mm with respect to the generation place of the long-latency component. The analysis of the control group demonstrates that, below 4 kHz, the observed effect is not dependent on the data acquisition and analysis procedure. These results confirm previous theoretical estimates and independent experimental evidence based on the measured latency difference between the two components. PMID:24815267

  3. Evidence of Shared Genome-Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rohan H C; Nugent, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A; Bidwell, Cinnamon L; McGeary, John E; Keller, Matthew C; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which additive genetic effects on trauma are shared with additive genetic effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate additive genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with additive genetic effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma. PMID:27214850

  4. Experimental evidence for phase separation in hydrogen-helium mixtures at Jovian planet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. W.; Brygoo, S.; Millot, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Jeanloz, R.; Loubeyre, P.

    2015-11-01

    Whether or not H-He mixtures phase separate in Jovian planets is important to our understanding of the structure and evolution of Jupiter and Saturn. Also integral to such planet models, as well as mechanisms for H-He phase separation, are the insulating-to-conducting and the molecular-to-atomic-hydrogen transitions in the H-He mixture. Coupling static and dynamic compression techniques has allowed us to make the first thermodynamic and transport measurements of H-He mixtures at deep Jovian planet conditions. These data provide evidence that the H-He fluid demixes at the high pressures and temperatures expected to exist deep inside Saturn and Jupiter. This phase separation may result in the differentiation of heavier helium clusters, leading to helium rain in the deep interior of Saturn and perhaps even in a significant outer layer of Jupiter. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Experimental evidence for an absorbing phase transition underlying yielding of a soft glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamanasa, K. Hima; Gokhale, Shreyas; Sood, A. K.; Ganapathy, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    A characteristic feature of solids ranging from foams to atomic crystals is the existence of a yield point, which marks the threshold stress beyond which a material undergoes plastic deformation. In hard materials, it is well-known that local yield events occur collectively in the form of intermittent avalanches. The avalanche size distributions exhibit power-law scaling indicating the presence of self-organized criticality. These observations led to predictions of a non-equilibrium phase transition at the yield point. By contrast, for soft solids like gels and dense suspensions, no such predictions exist. In the present work, by combining particle scale imaging with bulk rheology, we provide a direct evidence for a non-equilibrium phase transition governing yielding of an archetypal soft solid - a colloidal glass. The order parameter and the relaxation time exponents revealed that yielding is an absorbing phase transition that belongs to the conserved directed percolation universality class. We also identified a growing length scale associated with clusters of particles with high Debye-Waller factor. Our findings highlight the importance of correlations between local yield events and may well stimulate the development of a unified description of yielding of soft solids.

  6. Diffusion-perfusion relationships in skeletal muscle: models and experimental evidence from inert gas washout.

    PubMed

    Piiper, J; Meyer, M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the dependence of blood-tissue gas exchange upon diffusion, the simultaneous washout of two inert gases of differing diffusivity was investigated in isolated-perfused dog gastrocnemius preparations. The muscles were equilibrated with CH4 and SF6 via arterial blood. The washout kinetics were determined from venous blood samples analyzed by gas chromatography. The results revealed the following features: The washout of the test gases was pronouncedly multi-exponential, and could be described by three exponential components when analyzed to 5% of the initial value. The non-exponential washout was attributed to unequal distribution of capillary blood flow to tissue volume. The mean ratio of washout rate constants CH4/SF6 was within 1.10-1.25 and was even smaller than the ratio expected for pure perfusion limitation (1.46). Therefore, no evidence for effective tissue-blood diffusion limitation was obtained. The observed washout rate constant ratio could be explained by a model with veno-arterial back diffusion which more strongly retards washout kinetics of the better diffusible gas (CH4) as compared to the less diffusible gas (SF6). PMID:6731103

  7. Experimental evidence for an intraspecific Janzen-Connell effect mediated by soil biota.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xubing; Etienne, Rampal S; Liang, Minxia; Wang, Yongfan; Yu, Shixiao

    2015-03-01

    The negative effect of soil pathogens on seedling survival varies considerably among conspecific individuals, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. For variation between heterospecifics, a common explanation is the Janzen-Connell effect: negative density dependence in survival due to specialized pathogens aggregating on common hosts. We test whether an intraspecific Janzen-Connell effect exists, i.e., whether the survival chances of one population's seedlings surrounded by a different conspecific population increase with genetic difference, spatial distance, and trait dissimilarity between them. In a shade-house experiment, we grew seedlings of five populations of each of two subtropical tree species (Castanopsis fissa and Canarium album) for which we measured genetic distance using intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis and eight common traits/characters, and we treated them with soil material or soil biota filtrate collected from different populations. We found that the relative survival rate increased with increasing dissimilarity measured by spatial distance, genetic distance, and trait differences between the seedling and the population around which the soil was collected. This effect disappeared after soil sterilization. Our results provide evidence that genetic variation, trait similarity, and spatial distance can explain intraspecific variation in plant-soil biotic interactions and suggest that limiting similarity also occurs at the intraspecific level. PMID:26236863

  8. Solvation Phenomena in Dilute Solutions: Formal, Experimental Evidence, and Modeling Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A

    2013-01-01

    We review the fundamentals underlying a general molecular-based formalism for the microscopic interpretation of the solvation phenomena involving sparingly soluble solutes in compressible media, an approach that hinges around the unambiguous splitting of the species correlation function integrals into short-(finite) and long-ranged (diverging) contributions at infinite dilution, where this condition is taken as the reference system for the derivation of composition expansions. Then, we invoke the formalism (a) to illustrate the well-behaved nature of the solvation contributions to the mechanical partial molecular properties of solutes at infinite dilution, (b) to guide the development of, and provide molecular-based support to, the macroscopic modeling of high-temperature dilute aqueous-electrolyte solutions, (c) to study solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near-critical solvents in an attempt to understand from a microscopic perspective the macroscopic evidence regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects, and (d) to interpret the microscopic mechanism behind synergistic solvation effects involving either co-solutes or co-solvents, and provide a molecular argument on the unsuitability of the van der Waals one-fluid (vdW-1f) mixing rules for the 2 description of weakly attractive solutes in compressible solvents. Finally, we develop thermodynamically consistent perturbation expansions, around the infinite dilution reference, for the species residual properties in binary and ternary mixtures, and discuss the theoretical and modeling implications behind ad hoc first-order truncated expansions.

  9. Experimental evidence for the functional relevance of anion-π interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Ryan E.; Hennig, Andreas; Weimann, Dominik P.; Emery, Daniel; Ravikumar, Velayutham; Montenegro, Javier; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Gabutti, Sandro; Mayor, Marcel; Mareda, Jiri; Schalley, Christoph A.; Matile, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Attractive in theory and confirmed to exist, anion-π interactions have never really been seen at work. To catch them in action, we prepared a collection of monomeric, cyclic and rod-shaped naphthalenediimide transporters. Their ability to exert anion-π interactions was demonstrated by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in combination with theoretical calculations. To relate this structural evidence to transport activity in bilayer membranes, affinity and selectivity sequences were recorded. π-acidification and active-site decrowding increased binding, transport and chloride > bromide > iodide selectivity, and supramolecular organization inverted acetate > nitrate to nitrate > acetate selectivity. We conclude that anion-π interactions on monomeric surfaces are ideal for chloride recognition, whereas their supramolecular enhancement by π,π-interactions appears perfect to target nitrate. Chloride transporters are relevant to treat channelopathies, and nitrate sensors to monitor cellular signaling and cardiovascular diseases. A big impact on organocatalysis can be expected from the stabilization of anionic transition states on chiral π-acidic surfaces.

  10. Experimental Evidence of an Eco-evolutionary Feedback during Adaptive Divergence.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Blake; Aebischer, Thierry; Sullam, Karen E; Lundsgaard-Hansen, Bänz; Seehausen, Ole

    2016-02-22

    Differences in how organisms modify their environment can evolve rapidly and might influence adaptive population divergence. In a common garden experiment in aquatic mesocosms, we found that adult stickleback from a recently diverged pair of lake and stream populations had contrasting effects on ecosystem metrics. These modifications were caused by both genetic and plastic differences between populations and were sometimes comparable in magnitude to those caused by the presence/absence of stickleback. Lake and stream fish differentially affected the biomass of zooplankton and phytoplankton, the concentration of phosphorus, and the abundance of several prey (e.g., copepods) and non-prey (e.g., cyanobacteria) species. The adult-mediated effects on mesocosm ecosystems influenced the survival and growth of a subsequent generation of juvenile stickleback reared in the same mesocosms. The prior presence of adults decreased the overall growth rate of juveniles, and the prior presence of stream adults lowered overall juvenile survival. Among the survivors, lake juveniles grew faster than co-occurring stream juveniles, except in mesocosm ecosystems previously modified by adult lake fish that were reared on plankton. Overall, our results provide evidence for reciprocal interactions between ecosystem dynamics and evolutionary change (i.e., eco-evolutionary feedbacks) in the early stages of adaptive population divergence. PMID:26804555

  11. Is there an association between hypercholesterolemia and depression? Behavioral evidence from the LDLr(-/-) mouse experimental model.

    PubMed

    Engel, Daiane Fátima; de Oliveira, Jade; Lopes, Jadna Bogado; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; de Souza Brocardo, Patricia; de Bem, Andreza Fabro

    2016-09-15

    Although epidemiological studies have reported an association between hypercholesterolemia and mood disorders, there is a lack of data regarding depressive-like behavior in animal models of hypercholesterolemia. To address these questions, we assessed depressive-like behavior and hippocampal and cortical monoaminergic metabolism in three-month-old, low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr(-/-)) and C57BL/6 wild-type mice. The LDLr(-/-) mice exhibited depressive-like behavior in the sucrose preference test, splash test, and tail suspension test. Increased monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B activity was evidenced in the hippocampus of LDLr(-/-) mice. Furthermore, to address whether or not cholesterol modulates MAO activity, we exposed SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to human isolated low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Notably, LDL increased the activity of MAO-A and stimulated the reactive species generation in vitro. These findings indicate that depressive-like behavior in hypercholesterolemic mice is accompanied by alterations in the monoaminergic metabolism, providing new evidence about the association between hypercholesterolemia and depression. PMID:27185735

  12. Glycerol Is a Suberin Monomer. New Experimental Evidence for an Old Hypothesis1

    PubMed Central

    Moire, Laurence; Schmutz, Alain; Buchala, Antony; Yan, Bin; Stark, Ruth E.; Ryser, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    The monomer composition of the esterified part of suberin can be determined using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technology and is accordingly believed to be well known. However, evidence was presented recently indicating that the suberin of green cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv Green Lint) fibers contains substantial amounts of esterified glycerol. This observation is confirmed in the present report by a sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction of membrane lipids and by a developmental study, demonstrating the correlated accumulation of glycerol and established suberin monomers. Corresponding amounts of glycerol also occur in the suberin of the periderm of cotton stems and potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers. A periderm preparation of wound-healing potato tuber storage parenchyma was further purified by different treatments. As the purification proceeded, the concentration of glycerol increased at about the same rate as that of α,ω-alkanedioic acids, the most diagnostic suberin monomers. Therefore, it is proposed that glycerol is a monomer of suberins in general and can cross-link aliphatic and aromatic suberin domains, corresponding to the electron-translucent and electron-opaque suberin lamellae, respectively. This proposal is consistent with the reported dimensions of the electron-translucent suberin lamellae. PMID:10069853

  13. Phylogenetic and experimental evidence for host-specialized cryptic species in a biotrophic oomycete.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, Mélanie; Mestre, Pere; Comont, Gwenaelle; Lehman, Brian L; Schilder, Annemiek; Delmotte, François

    2013-01-01

    Assortative mating resulting from host plant specialization has been proposed to facilitate rapid ecological divergence in biotrophic plant pathogens. Downy mildews, a major group of biotrophic oomycetes, are prime candidates for testing speciation by host plant specialization. Here, we combined a phylogenetic and morphological approach with cross-pathogenicity tests to investigate host plant specialization and host range expansion in grapevine downy mildew. This destructive disease is caused by Plasmopara viticola, an oomycete endemic to North America on wild species and cultivated grapevines. Multiple genealogies and sporangia morphology provide evidence that P. viticola is a complex of four cryptic species, each associated with different host plants. Cross-inoculation experiments showed complete host plant specialization on Parthenocissus quinquefolia and on Vitis riparia, whereas cryptic species found on V. aestivalis, V. labrusca and V. vinifera were revealed to be less specific. We reconstructed the recent host range expansion of P. viticola from wild to cultivated grapevines, and showed that it was accompanied by an increase in aggressiveness of the pathogen. This case study on grapevine downy mildew illustrates how biotrophic plant pathogens can diversify by host plant specialization and emerge in agrosystems by shifting to cultivated hosts. These results might have important implications for viticulture, including breeding for resistance and disease management. PMID:23153246

  14. Experimental evidence of pharmacological management of anchorage in Orthodontics: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-González, Felipe José; Cañigral, Aránzazu; Balbontín-Ayala, Felipe; Gonzalo-Orden, José Manuel; de Carlos, Felix; Cobo, Teresa; Fernández-Vázquez, Jose Pedro; Sánchez-Lasheras, Fernando; Vega, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Orthodontic anchorage is one of the most challenging aspects of Orthodontics. Preventing undesired movement of teeth could result in safer and less complicated orthodontic treatment. Recently, several reviews have been published about the effects of different molecules on bone physiology and the clinical side effects in Orthodontics. However, the effects of local application of these substances on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement have not been assessed. Objectives: The aim of this research was to analyze the scientific evidence published in the literature about the effects of different molecules on orthodontic anchorage. Methods: The literature was systematically reviewed using PubMed/Medline, Scopus and Cochrane databases from 2000 up to July 31st, 2014. Articles were independently selected by two different researchers based on previously established inclusion and exclusion criteria, with a concordance Kappa index of 0.86. The methodological quality of the reviewed papers was performed. Results: Search strategy identified 270 articles. Twenty-five of them were selected after application of inclusion/exclusion criteria, and only 11 qualified for final analysis. Molecules involved in orthodontic anchorage were divided into three main groups: osteoprotegerin (OPG), bisphosphonates (BPs) and other molecules (OMs). Conclusions: Different drugs are able to alter the bone remodeling cycle, influencing osteoclast function and, therefore, tooth movement. Thus, they could be used in order to provide maximal anchorage while preventing undesired movements. OPG was found the most effective molecule in blocking the action of osteoclasts, thereby reducing undesired movements. PMID:26560822

  15. Experimental evidence for a cost of resistance to the fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, for the palmate newt, Lissotriton helveticus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causative agent of chytridiomycosis, is decimating amphibians worldwide. Unsurprisingly, the majority of studies have therefore concentrated on documenting morbidity and mortality of susceptible species and projecting population consequences as a consequence of this emerging infectious disease. Currently, there is a paucity of studies investigating the sub-lethal costs of Bd in apparently asymptomatic species, particularly in controlled experimental conditions. Here we report the consequences of a single dose of B. dendrobatidis zoospores on captive adult palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus) for morphological and behavioural traits that associate with reproductive success. Results A single exposure to ~2000 zoospores induced a subclinical Bd infection. One week after inoculation 84% of newts tested positive for Bd, and of those, 98% had apparently lost the infection by the day 30. However, exposed newts suffered significant mass loss compared with control newts, and those experimental newts removing higher levels of Bd lost most mass. We found no evidence to suggest that three secondary sexual characteristics (areas of dorsal crest and rear foot webbing, and length of tail filament) were reduced between experimental versus control newts; in fact, rear foot webbing was 26% more expansive at the end of the experiment in exposed newts. Finally, compared with unexposed controls, exposure to Bd was associated with a 50% earlier initiation of the non-reproductive terrestrial phase. Conclusions Our results suggest that Bd has measureable, but sub-lethal effects, on adult palmate newts, at least under the laboratory conditions presented. We conclude that the effects reported are most likely to be mediated through the initiation of costly immune responses and/or tissue repair mechanisms. Although we found no evidence of hastened secondary sexual trait regression, through reducing individual body condition and potentially

  16. Experimental evidence of dust-induced shaping of surface dissolved organic matter in the oligotrophic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Villena, Elvira; Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Charrière, Bruno; Delmont, Anne; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Marc, Tedetti; Wambeke France, Van

    2016-04-01

    Recent research has shown that dust deposition may impact the functioning of the microbial loop. On one hand, it enhances bacterial mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM), and so may limit the carbon export. On the other hand, the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and DOM in the surface ocean can increase the residence time of DOM, promoting its export and sequestration in the deep ocean. The main goal of this study was to experimentally assess whether the bacterial response to dust deposition is prone to have an effect on the residence time of the DOM pool by modifying its bioavailability. The bacterial degradation of DOM was followed on dust-amended and control treatments during long-term incubations. Dissolved organic carbon concentration decreased by 9 μmol L-1 over the course of the experiment in both control and dust-enriched conditions, with no significant differences between treatments. However, significant differences in DOM optical properties appeared at the latest stage of the incubations suggesting an accumulation of DOM of high molecular weight in the dust-amended treatment. At the end of the incubations, the remaining water was filtered and re-used as a new culture medium for a bacterial natural assemblage. Bacterial abundance and production was lower in the treatment previously submitted to dust enrichment, suggesting a decrease in DOM lability after a dust deposition event. These preliminary results point to a new link between dust and ocean carbon cycle through the modification of the residence time of the DOM pool.

  17. A Spotlight on Liquefaction: Evidence from Clinical Settings and Experimental Models in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2011-01-01

    Liquefaction is one of the most intriguing aspects of human tuberculosis. It is a major cause of the transition from the infection to active disease (tuberculosis, TB) as well as the transmission of M. tuberculosis to other persons. This paper reviews the natural history of liquefaction in humans from a pathological and radiological point of view and discusses how the experimental models available can be used to address the topic of liquefaction and cavity formation. Different concepts that have been related to liquefaction, from the influence of immune response to mechanical factors, are reviewed. Synchronic necrosis or apoptosis of infected macrophages in a close area, together with an ineffective fibrosis, appears to be clue in this process, in which macrophages, the immune response, and bacillary load interact usually in a particular scenario: the upper lobes of the lung. The summary would be that even if being a stochastic effect, liquefaction would result if the organization of the intragranulomatous necrosis (by means of fibrosis) would be disturbed. PMID:21437230

  18. Testing Basic Laws of Gravitation - Are Our Postulates on Dynamics and Gravitation Supported by Experimental Evidence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus

    Gravity is the most fundamental interaction; it not only describes a particular interaction between matter, but also encompasses issues such as the notion of space and time, the role of the observer, and the relativistic measurement process. Gravity is geometry and, in consequence, allows the existence of horizons and black holes, nontrivial topologies, a cosmological big bang, time-travel, warp drive, and other phenomena unknown in nonrelativistic physics. Here we present the experimental basis of General Relativity, addressing its foundations encoded in the Einstein Equivalence Principle and its predictions in the weak and strong gravity regimes. We discuss several approaches in the search to reveal an influence of the much sought-after quantum theory of gravity. We emphasize assumptions underlying the dynamics - for example, Newton's axioms and conservation laws - and the current extent to which they are supported by experiment. We discuss conditions under which gravity can be transformed away locally, and examine higher order time derivatives in the equations of motion.

  19. Experimental evidence regarding the pressure dependence of fission track annealing in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. S.; Lelarge, M. L. M. V.; Conceicao, R. V.; Balzaretti, N. M.

    2014-03-01

    The main purposes of fission track thermochronology are unravelling the thermal histories of sedimentary basins, determining uplift and denudation rates, identifying the structural evolution of orogenic belts, determining sedimentary provenance, and dating volcanic rocks. The effect of temperature on fission tracks is well known and is used to determine the thermal history; however, the effect of pressure on the stability of tracks is still under debate. The present work aims to understand the role of pressure on the annealing kinetics of apatite fission tracks. The samples of Durango apatite used in our experiments were chosen for their international recognition as a calibration standard for geological dating. Neutron irradiation of the samples, after total annealing of their spontaneous tracks, produced induced tracks with homogeneous densities and lengths. The effect of pressure associated with temperature on fission track annealing was verified by experimental procedures using a hydraulic press of 1000 t with a toroidal chamber profile. The experiments consisted of a combination of applying 2 and 4 GPa with 20,150,190,235, and 290 °C for 1 and 10 h. The annealing rate was analysed by measuring the lengths of the fission tracks after each experiment using optical microscopy. The results demonstrate that the annealing of apatite fission tracks has a pressure dependence for samples subjected to 2 and 4 GPa. However, when extrapolated to pressures of ⩽150 MPa, compatible with the normal geological context in which apatite fission track methodology is broadly used, this dependence becomes insignificant compared to the temperature effect.

  20. First experimental evidence for female mate choice in a nocturnal primate.

    PubMed

    Craul, Mathias; Zimmermann, Elke; Radespiel, Ute

    2004-10-01

    Female mate choice can be hypothesised in most nocturnal primates, since females show a higher investment in their offspring than males. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate if female grey mouse lemurs perform mate choice and whether age, relatedness (to the male), or male advertisement call activity systematically influence their decisions. A two-way mate choice design was developed in which females could choose between two males. Mate choice was deduced from the time spent in proximity to the males and from mating behaviour. During oestrus 12 of 17 females participated actively in the experiment and all of them showed either a significant spatial (n = 11) or behavioural (n = 1) preference for one male. In four cases copulations were observed. The influence of age on female mate choice was not statistically significant. In the cases with copulations, however, females mostly preferred the older male. This might indicate a preference for older age as an indicator of experience, fitness, and/or status. The influence of relatedness on female mate choice could not be definitely clarified. However, results imply a mechanism of kin recognition on the basis of familiarity. In the majority of choices, females preferred the male with higher trill call activity. Since trill call activity correlates with the relative dominance status of males, these results suggest an importance of the male dominance status for female mate choice in grey mouse lemurs. Altogether our findings indicate that females use a complex of different cues to choose their mates. PMID:15241637

  1. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils.

    PubMed

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F; Currano, Ellen D; Jacobs, Louis L; Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng; Gabbott, Sarah E; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-13

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns. PMID:26417094

  2. Yes, it turns: experimental evidence of pearl rotation during its formation

    PubMed Central

    Gueguen, Yannick; Czorlich, Yann; Mastail, Max; Le Tohic, Bruno; Defay, Didier; Lyonnard, Pierre; Marigliano, Damien; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Bari, Hubert; Lo, Cedrik; Chabrier, Sébastien; Le Moullac, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Cultured pearls are human creations formed by inserting a nucleus and a small piece of mantle tissue into a living shelled mollusc, usually a pearl oyster. Although many pearl observations intuitively suggest a possible rotation of the nucleated pearl inside the oyster, no experimental demonstration of such a movement has ever been done. This can be explained by the difficulty of observation of such a phenomenon in the tissues of a living animal. To investigate this question of pearl rotation, a magnetometer system was specifically engineered to register magnetic field variations with magnetic sensors from movements of a magnetic nucleus inserted in the pearl oyster. We demonstrated that a continuous movement of the nucleus inside the oyster starts after a minimum of 40 days post-grafting and continues until the pearl harvest. We measured a mean angular speed of 1.27° min−1 calculated for four different oysters. Rotation variability was observed among oysters and may be correlated to pearl shape and defects. Nature's ability to generate so amazingly complex structures like a pearl has delivered one of its secrets. PMID:26587271

  3. Evidence of gating in hundred nanometer diameter pores: an experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E; Schaldach, C M; Johnson, M R; Sawvel, A; Bourcier, W L; Wilson, W D

    2006-01-11

    We report on the observation of an unexpected gating mechanism at the 100 nm scale on track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Transport measurements of methyl viologen performed by absorption spectroscopy under various pH conditions demonstrated that perfect gating was achieved for 100 nm diameter pores at pH 2, while the positively charged molecular ions moved through the membrane according to diffusion laws at pH 5. An oppositely charged molecular ion, naphthalene disulfonate, in the same membrane, showed the opposite trend: diffusion of the negative ion at pH 2 and perfect gating at pH 5. The influence of parameters such as ionic strength and membrane surface coating were also investigated. A theoretical study of the system shows that at this larger length scale the magnitude of the electric field in the vicinity of the pores is too small to account for the experimental observations, rather, it is the surface trapping of the mobile ion (Cl{sup -} or Na{sup +}) which gives rise to the gating phenomena. This surprising effect might have potential applications for high-throughput separation of large molecules and bio-organisms.

  4. Quantum Criticality in an Ising Chain: Experimental Evidence for Emergent E8 Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldea, R.; Tennant, D. A.; Wheeler, E. M.; Wawrzynska, E.; Prabhakaran, D.; Telling, M.; Habicht, K.; Smeibidl, P.; Kiefer, K.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions take place between distinct phases of matter at zero temperature. Near the transition point, exotic quantum symmetries can emerge that govern the excitation spectrum of the system. A symmetry described by the E8 Lie group with a spectrum of eight particles was long predicted to appear near the critical point of an Ising chain. We realize this system experimentally by using strong transverse magnetic fields to tune the quasi-one-dimensional Ising ferromagnet CoNb2O6 (cobalt niobate) through its critical point. Spin excitations are observed to change character from pairs of kinks in the ordered phase to spin-flips in the paramagnetic phase. Just below the critical field, the spin dynamics shows a fine structure with two sharp modes at low energies, in a ratio that approaches the golden mean predicted for the first two meson particles of the E8 spectrum. Our results demonstrate the power of symmetry to describe complex quantum behaviors.

  5. Quantum criticality in an Ising chain: experimental evidence for emergent E8 symmetry.

    PubMed

    Coldea, R; Tennant, D A; Wheeler, E M; Wawrzynska, E; Prabhakaran, D; Telling, M; Habicht, K; Smeibidl, P; Kiefer, K

    2010-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions take place between distinct phases of matter at zero temperature. Near the transition point, exotic quantum symmetries can emerge that govern the excitation spectrum of the system. A symmetry described by the E8 Lie group with a spectrum of eight particles was long predicted to appear near the critical point of an Ising chain. We realize this system experimentally by using strong transverse magnetic fields to tune the quasi-one-dimensional Ising ferromagnet CoNb2O6 (cobalt niobate) through its critical point. Spin excitations are observed to change character from pairs of kinks in the ordered phase to spin-flips in the paramagnetic phase. Just below the critical field, the spin dynamics shows a fine structure with two sharp modes at low energies, in a ratio that approaches the golden mean predicted for the first two meson particles of the E8 spectrum. Our results demonstrate the power of symmetry to describe complex quantum behaviors. PMID:20056884

  6. Impact of Bisphenol A on the Cardiovascular System — Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoqian; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous plasticizing agent used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. There is well-documented and broad human exposure to BPA. The potential risk that BPA poses to the human health has attracted much attention from regulatory agencies and the general public, and has been extensively studied. An emerging and rapidly growing area in the study of BPA’s toxicity is its impact on the cardiovascular (CV) system. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that higher urinary BPA concentration in humans is associated with various types of CV diseases, including angina, hypertension, heart attack and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Experimental studies have demonstrated that acute BPA exposure promotes the development of arrhythmias in female rodent hearts. Chronic exposure to BPA has been shown to result in cardiac remodeling, atherosclerosis, and altered blood pressure in rodents. The underlying mechanisms may involve alteration of cardiac Ca2+ handling, ion channel inhibition/activation, oxidative stress, and genome/transcriptome modifications. In this review, we discuss these recent findings that point to the potential CV toxicity of BPA, and highlight the knowledge gaps in this growing research area. PMID:25153468

  7. Experimental evidence of impacts of an invasive parakeet on foraging behavior of native birds.

    PubMed

    Peck, Hannah L; Pringle, Henrietta E; Marshall, Harry H; Owens, Ian P F; Lord, Alexa M

    2014-05-01

    Resource competition is one potential behavioral mechanism by which invasive species can impact native species, but detecting this competition can be difficult due to the interactions that variable environmental conditions can have on species behavior. This is particularly the case in urban habitats where the disturbed environment can alter natural behavior from that in undisturbed habitats. The rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri), is an increasingly common invasive species, predominantly associated with large urban centers. Using an experimental approach, we tested the behavioral responses of native garden birds in response to the presence of a rose-ringed parakeet versus the presence of a similarly sized and dominant native bird, the great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major). Parakeet presence significantly reduced feeding rates and increased vigilance among native birds compared with our control treatments. Of visits made by native birds in the presence of a parakeet, feeding was more likely to occur in sites within the parakeet range compared with sites outside, suggesting some habituation of native birds has occurred following prior exposure to parakeets but overall foraging behavior is still disrupted. The results of our study suggest that nonnative species can have complex and subtle impacts on native fauna and show that a nonnative competitor can impact native species simply through their presence near resources. PMID:24822022

  8. Experimental evidence of impacts of an invasive parakeet on foraging behavior of native birds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Resource competition is one potential behavioral mechanism by which invasive species can impact native species, but detecting this competition can be difficult due to the interactions that variable environmental conditions can have on species behavior. This is particularly the case in urban habitats where the disturbed environment can alter natural behavior from that in undisturbed habitats. The rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri), is an increasingly common invasive species, predominantly associated with large urban centers. Using an experimental approach, we tested the behavioral responses of native garden birds in response to the presence of a rose-ringed parakeet versus the presence of a similarly sized and dominant native bird, the great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major). Parakeet presence significantly reduced feeding rates and increased vigilance among native birds compared with our control treatments. Of visits made by native birds in the presence of a parakeet, feeding was more likely to occur in sites within the parakeet range compared with sites outside, suggesting some habituation of native birds has occurred following prior exposure to parakeets but overall foraging behavior is still disrupted. The results of our study suggest that nonnative species can have complex and subtle impacts on native fauna and show that a nonnative competitor can impact native species simply through their presence near resources. PMID:24822022

  9. Optical manipulation of complex molecular systems by high density green photons: experimental and theoretical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Stamatin, Ioan; Ionescu, Elena; Avramescu, Sorin; Cristian Cune, Liviu; Apostol, Marian

    2013-05-01

    The recent revolution in modern optical techniques revealed that light interaction with matter generates a force, known as optical force, which produces material properties known in physics as optical matter. The basic technique of the domain uses forces exerted by a strongly focused beam of light to trap small objects and subsequently to manipulate their local structures. The purpose of this paper is to develop an alternative approach, using irradiations with high-density-green-photons, which induce electric dipoles by polarization effects. The materials used for the experiments were long carbon chains which represent the framework of biological macromolecules. The physical techniques used to reveal the locally induced molecular arrangements were: dynamic viscosity, zeta potential, chemiluminescence, liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry, and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The principal result of our experiments was the detection of different molecular arrangements within the mixture of alkane chains, generated by our optical manipulations. This induced "optical matter" displayed two material properties: antioxidant effects and large molecular aggregation effects. In order to bring the experimental results in relation with theory, we developed a physical model and the interacting force between polarizable bodies was computed. By numerical calculations stable structures for N = 6 and N = 8 particles were obtained.

  10. Overconfidence in wargames: experimental evidence on expectations, aggression, gender and testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Dominic D.P; McDermott, Rose; Barrett, Emily S; Cowden, Jonathan; Wrangham, Richard; McIntyre, Matthew H; Peter Rosen, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Summary Overconfidence has long been noted by historians and political scientists as a major cause of war. However, the origins of such overconfidence, and sources of variation, remain poorly understood. Mounting empirical studies now show that mentally healthy people tend to exhibit psychological biases that encourage optimism, collectively known as ‘positive illusions’. Positive illusions are thought to have been adaptive in our evolutionary past because they served to cope with adversity, harden resolve, or bluff opponents. Today, however, positive illusions may contribute to costly conflicts and wars. Testosterone has been proposed as a proximate mediator of positive illusions, given its role in promoting dominance and challenge behaviour, particularly in men. To date, no studies have attempted to link overconfidence, decisions about war, gender, and testosterone. Here we report that, in experimental wargames: (i) people are overconfident about their expectations of success; (ii) those who are more overconfident are more likely to attack; (iii) overconfidence and attacks are more pronounced among males than females; and (iv) testosterone is related to expectations of success, but not within gender, so its influence on overconfidence cannot be distinguished from any other gender specific factor. Overall, these results constitute the first empirical support of recent theoretical work linking overconfidence and war. PMID:16959643

  11. Experimental evidence for both progressive and simultaneous shear during quasistatic compression of a bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Wendelin J.; Liu, Yun; Gu, Xiaojun; Van Ness, Katherine D.; Robare, Steven L.; Liu, Xin; Antonaglia, James; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Hufnagel, Todd C.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-02-01

    Two distinct types of slip events occur during serrated plastic flow of bulk metallic glasses. These events are distinguished not only by their size but also by distinct stress drop rate profiles. Small stress drop serrations have fluctuating stress drop rates (with maximum stress drop rates ranging from 0.3-1 GPa/s), indicating progressive or intermittent propagation of a shear band. The large stress drop serrations are characterized by sharply peaked stress drop rate profiles (with maximum stress drop rates of 1-100 GPa/s). The propagation of a large slip is preceded by a slowly rising stress drop rate that is presumably due to the percolation of slipping weak spots prior to the initiation of shear over the entire shear plane. The onset of the rapid shear event is accompanied by a burst of acoustic emission. These large slips correspond to simultaneous shear with uniform sliding as confirmed by direct high-speed imaging and image correlation. Both small and large slip events occur throughout plastic deformation. The significant differences between these two types require that they be carefully distinguished in both modeling and experimental efforts.

  12. First Direct Experimental Evidence of Loss Cone Scattering of Energetic Electrons by Plasmaspheric Hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Halford, A.; Millan, R. M.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Woodger, L. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Fennell, J.; Sample, J. G.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Goldstein, J.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    A number of physical mechanisms have been identified as potentially important for causing Van Allen radiation belt electron loss. Over 40 years ago it was suggested that loss caused by electron interaction with an electromagnetic plasma wave called plasmaspheric hiss dominates electron loss in the outer portion of the radiation belt that overlaps with a high density region called the plasmasphere. Motivated by the difficulty of observing this loss process with particle detectors on satellites, the Balloon Array for Radiation Belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) campaign was designed to observe bremsstrahlung x-rays generated by electrons colliding with atmospheric neutrals after removal from the radiation belts. By comparison of x-ray counts to magnetically conjugate plasmaspheric hiss observed on the Van Allen Probes we provide the first direct experimental verification that hiss removes electrons from the radiation belts. X-ray counts and hiss amplitude show similar variation on timescales ranging from minutes to hours. A surprising result is that 1-20 min period fluctuations of x-rays and hiss are coherent on scales comparable to the size of the plasmasphere, far exceeding the few km scale on which wave-particle interactions operate, and establishing that the loss process has global effects on the radiation belts.

  13. Experimental evidence of large changes in terrestrial chlorine cycling following altered tree species composition.

    PubMed

    Montelius, Malin; Thiry, Yves; Marang, Laura; Ranger, Jacques; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Svensson, Teresia; Bastviken, David

    2015-04-21

    Organochlorine molecules (Clorg) are surprisingly abundant in soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl(-)) levels. Despite the widespread abundance of Clorg and the common ability of microorganisms to produce Clorg, we lack fundamental knowledge about how overall chlorine cycling is regulated in forested ecosystems. Here we present data from a long-term reforestation experiment where native forest was cleared and replaced with five different tree species. Our results show that the abundance and residence times of Cl(-) and Clorg after 30 years were highly dependent on which tree species were planted on the nearby plots. Average Cl(-) and Clorg content in soil humus were higher, at experimental plots with coniferous trees than in those with deciduous trees. Plots with Norway spruce had the highest net accumulation of Cl(-) and Clorg over the experiment period, and showed a 10 and 4 times higher Cl(-) and Clorg storage (kg ha(-1)) in the biomass, respectively, and 7 and 9 times higher storage of Cl(-) and Clorg in the soil humus layer, compared to plots with oak. The results can explain why local soil chlorine levels are frequently independent of atmospheric deposition, and provide opportunities for improved modeling of chlorine distribution and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:25811074

  14. Experimental evidence for climatically controlled changes between lateral erosion and incision of actively uplifting folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, Aaron; Paola, Chris; Burbank, Douglas; Thompson, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the incision and lateral erosion of rivers provides key data for the interpretation of landscapes as recorders of climatic and tectonic processes. We present results from six physical experiments on the erosion of a simple growing fold by antecedent streams. By varying uplift rates, sediment flux, and the width of alluvial fans upstream of the uplift, we produced a range of morphologies from narrow canyons through the fold to erosion of the entire uplift. The fraction of the uplift that was beveled by the river can be predicted by a dimensionless parameter linking the mobility of channels (strongly dependent on the sediment flux) and the rock-uplift rate. We apply these findings to a series of active folds in the foreland of the Tian Shan in NW China. Whereas the folds are incised today, they preserve uplifted, kilometer-wide beveled platforms. In the light of the experimental results, lateral migration rates required to explain such extensive beveling are similar to the lateral mobility of alluvial streams in areas much wetter than the presently arid northwestern Tarim Basin and suggest that major changes in water and sediment influxes are the probable cause of switches between lateral erosion and incision of active uplifts in the foreland of the Tian Shan. This finding is supported by the clustering of ages of fluvial terrace and alluvial fan deposition in that region.

  15. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F.; Currano, Ellen D.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Lyng Sylvestersen, Rene; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  16. No evidence of complementary water use along a plant species richness gradient in temperate experimental grasslands.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Dörte; Gockele, Annette; Ravenek, Janneke M; Roscher, Christiane; Strecker, Tanja; Weigelt, Alexandra; Buchmann, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Niche complementarity in resource use has been proposed as a key mechanism to explain the positive effects of increasing plant species richness on ecosystem processes, in particular on primary productivity. Since hardly any information is available for niche complementarity in water use, we tested the effects of plant diversity on spatial and temporal complementarity in water uptake in experimental grasslands by using stable water isotopes. We hypothesized that water uptake from deeper soil depths increases in more diverse compared to low diverse plant species mixtures. We labeled soil water in 8 cm (with 18O) and 28 cm depth (with ²H) three times during the 2011 growing season in 40 temperate grassland communities of varying species richness (2, 4, 8 and 16 species) and functional group number and composition (legumes, grasses, tall herbs, small herbs). Stable isotope analyses of xylem and soil water allowed identifying the preferential depth of water uptake. Higher enrichment in 18O of xylem water than in ²H suggested that the main water uptake was in the upper soil layer. Furthermore, our results revealed no differences in root water uptake among communities with different species richness, different number of functional groups or with time. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis of increased complementarity in water use in more diverse than in less diverse communities of temperate grassland species. PMID:25587998

  17. Experimental evidence of incomplete fluorescence quenching of pyrene bound to humic substances: implications for Koc measurements.

    PubMed

    Shirshin, E A; Budylin, G S; Grechischeva, N Yu; Fadeev, V V; Perminova, I V

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence quenching (FQ) is extensively used for quantitative assessment of partition coefficients (KOC) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to natural organic materials - humic substances (HS). The presence of bound PAHs with incompletely quenched fluorescence would lead to underestimation of the KOC values measured by this technique. The goal of this work was to prove the validity of this assumption using an original experimental setup, which implied FQ measurements upon excitation into two distinct vibronically coupled electronic states. Pyrene was used as a fluorescent probe, and aquatic fulvic acid (SRFA) and leonardite humic acid (CHP) were used as the humic materials with low and high binding affinity for pyrene, respectively. Excitation of pyrene into the forbidden (S0-S1) and allowed (S0-S2) electronic states yielded two pairs of nonidentical FQ curves. This was indicative of incomplete quenching of the bound pyrene, and the divergence of the two FQ curves was much more pronounced for CHP as compared to SRFA. The two component model of fluorescence response formation was proposed to estimate the KOC values from the data obtained. The resulting pyrene KOC value for CHP (220 ± 20) g L(-1) was a factor 3 higher compared to the KOC value determined with the use of the Stern-Volmer formalism (68 ± 2) g L(-1). At the same time for aquatic FA the difference in FQ curves was almost negligible, which enables the use of the Stern-Volmer formalism for weakly interacting HS and PAHs. PMID:27279258

  18. Experimental evidence for beneficial effects of projected climate change on hibernating amphibians.

    PubMed

    Üveges, Bálint; Mahr, Katharina; Szederkényi, Márk; Bókony, Veronika; Hoi, Herbert; Hettyey, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are the most threatened vertebrates today, experiencing worldwide declines. In recent years considerable effort was invested in exposing the causes of these declines. Climate change has been identified as such a cause; however, the expectable effects of predicted milder, shorter winters on hibernation success of temperate-zone Amphibians have remained controversial, mainly due to a lack of controlled experimental studies. Here we present a laboratory experiment, testing the effects of simulated climate change on hibernating juvenile common toads (Bufo bufo). We simulated hibernation conditions by exposing toadlets to current (1.5 °C) or elevated (4.5 °C) hibernation temperatures in combination with current (91 days) or shortened (61 days) hibernation length. We found that a shorter winter and milder hibernation temperature increased survival of toads during hibernation. Furthermore, the increase in temperature and shortening of the cold period had a synergistic positive effect on body mass change during hibernation. Consequently, while climate change may pose severe challenges for amphibians of the temperate zone during their activity period, the negative effects may be dampened by shorter and milder winters experienced during hibernation. PMID:27229882

  19. Experimental evidence for beneficial effects of projected climate change on hibernating amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Üveges, Bálint; Mahr, Katharina; Szederkényi, Márk; Bókony, Veronika; Hoi, Herbert; Hettyey, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are the most threatened vertebrates today, experiencing worldwide declines. In recent years considerable effort was invested in exposing the causes of these declines. Climate change has been identified as such a cause; however, the expectable effects of predicted milder, shorter winters on hibernation success of temperate-zone Amphibians have remained controversial, mainly due to a lack of controlled experimental studies. Here we present a laboratory experiment, testing the effects of simulated climate change on hibernating juvenile common toads (Bufo bufo). We simulated hibernation conditions by exposing toadlets to current (1.5 °C) or elevated (4.5 °C) hibernation temperatures in combination with current (91 days) or shortened (61 days) hibernation length. We found that a shorter winter and milder hibernation temperature increased survival of toads during hibernation. Furthermore, the increase in temperature and shortening of the cold period had a synergistic positive effect on body mass change during hibernation. Consequently, while climate change may pose severe challenges for amphibians of the temperate zone during their activity period, the negative effects may be dampened by shorter and milder winters experienced during hibernation. PMID:27229882

  20. Experimental evidence for American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) susceptibility to chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis).

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Stephanie S; Urbina, Jenny; Hua, Jessica; Chestnut, Tara; A Relyea, Rick; R Blaustein, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The emerging fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been associated with global amphibian population declines and extinctions. American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) are widely reported to be a tolerant host and a carrier of Bd that spreads the pathogen to less tolerant hosts. Here, we examined whether bullfrogs raised from eggs to metamorphosis in outdoor mesocosms were susceptible to Bd. We experimentally exposed metamorphic juveniles to Bd in the laboratory and compared mortality rates of pathogen-exposed animals to controls (non-exposed) in two separate experiments; one using a Bd strain isolated from a Western toad and another using a strain isolated from an American bullfrog. We wanted to examine whether metamorphic bullfrogs were susceptible to either of these strains. We show that bullfrogs were susceptible to one strain of Bd and not the other. In both experiments, infection load detected in the skin decreased over time, suggesting that metamorphic bullfrogs from some populations may be inefficient long-term carriers of Bd. PMID:23539129

  1. Yes, it turns: experimental evidence of pearl rotation during its formation.

    PubMed

    Gueguen, Yannick; Czorlich, Yann; Mastail, Max; Le Tohic, Bruno; Defay, Didier; Lyonnard, Pierre; Marigliano, Damien; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Bari, Hubert; Lo, Cedrik; Chabrier, Sébastien; Le Moullac, Gilles

    2015-07-01

    Cultured pearls are human creations formed by inserting a nucleus and a small piece of mantle tissue into a living shelled mollusc, usually a pearl oyster. Although many pearl observations intuitively suggest a possible rotation of the nucleated pearl inside the oyster, no experimental demonstration of such a movement has ever been done. This can be explained by the difficulty of observation of such a phenomenon in the tissues of a living animal. To investigate this question of pearl rotation, a magnetometer system was specifically engineered to register magnetic field variations with magnetic sensors from movements of a magnetic nucleus inserted in the pearl oyster. We demonstrated that a continuous movement of the nucleus inside the oyster starts after a minimum of 40 days post-grafting and continues until the pearl harvest. We measured a mean angular speed of 1.27° min(-1) calculated for four different oysters. Rotation variability was observed among oysters and may be correlated to pearl shape and defects. Nature's ability to generate so amazingly complex structures like a pearl has delivered one of its secrets. PMID:26587271

  2. Experimental evidence of beam-foil plasma creation during ion-solid interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Nandi, Tapan

    2016-08-01

    Charge state evolution of the energetic projectile ions during the passage through thin carbon foils has been revisited using the X-ray spectroscopy technique. Contributions from the bulk and the solid surface in the charge changing processes have been segregated by measuring the charge state distribution of the projectile ions in the bulk of the target during the ion-solid interaction. Interestingly, the charge state distribution measured in the bulk exhibits Lorentzian profile in contrast to the well-known Gaussian structure observed using the electromagnetic methods and the theoretical predictions. The occurrence of such behavior is a direct consequence of the imbalance between charge changing processes, which has been seen in various cases of the laboratory plasma. It suggests that the ion-solid collisions constitute high-density, localized plasma in the bulk of the solid target, called the beam-foil plasma. This condensed beam-foil plasma is similar to the high-density solar and stellar plasma which may have practical implementations in various fields, in particular, plasma physics and nuclear astrophysics. The present work suggests further modification in the theoretical charge state distribution calculations by incorporating the plasma coupling effects during the ion-solid interactions. Moreover, the multi-electron capture from the target exit surface has been confirmed through comparison between experimentally measured and theoretically predicted values of the mean charge state of the projectile ions.

  3. Behavioral response to contamination risk information in a spatially explicit groundwater environment: Experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingyuan; Michael, Holly A.; Duke, Joshua M.; Messer, Kent D.; Suter, Jordan F.

    2014-08-01

    This paper assesses the effectiveness of aquifer monitoring information in achieving more sustainable use of a groundwater resource in the absence of management policy. Groundwater user behavior in the face of an irreversible contamination threat is studied by applying methods of experimental economics to scenarios that combine a physics-based, spatially explicit, numerical groundwater model with different representations of information about an aquifer and its risk of contamination. The results suggest that the threat of catastrophic contamination affects pumping decisions: pumping is significantly reduced in experiments where contamination is possible compared to those where pumping cost is the only factor discouraging groundwater use. The level of information about the state of the aquifer also affects extraction behavior. Pumping rates differ when information that synthesizes data on aquifer conditions (a "risk gauge") is provided, despite invariant underlying economic incentives, and this result does not depend on whether the risk information is location-specific or from a whole aquifer perspective. Interestingly, users increase pumping when the risk gauge signals good aquifer status compared to a no-gauge treatment. When the gauge suggests impending contamination, however, pumping declines significantly, resulting in a lower probability of contamination. The study suggests that providing relatively simple aquifer condition guidance derived from monitoring data can lead to more sustainable use of groundwater resources.

  4. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils

    PubMed Central

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F.; Currano, Ellen D.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns. PMID:26417094

  5. Experimental evidence for modifying the current physical model for ice accretion on aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Walker, E.

    1986-01-01

    Closeup movies, still photographs, and other experimental data suggest that the current physical model for ice accretion needs significant modification. At aircraft airspeeds there was no flow of liquid over the surface of the ice after a short initial flow, even at barely subfreezing temperatures. Instead, there were very large stationary drops on the ice surface that lose water from their bottoms by freezing and replenish their liquid by catching the microscopic cloud droplets. This observation disagrees with the existing physical model, which assumes there is a thin liquid film continuously flowing over the ice surface. With no such flow, the freezing-fraction concept of the model fails when a mass balance is performed on the surface water. Rime ice does, as the model predicts, form when the air temperature is low enough to cause the cloud droplets to freeze almost immediately on impact. However, the characteristic shapes of horn-glaze ice or rime ice are primarily caused by the ice shape affecting the airflow locally and consequently the droplet catch and the resulting ice shape. Ice roughness greatly increases the heat transfer coefficient, stops the movement of drops along the surface, and may also affect the airflow initially and thereby the droplet catch. At high subreezing temperatures the initial flow and shedding of surface drops have a large effect on the ice shape. At the incipient freezing limit, no ice forms.

  6. Lexical plasticity in early bilinguals does not alter phoneme categories: II. Experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Sebastián-Gallés, Núria; Vera-Constán, Fátima; Larsson, Johan P; Costa, Albert; Deco, Gustavo

    2009-12-01

    When listening to modified speech, either naturally or artificially altered, the human perceptual system rapidly adapts to it. There is some debate about the nature of the mechanisms underlying this adaptation. Although some authors propose that listeners modify their prelexical representations, others assume changes at the lexical level. Recently, Larsson, Vera, Sebastian-Galles, and Deco [Lexical plasticity in early bilinguals does not alter phoneme categories: I. Neurodynamical modelling. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 20, 76-94, 2008] proposed a biologically plausible computational model to account for some existing data, one which successfully modeled how long-term exposure to a dialect triggers the creation of new lexical entries. One specific prediction of the model was that prelexical (phoneme) representations should not be affected by dialectal exposure (as long as the listener is exposed to both standard and dialectal pronunciations). Here we present a series of experiments testing the predictions of the model. Native listeners of Catalan, with extended exposure to Spanish-accented Catalan, were tested on different auditory lexical decision tasks and phoneme discrimination tasks. Behavioral and electrophysiological recordings were obtained. The results supported the predictions of our model. On the one hand, both error rates and N400 measurements indicated the existence of alternative lexical entries for dialectal varieties. On the other hand, no evidence of alterations at the phoneme level, either in the behavioral discrimination task or in the electrophysiological measurement (MMN), could be detected. The results of the present study are compared with those obtained in short-term laboratory exposures in an attempt to provide an integrative account. PMID:18855552

  7. Feeling the past: the absence of experimental evidence for anomalous retroactive influences on text processing.

    PubMed

    Traxler, Matthew J; Foss, Donald J; Podali, Ruchira; Zirnstein, Megan

    2012-11-01

    In two self-paced reading experiments, we investigated the hypothesis that information moves backward in time to influence prior behaviors (Bem Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 100:407-425, 2011a). In two of Bem's experiments, words were presented after target pictures in a pleasantness judgment task. In a condition in which the words were consistent with the emotional valence of the picture, reaction times to the pictures were significantly shorter , as compared with a condition in which the words were inconsistent with the emotional valence of the picture. Bem Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 100:407-425, (2011a) interpreted these results as showing a "retroactive priming" effect resulting from precognition. To test the precognition hypothesis, we adapted a standard repetition priming paradigm from psycholinguistics. In the experiments, participants read a set of texts. In one condition, the participants read the same text twice. In other conditions, participants read two different texts. The precognition hypothesis predicts that readers who encounter the same text twice will experience reductions in processing load during their first encounter with the text. Hence, these readers' average reading times should be shorter than those of readers who encounter the target text only once. Our results indicated that readers processed the target text faster the second time they read it. Also, their reading times decreased as their experience with the self-paced reading procedure increased. However, participants read the target text equally quickly during their initial encounter with the text, whether or not the text was subsequently repeated. Thus, the experiments demonstrated normal repetition priming and practice effects but offered no evidence for retroactive influences on text processing. PMID:22815066

  8. Experimental Evidence for Weathering and Martian Sulfate Formation Under Extremely Cold Weather-Limited Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Paul B.; Golden, D. C.; Michalski, J.

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photography and spectroscopy of the martian surface (MOC, HiRISE) from orbit has revolutionized our view of Mars with one of the most important discoveries being wide-spread layered sedimentary deposits associated with sulfate minerals across the low to mid latitude regions of Mars [1, 2]. The mechanism for sulfate formation on Mars has been frequently attributed to playa-like evaporative environments under prolonged warm conditions [3]. However, there are several problems with the presence of prolonged surface temperatures on Mars above 273 K during the Noachian including the faint young Sun [4] and the presence of suitable greenhouse gases [5]. The geomorphic evidence for early warm conditions may instead be explained by periodic episodes of warming rather than long term prolonged warm temperatures [6]. An alternate view of the ancient martian climate contends that prolonged warm temperatures were never present and that the atmosphere and climate has been similar to modern conditions throughout most of its history [6]. This view is more consistent with the climate models, but has had a difficult time explaining the sedimentary history of Mars and in particular the presence of sulfate minerals. We suggest here that mixtures of atmospheric aerosols, ice, and dust have the potential for creating small films of cryo-concentrated acidic solutions that may represent an important unexamined environment for understanding weathering processes on Mars [7, 8]. This study seeks to test whether sulfate formation may be possible at temperatures well below 0 C in water limited environments removing the need for prolonged warm periods to form sulfates on early Mars.

  9. Parents influence asymmetric sibling competition: experimental evidence with partially dependent young.

    PubMed

    Smiseth, Per T; Ward, Richard J S; Moore, Allen J

    2007-12-01

    evidence of asymmetric sibling competition when parents were absent and offspring obtained resources solely by self-feeding. PMID:18229851

  10. Short Lag Times for Invasive Tropical Plants: Evidence from Experimental Plantings in Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Daehler, Curtis C.

    2009-01-01

    Background The lag time of an invasion is the delay between arrival of an introduced species and its successful spread in a new area. To date, most estimates of lag times for plants have been indirect or anecdotal, and these estimates suggest that plant invasions are often characterized by lag times of 50 years or more. No general estimates are available of lag times for tropical plant invasions. Historical plantings and documentation were used to directly estimate lag times for tropical plant invasions in Hawai'i. Methodology/Principal Findings Historical planting records for the Lyon Arboretum dating back to 1920 were examined to identify plants that have since become invasive pests in the Hawaiian Islands. Annual reports describing escape from plantings were then used to determine the lag times between initial plantings and earliest recorded spread of the successful invaders. Among 23 species that eventually became invasive pests, the average lag time between introduction and first evidence of spread was 14 years for woody plants and 5 years for herbaceous plants. Conclusions/Significance These direct estimates of lag times are as much as an order of magnitude shorter than previous, indirect estimates, which were mainly based on temperate plants. Tropical invaders may have much shorter lag times than temperate species. A lack of direct and deliberate observations may have also inflated many previous lag time estimates. Although there have been documented cases of long lag times due to delayed arrival of a mutualist or environmental changes over time, this study suggests that most successful invasions are likely to begin shortly after arrival of the plant in a suitable habitat, at least in tropical environments. Short lag times suggest that controlled field trials may be a practical element of risk assessment for plant introductions. PMID:19223966

  11. Differential responses of short-term soil respiration dynamics to the experimental addition of nitrogen and water in the temperate semi-arid steppe of Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuchun; Liu, Xinchao; Dong, Yunshe; Peng, Qin; He, Yating; Sun, Liangjie; Jia, Junqiang; Cao, Congcong

    2014-04-01

    We examined the effects of simulated rainfall and increasing N supply of different levels on CO2 pulse emission from typical Inner Mongolian steppe soil using the static opaque chamber technique, respectively in a dry June and a rainy August. The treatments included NH4NO3 additions at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 20 g N/(m(2)·year) with or without water. Immediately after the experimental simulated rainfall events, the CO2 effluxes in the watering plots without N addition (WCK) increased greatly and reached the maximum value at 2 hr. However, the efflux level reverted to the background level within 48 hr. The cumulative CO2 effluxes in the soil rang ed from 5.60 to 6.49 g C/m(2) over 48 hr after a single water application, thus showing an increase of approximately 148.64% and 48.36% in the effluxes during both observation periods. By contrast, the addition of different N levels without water addition did not result in a significant change in soil respiration in the short term. Two-way ANOVA showed that the effects of the interaction between water and N addition were insignificant in short-term soil CO2 effluxes in the soil. The cumulative soil CO2 fluxes of different treatments over 48 hr accounted for approximately 5.34% to 6.91% and 2.36% to 2.93% of annual C emission in both experimental periods. These results stress the need for improving the sampling frequency after rainfall in future studies to ensure more accurate evaluation of the grassland C emission contribution. PMID:25079414

  12. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    SciTech Connect

    Boulfrad, Yacine Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska

    2014-11-03

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  13. Experimental evidence for healing during stick-slip at the bases of ice streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoet, Lucas K.; Iverson, Neal R.

    2016-04-01

    The Whillians Ice Stream has twice daily stick-slip events of ca. 50 cm with a maximum inter-event time of ca. 60,000 s. In order for stick-slip phenomena to occur under rate and state friction, two conditions need to be met: 1) A rate-weakening material at the interface, so that a nucleated slip perturbance can be propagated and 2) a material capable of healing (i.e., becoming stronger) when stationary, so that stress can be recharged during hold periods between ruptures. Although rate weakening has been experimentally demonstrated for some basal tills, experimental data relevant to glacier slip that bear on healing have been absent. Without an understanding of the healing mechanisms active at the beds of ice streams, models of the mechanics of ice stream stick-slip or ice stream shut-down will be inadequately informed. We investigated healing mechanisms with slide-hold-slide experiments, a technique common in rock mechanics, using two different ring shear apparatuses. In one set of experiments till alone was sheared, while in another set ice at its melting temperature was slid over till. These two kinds of experiments allowed for the isolation of mechanisms active at ice-till interface from those within the till. In all experiments sliding velocity was ca. 345 m/yr, and effective stress was ca. 150 kPa. Once steady-state sliding friction, μss, was attained, sliding was stopped and the materials were held in stationary contact for a given duration. When sliding was reinitiated, slip resistance initially rose above the previous μss value to a peak friction, μpeak, before returning to μss. The difference between μss and μpeak, Δμ, was then calculated. For each subsequent hold, the duration of stationary contact was increased logarithmically (100, 1,000, 10,000 and 100,000 s) until the maximum hold duration was attained. From the relationship between hold time and Δμ, a healing rate was calculated. Results from both sets of experiment indicate that

  14. Fossil bryophytes as recorders of ancient CO2 levels: Experimental evidence and a Cretaceous case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Benjamin J.; Beerling, David J.; Brentnall, Stuart J.; Royer, Dana L.

    2005-09-01

    Biological and geochemical CO2 proxies provide critical constraints on understanding the role of atmospheric CO2 in driving climate change during Earth history. As no single existing CO2 proxy is without its limitations, there is a clear need for new approaches to reconstructing past CO2 concentrations. Here we develop a new pre-Quaternary CO2 proxy based on the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of astomatous land plants. In a series of CO2-controlled laboratory experiments, we show that the carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C) of a range of bryophyte (liverwort and moss) species increases with atmospheric CO2 across the range 375 to 6000 ppm. Separate experiments establish that variations in growth temperature, water content and substrate type have minor impacts on the Δ13C of liverworts but not mosses, indicating the greater potential of liverworts to faithfully record past variations in CO2. A mechanistic model for calculating past CO2 concentrations from bryophyte Δ13C (White et al., 1994) is extended and calibrated using our experimental results. The potential for fossil liverworts to record past CO2 changes is investigated by analyzing the δ13C of specimens collected from Alexander Island, Antarctica dating to the "greenhouse" world of the mid-Cretaceous. Our analysis and isotopic model yield mid-Cretaceous CO2 concentrations of 1000-1400 ppm, in general agreement with independent proxy data and long-term carbon cycle models. The exceptionally long evolutionary history of bryophytes offers the possibility of reconstructing CO2 concentrations back to the mid-Ordovician, pre-dating all currently used quantitative CO2 proxies.

  15. Experimental evidence that dispersal drives ant community assembly in human-altered ecosystems.

    PubMed

    King, Joshua R; Tschinkel, Walter R

    2016-01-01

    A key shortcoming in our understanding of exotic species' success is that it is not known how post-introduction dispersal contributes to the success of exotic species and the reassembly of invaded communities. Exotic and native species face poorly understood competition-colonization trade-offs in heterogeneous landscapes of natural and anthropogenic habitats. We conducted three experiments that tested how ant queen behavior during dispersal affects community composition. Using experimental plots, we tested whether (1) different types of habitat disturbance and (2) different sizes of habitat disturbance affected the abundance of newly mated queens landing in the plots. The three most abundant species captured were the exotic fire ant Solenopsis invicta, and the native species Brachymyrmex depilis, and S. pergandei, respectively. When queens were considered collectively, more queens landed in plowed, sand-added, and roadside plots than in control or mow plots, in other words, in the more heavily disturbed plots. We also tested (3) the effect of habitat manipulations on the survival of newly mated fire ant queens (Solenopsis invicta). Soil disturbance (tilling), lack of shade, and removal (poisoning) of the ant community resulted in the greatest fire ant colony survivorship. Collectively, experiments revealed that both exotic and native newly mated ant queens select open, human-altered ecosystems for founding new colonies. The selection of such habitats by fire ant queens leads to their successful colony founding and ultimately to their dominance in those habitats. Selection of disturbed habitats is therefore advantageous for exotic species but is an ecological trap for native species because they do not often succeed in founding colonies in these habitats. PMID:27008792

  16. Ultrafine spherical quartz formation during seismic fault slip: Natural and experimental evidence and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Yen-Fang; Yang, Che-Ming; Song, Sheng-Rong; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Suppe, John; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    In recent works on the determination of pseudotachylyte within the principal slip zone (PSZ) of the Chelungpu fault (Taiwan), we demonstrated that frictional melting occurred at shallow depths during the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. Thus, the characteristics of melts are of paramount importance to investigate processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during seismic slips. We conducted rock friction experiments on siltstone recovered from the Taiwan Chelungpu fault Drilling Project (TCDP) at a slip rate of 1.3 m/s and a normal stress of 1 MPa. Here we not only target to characterize experimental pseudotachylyte and evaluate the associated frictional behavior, but also compare it with natural frictional melts of TCDP. Our results show that (1) initial shear stress drop was related to the generation of low viscosity melt patches, (2) the evolution of shear stress in the postmelting regime was congruent with frictional melt rheology, and (3) the slip strengthening presumably resulted from the extremely low content of water of the frictional melt. In particular, the state-of-art of in situ synchrotron analyses (X-ray diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscope) determine the presence of ultrafine spherical quartz (USQ) grains (~ 10 nm to 50 nm) in the glassy matrices presumably produced at high temperature. Our observations confirm that the USQ grains formed in rock friction experiments do occur in natural faults. We surmise the USQ is the result of frictional melting on siltstone and represents the latest slip zones of the Chelungpu fault, and further infer that the viscous melts may terminate seismic slips at shallow crustal conditions.

  17. Experimental evidence that human impacts drive fire ant invasions and ecological change

    PubMed Central

    King, Joshua R.; Tschinkel, Walter R.

    2008-01-01

    Biological invasions are often closely associated with human impacts and it is difficult to determine whether either or both are responsible for the negative impacts on native communities. Here, we show that human activity, not biological invasion, is the primary driver of negative effects on native communities and of the process of invasion itself. In a large-scale experiment, we combined additions of the exotic fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, with 2 disturbance treatments, mowing and plowing, in a fully crossed factorial design. Results indicate that plowing, in the absence of fire ants, greatly diminished total native ant abundance and diversity, whereas fire ants, even in the absence of disturbance, diminished some, but not all, native ant abundance and diversity. Transplanted fire ant colonies were favored by disturbance. In the absence of disturbance and on their own, fire ants do not invade the forest habitats of native ants. Our results demonstrate that fire ants are “passengers” rather than “drivers” of ecological change. We propose that fire ants may be representative of other invasive species that would be better described as disturbance specialists. Current pest management and conservation strategies should be reassessed to better account for the central role of human impacts in the process of biological invasion. PMID:19064909

  18. Experimental evidence of electron neutrino oscillations and validation of MSW-LMA model with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, M. Buizza

    2011-04-01

    We report the real time measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrino fluxes performed with the Borexino experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The achievement of these measurements was possible thanks to the excellent levels of the radiopurity reached. The measurement of the 7Be in real time is the first direct measurements of the survival probability for solar electron neutrinos in the vacuum region. For 8B we reached a threshold energy of 3MeV which is the lowest achieved so far in real time. For the first time, the same apparatus can measure two different oscillation regions (vacuum-driven and matter-enhanced) predicted by the MSW-LMA model. Borexino also quotes the ratio between the survival probabilities, corresponding to 1.93 ± 0.75, and validates the presence of the transition region between the two oscillation regimes, according to the MSW-LMA solution.In addition, a preliminary result on the Day-Night Asymmetry (ADN) for the 7Be neutrino flux is presented and corresponds to 0.007 ± 0.073. This measurement makes Borexino able to give once more an independent confirmation of the MSW-LMA solution.

  19. Evidence for the experimental transmission of cerebral beta-amyloidosis to primates.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, H. F.; Ridley, R. M.; Duchen, L. W.; Crow, T. J.; Bruton, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The brains of three marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) injected intracerebrally 6-7 years earlier with brain tissue from a patient with early onset Alzheimer's disease were found to contain moderate numbers of amyloid plaques with associated argyrophilic dystrophic neurites and cerebral amyloid angiopathy but no neurofibrillary tangles. The plaques and vascular amyloid stained positively with antibodies to beta (A4)-protein. The brains of three age-matched control marmosets from the same colony did not show these neuropathological features. The brain of one of two marmosets injected with brain tissue from a patient with prion disease with concomitant beta-amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy also showed beta-amyloid plaques and angiopathy but no spongiform encephalopathy. An occasional plaque was found in the brains of two of four marmosets injected with brain tissue from three elderly patients with age-related pathology, two of whom had an additional diagnosis of possible prion disease. Neither plaques nor cerebral amyloid angiopathy were found in six other marmosets who were older than the injected animals, in 12 further marmosets who were slightly younger but who had been injected several years previously with brain tissue which did not contain beta-amyloid, or in 10 younger marmosets who had been subjected to various neurosurgical procedures. These results suggest that cerebral beta-amyloidosis may be induced by the introduction of exogenous amyloid beta-protein. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8217779

  20. Theoretical and experimental evidence of Fano-like resonances in simple monomode photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouadili, A.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Soltani, A.; Talbi, A.; Akjouj, A.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2013-04-01

    A simple photonic device consisting of two dangling side resonators grafted at two sites on a waveguide is designed in order to obtain sharp resonant states inside the transmission gaps without introducing any defects in the structure. This results from an internal resonance of the structure when such a resonance is situated in the vicinity of a zero of transmission or placed between two zeros of transmission, the so-called Fano resonances. A general analytical expression for the transmission coefficient is given for various systems of this kind. The amplitude of the transmission is obtained following the Fano form. The full width at half maximum of the resonances as well as the asymmetric Fano parameter are discussed explicitly as function of the geometrical parameters of the system. In addition to the usual asymmetric Fano resonance, we show that this system may exhibit an electromagnetic induced transparency resonance as well as well as a particular case where such resonances collapse in the transmission coefficient. Also, we give a comparison between the phase of the determinant of the scattering matrix, the so-called Friedel phase, and the phase of the transmission amplitude. The analytical results are obtained by means of the Green's function method, whereas the experiments are carried out using coaxial cables in the radio-frequency regime. These results should have important consequences for designing integrated devices such as narrow-frequency optical or microwave filters and high-speed switches. This system is proposed as a simpler alternative to coupled-micoresonators.

  1. Experimental evidence for curcumin and its analogs for management of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Lozada-García, María Concepción; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious world health problem and one of the most studied diseases; a major concern about its treatment is that β-cell mass and functionality is hard to restore. In addition, it is frequently associated with severe complications, such as diabetic nephropathy and cardiomyopathy. The anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties of curcumin have made it a promising molecule for the treatment of this pathology; however, its solubility and bioavailability problems are still the subject of multiple studies. To cope with those difficulties, several approaches have been evaluated, such as the development of pharmaceutical formulations and curcumin analogs. This review discusses some of the studied therapeutic targets for curcumin in diabetes as well as the structural characteristics and targets of its analogs. The shortening of the central seven-carbon chain of curcumin has given rise to compounds without glucose-lowering effects but potentially useful for the treatment of diabetes complications; whereas preserving this chain retains the glucose-lowering properties. Most of the analogs discussed here have been recently synthesized and tested in animal models of type 1 diabetes; more studies in models of type 2 diabetes are needed. PMID:25769841

  2. [Experimental evidence of an antihypertensive and hypocholesterolemic effect of oil of argan, Argania sideroxylon].

    PubMed

    Berrada, Y; Settaf, A; Baddouri, K; Cherrah, A; Hassar, M

    2000-01-01

    The chronic ingestion of 5 ml/kg/d of Argan oil by spontaneously hypertensive rats restores normal blood pressure and induces hypocholesterolaemia. In order to confirm these results Meriones shawi, a rodent of the Gerbillideae family, was tested as a second animal model. Meriones submitted to a hypercaloric diet and physical inactivity became fat, and exhibited hypertension, dyslipidaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. When treated for two months with the same dosage regimen, decreases in glycaemia, total plasmatic cholesterol, LDL, insulinaemia and systolic and diastolic blood pressures of 4.4 per cent, 14.4 per cent, 32.5 per cent, 26.8 per cent, 28.8 per cent and 30.5 per cent were simultaneously observed. Increases in LDH and of TG of 27.9 per cent and 16.2 per cent respectively were also observed. No effect on body weight occurred. The action of polyunsatured fatty acids of the Argan oil is predominant, but in addition, other constituents play an active part. PMID:10967715

  3. Experimental evidence of new tetragonal polymorphs of silicon formed through ultrafast laser-induced confined microexplosion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rapp, L.; Haberl, B.; Pickard, C. J.; Bradby, J. E.; Gamaly, E. G.; Williams, J. S.; Rode, A. V.

    2015-06-29

    Ordinary materials can transform into novel phases with new crystal structures at extraordinary high pressure and temperature applied under both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions 1-6. The recently developed method of ultra-short laser-induced confined microexplosions 7-9 extends the range of possible new phases by initiating a highly non-equilibrium plasma state deep inside a bulk material 7-12. Ultra-high quenching rates can help to overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of new metastable phases, while the surrounding pristine crystal confines the affected material and preserves it for further study 10-12. Here we demonstrate that ultra-rapid pressure release from a completely disordered plasma statemore » in silicon produces several new metastable end phases quenched to ambient conditions. Their structure is determined from comparison to an ab initio random structure search which revealed six new energetically competitive potential phases, four tetragonal and two monoclinic ones. We show the presence of bt8 and st12, which have been predicted theoretically previously 13-15, but have not been observed in nature or in laboratory experiments. Additionally, the presence of the as yet unidentified silicon phase, Si-VIII and two of our other predicted tetragonal phases are highly likely within laser-affected zones. These findings pave the way for new materials with novel and exotic properties.« less

  4. Experimental evidence of new tetragonal polymorphs of silicon formed through ultrafast laser-induced confined microexplosion

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, L.; Haberl, B.; Pickard, C. J.; Bradby, J. E.; Gamaly, E. G.; Williams, J. S.; Rode, A. V.

    2015-06-29

    Ordinary materials can transform into novel phases with new crystal structures at extraordinary high pressure and temperature applied under both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions 1-6. The recently developed method of ultra-short laser-induced confined microexplosions 7-9 extends the range of possible new phases by initiating a highly non-equilibrium plasma state deep inside a bulk material 7-12. Ultra-high quenching rates can help to overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of new metastable phases, while the surrounding pristine crystal confines the affected material and preserves it for further study 10-12. Here we demonstrate that ultra-rapid pressure release from a completely disordered plasma state in silicon produces several new metastable end phases quenched to ambient conditions. Their structure is determined from comparison to an ab initio random structure search which revealed six new energetically competitive potential phases, four tetragonal and two monoclinic ones. We show the presence of bt8 and st12, which have been predicted theoretically previously 13-15, but have not been observed in nature or in laboratory experiments. Additionally, the presence of the as yet unidentified silicon phase, Si-VIII and two of our other predicted tetragonal phases are highly likely within laser-affected zones. These findings pave the way for new materials with novel and exotic properties.

  5. Experimental evidence of new tetragonal polymorphs of silicon formed through ultrafast laser-induced confined microexplosion

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, L.; Haberl, B.; Pickard, C.J.; Bradby, J.E.; Gamaly, E.G.; Williams, J.S.; Rode, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Ordinary materials can transform into novel phases at extraordinary high pressure and temperature. The recently developed method of ultrashort laser-induced confined microexplosions initiates a non-equilibrium disordered plasma state. Ultra-high quenching rates overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of new metastable phases, which are preserved in the surrounding pristine crystal for subsequent exploitation. Here we demonstrate that confined microexplosions in silicon produce several metastable end phases. Comparison with an ab initio random structure search reveals six energetically competitive potential phases, four tetragonal and two monoclinic structures. We show the presence of bt8 and st12, which have been predicted theoretically previously, but have not been observed in nature or in laboratory experiments. In addition, the presence of the as yet unidentified silicon phase, Si-VIII and two of our other predicted tetragonal phases are highly likely within laser-affected zones. These findings may pave the way for new materials with novel and exotic properties. PMID:26118985

  6. Thiol groups controls on arsenite binding by organic matter: new experimental and modeling evidence.

    PubMed

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Pédrot, Mathieu; Marsac, Rémi; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-12-15

    Although it has been suggested that several mechanisms can describe the direct binding of As(III) to organic matter (OM), more recently, the thiol functional group of humic acid (HA) was shown to be an important potential binding site for As(III). Isotherm experiments on As(III) sorption to HAs, that have either been grafted with thiol or not, were thus conducted to investigate the preferential As(III) binding sites. There was a low level of binding of As(III) to HA, which was strongly dependent on the abundance of the thiols. Experimental datasets were used to develop a new model (the modified PHREEQC-Model VI), which defines HA as a group of discrete carboxylic, phenolic and thiol sites. Protonation/deprotonation constants were determined for each group of sites (pKA=4.28±0.03; ΔpKA=2.13±0.10; pKB=7.11±0.26; ΔpKB=3.52±0.49; pKS=5.82±0.052; ΔpKS=6.12±0.12 for the carboxylic, phenolic and thiols sites, respectively) from HAs that were either grafted with thiol or not. The pKS value corresponds to that of single thiol-containing organic ligands. Two binding models were tested: the Mono model, which considered that As(III) is bound to the HA thiol site as monodentate complexes, and the Tri model, which considered that As(III) is bound as tridentate complexes. A simulation of the available literature datasets was used to validate the Mono model, with logKMS=2.91±0.04, i.e. the monodentate hypothesis. This study highlighted the importance of thiol groups in OM reactivity and, notably, determined the As(III) concentration bound to OM (considering that Fe is lacking or at least negligible) and was used to develop a model that is able to determine the As(III) concentrations bound to OM. PMID:26348657

  7. Experimental evidence of thermo-mechanical pressurization of faults during earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, Marie; Di Toro, Giulio; Nielsen, Stefan; Spagnuolo, Elena; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes occur while fault strength decreases with increasing slip and slip rate. Thermo-mechanical pressurization of pore fluids induced by frictional heating during seismic slip is one of the possible mechanisms responsible for fault dynamic weakening. However, has not yet been observed in the laboratory. To investigate seismic slip in the presence of pore fluids, 26 friction experiments were conducted at room temperature on hollow cylinders (50/30 mm external/internal diameter) of Etna basalt (1) under room-dry conditions or immersed in water under either (2) drained conditions (constant pore pressure, preventing fluid pressurization), and (3) undrained conditions (constant pore volume). Experiments were performed by spinning two basalt cylinders with the rotary shear machine (SHIVA, INGV Rome) at target slip rates (V) of 3 m/s, displacements (δ) from 4 m to 6 m, normal stress (σn) ranging from 15 to 35 MPa and initial pore fluid pressure (Pf) of 5 MPa.The experimental data are compared with those obtained from carbonate-bearing rocks (Carrara marble). In all the experiments, the coefficient of friction μ decayed exponentially from a peak value (μp = 0.55 ∓ 0.07) at about the initiation of slip towards a steady-state value μss of 0.1 under room-dry conditions, 0.1 under drained conditions and 0.08 under undrained conditions. The shear stress decay was about 75 percent over the first 5 cm of slip, independently of the ambient conditions. However, at a given σneff, δ and V, steady state shear stress was 20 percent lower under undrained than under drained and room dry conditions. Moreover, Pf under undrained conditions increased with displacement following a power law. Conversely, Pf and σn did not vary under drained conditions. After all experiments, a continuous, 100-200 µm thick, layer of glass (Scanning Electron Microscope investigation) separated the rock cylinders, irrespective of the ambient and hydraulic conditions. In summary, the mechanical

  8. Intrapopulation Variability Shaping Isotope Discrimination and Turnover: Experimental Evidence in Arctic Foxes

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Nicolas; Ahlstrøm, Øystein; Ehrich, Dorothée; Fuglei, Eva; Ims, Rolf A.; Yoccoz, Nigel G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Tissue-specific stable isotope signatures can provide insights into the trophic ecology of consumers and their roles in food webs. Two parameters are central for making valid inferences based on stable isotopes, isotopic discrimination (difference in isotopic ratio between consumer and its diet) and turnover time (renewal process of molecules in a given tissue usually measured when half of the tissue composition has changed). We investigated simultaneously the effects of age, sex, and diet types on the variation of discrimination and half-life in nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C, respectively) in five tissues (blood cells, plasma, muscle, liver, nail, and hair) of a top predator, the arctic fox Vulpes lagopus. Methodology/Principal Findings We fed 40 farmed foxes (equal numbers of adults and yearlings of both sexes) with diet capturing the range of resources used by their wild counterparts. We found that, for a single species, six tissues, and three diet types, the range of discrimination values can be almost as large as what is known at the scale of the whole mammalian or avian class. Discrimination varied depending on sex, age, tissue, and diet types, ranging from 0.3‰ to 5.3‰ (mean  = 2.6‰) for δ15N and from 0.2‰ to 2.9‰ (mean  = 0.9‰) for δ13C. We also found an impact of population structure on δ15N half-life in blood cells. Varying across individuals, δ15N half-life in plasma (6 to 10 days) was also shorter than for δ13C (14 to 22 days), though δ15N and δ13C half-lives are usually considered as equal. Conclusion/Significance Overall, our multi-factorial experiment revealed that at least six levels of isotopic variations could co-occur in the same population. Our experimental analysis provides a framework for quantifying multiple sources of variation in isotopic discrimination and half-life that needs to be taken into account when designing and analysing ecological field studies. PMID:21731715

  9. Evidence for the formation of an enamine species during aldol and Michael-type addition reactions promiscuously catalyzed by 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Harshwardhan; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard M; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-03-23

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which has a catalytic N-terminal proline residue (Pro1), can promiscuously catalyze various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, including aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde, and Michael-type addition of acetaldehyde to a wide variety of nitroalkenes to yield valuable γ-nitroaldehydes. To gain insight into how 4-OT catalyzes these unnatural reactions, we carried out exchange studies in D2 O, and X-ray crystallography studies. The former established that H-D exchange within acetaldehyde is catalyzed by 4-OT and that the Pro1 residue is crucial for this activity. The latter showed that Pro1 of 4-OT had reacted with acetaldehyde to give an enamine species. These results provide evidence of the mechanism of the 4-OT-catalyzed aldol and Michael-type addition reactions in which acetaldehyde is activated for nucleophilic addition by Pro1-dependent formation of an enamine intermediate. PMID:25728471

  10. Experimental evidence for the effect of hydrographs on sediment pulse dynamics in gravel-bedded rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Robert; Venditti, Jeremy G.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Wooster, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Gravel augmentation is a river restoration technique applied to channels downstream of dams where size-selective transport and lack of gravel resupply have created armored, relatively immobile channel beds. Augmentation sediment pulses rely on flow releases to move the material downstream and create conditions conducive to salmon spawning and rearing. Yet how sediment pulses respond to flow releases is often unknown. Here we explore how three types of dam releases (constant flow, small hydrograph, and large hydrograph) impact sediment transport and pulse behavior (translation and dispersion) in a channel with forced bar-pool morphology. We use the term sediment "pulse" generically to refer to the sediment introduced to the channel, the zone of pronounced bed material transport that it causes, and the sediment wave that may form in the channel from the additional sediment supply, which can include input sediment and bed material. In our experiments, we held the volume of water released constant, which is equivalent to holding the cost of purchasing a water volume constant in a stream restoration project. The sediment pulses had the same grain size as the bed material in the channel. We found that a constant flow 60% greater than the discharge required to initiate sediment motion caused a mixture of translation and dispersion of the sediment pulse. A broad crested hydrograph with a peak flow 2.5 times the discharge required for entrainment caused pulse dispersion, while a more peaked hydrograph >3 times the entrainment threshold discharge caused pulse dispersion with some translation. The hydrographs produced a well-defined clockwise hysteresis effecting sediment transport, as is often observed for fine-sediment transport and transport-limited gravel bed rivers. The results imply a rational basis for design of water releases associated with gravel augmentation that is directly linked to the desired sediment behavior.

  11. Experimental evidence of simultaneous multi-resonance noise reduction using an absorber with essential nonlinearity under two excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côte, Renaud; Pachebat, Marc; Bellizzi, Sergio

    2014-09-01

    The addition of an essentially nonlinear membrane absorber to a linear vibroacoustic system with multiple resonances is studied experimentally, using quasiperiodic excitation. An extended experimental dataset of the system response is analyzed under steady-state excitation at two frequencies. Thresholds between low and high damping states within the system and associated noise reduction are observed and quantified thanks to frequency conversion and RMS efficiency indicators. Following previous numerical results, it is shown that the membrane NES (Nonlinear Energy Sink) acts simultaneously and efficiently on two acoustic resonances. In all cases, the introduction of energy at a second excitation frequency appears favorable to lower the frequency conversion threshold and to lower the noise within the system. In particular, a simultaneous control of two one-to-one resonances by the NES is observed. Exploration of energy conversion in the two excitation amplitudes plane advocates for a linear dependence of the frequency conversion thresholds on the two excitation amplitudes.

  12. Experimental evidence for supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low temperature perchlorate glasses on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, J.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of liquid water on the cold and dry surface of Mars is possible where concentrated salt solutions lower the freezing point of water. The eutectic temperature is the maximum equilibrium freezing point depression possible for a given salt solution, which ranges from near 0°C for carbonates and sulfates, to as low as -75°C for perchlorates. Although eutectic temperatures suggest a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars, salt solutions will typically supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. We report on results investigating the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration for pure salt solutions and saturated soil solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. We measured supercooling by monitoring solution temperatures during slow cooling and warming experiments. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions typically supercool 5-15°C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the Martian summer. Remarkably, we found that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions never crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120°C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, which will induce crystallization in most salt solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are

  13. Enhancing the gene-environment interaction framework through a quasi-experimental research design: evidence from differential responses to September 11.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    This article uses a gene-environment interaction framework to examine the differential responses to an objective external stressor based on genetic variation in the production of depressive symptoms. This article advances the literature by utilizing a quasi-experimental environmental exposure design, as well as a regression discontinuity design, to control for seasonal trends, which limit the potential for gene-environment correlation and allow stronger causal claims. Replications are attempted for two prominent genes (5-HTT and MAOA), and three additional genes are explored (DRD2, DRD4, and DAT1). This article provides evidence of a main effect of 9/11 on reports of feelings of sadness and fails to replicate a common finding of interaction using 5-HTT but does show support for interaction with MAOA in men. It also provides new evidence that variation in the DRD4 gene modifies an individual's response to the exposure, with individuals with no 7-repeats found to have a muted response. PMID:24784984

  14. The Effects of Prosocial Video Games on Prosocial Behaviors: International Evidence from Correlational, Longitudinal, and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Anderson, Craig A.; Yukawa, Shintaro; Ihori, Nobuko; Saleem, Muniba; Ming, Lim Kam; Shibuya, Akiko; Liau, Albert K.; Khoo, Angeline; Bushman, Brad J.; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Sakamoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Although dozens of studies have documented a relation between violent video games and aggressive behaviors, very little attention has been paid to potential effects of prosocial games. Theoretically, games in which game characters help and support each other in nonviolent ways should increase both short-term and long-term prosocial behaviors. We report three studies conducted in three countries with three age groups to test this hypothesis. In the correlational study, Singaporean middle-school students who played more prosocial games behaved more prosocially. In the two longitudinal samples of Japanese children and adolescents, prosocial game play predicted later increases in prosocial behavior. In the experimental study, U.S. undergraduates randomly assigned to play prosocial games behaved more prosocially toward another student. These similar results across different methodologies, ages, and cultures provide robust evidence a prosocial game content effect, and provide support for the General Learning Model. PMID:19321812

  15. The effects of prosocial video games on prosocial behaviors: international evidence from correlational, longitudinal, and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Douglas A; Anderson, Craig A; Yukawa, Shintaro; Ihori, Nobuko; Saleem, Muniba; Ming, Lim Kam; Shibuya, Akiko; Liau, Albert K; Khoo, Angeline; Bushman, Brad J; Rowell Huesmann, L; Sakamoto, Akira

    2009-06-01

    Although dozens of studies have documented a relationship between violent video games and aggressive behaviors, very little attention has been paid to potential effects of prosocial games. Theoretically, games in which game characters help and support each other in nonviolent ways should increase both short-term and long-term prosocial behaviors. We report three studies conducted in three countries with three age groups to test this hypothesis. In the correlational study, Singaporean middle-school students who played more prosocial games behaved more prosocially. In the two longitudinal samples of Japanese children and adolescents, prosocial game play predicted later increases in prosocial behavior. In the experimental study, U.S. undergraduates randomly assigned to play prosocial games behaved more prosocially toward another student. These similar results across different methodologies, ages, and cultures provide robust evidence of a prosocial game content effect, and they provide support for the General Learning Model. PMID:19321812

  16. Experimental evidence of a buoyant mass difference between bovine spermatozoa bearing X- and Y-chromosomes using a micromechanical resonator.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marco; Battaglia, Raffaele; Ferrini, Gianluca; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometry is to date the only commercially viable technique for sex preselection of mammalian spermatozoa, measuring the different DNA content in X- and Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa. Here we present experimental evidence of a measurable difference between bovine spermatozoa bearing X- and Y-chromosomes based on their buoyant mass. Single cells of two populations of flow-cytometrically sorted spermatozoa were analyzed by means of a micromechanical resonator, consisting of a suspended doubly-clamped microcapillary. Spermatozoa buoyant mass is related to the transitory variation in vibration phase lag, caused by the passage through the sensitive area of a single sperm cell suspended in a fluid. Data analysis shows two well-separated distributions and provides evidence of the sensor capabilities to detect the buoyant mass of single cells with such accuracy to distinguish X- and Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa. These preliminary results suggest the possibility to develop an intriguing technique alternative to flow cytometry in the field of sperm sorting. PMID:24419052

  17. Reanalysis and experimental evidence indicate that the earliest trace fossil of a winged insect was a surface-skimming neopteran.

    PubMed

    Marden, James H

    2013-01-01

    A recent description and analysis of an imprint fossil from the Carboniferous concluded that it was made by a mayfly landing in sediment at the edge of water. Here, I reanalyze that trace fossil and supply experimental evidence regarding wing traces and behavior. The thorax of the trace maker lacked structures characteristic of mayflies, but closely matches a modern neopteran insect family (Taeniopterygidae, Plecoptera) little changed from Early Permian fossils. Edges of the folded wings of live Taeniopteryx leave marks on sediment closely matching marks in the trace fossil. Faint marks lateral to and beyond the reach of meso- and metathoracic legs match the location where wings of surface-skimming Taeniopteryx stoneflies lightly touch the sediment when these insects skim onto wet ground at shorelines. Dimensions of the thorax of the trace indicate relatively weak flight ability compared to fossils from the Early Permian, making doubtful the hypothesis that the trace maker was flight capable. Ultimately, this fossil best fits a scenario in which a neopteran insect skimmed across the surface of water, then folded its wings. Surface skimming as a precursor to the evolution of flight in insects is supported by this fossil evidence of skimming behavior in a Carboniferous insect. PMID:23289577

  18. Cash transfers, maternal depression and emotional well-being: Quasi-experimental evidence from India's Janani Suraksha Yojana programme.

    PubMed

    Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Pereira, Shreya K; Dutt, Varun; Tougher, Sarah; Haldar, Kaveri; Kumar, Paresh

    2016-08-01

    Maternal depression is an important public health concern. We investigated whether a national-scale initiative that provides cash transfers to women giving birth in government health facilities, the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), reduced maternal depression in India's largest state, Uttar Pradesh. Using primary data on 1695 women collected in early 2015, our quasi-experimental design exploited the fact that some women did not receive the JSY cash due to administrative problems in its disbursement - reasons that are unlikely to be correlated with determinants of maternal depression. We found that receipt of the cash was associated with an 8.5% reduction in the continuous measure of maternal depression and a 36% reduction in moderate depression. There was no evidence of an association with measures of emotional well-being, namely happiness and worry. The results suggest that the JSY had a clinically meaningful effect in reducing the burden of maternal depression, possibly by lessening the financial strain of delivery care. They contribute to the evidence that financial incentive schemes may have public health benefits beyond improving uptake of targeted health services. PMID:27387651

  19. Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 and high-density lipoprotein metabolism: experimental animal models and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Corsini, Alberto; Macchi, Chiara; Magni, Paolo; Ruscica, Massimiliano

    2016-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) belongs to the proprotein convertase family. Several studies have demonstrated its involvement in the regulation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels by inducing the degradation of the LDL receptor (LDLR). However, experimental, epidemiologic, and pharmacologic data provide important evidence on the role of PCSK9 also on high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). In mice, PCSK9 regulates the HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels by the degradation of hepatic LDLR, thus inhibiting the uptake of apolipoprotein (Apo)E-containing HDLs. Several epidemiologic and genetic studies reported positive relationship between PCSK9 and HDL-C levels, likely by reducing the uptake of the ApoE-containing HDL particles. PCSK9 enhances also the degradation of LDLR's closest family members, ApoE receptor 2, very low-density lipoprotein receptor, and LDLR-related protein 1. This feature provides a molecular mechanism by which PCSK9 may affect HDL metabolism. Experimental studies demonstrated that PCSK9 directly interacts with HDL by modulating PCSK9 self-assembly and its binding to the LDLR. Finally, the inhibition of PCSK9 by means of monoclonal antibodies directed to PCSK9 (ie, evolocumab and alirocumab) determines an increase of HDL-C fraction by 7% and 4.2%, respectively. Thus, the understanding of the role of PCSK9 on HDL metabolism needs to be elucidated with a particular focus on the effect of PCSK9 on HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:26548330

  20. Experimental evidence and 43 years of monitoring data show that food limits reproduction in a food-caching passerine.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Rachael; Strickland, Dan; Norris, D Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Several species of birds and mammals overcome periods of scarcity by caching food, but for the vast majority of species, it is virtually unknown whether they are food limited during these periods. The Gray Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) is a boreal-resident, food-caching passerine that breeds in late winter when fresh food is scarce. Using a two-year experiment and 43 years of monitoring data, we examined the food limitation hypothesis in a population of Gray Jays in Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada, that has declined by over 50% in the last three decades. Breeding pairs that were experimentally food supplemented during the pre-breeding period laid eggs earlier in the season and had larger brood sizes than non-supplemented controls. From the long-term data, we found strong evidence that pairs that were regularly supplemented by the public (park visitors) tended to lay eggs earlier and have larger clutches and brood sizes compared to pairs that were not supplemented. Nestling body condition (mass controlled for body size) was not influenced by either experimental or public food supplementation. Our results support the hypothesis that Gray Jays are food limited during their late-winter breeding period and suggest that warmer fall temperatures, which have been hypothesized to lead to cache spoilage, may have a significant impact on reproductive success in this declining population. Moreover, our results contribute to understanding how public feeding can influence the fitness of wild animals. PMID:27070019

  1. Direct, experimental evidence of the Fermi surface in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighi, H.; Kaiser, J.H.; Rayner, S.L.; West, R.N. ); Liu, J.Z.; Shelton, R. ); Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Solal, F.; Fluss, M.J. )

    1991-04-29

    We report new measurements of the electron-positron momentum spectra of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} performed with ultra-high statistical precision. These data differ from previous results in two significant respects: They show the D{sub 2} symmetry appropriate for untwinned crystals and, more importantly, they show unmistakable, statistically significant, discontinuities that are evidence of a major Fermi surface section. These results provide a partial answer to a question of special significance to the study of high temperature superconductors i.e. the distribution of the electrons in the material, the electronic structure. Special consideration has been given both experimentally and theoretically to the existence and shape of a Fermi surface in the materials and to the superconducting gap. There are only three experimental techniques that can provide details of the electronic structure at useful resolutions. They are angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation, ACAR, angle resolved photo emission, PE, and de Haas van Alphen measurements. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Calcium addition at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest increases sugar storage, antioxidant activity and cold tolerance in native red spruce (Picea rubens).

    PubMed

    Halman, Joshua M; Schaberg, Paul G; Hawley, Gary J; Eagar, Christopher

    2008-06-01

    In fall (November 2005) and winter (February 2006), we collected current-year foliage of native red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) growing in a reference watershed and in a watershed treated in 1999 with wollastonite (CaSiO(3), a slow-release calcium source) to simulate preindustrial soil calcium concentrations (Ca-addition watershed) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, NH). We analyzed nutrition, soluble sugar concentrations, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity and cold tolerance, to evaluate the basis of recent (2003) differences between watersheds in red spruce foliar winter injury. Foliar Ca and total sugar concentrations were significantly higher in trees in the Ca-addition watershed than in trees in the reference watershed during both fall (P=0.037 and 0.035, respectively) and winter (P=0.055 and 0.036, respectively). The Ca-addition treatment significantly increased foliar fructose and glucose concentrations in November (P=0.013 and 0.007, respectively) and foliar sucrose concentrations in winter (P=0.040). Foliar APX activity was similar in trees in both watersheds during fall (P=0.28), but higher in trees in the Ca-addition watershed during winter (P=0.063). Cold tolerance of foliage was significantly greater in trees in the Ca-addition watershed than in trees in the reference watershed (P<0.001). Our results suggest that low foliar sugar concentrations and APX activity, and reduced cold tolerance in trees in the reference watershed contributed to their high vulnerability to winter injury in 2003. Because the reference watershed reflects forest conditions in the region, the consequences of impaired physiological function caused by soil Ca depletion may have widespread implications for forest health. PMID:18381266

  3. Complete reversal of muscle wasting in experimental cancer cachexia: Additive effects of activin type II receptor inhibition and β-2 agonist.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Míriam; Busquets, Sílvia; Penna, Fabio; Zhou, Xiaolan; Marmonti, Enrica; Betancourt, Angelica; Massa, David; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Han, H Q; Argilés, Josep M

    2016-04-15

    Formoterol is a highly potent β2-adrenoceptor-selective agonist, which is a muscle growth promoter in many animal species. Myostatin/activin inhibition reverses skeletal muscle loss and prolongs survival of tumor-bearing animals. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of a combination of the soluble myostatin receptor ActRIIB (sActRIIB) and the β2-agonist formoterol in the cachectic Lewis lung carcinoma model. The combination of formoterol and sActRIIB was extremely effective in reversing muscle wasting associated with experimental cancer cachexia in mice. Muscle weights from tumor-bearing animals were completely recovered following treatment and this was also reflected in the measured grip strength. This combination increased food intake in both control and tumor-bearing animals. The double treatment also prolonged survival significantly without affecting the weight and growth of the primary tumor. In addition, it significantly reduced the number of metastasis. Concerning the mechanisms for the preservation of muscle mass during cachexia, the effects of formoterol and sActRIIB seemed to be additive, since formoterol reduced the rate of protein degradation (as measured in vitro as tyrosine release, using incubated isolated individual muscles) while sActRIIB only affected protein synthesis (as measured in vivo using tritiated phenylalanine). Formoterol also increased the rate of protein synthesis and this seemed to be favored by the presence of sActRIIB. Combining formoterol and sActRIIB seemed to be a very promising treatment for experimental cancer cachexia. Further studies in human patients are necessary and may lead to a highly effective treatment option for muscle wasting associated with cancer. PMID:26595367

  4. OA01.25.The first direct experimental evidence correlating ayurveda based tridosha prakriti, with western constitutional psychology somatotypes

    PubMed Central

    Metri, Kashinath G; Bhargav, Hemant; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra; Rizzo-Sierra; Basavakatti, Ramakrishna R

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Ayurveda is one of the most ancient systems of medical health care. The basic principles, diagnosis of the diseases and their treatment are based on individual prakriti (constitutional type). Ayurveda further classifies the prakriti of an individual on the basis of a set of psychosomatic attributes of personality, depending on whether this individual belongs to Vata, Pitta, or Kapha prakriti, or any combination of them (Patwardhan et al., 2005). The appropriate prakriti assessment is done by several means including questionnaires (Rastogi, 2012; Shilpa and Venkatesha-Murthy, 2011). We aimed to obtain experimental evidence correlating Ayurveda based tridosha-prakriti with western constitutional psychology somatotypes (Rizzo-Sierra, 2011). Method: We employed our Tridosha-prakriti questionnaire (Ramakrishna and Nagendra, 2012), and compared its results with a set of body composition parameters: Height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), muscle mass, fat mass, and fat percentage in normal healthy volunteers (25 males and 25 females, mean age was 26 (± 4) and 25 (± 6) years respectively). Moreover, two-tailed Pearson's correlations were investigated to match the extreme prakriti types with the western constitutional psychology somatotypes, through the mentioned body composition measures. Result: Significant negative correlations were observed between the percentage of Vata attributes as per the questionnaire in the individuals and their BMI, body weight and fat mass respectively (p<0.05). Similarly, there was a significant positive correlation between the percentage of Pitta attributes with the height, body weight, and muscle mass respectively. Also, a significant positive correlation was observed between the percentage of Kapha attributes with fat mass and fat percentage, along with a negative correlation with height. Conclusion: We provide evidence-linking Ayurveda to modern constitutional psychology. In this way, a concept such as prakriti is suggested

  5. Additional Evidence for Morpho-Dimensional Tooth Crown Variation in a New Indonesian H. erectus Sample from the Sangiran Dome (Central Java)

    PubMed Central

    Zanolli, Clément

    2013-01-01

    This contribution reports fifteen human fossil dental remains found during the last two decades in the Sangiran Dome area, in Central Java, Indonesia. Among this sample, only one of the specimens had already been briefly described, with the other fourteen remaining unreported. Seven of the fifteen isolated teeth were found in a secured stratigraphic context in the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation. The remaining elements were surface finds which, based on coincidental sources of information, were inferred as coming from the Kabuh Formation. Mainly constituted of permanent molars, but also including one upper incisor and one upper premolar, this dental sample brings additional evidence for a marked degree of size variation and time-related structural reduction in Javanese H. erectus. This is notably expressed by a significant decrease of the mesiodistal diameter, frequently associated to the reduction or even loss of the lower molar distal cusp (hypoconulid) and to a more square occlusal outline. In addition to the hypoconulid reduction or loss, this new sample also exhibits a low frequency of the occlusal Y-groove pattern, with a dominance of the X and, to a lesser extent, of the+patterns. This combination is rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene paleoanthropological record, including in the early Javanese dental assemblage from the Sangiran Dome. On the other hand, similar dental features are found in Chinese H. erectus and in H. heidelbergensis. As a whole, this new record confirms the complex nature of the intermittent exchanges that occurred between continental and insular Southeast Asia through the Pleistocene. PMID:23843996

  6. Additional evidence for morpho-dimensional tooth crown variation in a New Indonesian H. erectus sample from the Sangiran Dome (Central Java).

    PubMed

    Zanolli, Clément

    2013-01-01

    This contribution reports fifteen human fossil dental remains found during the last two decades in the Sangiran Dome area, in Central Java, Indonesia. Among this sample, only one of the specimens had already been briefly described, with the other fourteen remaining unreported. Seven of the fifteen isolated teeth were found in a secured stratigraphic context in the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation. The remaining elements were surface finds which, based on coincidental sources of information, were inferred as coming from the Kabuh Formation. Mainly constituted of permanent molars, but also including one upper incisor and one upper premolar, this dental sample brings additional evidence for a marked degree of size variation and time-related structural reduction in Javanese H. erectus. This is notably expressed by a significant decrease of the mesiodistal diameter, frequently associated to the reduction or even loss of the lower molar distal cusp (hypoconulid) and to a more square occlusal outline. In addition to the hypoconulid reduction or loss, this new sample also exhibits a low frequency of the occlusal Y-groove pattern, with a dominance of the X and, to a lesser extent, of the+patterns. This combination is rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene paleoanthropological record, including in the early Javanese dental assemblage from the Sangiran Dome. On the other hand, similar dental features are found in Chinese H. erectus and in H. heidelbergensis. As a whole, this new record confirms the complex nature of the intermittent exchanges that occurred between continental and insular Southeast Asia through the Pleistocene. PMID:23843996

  7. Experimental evidence of nitrogen control on pCO2 in phosphorus-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoon waters

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Roberta B.; Marotta, Humberto; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Natural and human-induced controls on carbon dioxide (CO2) in tropical waters may be very dynamic (over time and among or within ecosystems) considering the potential role of warmer temperatures intensifying metabolic responses and playing a direct role on the balance between photosynthesis and respiration. The high magnitude of biological processes at low latitudes following eutrophication by nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs into coastal lagoons waters may be a relevant component of the carbon cycle, showing controls on partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) that are still poorly understood. Here we assessed the strength of N control on pCO2 in P-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoons waters, using four experimental treatments in microcosms: control (no additional nutrients) and three levels of N additions coupled to P enrichments. In humic coastal lagoons waters, a persistent CO2 supersaturation was reported in controls and all nutrient-enriched treatments, ranging from 24- to 4-fold the atmospheric equilibrium value. However, both humic and clear coastal lagoons waters only showed significant decreases in pCO2 in relation to the controlled microcosms in the two treatments with higher N addition levels. Additionally, clear coastal lagoons water microcosms showed a shift from CO2 sources to CO2 sinks, in relation to the atmosphere. Only in the two more N-enriched treatments did pCO2 substantially decrease, from 650 µatm in controls and less N-enriched treatments to 10 µatm in more N-enriched microcosms. Humic substrates and N inputs can modulate pCO2 even in P-enriched coastal lagoons waters, thereby being important drivers on CO2 outgassing from inland waters. PMID:23390422

  8. Experimental evidence of the tonic vibration reflex during whole-body vibration of the loaded and unloaded leg.

    PubMed

    Zaidell, Lisa N; Mileva, Katya N; Sumners, David P; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Increased muscle activation during whole-body vibration (WBV) is mainly ascribed to a complex spinal and supraspinal neurophysiological mechanism termed the tonic vibration reflex (TVR). However, TVR has not been experimentally demonstrated during low-frequency WBV, therefore this investigation aimed to determine the expression of TVR during WBV. Whilst seated, eight healthy males were exposed to either vertical WBV applied to the leg via the plantar-surface of the foot, or Achilles tendon vibration (ATV) at 25 Hz and 50 Hz for 70s. Ankle plantar-flexion force, tri-axial accelerations at the shank and vibration source, and surface EMG activity of m. soleus (SOL) and m. tibialis anterior (TA) were recorded from the unloaded and passively loaded leg to simulate body mass supported during standing. Plantar flexion force was similarly augmented by WBV and ATV and increased over time in a load- and frequency dependent fashion. SOL and TA EMG amplitudes increased over time in all conditions independently of vibration mode. 50 Hz WBV and ATV resulted in greater muscle activation than 25 Hz in SOL when the shank was loaded and in TA when the shank was unloaded despite the greater transmission of vertical acceleration from source to shank with 25 Hz and WBV, especially during loading. Low-amplitude WBV of the unloaded and passively loaded leg produced slow tonic muscle contraction and plantar-flexion force increase of similar magnitudes to those induced by Achilles tendon vibration at the same frequencies. This study provides the first experimental evidence supporting the TVR as a plausible mechanism underlying the neuromuscular response to whole-body vibration. PMID:24386466

  9. Experimental Evidence of Threat-Sensitive Collective Avoidance Responses in a Large Wild-Caught Herring School

    PubMed Central

    Rieucau, Guillaume; Boswell, Kevin M.; De Robertis, Alex; Macaulay, Gavin J.; Handegard, Nils Olav

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation is commonly thought to improve animals' security. Within aquatic ecosystems, group-living prey can learn about immediate threats using cues perceived directly from predators, or from collective behaviours, for example, by reacting to the escape behaviours of companions. Combining cues from different modalities may improve the accuracy of prey antipredatory decisions. In this study, we explored the sensory modalities that mediate collective antipredatory responses of herring (Clupea harengus) when in a large school (approximately 60 000 individuals). By conducting a simulated predator encounter experiment in a semi-controlled environment (a sea cage), we tested the hypothesis that the collective responses of herring are threat-sensitive. We investigated whether cues from potential threats obtained visually or from the perception of water displacement, used independently or in an additive way, affected the strength of the collective avoidance reactions. We modified the sensory nature of the simulated threat by exposing the herring to 4 predator models differing in shape and transparency. The collective vertical avoidance response was observed and quantified using active acoustics. The combination of sensory cues elicited the strongest avoidance reactions, suggesting that collective antipredator responses in herring are mediated by the sensory modalities involved during threat detection in an additive fashion. Thus, this study provides evidence for magnitude-graded threat responses in a large school of wild-caught herring which is consistent with the “threat-sensitive hypothesis”. PMID:24489778

  10. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  11. Additional enhancer copies, with intact cdx binding sites, anteriorize Hoxa-7/lacZ expression in mouse embryos: evidence in keeping with an instructional cdx gradient.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Cockley, Adam; Drage, Deborah

    2004-09-01

    Expression of a Hoxa-7/lacZ reporter construct in transgenic mouse embryos is shifted anteriorly when the upstream enhancer is multimerized. The shift occurs in spinal ganglia, neurectoderm and in both paraxial and lateral plate mesoderms. Much of the multimer effect is inhibited by destruction of a single caudal (cdx) binding motif in the additional copies of the enhancer. These observations are in agreement with earlier enhancer multimerization analyses made for Hoxb-8 (Charite et al., 1998). Our findings therefore provide further evidence that the anterior limit of a Hox gene's expression domain is normally dependent upon and is determined by, the dosage of transcription factor(s) which bind to its enhancer element(s) and that these factors may be, or must include, the cdx proteins. We consider these findings in terms of both instructional (morphogen-like) gradient and timing models for the establishment of Hox gene expression domains. Enhancer multimerization results in an earlier onset of Hoxa-7/lacZ activity in the embryo. In neurectoderm at 8.7 days and in mesoderm at 10.5 days, the anterior boundaries of expression are located posterior to those seen at some earlier stages of development. We discuss how these findings are in keeping with a model where Hox expression boundaries become set along instructional cdx gradients, formed by cdx decay in cells moving away from the primitive streak region. PMID:15470633

  12. Additional Evidence that Juvenile Oyster Disease Is Caused by a Member of the Roseobacter Group and Colonization of Nonaffected Animals by Stappia stellulata-Like Strains†

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Juvenile oyster disease (JOD) causes significant annual mortalities of hatchery-produced Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, cultured in the Northeast. We have reported that a novel species of the α-proteobacteria Roseobacter group (designated CVSP) was numerically dominant in JOD-affected animals sampled during the 1997 epizootic on the Damariscotta River, Maine. In this study we report the isolation of CVSP bacteria from JOD-affected oysters during three separate epizootics in 1998. These bacteria were not detected in nonaffected oysters at the enzootic site, nor in animals raised at a JOD-free site. Animals raised at the JOD enzootic site that were unaffected by JOD were stably and persistently colonized by Stappia stellulata-like strains. These isolates (designated M1) inhibited the growth of CVSP bacteria in a disk-diffusion assay and thus may have prevented colonization of these animals by CVSP bacteria in situ. Laboratory-maintained C. virginica injected with CVSP bacteria experienced statistically significant elevated mortalities compared to controls, and CVSP bacteria were recovered from these animals during the mortality events. Together, these results provide additional evidence that CVSP bacteria are the etiological agent of JOD. Further, there are no other descriptions of specific marine α-proteobacteria that have been successfully cultivated from a defined animal host. Thus, this system presents an opportunity to investigate both bacterial and host factors involved in the establishment of such associations and the role of the invertebrate host in the ecology of these marine α-proteobacteria. PMID:10966410

  13. Contrasting soil fungal community responses to experimental nitrogen addition using the large subunit rRNA taxonomic marker and cellobiohydrolase I functional marker.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Balasch, Monica M; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2014-09-01

    Human activities have resulted in increased nitrogen inputs into terrestrial ecosystems, but the impact of nitrogen on ecosystem function, such as nutrient cycling, will depend at least in part on the response of soil fungal communities. We examined the response of soil fungi to experimental nitrogen addition in a loblolly pine forest (North Carolina, USA) using a taxonomic marker (large subunit rDNA, LSU) and a functional marker involved in a critical step of cellulose degradation (cellobiohydrolase, cbhI) at five time points that spanned fourteen months. Sampling date had no impact on fungal community richness or composition for either gene. Based on the LSU, nitrogen addition led to increased fungal community richness, reduced relative abundance of fungi in the phylum Basidiomycota and altered community composition; however, similar shifts were not observed with cbhI. Fungal community dissimilarity of the LSU and cbhI genes was significantly correlated in the ambient plots, but not in nitrogen-amended plots, suggesting either functional redundancy of fungi with the cbhI gene or shifts in other functional groups in response to nitrogen addition. To determine whether sequence similarity of cbhI could be predicted based on taxonomic relatedness of fungi, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of publically available cbhI sequences from known isolates and found that for a subset of isolates, similar cbhI genes were found within distantly related fungal taxa. Together, these findings suggest that taxonomic shifts in the total fungal community do not necessarily result in changes in the functional diversity of fungi. PMID:25039479

  14. Sub-meter desiccation crack patterns imaged by Curiosity at Gale Crater on Mars shed additional light on former lakes evident from examined outcrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallet, B.; Sletten, R. S.; Mangold, N.; Oehler, D. Z.; Williams, R. M. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heydari, E.; Rubin, D. M.; Rowland, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Small-scale desiccation crack patterns (mudcrack-like arrays of uniform ~0.1 to 1 m polygonal domains separated by linear or curving cracks in exposed bedding) imaged by Curiosity in Gale Crater, Mars complement a wealth of diverse data obtained from exposures of sedimentary rocks that point to deposition "in fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine environments" including an "intracrater lake system likely [to have] existed intermittently for thousands to millions of years …"(e.g. Grotzinger et al., 2015, Science, submitted). We interpret these mudcrack-like patterns, found on many of the bedrock exposures imaged by Curiosity, as desiccation cracks that developed either of two ways: 1) at the soft sediment-air interface like common mudcracks, or 2) at or below the sediment-water interface by synaeresis or diastasis (involving differential compaction). In the context of recent studies of terrestrial mudcracks, and cracks formed experimentally in various wet powders as they loose moisture, these desiccation features reflect diverse aspects of the formative environment. If they formed as mudcracks, some of the lakes were shallow enough to permit the recurrent drying and wetting that can lead to the geometric regularity characteristic of several of sets of mudcracks. Moreover, the water likely contained little suspended sediment otherwise the mudcracks would be buried too rapidly for the crack pattern to persist and to mature into regular polygonal patterns. The preservation of these desiccation crack patterns does not require, but does not exclude, deep burial and exhumation. Although invisible from satellite because of their size, a multitude of Mastcam and Navcam images reveals these informative features in considerable detail. These images complement much evidence, mostly from HiRISE data from several regions, suggesting that potential desiccation polygons on larger scales may be more common on the surface of Mars than generally recognized.

  15. Experimental inoculation of Artibeus jamaicensis bats with dengue virus serotypes 1 or 4 showed no evidence of sustained replication.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Romo, Salomé; Recio-Tótoro, Benito; Alcalá, Ana C; Lanz, Humberto; del Ángel, Rosa María; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor; Rodríguez-Moreno, Ángel; Ludert, Juan E

    2014-12-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease to humans. Bats are potential reservoirs for flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV). In this work, Artibeus jamaicensis bats were inoculated with two serotypes of DENV using different routes. For experimental inoculations (EI) 1 and 2, bats were inoculated subcutaneously or intraperitoneally with DENV-4; for EI-3 bats were inoculated intraperitoneally with DENV-1. Mock inoculated bats were kept as controls. In EI-4, bats were bitten by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with DENV-1 or 4. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays in plasma and spleen tissue collected from Day 1 to Days 9-17 after inoculation failed to reveal the presence of viral RNA in any of the samples. No evidence of circulating NS1 or specific anti-DENV IgG was detected in the plasma of the inoculated bats. These results indicate that A. jamaicensis bats are incapable of sustaining dengue virus replication and are unlikely to act as reservoirs for this virus. PMID:25311698

  16. Probing Bis-Fe(IV) MauG: Experimental Evidence for the Long-Range Charge-Resonance Model

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jiafeng; Davis, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of tryptophan tryptophylquinone, a protein-derived cofactor, involves a long-range reaction mediated by a bis-Fe(IV) intermediate of a di-heme enzyme, MauG. Recently, a unique charge-resonance (CR) phenomenon was discovered in this intermediate, and a biological, long-distance CR model was proposed. This model suggests that the chemical nature of the bis-Fe(IV) species is not as simple as it appears; rather, it is composed of a collection of resonance structures in a dynamic equilibrium. Here, we experimentally evaluated the proposed CR model by introducing small molecules to, and measuring the temperature dependence of, bis-Fe(IV) MauG. Spectroscopic evidence was presented to demonstrate that the selected compounds increase the decay rate of the bis-Fe(IV) species via disrupting the equilibrium of the resonance structures that constitutes the proposed CR model. The results support this new CR model and bring a fresh concept to the classical CR theory. PMID:25631460

  17. Experimental Evidence for Self-Limiting Reactive Flow through a Fractured Cement Core: Implications for Time-Dependent Wellbore Leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, Nicolas J.; Hesse, Marc A.; Bryant, Steven L.; Strazisar, Brian R; Lopano, Christina L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of reactive transport experiments in cement fractures. The experiments simulate coupling between flow and reaction when acidic, CO{sub 2}-rich fluids flow along a leaky wellbore. An analog dilute acid with a pH between 2.0 and 3.15 was injected at constant rate between 0.3 and 9.4 cm/s into a fractured cement core. Pressure differential across the core and effluent pH were measured to track flow path evolution, which was analyzed with electron microscopy after injection. In many experiments reaction was restricted within relatively narrow, tortuous channels along the fracture surface. The observations are consistent with coupling between flow and dissolution/precipitation. Injected acid reacts along the fracture surface to leach calcium from cement phases. Ahead of the reaction front, high pH pore fluid mixes with calcium-rich water and induces mineral precipitation. Increases in the pressure differential for most experiments indicate that precipitation can be sufficient to restrict flow. Experimental data from this study combined with published field evidence for mineral precipitation along cemented annuli suggests that leakage of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids along a wellbore may seal the leakage pathway if the initial aperture is small and residence time allows mobilization and precipitation of minerals along the fracture.

  18. Experimental evidence for the formation of CoFe{sub 2}C phase with colossal magnetocrystalline-anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gendy, Ahmed A. E-mail: ecarpenter2@vcu.edu; Bertino, Massimo; Qian, Meichun; Khanna, Shiv N. E-mail: ecarpenter2@vcu.edu; Clifford, Dustin; Carpenter, Everett E. E-mail: ecarpenter2@vcu.edu

    2015-05-25

    Attainment of magnetic order in nanoparticles at room temperature is an issue of critical importance for many different technologies. For ordinary ferromagnetic materials, a reduction in size leads to decreased magnetic anisotropy and results in superparamagnetic relaxations. If, instead, anisotropy could be enhanced at reduced particle sizes, then it would be possible to attain stable magnetic order at room temperature. Herein, we provide experimental evidence substantiating the synthesis of a cobalt iron carbide phase (CoFe{sub 2}C) of nanoparticles. Structural characterization of the CoFe{sub 2}C carbide phase was performed by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy electron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction was also performed as a complimentary analysis. Magnetic characterization of the carbide phase revealed a blocking temperature, T{sub B}, of 790 K for particles with a domain size as small as 5 ± 1 nm. The particles have magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 4.6 ± 2 × 10{sup 6 }J/m{sup 3}, which is ten times larger than that of Co nanoparticles. Such colossal anisotropy leads to thermally stable long range magnetic order. Moreover, the thermal stability constant is much larger than that of the commonly used FePt nanoparticles. With thermal stability and colossal anisotropy, the CoFe{sub 2}C nanoparticles have huge potential for enhanced magnetic data storage devices.

  19. Experimental evidence for the formation of CoFe2C phase with colossal magnetocrystalline-anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gendy, AA; Bertino, M; Clifford, D; Qian, MC; Khanna, SN; Carpenter, EE

    2015-05-25

    Attainment of magnetic order in nanoparticles at room temperature is an issue of critical importance for many different technologies. For ordinary ferromagnetic materials, a reduction in size leads to decreased magnetic anisotropy and results in superparamagnetic relaxations. If, instead, anisotropy could be enhanced at reduced particle sizes, then it would be possible to attain stable magnetic order at room temperature. Herein, we provide experimental evidence substantiating the synthesis of a cobalt iron carbide phase (CoFe2C) of nanoparticles. Structural characterization of the CoFe2C carbide phase was performed by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy electron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction was also performed as a complimentary analysis. Magnetic characterization of the carbide phase revealed a blocking temperature, TB, of 790K for particles with a domain size as small as 5 +/- 1 nm. The particles have magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 4.662 +/- 10 6 J/m(3), which is ten times larger than that of Co nanoparticles. Such colossal anisotropy leads to thermally stable long range magnetic order. Moreover, the thermal stability constant is much larger than that of the commonly used FePt nanoparticles. With thermal stability and colossal anisotropy, the CoFe2C nanoparticles have huge potential for enhanced magnetic data storage devices. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  20. Experimental Inoculation of Artibeus jamaicensis Bats with Dengue Virus Serotypes 1 or 4 Showed No Evidence of Sustained Replication

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Romo, Salomé; Recio-Tótoro, Benito; Alcalá, Ana C.; Lanz, Humberto; del Ángel, Rosa María; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor; Rodríguez-Moreno, Ángel; Ludert, Juan E.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease to humans. Bats are potential reservoirs for flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV). In this work, Artibeus jamaicensis bats were inoculated with two serotypes of DENV using different routes. For experimental inoculations (EI) 1 and 2, bats were inoculated subcutaneously or intraperitoneally with DENV-4; for EI-3 bats were inoculated intraperitoneally with DENV-1. Mock inoculated bats were kept as controls. In EI-4, bats were bitten by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with DENV-1 or 4. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays in plasma and spleen tissue collected from Day 1 to Days 9–17 after inoculation failed to reveal the presence of viral RNA in any of the samples. No evidence of circulating NS1 or specific anti-DENV IgG was detected in the plasma of the inoculated bats. These results indicate that A. jamaicensis bats are incapable of sustaining dengue virus replication and are unlikely to act as reservoirs for this virus. PMID:25311698