Science.gov

Sample records for additional experiments confirmed

  1. The PRACLAY demonstration and confirmation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, Frederic; Demarche, Marc

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The PRACLAY Demonstration and Confirmation Experiments are a contribution to the Belgian Research, Development and Demonstration program, managed by ONDRAF/NIRAS (the National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials), to assess the safety and feasibility of geological disposal of HLW (High Level and Long Lived Radioactive Waste) in Boom Clay. The in situ part of the program focuses on the confirmation of the THM(C) behaviour of the host rock in the vicinity of the disposal facility. Most of the issues investigated in the PRACLAY In Situ program is therefore generic for all repository design for HLW (respecting the temperature criteria: T{sub max} around the overpack <100 deg. C). The large scale Heater Experiment is the core experiment of this program. It aims mainly to study the large scale THM(C) response of the Boom Clay to the excavation of a disposal gallery and to a large scale thermal load. The interactions between the Boom Clay and the lining are also investigated. The Heater Experiment is break down in three tests: the Gallery and Crossing Test, the Heater Test and the Seal Test. The Heater Experiment will reproduce, in a conservative way, the most penalising conditions in the Boom Clay that could occur in a real repository. The paper provides a discussion on the choices made for the design of this experiment and details the progress of the project. (authors)

  2. 75 FR 5887 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Paracoccus Pigment; Confirmation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Paracoccus Pigment; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY... rule that appeared in the Federal Register of November 16, 2009. The final rule amended the color additive regulations to provide for the safe use of paracoccus pigment as a color additive in the feed...

  3. Four Additional Cases of Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense Infection Confirmed by Analysis of COX1 Gene in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyun; Jeon, Hyeong Kyu; Kim, Jin Bong

    2015-01-01

    Most of the diphyllobothriid tapeworms isolated from human samples in the Republic of Korea (= Korea) have been identified as Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense by genetic analysis. This paper reports confirmation of D. nihonkaiense infections in 4 additional human samples obtained between 1995 and 2014, which were analyzed at the Department of Parasitology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Korea. Analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) gene revealed a 98.5-99.5% similarity with a reference D. nihonkaiense sequence in GenBank. The present report adds 4 cases of D. nihonkaiense infections to the literature, indicating that the dominant diphyllobothriid tapeworm species in Korea is D. nihonkaiense but not D. latum. PMID:25748716

  4. 76 FR 59503 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 69; Confirmation of Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Listing of Color Additives Exempt From... May 4, 2011 (76 FR 25234). The final rule amended the color additive regulations to provide for the...-sulphonate (CAS Reg. No. 70209-99- 3), also known as Reactive Blue 69, as a color additive in contact...

  5. 75 FR 34360 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Bismuth Citrate; Confirmation of Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... level of bismuth citrate as a color additive in cosmetics intended for coloring hair on the scalp. DATES... hair on the scalp. FDA gave interested persons until April 26, 2010, to file objections or requests...

  6. 78 FR 68713 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Spirulina Extract; Confirmation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... the safe use of spirulina extract made from the dried biomass of the cyanobacteria Arthrospira... made from the dried biomass of the cyanobacteria A. platensis, as a color additive in candy and...

  7. Improving the patient experience with real-time PICC placement confirmation.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, Claire

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are now widely used in health care. The use of ultrasound and the micro introducer set have led to an increase in successful insertion rates. However, malposition can still be a problem. This can lead to delays in treatment, increase in procedure time and repeated chest X-rays as well as placement failure. Evolving technologies mean that these challenges can now be overcome. This article describes how a tracking and tip confirmation system (Sherlock 3CG Tip Confirmation System, CR Bard) was used to improve the patient experience during PICC placements by preventing malposition and delays in the start of treatment. Of 88 PICCs placed with the system, all were in an acceptable position when confirmed by chest X-ray and therefore none required any further adjustments post insertion.

  8. Radial velocity confirmation of Kepler-91 b. Additional evidence of its planetary nature using the Calar Alto/CAFE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Henning, Th.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2014-08-01

    The object transiting the star Kepler-91 was recently assessed as being of planetary nature. The confirmation was achieved by analysing the light-curve modulations observed in the Kepler data. However, quasi-simultaneous studies claimed a self-luminous nature for this object, thus rejecting it as a planet. In this work, we apply anindependent approach to confirm the planetary mass of Kepler-91b by using multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph (CAFE). We obtain the physical and orbital parameters with the radial velocity technique. In particular, we derive a value of 1.09 ± 0.20 MJup for the mass of Kepler-91b, in excellent agreement with our previous estimate that was based on the orbital brightness modulation.

  9. Substituting the polarizer mechanism with a polarization camera - an experiment to confirm its capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginald, Nelson Leslie; Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Yashiro, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Experiments that require polarized brightness measurements, traditionally have done so by taking three successive images through a polarizer that is rotated through three well-defined angles. With the advent of the polarization camera, the polarized brightness can be measured from a single image. This also eliminates the need for a polarizer and the associated rotator mechanisms and can contribute towards less weight, size, less power requirements, and importantly higher temporal resolution. We intend to demonstrate the capabilities of the polarization camera by conducting a field experiment in conjunction with the total solar eclipse of 21 August 2017 using the Imaging Spectrograph of Coronal Electrons (ISCORE) instrument (Reginald et. al., solar physics, 2009, 260, 347-361). In this instrumental concept four K-coronal images of the corona through four filters centered at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0, 423.3 nm with a bandpass of 4 nm are expected to allow us to determine the coronal electron temperature and electron speed all around the corona. In order to determine the K-coronal brightness through each filter, we would have to take three images by rotating a polarizer through three angles for each of the filters, and it is not feasible owing to the short durations of total solar eclipses. Therefore, in the past we have assumed the total brightness (F + K) measured by each of the four filters to represent K-coronal brightness, which is true in low solar corona. However, with the advent of the polarization camera we can now measure the Stokes Polarization Parameters on a pixel by pixel basis for every image taken by the polarization camera. This allows us to independently quantify the total brightness (K+F) and polarized brightness (K). Also in addition to the four filter images that allow us to measure the electron temperature and electron speed, taking an additional image without a filter will give us enough information to determine the electron density. This instrumental

  10. A motivational approach to confirmation: an interpretation of dysphagic patients' experiences.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, B; Pörn, I

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we articulate confirmation and disconfirmation as components in human motivation. We develop a theory of motivation on the basis of a model of human action and we explore aspects of confirmation and disconfirmation in the context of the meeting of dysphagic patients with their physicians. We distinguish four central elements in confirmation and disconfirmation and use these and the relations between them for the purpose of constructing a typology. Finally, on the basis of the results obtained we interpret a small volume of remarks reflecting the meaning field of some dysphagic patients in relation to their physicians. The underlying motive is to develop tools for understanding health care processes. The "SAUC-Confirmation-Model" and the theoretical framework in which it is embedded should be seen from that point of view.

  11. Experience with a urine opiate screening and confirmation cutoff of 2000 ng/mL.

    PubMed

    Fraser, A D; Worth, D

    1999-10-01

    Until recently, most laboratories used an opiate immunoassay screening and confirmation cutoff value of 300 ng/mL for codeine and morphine detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cutoff value for opiates was increased to 2000 ng/mL or higher in various laboratories because of concerns that small doses of codeine and foods containing poppy seeds would give a positive opiate-screening result. Workplace drug-testing programs in the U.S. raised the opiate cutoff value to 2000 ng/mL on 30 November 1998. The objective of this study is to describe the results of opiate testing of 8600 urine specimens collected over 24 months with a 2000-ng/mL screening and confirmation (codeine and morphine) cutoff value. Specimens were screened by the EMITdau opiate assay using an in-house 2000-ng/mL morphine calibrator. Presumptive positive findings (N = 621) were analyzed quantitatively by GC-MS for codeine and morphine. One hundred and eighty six urine specimens were positive for codeine and morphine (> 2000 ng/mL), 298 specimens were positive for codeine only (> 2000 ng/mL) and 26 specimens were positive for morphine only (> 2000 ng/mL). All remaining specimens had codeine and morphine values < 2000 ng/mL. The codeine and morphine confirmation rate in this program reduced from 7.1% in 1994-1996 (300-ng/mL cutoff) to 2.1% in 1997-1998 with a 2000-ng/mL cutoff value. The codeine-only confirmation rate lowered from 6.6% (300-ng/mL cutoff) to 3.4% (2000-ng/mL cutoff). It was concluded that increasing opiate screening and codeine and morphine confirmation cutoff values led to > 300% reduction in the confirmed-positive rate for codeine and morphine and a 47% reduction in codeine-only confirmations in a urine drug-testing program where codeine was the major opiate used.

  12. Polymer Photooxidation: An Experiment to Demonstrate the Effect of Additives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Norman S.; McKellar, John F.

    1979-01-01

    This undergraduate experiment shows that the inclusion of an appropriate additive can have a very marked effect on the physical properties of a polymer. The polymer used is polypropylene and the additives are 2-hydroxy-4-octyloxy-benzophenone and benzophenone. (BB)

  13. Understanding of the late Michelson's experiments that confirmed the aether existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rek, Radosław

    2016-06-01

    This paper contains a brief discussion of results of two experiments made by Albert Michelson in the years of 1923-1925. According to the paper written by the Nobel Prize winner the aether dragging should exist.

  14. An air transfer experiment confirms the role of volatile cues in communication between plants.

    PubMed

    Karban, Richard; Shiojiri, Kaori; Ishizaki, Satomi

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies reported that sagebrush plants near experimentally clipped neighbors experienced less herbivory than did plants near unclipped neighbors. Blocking air flow with plastic bags made this effect undetectable. However, some scientists remained skeptical about the possibility of volatile communication between plants since the existence and identity of a cue that operates in nature have never been demonstrated. We conducted an air transfer experiment that collected air from the headspace of an experimentally clipped donor plant and delivered it to the headspace of an unclipped assay plant. We found that assay plants treated with air from clipped donors were less likely to be damaged by naturally occurring herbivores in a field experiment. This simple air transfer experiment fulfills the most critical of Koch's postulates and provides more definitive evidence for volatile communication between plants. It also provides an inexpensive experimental protocol that can be used to screen plants for interplant communication in the field.

  15. Significant Life Experiences Affect Environmental Action: A Confirmation Study in Eastern Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Shih-Jang

    2009-01-01

    Two field studies form the basis of this article. The major purposes of Study 1 were to examine significant life experiences affecting the cultivation of environmental activists in eastern Taiwan, and to reconstruct the life paths followed by those active people who engaged in effective environmental action. 40 usable autobiographical memories…

  16. Psychosocial Experiences Associated with Confirmed and Self-Identified Dyslexia: A Participant-Driven Concept Map of Adult Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalavany, Blace Arthur; Carawan, Lena Williams; Rennick, Robyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Concept mapping (a mixed qualitative-quantitative methodology) was used to describe and understand the psychosocial experiences of adults with confirmed and self-identified dyslexia. Using innovative processes of art and photography, Phase 1 of the study included 15 adults who participated in focus groups and in-depth interviews and were asked to…

  17. Effects of an additional dimension in the Young experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, Allan Kardec

    2015-09-15

    The results of the Young experiment can be analyzed either by classical or Quantum Physics. The later one though leads to a more complete interpretation, based on two different patterns that appear when one works either with single or double slits. Here we show that the two patterns can be derived from a single principle, in the context of General Relativity, if one assumes an additional spatial dimension to the four known today. The found equations yield the same results as those in Quantum Mechanics.

  18. Falsification of Matching Theory and Confirmation of an Evolutionary Theory of Behavior Dynamics in a Critical Experiment.

    PubMed

    McDowell, J J; Calvin, Olivia L; Hackett, Ryan; Klapes, Bryan

    2017-03-31

    Two competing predictions of matching theory and an evolutionary theory of behavior dynamics, and one additional prediction of the evolutionary theory, were tested in a critical experiment in which human participants worked on concurrent schedules for money (Dallery, Soto, and McDowell, 2005). The three predictions concerned the descriptive adequacy of matching theory equations, and of equations describing emergent equilibria of the evolutionary theory. Tests of the predictions falsified matching theory and supported the evolutionary theory.

  19. Pre- and post-experimental manipulation assessments confirm the increase in number of birds due to the addition of nest boxes.

    PubMed

    Cuatianquiz Lima, Cecilia; Macías Garcia, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds breed in holes that they do not excavate themselves. This is possible where there are large trees whose size and age permit the digging of holes by primary excavators and only rarely happens in forest plantations, where we expected a deficit of both breeding holes and SCN species. We assessed whether the availability of tree cavities influenced the number of SCNs in two temperate forest types, and evaluated the change in number of SCNs after adding nest boxes. First, we counted all cavities within each of our 25-m radius sampling points in mature and young forest plots during 2009. We then added nest boxes at standardised locations during 2010 and 2011 and conducted fortnightly bird counts (January-October 2009-2011). In 2011 we added two extra plots of each forest type, where we also conducted bird counts. Prior to adding nest boxes, counts revealed more SCNs in mature than in young forest. Following the addition of nest boxes, the number of SCNs increased significantly in the points with nest boxes in both types of forest. Counts in 2011 confirmed the increase in number of birds due to the addition of nest boxes. Given the likely benefits associated with a richer bird community we propose that, as is routinely done in some countries, forest management programs preserve old tree stumps and add nest boxes to forest plantations in order to increase bird numbers and bird community diversity.

  20. Pre- and post-experimental manipulation assessments confirm the increase in number of birds due to the addition of nest boxes

    PubMed Central

    Cuatianquiz Lima, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds breed in holes that they do not excavate themselves. This is possible where there are large trees whose size and age permit the digging of holes by primary excavators and only rarely happens in forest plantations, where we expected a deficit of both breeding holes and SCN species. We assessed whether the availability of tree cavities influenced the number of SCNs in two temperate forest types, and evaluated the change in number of SCNs after adding nest boxes. First, we counted all cavities within each of our 25-m radius sampling points in mature and young forest plots during 2009. We then added nest boxes at standardised locations during 2010 and 2011 and conducted fortnightly bird counts (January–October 2009–2011). In 2011 we added two extra plots of each forest type, where we also conducted bird counts. Prior to adding nest boxes, counts revealed more SCNs in mature than in young forest. Following the addition of nest boxes, the number of SCNs increased significantly in the points with nest boxes in both types of forest. Counts in 2011 confirmed the increase in number of birds due to the addition of nest boxes. Given the likely benefits associated with a richer bird community we propose that, as is routinely done in some countries, forest management programs preserve old tree stumps and add nest boxes to forest plantations in order to increase bird numbers and bird community diversity. PMID:26998410

  1. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  2. Software reliability: Additional investigations into modeling with replicated experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Schotz, F. M.; Skirvan, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of programmer experience level, different program usage distributions, and programming languages are explored. All these factors affect performance, and some tentative relational hypotheses are presented. An analytic framework for replicated and non-replicated (traditional) software experiments is presented. A method of obtaining an upper bound on the error rate of the next error is proposed. The method was validated empirically by comparing forecasts with actual data. In all 14 cases the bound exceeded the observed parameter, albeit somewhat conservatively. Two other forecasting methods are proposed and compared to observed results. Although demonstrated relative to this framework that stages are neither independent nor exponentially distributed, empirical estimates show that the exponential assumption is nearly valid for all but the extreme tails of the distribution. Except for the dependence in the stage probabilities, Cox's model approximates to a degree what is being observed.

  3. An experiment in software reliability: Additional analyses using data from automated replications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, Janet R.; Lauterbach, Linda A.

    1988-01-01

    A study undertaken to collect software error data of laboratory quality for use in the development of credible methods for predicting the reliability of software used in life-critical applications is summarized. The software error data reported were acquired through automated repetitive run testing of three independent implementations of a launch interceptor condition module of a radar tracking problem. The results are based on 100 test applications to accumulate a sufficient sample size for error rate estimation. The data collected is used to confirm the results of two Boeing studies reported in NASA-CR-165836 Software Reliability: Repetitive Run Experimentation and Modeling, and NASA-CR-172378 Software Reliability: Additional Investigations into Modeling With Replicated Experiments, respectively. That is, the results confirm the log-linear pattern of software error rates and reject the hypothesis of equal error rates per individual fault. This rejection casts doubt on the assumption that the program's failure rate is a constant multiple of the number of residual bugs; an assumption which underlies some of the current models of software reliability. data raises new questions concerning the phenomenon of interacting faults.

  4. Confirmed Beliefs or False Assumptions? A Study of Home Stay Experiences in the French Study Abroad Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diao, Wenhao; Freed, Barbara; Smith, Leigh

    2011-01-01

    The past 20 years have witnessed enormous growth in a diverse array of studies which explore the linguistic impact of study abroad (SA) experiences. During this period a multitude of research projects have investigated SLA/L2 learning in SA, in a number of different languages (Russian, Japanese, French, Spanish, English), utilizing diverse…

  5. The laboratory confirmation of suspected measles cases in settings of low measles transmission: conclusions from the experience in the Americas.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Vance; Rota, Jennifer; Izurieta, Héctor; Carrasco, Peter; Bellini, William

    2004-01-01

    The Americas have set a goal of interrupting indigenous transmission of measles using a strategy developed by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). This strategy includes recommendations for vaccination activities to achieve and sustain high immunity in the population and is complemented by sensitive epidemiological surveillance systems developed to monitor illnesses characterized by febrile rash, and to provide effective virological and serological surveillance. A key component in ensuring the success of the programme has been a laboratory network comprising 22 national laboratories including reference centres. Commercially available indirect enzyme immunoassay kits (EIA) for immunoglobulin M (IgM)-class antibodies are currently being used throughout the region. However, because there are few or no true measles cases in the region, the positive predictive value of these diagnostic tests has decreased. False-positive results of IgM tests can also occur as a result of testing suspected measles cases with exanthemata caused by Parvovirus B19, rubella and Human herpesvirus 6, among others. In addition, as countries maintain high levels of vaccination activity and increased surveillance of rash and fever, the notification of febrile rash illness in recently vaccinated people can be anticipated. Thus, managers in the measles elimination programme must be prepared to address the interpretation of a positive result of a laboratory test for measles IgM when clinical and epidemiological data may indicate that the case is not measles. The interpretation of an IgM-positive test under different circumstances and the definition of a vaccine-related rash illness in a setting of greatly reduced, or absent, transmission of measles is discussed. PMID:15640921

  6. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Methyl Salicylate in Rubbing Alcohol: An Experiment Employing Standard Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Atta, Robert E.; Van Atta, R. Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Provides a gas chromatography experiment that exercises the quantitative technique of standard addition to the analysis for a minor component, methyl salicylate, in a commercial product, "wintergreen rubbing alcohol." (CS)

  7. Active dentate granule cells encode experience to promote the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Gregory W; Shen, Jia; Tian, Mu; Schroeder, Bryce; Wang, Jia; Man, Guoming; Wu, Song; Ge, Shaoyu

    2017-04-03

    The continuous addition of new dentate granule cells, exquisitely regulated by brain activity, renders the hippocampus plastic. However, how neural circuits encode experiences to impact the addition of adult-born neurons remains unknown. Here, we used endoscopic Ca(2+) imaging to track the real-time activity of individual dentate granule cells in freely-behaving mice. For the first time, we found that active dentate granule cells responded to a novel experience by preferentially increasing their Ca(2+) event frequency. This elevated activity, which we found to be associated with object exploration, returned to baseline by one hour in the same environment, but could be dishabituated via introduction to a novel environment. To seamlessly transition between environments, we next established a freely-controllable virtual reality system for unrestrained mice. We again observed increased firing of active neurons in a virtual enriched environment. Interestingly, multiple novel virtual experiences accumulatively increased the number of newborn neurons when compared to a single experience. Finally, optogenetic silencing of existing dentate granule cells during novel environmental exploration perturbed experience-induced neuronal addition. Together, our study shows that the adult brain conveys novel, enriched experiences to increase the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons by increasing the firing of active dentate granule cells.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTAdult brains are constantly reshaping themselves from synapses to circuits as we encounter novel experiences from moment to moment. Importantly, this reshaping includes the addition of newborn hippocampal neurons. However, it remains largely unknown how our circuits encode experience-induced brain activity to govern the addition of new hippocampal neurons. By coupling in vivo Ca(2+) imaging of dentate granule neurons with a novel unrestrained virtual reality system for rodents, we discovered that a new experience rapidly

  8. Response of non-added solutes during nutrient addition experiments in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cardona, B.; Wymore, A.; Koenig, L.; Coble, A. A.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient addition experiments, such as Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization (TASCC), have become widely popular as a means to study nutrient uptake dynamics in stream ecosystems. However, the impact of these additions on ambient concentrations of non-added solutes is often overlooked. TASCC addition experiments are ideal for assessing interactions among solutes because it allows for the characterization of multiple solute concentrations across a broad range of added nutrient concentrations. TASCC additions also require the addition of a conservative tracer (NaCl) to track changes in conductivity during the experimental manipulation. Despite its use as a conservative tracer, chloride (Cl) and its associated sodium (Na) might change the concentrations of other ions and non-added nutrients through ion exchange or other processes. Similarly, additions of biologically active solutes might change the concentrations of other non-added solutes. These methodological issues in nutrient addition experiments have been poorly addressed in the literature. Here we examine the response of non-added solutes to pulse additions (i.e. TASCC) of NaCl plus nitrate (NO3-), ammonium, and phosphate across biomes including temperate and tropical forests, and arctic taiga. Preliminary results demonstrate that non-added solutes respond to changes in the concentration of these added nutrients. For example, concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in suburban headwater streams of New Hampshire both increase and decrease in response to NO3- additions, apparently due to biotic processes. Similarly, cations such as potassium, magnesium, and calcium also increase during TASCC experiments, likely due to cation exchange processes associated with Na addition. The response of non-added solutes to short-term pulses of added nutrients and tracers needs to be carefully assessed to ensure that nutrient uptake metrics are accurate, and to detect biotic interactions that may

  9. Repository performance confirmation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-09-01

    Yucca Mountain license application identified a broad suite of monitoring activities. A revision of the plan was expected to winnow the number of activities down to a manageable size. As a result, an objective process for the next stage of performance confirmation planning was developed as an integral part of an overarching long-term testing and monitoring strategy. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance monitoring program at once reflects its importance to stakeholders while demonstrating adequate understanding of relevant monitoring parameters. The compliance criteria were stated by regulation and are currently monitored as part of the regulatory rule for disposal. At the outset, the screening practice and parameter selection were not predicated on a direct or indirect correlation to system performance metrics, as was the case for Yucca Mountain. Later on, correlation to performance was established, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant continues to monitor ten parameters originally identified in the compliance certification documentation. The monitoring program has proven to be effective for the technical intentions and societal or public assurance. The experience with performance confirmation in the license application process for Yucca Mountain helped identify an objective, quantitative methodology for this purpose. Revision of the existing plan would be based on findings of the total system performance assessment. Identification and prioritization of confirmation activities would then derive from performance metrics associated with performance assessment. Given the understanding of repository performance confirmation, as reviewed in this paper, it is evident that the performance confirmation program for the Yucca Mountain project could be readily re-engaged if licensing activities resumed.

  10. Chemical and biological consequences of using carbon dioxide versus acid additions in ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; DuFore, Christopher M.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Use of different approaches for manipulating seawater chemistry during ocean acidification experiments has confounded comparison of results from various experimental studies. Some of these discrepancies have been attributed to whether addition of acid (such as hydrochloric acid, HCl) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used to adjust carbonate system parameters. Experimental simulations of carbonate system parameter scenarios for the years 1766, 2007, and 2100 were performed using the carbonate speciation program CO2SYS to demonstrate the variation in seawater chemistry that can result from use of these approaches. Results showed that carbonate system parameters were 3 percent and 8 percent lower than target values in closed-system acid additions, and 1 percent and 5 percent higher in closed-system CO2 additions for the 2007 and 2100 simulations, respectively. Open-system simulations showed that carbonate system parameters can deviate by up to 52 percent to 70 percent from target values in both acid addition and CO2 addition experiments. Results from simulations for the year 2100 were applied to empirically derived equations that relate biogenic calcification to carbonate system parameters for calcifying marine organisms including coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera. Calculated calcification rates for coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera differed from rates at target conditions by 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent in closed-system CO2 gas additions, from 0.8 percent to 15 percent in the closed-system acid additions, from 4.8 percent to 94 percent in open-system acid additions, and from 7 percent to 142 percent in open-system CO2 additions.

  11. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Louise P.; Cross, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation. PMID:26209850

  12. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Cross, Emily S

    2015-12-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation.

  13. Goodness-of-fit methods for additive-risk models in tumorigenicity experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis

    2003-09-01

    In tumorigenicity experiments, a complication is that the time to event is generally not observed, so that the time to tumor is subject to interval censoring. One of the goals in these studies is to properly model the effect of dose on risk. Thus, it is important to have goodness of fit procedures available for assessing the model fit. While several estimation procedures have been developed for current-status data, relatively little work has been done on model-checking techniques. In this article, we propose numerical and graphical methods for the analysis of current-status data using the additive-risk model, primarily focusing on the situation where the monitoring times are dependent. The finite-sample properties of the proposed methodology are examined through numerical studies. The methods are then illustrated with data from a tumorigenicity experiment.

  14. Spinel dissolution via addition of glass forming chemicals. Results of preliminary experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Johnson, F. C.

    2015-11-01

    Increased loading of high level waste in glass can lead to crystallization within the glass. Some crystalline species, such as spinel, have no practical impact on the chemical durability of the glass, and therefore may be acceptable from both a processing and a product performance standpoint. In order to operate a melter with a controlled amount of crystallization, options must be developed for remediating an unacceptable accumulation of crystals. This report describes preliminary experiments designed to evaluate the ability to dissolve spinel crystals in simulated waste glass melts via the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs).

  15. Additional experiments relative to the shelf life of Li(Si)/FeS2 thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, J. Q.; Armijo, J. R.

    1985-02-01

    A continuing effort to develop a new thermal battery technology based on the Li(Si)/FeS2 electrochemical couple is reported. The results relate to the long shelf life requirement for thermal batteries designed by Sandia, and include topics relevant to leakage through the hermetic seal and accelerated aging experiments with materials new to the technology. Conclusions relevant to leakage through the hermetic seal are that the maximum leak rate must not exceed 1.8 x 10(-7) w, where w is the grams of Li(Si) contained by a battery, and that a bomb type leak test can be designed that is adequate for most Li(Si)/FeS2 batteries. Conclusions relevant to long term compatibility of new materials include the following: nickel is not compatible with the iron disulfide in the cathode; the CaSi2 additive used to suppress the initial voltage transient does not react or degrade during accelerated aging experiments, but the use of that material can lead to an increase in the variability of the activated lives, especially for long life batteries; Grafoil current collectors used with the cathode do not degrade in accelerated aging experiments.

  16. Effects of biochar addition to soil on nitrogen fluxes in a winter wheat lysimeter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüppi, Roman; Leifeld, Jens; Neftel, Albrecht; Conen, Franz; Six, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich, porous residue from pyrolysis of biomass that potentially increases crop yields by reducing losses of nitrogen from soils and/or enhancing the uptake of applied fertiliser by the crops. Previous research is scarce about biochar's ability to increase wheat yields in temperate soils or how it changes nitrogen dynamics in the field. In a lysimeter system with two different soils (sandy/silt loam) nitrogen fluxes were traced by isotopic 15N enriched fertiliser to identify changes in nitrous oxide emissions, leaching and plant uptake after biochar addition. 20t/ha woodchip-waste biochar (pH=13) was applied to these soils in four lysimeters per soil type; the same number of lysimeters served as a control. The soils were cropped with winter wheat during the season 2012/2013. 170 kg-N/ha ammonium nitrate fertiliser with 10% 15N was applied in 3 events during the growing season and 15N concentrations where measured at different points in time in plant, soil, leachate and emitted nitrous oxide. After one year the lysimeter system showed no difference between biochar and control treatment in grain- and straw yield or nitrogen uptake. However biochar did reduce nitrous oxide emissions in the silt loam and losses of nitrate leaching in sandy loam. This study indicates potential reduction of nitrogen loss from cropland soil by biochar application but could not confirm increased yields in an intensive wheat production system.

  17. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hensen, B.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M. S.; Dréau, A. E.; Reiserer, A.; Vermeulen, R. F. L.; Schouten, R. N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.; Taminiau, T. H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  18. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensen, B.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M. S.; Dréau, A. E.; Reiserer, A.; Vermeulen, R. F. L.; Schouten, R. N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.; Taminiau, T. H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-08-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator.

  19. The additive effect on suicidality of family history of suicidal behavior and early traumatic experiences.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Castroman, J; Guillaume, S; Olié, E; Jaussent, I; Baca-García, E; Courtet, P

    2015-01-01

    Family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood abuse are reported risk factors for suicide attempts and suicide completion. We aim to quantify the additive effect of family history of suicidal behavior and different subtypes of childhood abuse on suicidal behavior. We examined a sample of 496 suicide attempters, comparing individuals with family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood (physical or sexual) abuse, individuals with family history of suicidal behavior only, individuals with history of early traumatic experiences only, and individuals with none of these two risk factors with regards to suicidal features. An additive effect was found for the age at the first attempt in suicide attempters with both family history of suicidal behavior and either physical or sexual abuse. No significant interactions were found between family history of suicidal behavior and childhood trauma in relation to any characteristics of suicidal behavior. Subjects presenting family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse attempt suicide earlier in life than subjects with just one or none of them, particularly if they were sexually abused. Other suicidality indexes were only partially or not associated with this combination of risk factors. A careful assessment of patients with both family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse could help to prevent future suicide attempts, particularly in young people.

  20. Non-Empirical Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawid, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In fundamental physics today, some theories are taken to be probably viable despite a lack of strong (or any) empirical confirmation. This situation suggests, I argue, an extension of the concept of theory confirmation that allows for confirmation by observations that are not predicted by the theory in question. "Non-empirical confirmation", as I call the latter form of confirmation, plays a more conspicuous role today than in earlier periods of physics. It has always constituted a significant albeit implicit element of the assessment of physical theory, however, that has not been adequately accounted for in canonical reconstructions of the scientific method. The talk discusses the core argumentative structure of non-empirical confirmation, analyses the concept’s reliance on the empirical testability of the theories in question and addresses some worries that have been raised in its regard.

  1. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  2. Additive Manufacturing, Design, Testing, and Fabrication: A Full Engineering Experience at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zusack, Steven

    2016-01-01

    I worked on several projects this term. While most projects involved additive manufacturing, I was also involved with two design projects, two testing projects, and a fabrication project. The primary mentor for these was Richard Hagen. Secondary mentors were Hai Nguyen, Khadijah Shariff, and fabrication training from James Brown. Overall, my experience at JSC has been successful and what I have learned will continue to help me in my engineering education and profession long after I leave. My 3D printing projects ranged from less than a 1 cubic centimeter to about 1 cubic foot and involved several printers using different printing technologies. It was exciting to become familiar with printing technologies such as industrial grade FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling), the relatively new SLA (Stereolithography), and PolyJet. My primary duty with the FDM printers was to model parts that came in from various sources to print effectively and efficiently. Using methods my mentor taught me and the Stratasys Insight software, I was able to minimize imperfections, hasten build time, improve strength for specific forces (tensile, shear, etc...), and reduce likelihood of a print-failure. Also using FDM, I learned how to repair a part after it was printed. This is done by using a special kind of glue that chemically melts the two faces of plastic parts together to form a fused interface. My first goal with SLA technology was to bring the printer back to operational readiness. In becoming familiar with the Pegasus SLA printer, I researched the leveling, laser settings, and different vats to hold liquid material. With this research, I was successfully able to bring the Pegasus back online and have successfully printed multiple sample parts as well as functional parts. My experience with PolyJet technology has been focused on an understanding of the abilities/limits, costs, and the maintenance for daily use. Still upcoming will be experience with using a composite printer that uses FDM

  3. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [design of advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into test chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and rationale of an advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into each of four test chambers are outlined. The feasibility for multiple addition tests was established and various details of the methodology were studied. The four chamber battery of tests include: (1) determination of the effect of various atmospheric gases and selection of that gas which produces an optimum response; (2) determination of the effect of incubation temperature and selection of the optimum temperature for performing Martian biochemical tests; (3) sterile soil is dosed with a battery of C-14 labeled substrates and subjected to experimental temperature range; and (4) determination of the possible inhibitory effects of water on Martian organisms is performed initially by dosing with 0.01 ml and 0.5 ml of medium, respectively. A series of specifically labeled substrates are then added to obtain patterns in metabolic 14CO2 (C-14)O2 evolution.

  4. Bayesian Confirmation and Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellett, Frederick S., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The author briefly characterizes two ways to confirm the empirical part of educational theories: the hypothetico-deductive method and the Bayesian method. It is argued that the Bayesian approach can be justified. (JMK)

  5. Police arrest and self-defence skills: performance under anxiety of officers with and without additional experience in martial arts.

    PubMed

    Renden, Peter G; Landman, Annemarie; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; Oudejans, Raôul R D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether officers with additional martial arts training experience performed better in arrest and self-defence scenarios under low and high anxiety and were better able to maintain performance under high anxiety than officers who just rely on regular police training. We were especially interested to find out whether training once a week would already lead to better performance under high anxiety. Officers with additional experience in kickboxing or karate/jiu-jitsu (training several times per week), or krav maga (training once a week) and officers with no additional experience performed several arrest and self-defence skills under low and high anxiety. Results showed that officers with additional experience (also those who trained once a week) performed better under high anxiety than officers with no additional experience. Still, the additional experience did not prevent these participants from performing worse under high anxiety compared to low anxiety. Implications for training are discussed. Practitioner summary: Dutch police officers train their arrest and self-defence skills only four to six hours per year. Our results indicate that doing an additional martial arts training once a week may lead to better performance under anxiety, although it cannot prevent that performance decreases under high anxiety compared to low anxiety.

  6. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Tank, Jennifer; Sobota, Daniel; O'Brien, Jon; Webster, Jackson; Valett, H. Maurice; Dodds, Walter; Poole, Geoff; Peterson, Chris G.; Meyer, Judy; McDowell, William; Johnson, Sherri; Hamilton, Stephen; Gregory, Stanley; Grimm, Nancy; Dahm, Cliff; Cooper, Lee W; Ashkenas, Linda; Thomas, Suzanne; Sheibley, Rich; Potter, Jody; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Johnson, Laura; Helton, Ashley; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Burgin, Amy; Bernot, Melody; Beaulieu, Jake; Arango, Clay

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S{sub Wtot}). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Gross primary production shortened S{sub Wtot}, while increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} lengthened S{sub Wtot} resulting in no net effect of land use on NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal.

  7. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.O.; Tank, J.L.; Sobota, D.J.; Mulholland, P.J.; O'Brien, J. M.; Dodds, W.K.; Webster, J.R.; Valett, H.M.; Poole, G.C.; Peterson, B.J.; Meyer, J.L.; McDowell, W.H.; Johnson, S.L.; Hamilton, S.K.; Grimm, N. B.; Gregory, S.V.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Cooper, L.W.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Thomas, S.M.; Sheibley, R.W.; Potter, J.D.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Johnson, L.T.; Helton, A.M.; Crenshaw, C.M.; Burgin, A.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Arangob, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of 15NO-3 in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO-3 uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO-3 concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO-3 uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S Wtot). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO-3 concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO-3 concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO-3 removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO-3 uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO-3 uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO-3 concentration. Gross primary production shortened SWtot, while increasing NO-3 lengthened SWtot resulting in no net effect of land use on NO- 3 removal. ?? 2009.

  8. A Mössbauer experiment in a rotating system on the second-order Doppler shift: confirmation of the corrected result by Kündig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L.; Yarman, Tolga; Missevitch, Oleg V.; Rogozev, Boris I.

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of a Mössbauer experiment in a rotating system, whose performance was stimulated by our recent findings (2008 Phys. Scr. 77 035302) and which consisted of the fact that a correct processing of Kündig's experimental data on the subject gives an appreciable deviation of a relative energy shift ΔE/E between emission and absorption resonant lines from the standard prediction based on the relativistic dilation of time (that is, ΔE/E=-v2/2c2 to the accuracy c-2, where v is the tangential velocity of the absorber of resonant radiation, and c is the velocity of light in vacuum). That is, the Kündig result we have corrected becomes ΔE/E=-k(v2/c2), with k=0.596±0.006 (instead of the result k=0.5003±0.006, originally reported by Kündig). In our own experiment, we carried out measurements for two absorbers with a substantially different isomer shift, which allowed us to make a correction of the Mössbauer data regarding vibrations in the rotor system at various rotational frequencies. As a result, we obtained the overall estimation k=0.68±0.03.

  9. Overall satisfaction, sexual function, and the durability of neophallus dimensions following staged female to male genital gender confirming surgery: the Institute of Urology, London U.K. experience

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Nim A.; De Luca, Francesco; Spilotros, Marco; Ralph, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose What factors influence transgender men’s decisions to undergo (and to not undergo) specific genital gender confirming surgeries (GCS) has not been described in the literature. Sexual function outcomes related to clitoral transposition and penile prosthesis placement is also not well described. Durability of neophallus dimensions after phalloplasty has not been described. A better understanding of these factors is necessary for pre-op counseling. We sought to assess patient genital-GCS related satisfaction, regret, pre/post-op sexual function, genital preferences, and genital measurements post-op. Materials and methods We evaluated ten female to male transgender patients who had previously undergone suprapubic pedicle-flap phalloplasty [suprapubic phalloplasty (SP); N=10] and 15 who had undergone radial artery forearm-flap phalloplasty [(RAP); N=15; 5/15 without and 10/15 with cutaneous nerve to clitoral nerve anastomosis] at our center (UK). We queried patients’ surgery related preferences and concerns, satisfaction, and sexual function pre/post-surgery, and accounted for whether patients had undergone clitoral transposition and/or cutaneous-to-clitoral nerve anastomosis. We measured flaccid and (where applicable) erect length and girth using a smart-phone app we designed. Results Mean age at surgery and follow-up for those that underwent SP was 35.1 and 2.23 years, and 34 and 6.8 for those that underwent RAP. Mean satisfaction scores were 9.1/10 and 9/10 for those that underwent SP and RAP, respectively. No patient (0%) regretted starting genital-GCS surgery. All (100%) patients that could achieve orgasm before GCS with clitoral transposition could achieve orgasm after surgery, and the vast majority reported preserved quality of erogenous sensation by our transposition technique. All (100%) RAP and 9/10 SP patients reported masturbation with their phallus. Inflatable penile prosthesis placement was not associated with decreased erogenous

  10. Predicting leaf wax n-alkane 2H/1H ratios: controlled water source and humidity experiments with hydroponically grown trees confirm predictions of Craig-Gordon model.

    PubMed

    Tipple, Brett J; Berke, Melissa A; Hambach, Bastian; Roden, John S; Ehleringer, James R

    2015-06-01

    The extent to which both water source and atmospheric humidity affect δ(2)H values of terrestrial plant leaf waxes will affect the interpretations of δ(2)H variation of leaf waxes as a proxy for hydrological conditions. To elucidate the effects of these parameters, we conducted a long-term experiment in which we grew two tree species, Populus fremontii and Betula occidentalis, hydroponically under combinations of six isotopically distinct waters and two different atmospheric humidities. We observed that leaf n-alkane δ(2)H values of both species were linearly related to source water δ(2)H values, but with slope differences associated with differing humidities. When a modified version of the Craig-Gordon model incorporating plant factors was used to predict the δ(2)H values of leaf water, all modelled leaf water values fit the same linear relationship with n-alkane δ(2)H values. These observations suggested a relatively constant biosynthetic fractionation factor between leaf water and n-alkanes. However, our calculations indicated a small difference in the biosynthetic fractionation factor between the two species, consistent with small differences calculated for species in other studies. At present, it remains unclear if these apparent interspecies differences in biosynthetic fractionation reflect species-specific biochemistry or a common biosynthetic fractionation factor with insufficient model parameterization.

  11. The effect of tailor-made additives on crystal growth of methyl paraben: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhihui; Liu, Yong; Song, Yang; Guan, Guoqiang; Jiang, Yanbin

    2017-03-01

    In this study, methyl paraben (MP) was selected as the model component, and acetaminophen (APAP), p-methyl acetanilide (PMAA) and acetanilide (ACET), which share the similar molecular structure as MP, were selected as the three tailor-made additives to study the effect of tailor-made additives on the crystal growth of MP. HPLC results indicated that the MP crystals induced by the three additives contained MP only. Photographs of the single crystals prepared indicated that the morphology of the MP crystals was greatly changed by the additives, but PXRD and single crystal diffraction results illustrated that the MP crystals were the same polymorph only with different crystal habits, and no new crystal form was found compared with other references. To investigate the effect of the additives on the crystal growth, the interaction between additives and facets was discussed in detail using the DFT methods and MD simulations. The results showed that APAP, PMAA and ACET would be selectively adsorbed on the growth surfaces of the crystal facets, which induced the change in MP crystal habits.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as additional treatment in deep sternal wound infections – a single center's experience

    PubMed Central

    Bryndza, Magdalena; Chrapusta, Anna; Kobielska, Ewa; Kapelak, Bogusław; Grudzień, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is one of the most serious complications after cardiac surgery procedures, observed in 5% of patients. Current standard medical therapy for DSWI includes antibiotics, surgical debridement, resuturing or negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Unfortunately, in some cases these methods are insufficient, and additional therapeutic options are needed. Aim To assess the effects and usefulness of additional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2) in patients with DSWI after cardiac surgery procedures. Material and methods A retrospective analysis of 10 patients after cardiac surgery who developed DSWI in the period 2010–2012 was performed. After 3 months of ineffective conventional therapy including targeted antibiotic, surgical sternal debridement and NPWT, patients were qualified for additional HBO2 therapy. A total of 20 sessions of HBO2 therapy were performed, each 92 minutes long. Results After 4 weeks of HBO2 treatment, 7 patients presented complete wound healing with fibrous scar formation. One patient was qualified for the another cycle of HBO2 therapy with 20 additional sessions, and complete wound healing was observed. In 2 cases, after 5 and 19 sessions, HBO2 was interrupted because of improper qualifications. Conclusions The HBO2 as an additional therapy in DSWI was successful in 80% of cases, and no complications were observed. However, due to the small number of published studies with a small number of patients, randomized, clinical trials are needed to assess the clinical results of HBO2 in DSWI after cardiac surgery procedures. PMID:27785131

  13. Exposure and Experience: Additional Criteria for Selecting Future Operational Theater Commanders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-23

    Kaufmann. From Plato to Derrida . Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008. 8 Experience Comparison of Former...Forrest E., and Walter Kaufmann. From Plato to Derrida . Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008. Bell, William Gardner. Center

  14. English as an Additional Language (EAL) "viva voce": The EAL Doctoral Oral Examination Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Is the doctoral "viva voce" a reasonable method of examination? This exploratory paper proposes that the doctoral "viva voce" (oral examination) is a slightly different hurdle for doctoral candidates for whom English is an additional language (EAL, also termed ESL) than for those whose first language is English. It investigates…

  15. Designing Location-Based Learning Experiences for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Additional Sensory Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David J.; McHugh, David; Standen, Penny; Evett, Lindsay; Shopland, Nick; Battersby, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The research reported here is part of a larger project which seeks to combine serious games (or games-based learning) with location-based services to help people with intellectual disabilities and additional sensory impairments to develop work based skills. Specifically this paper reports on where these approaches are combined to scaffold the…

  16. Laser Additive Melting and Solidification of Inconel 718: Finite Element Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, John; Ladani, Leila; Sadowski, Magda

    2016-03-01

    The field of powdered metal additive manufacturing is experiencing a surge in public interest finding uses in aerospace, defense, and biomedical industries. The relative youth of the technology coupled with public interest makes the field a vibrant research topic. The authors have expanded upon previously published finite element models used to analyze the processing of novel engineering materials through the use of laser- and electron beam-based additive manufacturing. In this work, the authors present a model for simulating fabrication of Inconel 718 using laser melting processes. Thermal transport phenomena and melt pool geometries are discussed and validation against experimental findings is presented. After comparing experimental and simulation results, the authors present two correction correlations to transform the modeling results into meaningful predictions of actual laser melting melt pool geometries in Inconel 718.

  17. Additive Manufacture (3D Printing) of Plasma Diagnostic Components and Assemblies for Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinley, Morgan; Chun, Katherine; Melnik, Paul; Sieck, Paul; Smith, Trevor; Stuber, James; Woodruff, Simon; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; Card, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating the potential impact of additive manufacturing (3D printing) on the cost and complexity of plasma diagnostics. We present a survey of the current state-of-the-art in additive manufacture of metals, as well as the design of diagnostic components that have been optimized for and take advantage of these processes. Included among these is a set of retarding field analyzer probe heads that have been printed in tungsten with internal heat sinks and cooling channels. Finite element analysis of these probe heads shows the potential for a 750K reduction in peak temperature, allowing the probe to take data twice as often without melting. Results of the evaluation of these probe heads for mechanical strength and outgassing, as well as their use on Alcator C-Mod will be presented. Supported by DOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0011858.

  18. Additional results on space environmental effects on polymer matrix composites: Experiment A0180

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Additional experimental results on the atomic oxygen erosion of boron, Kevlar, and graphite fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites are presented. Damage of composite laminates due to micrometeoroid/debris impacts is also examined with particular emphasis on the relationship between damage area and actual hole size due to particle penetration. Special attention is given to one micrometeoroid impact on an aluminum base plate which resulted in ejecta visible on an adjoining vertical flange structure.

  19. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150°C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  20. Confirmation of interstellar methylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Jewell, P. R.; Lovas, F. J.

    1995-01-01

    Four spectral emission features of the N(sub KK) = 4(sub 04) -3(sub 13) rotational transition of methylene (CH2) have been detected at signal levels 5-7 sigma above noise toward the hot core of the Orion-KL nebula and the molecular cloud in proximity to the continuum source W51 M. Specifically, in both sources we have resolved the F = 6-5, 5-4, and 4-3 hyperfine transitions of the J = 5-4 fine-structure levels and detected the blended hyperfine structure of the J = 4-3 fine structure levels. At the J = 3-2 fine-structure levels, we have observed new transitions of NS, a known interstellar molecule, which severely contaminates the search for CH2 hyperfine transitions. These new sensitive observations finally confirm the existence of interstellar CH2 which was tentatively reported by us some years ago.

  1. [Autoptically confirmed malpractice cases].

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Claims of lethal medical malpractice cases in penal law are mostly dealt with by experts in forensic medicine since in lethal cases the autopsy is crucial for determining the cause of death. Knowledge of the cause of death, in turn, is the necessary basis of an expert opinion on negligence and the causality between negligence and cause of death. Compared to civil lawsuits filed for malpractice and cases dealt with at the arbitration committees of the medical councils penal lawsuits with 1500 to 2000 cases per year are of minor importance. Our own retrospective multicentre study on lawsuits filed for lethal cases of medical malpractice (based on autopsy findings of 4450 cases) revealed an annual increase in autopsies due to medical negligence from 3 to 6 hundred. Hospital doctors are more frequently affected by medical malpractice claims than private-practice physicians. However, the rate of confirmed medical malpractice cases is much higher for doctors in private practice. Although surgeons are most frequently charged with medical malpractice the rate of confirmed medical malpractice cases is comparatively low in surgery. Medico-legal autopsies in cases of alleged medical malpractice are often ordered by the public prosecutor because the manner of death was classified as unnatural or undetermined. Therefore the often-heard reproach that doctors frequently make mistakes and do their very best to hide them is not true. Thus, it has to be recommended that in a case of unexpected death associated with medical treatment the doctor in his own interest should classify the manner of death as undetermined.

  2. Experiences of clinical tutors with English as an additional language (EAL) students.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongyan; Maithus, Caroline

    2012-11-01

    Clinical tutors, referred to in the international literature as clinical supervisors, facilitators, mentors or instructors, are responsible for providing and supervising workplace learning opportunities for groups of Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students. They also play a key role in assessing students. The role modeling and support provided by both clinical tutors and registered nurses (RN) or nurse preceptors helps students become familiar with the language in which nursing work is realised. As BN student cohorts in New Zealand have become more diverse in terms of cultures, ethnicities and language backgrounds, clinical tutors have to directly facilitate the development of context-specific and client-focused communication skills for students who speak English as an additional language. We undertook a study which looked at the perceptions of new nursing graduates with English as an additional language (EAL) on the development of spoken language skills for the clinical workplace. As well as interviewing graduates, we spoke to four clinical tutors in order to elicit their views on the language development of EAL students in previous cohorts. This article reports on the themes which emerged from the interviews with the tutors. These include goal setting for communication, integrating students into nursing work, making assessment less stressful, and endorsing independent learning strategies. Based on their observations and on other published research we make some suggestions about ways both clinical tutors and EAL students within their teaching groups could be supported in the development of communication skills for clinical practice.

  3. Additive manufacture (3d printing) of plasma diagnostic components and assemblies for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Paul; Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; You, Setthivoine; Card, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) is now becoming sufficiently accurate with a large range of materials for use in printing sensors needed universally in fusion energy research. Decreasing production cost and significantly lowering design time of energy subsystems would realize significant cost reduction for standard diagnostics commonly obtained through research grants. There is now a well-established set of plasma diagnostics, but these expensive since they are often highly complex and require customization, sometimes pace the project. Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is developing rapidly, including open source designs. Basic components can be printed for (in some cases) less than 1/100th costs of conventional manufacturing. We have examined the impact that AM can have on plasma diagnostic cost by taking 15 separate diagnostics through an engineering design using Conventional Manufacturing (CM) techniques to determine costs of components and labor costs associated with getting the diagnostic to work as intended. With that information in hand, we set about optimizing the design to exploit the benefits of AM. Work performed under DOE Contract DE-SC0011858.

  4. Assessment of quality of platelets preserved in plasma and platelet additive solution: A Malaysian experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtar, Munirah Binti; Hashim, Hasna Binti; Joshi, Sanmukh R

    2016-01-01

    Background: A use of platelet additives solution (PAS) improves storage conditions so as to give increased shelf life to platelets and to maintain hemostatic function. Objective: The present study was aimed to compare in vitro quality of platelet rich plasma (PRP)-derived platelet concentrate (PC) during extended period of storage in plasma and in additive solution (Composol PS and Fresenius). Study Design: Randomized 19 PCs each were used in the study for plasma and PAS as the storage medium. The measurement parameters, including pH, total white blood cell (WBC) count, total platelet count, and platelet activation rate, were studied on day 1, day 5, and day 8 of the storage period. The sterility test was carried out on the eighth day of storage. Results: pH of PC suspended in PAS was significantly lower as compared to that in plasma (P < 0.001) for all the three days of sampling. The WBC count, both in plasma and in PAS, showed an acceptable values of being <0.2 Χ 109 /unit during the storage period. Platelet count in PAS was higher as compared to that in plasma, though it was not statistically significant. While both the groups showed increased platelet activation rate during the storage, the PCs suspended in PAS showed significantly higher platelet activation rate (p0.001). Results from sterility test showed no bacterial growth in the PCs in both the groups. Conclusion: Most parameters studied on platelet storage in suspending medium of native plasma and PAS remained well within the acceptable limits. However, the pH values and platelet activation rate significantly differed in PAS as compared with plasma. PMID:27011678

  5. Summary and overview of the CYCLOPS P addition Lagrangian experiment in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krom, M. D.; Thingstad, T. F.; Brenner, S.; Carbo, P.; Drakopoulos, P.; Fileman, T. W.; Flaten, G. A. F.; Groom, S.; Herut, B.; Kitidis, V.; Kress, N.; Law, C. S.; Liddicoat, M. I.; Mantoura, R. F. C.; Pasternak, A.; Pitta, P.; Polychronaki, T.; Psarra, S.; Rassoulzadegan, F.; Skjoldal, E. F.; Spyres, G.; Tanaka, T.; Tselepides, A.; Wassmann, P.; Wexels Riser, C.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Zodiatis, G.; Zohary, T.

    2005-11-01

    CYCLOPS was a European Framework 5 program to further our understanding of phosphorus cycling in the Eastern Mediterranean. The core of CYCLOPS was a Lagrangian experiment in which buffered phosphoric acid was added to a <4×4 km patch of water together with SF 6 as the inert tracer. The patch was followed for nine days in total. Results obtained prior to the experiment showed that the system was typically ultra-oligotrophic and P-starved with DON:DOP, PON:POP and DIN:DIP all having ratios greatly in excess of 16:1 in surface waters. To our surprise, we found that although the added phosphate was rapidly taken up by the microbial biota, there was a small but significant decrease in chlorophyll a and no increase in primary production, together with an increase in heterotrophic bacterial activity, ciliate numbers and in the gut fullness and egg numbers in the zooplankton community. A microcosm experiment carried out using within-patch and out-of-patch water showed that the phytoplankton community were N and P co-limited while the bacteria and micrograzers were P-limited. Thus this system tends to N and P co-limitation of phytoplankton productivity in summer possibly caused by bioavailable DIN being converted into non-bioavailable forms of DON. On the basis of the data collected within the programme it was concluded that this behavior could be explained by three non-mutually exclusive processes described as (1) trophic by-pass in which the added phosphate gets directly to the grazing part of the predatory food chain from the heterotrophic bacteria bypassing the phytoplankton compartment phosphate, (2) trophic tunnelling in which phosphate is rapidly taken up by both phytoplankton and bacteria via rapid luxury consumption. This causes an immediate change in the phosphorus content but not the abundance of the prey organisms. The added P then "reappears" as responses at the predator level much more rapidly than expected, and (3) mixotrophic by-pass in which inorganic

  6. CONFIRMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR PHOSPHINE

    SciTech Connect

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Encrenaz, P.; Teyssier, D.

    2014-08-01

    Phosphine (PH{sub 3}) was tentatively identified a few years ago in the carbon star envelopes IRC +10216 and CRL 2688 from observations of an emission line at 266.9 GHz attributable to the J = 1-0 rotational transition. We report the detection of the J = 2-1 rotational transition of PH{sub 3} in IRC +10216 using the HIFI instrument on board Herschel, which definitively confirms the identification of PH{sub 3}. Radiative transfer calculations indicate that infrared pumping in excited vibrational states plays an important role in the excitation of PH{sub 3} in the envelope of IRC +10216, and that the observed lines are consistent with phosphine being formed anywhere between the star and 100 R {sub *} from the star, with an abundance of 10{sup –8} relative to H{sub 2}. The detection of PH{sub 3} challenges chemical models, none of which offer a satisfactory formation scenario. Although PH{sub 3} holds just 2% of the total available phosphorus in IRC +10216, it is, together with HCP, one of the major gas phase carriers of phosphorus in the inner circumstellar layers, suggesting that it could also be an important phosphorus species in other astronomical environments. This is the first unambiguous detection of PH{sub 3} outside the solar system, and is a further step toward a better understanding of the chemistry of phosphorus in space.

  7. [Requirements for drug approval and additional benefits assessment: Regulatory aspects and experiences].

    PubMed

    Broich, K; Löbker, W; Schulte, A; Beinlich, P; Müller, T

    2016-04-01

    The early assessment of benefits of newly approved drugs with novel active substances or new applications, which came into force on 1 January 2011 still represents a challenge to all parties involved. This article highlights the definitions, regulatory requirements and interaction between drug marketing approval and early assessment of benefits in Germany. The constellation of an extensively harmonized European and even international drug authorization process with a predominantly national regulation of drug reimbursement situation inevitably causes friction, which could be markedly reduced through early joint advisory discussions during the planning phase for pivotal clinical trials. During the year 2015 the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) carried out 300 scientific advice procedures of which 34 were concerned with applications in the field of indications for the central nervous system (CNS). In comparison 98 advisory meetings were held by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) of which the BfArM provided advice in 12 instances and in 2 cases on CNS indications. Study design, endpoints and appropriate comparative therapies are the key issues in exchanges and discussions between the BfArM, the G‑BA and applicants. Under these aspects the BfArM and G‑BA promote an early and consistent involvement in early advice procedures regarding the prerequisites for drug approval and assessment of additional benefits.

  8. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: 2. Denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Sobota, Daniel; Dodds, Walter; Findlay, Stuart; Grimm, Nancy; Hamilton, Stephen; McDowell, William; O'Brien, Jon; Tank, Jennifer; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dahm, Cliff; Gregory, Stanley; Johnson, Sherri; Meyer, Judy; Peterson, Bruce; Poole, Geoff; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Arango, Clay; Beaulieu, Jake; Bernot, Melody; Burgin, Amy; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Helton, Ashley; Johnson, Laura; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Potter, Jody; Sheibley, Rich; Thomas, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field {sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S{sub Wden}) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N{sub 2} production rates far exceeded N{sub 2}O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling S{sub Wden} were specific discharge (discharge/width) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (U{sub den}) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although U{sub den} increased with increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, the efficiency of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO{sub 3}{sup -} load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration.

  9. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulholland, P.J.; Hall, R.O.; Sobota, D.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Grimm, N. B.; Hamilton, S.K.; McDowell, W.H.; O'Brien, J. M.; Tank, J.L.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, S.V.; Johnson, S.L.; Meyer, J.L.; Peterson, B.J.; Poole, G.C.; Valett, H.M.; Webster, J.R.; Arango, C.P.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Thomasn, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field 15N-NO- 3 tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (SWden) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N2 production rates far exceeded N2O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO-3 removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NHz 4 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling SWden were specific discharge (discharge / width) and NO-3 concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (Uden) and NO- 3 concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although Uden increased with increasing NO- 3 concentration, the efficiency of NO-3 removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO-3 load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO-3 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO-3 concentration. ?? 2009.

  10. Effect of Additives on Green Sand Molding Properties using Design of Experiments and Taguchi's Quality Loss Function - An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Bhagyashree; Mokashi, Pavani; Anand, R. L.; Burli, S. B.; Khandal, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental study aims to underseek the effect of various additives on the green sand molding properties as a particular combination of additives could yield desired sand properties. The input parameters (factors) selected were water and powder (Fly ash, Coconut shell and Tamarind) in three levels. Experiments were planned using design of experiments (DOE). On the basis of plans, experiments were conducted to understand the behavior of sand mould properties such as compression strength, shear strength, permeability number with various additives. From the experimental results it could be concluded that the factors have significant effect on the sand properties as P-value found to be less than 0.05 for all the cases studied. The optimization based on quality loss function was also performed. The study revealed that the quality loss associated with the tamarind powder was lesser compared to other additives selected for the study. The optimization based on quality loss function and the parametric analysis using ANOVA suggested that the tamarind powder of 8 gm per Kg of molding sand and moisture content of 7% yield better properties to obtain sound castings.

  11. Model confirmation in climate economics.

    PubMed

    Millner, Antony; McDermott, Thomas K J

    2016-08-02

    Benefit-cost integrated assessment models (BC-IAMs) inform climate policy debates by quantifying the trade-offs between alternative greenhouse gas abatement options. They achieve this by coupling simplified models of the climate system to models of the global economy and the costs and benefits of climate policy. Although these models have provided valuable qualitative insights into the sensitivity of policy trade-offs to different ethical and empirical assumptions, they are increasingly being used to inform the selection of policies in the real world. To the extent that BC-IAMs are used as inputs to policy selection, our confidence in their quantitative outputs must depend on the empirical validity of their modeling assumptions. We have a degree of confidence in climate models both because they have been tested on historical data in hindcasting experiments and because the physical principles they are based on have been empirically confirmed in closely related applications. By contrast, the economic components of BC-IAMs often rely on untestable scenarios, or on structural models that are comparatively untested on relevant time scales. Where possible, an approach to model confirmation similar to that used in climate science could help to build confidence in the economic components of BC-IAMs, or focus attention on which components might need refinement for policy applications. We illustrate the potential benefits of model confirmation exercises by performing a long-run hindcasting experiment with one of the leading BC-IAMs. We show that its model of long-run economic growth-one of its most important economic components-had questionable predictive power over the 20th century.

  12. Model confirmation in climate economics

    PubMed Central

    Millner, Antony; McDermott, Thomas K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Benefit–cost integrated assessment models (BC-IAMs) inform climate policy debates by quantifying the trade-offs between alternative greenhouse gas abatement options. They achieve this by coupling simplified models of the climate system to models of the global economy and the costs and benefits of climate policy. Although these models have provided valuable qualitative insights into the sensitivity of policy trade-offs to different ethical and empirical assumptions, they are increasingly being used to inform the selection of policies in the real world. To the extent that BC-IAMs are used as inputs to policy selection, our confidence in their quantitative outputs must depend on the empirical validity of their modeling assumptions. We have a degree of confidence in climate models both because they have been tested on historical data in hindcasting experiments and because the physical principles they are based on have been empirically confirmed in closely related applications. By contrast, the economic components of BC-IAMs often rely on untestable scenarios, or on structural models that are comparatively untested on relevant time scales. Where possible, an approach to model confirmation similar to that used in climate science could help to build confidence in the economic components of BC-IAMs, or focus attention on which components might need refinement for policy applications. We illustrate the potential benefits of model confirmation exercises by performing a long-run hindcasting experiment with one of the leading BC-IAMs. We show that its model of long-run economic growth—one of its most important economic components—had questionable predictive power over the 20th century. PMID:27432964

  13. Impacts of Asian Dust and Haze Particles Addition on Phytoplankton in Incubation Experiments in the Yellow Sea of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Zhang, C.; Liu, Y.; Shi, J.; Yao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition (AD) induced by dust events and air pollutants has been considered as an important source of bio-available nutrients such as N, P, Si and trace metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Pb) to the oceans. The coastal seas of China are severely affected by AD from Asian dust events and haze episodes, especially in spring and winter. In this study, several on-board incubation experiments were performed in the Yellow Sea of China during 2011 - 2014, to explore the responses of micro-, nano- and pico-phytoplankton to various combinations of Asian dust, nutrients and haze particles by measuring the size-fractionated chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration. In the experiments of Asian dust addition, the concentration of Chl a and the conversion efficiency index of N into Chl a increased by up to ~40 % and ~30 %, respectively, compared to the control, showing enhancement effects on the growth of phytoplankton. The addition of haze particles exhibited more obvious promotions of pico-phytoplankton growth, but more severe inhibitions of micro-phytoplankton growth than other treatments. The incubation experiments conducted in the Yellow Sea also indicated P limitation variations in spring and summer. It was inferred that both Asian dust and haze particles additions had significant impacts on the growth and structure of phytoplankton by modulating the limiting factors.

  14. Monte Mountain thrust, additional confirmation of the central Nevada thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, A.K. ); Chamberlain, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Monte Mountain thrust, a newly identified thrust exposed in the Timpahute Range, east central Nevada places porous Devonian reservoir rocks over rich Mississippian source rocks at the peak oil generating window. The thrust provides insurmountable evidence of a thrust model that may lead to discovery of giant oil and gas fields along the 400-mi long central Nevada thrust belt. The Timpahute Range lies a little over 50 mi on strike to the south of the prolific Grant Canyon field. Scattered remnants of the north-trending thrust belt are obscured by parallel valleys of Tertiary valley fill and volcanics. The fact that the east-west-trending Timpahute Range could contain exposures of the north-south-trending central Nevada thrust belt attracted them to the range, Familiarity with the stratigraphic section led to the discovery of the thrust. As much as 750 ft of Devonian Guilmette sandstones, in the hanging wall just above the thrust contact have been erroneously mapped as Mississippian Scotty Wash sandstones. These Devonian sandstones could be excellent reservoir rocks. Sandstones in the Guilmette increase in thickness westward. East-vergent thrusting has juxtaposed plates of thicker Guilmette sandstones with plates of thinner sandstones, Reconstruction of Devonian paleogeography provides a clue to the amount of displacement along thrust boundaries.

  15. Effects of biochar addition on greenhouse gas emissions and microbial responses in a short-term laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gayoung; Kang, Hojeong

    2012-01-01

    Biochar application to soil has drawn much attention as a strategy to sequester atmospheric carbon in soil ecosystems. The applicability of this strategy as a climate change mitigation option is limited by our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the observed changes in greenhouse gas emissions from soils, microbial responses, and soil fertility changes. We conducted an 8-wk laboratory incubation using soils from PASTURE (silt loam) and RICE PADDY (silt loam) sites with and without two types of biochar (biochar from swine manure [CHAR-M] and from barley stover [CHAR-B]). Responses to addition of the different biochars varied with the soil source. Addition of CHAR-B did not change CO and CH evolution from the PASTURE or the RICE PADDY soils, but there was a decrease in NO emissions from the PASTURE soil. The effects of CHAR-M addition on greenhouse gas emissions were different for the soils. The most substantial change was an increase in NO emissions from the RICE PADDY soil. This result was attributed to a combination of abundant denitrifiers in this soil and increased net nitrogen mineralization. Soil phosphatase and N-acetylglucosaminidase activity in the CHAR-B-treated soils was enhanced compared with the controls for both soils. Fungal biomass was higher in the CHAR-B-treated RICE PADDY soil. From our results, we suggest CHAR-B to be an appropriate amendment for the PASTURE and RICE PADDY soils because it provides increased nitrogen availability and microbial activity with no net increase in greenhouse gas emissions. Application of CHAR-M to RICE PADDY soils could result in excess nitrogen availability, which may increase NO emissions and possible NO leaching problems. Thus, this study confirms that the ability of environmentally sound biochar additions to sequester carbon in soils depends on the characteristics of the receiving soil as well as the nature of the biochar.

  16. Changes in water, carbon, and nitrogen fluxes with the addition of biochar to soils: lessons learned from laboratory and greenhouse experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. T.; Gallagher, M. E.; Masiello, C. A.; Liu, Z.; Dugan, B.; Rudgers, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The addition of biochar to agricultural soils has the potential to provide a number of ecosystem services, ranging from carbon (C) sequestration to increased soil fertility and crop production. It is estimated that 0.5 to 0.9 Pg of C yr-1 can be sequestered through the addition of biochar to soils, significantly increasing the charcoal flux to the biosphere over natural inputs from fire (0.05 to 0.20 Pg C yr-1). There remain large uncertainties about biochar mobility within the environment, making it a challenge to assess the ecosystem residence time of biochar. We conducted laboratory and greenhouse experiments to understand how soil amendment with laboratory-produced biochar changes water, C, and nitrogen (N) fluxes from soils. We used column experiments to assess how biochar amendment to three types of soils (sand, organic, clay-rich) affected hydraulic conductivity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) fluxes. Results varied with soil type; biochar significantly decreased the hydraulic conductivity of the sand and organic soils by a factor of 10.6 and 2.7, respectively. While not statistically significant, biochar addition increased the hydraulic conductivity of the clay-rich soil by 50% on average. The addition of biochar significantly increased the DOC fluxes from the C-poor sand and clay soils while it significantly decreased the DOC flux from the organic-rich soil. In contrast, TDN fluxes decreased with biochar additions from all soil types, though the results were not statistically significant from the clay-rich soil. These laboratory experiments suggest that changes in the hydraulic conductivity of soil due to biochar amendments could play a significant role in understanding how biochar additions to agricultural fields will change watershed C and N dynamics. We additionally conducted a 28-day greenhouse experiment with sorghum plants using a three-way factorial treatment (water availability x biochar x mycorrhizae) to

  17. Calcium nitrate addition to control the internal load of phosphorus from sediments of a tropical eutrophic reservoir: microcosm experiments.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T M; Sueitt, A P E; Beraldo, D A S; Botta, C M R; Fadini, P S; Nascimento, M R L; Faria, B M; Mozeto, A A

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform laboratory experiments on calcium nitrate addition to sediments of a tropical eutrophic urban reservoir (Ibirité reservoir, SE Brazil) to immobilize the reactive soluble phosphorus (RSP) and to evaluate possible geochemical changes and toxic effects caused by this treatment. Reductions of 75 and 89% in the concentration of RSP were observed in the water column and interstitial water, respectively, after 145 days of nitrate addition. The nitrate application increased the rate of autotrophic denitrification, causing a consumption of 98% of the added nitrate and oxidation of 99% of the acid volatile sulfide. As a consequence, there were increases in the sulfate and iron (II) concentrations in the sediment interstitial water and water column, as well as changes in the copper speciation in the sediments. Toxicity tests initially indicated that the high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite in the sediment interstitial water (up to 2300 mg L(-1) and 260 mg L(-1), respectively) were the major cause of mortality of Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Chironomus xanthus. However, at the end of the experiment, the sediment toxicity was completely removed and a reduction in the 48 h-EC50 of the water was also observed. Based on these results we can say that calcium nitrate treatment proved to be a valuable tool in remediation of eutrophic aquatic ecosystems leading to conditions that can support a great diversity of organisms after a restoration period.

  18. Motor imagery of locomotion with an additional load: actual load experience does not affect differences between physical and mental durations.

    PubMed

    Munzert, Jörn; Blischke, Klaus; Krüger, Britta

    2015-03-01

    Motor imagery relies strongly on motor representations. Currently, it is widely accepted that both the imagery and execution of actions share the same neural representations (Jeannerod, Neuroimage 14:S103-S109, 2001). Comparing mental with actual movement durations opens a window through which to examine motor representations and how they relate to cognitive motor processes. The present experiment examined mental durations reported by participants standing upright who imagined walking either with or without an additional load while actually carrying or not carrying that same load. Results showed a robust effect of longer durations when imagining the additional load during mental walking, whereas physical walking with an additional load did not extend movement durations accordingly. However, experiencing an actual load during imagery did not influence mental durations substantially. This dissociation of load-related effects can be interpreted as being due to an interaction of motor processes and their cognitive representation along with a reduction in neural activity in vestibular and somatosensory areas during imagery of locomotion. It is argued that this effect might be specific to locomotion and not generalize to a broader range of movements.

  19. Determination of Unknown Concentrations of Sodium Acetate Using the Method of Standard Addition and Proton NMR: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajabzadeh, Massy

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment, students learn how to find the unknown concentration of sodium acetate using both the graphical treatment of standard addition and the standard addition equation. In the graphical treatment of standard addition, the peak area of the methyl peak in each of the sodium acetate standard solutions is found by integration using…

  20. Significant Change in Marine Plankton Structure and Carbon Production After the Addition of River Water in a Mesocosm Experiment.

    PubMed

    Fouilland, E; Trottet, A; Alves-de-Souza, C; Bonnet, D; Bouvier, T; Bouvy, M; Boyer, S; Guillou, L; Hatey, E; Jing, H; Leboulanger, C; Le Floc'h, E; Liu, H; Mas, S; Mostajir, B; Nouguier, J; Pecqueur, D; Rochelle-Newall, E; Roques, C; Salles, C; Tournoud, M-G; Vasseur, C; Vidussi, F

    2017-03-16

    Rivers are known to be major contributors to eutrophication in marine coastal waters, but little is known on the short-term impact of freshwater surges on the structure and functioning of the marine plankton community. The effect of adding river water, reducing the salinity by 15 and 30%, on an autumn plankton community in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Thau Lagoon, France) was determined during a 6-day mesocosm experiment. Adding river water brought not only nutrients but also chlorophyceans that did not survive in the brackish mesocosm waters. The addition of water led to initial increases (days 1-2) in bacterial production as well as increases in the abundances of bacterioplankton and picoeukaryotes. After day 3, the increases were more significant for diatoms and dinoflagellates that were already present in the Thau Lagoon water (mainly Pseudo-nitzschia spp. group delicatissima and Prorocentrum triestinum) and other larger organisms (tintinnids, rotifers). At the same time, the abundances of bacterioplankton, cyanobacteria, and picoeukaryote fell, some nutrients (NH4(+), SiO4(3-)) returned to pre-input levels, and the plankton structure moved from a trophic food web based on secondary production to the accumulation of primary producers in the mesocosms with added river water. Our results also show that, after freshwater inputs, there is rapid emergence of plankton species that are potentially harmful to living organisms. This suggests that flash flood events may lead to sanitary issues, other than pathogens, in exploited marine areas.

  1. Age and School Experience as Factors in Rule Utilization: Use of a Simple Addition Rule. Final Report, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulet, L. R.

    This study attempted to investigate the effects of school experience on performance on visual perception tests involving line figures and forms. The subjects were 120 first grade students selected from two public schools in the same community. The experiment involved an Experimental Treatments X Age X Time of Testing factorial design. All subjects…

  2. Graham confirmed as OSTP Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William R. Graham was confirmed by the Senate on October 1, 1986, as the science advisor to President Ronald Reagan and head of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Formerly the deputy administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Graham started his new post on October 6.

  3. Independent and additive contributions of postvictory testosterone and social experience to the development of the winner effect.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Oyegbile, Temitayo O; Marler, Catherine A

    2011-09-01

    The processes through which salient social experiences influence future behavior are not well understood. Winning fights, for example, can increase the odds of future victory, yet little is known about the internal mechanisms that underlie such winner effects. Here, we use the territorial California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) to investigate how the effects of postvictory testosterone (T) release and winning experience individually mediate positive changes in future winning ability and antagonistic behavior. Male mice were castrated and implanted with T capsules to maintain basal levels of this hormone. We found that males form a robust winner effect if they win three separate territorial disputes and experience a single T surge roughly 45 min after each encounter. Meanwhile, males exhibit only an intermediate winner effect if they either 1) acquire three previous wins but do not experience a change in postvictory T or 2) acquire no previous wins but experience three separate T pulses. The results indicate that the effect of postvictory T must be coupled with that of winning experience to trigger the maximum positive shift in winning ability, which highlights the importance of social context in the development of the winner effect. At the same time, however, postvictory T and winning experience are each capable of increasing future winning ability independently, and this finding suggests that these two factors drive plasticity in antagonistic behavior via distinct mechanistic channels. More broadly, our data offer insight into the possible ways in which various species might be able to adjust their behavioral repertoire in response to social interactions through mechanisms that are unlinked from the effects of gonadal steroid action.

  4. Performance Confirmation Data Aquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Markman

    2000-10-27

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify and analyze concepts for the acquisition of data in support of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the criteria for design as presented in the Performance Confirmation Data Acquisition/Monitoring System Description Document, by way of the Input Transmittal, Performance Confirmation Input Criteria (CRWMS M&O 1999c). (2) Identify and describe existing and potential new trends in data acquisition system software and hardware that would support the PC plan. The data acquisition software and hardware will support the field instruments and equipment that will be installed for the observation and perimeter drift borehole monitoring, and in-situ monitoring within the emplacement drifts. The exhaust air monitoring requirements will be supported by a data communication network interface with the ventilation monitoring system database. (3) Identify the concepts and features that a data acquisition system should have in order to support the PC process and its activities. (4) Based on PC monitoring needs and available technologies, further develop concepts of a potential data acquisition system network in support of the PC program and the Site Recommendation and License Application.

  5. Reflections on Doctoral Supervision: Drawing from the Experiences of Students with Additional Learning Needs in Two Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Bethan

    2015-01-01

    Supervision is an essential part of doctoral study, consisting of relationship and process aspects, underpinned by a range of values. To date there has been limited research specifically about disabled doctoral students' experiences of supervision. This paper draws on qualitative, narrative interviews about doctoral supervision with disabled…

  6. Examining the Influence of Additional Field-Based Experiences on Pre-Service Teachers and Their Perceived Ability to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to analyse more closely the training experiences of pre-service teachers, the author conducted an exploratory quasi-experimental study at a university located in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. All students who were enrolled in the same reading methods course (but enrolled in different sections) were invited to participate in…

  7. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  8. Confirmation of shutdown cooling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Kotaro Tabuchi, Masato; Sugimura, Naoki; Tatsumi, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    After the Fukushima accidents, all nuclear power plants in Japan have gradually stopped their operations and have long periods of shutdown. During those periods, reactivity of fuels continues to change significantly especially for high-burnup UO{sub 2} fuels and MOX fuels due to radioactive decays. It is necessary to consider these isotopic changes precisely, to predict neutronics characteristics accurately. In this paper, shutdown cooling (SDC) effects of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels that have unusual operation histories are confirmed by the advanced lattice code, AEGIS. The calculation results show that the effects need to be considered even after nuclear power plants come back to normal operation.

  9. Confirmation of shutdown cooling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kotaro; Tabuchi, Masato; Sugimura, Naoki; Tatsumi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima accidents, all nuclear power plants in Japan have gradually stopped their operations and have long periods of shutdown. During those periods, reactivity of fuels continues to change significantly especially for high-burnup UO2 fuels and MOX fuels due to radioactive decays. It is necessary to consider these isotopic changes precisely, to predict neutronics characteristics accurately. In this paper, shutdown cooling (SDC) effects of UO2 and MOX fuels that have unusual operation histories are confirmed by the advanced lattice code, AEGIS. The calculation results show that the effects need to be considered even after nuclear power plants come back to normal operation.

  10. [Additional memory load causes changes in induced EEG beta-rhythm in experiments with a visual set formed to facial expression].

    PubMed

    Iakovenko, I A; Kozlov, M K; Cheremushkin, E A

    2012-01-01

    Subjects were divided into two equal groups 35 healthy subjects each. Formation of the visual set to facial emotion recognition was supplemented with two types of additional task: either visuospatial (to find a target stimulus among others) or verbal (to tell a word from a pseudoword). The results of the experiments were compared to those obtained in similar experiments without the memory load. Changes in the EEG beta rhythm during visual set forming and testing were studied. The EEG was analyzed by wavelet transformation. Changes in the mean level, maximum and latency of the maximum of wavelet coefficient were rated at different stages of the experiment. All these characteristics for the beta rhythm were higher in experiments with both types of additional memory load as compared to those without the memory load.

  11. East Asian International Student Experiences as Learners of English as an Additional Language: Implications for School Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popadiuk, Natalee E.; Marshall, Steve

    2011-01-01

    In the school counselling literature, little focus is placed on international students who are learners of English as an Additional Language (EAL) and on school counselling support related to their language acquisition. Using the Critical Incident Technique, we analyzed transcripts of 21 international EAL students from China, Japan, and Korea who…

  12. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    PubMed

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  13. Performance confirmation data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    McAffee, D.A.; Raczka, N.T.

    1997-12-31

    As part of the Viability Assessment (VA) work, this QAP-3-9 document presents and evaluates a comprehensive set of viable concepts for collecting Performance Confirmation (PC) related data. The concepts include: monitoring subsurface repository air temperatures, humidity levels and gaseous emissions via the subsurface ventilation systems, and monitoring the repository geo-technical parameters and rock mass from bore-holes located along the perimeter main drifts and throughout a series of human-rated Observation Drifts to be located in a plane 25 meters above the plane of the emplacement drifts. A key element of this document is the development and analysis of a purposed multi-purpose Remote Inspection Gantry that would provide direct, real-time visual, thermal, and radiological monitoring of conditions inside operational emplacement drifts and close-up observations of in-situ Waste Packages. Preliminary finite-element analyses are presented that indicate the technological feasibility of operating an inspection gantry inside the operational emplacement drifts for short inspection missions lasting 2--3 hours. Overall reliability, availability, and maintainability of the PC data collection concepts are discussed. Preliminary concepts for PC data collection network are also provided.

  14. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    PubMed Central

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models. PMID:28074874

  15. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models.

  16. Microstructural Stability of Nanocrystalline Copper through the Addition of Antimony Dopants at Grain Boundaries: Experiments and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rajgarhia, Rahul K.; Saxena, Ashok; Spearot, Douglas; Hartwig, Ted; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Kenik, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments and simulations show that the microstructural stability of nanocrystalline Cu can be improved by adding impurity atoms, such as Sb, which migrate to the grain boundaries. Cu100-xSbx alloys are cast in three compositions (Cu-0.0, 0.2 and 0.5 at.%Sb) and subsequently processed into nanocrystalline form by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE). The presence of Sb atoms at the grain boundaries increases the recrystallization temperature to 400 C compared to 200 C for pure nanocrystalline Cu, which was verified by measurements of microhardness, ultimate tensile strength, grain size using TEM, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed using a wider range of Sb compositions (0.0 to 1.0 at.%Sb) to study the underlying mechanisms associated with stability. MD simulations show that Sb atoms reduce excess grain boundary energy and that 0.2 and 0.5 at.%Sb is enough to stabilize the nanocrystalline Cu microstructure.

  17. The newer aspect of dexmedetomidine use in dentistry: As an additive to local anesthesia, initial experience, and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Thepra, Manju; Bhagol, Amrish; Priya, Kannu; Singh, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the availability of a wide variety of pharmacological agents in the field of anesthesia, there has always been a continuous search for newer local anesthetic agents with improved efficacy, potency, and better handling properties. Dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, is an emerging agent for provision of additive local anesthetic effect if used with conventional local anesthetics, which can be implicated in dentistry for performing many minor oral surgical procedures. The present paper reports a pilot study comparing clinical efficacy and potency of this newer emerging drug in combination with lignocaine. Materials and Methods: Ten patients undergoing orthodontic extraction for correction of malocclusion and other dentofacial deformities requiring orthodontic treatment were locally infiltrated with 2% lignocaine plus dexmedetomidine 1μ/ml and 2% lignocaine plus adrenaline in 1:200,000 dilution at two different appointments. The onset of action, duration of action, and pain threshold were assessed. Results: Onset of action was found to be faster with longer duration of action with the newer drug dexmedetomidine and lignocaine combination when compared with combination of lignocaine and adrenaline. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the combination of dexmedetomidine with lignocaine enhances the local anesthetic potency of lignocaine without significant systemic effects when locally injected into oral mucosa. PMID:28163484

  18. Forestry Impacts on Mercury Mobility, Methylation, and Bioaccumulation - A Field Experiment with Enriched Stable Mercury Isotope Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Haynes, Kristine; Mazur, Maxwell; Fidler, Nathan; Eckley, Chris; Kolka, Randy; Eggert, Susan; Sebestyen, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Forest harvesting has clear impacts on terrestrial hydrology at least over the short term. Similar biogeochemical impacts, such as augmented mercury fluxes or downstream impacts on ecosystems are not as clear, and recent studies have not demonstrated consistent or predictable impacts across systems. To gain a better process understanding of mercury cycling in upland forest-lowland peatland ecosystems, we undertook a field-scale experiment at a study site in northern Minnesota (USA) where shallow subsurface hillslope runoff flows into an adjacent peatland ecosystem. Starting in 2009, three upland forest plots (< 1 hectare each) were delineated and hydrometric infrastructure such as runoff trenches, snow lysimeters, soil moisture probes, shallow piezometers, and throughfall gauges were installed in each plot. We added 14.2 to 16.7 μg/m2 of enriched mercury-200 and mercury-204 (as dilute mercuric nitrate) in the spring of 2011 and 2012, respectively, to distinguish between contemporary and legacy mercury and to provide some insight into the duration of contemporary mercury mobility in impacted terrestrial ecosystems. During the late winter of 2012, one of the study plots was clearcut and approximately 80% of slash was removed. We clearcut a second plot without slash removal, and left the third plot as a control. Throughout the study, we have monitored (including isotopes): mercury in runoff, soil-air gaseous Hg fluxes, methylation potentials in the adjacent peatland, and bioaccumulation into invertebrates inhabiting the adjacent peatland. Early results mostly indicate that slash removal actually lessens the impacts of clearcutting on mercury mobility (although forest harvesting in general does have a significant impact) and that forestry operations at this scale have little to no impact on methylation or bioaccumulation in downstream peatlands. Thus far, the greatest impact of slash removal in forest harvested systems is an increase in mercury evasion, likely as a

  19. Effect of pore size on bone ingrowth into porous titanium implants fabricated by additive manufacturing: An in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoya; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Otsuki, Bungo; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique with the ability to produce metallic scaffolds with accurately controlled pore size, porosity, and interconnectivity for orthopedic applications. However, the optimal pore structure of porous titanium manufactured by SLM remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pore size with constant porosity on in vivo bone ingrowth in rabbits into porous titanium implants manufactured by SLM. Three porous titanium implants (with an intended porosity of 65% and pore sizes of 300, 600, and 900μm, designated the P300, P600, and P900 implants, respectively) were manufactured by SLM. A diamond lattice was adapted as the basic structure. Their porous structures were evaluated and verified using microfocus X-ray computed tomography. Their bone-implant fixation ability was evaluated by their implantation as porous-surfaced titanium plates into the cortical bone of the rabbit tibia. Bone ingrowth was evaluated by their implantation as cylindrical porous titanium implants into the cancellous bone of the rabbit femur for 2, 4, and 8weeks. The average pore sizes of the P300, P600, and P900 implants were 309, 632, and 956μm, respectively. The P600 implant demonstrated a significantly higher fixation ability at 2weeks than the other implants. After 4weeks, all models had sufficiently high fixation ability in a detaching test. Bone ingrowth into the P300 implant was lower than into the other implants at 4weeks. Because of its appropriate mechanical strength, high fixation ability, and rapid bone ingrowth, our results indicate that the pore structure of the P600 implant is a suitable porous structure for orthopedic implants manufactured by SLM.

  20. Separation and confirmation of showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslušan, L.; Hajduková, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Using IAU MDC photographic, IAU MDC CAMS video, SonotaCo video, and EDMOND video databases, we aim to separate all provable annual meteor showers from each of these databases. We intend to reveal the problems inherent in this procedure and answer the question whether the databases are complete and the methods of separation used are reliable. We aim to evaluate the statistical significance of each separated shower. In this respect, we intend to give a list of reliably separated showers rather than a list of the maximum possible number of showers. Methods: To separate the showers, we simultaneously used two methods. The use of two methods enables us to compare their results, and this can indicate the reliability of the methods. To evaluate the statistical significance, we suggest a new method based on the ideas of the break-point method. Results: We give a compilation of the showers from all four databases using both methods. Using the first (second) method, we separated 107 (133) showers, which are in at least one of the databases used. These relatively low numbers are a consequence of discarding any candidate shower with a poor statistical significance. Most of the separated showers were identified as meteor showers from the IAU MDC list of all showers. Many of them were identified as several of the showers in the list. This proves that many showers have been named multiple times with different names. Conclusions: At present, a prevailing share of existing annual showers can be found in the data and confirmed when we use a combination of results from large databases. However, to gain a complete list of showers, we need more-complete meteor databases than the most extensive databases currently are. We also still need a more sophisticated method to separate showers and evaluate their statistical significance. Tables A.1 and A.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  1. Effect of volcano ash additions on nutrient concentrations, bloom dynamics and community metabolism in a short-term experiment in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinbauer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Volcano ash deposition is now considered as an important source of inorganic bioavailable iron which can relieve Fe-limitation in the ocean. As volcano ash also releases PO4, a experiment was performed in the NW Mediterranean Sea to test whether volcano ash deposition can affect nutrient dynamics and bloom development in a P-limited system. In a 54h experiment, it was shown that the development of a phytoplankton bloom was not enhanced or even repressed by ash additions of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas higher ash concentrations (200 mg l-1) induced a phytoplankton bloom as indicated by elevated Chlorophyll-a levels. Concurrently, net community production (NCP) and gross primary production (GPP) were enhanced at T24h at the highest ash additions. The metabolic balance was roughly neutral at low or no ash additions, but shifted towards phototrophy at the highest ash additions. The data on inorganic nutrient development and release estimates from ash material assays suggest relieving of P-limitation concomitant with NO3 and silicate use from ash. The concentration of TEP increased with increasing ash levels. The abundances of the heterotrophic compartment (bacteria, viruses and ciliates) also indicated dose-dependent responses. Our data suggest that heterotrophs won the competition for inorganic nutrients at ash levels of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas phytoplankton won at levels of 200 mg l-1. Overall, our experiments point to a strong potential of volcano ash deposition as forcing factor for nutrient dynamics and the activity of microbial plankton in a P-limited system.

  2. Kinetics of the addition of olefins to Si-centered radicals: the critical role of dispersion interactions revealed by theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin R; Clarkin, Owen J; Dale, Stephen G; DiLabio, Gino A

    2015-06-04

    Solution-phase rate constants for the addition of selected olefins to the triethylsilyl and tris(trimethylsilyl)silyl radicals are measured using laser-flash photolysis and competition kinetics. The results are compared with predictions from density functional theory (DFT) calculations, both with and without dispersion corrections obtained from the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) model. Without a dispersion correction, the rate constants are consistently underestimated; the errors increase with system size, up to 10(6) s(-1) for the largest system considered. Dispersion interactions preferentially stabilize the transition states relative to the separated reactants and bring the DFT-calculated rate constants into excellent agreement with experiment. Thus, dispersion interactions are found to play a key role in determining the kinetics for addition reactions, particularly those involving sterically bulky functional groups.

  3. Response of aboveground biomass and diversity to nitrogen addition – a five-year experiment in semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Kejian; Qi, Yu; Huang, Yongmei; Chen, Huiying; Sheng, Zhilu; Xu, Xia; Duan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the response of the plant community to increasing nitrogen (N) deposition is helpful for improving pasture management in semi-arid areas. We implemented a 5-year N addition experiment in a Stipa krylovii steppe of Inner Mongolia, northern China. The aboveground biomass (AGB) and species richness were measured annually. Along with the N addition levels, the species richness declined significantly, and the species composition changed noticeably. However, the total AGB did not exhibit a noticeable increase. We found that compensatory effects of the AGB occurred not only between the grasses and the forbs but also among Gramineae species. The plant responses to N addition, from the community to species level, lessened in dry years compared to wet or normal years. The N addition intensified the reduction of community productivity in dry years. Our study indicated that the compensatory effects of the AGB among the species sustained the stability of grassland productivity. However, biodiversity loss resulting from increasing N deposition might lead the semi-arid grassland ecosystem to be unsustainable, especially in dry years. PMID:27573360

  4. Response of aboveground biomass and diversity to nitrogen addition – a five-year experiment in semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kejian; Qi, Yu; Huang, Yongmei; Chen, Huiying; Sheng, Zhilu; Xu, Xia; Duan, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the response of the plant community to increasing nitrogen (N) deposition is helpful for improving pasture management in semi-arid areas. We implemented a 5-year N addition experiment in a Stipa krylovii steppe of Inner Mongolia, northern China. The aboveground biomass (AGB) and species richness were measured annually. Along with the N addition levels, the species richness declined significantly, and the species composition changed noticeably. However, the total AGB did not exhibit a noticeable increase. We found that compensatory effects of the AGB occurred not only between the grasses and the forbs but also among Gramineae species. The plant responses to N addition, from the community to species level, lessened in dry years compared to wet or normal years. The N addition intensified the reduction of community productivity in dry years. Our study indicated that the compensatory effects of the AGB among the species sustained the stability of grassland productivity. However, biodiversity loss resulting from increasing N deposition might lead the semi-arid grassland ecosystem to be unsustainable, especially in dry years.

  5. The Buber-Rogers Dialogue: Theory Confirmed in Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seckinger, Donald S.

    1976-01-01

    Considers a dialogue between Carl Rogers and Martin Buber and its use both in distinguishing the concept teaching from the concept therapy as a general case and specifically in differentiating existential psychotherapy from Buber's theory of instruction. (Author/RK)

  6. Development of the performance confirmation program at YUCCA mountain, nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeCain, G.D.; Barr, D.; Weaver, D.; Snell, R.; Goodin, S.W.; Hansen, F.D.

    2006-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Performance Confirmation program consists of tests, monitoring activities, experiments, and analyses to evaluate the adequacy of assumptions, data, and analyses that form the basis of the conceptual and numerical models of flow and transport associated with a proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Performance Confirmation program uses an eight-stage risk-informed, performance-based approach. Selection of the Performance Confirmation activities for inclusion in the Performance Confirmation program was done using a risk-informed performance-based decision analysis. The result of this analysis was a Performance Confirmation base portfolio that consists of 20 activities. The 20 Performance Confirmation activities include geologic, hydrologie, and construction/engineering testing. Some of the activities began during site characterization, and others will begin during construction, or post emplacement, and continue until repository closure.

  7. TANK 50 BATCH 0 SALTSTONE FORMULATION CONFIRMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2006-06-05

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel were requested to confirm the Tank 50 Batch 0 grout formulation per Technical Task Request, SSF-TTR-2006-0001 (task 1 of 2) [1]. Earlier Batch 0 formulation testing used a Tank 50 sample collected in September 2005 and is described elsewhere [2]. The current testing was performed using a sample of Tank 50 waste collected in May 2006. This work was performed according to the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TT/QAP), WSRC-RP-2006-00594 [3]. The salt solution collected from Tank 50 in May 2006 contained approximately 3 weight percent more solids than the sample collected in September 2005. The insoluble solids took longer to settle in the new sample which was interpreted as indicating finer particles in the current sample. The saltstone formulation developed for the September 2005 Tank 50 Batch 0 sample was confirmed for the May 2006 sample with one minor exception. Saltstone prepared with the Tank 50 sample collected in May 2006 required 1.5 times more Daratard 17 set retarding admixture than the saltstone prepared with the September In addition, a sample prepared with lower shear mixing (stirring with a spatula) had a higher plastic viscosity (57 cP) than samples made with higher shear mixing in a blender (23cP). The static gel times of the saltstone slurries made with low shear mixing were also shorter ({approx}32 minutes) than those for comparable samples made in the blender ({approx}47 minutes). The addition of the various waste streams (ETP, HEU-HCAN, and GPE-HCAN) to Tank 50 from September 2005 to May 2006 has increased the amount of set retarder, Daratard 17, required for processing saltstone slurries through the Saltstone facility. If these streams are continued to be added to Tank 50, the quantity of admixtures required to maintain the same processing conditions for the Saltstone facility will probably change and additional testing is recommended to reconfirm the Tank 50 Saltstone formulation.

  8. Seismic reflection data imaging and interpretation from Braniewo2014 experiment using additional wide-angle refraction and reflection and well-logs data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Majdański, Mariusz; Białas, Sebastian; Gaczyński, Edward; Maksym, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Braniewo2014 reflection and refraction experiment was realized in cooperation between Polish Oil and Gas Company (PGNiG) and the Institute of Geophysics (IGF), Polish Academy of Sciences, near the locality of Braniewo in northern Poland. PGNiG realized a 20-km-long reflection profile, using vibroseis and dynamite shooting; the aim of the reflection survey was to characterise Silurian shale gas reservoir. IGF deployed 59 seismic stations along this profile and registered additional full-spread wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with offsets up to 12 km; maximum offsets from the seismic reflection survey was 3 km. To improve the velocity information two velocity logs from near deep boreholes were used. The main goal of the joint reflection-refraction interpretation was to find relations between velocity field from reflection velocity analysis and refraction tomography, and to build a velocity model which would be consistent for both, reflection and refraction, datasets. In this paper we present imaging results and velocity models from Braniewo2014 experiment and the methodology we used.

  9. Co-addition of manure increases the dissipation rates of tylosin A and the numbers of resistance genes in laboratory incubation experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yong-De; Liao, Xin-Di; Liang, Juan-Boo; Xin, Wen; Wu, Yin-Bao

    2015-09-15

    The behavior of veterinary antibiotics in the soil is commonly studied using the following methods to add antibiotics to the soil: (A) adding manure collected from animals fed a diet that includes antibiotics; (B) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics; and (C) the direct addition of antibiotics. However, most studies have only used methods (B) and (C) in their research, and few studies have simultaneously compared the different antibiotic addition methods. This study used tylosin A (TYLA) as a model antibiotic to compare the effects of these three commonly used antibiotic addition methods on the dissipation rates of TYLA and the numbers of resistance genes in laboratory incubation experiments. The results showed that the three treatment methods produced similar TYLA degradation trends; however, there were significant differences (P<0.05) in the TYLA degradation half-life (t1/2) among the three methods. The half-life of TYLA degradation in treatments A, B and C was 2.44 ± 0.04, 1.21 ± 0.03 and 5.13 ± 0.11 days, respectively. The presence of manure resulted in a higher electrical conductivity (EC), higher relative abundance of Citrobacter amalonaticus, higher macrolide resistant gene (ermB, ermF and ermT) count and lower ecological toxicity in the soil, which could partially explain the higher TYLA degradation rate in the treatments containing manure. The higher degradation rate of TYLA in treatment B when compared to treatment A could be due to the lower concentrations of tylosin B (TYLB) and tylosin D (TYLD). The main route for veterinary antibiotics to enter the soil is via the manure of animals that have been administered antibiotics. Therefore, the more appropriate method to study the degradation and ecotoxicity of antibiotic residues in the soil is by using manure from animals fed/administered the particular antibiotic rather than by adding the antibiotic directly to the soil.

  10. Soil microbial biomass and community structure affected by repeated additions of sewage sludge in four Swedish long-term field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, G.; Kätterer, T.; Kirchmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter is a key attribute of soil fertility. The pool of soil organic C can be increased, either by mineral fertilisers or by adding organic amendments such as sewage sludge. Sewage sludge has positive effects on agricultural soils through the supply of organic matter and essential plant nutrients, but sludge may also contain unwanted heavy metals, xenobiotic substances and pathogens. One obvious effect of long-term sewage sludge addition is a decrease in soil pH, caused by N mineralisation followed by nitrification, sulphate formation and presence of organic acids with the organic matter added. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sewage sludge on the microbial biomass and community structure. Materials and methods We analysed soil samples from four sites where sewage sludge has been repeatedly applied in long-term field experiments situated in different parts of Sweden; Ultuna (59°49'N, 17°39'E, started 1956), Lanna (58°21'N, 13°06'E, started 1997-98), Petersborg (55°32'N, 13°00'E, started 1981) and Igelösa (55°45'N, 13°18'E, started 1981). In these four experiments, at least one sewage sludge treatment is included in the experimental design. In the Ultuna experiment, all organic fertilisers, including sewage sludge, are applied every second year, corresponding to 4 ton C ha-1. The Lanna experiment has a similar design, with 8 ton dry matter ha-1 applied every second year. Lanna also has an additional treatment in which metal salts (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) are added together with sewage sludge. At Petersborg and Igelösa, two levels of sewage sludge (4 or 12 ton dry matter ha-1 every 4th year) are compared with three levels of NPK fertiliser (0 N, ½ normal N and normal N). Topsoil samples (0-20 cm depth) from the four sites were analysed for total C, total N, pH and PLFAs (phospholipid fatty acids). In addition, crop yields were recorded. Results At all four sites, sewage sludge has had a positive effect on crop yields

  11. Drug confirmation by mass spectrometry: Identification criteria and complicating factors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Chen, Derrick; Wang, Sihe

    2015-01-01

    Drug confirmation by mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography is essential to toxicology, doping control, pain management, and workplace drug testing. High confidence in this technology is due to its superior specificity and sensitivity. However, there are challenges associated with drug confirmation, and proper setup and validation of these assays are important in assuring high-quality results. In this article, assay parameters required for drug confirmation are summarized based on recent scientific publications, various established guidelines, and our own practical experience. Factors affecting the result quality and correct results interpretation are critically reviewed. Several emerging technologies and their potential applications are briefly explored.

  12. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  13. The Role of Patients’ Age on Their Preferences for Choosing Additional Blood Pressure-Lowering Drugs: A Discrete Choice Experiment in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sieta T.; de Vries, Folgerdiena M.; Dekker, Thijs; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Denig, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether patients’ willingness to add a blood pressure-lowering drug and the importance they attach to specific treatment characteristics differ among age groups in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods Patients being prescribed at least an oral glucose-lowering and a blood pressure-lowering drug completed a questionnaire including a discrete choice experiment. This experiment contained choice sets with hypothetical blood pressure-lowering drugs and a no additional drug alternative, which differed in their characteristics (i.e. effects and intake moments). Differences in willingness to add a drug were compared between patients <75 years (non-aged) and ≥75 years (aged) using Pearson χ2-tests. Multinomial logit models were used to assess and compare the importance attached to the characteristics. Results Of the 161 patients who completed the questionnaire, 151 (72%) could be included in the analyses (mean age 68 years; 42% female). Aged patients were less willing to add a drug than non-aged patients (67% versus 84% respectively; P = 0.017). In both age groups, the effect on blood pressure was most important for choosing a drug, followed by the risk of adverse drug events and the risk of death. The effect on limitations due to stroke was only significant in the non-aged group. The effect on blood pressure was slightly more important in the non-aged than the aged group (P = 0.043). Conclusions Aged patients appear less willing to add a preventive drug than non-aged patients. The importance attached to various treatment characteristics does not seem to differ much among age groups. PMID:26445349

  14. Theory-led confirmation bias and experimental persona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Questionnaire and interview findings from a survey of three Year 8 (ages 12-13 years) science practical lessons (n = 52) demonstrate how pupils' data collection and inference making were sometimes biased by desires to confirm a personal theory. A variety of behaviours are described where learners knowingly rejected anomalies, manipulated apparatus, invented results or carried out other improper operations to either collect data which they believed were scientifically correct, or achieve social conformity. It is proposed that confirmation bias was a consequence of the degree to which individuals were laden by theory, and driven by this, experimenters assumed one of three different personas: becoming right answer confirmers; good scientists; or indifferent spectators. These personas have parallels with historical instances of scientific behaviour. Implications of a continued teacher-tolerance of pupil confirmation bias include the promotion of unscientific experimenting, and the persistence of unchallenged science misconceptions. Solutions are offered in the way of practical strategies that might reduce experimenters' theory-ladeness.

  15. Confirming LEU in an LFUA environment

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, R.R.

    1985-11-01

    A standard sequential procedure is adapted to a limited-frequency unannounced access (LFUA) inspection problem, where uranium enrichment is monitored using nondestructive assay instrumentation. If the enrichment is in the low-enriched uranium (LEU) range, rapid confirmation to that effect is provided under anticipated measurement conditions. Decision thresholds are derived based on the required confidence level in an LEU confirmation. Also, the procedure is easily automated and is such that the raw data need not be revealed.

  16. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  17. A New Way to Confirm Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    What was the big deal behind the Kepler news conference yesterday? Its not just that the number of confirmed planets found by Kepler has more than doubled (though thats certainly exciting news!). Whats especially interesting is the way in which these new planets were confirmed.Number of planet discoveries by year since 1995, including previous non-Kepler discoveries (blue), previous Kepler discoveries (light blue) and the newly validated Kepler planets (orange). [NASA Ames/W. Stenzel; Princeton University/T. Morton]No Need for Follow-UpBefore Kepler, the way we confirmed planet candidates was with follow-up observations. The candidate could be validated either by directly imaging (which is rare) or obtaining a large number radial-velocity measurements of the wobble of the planets host star due to the planets orbit. But once Kepler started producing planet candidates, these approaches to validation became less feasible. A lot of Kepler candidates are small and orbit faint stars, making follow-up observations difficult or impossible.This problem is what inspired the development of whats known as probabilistic validation, an analysis technique that involves assessing the likelihood that the candidates signal is caused by various false-positive scenarios. Using this technique allows astronomers to estimate the likelihood of a candidate signal being a true planet detection; if that likelihood is high enough, the planet candidate can be confirmed without the need for follow-up observations.A breakdown of the catalog of Kepler Objects of Interest. Just over half had previously been identified as false positives or confirmed as candidates. 1284 are newly validated, and another 455 have FPP of1090%. [Morton et al. 2016]Probabilistic validation has been used in the past to confirm individual planet candidates in Kepler data, but now Timothy Morton (Princeton University) and collaborators have taken this to a new level: they developed the first code thats designed to do fully

  18. Confirmed and Potential Sources of Legionella Reviewed.

    PubMed

    van Heijnsbergen, Eri; Schalk, Johanna A C; Euser, Sjoerd M; Brandsema, Petra S; den Boer, Jeroen W; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-04-21

    Legionella bacteria are ubiquitous in natural matrices and man-made systems. However, it is not always clear if these reservoirs can act as source of infection resulting in cases of Legionnaires' disease. This review provides an overview of reservoirs of Legionella reported in the literature, other than drinking water distribution systems. Levels of evidence were developed to discriminate between potential and confirmed sources of Legionella. A total of 17 systems and matrices could be classified as confirmed sources of Legionella. Many other man-made systems or natural matrices were not classified as a confirmed source, since either no patients were linked to these reservoirs or the supporting evidence was weak. However, these systems or matrices could play an important role in the transmission of infectious Legionella bacteria; they might not yet be considered in source investigations, resulting in an underestimation of their importance. To optimize source investigations it is important to have knowledge about all the (potential) sources of Legionella. Further research is needed to unravel what the contribution is of each confirmed source, and possibly also potential sources, to the LD disease burden.

  19. RENORM predictions of diffraction at LHC confirmed

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2015-04-10

    The RENORM model predictions of diffractive, total, and total-inelastic cross sections at the LHC are confirmed by recent measurements. The predictions of several other available models are discussed, highlighting their differences from RENORM, mainly arising from the way rapidity gap formation, low- and high-mass diffraction, unitarization, and hadronization are implemented.

  20. A study of vertebra number in pigs confirms the effect of vertnin and reveals additional QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Formation of the vertebral column is a critical developmental stage in mammals that is strictly controlled in most species. The pig is quite unique as considerable variation exists in number of thoracic vertebra as well as number of lumbar vertebra. At least two genes have been identified that affec...

  1. A study of vertebra number in pigs confirms the association of vertnin and reveals additional QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Formation of the vertebral column is a critical developmental stage in mammals. The strict control of this process has resulted in little variation in number of vertebrae across mammalian species and no variation within most mammalian species. The pig is quite unique as considerable vari...

  2. Confirming QTLs and finding additional Loci responsible for resistance to Sheath Blight in Rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice around the globe, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. Major genes governing resistance to ShB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide; however...

  3. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  4. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  5. PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION IN-SITU INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    N.T. Raczka

    2000-05-23

    The purpose of this document is to identify and analyze the types of in-situ instruments and methods that could be used in support of the data acquisition portion of the Performance Confirmation (PC) program at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The PC program will require geomechanical , geophysical, thermal, and hydrologic instrumentation of several kinds. This analysis is being prepared to document the technical issues associated with each type of measurement during the PC period. This analysis utilizes the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) as its starting point. The scope of this analysis is primarily on the period after the start of waste package emplacement and before permanent closure of the repository, a period lasting between 15 and 300 years after last package emplacement (Stroupe 2000, Attachment 1, p. 1). The primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Review the design criteria as presented in the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). The scope of this analysis will be limited to the instrumentation related to parameters that require continuous monitoring of the conditions underground. (2) Preliminary identification and listing of the data requirements and parameters as related to the current repository layout in support of PC monitoring. (3) Preliminary identification of methods and instrumentation for the acquisition of the required data. Although the ''Performance Confirmation Input Criteria'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a) defines a broad range of data that must be obtained from a variety of methods, the focus of this analysis is on instrumentation related to the performance of the rock mass and the formation of water in the repository environment, that is obtainable from in-situ observation, testing, and monitoring.

  6. Confirmation of Aedes taeniorhynchus in Oklahoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-01-01

    Richardson 3 and Joseph E. Farlow ABSTRACT. A single female collected in 1971 confirms the presence of Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) in Oklahoma. This...from Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas (Eldridge et al. 1972). Although most of these specimens were pooled for virus isolation attempts...infrequent specimens were pinned and retained for further study. Included among the latter was a single female of Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) from

  7. Improving planning, design, reporting and scientific quality of animal experiments by using the Gold Standard Publication Checklist, in addition to the ARRIVE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R; de Vries, Rob; Leenaars, Marlies; Curfs, Jo; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2011-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated serious omissions in the way research that use animals is reported. In order to improve the quality of reporting of animal experiments, the Animals in research: reporting in vivo experiments (ARRIVE) Guidelines were published in the British Journal of Pharmacology in August 2010. However, not only the quality of reporting of completed animal studies needs to be improved, but also the design and execution of new experiments. With both these goals in mind, we published the Gold Standard Publication Checklist (GSPC) in May 2010, a few months before the ARRIVE guidelines appeared. In this letter, we compare the GSPC checklist with the ARRIVE Guidelines. The GSPC describes certain items in more detail, which makes it both easier to use when designing and conducting an experiment and particularly suitable for making systematic reviews of animal studies more feasible. In order to improve not only the reporting but also the planning, design, execution and thereby, the scientific quality of animal experiments, we strongly recommend to all scientists involved in animal experimentation and to editors of journals publishing animal studies to take a closer look at the contents of both the ARRIVE guidelines and GSPC, and select the set of guidelines which is most appropriate for their particular situation.

  8. The price of information: Increased inspection costs reduce the confirmation bias in visual search.

    PubMed

    Rajsic, Jason; Wilson, Daryl E; Pratt, Jay

    2017-01-31

    In visual search, there is a confirmation bias such that attention is biased towards stimuli that match a target template, which has been attributed to covert costs of updating the templates that guide search [Rajsic, Wilson, & Pratt, 2015. Confirmation bias in visual search. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/xhp0000090 ]. In order to provide direct evidence for this speculation, the present study increased the cost of inspections in search by using gaze- and mouse-contingent searches, which restrict the manner in which information in search displays can be accrued, and incur additional motor costs (in the case of mouse-contingent searches). In a fourth experiment, we rhythmically mask elements in the search display to induce temporal inspection costs. Our results indicated that confirmation bias is indeed attenuated when inspection costs are increased. We conclude that confirmation bias results from the low-cost strategy of matching information to a single, concrete visual template, and that more sophisticated guidance strategies will be used when sufficiently beneficial. This demonstrates that search guidance itself comes at a cost, and that the form of guidance adopted in a given search depends on a comparison between guidance costs and the expected benefits of their implementation.

  9. Irradiation of Metallic Fuels with Rare Earth Additions for Actinide Transmutation in the ATR. Experiment Description for AFC-2A and AFC-2B

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Hayes; D. J. Utterbeck; T. A. Hyde

    2007-03-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), now within the broader context of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing metallic transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the metallic fuel test series in progress in the ATR. This report documents the experiment description and test matrix of the proposed experiments and the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) and fabrication schedule.

  10. Irradiation of Metallic Fuels with Rare Earth Additions for Actinide Transmutation in the Advanced Test Reactor. Experiment Description for AFC-2A and AFC-2B

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Steven L.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), now within the broader context of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing metallic transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the metallic fuel test series in progress in the ATR. This report documents the experiment description and test matrix of the proposed experiments and the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) and fabrication schedule.

  11. Irradiation of Metallic Fuels with Rare Earth Additions for Actinide Transmutation in the ATR. Experiment Description for AFC-2A and AFC-2B

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Hayes; D. J. Utterbeck; T. A. Hyde

    2006-11-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), now within the broader context of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing metallic transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the metallic fuel test series in progress in the ATR. This report documents the experiment description and test matrix of the proposed experiments and the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) and fabrication schedule.

  12. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  13. Qualitative impact of salinity, UV radiation and turbulence on leaching of organic plastic additives from four common plastics - A lab experiment.

    PubMed

    Suhrhoff, Tim Jesper; Scholz-Böttcher, Barbara M

    2016-01-15

    Four common consumer plastic samples (polyethylene, polystyrene, polyethylene terephthalate, polyvinylchloride) were studied to investigate the impact of physical parameters such as turbulence, salinity and UV irradiance on leaching behavior of selected plastic components. Polymers were exposed to two different salinities (i.e. 0 and 35 g/kg), UV radiation and turbulence. Additives (e.g. bisphenol A, phthalates, citrates, and Irgafos® 168 phosphate) and oligomers were detected in initial plastics and aqueous extracts. Identification and quantification was performed by GC-FID/MS. Bisphenol A and citrate based additives are leached easier compared to phthalates. The print highly contributed to the chemical burden of the analyzed polyethylene bag. The study underlines a positive relationship between turbulence and magnitude of leaching. Salinity had a minor impact that differs for each analyte. Global annual release of additives from assessed plastics into marine environments is estimated to be between 35 and 917 tons, of which most are derived from plasticized polyvinylchloride.

  14. Generation, Isolation, and Characterization of a Stable Enol from Grignard Addition to a Bis-Ester: A Microscale Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicaise, Olivier J. C.; Ostrom, Kyle F.; Dalke, Brent J.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is described that introduces students to the concept of temperature-dependent stability of the tetrahedral intermediate in an acyl-transfer reaction. The process involves the determination of the structure of an alpha-ketoester and its corresponding remarkably stable enol ester to suggest a mechanism for the formation of the products.

  15. Detection of Salicylic Acid in Willow Bark: An Addition to a Classic Series of Experiments in the Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Matthew D.; McLeod, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivative, acetylsalicylic acid, are often encountered in introductory organic chemistry experiments, and mention is often made that salicylic acid was originally isolated from the bark of the willow tree. This biological connection, however, is typically not further pursued, leaving students with an impression that biology…

  16. Preliminary Analysis of Remote Monitoring & Robotic Concepts for Performance Confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. McAffee

    1997-02-18

    As defined in 10 CFR Part 60.2, Performance Confirmation is the ''program of tests, experiments and analyses which is conducted to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the information used to determine with reasonable assurance that the performance objectives for the period after permanent closure will be met''. The overall Performance Confirmation program begins during site characterization and continues up to repository closure. The main purpose of this document is to develop, explore and analyze initial concepts for using remotely operated and robotic systems in gathering repository performance information during Performance Confirmation. This analysis focuses primarily on possible Performance Confirmation related applications within the emplacement drifts after waste packages have been emplaced (post-emplacement) and before permanent closure of the repository (preclosure). This will be a period of time lasting approximately 100 years and basically coincides with the Caretaker phase of the project. This analysis also examines, to a lesser extent, some applications related to Caretaker operations. A previous report examined remote handling and robotic technologies that could be employed during the waste package emplacement phase of the project (Reference 5.1). This analysis is being prepared to provide an early investigation of possible design concepts and technical challenges associated with developing remote systems for monitoring and inspecting activities during Performance Confirmation. The writing of this analysis preceded formal development of Performance Confirmation functional requirements and program plans and therefore examines, in part, the fundamental Performance Confirmation monitoring needs and operating conditions. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Describe the operating environment and conditions expected in the emplacement drifts during the preclosure period. (Presented in Section 7.2). (2) Identify and discuss the

  17. Confirmation of Europa's water vapor plume activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Lorenz

    2013-10-01

    STIS spectral UV images of Jupiter's satellite Europa obtained during HST Cycle 20 revealed atomic H and O auroral emissions in intensity ratios which uniquely identify the source as electron impact excitation of water molecules above Europa's south pole and hypothesized to be associated with water vapor plumes as reported in Roth et al., Science, 2014. The plumes were detected when Europa was at apocenter on December 30/31, 2012. Two other sets of STIS observations when Europa was near pericenter did not show plume emission within the sensitivity of STIS. The plume variability is predicted to be correlated with Europa's distance from Jupiter in the observed way. However, the one plume detection at apocenter and the two non-detections near pericenter require confirmation. Therefore we request two visits of 5 orbits each to observe Europa at orbital positions of the predicted maximum plume activity {similar to the December 2012 STIS Europa visit} to provide confirmation of the initial STIS discovery and to consolidate the predicted geophysical variability pattern.

  18. Kepler Confirmation of Multi-Planet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.

    2011-10-01

    The NASA Kepler spacecraft has detected 170 candidate multi-planet systems in the first two quarters of data released in February 2011 by Borucki et al. (2011). These systems comprise 115 double candidate systems, 45 triple candidate sys- tems, and 10 systems with 4 or more candidate planets. The architecture and dynamics of these systems were discussed by Lissauer et al. (2011), and a comparison of candidates in single- and multi-planet systems was presented by Latham et al. (2011). Proceeding from "planetary candidate" systems to confirmed and validated multi-planet systems is a difficult process, as most of these systems orbit stars too faint to obtain extremely precise (1ms-1) radial velocity confimation. Here, we discuss in detail the use of transit timing vari- ations (cf. e.g. Holman et al., 2010) to confirm planets near a mean motion resonance. We also discuss extensions to the BLENDER validation (Torres et al., 2004, 2011; Fressin et al., 2011) to validate planets in multi-planet systems. Kepler was competitively selected as the tenth Discovery mission. Funding for the Kepler Mis- sion is provided by NASA's Science Mission Direc- torate. We are deeply grateful for the very hard work of the entire Kepler team.

  19. CAMS confirmation of previously reported meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Holman, D.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    Leading up to the 2015 IAU General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union's Working List of Meteor Showers included 486 unconfirmed showers, showers that are not certain to exist. If confirmed, each shower would provide a record of past comet or asteroid activity. Now, we report that 41 of these are detected in the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteor shower survey. They manifest as meteoroids arriving at Earth from a similar direction and orbit, after removing the daily radiant drift due to Earth's motion around the Sun. These showers do exist and, therefore, can be moved to the IAU List of Established Meteor Showers. This adds to 31 previously confirmed showers from CAMS data. For each shower, finding charts are presented based on 230,000 meteors observed up to March of 2015, calculated by re-projecting the drift-corrected Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates into more familiar equatorial coordinates. Showers that are not detected, but should have, and duplicate showers that project to the same Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates, are recommended for removal from the Working List.

  20. [Cutaneous gnathostomiasis, first confirmed case in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Jurado, Leonardo F; Palacios, Diana M; López, Rocío; Baldión, Margarita; Matijasevic, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Gnathostomiasis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by some species of helminthes belonging to the genus Gnathostoma . It has a wide clinical presentation and its diagnosis is a challenge. Tropical and subtropical countries are endemic, and its transmission is associated with eating raw or undercooked meat from fresh water animals. Increasing global tourism and consuming exotic foods have produced a noticeable rise in cases of the disease in the last decades. However, in our country, there has not been any confirmed case of gnathostomiasis previously reported. We present the case of a 63-year-old Colombian man with an international travel history, who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms. During the hospital stay, he developed a cutaneous lesion on the upper right abdominal quadrant, where later, a larva was found. A morphological study allowed us to identify it as Gnathostoma spinigerum . As such, this is the first report of an imported case of gnathostomiasis confirmed in Colombia. This article describes the principles, etiology, pathogenic cycle and treatment of this disease with special considerations to our patient´s particular features.

  1. High court nominee confirmed by Senate committee.

    PubMed

    1994-07-22

    On July 19, 1994, the 18-member US Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously approved President Clinton's nominee for Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court, Chief Judge Stephen Breyer. If confirmed by the full Senate, Judge Breyer will replace recently retired Justice Harry Blackmun, author of the Roe vs. Wade decision. When asked during the proceedings about whether a line could be drawn to determine a state's interest in the regulation of abortion services at different points during pregnancy, Judge Breyer replied that the finding in Roe vs. Wade has been the law for at least 21 years and that the law was recently upheld in Planned Parenthood vs. Casey. He refused to answer specific questions on how the law applies since he anticipates that those questions will be the subject of litigation in the future. During his career, Judge Breyer was involved in 2 abortion-related cases. In one, he joined an opinion which struck down restrictions on abortion counseling and referrals by family planning clinics receiving federal funds. In the other, he dissented from a court reversal of dismissal of a challenge to Massachusetts's parental involvement requirement. The only heated exchange during the confirmation hearing occurred when the Judge was asked if he would consider it a conflict of interest to rule in environmental pollution cases since he has holdings in Lloyds of London, which insures clients against asbestos and pollution claims.

  2. Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Porous Media Using Polymer Additives: Column and Flow Cell Ex-periments

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-03-20

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to investigate whether barrier reductive capacity can be enhanced by adding micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers. Porous media were packed in a wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel sur-rounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments. The flow cell experiments indicated that iron concentration enhancements of at least 0.6% (w/w) could be obtained using moderate flow rates and injection of 30 pore volumes. The 0.6% amended Fe0 concentration would provide approximately 20 times the average reductive capacity that is provided by the dithionite-reduced iron in the ISRM barrier. Calculations show that a 1-m-long Fe0 amended zone with an average concentration of 0.6% w/w iron subject to a groundwater velocity of 1 m/day will have an estimated longevity of 7.2 years.

  3. Multiple familial trichoepithelioma: confirmation via dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Bajaj, Shirin; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.; González, Sergio; Muñoz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Trichoepitheliomas are uncommon benign adnexal neoplasms that originate from the hair follicles. Multiple familial trichoepithelioma constitute an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the appearance of multiple flesh-colored, symmetrical papules, tumors and/or nodules in the central face and occasionally on the scalp. Although clinical diagnosis is usually straightforward in light of the family history and naked-eye examination, dermoscopy may aid in its confirmation. Dermoscopy of each papule revealed in-focus arborizing vessels, multiple milia-like cysts and rosettes amidst a whitish background. In a patient with multiple facial papules revealing a dermoscopic appearance described above, the diagnosis of sporadic or familial multiple trichoepithelioma should be considered. PMID:27648384

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF THE PISCES OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian B.; Preston, George W.; Simon, Joshua D.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Gould, Andrew; Ivezic, Zeljko; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-11-10

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of the 'Pisces Overdensity', also known as 'Structure J', a photometric overdensity of RR Lyrae stars discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at an estimated photometric distance of approx85 kpc. We measure radial velocities for eight RR Lyrae stars within Pisces. We find that five of the eight stars have heliocentric radial velocities within a narrow range of -87 km s{sup -1} < v{sub r} < -67 km s{sup -1}, suggesting that the photometric overdensity is mainly due to a physically associated system, probably a dwarf galaxy or a disrupted galaxy. Two of the remaining three stars differ from one another by only 9 km s{sup -1}, but it would be premature to identify them as a second system.

  5. Louisiana slope salt-ridge continuity confirmed

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Hoffman, K.S.; Sullivan, N.

    1989-03-01

    The Louisiana offshore is a world-class hydrocarbon province. Abundant reservoirs develop as the result of interaction between salt tectonics and sedimentation. Thus, it is essential to know both regional and local characteristics of the extent and timing of salt tectonics as an aid in hydrocarbon exploration. Exploration mythology mandates that salt domes and ridges are virtually random across the slope area. In sharp contrast, the authors describe a definite pattern to the salt ridges of slightly concave (to the north) arcs, with the southernmost arc located along the Sigsbee Escarpment and the northernmost along the shelf break. Furthermore, salt domes may not be truly randomly located but rather part of ancestral or existent salt ridges. Confirming data are provided by dip bathymatric and seismic profiles. The bathymetric profiles are at 5-mi (8-km) spacings from 1987 published charts of the Gulf of Mexico. Dip seismic lines reveal that bathymetric highs are associated with underlying salt. Buried salt accumulations are surficially expressed by actual ridges and domes, a leveling of sea floor, or a local decrease in the rate of regional slope descent. Salt is the Neogene-age basement of the Louisiana slope. The existence of an overall salt-ridge pattern implies that there is a single dynamic geologic system controlling the evolution of this slope. As salt tectonic rates and timing are deciphered for specific sites along dip, intervening rates may be interpolated to unmapped zones. Confirming an overall salt tectonic pattern is mandatory prior to quantifying regional and specific rates for the whole slope.

  6. Sciatica: Detection and Confirmation by New Method

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    We need to overcome limitations of present assessment and also integrate newer research in our work about sciatica. Inflammation induces changes in the DRG and nerve root. It sensitizes the axons. Nociceptor is a unique axon. It is pseudo unipolar: both its ends, central and peripheral, behave in similar fashion. The nerve in periphery which carries these axons may selectively become sensitive to mechanical pressure--“mechanosensitized,” as we coin the phrase. Many pain questionnaires are used and are effective in identifying neuropathic pain solely on basis of descriptors but they do not directly physically correlate nerve root and pain. A thorough neurological evaluation is always needed. Physical examination is not direct pain assessment but testing mobility of nerve root and its effect on pain generation. There is a dogmatic dominance of dermatomes in assessment of leg pain. They are unreliable. Images may not correlate with symptoms and pathology in about 28% of cases. Electrophysiology may be normal in purely inflamed nerve root. Palpation may help in such inflammatory setting to refine our assessment further. Confirmation of sciatica is done by selective nerve root block (SNRB) today but it is fraught with several complications and needs elaborate inpatient and operating room set up. We have used the unique property of the pseudo unipolar axon that both its ends have similar functional properties and so inject along its peripheral end sodium channel blockers to block the basic cause of the mechanosensitization namely upregulated sodium channels in the root or DRG. Thus using palpation we may be able to detect symptomatic nerve in stage of inflammation and with distal end injection, along same inflamed nerve we may be able to abolish and so confirm sciatica. Discussions of sciatica pain diagnosis tend to immediately shift and centre on the affected disc rather than the nerve. Theoretically it may be possible to detect the affected nerve by palpating the

  7. Confirming sub-Neptunian Transiting Exoplanets with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Kepler Science Team

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission, launched in March 2009, uses transit photometry to detect and characterize exoplanets with the objective of determining the frequency of earth-size planets in the habitable zone. The instrument is a wide field-of-view (115 square degrees) photometer comprised of a 0.95-meter effective aperture Schmidt telescope feeding an array of 42 CCDs that continuously and simultaneously monitors the brightness of up to 170,000 stars. In January, 2010, the team announced its first 5 planet discoveries identified in the first 43 days of data and confirmed by radial velocity follow-up. The "first five" are all short-period giant planets, the smallest being comparable in size to Neptune. Collectively, they are similar to the sample of transiting exoplanets that have been identified to date, the roster of which currently hovers around 100. In August 2010, an additional two planets, each orbiting the star Kepler-9, were confirmed by a combination of radial velocity and transit timing measurements. A third, smaller planet in the same system was validated stastistically by probing the parameter space for potential false-positives. Throughout 2010, a concerted effort was made to push radial velocity confirmation down toward the smaller planets. Recent progress on our efforts to confirm such candidates is discussed.

  8. Objectivity in confirmation: post hoc monsters and novel predictions.

    PubMed

    Votsis, Ioannis

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to put in place some cornerstones in the foundations for an objective theory of confirmation by considering lessons from the failures of predictivism. Discussion begins with a widely accepted challenge, to find out what is needed in addition to the right kind of inferential-semantical relations between hypothesis and evidence to have a complete account of confirmation, one that gives a definitive answer to the question whether hypotheses branded as "post hoc monsters" can be confirmed. The predictivist view is then presented as a way to meet this challenge. Particular attention is paid to Worrall's version of predictivism, as it appears to be the most sophisticated of the lot. It is argued that, despite its faults, his view turns our heads in the right direction by attempting to remove contingent considerations from confirmational matters. The demand to remove such considerations becomes the first of four cornerstones. Each cornerstone is put in place with the aim to steer clear of the sort of failures that plague various kinds of predictivism. In the process, it becomes obvious that the original challenge is wrongheaded and in need of revision. The paper ends with just such a revision.

  9. Hindsight and confirmation biases in an exercise in telepathy.

    PubMed

    Rudski, Jeffrey M

    2002-12-01

    Belief in the paranormal or claims of paranormal experiences may be, at least in part, associated with systematic cognitive biases. 48 undergraduate college students engaged in an exercise in telepathy in which the color of cards was 'sent' to them by the experimenter under two conditions. In a Hindsight-possible condition, participants recorded whether their choice was correct following the revelation of the color. In the Control condition participants committed to a particular response by writing it down before receiving feedback, thus eliminating ability to alter retrospectively what 'was known all along'. Consistent with a hindsight bias, participants performed significantly better under the Hindsight-possible condition. Moreover, a statisically significant correlation was found between paranormal belief assessed on Tobacyk's 1988 Revised Paranormal Belief Scale in the Hindsight-possible but not in the Control condition, suggesting a confirmation bias. Results are discussed in terms of interactions between hindsight and confirmation biases and how they might relate to paranormal beliefs.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Contrasting Effects of Resident Vegetation on Establishment, Growth and Reproduction of Dry Grassland Plants: Implications for Seed Addition Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Knappová, Jana; Knapp, Michal; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Successful establishment of plants is limited by both biotic and abiotic conditions and their interactions. Seedling establishment is also used as a direct measure of habitat suitability, but transient changes in vegetation might provide windows of opportunity allowing plant species to colonize sites which otherwise appear unsuitable. We aimed to study spatio-temporal variability in the effects of resident vegetation on establishment, growth and reproduction of dry grassland species in abandoned arable fields representing potentially suitable habitats. Seeds were sown in disturbed (bare of vegetation and roots) and undisturbed plots in three fields abandoned in the last 20 years. To assess the effects of temporal variation on plant establishment, we initiated our experiments in two years (2007 and 2008). Seventeen out of the 35 sown species flowered within two years after sowing, while three species completely failed to become established. The vegetation in the undisturbed plots facilitated seedling establishment only in the year with low spring precipitation, and the effect did not hold for all species. In contrast, growth and flowering rate were consistently much greater in the disturbed plots, but the effect size differed between the fields and years of sowing. We show that colonization is more successful when site opening by disturbance coincide with other suitable conditions such as weather or soil characteristics. Seasonal variability involved in our study emphasizes the necessity of temporal replication of sowing experiments. Studies assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing should either involve both vegetation removal treatments and untreated plots or follow the gradient of vegetation cover. We strongly recommend following the numbers of established individuals, their sizes and reproductive success when assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing since one can gain completely different results in different phases of plant life cycle. PMID:23755288

  11. Observational Confirmations of Spiral Density Wave Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Julia D.; Kennefick, Daniel; Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed; Berrier, Joel; Davis, Benjamin; Fusco, Michael; Pour Imani, Hamed; Shields, Doug; DMS, SINGS

    2017-01-01

    Using two techniques to reliably and accurately measure the pitch angles of spiral arms in late-type galaxies, we have compared pitch angles to directly measured black hole masses in local galaxies and demonstrated a strong correlation between them. Using the relation thus established we have developed a pitch angle distribution function of a statistically complete volume limited sample of nearby galaxies and developed a central black hole mass function for nearby spiral galaxies.We have further shown that density wave theory leads us to a three-way correlation between bulge mass, pitch angle, and disk gas density, and have used data from the Galaxy Disk Mass Survey to confirm this possible fundamental plane. Density wave theory also predicts that the pitch angle of spiral arms should change with observed waveband as each waveband is sampling a different stage in stellar population formation and evolution. We present evidence that this is indeed the case using a sample of galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey. Furthermore, the evolved spiral arms cross at the galaxy co-rotation radius. This gives a new method for determining the co-rotation radius of spiral galaxies that is found to agree with those found using previous methods.

  12. Histopathology confirms white-nose syndrome in bats in Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pikula, J.; Bandouchova, H.; Novotny, L.; Meteyer, C.U.; Zukal, J.; Irwin, N.R.; Zima, J.; Martinkova, N.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome, associated with the fungal skin infection geomycosis, caused regional population collapse in bats in North America. Our results, based on histopathology, show the presence of white-nose syndrome in Europe. Dermatohistopathology on two bats (Myotis myotis) found dead in March 2010 with geomycosis in the Czech Republic had characteristics resembling Geomyces destructans infection in bats confirmed with white-nose syndrome in US hibernacula. In addition, a live M. myotis, biopsied for histopathology during hibernation in April 2011, had typical fungal infection with cupping erosion and invasion of muzzle skin diagnostic for white-nose syndrome and conidiospores identical to G. destructans that were genetically confirmed as G. destructans. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2012.

  13. Radiographic appearance of confirmed pulmonary lymphoma in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Nicole E; Reichle, Jean K; Valdés-Martínez, Alejandro; Williams, Jamie; Goggin, Justin M; Leach, Lesley; Hanson, Jennifer; Hill, Steve; Axam, Tasha

    2010-01-01

    Herein we describe the thoracic radiographic appearance of confirmed pulmonary lymphoma. Patients with thoracic radiographs and cytologically or histologically confirmed pulmonary lymphoma were sought by contacting American College of Veterinary Radiology members. Seven cats and 16 dogs met the inclusion criteria, ranging in age from 4 to 15 years. Method of diagnosis was via ultrasound-guided cytology (four), surgical biopsy (two), ultrasound-guided biopsy (one), and necropsy (16). Radiographic findings varied but ranged from normal (one) to alveolar (six) and/or unstructured interstitial infiltrates (11), nodules and/or masses (eight), and bronchial infiltrates (four). Additional thoracic radiographic findings included pleural effusion and lymphadenopathy. The results of this evaluation indicate a wide variability in thoracic radiographic abnormalities in cats and dogs with pulmonary lymphoma.

  14. Experimental confirmation of the transversal symmetry breaking in laser profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Silvânia A.; De Leo, Stefano; Oliveira-Huguenin, José A.; da Silva, Ladário

    2017-02-01

    The Snell phase effects on the propagation of optical beams through dielectric blocks have been matter of recent theoretical studies. The effects of this phase on the laser profiles have been tested in our experiment. The data show an excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions confirming the axial spreading modification and the transversal symmetry breaking. The possibility to set, by rotating the dielectric blocks, different configurations allows to recover the transversal symmetry. Based on this experimental evidence, dielectric blocks can be used as alternative optical tools to control the beam profile.

  15. U.S. Senate confirms new USGS director

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Shortly before adjourning in October, the U.S. Senate confirmed Charles Groat as the new director of the U.S. Geological Survey. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt is expected to swear him in shortly as the agency's 13th director. Groat takes over from Thomas Casadevall, who has served as acting director since Gordon Eaton resigned in September 1997.Groat, an AGU member, has more than 25 years of experience in the Earth science fields, including energy and minerals resource assessment, groundwater occurrence and protection, geomorphic processes and landform evolution in desert areas, and coastal studies.

  16. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks in Lab and Field: Physical, Chemical, and Biological Effects of Fluids (Detecting a Biosurfactant Additive in a Field Irrigation Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Spetzler, Hartmut

    2006-05-01

    We have been exploring a new technology that is based on using low-frequency seismic attenuation data to monitor changes in fluid saturation conditions in two-fluid phase porous materials. The seismic attenuation mechanism is related to the loss of energy due to the hysteresis of resistance to meniscus movement (changes in surface tension, wettability) when a pore containing two fluids is stressed at very low frequencies (< 10 Hz). This technology has potential applications to monitoring changes in (1) leakage at buried waste sites, (2) contaminant remediation, and (3) flooding during enhanced petroleum recovery. We have concluded a three year field study at the Maricopa Agricultural Center site of the University of Arizona. Three sets of instruments were installed along an East-West line perpendicular to the 50m by 50m inigation site. Each set of instruments consisted of one three component seismometer and one tiltmeter. Microseisms and solid Earth-tides served as strain sources. The former have a power peak at a period of about 6 seconds and the tides have about two cycles per day. Installation of instruments commenced in late summer of 2002. The instruments operated nearly continuously until April 2005. During the fall of 2003 the site was irrigated with water and one year later with water containing 150 ppm of a biosurfactant additive. This biodegradable additive served to mimic a class of contaminants that change the surface tension of the inigation fluid. Tilt data clearly show tidal tilts superimposed on local tilts due to agricultural irrigation and field work. When the observed signals were correlated with site specific theoretical tilt signals we saw no anomalies for the water irrigation in 2003, but large anomalies on two stations for the surfactant irrigation in 2004. Occasional failures of seismometers as well as data acquisition systems contributed to less than continuous coverage. These data are noisier than the tilt data, but do also show possible

  17. Rice Yield and the Fate of Fertilizer Nitrogen as Affected by Addition of Earthworm Casts Collected from Oilseed Rape Fields: A Pot Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Zhou, Xuefeng; Xie, Xiaobing; Zhao, Chunrong; Chen, Jiana; Cao, Fangbo; Zou, Yingbin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism associated with improvement of soil nutritional status by oilseed rape crop, leading to better performance of rice crop, in rice-oilseed rape cropping systems is little known. The present study was aimed to test the hypothesis that earthworm casts produced during oilseed rape-growing season have positive effects on grain yield and fertilizer nitrogen (N) utilization in the subsequent flooded rice crop. A 15N-tracing pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of earthworm casts collected from oilseed rape fields on yield attributes in rice and the fate of fertilizer N. Soil treated with earthworm casts (soil: earthworm casts = 4: 1, w/w) (EC1) produced 39% higher grain yield than soil only (EC0). EC1 had 18% more panicle number and 10% higher spikelet filling percentage than EC0. Aboveground biomass and harvest index were higher in EC1 than in EC0 by 20% and 15%, respectively. SPAD values in flag leaves were 10% and 22% higher under EC1 than EC0 at 15 and 20 days after heading, respectively. EC1 had 19% higher total N uptake and 18% higher physiological N-use efficiency than EC0. These positive effects of earthworm casts on yield attributes offset negative effects of decreasing N rate from 0.74 g pot–1 (equivalent to the recommended field rate of 150 kg ha–1) to 0.44 g pot–1 (equivalent to 60% of the recommended rate). Fertilizer N retention rate was 7% higher while fertilizer N loss rate was 6% lower in EC1 than in EC0. Our study suggests that earthworm casts produced during oilseed rape-growing season are expected to have the following benefits on the subsequent flooded rice system: (1) improving growth and physiological processes in rice plants and consequently increasing rice grain yield, and (2) increasing fertilizer N retention rate and hence decreasing fertilizer N loss rate and reducing environmental risk. PMID:27880837

  18. Control of nitrification/denitrification in an onsite two-chamber intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor with alkalinity and carbon addition: Model and experiment.

    PubMed

    Perera, Mahamalage Kusumitha; Englehardt, James D; Tchobanoglous, George; Shamskhorzani, Reza

    2017-02-20

    Denitrifying membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are being found useful in water reuse treatment systems, including net-zero water (nearly closed-loop), non-reverse osmosis-based, direct potable reuse (DPR) systems. In such systems nitrogen may need to be controlled in the MBR to meet the nitrate drinking water standard in the finished water. To achieve efficient nitrification and denitrification, the addition of alkalinity and external carbon may be required, and control of the carbon feed rate is then important. In this work, an onsite, two-chamber aerobic nitrifying/denitrifying MBR, representing one unit process of a net-zero water, non-reverse osmosis-based DPR system, was modeled as a basis for control of the MBR internal recycling rate, aeration rate, and external carbon feed rate. Specifically, a modification of the activated sludge model ASM2dSMP was modified further to represent the rate of recycling between separate aerobic and anoxic chambers, rates of carbon and alkalinity feed, and variable aeration schedule, and was demonstrated versus field data. The optimal aeration pattern for the modeled reactor configuration and influent matrix was found to be 30 min of aeration in a 2 h cycle (104 m(3) air/d per 1 m(3)/d average influent), to ultimately meet the nitrate drinking water standard. Optimal recycling ratios (inter-chamber flow to average daily flow) were found to be 1.5 and 3 during rest and mixing periods, respectively. The model can be used to optimize aeration pattern and recycling ratio in such MBRs, with slight modifications to reflect reactor configuration, influent matrix, and target nitrogen species concentrations, though some recalibration may be required.

  19. Experimenter Confirmation Bias and the Correction of Science Misconceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael; Coole, Hilary

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a randomised educational experiment ( n = 47) that examined two different teaching methods and compared their effectiveness at correcting one science misconception using a sample of trainee primary school teachers. The treatment was designed to promote engagement with the scientific concept by eliciting emotional responses from learners that were triggered by their own confirmation biases. The treatment group showed superior learning gains to control at post-test immediately after the lesson, although benefits had dissipated after 6 weeks. Findings are discussed with reference to the conceptual change paradigm and to the importance of feeling emotion during a learning experience, having implications for the teaching of pedagogies to adults that have been previously shown to be successful with children.

  20. Experimental confirmation of liquid brines on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E.; Renno, N. O.; Martinez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of water ice and perchlorates in the shallow subsurface of Mars [1,2] is interesting because they could produce aqueous liquid solutions under Mars' present-day environmental conditions. We used the Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber [3] to simulate the pressure, temperature and relative humidity during the full diurnal cycle of sol 19 at the Phoenix landing site. Sol 19 was chosen because on this sol ice found in a shallow trench (Dodo-Goldilocks) at a depth of ~5 cm was removed with little effort [4], suggesting that it was a frozen brine (softer than freshwater ice), and because oblate spheroids found on a strut of the lander, possibly a saline mud, were observed to grow and darken (suggesting liquefaction) [4]. The results of our simulations show that early in the mission the frozen brine likely found in the Dodo-Goldilocks trench could melt in the morning, temporarily forming aqueous liquid solutions when the temperature in the trench was above the eutectic temperature of the Ca(ClO4)2 salt (~199 K). In addition, the results of our simulations indicate that the spheroids observed on a strut of the Phoenix lander were most likely droplets of liquid brines. Since halophilic terrestrial bacteria thrive in brines [5], our results suggest that Mars' polar region could potentially be a habitat for microorganisms. In addition, it has been suggested that frost could form on fine-grained terrains at Gale crater during the winter [6]. If this frost gets in contact with perchlorate salts, it could melt temporarily forming liquid brines.

  1. Confirmation of Water Plumes on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    Evidence was found for plumes of water ice venting from the polar regions of Europa (Roth et al 2014a) - FUV detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. We find additional evidence for the presence of ice plumes on Europa from HST transit imaging observations (Sparks et al 2016). The evidence for plumes remains marginal, 4-sigma, and there is considerable debate as to their reality. SOFIA can potentially resolve this issue with an unambiguous direct detection of water vapor using EXES. Detection of the fundamental vibrational mode of water vapor at 6 micron, as opposed to the atomic constituents of water, would prove that the plumes exist and inform us of their physical chemistry through quantitative consideration of the balance between water vapor and its dissociation products, hydrogen and oxygen. We propose to obtain spectra of the leading and trailing hemispheres separately, with trailing as the higher priority. These provide two very different physical environments and plausibly different degrees of activity. If the plumes of Europa arise from the deep ocean, we have gained access to probably the most astrobiologically interesting location in the Solar System, and clarify an issue of major strategic importance in NASAs planning for its multi-billion dollar mission to Europa.

  2. BUSTED BUTTE TEST FACILITY GROUND SUPPORT CONFIRMATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bonabian

    1998-06-17

    The main purpose and objective of this analysis is to confirm the validity of the ground support design for Busted Butte Test Facility (BBTF). The highwall stability and adequacy of highwall and tunnel ground support is addressed in this analysis. The design of the BBTF including the ground support system was performed in a separate document (Reference 5.3). Both in situ and seismic loads are considered in the evaluation of the highwall and the tunnel ground support system. In this analysis only the ground support designed in Reference 5.3 is addressed. The additional ground support installed (still work in progress) by the constructor is not addressed in this analysis. This additional ground support was evaluated by the A/E during a site visit and its findings and recommendations are addressed in this analysis.

  3. NASA Observatory Confirms Black Hole Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    cosmic time. Such "cosmic downsizing" was previously observed for galaxies undergoing star formation. These results connect well with the observations of nearby galaxies, which find that the mass of a supermassive black hole is proportional to the mass of the central region of its host galaxy. The other co-authors on the paper in the February 2005 issue of The Astronomical Journal were Len Cowie, Wei-Hao Wang, and Peter Capak (Institute for Astronomy, Univ. of Hawaii), Yuxuan Yang (GSFC and the Univ. of Maryland, College Park), and Aaron Steffen (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Space Mission Directorate, Washington. Northrop Grumman of Redondo Beach, Calif., formerly TRW, Inc., was the prime development contractor for the observatory. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  4. Intolerance to food additives - does it exist?

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul J; Kemp, Andrew S

    2012-02-01

    'Food intolerance' is often confused with a range of adverse symptoms which may be coincidental to ingestion of food. 'Food intolerance' is defined as a reaction in which symptoms must be objectively reproducible and not known to involve an immunological mechanism. A more precise term is non-allergic food hypersensitivity, which contrasts with food allergies which are due to an immunological mechanism. Some children will experience food reactions to food additives. Reported symptoms range from urticaria/angioedema to hyperactive behaviours. While parents/carers report that over one fifth of children experience of food reaction, only 1 in 20 of these are confirmed to have a non-allergic food hypersensitivity on testing.

  5. 49 CFR 40.255 - What happens next after the alcohol confirmation test result?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of an alcohol confirmation test, you must, as the BAT, take the following additional steps: (1) Sign... further is required of the employee. As the BAT, you must sign and date Step 3 of the ATF. (3) If the alcohol confirmation test result is 0.02 or higher, direct the employee to sign and date Step 4 of the...

  6. Confirming a substellar companion candidate around a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, Bettina; Luhman, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    In a search for substellar companions around young neutron stars, we found an indication for a very faint near-infrared source at the position of the isolated neutron star RXJ0806.4-4123. The suspected near-IR source cannot be the neutron star itself because the latter is much too faint to be detected. Recent Herschel 160 microm observations of the field point to an additional dusty belt around the neutron star. The outer location of the dusty belt could be explained by the presence of a substellar companion around the neutron star. We propose deeper near-infrared observations with FLAMINGOS-2 to confirm that the near-infrared source is real. The observation could provide the first direct detection of a substellar companion around a neutron star. However, even a non-detection would be interesting to constrain evolution models of the dusty belt around the neutron star.

  7. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  8. Confirmation studies of Soviet research on immunological effects of microwaves: Russian immunology results.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, Yury G; Grigoriev, Oleg A; Ivanov, Alexander A; Lyaginskaya, Antonina M; Merkulov, Anton V; Shagina, Natalia B; Maltsev, Vyacheslav N; Lévêque, Philippe; Ulanova, Alla M; Osipov, Vyacheslav A; Shafirkin, Alexander V

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a replication study performed to investigate earlier Soviet studies conducted between 1974 and 1991 that showed immunological and reproductive effects of long-term low-level exposure of rats to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. The early studies were used, in part, for developing exposure standards for the USSR population and thus it was necessary to confirm the Russian findings. In the present study, the conditions of RF exposure were made as similar as possible to those in the earlier experiments: Wistar rats were exposed in the far field to 2450 MHz continuous wave RF fields with an incident power density in the cages of 5 W/m² for 7 h/day, 5 days/week for a total of 30 days, resulting in a whole-body SAR of 0.16 W/kg. Effects of the exposure on immunological parameters in the brain and liver of rats were evaluated using the complement fixation test (CFT), as in the original studies, and an additional test, the more modern ELISA test. Our results, using CFT and ELISA, partly confirmed the findings of the early studies and indicated possible effects from non-thermal RF exposure on autoimmune processes. The RF exposure resulted in minor increases in formation of antibodies in brain tissue extract and the exposure did not appear to be pathological. In addition, a study was conducted to replicate a previous Soviet study on effects from the injection of blood serum from RF-exposed rats on pregnancy and foetal and offspring development of rats, using a similar animal model and protocol. Our results showed the same general trends as the earlier study, suggesting possible adverse effects of the blood serum from exposed rats on pregnancy and foetal development of intact rats, however, application of these results in developing exposure standards is limited.

  9. The Quality and Effectiveness of Confirmation Classes in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemela, Kati

    2006-01-01

    Every year some 90% of 15-year-olds in Finland attend confirmation classes in the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland, which is greater than the percentage of that age group belonging to the Church. What is behind the popularity of Finnish confirmation classes? This article scrutinizes the quality and effectiveness of confirmation classes.…

  10. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  11. Confirming and Improving Ross Variable Star RV Del

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Tyler R.; Sanchez, Rick; Palser, Sage; Schultze, Kendra; Kenney, Jessica; Thompson, Briana; DeCoster, Richard; Mills, Frank; Osborn, Wayne; Hoette, Vivian L.; Skynet Junior Scholars; Stone Edge Observatory

    2017-01-01

    RV Del is an intrinsic pulsating variable star in the constellation Delphinus, discovered by Ross (1926). The AAVSO list RV Del as a RRAB type of variable star. RV Del has been found to have a magnitude that varies from 12.9 - 14.2 and a period of 11.9553 hours.The purpose of our research of RV Del is to confirm and improve previous results as well as explore different methods to engage middle school students in the scientific method and astronomy. The SKYNET network of telescopes allows students to request images from a group of international research class telescopes. The telescope request process allows students first-hand experience in astronomy while the data analysis allows students to understand advance software systems to produce publishable results. Data is being gathered using the SKYNET network and Stone Edge Observatory to gather photometry of RV Del and create a new light curve. Findings will be presented the January 2017 AAS.

  12. [Autoimmune processes after long-term low-level exposure to electromagnetic fields (the results of an experiment). Part 1. Mobile communications and changes in electromagnetic conditions for the population. Needs for additional substantiation of the existing hygienic standards].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Grigor'ev, O A; Ivanov, A A; Liaginskaia, A M; Merkulov, A V; Stepanov, V S; Shagina, N B

    2010-01-01

    Mobile communications provides a new source of electromagnetic exposure for almost the whole population of the Russian Federation. For the first time in the history of civilization the brain of mobile phone users was exposed to localized radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF). Population exposure from the base stations is also considered to be specific. However, existing standards for limiting the exposure do not account for this special EMF source and may not ensure the absence of health effects. There was a need for reliable information that would extend databases used for development of new standards. As recommended by the World Health Organization an additional experiment was performed under the supervision of foreign experts, which showed changes in autoimmune status in rats after long-term low-level RF EMF exposure with an incident power density of 500 microW/cm2.

  13. Predictors of aggressive clinical phenotype among immunohistochemically confirmed atypical adenomas.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Hasan A; Cote, David J; Dunn, Ian F; Laws, Edward R

    2016-12-01

    Despite formal pathological criteria, not all atypical pituitary adenomas display clinically aggressive behavior. We set out to determine which factors predict a clinically aggressive phenotype among a cohort of atypical pituitary adenomas. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed from April 2008 to July 2015. Of 569 pituitary adenomas, 47 (8.3%) patients were surgically treated for atypical adenomas as defined by the WHO criteria. Clinically aggressive adenomas were defined as occurring in those patients who necessitated additional therapeutic intervention after the index (first) surgery, including additional surgery, medical therapy, or radiosurgery. Forty-seven patients with histopathological and immunohistochemical confirmation of atypical adenomas were identified and of these, 23 were noted to have a clinically aggressive course. Among the remaining 24 patients, the disease remained quiescent after the index surgery. On univariate analysis, clinically aggressive lesions were more likely to have a larger axial diameter on MRI (2.9±1.9cm vs. 1.9±0.7cm, p=0.02), greater incidence of cavernous sinus invasion (65.2% vs. 20.8%, p<0.01), and greater incidence of clival extension (60.9% vs. 0, p<0.01) on preoperative imaging. The two groups were equivalent with regard to immunohistochemical staining for ACTH, HGH, LH, FSH, PRL, and TSH. Clinically aggressive lesions, however, trended towards a greater average MIB-1 proliferative index (7.5%±4.9 vs. 6.0%±3.6, p=0.03). On multivariate analysis, the MIB-1 proliferative index trended towards statistical significance (p=0.06) as an independent predictor of clinical aggressiveness. Atypical pituitary adenomas are defined by a rigid set of immunohistochemical markers, but not all necessarily demonstrate an aggressive clinical phenotype.

  14. Confirming and extending the hypothesis of universality in sandpiles.

    PubMed

    Bonachela, Juan A; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2008-10-01

    Stochastic sandpiles self-organize to an absorbing-state critical point with scaling behavior different from directed percolation (DP) and characterized by the presence of an additional conservation law. This is usually called the C-DP or Manna universality class. There remains, however, an exception to this universality principle: a sandpile automaton introduced by Maslov and Zhang, which was claimed to be in the DP class despite the existence of a conservation law. We show, by means of careful numerical simulations as well as by constructing and analyzing a field theory, that (contrarily to what was previously thought) this sandpile is also in the C-DP or Manna class. This confirms the hypothesis of universality for stochastic sandpiles and gives rise to a fully coherent picture of self-organized criticality in systems with conservation. In passing, we obtain a number of results for the C-DP class and introduce a strategy to easily discriminate between DP and C-DP scaling.

  15. Stereochemical Assignment of Strigolactone Analogues Confirms Their Selective Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Artuso, Emma; Ghibaudi, Elena; Lace, Beatrice; Marabello, Domenica; Vinciguerra, Daniele; Lombardi, Chiara; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram; Novero, Mara; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Scarpi, Dina; Parisotto, Stefano; Deagostino, Annamaria; Venturello, Paolo; Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Bier, Ariel; Prandi, Cristina

    2015-11-25

    Strigolactones (SLs) are new plant hormones with various developmental functions. They are also soil signaling chemicals that are required for establishing beneficial mycorrhizal plant/fungus symbiosis. In addition, SLs play an essential role in inducing seed germination in root-parasitic weeds, which are one of the seven most serious biological threats to food security. There are around 20 natural SLs that are produced by plants in very low quantities. Therefore, most of the knowledge on SL signal transduction and associated molecular events is based on the application of synthetic analogues. Stereochemistry plays a crucial role in the structure-activity relationship of SLs, as compounds with an unnatural D-ring configuration may induce biological effects that are unrelated to SLs. We have synthesized a series of strigolactone analogues, whose absolute configuration has been elucidated and related with their biological activity, thus confirming the high specificity of the response. Analogues bearing the R-configured butenolide moiety showed enhanced biological activity, which highlights the importance of this stereochemical motif.

  16. Ceramics with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Feng, Lajun; Lei, Ali; Zhao, Kang; Yan, Aijun

    2014-09-01

    Li2CO3, MgCO3, BaCO3, and Bi2O3 dopants were introduced into CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics in order to improve the dielectric properties. The CCTO ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method. The phase structure, microstructure, and dielectric behavior were carefully investigated. The pure structure without any impurity phases can be confirmed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis illuminated that the grains of Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics were greater than that of pure CCTO. It was important for the properties of the CCTO ceramics to study the additives in complex impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics had the higher permittivity (>45000), the lower dielectric loss (<0.025) than those of CCTO at 1 kHz at room temperature and good temperature stability from -30 to 75 °C.

  17. Is it efficient to co-compost and co-vermicompost green waste with biochar and/or clay to reduce CO2 emissions? A short-term laboratory experiment on (vermi)composts with additives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthod, Justine; Rumpel, Cornélia; Paradelo, Remigio; Dignac, Marie-France

    2016-04-01

    Intensive farming practices can lead to a depletion of soil organic matter, negatively impacting important soil properties such as structural stability, fertility and C storage. The addition of organic amendments such as compost and vermicompost, rich in carbon, helps maintaining soil organic matter levels or restoring degraded soils. Composting and vermicomposting are based on stabilization of organic matter through the mineralization of easily decomposable organic matter compounds, therefore releasing greenhouse gases, including CO2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the global potential reduction of such emissions by the use of additives (2:1 clay and/or biochar): during (vermi)composting processes and after use of the final products as soil amendments. We hypothesized that the interactions between the additives and organic matter may lead to carbon stabilization and that such interactions may be enhanced by the presence of worms (Eisenia). We added in different proportions clay (25% or 50%), biochar (10%) and a mixture of biochar (10%) with clay (25%) to pre-composted green waste. The CO2 emissions of the composting and vermicomposting processes were measured during 21 days. After that, the amendments were added to a loamy cambisol soil and the CO2 emissions were monitored during 30 days of a laboratory experiment. The most efficient treatments in terms of reducing global CO2 emissions were the co-vermicomposting process with 25% clay followed by co-composting with 50% clay and with 10% biochar plus 25% clay. In this treatment (vermicompost with 25% clay), the carbon emissions were decreased by up to 44% compared to regular compost. Addition of biochar reduced CO2 emissions only during composting. Co-composting with biochar could be a promising avenue to limit global CO2 emissions whereas in presence of worms clay additions are better suited. These findings suggest that the presence of worms increased the formation of organo-mineral associations and thus C

  18. 10 CFR 60.137 - General requirements for performance confirmation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General requirements for performance confirmation. 60.137 Section 60.137 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Performance Confirmation Requirements § 60.137...

  19. 40 CFR 281.34 - Release reporting, investigation, and confirmation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release reporting, investigation, and confirmation. 281.34 Section 281.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... having an impact in the surrounding area; and (b) Promptly report all confirmed underground releases...

  20. Histopathologic criteria to confirm white-nose syndrome in bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Buckles, E.L.; Blehert, D.S.; Hicks, A.C.; Green, D.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Thomas, N.J.; Gargas, A.; Behr, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a cutaneous fungal disease of hibernating bats associated with a novel Geomyces sp. fungus. Currently, confirmation of WNS requires histopathologic examination. Invasion of living tissue distinguishes this fungal infection from those caused by conventional transmissible dermatophytes. Although fungal hyphae penetrate the connective tissue of glabrous skin and muzzle, there is typically no cellular inflammatory response in hibernating bats. Preferred tissue samples to diagnose this fungal infection are rostral muzzle with nose and wing membrane fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. To optimize detection, the muzzle is trimmed longitudinally, the wing membrane is rolled, and multiple cross-sections are embedded to increase the surface area examined. Periodic acid-Schiff stain is essential to discriminate the nonpigmented fungal hyphae and conidia. Fungal hyphae form cup-like epidermal erosions and ulcers in the wing membrane and pinna with involvement of underlying connective tissue. In addition, fungal hyphae are present in hair follicles and in sebaceous and apocrine glands of the muzzle with invasion of tissue surrounding adnexa. Fungal hyphae in tissues are branching and septate, but the diameter and shape of the hyphae may vary from parallel walls measuring 2 ??m in diameter to irregular walls measuring 3-5 ??m in diameter. When present on short aerial hyphae, curved conidia are approximately 2.5 ??m wide and 7.5 ??m in curved length. Conidia have a more deeply basophilic center, and one or both ends are usually blunt. Although WNS is a disease of hibernating bats, severe wing damage due to fungal hyphae may be seen in bats that have recently emerged from hibernation. These recently emerged bats also have a robust suppurative inflammatory response.

  1. Mars Express confirms methane in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    From the time of its arrival at Mars, the Mars Express spacecraft started producing stunning results. One of the aims of the mission is analysing in detail the chemical composition of the Martian atmosphere, known to consist of 95% percent carbon dioxide plus 5% of minor constituents. It is also from these minor constituents, which scientists expect to be oxygen, water, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde and methane, that we may get important information on the evolution of the planet and possible implications for the presence of past or present life. The presence of methane has been confirmed thanks to the observations of the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) on board Mars Express during the past few weeks. This instrument is able to detect the presence of particular molecules by analysing their 'spectral fingerprints' - the specific way each molecule absorbs the sunlight it receives. The measurements confirm so far that the amount of methane is very small - about 10 parts in a thousand million, so its production process is probably small. However, the exciting question remains: "Where does this methane come from?" Methane, unless it is continuously produced by a source, only survives in the Martian atmosphere for a few hundreds of years because it quickly oxidises to form water and carbon dioxide, both present in the Martian atmosphere. So, there must be a mechanism that refills the atmosphere with methane. “The first thing to understand is how exactly the methane is distributed in the Martian atmosphere,” says Vittorio Formisano, Principal Investigator for the PFS instrument. “Since the methane presence is so small, we need to take more measurements. Only then will we have enough data to make a statistical analysis and understand whether there are regions of the atmosphere where methane is more concentrated.” Once this is done, scientists will try to establish a link between the planet-wide distribution of methane and possible atmospheric or surface

  2. Preference-Inconsistent Recommendations: An Effective Approach for Reducing Confirmation Bias and Stimulating Divergent Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwind, Christina; Buder, Jurgen; Cress, Ulrike; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2012-01-01

    The Web is a perfect backdrop for opinion formation as a multitude of different opinions is publicly available. However, the different opinions often remain unexploited: Learners prefer preference-consistent over preference-inconsistent information, a phenomenon called confirmation bias. Two experiments were designed to test whether technologies…

  3. Imaging Study Confirms Brain Differences in People with ADHD

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163599.html Imaging Study Confirms Brain Differences in People With ADHD Attention-deficit/hyperactivity should be considered a brain disorder, researchers say To use the sharing features ...

  4. Confirming psychogenic nonepileptic seizures with video-EEG: sex matters.

    PubMed

    Noe, Katherine H; Grade, Madeline; Stonnington, Cynthia M; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Locke, Dona E C

    2012-03-01

    The influence of gender on psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) diagnosis was examined retrospectively in 439 subjects undergoing video-EEG (vEEG) for spell classification, of whom 142 women and 42 men had confirmed PNES. The epileptologist's predicted diagnosis was correct in 72% overall. Confirmed epilepsy was correctly predicted in 94% men and 88% women. In contrast, confirmed PNES was accurately predicted in 86% women versus 61% men (p=0.003). Sex-based differences in likelihood of an indeterminate admission were not observed for predicted epilepsy or physiologic events, but were for predicted PNES (39% men, 12% women, p=0.0002). More frequent failure to record spells in men than women with predicted PNES was not explained by spell frequency, duration of monitoring, age, medication use, or personality profile. PNES are not only less common in men, but also more challenging to recognize in the clinic, and even when suspected more difficult to confirm with vEEG.

  5. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  6. Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163805.html Nasal Swab Shows Promise in Confirming Lung Cancers Simple technique is based on cancer DNA ... 27, 2017 MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer remains by far the leading cancer killer ...

  7. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  8. Confirming Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission from a cadaver to an embalmer using molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Janelle A; Meissner, Jeanne Sullivan; Ahuja, Shama Desai; Shashkina, Elena; O'Flaherty, Tholief; Proops, Douglas C

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping results and epidemiologic investigation were used to confirm tuberculosis transmission from a cadaver to an embalmer. This investigation highlights the utility of genotyping in identifying unsuspected epidemiologic links and unusual transmission settings. In addition, the investigation provides additional evidence for the occupational risk of tuberculosis among funeral service workers and indicates a need for education about tuberculosis risk and the importance of adhering to appropriate infection control measures among funeral service workers.

  9. Asthma and anaphylactoid reactions to food additives.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.; Sussman, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Presumed allergic reactions to hidden food additives are both controversial and important. Clinical manifestations include asthma, urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylactic-anaphylactoid events. Most adverse reactions are caused by just a few additives, such as sulfites and monosodium glutamate. Diagnosis is suspected from the history and confirmed by specific challenge. The treatment is specific avoidance. PMID:8499792

  10. Microfluidic assay without blocking for rapid HIV screening and confirmation.

    PubMed

    Song, Lusheng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wenjun; Ma, Liying; Liu, Yong; Hao, Yanlin; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2012-08-01

    The essential step for HIV spreading limitation is the screening tests. However, there are multiple disadvantages in current screening assays which need further confirmation test. Herein we developed a rapid HIV assay combining screening and confirmation test by using the microfluidic network assay. Meanwhile, the assay is accelerated by bypassing the step of blocking. We call this method as microfluidic assay without blocking (MAWB). Both the limit of detection and reagent incubation time of MAWB are determined by screening of one model protein pair: ovalbumin and its antibody. The assay time is accelerated about 25% while the limit of detection (LOD) is well kept. Formatting the method in for both HIV screening (testing 8 HIV-related samples) and confirmation (assaying 6 kinds of HIV antibodies of each sample) within 30 min was successful. Fast HIV screening and confirmation of 20 plasma samples were also demonstrated by this method. MAWB improved the assay speed while keeping the LOD of conventional ELISA. Meanwhile, both the accuracy and throughput of MAWB were well improved, which made it an excellent candidate for a quick HIV test for both screening and confirmation. Methods like this one will find wide applications in clinical diagnosis and biochemical analysis based on the interactions between pairs of molecules.

  11. Curious Variables Experiment (CURVE). TT Bootis -- Superhump Period Change Pattern Confirmed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olech, A.; Cook, L. M.; Złoczewski, K.; Mularczyk, K.; Kêdzierski, P.; Udalski, A.; Wisniewski, M.

    2004-09-01

    We report extensive multi-station photometry of TT Boo during its June 2004 superoutburst. The amplitude of the superoutburst was about 5.5 mag and its length about 22 days. The star showed a small re-brightening starting around the 9th day of the superoutburst. During entire bright state we observed clear superhumps with amplitudes from 0.07 mag to 0.26 mag and a mean period of Psh=0.0779589(47) days (112.261+/-0.007 min). The period was not constant but decreased at the beginning and the end of superoutburst and increased in the middle phase. We argue that the complicated shape of the O-C diagram is caused by real period changes rather than by phase shifts. Combining the data from two superoutbursts, 1989 and 2004, allowed us to trace the birth of the late superhumps and we conclude that it is a rather quick process lasting about one day.

  12. Captive Rearing Experiments Confirm Song Development without Learning in a Tracheophone Suboscine Bird

    PubMed Central

    Touchton, Janeene M.; Seddon, Nathalie; Tobias, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of vocal learning in animals has long been the subject of debate, but progress has been limited by uncertainty regarding the distribution of learning mechanisms across the tree of life, even for model systems such as birdsong. In particular, the importance of learning is well known in oscine songbirds, but disputed in suboscines. Members of this diverse group (∼1150 species) are generally assumed not to learn their songs, but empirical evidence is scarce, with previous studies restricted to the bronchophone (non-tracheophone) clade. Here, we conduct the first experimental study of song development in a tracheophone suboscine bird by rearing spotted antbird (Hylophylax naevioides) chicks in soundproofed aviaries. Individuals were raised either in silence with no tutor or exposed to standardized playback of a heterospecific tutor. All individuals surviving to maturity took a minimum of 79 days to produce a crystallized version of adult song, which in all cases was indistinguishable from wild song types of their own species. These first insights into song development in tracheophone suboscines suggest that adult songs are innate rather than learnt. Given that empirical evidence for song learning in suboscines is restricted to polygamous and lek-mating species, whereas tracheophone suboscines are mainly monogamous with long-term social bonds, our results are consistent with the view that sexual selection promotes song learning in birds. PMID:24788343

  13. Countering Positive Confirmation Biases in Command Teams: An Experiment with Different Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    information to disprove them (Wickens & Hollands, 2000). It has also been found ( Einhorn & Hogarth (1978), Mynatt , Doherty, & Tweney (1977), Schustack...relevance of groupthink for the 21st century. Organization, Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 73(2/3), 327-351. 17 Mynatt , C. R., Doherty, M

  14. Lay Evaluation of Financial Experts: The Action Advice Effect and Confirmation Bias.

    PubMed

    Zaleskiewicz, Tomasz; Gasiorowska, Agata; Stasiuk, Katarzyna; Maksymiuk, Renata; Bar-Tal, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this experimental project was to investigate lay peoples' perceptions of epistemic authority (EA) in the field of finance. EA is defined as the extent to which a source of information is treated as evidence for judgments independently of its objective expertise and based on subjective beliefs. Previous research suggested that EA evaluations are biased and that lay people tend to ascribe higher EA to experts who advise action (in the case of medical experts) or confirm clients' expectations (in the case of politicians). However, there has been no research into biases in lay evaluations of financial experts and this project is aimed to fill this gap. Experiment 1 showed that lay people tended to ascribe greater authority to financial consultants who gave more active advice to clients considering taking out a mortgage. Experiment 2 confirmed the action advice effect found in Experiment 1. However, the outcomes of Experiments 2 and - particularly - 3 suggested that this bias might also be due to clients' desire to confirm their own opinions. Experiment 2 showed that the action advice effect was moderated by clients' own opinions on taking loans. Lay people ascribed the greatest EA to the advisor in the scenario in which he advised taking action and where this coincided with the client's positive opinion on the advisability of taking out a loan. In Experiment 3 only participants with a positive opinion on the financial product ascribed greater authority to experts who recommended it; participants whose opinion was negative tended to rate consultants who advised rejecting the product more highly. To conclude, these three experiments revealed that lay people ascribe higher EA to financial consultants who advise action rather than maintenance of the status quo, but this effect is limited by confirmation bias: when the client's a priori opinion is salient, greater authority is ascribed to experts whose advice confirms it. In this sense, results presented in the

  15. Lay Evaluation of Financial Experts: The Action Advice Effect and Confirmation Bias

    PubMed Central

    Zaleskiewicz, Tomasz; Gasiorowska, Agata; Stasiuk, Katarzyna; Maksymiuk, Renata; Bar-Tal, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this experimental project was to investigate lay peoples’ perceptions of epistemic authority (EA) in the field of finance. EA is defined as the extent to which a source of information is treated as evidence for judgments independently of its objective expertise and based on subjective beliefs. Previous research suggested that EA evaluations are biased and that lay people tend to ascribe higher EA to experts who advise action (in the case of medical experts) or confirm clients’ expectations (in the case of politicians). However, there has been no research into biases in lay evaluations of financial experts and this project is aimed to fill this gap. Experiment 1 showed that lay people tended to ascribe greater authority to financial consultants who gave more active advice to clients considering taking out a mortgage. Experiment 2 confirmed the action advice effect found in Experiment 1. However, the outcomes of Experiments 2 and – particularly – 3 suggested that this bias might also be due to clients’ desire to confirm their own opinions. Experiment 2 showed that the action advice effect was moderated by clients’ own opinions on taking loans. Lay people ascribed the greatest EA to the advisor in the scenario in which he advised taking action and where this coincided with the client’s positive opinion on the advisability of taking out a loan. In Experiment 3 only participants with a positive opinion on the financial product ascribed greater authority to experts who recommended it; participants whose opinion was negative tended to rate consultants who advised rejecting the product more highly. To conclude, these three experiments revealed that lay people ascribe higher EA to financial consultants who advise action rather than maintenance of the status quo, but this effect is limited by confirmation bias: when the client’s a priori opinion is salient, greater authority is ascribed to experts whose advice confirms it. In this sense, results

  16. Racial athletic stereotype confirmation in college football recruiting.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Grant; Good, Jessica J; Gross, Alexi R

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested real-world racial stereotype use in the context of college athletic recruiting. Stereotype confirmation suggests that observers use stereotypes as hypotheses and interpret relevant evidence in a biased way that confirms their stereotypes. Shifting standards suggest that the evaluative standard to which we hold a target changes as a function of their group membership. We examined whether stereotype confirmation and shifting standards effects would be seen in college football coaches during recruiting. College football coaches evaluated a Black or White player on several attributes and made both zero- and non-zero-sum allocations. Results suggested that coaches used the evidence presented to develop biased subjective evaluations of the players based on race while still maintaining equivalent objective evaluations. Coaches also allocated greater overall resources to the Black recruit than the White recruit.

  17. “The Prevalence of Confirmed Maltreatment Among American Children, 2004-2011”

    PubMed Central

    Wildeman, Christopher; Emanuel, Natalia; Leventhal, John M.; Putnam-Hornstein, Emily; Waldfogel, Jane; Lee, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Importance Child maltreatment is a risk factor for poor health throughout the life course. Existing estimates of the proportion of the U.S. population maltreated during childhood are based on retrospective self-reports. Records of officially confirmed maltreatment have been used to produce annual rather than cumulative counts of maltreated individuals. Objective To estimate the proportion of U.S. children who are substantiated or indicated for maltreatment by Child Protective Services (referred to as confirmed maltreatment) by age 18. Design, Setting, and Participants The National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) Child File includes information on all U.S. children with a confirmed report of maltreatment, totaling 5,689,900 children (2004-2011). We developed synthetic cohort life tables to estimate the cumulative prevalence of confirmed childhood maltreatment by age 18. Main Outcome Measure The cumulative prevalence of confirmed child maltreatment between birth and age 18 by race/ethnicity, sex, and year. Results At 2011 rates, 12.5% [95% CI: 12.5%, 12.6%] of U.S. children will experience a confirmed case of maltreatment by age 18. Girls have a higher cumulative prevalence than boys (13.0% [95% CI: 12.9%, 13.0%] vs. 12.0% [95% CI: 12.0%, 12.1%]). Black (20.9% [95% CI: 20.8%, 21.1%]), Native American (14.5% [95% CI: 14.2%, 14.9%]), and Hispanic (13.0% [95% CI: 12.9%, 13.1%]) children have higher prevalences than White (10.7% [95% CI: 10.6%, 10.8%]) or Asian/Pacific Islander (3.8% [95% CI: 3.7%, 3.8%]) children. The risk of maltreatment is highest in the first few years of life; 2.1% [95% CI: 2,1%, 2.1%] of children have confirmed maltreatment by age 1, and 5.8% [95% CI: 5.8%, 5.9%] have confirmed maltreatment by age 5. Estimates from 2011 were consistent with those from 2004-2010. Conclusions and Relevance Annual rates of confirmed child maltreatment dramatically understate the cumulative number of children confirmed as maltreated during childhood. Our

  18. First confirmed report of a bacterial brood disease in stingless bees.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Jenny Lee; Haigh, Anthony Mark; Riegler, Markus; Spooner-Hart, Robert Neil

    2017-03-01

    Susceptibility to brood pathogens in eusocial stingless bees (Meliponini), alternative pollinators to honey bees, is unknown. Brood losses in managed colonies of the Australian stingless bee, Tetragonula carbonaria, were studied over 20months. We isolated a disease-causing bacterium, Lysinibacillus sphaericus (Firmicutes, Bacillaceae), from worker and queen larvae, brood cell provisions and honey stores. Pathogenicity experiments confirmed this bacterium as the causal organism. It took 22days from infection to first appearance of brood disease symptoms. This is the first confirmed record of a brood pathogen in stingless bees.

  19. Apnoea testing to confirm brain death in clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    van Donselaar, C A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Gijn, J

    1986-01-01

    In six patients an apnoea test was carried out to confirm brain death according to a protocol recommended in the USA. After ten minutes' apnoea the pCO2 did not reach the target value of 7.98 kPa (60 mm Hg) in any of these patients. This was caused by the low initial value and the slow increase of the pCO2. Moreover, we could not confirm the belief that the necessary duration of the apnoea test can be predicted by assuming a rise of the pCO2 of 0.33 kPa (2.5 mm Hg) per minute. PMID:3093640

  20. Apnoea testing to confirm brain death in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    van Donselaar, C A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Gijn, J

    1986-09-01

    In six patients an apnoea test was carried out to confirm brain death according to a protocol recommended in the USA. After ten minutes' apnoea the pCO2 did not reach the target value of 7.98 kPa (60 mm Hg) in any of these patients. This was caused by the low initial value and the slow increase of the pCO2. Moreover, we could not confirm the belief that the necessary duration of the apnoea test can be predicted by assuming a rise of the pCO2 of 0.33 kPa (2.5 mm Hg) per minute.

  1. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  2. 76 FR 42769 - Recordkeeping and Confirmation Requirements for Securities Transactions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Recordkeeping and Confirmation Requirements for Securities Transactions... Requirements for Securities Transactions. OMB Number: 1550-0109. Form Number: N/A. Description: The regulation... requirement described below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, as required by...

  3. 18 CFR 300.10 - Application for confirmation and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS FOR FEDERAL POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS CONFIRMATION AND APPROVAL OF THE RATES OF FEDERAL POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS Filing Requirements § 300.10... with applicable laws and that it is the lowest possible rate consistent with sound business...

  4. The First Confirmed Videorecordings of Lunar Meteor Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. W.; Cudnik, B.; Palmer, D. M.; Sada, P. V.; Melosh, J.; Beech, M.; Pellerin, L.; Asher, D.; Frankenberger R.; Venable R.

    2000-01-01

    North American observers recorded at least six meteors striking the Moon's surface during the Leonid meteor shower on 1999 Nov. 18. Each meteor produced a flash that was recorded from at least two separate locations, marking the first confirmed lunar meteor impacts.

  5. Confirmation of trisomy 22 by trypsin-giemsa staining.

    PubMed Central

    Begleiter, M L; Kulkarni, P; Harris, D J

    1976-01-01

    A small-for-dates male infant with mental retardation, microcephaly, malformed ears, preauricular sinuses, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, congenital heart diseases, micropenis, and micropolygyria of the parietal and occipital lobes of the cerebral cortex was shown to have a 47,XY,+22 karyotype by trypsin-giemsa banding. Review of reported cases confirms that there may be distinctive trisomy 22 syndrome. Images PMID:138743

  6. A new virus of soybean confirmed in Wisconsin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This week our laboratory confirmed the presence of Soybean vein necrosis-associated virus (SVNaV) in soybeans sampled in Wisconsin. Samples were taken at several times during September and processed in our laboratory. Symptoms of the disease caused by the virus include yellowing (chlorosis) of the ...

  7. Theory-Led Confirmation Bias and Experimental Persona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Questionnaire and interview findings from a survey of three Year 8 (ages 12-13 years) science practical lessons (n = 52) demonstrate how pupils' data collection and inference making were sometimes biased by desires to confirm a personal theory. A variety of behaviours are described where learners knowingly rejected anomalies, manipulated…

  8. Confirmation of correct tracheal tube placement in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Schmölzer, Georg M; O'Reilly, Megan; Davis, Peter G; Cheung, Po-Yin; Roehr, Charles Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Tracheal intubation remains a common procedure during neonatal intensive care. Rapid confirmation of correct tube placement is important because tube malposition is associated with serious adverse outcomes. The current gold standard test to confirm tube position is a chest radiograph, however this is often delayed until after ventilation has commenced. Hence, point of care methods to confirm correct tube placement have been developed. The aim of this article is to review the available literature on tube placement in newborn infants. We reviewed books, resuscitation manuals and articles from 1830 to the present with the search terms "Infant, Newborn", "Endotracheal intubation", "Resuscitation", "Clinical signs", "Radiography", "Respiratory Function Tests", "Laryngoscopy", "Ultrasonography", and "Bronchoscopy". Various techniques have been studied to help clinicians assess tube placement. However, despite 85 years of clinical practice, the search for higher success rates and quicker intubation continues. Currently, chest radiography remains the gold standard test to confirm tube position. However, rigorous evaluation of new techniques is required to ensure the safety of newborn infants.

  9. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Answer and Confirmation Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    The answer and confirmation sheets for the United States Naval Academy course on psychology and leadership developed by Westinghouse Corporation are contained in this document. The text-workbooks from which test questions are drawn appear under EM 010 420 through EM 010 447, and the test items accompanying each appear under EM 010 451 through EM…

  10. Ticks Carrying Lyme Disease Confirmed in Eastern National Parks

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Ticks Carrying Lyme Disease Confirmed in Eastern National Parks U.S. National Park Service and CDC advise using insect repellents on ... Planning a hiking trip in an eastern U.S. national park? Better pack tick repellent -- a new study found ...

  11. First confirmed case of the bovine brachyspina syndrome in Canada.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; DeLay, Josepha; Hicks, Bryan; Fredholm, Merete

    2010-12-01

    Brachyspina syndrome is a congenital inherited lethal defect in Holstein cattle. Although cases have previously been reported from Europe, the first confirmed North American case is reported herein. This case was genetically related to the European cases, but pedigree analysis indicates that the founder may be more remote than previously expected.

  12. Narrative Skills Following Early Confirmation of Permanent Childhood Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worsfold, Sarah; Mahon, Merle; Yuen, Ho Ming; Kennedy, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare spoken language production in children with permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) whose PCHI was confirmed either early or late. Method: Audio-taped spoken narrative was assessed for syntax, phonology, morphology, and narrative in transcripts from a population-based sample of 89 children (49 males,…

  13. Overview of NRC's Regulatory Perspective on Performance Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedors, R. W.; Pohle, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste at 10 CFR Part 63, Subpart F, require the implementation of a Performance Confirmation Program for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The goals of the Performance Confirmation Program are to confirm that the (i) actual subsurface conditions and potential changes in these conditions during construction and waste emplacement operations are within the limits assumed during the licensing review, and (ii) natural and engineered barriers are functioning as intended and anticipated. For a license application for construction authorization, only a plan is required by the regulations. Proposed activities might include (i) monitoring the repository environment, both engineered and natural components, (ii) field and laboratory investigations under more controlled conditions to better understand processes, and (iii) scientific and programmatic evaluation of the data to support operational decisionmaking and guide adaptive design alterations. NRC review of vadose zone monitoring methods revealed limitations in current technological solutions such that many presently available hydro-environmental sensors would likely not be suitable for long- term, deep-subsurface, fractured rock monitoring activities, particularly with respect to the temperatures and radiation environment that will occur near or within waste emplacement drifts. Sensor deployment strategies will also have to be developed considering the repository environment. Thus, achieving the goals of the performance confirmation program could be affected by limits on sensor capabilities or on an as yet to be proposed sensor deployment strategy. A performance confirmation program implemented over a lengthy operational period allows for future evolution and development of sensors and strategies to further advance the collection of information relevant to processes important for performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The NRC

  14. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  15. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  16. Assessment and confirmation of tracheal intubation when capnography fails: a novel use for an USB camera.

    PubMed

    Karippacheril, John George; Umesh, Goneppanavar; Nanda, Shetty

    2013-10-01

    A 62 year old male with a right pyriform fossa lesion extending to the right arytenoid and obscuring the glottic inlet was planned for laser assisted excision. Direct laryngoscopic assessment after topicalization of the airway, showed a Cormack Lehane grade 3 view. We report a case where, in the absence of a fiberscope, a novel inexpensive Universal Serial Bus camera was used to obtain an optimal laryngoscopic view. This provided direct visual confirmation of tracheal intubation with a Laser Flex tube, when capnography failed to show any trace. Capnography may not be reliable as a sole indicator of confirmation of correct endotracheal tube placement. Video laryngoscopy may provide additional confirmation of endotracheal intubation.

  17. Confirmation of the chi Cygnids (CCY, IAU#757)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Tóth, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present independent confirmation of the existence of the chi Cygnid (CCY, IAU#757) meteor shower. The chi Cygnids were discovered by Peter Jenniskens within the frame of CAMS project (Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance). Thanks to the cooperation between European viDeo MeteOr Network (EDMONd), International Meteor Organization Video Meteor Network (IMO VMN) and the BRAzilian Meteor Observation Network (BRAMON) the current version of the EDMOND database (v5.02) contains 189 323 multi-station meteor orbits. This large data sample allowed confirmation of the increased activity from the chi Cygnid swarm during the night of 2015 September 14/15, and also made it possible to map the activity of this newly discovered swarm during the years 2001-2014.

  18. Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Mark A.

    2013-04-25

    The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

  19. Theory of chaotic orbital variations confirmed by Cretaceous geological evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Meyers, Stephen R.; Sageman, Bradley B.

    2017-02-01

    Variations in the Earth’s orbit and spin vector are a primary control on insolation and climate; their recognition in the geological record has revolutionized our understanding of palaeoclimate dynamics, and has catalysed improvements in the accuracy and precision of the geological timescale. Yet the secular evolution of the planetary orbits beyond 50 million years ago remains highly uncertain, and the chaotic dynamical nature of the Solar System predicted by theoretical models has yet to be rigorously confirmed by well constrained (radioisotopically calibrated and anchored) geological data. Here we present geological evidence for a chaotic resonance transition associated with interactions between the orbits of Mars and the Earth, using an integrated radioisotopic and astronomical timescale from the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin of what is now North America. This analysis confirms the predicted chaotic dynamical behaviour of the Solar System, and provides a constraint for refining numerical solutions for insolation, which will enable a more precise and accurate geological timescale to be produced.

  20. Repeated use of request for confirmation in atypical interaction

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigates a specific method for making possible the participation of participants with cognitive and communicative impairments in social face-to-face interaction. Non-impaired co-participants design close-ended questions that project who the next speaker is, i.e. the impaired co-participant. The questions also project what kind of response amongst alternatives the impaired co-participant is supposed to produce. Upon answers to these questions, the non-impaired co-participant requests the impaired participant to confirm the answer twice. Using conversation analytic (CA) methods, the study scrutinises what is achieved by requesting a confirmation of the provided answer – repeatedly so. The study argues that the practice may put the (deficit) competence of the participant with impairments in focus if the initial close-ended question works to establish an understanding of a prior action by the participant with impairments. PMID:27610755

  1. Confirming the Lanchestrian linear-logarithmic model of attrition

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.S. III.

    1990-12-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series of reports on the breakthrough research in historical validation of attrition in conflict. Significant defense policy decisions, including weapons acquisition and arms reduction, are based in part on models of conflict. Most of these models are driven by their attrition algorithms, usually forms of the Lanchester square and linear laws. None of these algorithms have been validated. The results of this paper confirm the results of earlier papers, using a large database of historical results. The homogeneous linear-logarithmic Lanchestrian attrition model is validated to the extent possible with current initial and final force size data and is consistent with the Iwo Jima data. A particular differential linear-logarithmic model is described that fits the data very well. A version of Helmbold's victory predicting parameter is also confirmed, with an associated probability function. 37 refs., 73 figs., 68 tabs.

  2. An Anonymous Voting Scheme based on Confirmation Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Kazi Md. Rokibul; Tamura, Shinsuke; Taniguchi, Shuji; Yanase, Tatsuro

    This paper proposes a new electronic voting (e-voting) scheme that fulfills all the security requirements of e-voting i.e. privacy, accuracy, universal verifiability, fairness, receipt-freeness, incoercibility, dispute-freeness, robustness, practicality and scalability; usually some of which are found to be traded. When compared with other existing schemes, this scheme requires much more simple computations and weaker assumptions about trustworthiness of individual election authorities. The key mechanism is the one that uses confirmation numbers involved in individual votes to make votes verifiable while disabling all entities including voters themselves to know the linkages between voters and their votes. Many existing e-voting schemes extensively deploy zero-knowledge proof (ZKP) to achieve verifiability. However, ZKP is expensive and complicated. The confirmation numbers attain the verifiability requirement in a much more simple and intuitive way, then the scheme becomes scalable and practical.

  3. The Ghostly Novae of Spirits: Candidates, Confirmations, and Classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corgan, David William

    2015-08-01

    The SPIRITS (SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey) project has surveyed 242 galaxies across multiple epochs for over a year, searching for gap transient and variable star activity. To date, a wealth of candidate objects has been discovered in the warm Spitzer data being used, with the current total at 1426 individual detections. The discovery, confirmation, follow-up, and comparison to prediction rates of these candidates is presented. Employing subjective detection methods, discussed herein, individual discovery to group confirmation rates were found to be less than 3.6%. Photometric confirmation with correlated team instruments left 53 sources of interest remaining for further study. These targets ranged across 30 different galaxies including IC2163, Messier 101, and NGC3198. Follow-up ground observations in the 1.2, 1.6, and 2.2 µm wavelengths with the legacy 2MASS instrument at MLOF (Mount Lemmon Observing Facility) are highlighted. The data reduction process which has evolved to improve detections by ~.6mag is also detailed. These results are supplemented by SPIRITS team input from a variety of world-class infrared facilities to produce overall nova candidate characteristics, which are included. In some cases this extends to light curves from confirmed and observed novae to depths of ~20mag, while in others it is restricted to limiting magnitudes of ~18 at sight of occurrence (the true “ghosts” of SPIRITS). Candidate novae have been separated into classes where data allows, including the possible discovery of a new variable type coined SMIRTS (Super Massive InfraRed TransientS), and probable members of the elusive Luminous Red Novae category. Finally, comparison of numerical survey results to nova prediction rates is undertaken and results presented. Where deviations from luminosity curve fittings occur, such as in the overly active M81 and IC0342 galaxies, possible causes are proposed.

  4. Installation Restoration Program Phase 2. Confirmation/Quantification Stage 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-03

    RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITEDI PREPARED FOR ALASKAN AIR COMMAND ELMENDORF AFB, ALASKA 99506I UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OCCUPATIONAL & ENVIRONMENTAL...PROGRAM PHASE II - CONFIRMATION/QUANTIFICATION STAGE 2 FINAL REPORT FOR EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE ALASKA ALASKAN AIR COMMAND ELMENDORF AFB, ALASKA 99506...Classifcation) IRP Phase II, Stage 2, Final Report, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska 2 PERSONAk ATHOR(S) Dames D’ore 13 ~jV~F EPRT13b. TIMEfCJFLD 1.DTE.OF

  5. Assessment of Response Surface Models using Independent Confirmation Point Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights various advantages that confirmation-point residuals have over conventional model design-point residuals in assessing the adequacy of a response surface model fitted by regression techniques to a sample of experimental data. Particular advantages are highlighted for the case of design matrices that may be ill-conditioned for a given sample of data. The impact of both aleatory and epistemological uncertainty in response model adequacy assessments is considered.

  6. Occupational attainment influences survival in autopsy-confirmed frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Jarcy; Xie, Sharon X.; McMillan, Corey T.; Rascovsky, Katya; Irwin, David J.; Kolanowski, Ann; Grossman, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the influence of occupational attainment and education on survival in autopsy-confirmed cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 83 demographically matched, autopsy-confirmed FTLD (n = 34) and AD (n = 49) cases. Each patient's primary occupation was classified and ranked. Level of education was recorded in years. Survival was defined as time from symptom onset until death. Linear regression was used to test for associations among occupational attainment, education, and patient survival. Results: Median survival was 81 months for FTLD and 95 months for AD. Years of education and occupational attainment were similar for both groups. We found that higher occupational attainment was associated with longer survival in FTLD but not AD. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that higher occupational attainment is associated with longer survival in autopsy-confirmed FTLD. The identification of protective factors associated with FTLD survival has important implications for estimates of prognosis and longitudinal studies such as treatment trials. PMID:25904687

  7. Optimization of Regression Models of Experimental Data Using Confirmation Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2010-01-01

    A new search metric is discussed that may be used to better assess the predictive capability of different math term combinations during the optimization of a regression model of experimental data. The new search metric can be determined for each tested math term combination if the given experimental data set is split into two subsets. The first subset consists of data points that are only used to determine the coefficients of the regression model. The second subset consists of confirmation points that are exclusively used to test the regression model. The new search metric value is assigned after comparing two values that describe the quality of the fit of each subset. The first value is the standard deviation of the PRESS residuals of the data points. The second value is the standard deviation of the response residuals of the confirmation points. The greater of the two values is used as the new search metric value. This choice guarantees that both standard deviations are always less or equal to the value that is used during the optimization. Experimental data from the calibration of a wind tunnel strain-gage balance is used to illustrate the application of the new search metric. The new search metric ultimately generates an optimized regression model that was already tested at regression model independent confirmation points before it is ever used to predict an unknown response from a set of regressors.

  8. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  9. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  10. Chesapeake Bay Crater, Virginia: Confirmation of Impact Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W. U.; Brandt, D.; Poag, C. W.

    1995-09-01

    samples, from 368 to 423 m depth, are from the Exmore core, which was drilled at the outer limit of the crater. The samples consist mainly of various siltstones, sandstones, with some shale and graywacke. The silica content of the samples studied ranged between 32 and 73 wt%. Some samples are very rich in carbonates. Recalculating the high-silica samples (some sandstones) to a carbonate- and water-free composition yields results that are similar to, but not identical with, those of the more silica-poor North American tektites. Petrographical thin section studies were done on about 40 sediment, metasediment, and crystalline rock samples from the Exmore and Kiptopeke cores. The samples included some crystalline rock clasts and millimeter-sized loose particulates. We found abundant evidence of shock metamorphic effects in numerous samples from the Exmore core, at depths from 372 to 414 m. Shock metamorphic effects were recorded as planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz, K-feldspar, and plagioclase. In quartz and K- feldspar, up to three intersecting sets of PDFs with characteristic crystallographic orientations were found. A histogram of PDF orientations showed predominantly {10bar13} (omega), {10bar12} (pi), and {22bar41} orientations, with only very few unindexed planes. The PDF orientations suggest a peak pressure >16 GPa. Shock effects were recognized only in crystalline rock fragments or clasts, but not in sedimentary material. In addition, numerous clasts show evidence of partial or complete melting and annealing, and some small impact melt rock inclusions (probably part of impact melt breccias) were recognized. Our findings provide confirming evidence that the Chesapeake Bay structure is indeed an impact structure. Acknowledgments: Supported by FWF Project P-8794-GEO. References: [1] Poag C. W. et al. (1992) Geology, 20, 771-774. [2] Poag C. W. et al. (1994) Geology, 22, 691-694. [3] Poag C. W. and Aubry M.-P. (1995) Palaios, 10, 16-43. [4] Koeberl C. (1989

  11. The NEON Science Commissioning Plan: Strategies for Confirming System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, G. D.; Thorpe, A.; Buur, H.

    2015-12-01

    A transformation is underway in the field of ecological monitoring as compelling science questions motivate us to build ever-larger networks aiming to acquire uniform datasets over wide geographical ranges and long timescales. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), currently under construction across the U.S., represents the most ambitious such effort to characterize ecology at the continental scale. When completed in 2017, NEON will begin a 30-year program to monitor the state of North American ecosystems at scores of independent sites by employing a combination of terrestrial and aquatic sensors, organismal, biogeochemical, and hydrological sampling conducted by field staff, and airborne remote-sensing imaging and spectroscopy. Simply building and bringing such complex, long-term monitoring networks online is, however, insufficient to produce a useful result: the science team must also confirm that the system fulfills its essential mission to generate accurate and uniform data from all sites over time. This is the role of Science Commissioning, the process which completes the construction stage by confirming that the system operates as designed before entering full operations. Ideally, Science Commissioning involves simply testing the completed system against all applicable science requirements. In the real world of large, complex networks, planners of Science Commissioning must grapple with several key questions: How can we verify that the measurements from a given subsystem reflect "truth"? How can we ensure that similar subsystems at different sites return equivalent results? How can we confirm that data from the same site remain comparable over long periods of time? How can we conduct meaningful tests on a large system in a reasonable amount of time and effort? We describe the specific strategies NEON is developing to meet these challenges and the implications for other large ecological monitoring networks.

  12. [First confirmed case of laryngeal diphtheria in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Koeck, J L; Merle, C; Bimet, F; Kiredjian, M; Goullin, B; Teyssou, R

    2000-01-01

    The first bacteriologically confirmed case of laryngeal diphtheria in Djibouti was reported in 1998. It involved a three-year-old native-born infant who had been vaccinated during the first year of life with three doses of a combined vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis, and pertussis. A rapid clinical improvement was observed under erythromycin treatment. Other cases of laryngeal diphtheria have been observed. It is important to reverse decreasing vaccinal coverage in Djibouti and to warn incoming travelers of the need to be adequate immunized against diphtheria. Enhanced epidemiologic surveillance of this disease is also needed.

  13. Juvenile Huntington's disease confirmed by genetic examination in twins.

    PubMed

    Levy, G; Nobre, M E; Cimini, V T; Raskin, S; Engelhardt, E

    1999-09-01

    Early-onset Huntington's disease (HD) occurs in approximately 10% of HD's cases. We report juvenile HD in phenotypically identical twins, evaluated by history, clinical and neurologic examination, minimental state examination, blood laboratory exams, cerebrospinal fluid examination, skull computed tomography, and genetic examination for HD. Patients had the akinetic-rigid variety (Westphal variant) of the disease and paternal inheritance. The laboratory workup confirmed the clinical diagnosis of HD, which adds this report to the rare cases of HD in twins reported in the literature.

  14. California study confirms fueloil is not serious environmental threat

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Near the end of 1995, a major study on the cleanup of leaking underground storage tanks (UST) was released in California. The study was conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the State Water Resources Control Baoard. It included the findings, conclusions and recommndations resulting from an 18 month review of the regulatory framework and cleanup process currently applied to California`s leaking underground fuel tanks (LUFT). The results of this independent study once agin confirm what the heating oil industry has said for years about the benign impact of fueloil on the environment. Key extracts from that report are disucssed.

  15. Omar field discovery confirms Syria as exploration hot spot

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-20

    Syria is proving to be one of the Mediterranean's exploration hot spots. The discovery of Omar field by a Shell-led exploration group earlier this year confirmed Syria as a prime exploration prospect. For years Syria produced small volumes of heavy, high-sulfur crude mainly for refining and use in the domestic market and found it difficult to attract foreign explorers. Industry sources say there is now no shortage of outside industry interest in taking new exploration concessions. Over the last 6 months much of the available prospective acreage has been taken up as industry interest in Syria reached nee heights.

  16. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  17. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  18. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  19. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  20. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  1. Predictive Symptoms and Signs of Laboratory-confirmed Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeng-How; Huang, Po-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Influenza infection poses annual threats and leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis is the key to successful treatment. Laboratory-based diagnosis has various limitations. Diagnosis based on symptoms or signs is still indispensable in clinical practice. We investigated the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza. A prospective study across 2 influenza seasons was performed from June 2010 to June 2012 at 2 branches (Taipei and Lin-Kou) of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Patients who visited outpatient clinics with suspected acute respiratory tract infection were sampled by throat swab or nasopharyngeal swab. RT-PCR and/or virus culture were used as a reference standard. We used logistic regression to identify the symptoms or signs associated with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection. We also evaluated the performance metrics of different influenza-like illness used in Taiwan, the USA, and WHO. A total of 158 patients were included in the study. The prevalence of influenza infection was 45% (71/158). Fever, cough, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal congestion were significant predictors for influenza infection. Whereas fever + cough had a best sensitivity (86%; confidence interval [CI] 76%–93%), fever + cough and sneezing had a best specificity (77%; CI 62%–88%). Different case definitions of influenza-like illness had comparable accuracy in sensitivity and specificity. Clinical diagnosis based on symptoms and signs is useful for allocating resources, identifying those who may benefit from early antiviral therapy and providing valuable information for surveillance purpose. PMID:26554802

  2. A U-235 confirmation method with a discriminating view

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, G.D.; Hartwell, J.K.; Reed, B.M.

    1998-09-01

    Reprocessed spent nuclear fuel that has gone through various stages of chemical processing is currently stored at the INEEL. The material consists of three categories: clean U-235 with radiation readings in the mR/h range, U-235 and fission products up to 900 mR/h, and U-235 with U-232 from 100--200 mR/h. The material is contained in plastic bottles and stored in steel structures consisting of seven vertically arranged individual compartments. A total of forty stacks reside in individual concrete wells. This material is considered hard to measure due to excessive radiation exposure to personnel involved with handling the material during mass and NaI U-235 confirmation measurements for Safeguards inventory purposes. A U-235 confirmation method was developed to assay the individual items in place with the ability to discriminate one item from the other items in the stack. Equipment used with this method includes a portable high-resolution gamma-ray detection system, an appropriate tungsten shield and collimator, and a laser-positioning device. A discrimination control test was incorporated to compare the gamma-ray signal of an item in place to the background signal when the item is removed. Total discrimination of the 186-keV gamma ray signal was achieved.

  3. Lymphoscintigraphy to confirm the clinical diagnosis of lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Golueke, P.J.; Montgomery, R.A.; Petronis, J.D.; Minken, S.L.; Perler, B.A.; Williams, G.M. )

    1989-09-01

    Confirmation of the diagnosis of lymphedema often requires lymphangiography, a procedure that is painful for the patient and technically demanding. Radioisotope lymphoscintigraphy is a relatively new technique that uses technetium 99 m antimony trisulfide colloid to produce a diagnostic image similar to a lymphangiogram. The procedure requires a single subcutaneous injection in the involved extremity, and images are obtained 3 hours later. It is technically easy to perform, produces minimal discomfort for the patient, and has no adverse effects. We have recently used radioisotope lymphoscintigraphy to evaluate 17 patients with extremity edema. These patients initially had a presumed diagnosis of lymphedema involving the upper or lower extremity. Lymphoscintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of lymphedema in 12 (70.6%) patients. In five of the 17 patients (29.4%) the clinical impression of lymphedema was not supported by lymphoscintigraphy, leading to alternative diagnoses such as lipomatosis, venous insufficiency (two patients), congestive heart failure, and disuse edema. In all patients with secondary lymphedema the lymphatic system in the involved extremity could be partially visualized. Conversely, three of four patients with primary lymphedema had no ascent of the tracer from the foot and no lymphatic channels could be visualized. Lymphoscintigraphy is relatively easy to perform, safe, minimally invasive, and not uncomfortable for the patient. It is useful in differentiating lymphedema from other causes of extremity edema, allowing institution of appropriate therapy.

  4. Recognition Confidence under Violated and Confirmed Memory Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Antonio; Cox, Justin C.; Dobbins, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals' memory experiences typically covary with those of others' around them, and on average, an item is more likely to be familiar if a companion recommends it as such. Although it would be ideal if observers could use the external recommendations of others' as statistical priors during recognition decisions, it is currently unclear how or…

  5. Planet Hunters: Two New Confirmed Planets and the First Kepler Seven Candidate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph; Wang, J.; Jek, K.; Fischer, D.; Agol, E.; Hunters, Planet

    2014-01-01

    Planet Hunters has confirmed two new planets, PH3 b and PH3 c, through transit timing variations (TTVs) and discovered a seventh planet candidate KOI-351.07, marking the first Kepler seven candidate system. Since most Kepler multiple planet candidates are true planets, KOI-351.07 is the strongest proposed seventh planet candidate in any planetary system. KOI-351 is a very compact system; all candidates have periods < 1 year. . Although errors are large, the inner five planets appear to all be sub-Neptune, while the outer two are likely gas giants. In our new confirmed system PH3, both confirmed planets experience significant TTVs, with PH3 b having an amplitude of over 5 hours. Along with the third candidate in the system (KOI-1353.02), this system may be in a Laplace resonance: Pout/Pmid = Pmid/Pin = 1.91. These new discoveries add to Planet Hunters previous successes: two previously confirmed planets and ≈ 60 other planet candidates.

  6. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  7. Complications of bacteriologically confirmed typhoid fever in children.

    PubMed

    Malik, Alam Sher

    2002-04-01

    To find the incidence, markers and nature of complications of typhoid fever, we studied 102 children with cultures positive for Salmonella typhi in a cross-sectional study, prospectively, over a period of almost 5 years. All isolates were sensitive to commonly used antibiotics. One third of these children developed complications which included: anicteric hepatitis, bone marrow suppression, paralytic ileus, myocarditis, psychosis, cholecystitis, osteomyelitis, peritonitis, pneumonia, haemolysis, and syndrome of inappropriate release of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). Twelve children developed multiple complications. If hepatitis is excluded from the complications, the rate of complications in bacteriologically confirmed cases of typhoid fever drops to 11 per cent. These complications were not related to: the age or sex of patients, duration of illness before admission, use of antibiotics before admission, nutritional status, level of 'O' or 'H' titre, presence of IgM or IgG antibodies, or treatment with chloramphenicol or ampicillin. Children with splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia or leukopenia were more likely to develop complications.

  8. Epiphyseal ewing sarcoma: first reported case with molecular confirmation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Yosmar; García-Esparza, Elena; Conde, Esther; Azorín, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric malignant bone neoplasm after osteosarcoma. Ewing sarcoma comprises "small, round, blue-cell" tumors thought to arise from neural crest cells. The authors report the case of a 14-year-old boy that presented with a nonpainful circumscribed lesion. The radiographs showed a lytic lesion at the tibial epiphysis with a large soft tissue mass, best depicted in the magnetic resonance imaging scan that suggested an aggressive lesion. A needle biopsy of the lesion was performed. The diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma was made based on microscopic, immunohistochemical, polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. This is the third case report about a primary epiphyseal Ewing sarcoma and the fist one with molecular confirmation.

  9. CONFIRMATION OF A RETROGRADE ORBIT FOR EXOPLANET WASP-17b

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Sackett, Penny D.; Winn, Joshua N.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2010-10-20

    We present high-precision radial velocity observations of WASP-17 throughout the transit of its close-in giant planet, using the MIKE spectrograph on the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. By modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find the sky-projected spin-orbit angle to be {lambda} = 167.4 {+-} 11.2 deg. This independently confirms the previous finding that WASP-17b is on a retrograde orbit, suggesting it underwent migration via a mechanism other than just the gravitational interaction between the planet and the disk. Interestingly, our result for {lambda} differs by 45 {+-} 13 deg from the previously announced value, and we also find that the spectroscopic transit occurs 15 {+-} 5 minutes earlier than expected, based on the published ephemeris. The discrepancy in the ephemeris highlights the need for contemporaneous spectroscopic and photometric transit observations whenever possible.

  10. RADIAL VELOCITY CONFIRMATION OF A BINARY DETECTED FROM PULSE TIMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, B. N.; Dunlap, B. H.; Clemens, J. C.

    2011-08-10

    A periodic variation in the pulse timings of the pulsating hot subdwarf B (sdB) star CS 1246 was recently discovered via the observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram and suggests the presence of a binary companion with an orbital period of two weeks. Fits to this phase variation, when interpreted as orbital reflex motion, imply CS 1246 orbits a barycenter 11 lt-s away with a velocity of 16.6 km s{sup -1}. Using the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR telescope, we decided to confirm this hypothesis by obtaining radial velocity measurements of the system over several months. Our spectra reveal a velocity variation with amplitude, period, and phase in accordance with the O-C diagram predictions. This corroboration demonstrates that the rapid pulsations of hot sdB stars can be adequate clocks for the discovery of binary companions via the pulse timing method.

  11. Thalassaemia screening and confirmation of carriers in parents.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Angela N; Saminathan, Ramasamy; Choolani, Mahesh

    2017-02-01

    Haemoglobinopathies are among the most common inherited monogenic disorders worldwide. Thalassaemia screening for carrier status is recommended for adults of reproductive age if suspected of being at risk. Conventional laboratory methods for screening include the assessment of haematological indices, and high-performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis or isoelectric focusing to measure the levels of HbA2 and HbF, and to identify haemoglobin variants. Each screening method has its advantages and disadvantages, the main disadvantage being that none can fully resolve all variants. The complex nature of the genetics of haemoglobinopathies necessitates expertise in the interpretation of screening results to evaluate the most likely genotypes, which must then be confirmed using the DNA diagnosis. This review highlights the limits and pitfalls of each screening technique, and outlines a rational combination of different methods to overcome issues in thalassaemia carrier detection.

  12. Exploring nurses' confirmed expectations regarding health IT: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Zadvinskis, Inga M; Chipps, Esther; Yen, Po-Yin

    2014-02-01

    Health information technology (IT) benefits both patients and providers with respect to health care quality and perceived usefulness. Although existing research provides a preliminary understanding of nurses' perception of health IT, perceptions do not guide actions. This phenomenological study explored nurses' perceptions regarding electronic health records and bar code medication administration four months post implementation on a medical-surgical unit in an academic medical center. Ten staff nurses (8 females and 2 males) participated. We categorized the results into five themes from personal-level to organizational-level confirmed expectations: (1) nurses' interaction with computer, (2) nursing performance regarding task accomplishment, (3) unit-specific teamwork, (4) interdisciplinary teamwork, and (5) quality of care. We discovered that effective health IT must be congruent with nursing expectations. IT professionals, nursing and organizational leaders may use findings to structure an environment supportive of effective health IT in nursing practice.

  13. Confirmation of a purple-leaved plum graft hybrid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X M; Liu, Y S; Li, X J

    2013-03-11

    Fifty-seven scions from an adult purple-leaved plum tree were grafted onto the crown of a 6-year-old Yuhuang plum tree and compared to the control of a non-grafted tree. The floral buds of the purple-leaved plum were fully removed before blossoming to avoid sexual hybridization between the two species. The seeds of the Yuhuang plum were picked in July and sown in the spring after stratification. Three, eleven and eight variants with purplish red leaves were found among the seedlings that grew from the seeds picked in 1999, 2000, and 2001, respectively. The ratio of variant occurrence ranged from 2.3 to 15.8%. Our results confirmed the observation of a graft hybrid by Luther Burbank.

  14. Confirmation of prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D E; Kalousek, D K

    1989-04-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism causes problems in interpretation and in genetic counselling. Part of the difficulty with any prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism is interpretation of results without knowing the exact origin, embryonic or extraembryonic, of the abnormal cell line. To confuse the issue in cases of prenatal diagnosis of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism is the recent demonstration that a diagnosis of 45,X/46,XY made prenatally is not necessarily associated with the same phenotype as when diagnosed postnatally. We present two cases of prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism (45,X/46,XY and 45,X/47,XYY). Posttermination examination of the phenotypically normal male fetuses and their placentas established that the placenta was the most likely source of the 45,X cell line. An approach to confirming the prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism and establishing its origin utilizing detailed cytogenetic examination of both fetus and placenta is suggested.

  15. Fluorogenic assays for immediate confirmation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, P C; Hartman, P A

    1982-01-01

    Rapid assays for Escherichia coli were developed by using the compound 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronide (MUG), which is hydrolyzed by glucuronidase to yield a fluorogenic product. The production of glucuronidase was limited to strains of E. coli and some Salmonella and Shigella strains in the family Enterobacteriaceae. For immediate confirmation of the presence of E. coli in most-probable-number tubes, MUG was incorporated into lauryl tryptose broth at a final concentration of 100 micrograms/ml. Results of both the presumptive test (gas production) and the confirmed test (fluorescence) for E. coli were obtained from a variety of food, water, and milk samples after incubation for only 24 h at 35 degrees C. Approximately 90% of the tubes showing both gas production and fluorescence contained fecal coliforms (they were positive in EC broth incubated at 45 degrees C). Few false-positive reactions were observed. The lauryl tryptose broth-MUG-most-probable-number assay was superior to violet red bile agar for the detection of heat- and chlorine-injured E. coli cells. Anaerogenic strains produced positive reactions, and small numbers of E. coli could be detected in the presence of large numbers of competing bacteria. The fluorogenic assay was sensitive and rapid; the presence of one viable cell was detected within 20 h. E. coli colonies could be distinguished from other coliforms on membrane filters and plates of violet red bile agar if MUG was incorporated into the culture media. A rapid confirmatory test for E. coli that is amenable to automation was developed by using microtitration plates filled with a nonselective medium containing MUG. Pure or mixed cultures containing E. coli produced fluorescence within 4 h (most strains) to 24 h (a few weakly positive strains). Images PMID:7049088

  16. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  17. Fused Lasso Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable using p covariates that are measured on n independent observations, in a setting in which additive, flexible, and interpretable fits are desired. We propose the fused lasso additive model (FLAM), in which each additive function is estimated to be piecewise constant with a small number of adaptively-chosen knots. FLAM is the solution to a convex optimization problem, for which a simple algorithm with guaranteed convergence to a global optimum is provided. FLAM is shown to be consistent in high dimensions, and an unbiased estimator of its degrees of freedom is proposed. We evaluate the performance of FLAM in a simulation study and on two data sets. Supplemental materials are available online, and the R package flam is available on CRAN. PMID:28239246

  18. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  19. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  20. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  1. DIRECT IMAGING CONFIRMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A DUST-ENSHROUDED CANDIDATE EXOPLANET ORBITING FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Debes, John; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Burrows, Adam; Itoh, Yoichi; Fukagawa, Misato; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kuchner, Marc; Matsumura, Soko

    2012-12-01

    We present Subaru/IRCS J-band data for Fomalhaut and a (re)reduction of archival 2004-2006 HST/ACS data first presented by Kalas et al. We confirm the existence of a candidate exoplanet, Fomalhaut b, in both the 2004 and 2006 F606W data sets at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, we confirm the detection at F814W and present a new detection in F435W. Fomalhaut b's space motion may be consistent with it being in an apsidally aligned, non-debris ring-crossing orbit, although new astrometry is required for firmer conclusions. We cannot confirm that Fomalhaut b exhibits 0.7-0.8 mag variability cited as evidence for planet accretion or a semi-transient dust cloud. The new, combined optical spectral energy distribution and IR upper limits confirm that emission identifying Fomalhaut b originates from starlight scattered by small dust, but this dust is most likely associated with a massive body. The Subaru and IRAC/4.5 {mu}m upper limits imply M < 2 M{sub J} , still consistent with the range of Fomalhaut b masses needed to sculpt the disk. Fomalhaut b is very plausibly 'a planet identified from direct imaging' even if current images of it do not, strictly speaking, show thermal emission from a directly imaged planet.

  2. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  3. More Than Additional Space...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A much needed addition to the Jamestown Elementary School turned out to be more than an expansion of walls for more space. A new educational program, a limited budget, and a short time line were tackled on a team approach basis and were successfully resolved. (Author)

  4. Confirmation of PM typing protocols for consistent and reliable results.

    PubMed

    Crouse, C A; Nippes, D C; Ritzline, E L

    1996-05-01

    A recent report in the Perkin Elmer "Forensic Forum" bulletin described a modification to the previously published PM typing protocol indicating that in order to obtain consistent and reliable PM and DQA1 typing results, disodium EDTA should be added to the post-amplification mixture before denaturation of the DNA fragments. The analysis and validation of this suggestion is described in the accompanying paper. We report the evaluation of this additional step when typing for PM alleles and conclude that the standard operating procedures currently enforced at the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office and Indian River crime laboratories do not necessitate the need for the addition of disodium EDTA to the PM amplified products prior to the heat denaturation step. Further, depending on an individual laboratory's PM protocol, the recommendation by Perkin Elmer to add disodium EDTA to PM amplified products before typing has merit and should be carefully considered when determining laboratory PM typing protocols.

  5. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification Stage I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-24

    level below ground: vmA Temp. Addres Fahr . * Teat delivery.: pm _________________________________or -- - r Pump’ _7 Ral= _ Owner’s...esapletLea Or abadomat Of the 11." W= OWEI is oft drlled ole: - Tota2- Ii-e ,1 . p of well: at ag wter lev below O-0 Temp. Fahr . M eat er...Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, UBTL is currently licensed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to perform

  6. Independent Confirmation of the Pioneer 10 Anomalous Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markwardt, Craig B.

    2002-01-01

    I perform an independent analysis of radio Doppler tracking data from the Pioneer 10 spacecraft for the time period 1987-1994. All of the tracking data were taken from public archive sources, and the analysis tools were developed independently by myself. I confirm that an apparent anomalous acceleration is acting on the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is not accounted for by present physical models of spacecraft navigation. My best fit value for the acceleration, including corrections for systematic biases and uncertainties, is (8.60 plus or minus 1.34) x 10(exp -8) centimeters per second, directed towards the Sun. This value compares favorably to previous results. I examine the robustness of my result to various perturbations of the analysis method, and find agreement to within plus or minus 5%. The anomalous acceleration is reasonably constant with time, with a characteristic variation time scale of greater than 70 yr. Such a variation timescale is still too short to rule out on-board thermal radiation effects, based on this particular Pioneer 10 data set.

  7. Quality of life among adults with confirmed dengue in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Nascimento, Nazareth Elias; Suaya, Jose A; Siqueira, Joao Bosco; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Turchi, Marilia Dalva; Guilarde, Adriana Oliveira; Peres, Joao Borges; Shepard, Donald S

    2011-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to measure the quality of life (QoL) during a dengue episode. We conducted a facility-based survey in central Brazil in 2005 and recruited 372 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients greater than 12 years of age in hospital and ambulatory settings. We administered the World Health Organization QoL instrument approximately 15 days after the onset of symptoms. We used principal component analysis with varimax rotation to identify domains related to QoL. The median age of interviewees was 36 years. Most (85%) reported their general health status as very good or good before the dengue episode. Although ambulatory patients were mainly classified as having dengue fever, 44.8% of hospitalized patients had dengue hemorrhagic fever or intermediate dengue. Principal component analysis identified five principal components related to cognition, sleep and energy, mobility, self-care, pain, and discomfort, which explained 73% of the variability of the data matrix. Hospitalized patients had significantly lower mean scores for dimensions cognition, self-care, and pain than ambulatory patients. This investigation documented the generally poor QoL during a dengue episode caused by the large number of domains affected and significant differences between health care settings.

  8. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  9. Experimental confirmation of multiple community states in a marine ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Petraitis, Peter S.; Methratta, Elizabeth T.; Rhile, Erika C.; Vidargas, Nicholas A.; Dudgeon, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Small changes in environmental conditions can unexpectedly tip an ecosystem from one community type to another, and these often irreversible shifts have been observed in semi-arid grasslands, freshwater lakes and ponds, coral reefs, and kelp forests. A commonly accepted explanation is that these ecosystems contain multiple stable points, but experimental tests confirming multiple stable states have proven elusive. Here we present a novel approach and show that mussel beds and rockweed stands are multiple stable states on intertidal shores in the Gulf of Maine, USA. Using broad-scale observational data and long-term data from experimental clearings, we show that the removal of rockweed by winter ice scour can tip persistent rockweed stands to mussel beds. The observational data were analyzed with Anderson's discriminant analysis of principal coordinates, which provided an objective function to separate mussel beds from rockweed stands. The function was then applied to 55 experimental plots, which had been established in rockweed stands in 1996. Based on 2005 data, all uncleared controls and all but one of the small clearings were classified as rockweed stands; 37% of the large clearings were classified as mussel beds. Our results address the establishment of mussels versus rockweeds and complement rather than refute the current paradigm that mussel beds and rockweed stands, once established, are maintained by site-specific differences in strong consumer control. PMID:19399520

  10. Gluten Psychosis: Confirmation of a New Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore; Franzonello, Chiara; Mancardi, Margherita; Ruggieri, Martino; Catassi, Carlo

    2015-07-08

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a syndrome diagnosed in patients with symptoms that respond to removal of gluten from the diet, after celiac disease and wheat allergy have been excluded. NCGS has been related to neuro-psychiatric disorders, such as autism, schizophrenia and depression. A singular report of NCGS presenting with hallucinations has been described in an adult patient. We report a pediatric case of a psychotic disorder clearly related to NCGS and investigate the causes by a review of literature. The pathogenesis of neuro-psychiatric manifestations of NCGS is unclear. It has been hypothesized that: (a) a "leaky gut" allows some gluten peptides to cross the intestinal membrane and the blood brain barrier, affecting the endogenous opiate system and neurotransmission; or (b) gluten peptides may set up an innate immune response in the brain similar to that described in the gut mucosa, causing exposure from neuronal cells of a transglutaminase primarily expressed in the brain. The present case-report confirms that psychosis may be a manifestation of NCGS, and may also involve children; the diagnosis is difficult with many cases remaining undiagnosed. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to establish the real role of gluten as a triggering factor in neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  11. Quality of Life among Adults with Confirmed Dengue in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Nascimento, Nazareth Elias; Suaya, Jose A.; Siqueira, Joao Bosco; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Turchi, Marilia Dalva; Guilarde, Adriana Oliveira; Peres, Joao Borges; Shepard, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to measure the quality of life (QoL) during a dengue episode. We conducted a facility-based survey in central Brazil in 2005 and recruited 372 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients greater than 12 years of age in hospital and ambulatory settings. We administered the World Health Organization QoL instrument approximately 15 days after the onset of symptoms. We used principal component analysis with varimax rotation to identify domains related to QoL. The median age of interviewees was 36 years. Most (85%) reported their general health status as very good or good before the dengue episode. Although ambulatory patients were mainly classified as having dengue fever, 44.8% of hospitalized patients had dengue hemorrhagic fever or intermediate dengue. Principal component analysis identified five principal components related to cognition, sleep and energy, mobility, self-care, pain, and discomfort, which explained 73% of the variability of the data matrix. Hospitalized patients had significantly lower mean scores for dimensions cognition, self-care, and pain than ambulatory patients. This investigation documented the generally poor QoL during a dengue episode caused by the large number of domains affected and significant differences between health care settings. PMID:21976580

  12. Rhenium in seawater - Confirmation of generally conservative behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Creaser, R. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A depth profile of the concentration of Re was measured in the Pacific Ocean using a technique developed for the clean chemical separation and the precise measurement of Re by isotope dilution and negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-NTIMS). We obtain a narrow range for Re from 7.20 +/- 0.03 to 7.38 +/- 0.03 ng/kg for depths between 45 m and 4700 m. This demonstrates that Re is relatively well mixed throughout the water column and confirms the theoretical prediction that the behavior of Re in the oceans is conservative. When examined in detail, both salinity and the concentration of Re increase by approximately 1.5 percent between 400 and 4700 m, a correlation consistent with conservative behavior. However, Re appears to be depleted relative to salinity by 1.0-1.5 percent at 100 m, and enriched by approximately 4 percent at the surface. These observations suggest a minor level of Re scavenging in near surface waters, and an input of Re to the ocean surface. This work demonstrates the utility of geochemical investigations of certain trace elements not previously been amenable to detailed study.

  13. Confirmation of elevated arsenic levels in groundwater of Myanmar.

    PubMed

    van Geen, Alexander; Win, Kyi Htut; Zaw, Than; Naing, Win; Mey, Jacob L; Mailloux, Brian

    2014-04-15

    Millions of villagers across South and Southeast Asia are exposed to toxic levels of arsenic (As) by drinking well water. In order to confirm the field-kit results that Myanmar is also affected, a total of 55 wells were tested in the field in January 2013 and sampled for laboratory analysis across seven villages spanning a range of As contamination in the lower Ayeyarwady basin. Elevated concentrations of As (50-630 μg/L) were measured in wells up to 60 m deep and associated with high levels of Fe (up to 21 mg/L) and low concentrations of SO4 (<0.05 mg/L). Concentrations of As <10 μg/L were measured in some shallow (<30 m) grey sands and in both shallow and deep orange sands. These results indicate that the main mechanism of As release to groundwater in Myanmar is the reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides, as in the neighboring Bengal, Mekong, and Red River basins. Concentrations of As in groundwater of Myanmar are therefore unlikely to change rapidly over time and switching to existing low-As wells is a viable way of reducing exposure in the short term. However, only 17 of the 55 well owners interviewed correctly recalled the status of their well despite extensive testing in the region. A renewed effort is thus needed to test existing wells and new wells that continue to be installed and to communicate the health risks of exposure to As for infants, children, and adults.

  14. Paleomagnetic confirmation of the Laurentian origin of the Argentine Precordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapalini, A. E.; Astini, R. A.

    1998-02-01

    Several recent tectonic models have portrayed the Argentine Precordillera has been recently portrayed as an Early Paleozoic Laurentian derived exotic terrane now found in southwestern South America. These models have primarily been based on strong biogeographic and stratigraphic evidence, however, no paleomagnetic data have previously been available to independently test them. A paleomagnetic study was, therefore, carried out on the Early Cambrian Cerro Totora Formation, exposed in the northern reaches of the Argentine Precordillera. After stepwise thermal demagnetization a pre-folding remanence was identified in ten sites of this formation, yielding a paleomagnetic pole (CT) at 37.0°N, 314.1°E, A95=5.8°. This pole is not consistent with the latest Proterozoic-Early Paleozoic apparent polar wander path for Gondwana, but it agrees with the Early Cambrian Section of the Laurentian path if the Argentine Precordillera is positioned as the conjugate margin of the Ouachita embayment in southeast Laurentia. This result confirms that the Precordillera is an allochthonous terrane derived from Laurentia in Cambrian times, that was later accreted to Gondwana, probably in Middle Ordovician times.

  15. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T.L.; Kothes, R.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nontherma1 nebula 40" in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.63, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. Morphologically, the nebula appears to be slightly extended along a direction, in projection on the sky, previously demonstrated to be of significance in radio and ASCA observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5" from the point source, but energetic arguments suggest that it is not the resolved termination shock of the pulsar wind against the ambient medium. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents the first example of a pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind.

  16. Reichenbach on causality in 1923: Scientific inference, coordination, and confirmation.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Flavia

    2015-10-01

    In The Theory of Relativity and A Priori Knowledge (1920b), Reichenbach developed an original account of cognition as coordination of formal structures to empirical ones. One of the most salient features of this account is that it is explicitly not a top-down type of coordination, and in fact it is crucially "directed" by the empirical side. Reichenbach called this feature "the mutuality of coordination" but, in that work, did not elaborate sufficiently on how this is supposed to work. In a paper that he wrote less than two years afterwards (but that he published only in 1932), "The Principle of Causality and the Possibility of its Empirical Confirmation" (1923/1932), he described what seems to be a model for this idea, now within an analysis of causality that results in an account of scientific inference. Recent reassessments of his early proposal do not seem to capture the extent of Reichenbach's original worries. The present paper analyses Reichenbach's early account and suggests a new way to look at his early work. According to it, we perform measurements, individuate parameters, collect and analyse data, by using a "constructive" approach, such as the one with which we formulate and test hypotheses, which paradigmatically requires some simplicity assumptions. Reichenbach's attempt to account for all these aspects in 1923 was obviously limited and naive in many ways, but it shows that, in his view, there were multiple ways in which the idea of "constitution" is embodied in scientific practice.

  17. Cloud Creek structure, central Wyoming, USA: Impact origin confirmed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, D. S.; Therriault, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    The circular Cloud Creek structure in central Wyoming, USA is buried beneath ~1200 m of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks and has a current diameter of ~7 km. The morphology/morphometry of the structure, as defined by borehole, seismic, and gravity data, is similar to that of other buried terrestrial complex impact structures in sedimentary target rocks, e.g., Red Wing Creek in North Dakota, USA. The structure has a fault-bordered central peak with minimum diameter of ~1.4 km, composed predominantly of Paleozoic carbonates thickened by thrust faulting and brecciation, and is elevated some 520 m above equivalent strata beyond the outer rim of the structure. There is a ~1.6 km wide annular trough sloping away from the central peak (maximum structural relief, 300 m) and terminated by a detached, fault-bounded, rim anticline. The youngest rocks within the structure are Late Triassic (Norian?) clastics and these are overlain unconformably by post-impact Middle Jurassic (Bathonian?) sandstones and shales. Thus, the formation of the Cloud Creek structure is dated chronostratigraphicly as ~190 ± 20 Ma. Reported here for the first time are measurements of planar deformation features (PDFs) in shocked quartz grains in thin sections made from drill cuttings recovered in a borehole drilled at the southern perimeter of the central peak. Other, less definitive microstructures consistent with impact occur in samples collected from boreholes drilled into the central peak and rim anticline. The shock- metamorphic evidence confirms an impact origin for the Cloud Creek structure.

  18. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  19. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  20. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  1. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  2. Satellite Gravity Measurements Confirm Accelerated Melting of Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Wilson, C. R.; Tapley, B. D.

    2006-09-01

    Using time-variable gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, we estimate ice mass changes over Greenland during the period April 2002 to November 2005. After correcting for the effects of spatial filtering and limited resolution of GRACE data, the estimated total ice melting rate over Greenland is -239 +/- 23 cubic kilometers per year, mostly from East Greenland. This estimate agrees remarkably well with a recent assessment of -224 +/- 41 cubic kilometers per year, based on satellite radar interferometry data. GRACE estimates in southeast Greenland suggest accelerated melting since the summer of 2004, consistent with the latest remote sensing measurements.

  3. Science of Global Climate Modeling: Confirmation from Discoveries on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    2012-10-01

    As early as 1993, analysis of obliquity changes on Mars revealed irregular cycles of high excursion, over 45°1. Further obliquity analyses indicated that insolation and climatic conditions vary with time, with the four most recent episodes of obliquity >45° occurring about 5.5, 8, 9, and 15 My.2 Various researchers applied global climate models, using Martian parameters and obliquity changes. The models (independent of Martian geomorphological observations) indicate exceptional climate conditions during the high-obliquity episodes at >45°3,4, with localized massive ice deposition effects east of Hellas and on the west slopes of Tharsis.5 At last year’s DPS my co-authors and I detailed evidence of unusual active glaciation in Greg crater, near the center of the predicted area of ice accumulation during high obliquity.6 We found that the timescale of glacial surface layer activity matches the general 5-15 My timescale of the last episodes of high obliquity and ice deposition. Radar results confirm ice deposits in debris aprons concentrated in the same area.7 Less direct evidence has also been found for glacial ice deposits in the west Tharsis region.8 Here I emphasize that if the models can be adjusted to Mars and then successfully indicate unusual, specific features that we see there, it is an argument for the robustness of climate modeling in general. In recent years we have see various public figures casting doubt on the validity of terrestrial global modeling. The successful match of Martian climate modeling with direct Martian geological and chronometric observations provides an interesting and teachable refutation of the attacks on climate science. References: 1. Science 259:1294-1297; 2. LPSC XXXV, Abs. 1600; 3. Nature 412:411-413; 4. Science 295:110-113; 5. Science 311:368-371; 6. EPSC-DPS Abs. 1394; 7. Science 322:1235-1238; 8. Nature 434:346-351.

  4. Flora Spin Axis Survey: Confirmation of the Yarkovsky Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegert, Melissa J.; Molnar, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The Flora asteroid family's size and location on the inner edge of the main belt make it a likely source of NEOs and asteroid-planet collisions; however, reliable determination of Flora membership is inhibited by the family's age and the presence of a large background. We discovered a significant correlation between semimajor axis and asteroid diameter that we interpreted as the prograde spinning remnants of a single collision, disturbed over time by the Yarkovsky effect (Molnar and Haegert 2008, BAAS, 40, 286). The tightness of the correlation requires nearly uniform obliquities among the Floras. We suggested the single-collision model might be tested by an observational survey of Flora obliquities. The present survey is designed to perform this test. We defined two samples: 1) a Flora-enriched sample of asteroids along the density enhancement in semimajor axis-diameter space, and 2) a control sample of asteroids offset from the enhancement on either side. While a collision is not expected to result in a uniform obliquity distribution, this correlation can also be produced by a uniform time-average obliquity, which we will show is theoretically plausible. We used a time-efficient modification of the epoch method to determine prograde/retrograde spin sense. We present the spin axis results for ten Flora-enriched sample asteroids (three determined by us, six independently measured by Durech et al. 2009, and one observed by spacecraft). All ten have prograde spin sense. We also present the results for seven asteroids from our control sample; two of these have prograde spin sense and five have retrograde. The presence of retrograde asteroids in the control sample establishes the significance of our prograde Flora result, strongly confirming our model. Their abundance is consistent with an accumulated segregation due to Yarkovsky drift among the background asteroids. Funded by a Kuiper endowment and a Calvin Research Fellowship.

  5. Confirmation of elevated arsenic levels in groundwater of Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    van Geen, Alexander; Win, Kyi Htut; Zaw, Than; Naing, Win; Mey, Jacob L.; Mailloux, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Millions of villagers across South and Southeast Asia are exposed to toxic levels of arsenic (As) by drinking well water. In order to confirm field-kit results that Myanmar is also affected, a total of 55 wells were tested in the field in January 2013 and sampled for laboratory analysis across seven villages spanning a range of As contamination in the lower Ayeyarwady basin. Elevated concentrations of As (50–630 μg/L) were measured in wells up to 60 m deep and associated with high levels of Fe (up to 21 mg/L) and low concentrations of SO4 (<0.05 mg/L). Concentrations of As <10 μg/L were measured in some shallow (<30 m) grey sands and in both shallow and deep orange sands. These results indicate that the main mechanism of As release to groundwater in Myanmar is the reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides, as in the neighboring Bengal, Mekong, and Red River basins. Concentrations of As in groundwater of Myanmar are therefore unlikely to change rapidly over time and switching to existing low-As wells is a viable way of reducing exposure in the short term. However, only 17 of the 55 well owners interviewed correctly recalled the status of their well despite extensive testing in the region. A renewed effort is thus needed to test existing wells and new wells that continue to be installed and to communicate the health risks of exposure to As for infants, children, and adults. PMID:24530581

  6. Analytical confirmation of Xanthium strumarium poisoning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Botha, Christo J; Lessing, Dries; Rösemann, Magda; van Wilpe, Erna; Williams, June H

    2014-09-01

    Xanthium strumarium, commonly referred to as "cocklebur," rarely causes poisoning in cattle. When mature, this robust, annual weed bears numerous oval, brownish, spiny burs. Only the seeds in the burs and young seedlings (cotyledonary leaves) contain the toxic principle, carboxyatractyloside. In the Frankfort district of the Free State Province of South Africa, a herd of 150 Bonsmara cows were allowed to graze on the banks of a small river, where mature cocklebur was growing. Four cows died while grazing in this relatively small area. Clinical signs ranged from recumbency, apparent blindness, and hypersensitivity to convulsive seizures. During necropsy, burs completely matted with ingesta were located in the rumen content. The most distinctive microscopic lesions were severe, bridging centrilobular to midzonal hepatocyte necrosis and hemorrhage. Ultrastructurally, periacinar hepatocytes were necrotic, and novel electron-dense cytoplasmic needle-like crystals were observed, often in close association with peroxisomes. Carboxyatractyloside concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Carboxyatractyloside was present in rumen contents at 2.5 mg/kg; in burs removed from the rumen at 0.17 mg/kg; in liver at 66 ng/g, and was below the limit of quantitation in the kidney sample, estimated at approximately 0.8 ng/g. Based on the presence of the plants on the riverbank, the history of exposure, the clinical findings, the presence of burs in the rumen, and the microscopic and ultrastructural lesions, X. strumarium poisoning in the herd of cattle was confirmed and was supported by LC-HRMS.

  7. Terra Data Confirm Warm, Dry U.S. Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    New maps of land surface temperature and snow cover produced by NASA's Terra satellite show this year's winter was warmer than last year's, and the snow line stayed farther north than normal. The observations confirm earlier National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports that the United States was unusually warm and dry this past winter. (Click to read the NASA press release and to access higher-resolution images.) For the last two years, a new sensor aboard Terra has been collecting the most detailed global measurements ever made of our world's land surface temperatures and snow cover. The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is already giving scientists new insights into our changing planet. Average temperatures during December 2001 through February 2002 for the contiguous United States appear to have been unseasonably warm from the Rockies eastward. In the top image the coldest temperatures appear black, while dark green, blue, red, yellow, and white indicate progressively warmer temperatures. MODIS observes both land surface temperature and emissivity, which indicates how efficiently a surface absorbs and emits thermal radiation. Compared to the winter of 2000-01, temperatures throughout much of the U.S. were warmer in 2001-02. The bottom image depicts the differences on a scale from dark blue (colder this year than last) to red (warmer this year than last). A large region of warm temperatures dominated the northern Great Plains, while the area around the Great Salt Lake was a cold spot. Images courtesy Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC, based upon data courtesy Zhengming Wan, MODIS Land Science Team member at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Institute for Computational Earth System Science

  8. Incidental Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Patients with Confirmed and Unconfirmed Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brunisholz, Kimberly D.; Joy, Elizabeth A.; Hashibe, Mia; Gren, Lisa H.; Savitz, Lucy A.; Hamilton, Sharon; Cannon, Wayne; Kim, Jaewhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) diagnosis among patients with confirmed and unconfirmed prediabetes (preDM) relative to an at-risk group receiving care from primary care physicians over a 5-year period. Study Design Utilizing data from the Intermountain Healthcare (IH) Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) from 2006–2013, we performed a prospective analysis using discrete survival analysis to estimate the time to diagnosis of T2DM among groups. Population Studied Adult patients who had at least one outpatient visit with a primary care physician during 2006–2008 at an IH clinic and subsequent visits through 2013. Patients were included for the study if they were (a) at-risk for diabetes (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 and one additional risk factor: high risk ethnicity, first degree relative with diabetes, elevated triglycerides or blood pressure, low HDL, diagnosis of gestational diabetes or polycystic ovarian syndrome, or birth of a baby weighing >9 lbs); or (b) confirmed preDM (HbA1c ≥ 5.7–6.49% or fasting blood glucose 100–125 mg/dL); or (c) unconfirmed preDM (documented fasting lipid panel and glucose 100–125 mg/dL on the same day). Principal Findings Of the 33,838 patients who were eligible for study, 57.0% were considered at-risk, 38.4% had unconfirmed preDM, and 4.6% had confirmed preDM. Those with unconfirmed and confirmed preDM tended to be Caucasian and a greater proportion were obese compared to those at-risk for disease. Patients with unconfirmed and confirmed preDM tended to have more prevalent high blood pressure and depression as compared to the at-risk group. Based on the discrete survival analyses, patients with unconfirmed preDM and confirmed preDM were more likely to develop T2DM when compared to at-risk patients. Conclusions Unconfirmed and confirmed preDM are strongly associated with the development of T2DM as compared to patients with only risk factors for disease. PMID:27427913

  9. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine oral fluid on-site screening and confirmation.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-01-01

    Accurate on-site devices to screen for drug intake are critical for establishing whether an individual is driving under the influence of drugs (DUID); however, on-site oral fluid (OF) cocaine device performance is variable. We evaluated the performance of a newly developed benzoylecgonine (BE) test-strip for the Draeger® DrugTest 5000 device (20 µg/L cut-off) with equivalent cross reactivity for cocaine and BE. Ten cocaine users provided OF, collected with the Draeger cassette and Oral-Eze® and StatSure Saliva Sampler(TM) devices, up to 69 h following 25 mg intravenous cocaine administration. All screening results were confirmed by a validated two-dimensional-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (2D-GC-MS) method for cocaine and/or BE. Cocaine test-strip median Tlast for screening only results was 6.5 h, and 6.5 h with Oral-Eze® and 4 h for StatSure OF confirmation for cocaine and/or BE at 1, 8, and 10 µg/L; sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency ranged from 85.5 to 100% and 83.3 to 100% for cocaine only confirmation at 8 and 10 µg/L. For the BE test-strip, median Tlast was 12.5 h for screening only and confirmation for cocaine and/or BE at all three cut-offs; sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency ranged from 85.5 to 97.5% and 78.4 to 97.4% with cocaine and/or BE confirmation at 8 and 10 µg/L cut-offs, respectively. The Draeger cocaine test-strip with cocaine only confirmation offers a useful option for monitoring the acute intoxication phase of DUID; additionally the BE test-strip with cocaine and/or BE confirmation increases the length of detection of cocaine intake for workplace drug testing, drug court, parole, pain management, drug treatment programs and both the acute cocaine intoxication and cocaine crash/fatigue phase of DUID. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Confirmation of gravisensitivity in the slime mold physarum polycephalum under near weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, I.; Briegleb, W.; Sobick, V.; Wohlfarth-Bottermann, K. E.

    We have investigated Physarum polycephalum, a unicellular organism with no special gravity receptors, on its ability to react to gravity. The first experiments were 0 g-simulation experiments on the fast-rotating clinostat conducted with plasmodial strands of this acellular slime mold. In these earth-bound experiments the observed parameters were periodicity of the contractions and dilatations of the strand's ectoplasm as well as the periodicity and velocity of the striking cytoplasmic (endoplasmic) shuttle streaming. During 0 g-simulation these parameters showed significant changes indicating the existence of a gravisensitivity of the slime mold. The Space-Shuttle experiment (ESA-Biorack in D 1-Mission) should demonstrate the validity of the 0 g-simulation on the fast-rotating clinostat. The experiment was designed in a way enabling the registration of the same parameters as on the clinostat (using the light microscope in combination with a photo diode and a cinecamera). Only one of the two planned measurement sessions was fully successful and provided us with data confirming the results gained on the fast-rotating clinostat: The slime mold showed under real near weightlessness in the D 1-Space Shuttle Mission a transient frequency increase in its contraction rhythmicity and a (steady) increase in the streaming velocity of its endoplasm.

  11. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  12. Callipeltosides A, B and C: Total Syntheses and Structural Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Frost, James R; Pearson, Colin M; Snaddon, Thomas N; Booth, Richard A; Turner, Richard M; Gold, Johan; Shaw, David M; Gaunt, Matthew J; Ley, Steven V

    2015-01-01

    Since their isolation almost 20 years ago, the callipeltosides have been of long standing interest to the synthetic community owing to their unique structural features and inherent biological activity. Herein we present our full research effort that has led to the synthesis of these molecules. Key aspects of our final strategy include 1) synthesis of the C1–C9 pyran core (5) using an AuCl3-catalysed cyclisation; 2) formation of C10–C22 vinyl iodide (55) by sequential bidirectional Stille reactions and 3) diastereoselective union of these advanced fragments by means of an alkenylzinc addition (d.r.=91:9 at C9). The common callipeltoside aglycon (4) was completed in a further five steps. Following this, all three sugar fragments were appended to provide the entire callipeltoside family. In addition to this, D-configured callipeltose B was synthesised and appended to the callipeltoside aglycon. The 1H NMR spectrum of this molecule was found to be significantly different to the natural isolate, further supporting our assignment of callipeltoside B (2). PMID:26230615

  13. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  14. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  15. A new quantum sealed-bid auction protocol with secret order in post-confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Tao; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Xu, Gang; Meng, Xiang-Hua; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2015-10-01

    A new security protocol for quantum sealed-bid auction is proposed to resist the collusion attack from some malicious bidders. The most significant feature of this protocol is that bidders prepare their particles with secret order in post-confirmation for encoding bids. In addition, a new theorem and its proof are given based on the theory of combinatorial mathematics, which can be used as evaluation criteria for the collusion attack. It is shown that the new protocol is immune to the collusion attack and meets the demand for a secure auction. Compared with those previous protocols, the security, efficiency and availability of the proposed protocol are largely improved.

  16. Achillea millefolium L. s.l. revisited: recent findings confirm the traditional use.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Birgit; Kopp, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Yarrow (Achillea millefolium L. s.l.) is traditionally used in the treatment of inflammatory and spasmodic gastro-intestinal disorders, hepato-biliary complaints and inflammation. Now we could show that the flavonoids mediated the antispasmodic properties of yarrow, whereas the dicaffeoylquinic acids caused the choleretic effects. Moreover, we observed an in vitro-inhibition of human neutrophil elastase, a protease involved in the inflammatory process, by extracts and fractions from yarrow, which suggests additional mechanisms of antiphlogistic action. The presented results confirm the traditional use of yarrow.

  17. Recurrent Pure Calcite Urolithiasis Confirmed by Endoscopic Removal and Infrared Spectroscopy in a Malnourished Anorectic Female

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Kim Hovgaard; Sloth Osther, Palle Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Often when calcite is found as a component of urinary calculi, they are considered false calculi or artifacts. We present a case of true calcite urolithiasis. The stone material was removed percutaneously from a severely malnourished anorectic woman and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (IRS). In addition, calcite urolithiasis was confirmed in several recurrent stone events by IRS. Laxative abuse with magnesium oxide was believed to be the underlying cause of stone formation, and ammonium chloride given as one weekly dose turned out to be effective for stone prevention. PMID:27579419

  18. Confirmed Plasmodium vivax Resistance to Chloroquine in Central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Vinh; Hong, Nguyen Van; Van, Nguyen Van; Louisa, Melva; Baird, Kevin; Xa, Nguyen Xuan; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Hung, Le Xuan; Duong, Tran Thanh; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Speybroeck, Niko; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax resistance to chloroquine (CQ) is currently reported in almost all countries where P. vivax is endemic. In Vietnam, despite a first report on P. vivax resistance to chloroquine published in the early 2000s, P. vivax was still considered sensitive to CQ. Between May 2009 and December 2011, a 2-year cohort study was conducted in central Vietnam to assess the recommended radical cure regimen based on a 10-day course of primaquine (0.5 mg/kg/day) together with 3 days of CQ (25 mg/kg). Here we report the results of the first 28-day follow-up estimating the cumulative risk of P. vivax recurrences together with the corresponding CQ blood concentrations, among other endpoints. Out of 260 recruited P. vivax patients, 240 completed treatment and were followed up to day 28 according to the WHO guidelines. Eight patients (3.45%) had a recurrent P. vivax infection, at day 14 (n = 2), day 21 (n = 1), and day 28 (n = 5). Chloroquine blood concentrations, available for 3/8 recurrent infections (days 14, 21, and 28), were above the MIC (>100 ng/ml whole blood) in all of these cases. Fever and parasitemia (both sexual and asexual stages) were cleared by day 3. Anemia was common at day 0 (35.8%), especially in children under 10 years (50%), and hemoglobin (Hb) recovery at day 28 was substantial among anemic patients (median change from day 0 to 28, +1.7 g/dl; interquartile range [IQR], +0.7 to +3.2). This report, based on CQ blood levels measured at the time of recurrences, confirms for the first time P. vivax CQ resistance in central Vietnam and calls for further studies using standardized protocols for accurately monitoring the extent and evolution of P. vivax resistance to chloroquine in Vietnam. These results, together with the mounting evidence of artemisinin resistance in central Vietnam, further highlight the increasing threat of antimalarial drug resistance to malaria elimination in Vietnam.

  19. Ramos-Arroyo syndrome: confirmation of an entity.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Madeleine J; Cosgrove, Mike; Laws, David E; Pilz, Daniela T

    2011-10-01

    In 1987, Ramos-Arroyo et al. described a family with a previously unreported combination of features, which included corneal anesthesia, short stature, sensorineural deafness, learning difficulties, and a characteristic facial appearance. The family was reviewed in 2008 and additional features were noted. The name Ramos-Arroyo syndrome was proposed. The condition can be delineated by corneal anesthesia, absence of the peripapillary choriocapillaris and retinal pigment epithelium, bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, unusual facial appearance, persistent ductus arteriosus, Hirschprung disease, short stature, and intellectual disability. No other patient has been described since. Here, we report on a 5-year-old girl with features consistent with Ramos-Arroyo syndrome. We propose an overlap of this condition with dysautonomia syndromes.

  20. Additive composition, for gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Vataru, M.

    1989-01-10

    An admixture is described that comprises Diesel fuel and an additive composition added thereto which is between about 0.05 to about 2.0 percent by weight of the fuel, the composition comprising: (a) between about 0.05 and 25% relative weight parts of an organic peroxide, and (b) between about 0.1 and 25% relative weight parts of detergent selected from the component group that consists of: (i) fatty amines; (ii) ethoxylated and propoxylated derivatives of fatty amines; (iii) fatty diamines; (iv) fatty imidazlines; (v) polymeric amines and derivatives thereof; (vi) combination of one or more of the (i) through (v) components with carboxylic acid or acids having from three to forth carbon atoms, (c) from about 99.0 to about 50% by weight of a hydrocarbon solvent.

  1. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  2. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  3. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  4. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  5. Utilization of thin-layer chromatography for confirmational sampling during remedial excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a simple, efficient, inexpensive, and accurate method of chemical analysis. This method is applicable to field testing for confirming the limits of excavation during excavation of petroleum, oil, and/or lubricant (POL) contamination. Traditionally, excavation at contaminated sites suffers from a time delay due to the need to obtain laboratory confirmation of the limits of excavation. All suspected contaminated material is removed for stockpiling or remediation. The remaining soils need to be sampled to confirm that no contaminated material remains in the excavation. The site scientist collects samples and sends them out for analysis at a certified laboratory. The laboratory requires, even for a rush order, several days to analyze the samples. This time delay interferes with the efficiency of the operation. The excavations either have to be left open (which is a safety hazard) or reopened if additional material must be excavated. TLC samples can be collected and analyzed in several hours allowing for a short turnaround time for analytical results. The TLC method can be easily performed by a technician. Results of a case study from a subarctic Alaskan site will be reported. Simple operational TLC procedures will be shared. The equipment required for TLC analysis will be outlined. Correlation data between TLC and laboratory analysis will be presented.

  6. Confirmation of the calculated breeding ratio for CRBRP

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, P.J.; Liaw, J.; Turski, R.

    1983-01-01

    A breeding ratio of at least 1.2 was a design goal for CRBRP. The value for the initial core (using plutonium with 11% /sup 240/Pu) calculated with ENDF/B-IV data is 1.27. Engineering mock-up studies for CRBRP were made in ZPPR-11. Analysis of ZPPR-11 using ENDF/B-IV data showed consistent underprediction of K/sub eff/ by about 1.5% and overpredictions of the /sup 238/U capture to /sup 239/Pu fission ratio (C8/F9) between 5% and 8%. These results are typical for all LMFBR critical assemblies at ANL. The following approach was used to determine the breeding ratio: sensitivity analysis of a range of fast reactor benchmarks and a fit to the experimental data by data adjustment; tests of the adjusted data against experiments in ZPPR-11; calculations for CRBRP with ENDF/B-IV data and the adjusted data to predict the breeding ratio bias; and estimates of k/sub eff/ and breeding ratio uncertainties using data sensitivities for CRBRP.

  7. Experimental confirmations of bioeffective effect of magnetic storms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, I. D.; Khabarova, O. V.; Obridko, V. N.; Ragulskaja, M. V.; Reznikov, A. E.

    The results of experiments for the determination of the influence of geomagnetic field disturbances on a human organism are considered. We used the method of electropuncture diagnostics by R. Voll for this end. The method is based on measurements, of conductivity in acupuncture points and is convenient because it allows us to estimate deviations from the norm in the functioning of various organs in the same units. The local A-index is used as an indicator of geomagnetic field disturbance. The daily measurements of the group (27 persons) have shown the presence of a synchronous mass response of inspected people on magnetic storms. At first it is exhibited as a sharp (within 3-4 hours) increase of conductivity of all the acupuncture points from normal values, which corresponds to a maximum of adaptational capabilities of an organism; and then a long duration (about 4 day) decrease of conductivity that describes the depression of all organs and systems of an organism. The reaction of adaptation on three magnetic storms of identical intensity going with an interval per week was registered for half of the inspected people. It was found that the duration of the depression phase and the imbalance of an organism, intrinsic to this phase, depends extremely on the wholeness of the organism (that is on the power of ties between organs and coordination of their activity), but not on the type of disease.

  8. Corrugator activity confirms immediate negative affect in surprise

    PubMed Central

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of surprise entails a complex of immediate responses, such as cognitive interruption, attention allocation to, and more systematic processing of the surprising stimulus. All these processes serve the ultimate function to increase processing depth and thus cognitively master the surprising stimulus. The present account introduces phasic negative affect as the underlying mechanism responsible for this switch in operating mode. Surprising stimuli are schema-discrepant and thus entail cognitive disfluency, which elicits immediate negative affect. This affect in turn works like a phasic cognitive tuning switching the current processing mode from more automatic and heuristic to more systematic and reflective processing. Directly testing the initial elicitation of negative affect by surprising events, the present experiment presented high and low surprising neutral trivia statements to N = 28 participants while assessing their spontaneous facial expressions via facial electromyography. High compared to low surprising trivia elicited higher corrugator activity, indicative of negative affect and mental effort, while leaving zygomaticus (positive affect) and frontalis (cultural surprise expression) activity unaffected. Future research shall investigate the mediating role of negative affect in eliciting surprise-related outcomes. PMID:25762956

  9. Effect of vermiculite addition on compost produced from Korean food wastes.

    PubMed

    Seo, J Y; Heo, J S; Kim, T H; Joo, W H; Crohn, D M

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of vermiculite addition on composting food wastes from Korean households, food wastes were composted in three small bins to which different additives were added. The following three bins were employed: in Case I, only recycled compost was composted; in Case II, food wastes with recycled compost; and in Case III, food wastes with recycled compost and vermiculite. In the experiment performed for 30 days, it was confirmed that the supplementary addition of vermiculite to the composting mixture did not significantly improve the weight loss rate and the decomposition rate of food wastes. Due to dilution through the use of inorganic vermiculite, the vermiculite addition reduced the organic matter concentration of the composting mixtures. Vermiculite addition did not raise the pH value. Weight losses of roughly 70% were observed based on calculating moisture loss as well as dry food waste loss and not considering additives, while dry food waste loss was 29.4% and 35.8% with and without the addition of vermiculite, respectively. For these experiments, the major portion of the weight loss was the loss of water. The results indicate a need to differentiate between weight loss percentages and decomposition percentages, and a need to indicate if either of these percentages includes or excludes the mass of additives.

  10. Association Between Stillbirth and Risk Factors Known at Pregnancy Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    .5% stillbirths, 2.1% live births) (vs never use; AOR, 2.08 [95% CI, 1.12–3.88]); smoking during the 3 months prior to pregnancy (<10 cigarettes/d, 10.0% stillbirths, 6.5% live births) (vs none; AOR, 1.55 [95% CI, 1.02–2.35]); obesity/overweight (15.5% stillbirths, 12.4% live births) (vs normal weight; AOR, 1.72 [95% CI, 1.22–2.43]); not living with a partner (25.4% stillbirths, 15.3% live births) (vs married; AOR, 1.62 [95% CI, 1.15–2.27]); and plurality (6.4% stillbirths, 1.9% live births) (vs singleton; AOR, 4.59 [95% CI, 2.63–8.00]). The generalized R2 was 0.19, explaining little of the variance. Conclusion Multiple risk factors that would have been known at the time of pregnancy confirmation were associated with stillbirth but accounted for only a small amount of the variance in this outcome. PMID:22166606

  11. Confirming stereochemical structures of strigolactones produced by rice and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaonan; Yoneyama, Kaori; Kisugi, Takaya; Uchida, Kenichi; Ito, Seisuke; Akiyama, Kohki; Hayashi, Hideo; Yokota, Takao; Nomura, Takahito; Yoneyama, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Major strigolactones (SLs) produced by rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Michinoku No. 1) were purified and their stereochemical structures were determined by comparing with optically pure synthetic standards for their NMR and CD data and retention times and mass fragmentations in ESI-LC/MS and GC-MS. SLs purified from root exudates of rice plants were orobanchol, orobanchyl acetate, and ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol. In addition to these SLs, 7-oxoorobanchyl acetate and the putative three methoxy-5-deoxystrigol isomers were detected by LC-MS/MS. The production of 7-oxoorobanchyl acetate seemed to occur in the early growth stage, as it was detected only in the root exudates collected during the first week of incubation. The root exudates of tobacco contained at least 11 SLs, including solanacol, solanacyl acetate, orobanchol, ent-2'-epi-orobanchol, orobanchyl acetate, ent-2'-epi-orobanchyl acetate, 5-deoxystrigol, ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol, and three isomers of putative didehydro-orobanchol whose structures remain to be clarified. Furthermore, two sorgolactone isomers but not sorgolactone were detected as minor SLs by LC-MS/MS analysis. It is intriguing to note that rice plants produced only orobanchol-type SLs, derived from ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol, but both orobanchol-type and strigol-type SLs, derived from 5-deoxystrigol were detected in tobacco plants.

  12. Confirmed Assignments of Isomeric Dimethylbenzyl Radicals Generated by Corona Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young Wook; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2012-06-01

    Polymethylbenzyl radicals, multi-methyl-substituted benzyl radicals, have been believed to be an ideal model for understanding the torsional effect of methyl group and substitution effect on electronic transition. These radicals are mainly generated from polymethylbenzenes by electric discharge for spectroscopic observation. However, the existence of several methyl groups on the benzene ring may produce several isomeric polymethylbenzyl radicals by removing one of the C-H bonds of each methyl group at different substitution position, which makes the assignment of spectrum ambiguous. In this work, the controversial vibronic assignments of isomeric dimethylbenzyl radicals were clearly resolved by using different precursors. By using corresponding dimethylbenzyl chlorides as precursors, we identified the origins of the vibronic bands of the dimethylbenzyl radicals generated by corona discharge of precursors 1,2,3- and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzenes. From the analysis of the spectra observed from the dimethylbenzyl chlorides in a corona excited supersonic expansion using a pinhole-type glass nozzle, we revised previous assignments of the 2,6- and 2,3-dimethylbenzyl radicals as well as the 3,4-, 2,4-, and 2,5-dimethylbenzyl radicals. In addition, spectroscopic data of electronic transition and vibrational mode frequencies in the ground electronic state of each isomer were accurately determined by comparing them with those obtained by an ab initio calculation and with the known vibrational data of precursors.

  13. Confirmation of sublunarean voids and thin layering in mare deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Ashley, J. W.; Boyd, A. K.; Wagner, R. V.; Speyerer, E. J.; Ray Hawke, B.; Hiesinger, H.; van der Bogert, C. H.

    2012-08-01

    Typical flow thicknesses of lunar mare basalts were not well constrained in the past, because as craters and rilles age, downslope movement of loose material tends to mix and bury stratigraphy, obscuring the three dimensional nature of the maria. New Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera high resolution images unambiguously reveal thicknesses of mare basalt layers exposed in impact craters, rilles, and steep-walled pits. Pits up to one hundred meters deep present relatively unmodified, near-vertical sections of mare in three cases, and many young impact craters also expose well preserved sections of mare. Oblique views of each pit and many of these craters reveal multiple layers, 3 to 14 m thick, indicating that eruptions typically produced a series of ˜10 m thick flows (or flow lobes) rather than flows many tens to hundreds of meters thick. Additionally, these images unambiguously show that the floors of two pits extend beneath the mare surfaces, thus revealing sublunarean voids of unknown lateral extent. We also document the occurrence of pits that may be expressions of collapse into subsurface voids in non-mare impact melt deposits. These voids are compelling targets for future human and robotic exploration, with potential as temporary shelters, habitations, or geologic museums.

  14. Cardiotoxicity associated with the synthetic cannabinoid, K9, with laboratory confirmation.

    PubMed

    Young, Amy C; Schwarz, Evan; Medina, Genevieve; Obafemi, Adebisi; Feng, Sing-Yi; Kane, Colin; Kleinschmidt, Kurt

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids have been popular recreational drugs of abuse for their psychoactive properties. Five of the many synthetic cannabinoids have been recently banned in the United States because of their unknown and potentially harmful adverse effects. Little is known about these substances. They are thought to have natural cannabinoid-like effects but have different chemical structures. Adverse effects related to synthetic cannabinoids are not well known. We provide clinical effects and patient outcome following K9 use. In addition, we briefly review synthetic cannabinoids. We present a 17-year-old adolescent boy with chest pain, tachycardia, and then bradycardia associated with smoking K9. Two synthetic cannabinoids, JWH-018 and JWH-073, were confirmed on laboratory analysis. In addition to the limited current data, we demonstrate harmful adverse effects related to toxicity of 2 synthetic cannabinoids. Further studies are needed.

  15. Additive lattice kirigami.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  16. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  17. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  18. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system.

  19. Cosmic Forensics Confirms Gamma-Ray Burst And Supernova Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Scientists announced today that they have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to confirm that a gamma-ray burst was connected to the death of a massive star. This result is an important step in understanding the origin of gamma-ray bursts, the most violent events in the present-day universe. "If a gamma-ray burst were a crime, then we now have strong circumstantial evidence that a supernova explosion was at the scene," said Nathaniel Butler of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, lead author of a paper presented today at the meeting of the High Energy Division of the American Astronomical Society. Chandra was able to obtain an unusually long observation (approximately 21 hours) of the afterglow of GRB 020813 (so named because the High-Energy Transient Explorer, HETE, discovered it on August 13, 2002.) A grating spectrometer aboard Chandra revealed an overabundance of elements characteristically dispersed in a supernova explosion. Narrow lines, or bumps, due to silicon and sulfur ions (atoms stripped of most of their electrons) were clearly identified in the X-ray spectrum of GRB 020813. "Our observation of GRB 020813 supports two of the most important features of the popular supra-nova model for gamma-ray bursts," said Butler. "An extremely massive star likely exploded less than two months prior to the gamma-ray burst, and the radiation from the gamma-ray burst was beamed into a narrow cone." An analysis of the data showed that the ions were moving away from the site of the gamma-ray burst at a tenth the speed of light, probably as part of a shell of matter ejected in the supernova explosion. The line features were observed to be sharply peaked, indicating that they were coming from a narrow region of the expanding shell. This implies that only a small fraction of the shell was illuminated by the gamma-ray burst, as would be expected if the burst was beamed into a narrow cone. The observed duration of the afterglow suggests a delay of about 60 days

  20. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Apps, John; Doughty, Christine; Gwatney, Hope; Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Trautz, Robert; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-03-01

    This is the final report of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix. We examine site characterization projects from several sites in the world. The list includes Yucca Mountain in the USA, Tono and Horonobe in Japan, AECL in Canada, sites in Sweden, and Olkiluoto in Finland. We identify important geologic features and parameters common to most (or all) sites to provide useful information for future repository siting activity. At first glance, one could question whether there was any commonality among the sites, which are in different rock types at different locations. For example, the planned Yucca Mountain site is a dry repository in unsaturated tuff, whereas the Swedish sites are situated in saturated granite. However, the study concludes that indeed there are a number of important common features and parameters among all the sites--namely, (1) fault properties, (2) fracture-matrix interaction (3) groundwater flux, (4) boundary conditions, and (5) the permeability and porosity of the materials. We list the lessons learned from the Yucca Mountain Project and other site characterization programs. Most programs have by and large been quite successful. Nonetheless, there are definitely 'should-haves' and 'could-haves', or lessons to be learned, in all these programs. Although each site characterization program has some unique aspects, we believe that these crosscutting lessons can be very useful for future site investigations to be conducted in Japan. One of the most common lessons learned is that a repository program should allow for flexibility, in both schedule and approach. We examine field investigation technologies used to collect site characterization data in the field. An extensive list of existing field technologies is presented, with some discussion on usage and limitations. Many of the

  1. Wavelet Based Method for Congestive Heart Failure Recognition by Three Confirmation Functions.

    PubMed

    Daqrouq, K; Dobaie, A

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signals and arrhythmia characterization by wavelet energy is proposed. This study employs a wavelet based feature extraction method for congestive heart failure (CHF) obtained from the percentage energy (PE) of terminal wavelet packet transform (WPT) subsignals. In addition, the average framing percentage energy (AFE) technique is proposed, termed WAFE. A new classification method is introduced by three confirmation functions. The confirmation methods are based on three concepts: percentage root mean square difference error (PRD), logarithmic difference signal ratio (LDSR), and correlation coefficient (CC). The proposed method showed to be a potential effective discriminator in recognizing such clinical syndrome. ECG signals taken from MIT-BIH arrhythmia dataset and other databases are utilized to analyze different arrhythmias and normal ECGs. Several known methods were studied for comparison. The best recognition rate selection obtained was for WAFE. The recognition performance was accomplished as 92.60% accurate. The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve as a common tool for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy was illustrated, which indicated that the tests are reliable. The performance of the presented system was investigated in additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) environment, where the recognition rate was 81.48% for 5 dB.

  2. Wavelet Based Method for Congestive Heart Failure Recognition by Three Confirmation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Daqrouq, K.; Dobaie, A.

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signals and arrhythmia characterization by wavelet energy is proposed. This study employs a wavelet based feature extraction method for congestive heart failure (CHF) obtained from the percentage energy (PE) of terminal wavelet packet transform (WPT) subsignals. In addition, the average framing percentage energy (AFE) technique is proposed, termed WAFE. A new classification method is introduced by three confirmation functions. The confirmation methods are based on three concepts: percentage root mean square difference error (PRD), logarithmic difference signal ratio (LDSR), and correlation coefficient (CC). The proposed method showed to be a potential effective discriminator in recognizing such clinical syndrome. ECG signals taken from MIT-BIH arrhythmia dataset and other databases are utilized to analyze different arrhythmias and normal ECGs. Several known methods were studied for comparison. The best recognition rate selection obtained was for WAFE. The recognition performance was accomplished as 92.60% accurate. The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve as a common tool for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy was illustrated, which indicated that the tests are reliable. The performance of the presented system was investigated in additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) environment, where the recognition rate was 81.48% for 5 dB. PMID:26949412

  3. Osteogenesis imperfecta type V: clinical and radiographic manifestations in mutation confirmed patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Hwa; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Kosaki, Keisuke; Kim, Jung-Wook; Cho, Sung Yoon; Yoo, Won Joon; Choi, In Ho; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2013-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type V is a specific OI phenotype with interosseous membrane calcification of the forearm and hyperplastic callus formation as typical features. The causative gene mutation for OI type V has been recently discovered. The purpose of this report is to review the clinical and radiographic characteristics of mutation confirmed OI type V in detail. Sixteen (nine familial and seven sporadic) patients were enrolled in the study. Blue sclera and dentinogenesis imperfecta were not evident in any patient. However, hypodontia in the permanent teeth, ectopic eruption, and short roots in molars were additionally observed in 11 patients. Of the radiographic abnormalities, cortical thickening and bony excrescence of interosseous margin of the ulna was the most common finding, followed by overgrowth of the olecranon and/or coronoid process of the ulna. Slender ribs and sloping of the posterior ribs with or without fractures were also a consistent finding. Hyperplastic callus was detected in 75% of patients and was commonly encountered at the femur. Heterotopic ossification in the muscles and tendon insertion sites were noted in four patients, which resulted in bony ankylosis or contracture of joints. The current study confirms common clinical and radiographic findings of OI type V and reports additional phenotypic information. These observations provide clues to recognize OI type V more promptly and guide to direct targeted molecular study. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Confirmation and investigation of higher science curiosity in Juarez Middle School students compared to their peers in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona Miranda, Karla

    In the last 20 years attitudes towards science and science classes in K-12 education have been an important topic of investigation due to the decreasing number of students choosing Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) related careers, and the increasing need for STEM prepared workers to cover the job demands of the future. The purpose of this study is to confirm a previously measured difference in scientific curiosity between middle school students in El Paso and in Ciudad Juarez, and to collect additional data that might tell us what the possible factors or reasons for this difference are. Our sample consists of 156 middle school students from Juarez public schools, and 448 middle school students from El Paso public middle schools. The Children's Science Curiosity Scale of Harty & Beall (1984) will be used to measure the curiosity level. Additionally, the students will be asked to respond to "Why do you like or dislike science?" Our results show that those obtained by Ortiz (2006) in a similar study persist but with a reduction of standard deviations. The percentage of students that state that they do not like science in Ciudad Juarez and El Paso are 9% and 14%, respectively. The most common reason to like science among students in Ciudad Juarez was related to the topics covered in class, and among students in El Paso was related to the experiments and hands-on activities done in class. After analyzing contingency tables with chi-squared tests and calculating the respective contingency coefficients, it is safe to say that even though relationships between the reasons to like or dislike science and country exist, these relationships are not strong. Other results, limitations, and future research also are discussed.

  5. Sensory experience induced by nitrous oxide analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E.; Galili, D.; Furer, R.; Steiner, J.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary findings on a group of 15 dental patients, treated with nitrous oxide indicated frequent occurrence of several, well-defined sensory experiences related to various modalities. A subsequent controlled experiment carried out on 44 volunteers, inhaling a 35% N2O + 65% O2 sedative gas-mixture as well as O2 alone in two different sessions confirmed a large variety of sensations not related to external stimuli. Taste and/or odor and thermal sensations were often reported as well as changes in auditory or visual perception of the environment in addition to reports of general heaviness, relaxation or tingling. PMID:2097907

  6. The Afshar Experiment and Complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Ruth

    2006-03-01

    A modified version of Young's experiment by Shahriar Afshar demonstrates that, prior to what appears to be a ``which-way'' measurement, an interference pattern exists. Afshar has claimed that this result constitutes a violation of the Principle of Complementarity. This paper discusses the implications of this experiment and considers how Cramer's Transactional Interpretation easily accomodates the result. It is also shown that the Afshar experiment is isomorphic in key respects to a spin one-half particle prepared as ``spin up along x'' and post- selected in a specific state of spin along z. The terminology ``which way'' or ``which-slit'' is critiqued; it is argued that this usage by both Afshar and his critics is misleading and has contributed to confusion surrounding the interpretation of the experiment. Nevertheless, it is concluded that Bohr would have had no more problem accounting for the Afshar result than he would in accounting for the aforementioned pre- and post- selection spin experiment, in which the particle's preparation state is confirmed by a nondestructive measurement prior to post-selection. In addition, some new inferences about the interpretation of delayed choice experiments are drawn from the analysis.

  7. Intonation as an encoder of speaker certainty: information and confirmation yes-no questions in Catalan.

    PubMed

    Vanrell, Maria del Mar; Mascaró, Ignasi; Torres-Tamarit, Francesc; Prieto, Pilar

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies in the field of intonational phonology have shown that information-seeking questions can be distinguished from confirmation-seeking questions by prosodic means in a variety of languages (Armstrong, 2010, for Puerto Rican Spanish; Grice & Savino, 1997, for Bari Italian; Kügler, 2003, for Leipzig German; Mata & Santos, 2010, for European Portuguese; Vanrell, Mascaró, Prieto, & Torres-Tamarit, 2010, for Catalan). However, all these studies have relied on production experiments and little is known about the perceptual relevance of these intonational cues. This paper explores whether Majorcan Catalan listeners distinguish information- and confirmation-seeking questions by means of two distinct nuclear falling pitch accents. Three behavioral tasks were conducted with 20 Majorcan Catalan subjects, namely a semantic congruity test, a rating test, and a classical categorical perception identification/discrimination test. The results show that a difference in pitch scaling on the leading H tone of the H+L* nuclear pitch accent is the main cue used by Majorcan Catalan listeners to distinguish confirmation questions from information-seeking questions. Thus, while a iH+L* pitch accent signals an information-seeking question (i.e., the speaker has no expectation about the nature of the answer), the H+L* pitch accent indicates that the speaker is asking about mutually shared information. We argue that these results have implications in representing the distinctions of tonal height in Catalan. The results also support the claim that phonological contrasts in intonation, together with other linguistic strategies, can signal the speakers' beliefs about the certainty of the proposition expressed.

  8. TitaniQ recrystallized: experimental confirmation of the original Ti-in-quartz calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jay B.; Watson, E. Bruce; Spear, Frank S.; Wark, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    agreement with the P- T conditions of the synthesis experiment. Separates of the high-Ti quartz from the initial synthesis experiment described above were used as starting material in subsequent experiments at 20 kbar, at which pressure the solubility of Ti in quartz is expected to be significantly lower in the recrystallized quartz. These recrystallization experiments were conducted under wet and dry conditions at 925 °C, and under wet conditions at 850 °C. Both wet and dry recrystallization experiments produced polycrystalline quartzites. Rutile occurs as inclusions in quartz, and as individual crystals dispersed along quartz grain boundaries. Quartz that grew during the recrystallization experiments has dark cathodoluminescence indicating substantially lower Ti concentrations. The average Ti concentrations in quartz from the recrystallization experiments are within the 95 % confidence interval of a linear fit to the 20 kbar data of Thomas et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 160:743-759, 2010). Collectively, the results from the synthesis and recrystallization experiments confirm that the Ti-in-quartz concentrations used to calibrate the P- T dependencies of Ti-in-quartz solubility in Thomas et al.'s (Contrib Mineral Petrol 160:743-759, 2010) calibration represent the equilibrium concentrations of Ti in quartz.

  9. Surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous solid water films: Confirmation of “top-down” crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-01-11

    Here, the crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism was confirmed by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D2O in H2O) at various positions in an ASW (H2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a “top-down” crystallization mechanism.

  10. Surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous solid water films: Confirmation of “top-down” crystallization

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-01-11

    Here, the crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism wasmore » confirmed by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D2O in H2O) at various positions in an ASW (H2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a “top-down” crystallization mechanism.« less

  11. Honeybees can learn the relationship between the solar ephemeris and a newly experienced landscape: a confirmation.

    PubMed

    Kemfort, Jordan R; Towne, William F

    2013-10-15

    Honeybees learn the spatial relationship between the sun's pattern of movement and the landscape immediately surrounding their nest, which allows bees to locate the sun under overcast skies by reference to the landscape alone. Surprisingly, when bees have been transplanted from their natal landscape to a rotated twin landscape - such as from one treeline to a similar but differently oriented treeline - they fail to learn the relationship between the sun and the second landscape. This raises the question of whether bees can ever learn the relationship between the sun's pattern of movement and a landscape other than their natal one. Here we confirm, with new and necessary controls, that bees can indeed learn the relationship between the sun's pattern of movement and a second (that is, non-natal) landscape, if the second landscape is panoramically different from the bees' natal site. We transplanted bees from their natal site to a panoramically different second site and, 3 days later, tested the bees' knowledge of the relationship between the sun and the second landscape. The test involved observing the bees' communicative dances under overcast skies at a third site that was a rotated twin of the second. These bees oriented their dances using a memory of the sun's course in relation to the second landscape, indicating that they had learned this relationship. Meanwhile, control bees transplanted directly from the natal site to the third site, skipping the second, danced differently, confirming the importance of the experimental bees' experience at the second site.

  12. An Extended Expectation-Confirmation Model for Mobile Nursing Information System Continuance.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pi-Jung; Lai, Hui-Min; Ma, Chen-Chung; Alexander, Judith W; Lin, Memg-Yi

    2016-11-01

    Nursing is critical in health care systems and comprises the planning, execution, and documentation of nursing care. To better manage health care information during patient care, the use of a mobile nursing information system (MNIS) provides more time to care for inpatients by reducing time-consuming and redundant paperwork. The purpose of this study was to extend the expectation-confirmation model and explore the roles of nursing professional competency (skill in use), habit (customary use), satisfaction (with use), and frequency of prior use in the context of MNIS continuance usage. We randomly chose 3 hospitals from among 14 hospitals in Taiwan that had indicated they used an MNIS. We conducted a field survey of nurses who had experience using the MNIS. We used a valid sample of 90 nurses to test the research model, using structural equation modeling with the partial least squares method. The results show that habit and frequency of prior use had a significant impact on MNIS continuance usage. Satisfaction and frequency of prior use had a significant impact on habit. Nurses' professional competence is crucial to perceived usefulness and, thus, is relevant in the context of MNIS continuance usage. When habit weakens over time, the continuance intention predicts continuance usage. This study showed that the extended expectation-confirmation model effectively predicts nurses' MNIS continuance usage and provides implications. Academics and practitioners should understand how nurses' habits form and how they affect continued MNIS use. Understanding the antecedents of habits can help nursing managers identify and manipulate habit formation.

  13. Engagement in E-learning opportunities: an empirical study on patient education using expectation confirmation theory.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Kai; Lin, I-Chun; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ming-Tsu

    2012-06-01

    Medical e-learning technology is widely employed to create an online platform for patients and healthcare providers alike. However, there are few studies that have investigated the reasons why some users reject e-learning technology usage after their initial experience. This study was conducted with the aim to better understand the factors leading to patients' continued usage of e-learning technologies. The theoretical foundation was based on the expectation-confirmation theory (ECT). The questionnaire survey was conducted during a two-month period and covered a total sample of 281 outpatients in a regional-teaching hospital. We found that the intention to continue e-learning usage was significantly related to patients' education level, expectation, perceived performance, confirmation and satisfaction. The use of this ECT model may provide administrators in the healthcare industry insights into the implementation of e-learning technologies. This research also opens up a new direction and enhances the completeness of related researches in the fields of medical informatics and health education.

  14. Surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous solid water films: Confirmation of “top-down” crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Chunqing; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-10-01

    The crystallization kinetics of nanoscale amorphous solid water (ASW) films are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). TPD measurements are used to probe surface crystallization and RAIRS measurements are used to probe bulk crystallization. Isothermal TPD results show that surface crystallization is independent of the film thickness (from 100 to 1000 ML). Conversely, the RAIRS measurements show that the bulk crystallization time increases linearly with increasing film thickness. These results suggest that nucleation and crystallization begin at the ASW/vacuum interface and then the crystallization growth front propagates linearly into the bulk. This mechanism was confirmed by selective placement of an isotopic layer (5% D2O in H2O) at various positions in an ASW (H2O) film. In this case, the closer the isotopic layer was to the vacuum interface, the earlier the isotopic layer crystallized. These experiments provide direct evidence to confirm that ASW crystallization in vacuum proceeds by a “top-down” crystallization mechanism.

  15. Confirmation of the observation of 2v ββ decay of 76Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avignone, F. T.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Guerard, C. K.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Miley, H. S.; Pogosov, V. S.; Reeves, J. H.; Starostin, A. S.; Tamanyan, A. G.

    1991-03-01

    Two previous independent reports of 2v ββ decay by the ITEP-YPI Collaboration, T {1}/{2}2 v = (9±1) × 10 20yr (1σ) , and the PNL-USC Collaboration, T {1}/{2}2 v = (1.12 -0.26+0.48) × 10 21yr (2σ) , are confirmed. A 0.25 kg Ge(Li) detector, isotopically enriched to 85% in 76Ge, was operated in the PNL-USC ultralow-background facility in the Homestake gold mine. Following a single correction to the data, a spectrum resembling that observed in the earlier PNL-USC experiment, with about the same intensity per 76Ge atom per year, was observed. The measured half-life is T {1}/{2}2 v = (9.2 -0.4+0.7) × 10 20yr (2σ) .

  16. Predictive simulation and experimental confirmation of the onset of instability of explosively driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Potocki, Mark L; Hull, Lawrence M

    2010-01-01

    The detonation of explosives with thin shells can cause the shells to expand to over 200% strain at strain rates on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup -1} before failure. Experimental data indicate the development and growth of multiple plastic instabilities lead to the formation of failure and fragmentation in the near periodic pattern. Presented are comparisons of the onset of instabilities from simulations and experimental data. At Los Alamos National Laboratory material models have been evolving for several years to simulate high strain-rate behavior. Our models include the effects of shock heating and damage evolutions as well as failure. The current edition of one of our models uses a tabular EOS, the PTW strength model, a modified Gurson yield surface to compute damage evolution, and a Johnson-Cook failure model. Presented are some of the details of these models. An experiment confirmed the temperature discontinuities.

  17. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Perks, J; Benedict, S; Lucero, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  18. 49 CFR 40.251 - What are the first steps in an alcohol confirmation test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... What are the first steps in an alcohol confirmation test? As the BAT for an alcohol confirmation test, you must follow these steps to begin the confirmation test process: (a) You must carry out a requirement for a waiting period before the confirmation test, by taking the following steps: (1) You...

  19. 49 CFR 40.251 - What are the first steps in an alcohol confirmation test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... What are the first steps in an alcohol confirmation test? As the BAT for an alcohol confirmation test, you must follow these steps to begin the confirmation test process: (a) You must carry out a requirement for a waiting period before the confirmation test, by taking the following steps: (1) You...

  20. Identification and confirmation of ammonia toxicity in contaminated sediments using a modified toxicity identification evaluation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sprang, P.A. Van; Janssen, C.R.

    1997-12-01

    Toxicity identification of sediment pore waters from four sites in the Upper Scheldt (Belgium) was assessed using a simplified and discriminative toxicity identification evaluation procedure. The samples from all locations exhibited acute toxicity toward the freshwater crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus. Toxicity was removed or considerably reduced by the cation exchange resins and air stripping at pH 11. In addition, the toxicity of the pore waters was found to be highly pH dependent. Increased toxicity was observed at higher pH levels, whereas reduced toxicity was found at lower pH levels. Based on these results, ammonia was suggested as the main toxic agent. The presence of ammonia concentrations exceeding the 24-h median lethal concentration and comparison of the toxicity characterization profiles of the pore waters with those of the suspected toxicant supported this hypothesis. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between the observed toxicity of the pore waters and the expected toxicity (due to the presence of the suspected toxicant) confirmed ammonia as the true toxic agent. Finally, the ratio between the expected ammonia toxicity and the observed toxicity from the characterization tests was approx. 1, meaning that all or most of the observed toxicity was caused by the presence of one toxicant (i.e., ammonia). The developed toxicity identification evaluation procedure is suggested as a useful tool for the identification and confirmation of toxicants in contaminated sediments.

  1. Microgenetic patterns of children's multiplication learning: confirming the overlapping waves model by latent growth modeling.

    PubMed

    van der Ven, Sanne H G; Boom, Jan; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H; Leseman, Paul P M

    2012-09-01

    Variability in strategy selection is an important characteristic of learning new skills such as mathematical skills. Strategies gradually come and go during this development. In 1996, Siegler described this phenomenon as "overlapping waves." In the current microgenetic study, we attempted to model these overlapping waves statistically. In addition, we investigated whether development in strategy selection is related to development in accuracy and to what degree working memory is related to both. We expected that children with poor working memory are limited in their possibilities to make the associations that are necessary to progress to more mature strategies. This limitation would explain the often-found relationship between working memory and mathematical abilities. To this aim, the strategy selection and accuracy of 98 children who were learning single-digit multiplication was assessed eight times on a weekly basis. Using latent growth modeling for categorical data, we confirmed Siegler's hypothesis of overlapping waves. Moreover, both the intercepts and the slopes of strategy selection and accuracy were strongly interrelated. Finally, working memory predicted both strategy selection and accuracy, confirming that working memory is related to mathematical problem solving in two ways because it influences both the maturity of strategy choice and the probability of making procedural mistakes.

  2. Website Quality, Expectation, Confirmation, and End User Satisfaction: The Knowledge-Intensive Website of the Korean National Cancer Information Center

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Chulmo; Wati, Yulia; Park, Keeho

    2011-01-01

    Background The fact that patient satisfaction with primary care clinical practices and physician-patient communications has decreased gradually has brought a new opportunity to the online channel as a supplementary service to provide additional information. Objective In this study, our objectives were to examine the process of cognitive knowledge expectation-confirmation from eHealth users and to recommend the attributes of a “knowledge-intensive website.”. Knowledge expectation can be defined as users’ existing attitudes or beliefs regarding expected levels of knowledge they may gain by accessing the website. Knowledge confirmation is the extent to which user’s knowledge expectation of information systems use is realized during actual use. In our hypothesized research model, perceived information quality, presentation and attractiveness as well as knowledge expectation influence knowledge confirmation, which in turn influences perceived usefulness and end user satisfaction, which feeds back to knowledge expectation. Methods An empirical study was conducted at the National Cancer Center (NCC), Republic of Korea (South Korea), by evaluating its official website. A user survey was administered containing items to measure subjectively perceived website quality and expectation-confirmation attributes. A study sample of 198 usable responses was used for further analysis. We used the structural equation model to test the proposed research model. Results Knowledge expectation exhibited a positive effect on knowledge confirmation (beta = .27, P < .001). The paths from information quality, information presentation, and website attractiveness to knowledge confirmation were also positive and significant (beta = .24, P < .001; beta = .29, P < .001; beta = .18, P < .001, respectively). Moreover, the effect of knowledge confirmation on perceived usefulness was also positively significant (beta = .64, P < .001). Knowledge expectation together with knowledge confirmation

  3. Digging up "Taosi Observatory" and the Confirmation from the Ancient References

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Boa; Chen, Jiu-Jin

    2007-12-01

    The ancient references recorded that the two suggestions for the calendar existed in the Emperor Yao time. It is unrealistic for the officer Xihe to observe the four middle transit stars at the beginning of the evening to determine the seasons. In addition, the suggestion of the leap month in the certain year being in the lunar calendar by him is also not realistic. The variations of the azimuths for the sunrise and sunset observed by him "created 10 days", that is, created the ten-month solar calendar which is just realistic. The result in the paper by Li Wei-boa et al. (2007) has also been confirmed. This paper supplements the suggestion in the paper mentioned above and the two papers could be the sisterly papers.

  4. Confirmation of Legionella pneumophila cultures with a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Tenover, F C; Carlson, L; Goldstein, L; Sturge, J; Plorde, J J

    1985-01-01

    We compared a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against an outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila (Genetic Systems Corp. [GSC], Seattle, Wash.) with a similarly labeled polyclonal reagent (L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, poly; BioDx, Inc., Denville, N.J.) for the confirmation of L. pneumophila isolates grown in culture. Duplicate suspensions of 52 organisms, including 21 L. pneumophila and 8 non-L. pneumophila species of legionella, were placed on individual glass slides, fixed, and stained with both reagents, and the results were compared. Both antisera correctly identified all L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, but only the GSC reagent produced definitive staining of the L. pneumophila isolates of serogroups 7, 8, and 9. Additionally, the GSC reagent produced more uniform staining patterns around the legionella bacilli and displayed little background fluorescence when compared with the BioDx reagent. PMID:3891777

  5. Genetic Confirmation of the Role of Sulfopyruvate Decarboxylase in Coenzyme M Biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    DOE PAGES

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Ellison, Courtney K.; Whitman, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Coenzyme M is an essential coenzyme for methanogenesis. The proposed biosynthetic pathway consists of five steps, of which the fourth step is catalyzed by sulfopyruvate decarboxylase (ComDE). Disruption of the gene comE by transposon mutagenesis resulted in a partial coenzyme M auxotroph, which grew poorly in the absence of coenzyme M and retained less than 3% of the wild type level of coenzyme M biosynthesis. Upon coenzyme M addition, normal growth of the mutant was restored. Moreover, complementation of the mutation with the wild type comE gene in trans restored full growth in the absence of coenzyme M. Thesemore » results confirm that ComE plays an important role in coenzyme M biosynthesis. The inability to yield a complete CoM auxotroph suggests that either the transposon insertion failed to completely inactivate the gene or M. maripaludis possesses a promiscuous activity that partially complemented the mutation.« less

  6. Infective Endocarditis Caused by Neisseria elongata on a Native Tricuspid Valve and Confirmed by DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon Pyo; Kang, Ki-Woon; Yoon, Hyeon Soo; Yoo, Seungmin; Lee, Myung-Shin

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria elongata, a common oral bacterium, has been recognized as a cause of infections such as infective endocarditis, septicemia, and osteomyelitis. Neisseria-induced infective endocarditis, although infrequently reported, typically arises after dental procedures. Without antibiotic therapy, its complications can be severe. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with fever, severe dyspnea, and a leg abscess from cellulitis. An echocardiogram showed a vegetation-like echogenic structure on the septal leaflet of the patient's native tricuspid valve, and an insignificant Gerbode defect. Three blood cultures grew gram-negative, antibiotic-susceptible coccobacilli that were confirmed to be N. elongata. Subsequent DNA sequencing conclusively isolated N. elongata subsp nitroreducens as the organism responsible for the infective endocarditis. The patient recovered after 21 days of antibiotic therapy. In addition to the patient's unusual case, we discuss the nature and isolation of N. elongata and its subspecies. PMID:24808790

  7. Quenching and enhancing of SERS of methyl orange after the addition of chlorine and nitrate anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aiping; Zhang, Jinzhi

    2009-08-01

    The influence of Cl - and NO 3- anions on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of methyl orange adsorbed on “chemical pure” silver colloids was studied. It was found that NO 3- could give rise to a large enhancement of SERS of methyl orange, while Cl - could obviously weaken the SERS intensity of this molecule. Both quenching and enhancing effects were discussed and compared with each other. It indicated the coadsorbed process of these adsorbed species, and different adsorption behaviors of the molecules on silver surface directly resulted in the difference. In addition, the results of TEM pictures and UV-visible spectral experiments have also confirmed the conclusion above.

  8. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  9. Clinical and Epidemiological Characterization of Laboratory-Confirmed Autochthonous Cases of Zika Virus Disease in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Corona, Maria Eugenia; De la Garza Barroso, Ana Lucía; Rodriguez Martínez, Jose Cruz; Luna Guzmán, Norma Irene; Ruiz Matus, Cuitláhuac; Díaz Quiñonez, José Alberto; Lopez Martinez, Irma; Kuri Morales, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2014, autochthonous circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas was detected (Easter Island, Chile). In May 2015, Brazil confirmed autochthonous ­­transmission and in October of that year Colombia reported their first  cases. Now more than 52 countries have reported cases, including Mexico. To deal with this contingency in Mexico, several surveillance systems, in addition to systems for vector-borne diseases were strengthened with the participation of all health institutions. Also, the Ministry of Health defined an Action Plan against ZIKV for the whole country. Methods: We analyzed 93 autochthonous cases of ZIKV disease identified by Epidemiological Surveillance System for Zika Virus in Mexico. All autochthonous cases confirmed by laboratory since November 25, 2015 to February 19, 2016 were included. A description of clinical and epidemiological characteristics of 93 cases of ZIKV disease are presenting and, we describe the Action Plan against this public health emergency.  Results: The distribution of cases by sex was 61 men and 32 women; mean age was 35 years old (S.D. 15, range 6-90). The main clinical features in the 93 cases were fever (96.6%), rash (93.3%), non-purulent conjunctivitis (88.8%), headache (85.4%), and myalgia (84.3%). No deaths were reported. Conclusion: The ZIKV epidemic poses new challenges to public health systems. The information provided for basic, clinical, and epidemiological research, in addition to the data derived from epidemiological surveillance is essential. However, there are still many unanswered questions regarding mechanisms of transmission, complications, and impact of this virus. PMID:27158557

  10. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A z = 6.740 GALAXY BEHIND THE BULLET CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Bradac, Marusa; Hall, Nicholas; Vanzella, Eros; Treu, Tommaso; Fontana, Adriano; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Zaritsky, Dennis; Clement, Benjamin; Stiavelli, Massimo

    2012-08-10

    We present the first results of our spectroscopic follow-up of 6.5 < z < 10 candidate galaxies behind clusters of galaxies. We report the spectroscopic confirmation of an intrinsically faint Lyman break galaxy (LBG) identified as a z{sub 850LP}-band dropout behind the Bullet Cluster. We detect an emission line at {lambda} = 9412 A at >5{sigma} significance using a 16 hr long exposure with FORS2 VLT. Based on the absence of flux in bluer broadband filters, the blue color of the source, and the absence of additional lines, we identify the line as Ly{alpha} at z = 6.740 {+-} 0.003. The integrated line flux is f = (0.7 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg{sup -1} s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (the uncertainties are due to random and flux calibration errors, respectively) making it the faintest Ly{alpha} flux detected at these redshifts. Given the magnification of {mu} = 3.0 {+-} 0.2 the intrinsic (corrected for lensing) flux is f {sup int} = (0.23 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg{sup -1} s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (additional uncertainty due to magnification), which is {approx}2-3 times fainter than other such measurements in z {approx} 7 galaxies. The intrinsic H{sub 160W}-band magnitude of the object is m{sup int}{sub H{sub 1{sub 6{sub 0{sub W}}}}}=27.57{+-}0.17, corresponding to 0.5 L* for LBGs at these redshifts. The galaxy is one of the two sub-L* LBG galaxies spectroscopically confirmed at these high redshifts (the other is also a lensed z = 7.045 galaxy), making it a valuable probe for the neutral hydrogen fraction in the early universe.

  11. MicroRNA markers for forensic body fluid identification obtained from microarray screening and quantitative RT-PCR confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Zubakov, Dmitry; Boersma, Anton W. M.; Choi, Ying; van Kuijk, Patricia F.; Wiemer, Erik A. C.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein coding molecules with important regulatory functions; many have tissue-specific expression patterns. Their very small size in principle makes them less prone to degradation processes, unlike messenger RNAs (mRNAs), which were previously proposed as molecular tools for forensic body fluid identification. To identify suitable miRNA markers for forensic body fluid identification, we first screened total RNA samples derived from saliva, semen, vaginal secretion, and venous and menstrual blood for the expression of 718 human miRNAs using a microarray platform. All body fluids could be easily distinguished from each other on the basis of complete array-based miRNA expression profiles. Results from quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR; TaqMan) assays for microarray candidate markers confirmed strong over-expression in the targeting body fluid of several miRNAs for venous blood and several others for semen. However, no candidate markers from array experiments for other body fluids such as saliva, vaginal secretion, or menstrual blood could be confirmed by RT-PCR. Time-wise degradation of venous blood and semen stains for at least 1 year under lab conditions did not significantly affect the detection sensitivity of the identified miRNA markers. The detection limit of the TaqMan assays tested for selected venous blood and semen miRNA markers required only subpicogram amounts of total RNA per single RT-PCR test, which is considerably less than usually needed for reliable mRNA RT-PCR detection. We therefore propose the application of several stable miRNA markers for the forensic identification of blood stains and several others for semen stain identification, using commercially available TaqMan assays. Additional work remains necessary in search for suitable miRNA markers for other forensically relevant body fluids. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00414-009-0402-3) contains

  12. Priming Addition Facts with Semantic Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Miriam; Pedigo, Samuel F.; Oskarsson, An T.

    2008-01-01

    Results from 2 relational-priming experiments suggest the existence of an automatic analogical coordination between semantic and arithmetic relations. Word pairs denoting object sets served as primes in a task that elicits "obligatory" activation of addition facts (5 + 3 activates 8; J. LeFevre, J. Bisanz, & L. Mrkonjic, 1988). Semantic relations…

  13. Priming addition facts with semantic relations.

    PubMed

    Bassok, Miriam; Pedigo, Samuel F; Oskarsson, An T

    2008-03-01

    Results from 2 relational-priming experiments suggest the existence of an automatic analogical coordination between semantic and arithmetic relations. Word pairs denoting object sets served as primes in a task that elicits "obligatory" activation of addition facts (5 + 3 activates 8; J. LeFevre, J. Bisanz, & L. Mrkonjic, 1988). Semantic relations between the priming words were either aligned or misaligned with the structure of addition (M. Bassok, V. M. Chase, & S. A. Martin, 1998). Obligatory activation of addition facts occurred when the digits were primed by categorically related words (tulips-daisies), which are aligned with addition, but did not occur when the digits were primed by unrelated words (hens-radios, Experiment 1) or by functionally related words (records-songs, Experiment 2), which are misaligned with addition. These findings lend support to the viability of automatic analogical priming (B. A. Spellman, K. J. Holyoak, & R. G. Morrison, 2001) and highlight the relevance of arithmetic applications to theoretical accounts of mental arithmetic.

  14. Experiment Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik

    Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central databases, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment databases: databases designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive database. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment database to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.

  15. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Steffen, Jason H.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  16. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. II. CONFIRMATION OF TWO MULTIPLANET SYSTEMS VIA A NON-PARAMETRIC CORRELATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Charbonneau, David; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Welsh, William F.; Allen, Christopher; Buchhave, Lars A.; Collaboration: Kepler Science Team; and others

    2012-05-10

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies is in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the TTVs of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple-planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  17. From Lucy to Kadanuumuu: balanced analyses of Australopithecus afarensis assemblages confirm only moderate skeletal dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Reno, Philip L; Lovejoy, C Owen

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in body size is often used as a correlate of social and reproductive behavior in Australopithecus afarensis. In addition to a number of isolated specimens, the sample for this species includes two small associated skeletons (A.L. 288-1 or "Lucy" and A.L. 128/129) and a geologically contemporaneous death assemblage of several larger individuals (A.L. 333). These have driven both perceptions and quantitative analyses concluding that Au. afarensis was markedly dimorphic. The Template Method enables simultaneous evaluation of multiple skeletal sites, thereby greatly expanding sample size, and reveals that A. afarensis dimorphism was similar to that of modern humans. A new very large partial skeleton (KSD-VP-1/1 or "Kadanuumuu") can now also be used, like Lucy, as a template specimen. In addition, the recently developed Geometric Mean Method has been used to argue that Au. afarensis was equally or even more dimorphic than gorillas. However, in its previous application Lucy and A.L. 128/129 accounted for 10 of 11 estimates of female size. Here we directly compare the two methods and demonstrate that including multiple measurements from the same partial skeleton that falls at the margin of the species size range dramatically inflates dimorphism estimates. Prevention of the dominance of a single specimen's contribution to calculations of multiple dimorphism estimates confirms that Au. afarensis was only moderately dimorphic.

  18. From Lucy to Kadanuumuu: balanced analyses of Australopithecus afarensis assemblages confirm only moderate skeletal dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Lovejoy, C. Owen

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in body size is often used as a correlate of social and reproductive behavior in Australopithecus afarensis. In addition to a number of isolated specimens, the sample for this species includes two small associated skeletons (A.L. 288-1 or “Lucy” and A.L. 128/129) and a geologically contemporaneous death assemblage of several larger individuals (A.L. 333). These have driven both perceptions and quantitative analyses concluding that Au. afarensis was markedly dimorphic. The Template Method enables simultaneous evaluation of multiple skeletal sites, thereby greatly expanding sample size, and reveals that A. afarensis dimorphism was similar to that of modern humans. A new very large partial skeleton (KSD-VP-1/1 or “Kadanuumuu”) can now also be used, like Lucy, as a template specimen. In addition, the recently developed Geometric Mean Method has been used to argue that Au. afarensis was equally or even more dimorphic than gorillas. However, in its previous application Lucy and A.L. 128/129 accounted for 10 of 11 estimates of female size. Here we directly compare the two methods and demonstrate that including multiple measurements from the same partial skeleton that falls at the margin of the species size range dramatically inflates dimorphism estimates. Prevention of the dominance of a single specimen’s contribution to calculations of multiple dimorphism estimates confirms that Au. afarensis was only moderately dimorphic. PMID:25945314

  19. Experimental Confirmation of Water Column Natural Resonance Migration in a BBDB Device

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L.; Gunawan, Budi; Holmes, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Experiments were conducted with a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) oscillating water column wave energy conversion device with a scaling factor of 50 at HMRC at University College Cork, Ireland. Results were compared to numerical performance models. This work experimentally verified the migration of the natural resonance location of the water column due to hydrodynamic coupling for a floating non- axisymmetric device without a power conversion chain PCC present. In addition, the experimental results verified the performance model with a PCC of the same non- axisymmetric device when both floating and grounded.

  20. Cognitive bias in forensic anthropology: visual assessment of skeletal remains is susceptible to confirmation bias.

    PubMed

    Nakhaeizadeh, Sherry; Dror, Itiel E; Morgan, Ruth M

    2014-05-01

    An experimental study was designed to examine cognitive biases within forensic anthropological non-metric methods in assessing sex, ancestry and age at death. To investigate examiner interpretation, forty-one non-novice participants were semi randomly divided into three groups. Prior to conducting the assessment of the skeletal remains, two of the groups were given different extraneous contextual information regarding the sex, ancestry and age at death of the individual. The third group acted as a control group with no extraneous contextual information. The experiment was designed to investigate if the interpretation and conclusions of the skeletal remains would differ amongst participants within the three groups, and to assess whether the examiners would confirm or disagree with the given extraneous context when establishing a biological profile. The results revealed a significant biasing effect within the three groups, demonstrating a strong confirmation bias in the assessment of sex, ancestry and age at death. In assessment of sex, 31% of the participants in the control group concluded that the skeleton remains were male. In contrast, in the group that received contextual information that the remains were male, 72% concluded that the remains were male, and in the participant group where the context was that the remains were of a female, 0% of the participants concluded that the remains were male. Comparable results showing bias were found in assessing ancestry and age at death. These data demonstrate that cognitive bias can impact forensic anthropological non-metric methods on skeletal remains and affects the interpretation and conclusions of the forensic scientists. This empirical study is a step in establishing an evidence base approach for dealing with cognitive issues in forensic anthropological assessments, so as to enhance this valuable forensic science discipline.

  1. 78 FR 21045 - Confirmation, Portfolio Reconciliation, Portfolio Compression, and Swap Trading Relationship...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 23 RIN 3038-AC96 Confirmation, Portfolio Reconciliation, Portfolio Compression, and... requirements for swap confirmation, portfolio reconciliation, portfolio compression, and swap...

  2. How Safe Are Color Additives?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Safe are Color Additives? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed Download PDF (380 K) Color additives give the red tint to your fruit ...

  3. Minimum current requirement for confirming the localization of an epiradicular catheter placement

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Seon; Shim, Jae Hang; Kim, Dong Won; Kang, Min Serk

    2012-01-01

    Background Based on the necessity to confirm the epiradicular catheter misplacement, epiradicular threshold current for the confirmation of catheter tip localization is required. Methods Thirty-four adult patients with low extremity radiating pain were to receive epiradicular catheterization at the lumbosacral level. The epidural space was accessed percutaneously in cranial to caudal direction. A metal coil-reinforced epidural catheter was inserted and advanced caudolaterally toward the target neural foramen until the catheter tip was located below the bisection of pedicle. The electrical stimulation was performed after catheter placement in epidural and epiradicular space. Using the constant current nerve stimulator, the stimulating current was increased from 0 to 5 mA (pulse width of 0.3 ms; frequency of 2 Hz) until adequate motor contraction was evident. The threshold current for motor response with epidural space (EDmA) and epiradicular space (ERmA) placement were recorded upon electrical stimulation. In addition, the threshold charge for motor response with epidural (EDnC) and epiradicular (ERnC) placement were recorded. Results Of 34 catheters intentionally placed in the epiradicular space, ERmA was 0.53 ± 0.48 mA. The ERnC was significantly lower than EDnC (P < 0.05). The EDmA and ERmA were below 1 mA in 3 patients and above 1 mA in 4 patients, respectively. Conclusions We conclude that, threshold current for motor response seems to be lower for epiradicular compared with epidural placement, although we were not able to directly investigate the epidural threshold current. The threshold current of epiradicular space overlap that in the epidural space. PMID:23060981

  4. Systematic analysis of glycerol: colourimetric screening and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Sardela, Vinícius F; Scalco, Fernanda B; Cavalcante, Karina M; Simoni, Ruth E; Silva, Deyvison R; Pereira, Henrique Marcelo G; de Oliveira, Maria Lúcia L Costa; Aquino Neto, Francisco R

    2015-10-01

    Glycerol is a naturally occurring polyol in the human body, essential for several metabolic processes. It is widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and medical industries and in clinical practice as a plasma volume expander (PVE). Athletes, however, may use glycerol to mask the presence of forbidden substances or to enhance performance, inclusively through hyperhydration achieved by glycerol ingestion with added fluid. These practices are considered doping, and are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Therefore, glycerol was introduced in the prohibited list. Doping through glycerol ingestion can readily be identified by detection of elevated glycerol concentrations in urine. In this paper, a protocol for the fast detection of glycerol in urine is proposed. It consists of a previous visual colourimetric screening, followed by a quantitative/qualitative confirmation analysis by mass spectrometry. The screening procedure involves a reaction in which polyhydric alcohols are oxidized by periodate to formic acid and formaldehyde, which is detected by the addition of a fuchsin solution. For the subsequent qualitative/quantitative confirmation analysis, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based approach with a non-deuterated internal standard and a drying step of only 10 min is proposed. The linear correlation was demonstrated within WADA´s threshold range. The calculated RSD were 2.1% for within-day precision and 2.8% for between-day precision. The uncertainty estimation was calculated, and a value of 2.7% was obtained. The procedure may also be used for the analysis of other polyols in urine, as for example the PVE mannitol.

  5. Detergent Additive for Lubricating Oils,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Russian patent pertains to a method of producing additives for lubricating oils . A method is known for producing an antiwear additive for... lubricating oils by processing phenols with phosphorus oxychloride, phosphoric acid esters are obtained. In order to give the additive detergent properties

  6. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Asthma in Population-Based Cohorts Confirm Known and Suggested Loci and Identify an Additional Association near HLA

    PubMed Central

    Couto Alves, Alexessander; Lyon, Helen N.; Ferreira, Manuel A. R.; Strachan, David P.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Abramson, Michael J.; Brown, Matthew A.; Coin, Lachlan; Dharmage, Shyamali C.; Duffy, David L.; Haahtela, Tari; Heath, Andrew C.; Janson, Christer; Kähönen, Mika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Laitinen, Jaana; Le Souef, Peter; Lehtimäki, Terho; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Marks, Guy B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Matheson, Melanie C.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Palotie, Aarno; Pouta, Anneli; Robertson, Colin F.; Viikari, Jorma; Widen, Elisabeth; Wjst, Matthias; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Thompson, Philip J.; Wareham, Nick; Eriksson, Johan; Jousilahti, Pekka; Laitinen, Tarja; Pekkanen, Juha; Raitakari, Olli T.; O'Connor, George T.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Asthma has substantial morbidity and mortality and a strong genetic component, but identification of genetic risk factors is limited by availability of suitable studies. Objectives To test if population-based cohorts with self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma and genome-wide association (GWA) data could be used to validate known associations with asthma and identify novel associations. Methods The APCAT (Analysis in Population-based Cohorts of Asthma Traits) consortium consists of 1,716 individuals with asthma and 16,888 healthy controls from six European-descent population-based cohorts. We examined associations in APCAT of thirteen variants previously reported as genome-wide significant (P<5x10−8) and three variants reported as suggestive (P<5×10−7). We also searched for novel associations in APCAT (Stage 1) and followed-up the most promising variants in 4,035 asthmatics and 11,251 healthy controls (Stage 2). Finally, we conducted the first genome-wide screen for interactions with smoking or hay fever. Main Results We observed association in the same direction for all thirteen previously reported variants and nominally replicated ten of them. One variant that was previously suggestive, rs11071559 in RORA, now reaches genome-wide significance when combined with our data (P = 2.4×10−9). We also identified two genome-wide significant associations: rs13408661 near IL1RL1/IL18R1 (PStage1+Stage2 = 1.1x10−9), which is correlated with a variant recently shown to be associated with asthma (rs3771180), and rs9268516 in the HLA region (PStage1+Stage2 = 1.1x10−8), which appears to be independent of previously reported associations in this locus. Finally, we found no strong evidence for gene-environment interactions with smoking or hay fever status. Conclusions Population-based cohorts with simple asthma phenotypes represent a valuable and largely untapped resource for genetic studies of asthma. PMID:23028483

  7. 10 CFR 60.141 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 60.141 Section 60.141 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Performance Confirmation Program § 60.141 Confirmation of geotechnical...

  8. 77 FR 53769 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... and 171 RIN 3150-AJ14 Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Direct final rule; confirmation of effective date. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is confirming the effective date of August 22, 2012,...

  9. 78 FR 10642 - Removal of Confirm Service From the Market-Dominant Product List

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Confirm Service From the Market-Dominant Product List AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Commission to remove Confirm service from the Mail Classification Schedule's Market-Dominant product list... Regulatory Commission a request to remove Confirm service from the Mail Classification Schedule's...

  10. 49 CFR 40.251 - What are the first steps in an alcohol confirmation test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What are the first steps in an alcohol... FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests § 40.251 What are the first steps in an alcohol confirmation test? As the BAT for an alcohol confirmation...

  11. Ubiquitous healthy diatoms in the deep sea confirms deep carbon injection by the biological pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí, Susana; González-Gordillo, Jose I.; Vaqué, Dolors; Estrada, Marta; Cerezo, Maria I.; Salazar, Guillem; Gasol, Josep M.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    The role of the ocean as a sink for CO2 is partially dependent on the downward transport of phytoplankton cells packaged within fast-sinking particles. However, whether such fast-sinking mechanisms deliver fresh organic carbon down to the deep bathypelagic sea and whether this mechanism is prevalent across the ocean awaits confirmation. Photosynthetic plankton, directly responsible for trapping CO2 in organic form in the surface layer, are a key constituent of the flux of sinking particles and are assumed to die and become detritus upon leaving the photic layer. Research in the 1960-70's reported the occasional presence of well-preserved phytoplankton cells in the deep ocean, but these observations, which could signal at rapid sinking rates, were considered anecdotal. Using new developments we tested the presence of healthy phytoplankton cells in the deep sea (2000 to 4000 m depth) along the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition, a global expedition sampling the bathypelagic zone of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. In particular, we used a new microplankton sampling device, the Bottle-Net, 16S rDNA sequences, flow cytometric counts, vital stains and experiments to explore the abundance and health status of photosynthetic plankton cells between 2,000 and 4,000 m depth along the Circumnavigation track. We described the community of microplankton (> 20μm) found at the deep ocean (2000-4000 m depth), surprisingly dominated by phytoplankton, and within this, by diatoms. Moreover, we report the ubiquitous presence of healthy photosynthetic cells, dominated by diatoms, down to 4,000 m in the deep dark sea. Decay experiments with surface phytoplankton suggested that the large proportion (18%) of healthy photosynthetic cells observed, on average, in the dark ocean, requires transport times from few days to few weeks, corresponding to sinking rates of 124 to 732 m d-1, comparable to those of fast sinking aggregates and faecal pellets. These results confirm the

  12. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  13. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  14. Failure to confirm the Rauscher and Shaw description of recovery of the Mozart effect.

    PubMed

    Steele, K M; Brown, J D; Stoecker, J A

    1999-06-01

    The Mozart effect is an increase in spatial reasoning scores detected immediately after listening to the first movement of a Mozart piano sonata. Rauscher and Shaw (1998) suggested that failure to produce a Mozart effect could arise from carryover effects of a spatial reasoning pretest which may interfere with the effect of listening to Mozart. They cited an unpublished study in which a verbal distractor was inserted between the pretest and listening condition, and the manipulation produced the recovery of a Mozart effect. This experiment attempted to confirm the unpublished study. 206 college students were exposed to one of three sequences, pretest-Verbal distractor material-Mozart, pretest-Mozart-Verbal distractor material, and pretest-Verbal distractor material. An immediate posttest indicated no significant difference on solution of paper folding and cutting items among the three groups. The results do not support Rauscher and Shaw (1998). Our negative results are consistent with prior failures in other laboratories to produce a Mozart effect.

  15. Fulfilling Koch's postulates confirms the mycotic origin of Lethargic Crab Disease.

    PubMed

    Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Boeger, Walter A; Vicente, Vânia A; Chammas, Marcelo; Ostrensky, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    In the northeast region of the Brazilian coast, a disease has been causing massive mortalities of populations of the mangrove land crab, Ucides cordatus (L.) since 1997. The clinical signs of this disease, which include lethargy and ataxia, led to the disease being termed Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD). Evidence from a variety of sources indicates that there is an association between LCD and a new species of black yeast, Exophiala cancerae de Hoog, Vicente, Najafzadeh, Badali, Seyedmousavi & Boeger. This study tests this putative correlation through in vivo experiments. Disease-free specimens of U. cordatus were experimentally infected with Exophiala cancerae (strain CBS 120420) isolate. During the 30-day experimental period, only a single death was observed within the control crabs. However, at the end of this period, crabs that were inoculated once or three-times with mycelial elements and hyphae of E. cancerae had a 60% and 50% mortality rates, respectively (n = 6 and n = 5). These results support that the fungal agent is pathogenic and is the causative agent of LCD. Species-specific molecular markers confirm the presence of E. cancerae (strain CBS 120420) in recovered colonies and tissue samples from the infected animals. The experimentally infected crabs manifested signs (lethargy, ataxia and tetany) that were consistent to LCD-affected animals in the environment. These results fulfil Koch's postulates and the hypothesis that the tested strain of Exophiala cancerae is a causative agent of LCD is accepted.

  16. Confirmation of parity violation in the {gamma} decay of {sup 180}Hf{sup m}

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J. R.; Goldring, G.; Hass, M.; Lakshmi, S.; Stone, N. J.; Severijns, N.; Kraev, I. S.; Wauters, F.; Zakoucky, D.; Giles, T.; Lindroos, M.; Koester, U.

    2007-08-15

    This paper reports measurements made using the technique of online nuclear orientation which reexamine the {gamma} decay of isomeric {sup 180}Hf{sup m} and specifically the 501 keV 8{sup -}6{sup +} transition. The irregular admixture of E2 to M2/E3 multipolarity in this transition, deduced from the forward-backward asymmetry of its angular distribution, has for decades stood as the prime evidence for parity mixing in nuclear states. The experiment, based on ion implantation of the newly developed mass-separated {sup 180}Hf{sup m} beam at the CERN online isotope mass separator (ISOLDE) facility into an iron foil maintained at millikelvin temperatures, produces higher degrees of polarization than were achieved in previous studies of this system. The value found for the E2/M2 mixing ratio, {epsilon}=-0.0324(16)(19), is in close agreement with the previous published average value {epsilon}=-0.030(2), in full confirmation of the presence of the irregular E2 admixture in the 501 keV transition. The temperature dependence of the forward-backward asymmetry has been measured over a more extended range of nuclear polarization than previously possible, giving further evidence for parity mixing of the 8{sup -} and 8{sup +} levels and the deduced E2/M2 mixing ratio.

  17. Systematic study of subcellular localization of Arabidopsis PPR proteins confirms a massive targeting to organelles

    PubMed Central

    Colcombet, Jean; Lopez-Obando, Mauricio; Heurtevin, Laure; Bernard, Clément; Martin, Karine; Berthomé, Richard; Lurin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Four hundred and fifty-eight genes coding for PentatricoPeptide Repeat (PPR) proteins are annotated in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Over the past 10 years, numerous reports have shown that many of these proteins function in organelles to target specific transcripts and are involved in post-transcriptional regulation. Therefore, they are thought to be important players in the coordination between nuclear and organelle genome expression. Only four of these proteins have been described to be addressed outside organelles, indicating that some PPRs could function in post-transcriptional regulations of nuclear genes. In this work, we updated and improved our current knowledge on the localization of PPR proteins of Arabidopsis within the plant cell. We particularly investigated the subcellular localization of 166 PPR proteins whose targeting predictions were ambiguous, using a combination of high-throughput cloning and microscopy. Through systematic localization experiments and data integration, we confirmed that PPR proteins are largely targeted to organelles and showed that dual targeting to both the mitochondria and plastid occurs more frequently than expected. These results allow us to speculate that dual-targeted PPR proteins could be important for the fine coordination of gene expressions in both organelles. PMID:24037373

  18. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-09

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  19. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  20. Thermal Response of an Additive Manufactured Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tong; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, Hsin; Ozpineci, Burak; Ayers, Curtis William

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the impacts of abnormal thermal property introduced by additive manufacture has been analysis based on simulation and experiment of a 3D printed liquid-cooled heat sink. Comparisons to the heat sink with identical geometry and conventionally manufactured by Aluminum 6061 are presented. Micro-structure analysis is implemented and solutions to eliminate the impacts by different manufacture methods are proposed.

  1. Fluorescence measurements of the thermal control experiments coatings on LDEF S0069 and A0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, J. M.; Mell, R. J.; Peters, P. N.; Gregory, J. C.; Wilkes, D. R.; Miller, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements were made on the thermal control coatings from the Long Duration Experiment Facility (LDEF) S0069, Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE); and the A0114, Interaction of Atomic Oxygen with Material Surfaces in Low Earth orbit. Fluorescence was observed in two types of thermal control coatings and is attributed to pigments or binders. In addition, fluorescence measurement on the silver Teflon from the front cover of TCSE led to confirmation of damage (cracking) to the metal layers during application.

  2. Online measurement of bead geometry in GMAW-based additive manufacturing using passive vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jun; Zhang, Guangjun

    2013-11-01

    Additive manufacturing based on gas metal arc welding is an advanced technique for depositing fully dense components with low cost. Despite this fact, techniques to achieve accurate control and automation of the process have not yet been perfectly developed. The online measurement of the deposited bead geometry is a key problem for reliable control. In this work a passive vision-sensing system, comprising two cameras and composite filtering techniques, was proposed for real-time detection of the bead height and width through deposition of thin walls. The nozzle to the top surface distance was monitored for eliminating accumulated height errors during the multi-layer deposition process. Various image processing algorithms were applied and discussed for extracting feature parameters. A calibration procedure was presented for the monitoring system. Validation experiments confirmed the effectiveness of the online measurement system for bead geometry in layered additive manufacturing.

  3. Influence of Biofuel Additions on the Ignition Delay of Single Diesel Fuel Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeika, A. K.; Golovko, V. V.; Zolotko, A. N.; Raslavičius, L.; Lubarskii, V. M.

    2015-07-01

    The behavior of single drops of two- and three-component mineral diesel fuel blends with ethanol and rapeseed oil methyl ester in a heated atmosphere has been investigated. With the use of the known quasi-stationary approach, the influence of the thermal properties of fuel blend components and their composition on the ignition delay time of the drop has been investigated. It has been established that under inert heating conditions of the drop, additions of low-boiling ethanol to diesel fuel should shorten the duration of the preignition period, and additions of rapeseed oil methyl ester should, on the contrary, prolong it. Analysis of the obtained data has made it possible to determine the optimal composition of the fuel blend for the most economical operation of the diesel. The prognostic estimates made are confirmed by laboratory experiments and bench tests of fuel blends.

  4. Oligomers of the amyloid-beta protein disrupt working memory: confirmation with two behavioral procedures.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Morgan-Paisley, Kineta; Panos, John J; Kim, Eun-Mee; O'Hare, Eugene; Cleary, James P; Lesné, Sylvain; Ashe, Karen H; Porritt, Matthew; Baker, Lisa E

    2008-11-21

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that oligomers of amyloid-beta play a role in the cognitive impairment characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, but only three studies have provided experimental evidence of such impairment. To provide additional information about the effects of these oligomers on memory, the present study examined the memory of groups of rats exposed to ICV injections of the culture media (CM) of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells that were (7PA2) and were not (CHO-) transfected with a human mutation of amyloid precursor protein that appears to cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease. The 7PA2 CM, which contained concentrations of soluble amyloid-beta oligomers physiologically relevant to those found in human brain, significantly disrupted working memory in rats tested in a radial-arm maze. In contrast, CHO- CM, which did not contain such oligomers, had no effect on memory. The disruptive effects of 7PA2-derived amyloid-beta oligomers, evident 2h after exposure, disappeared within a day. These findings are compared to results from 7PA2 CM tested under a complex procedure thought to measure aspects of executive function. The results confirm the disruptive effects of low-n amyloid-beta oligomers and extend them to a well-established rat model of memory.

  5. PCR Improves Diagnostic Yield from Lung Aspiration in Malawian Children with Radiologically Confirmed Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, Enitan D.; Mankhambo, Limangeni A.; Guiver, Malcolm; Banda, Daniel L.; Denis, Brigitte; Dove, Winifred; Jeffers, Graham; Molyneux, Elizabeth M.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Graham, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Accurate data on childhood pneumonia aetiology are essential especially from regions where mortality is high, in order to inform case-management guidelines and the potential of prevention strategies such as bacterial conjugate vaccines. Yield from blood culture is low, but lung aspirate culture provides a higher diagnostic yield. We aimed to determine if diagnostic yield could be increased further by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae b) and viruses in lung aspirate fluid. Methods A total of 95 children with radiological focal, lobar or segmental consolidation had lung aspirate performed and sent for bacterial culture and for PCR for detection of bacteria, viruses and Pneumocystis jirovecii. In children with a pneumococcal aetiology, pneumococcal bacterial loads were calculated in blood and lung aspirate fluid. Results Blood culture identified a bacterial pathogen in only 8 patients (8%). With the addition of PCR on lung aspirate samples, causative pathogens (bacterial, viral, pneumocystis) were identified singly or as co-infections in 59 children (62%). The commonest bacterial organism was S.pneumoniae (41%), followed by H. influenzae b (6%), and the commonest virus identified was adenovirus (16%), followed by human bocavirus (HBoV) (4%), either as single or co-infection. Conclusions In a select group of African children, lung aspirate PCR significantly improves diagnostic yield. Our study confirms a major role of S.pneumoniae and viruses in the aetiology of childhood pneumonia in Africa. PMID:21695128

  6. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: LOD-score considerations for confirmation of linkage in a heterogeneous trait

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, M.P.; Kibar, Z.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system, defined by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. HSP may be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or an X-linked trait. AD HSP is genetically heterogeneous, and three loci have been identified so far: SPG3 maps to chromosome 14q, SPG4 to 2p, and SPG4a to 15q. We have undertaken linkage analysis with 21 uncomplicated AD families to the three AD HSP loci. We report significant linkage for three of our families to the SPG4 locus and exclude several families by multipoint linkage. We used linkage information from several different research teams to evaluate the statistical probability of linkage to the SPG4 locus for uncomplicated AD HSP families and established the critical LOD-score value necessary for confirmation of linkage to the SPG4 locus from Bayesian statistics. In addition, we calculated the empirical P-values for the LOD scores obtained with all families with computer simulation methods. Power to detect significant linkage, as well as type I error probabilities, were evaluated. This combined analytical approach permitted conclusive linkage analyses on small to medium-size families, under the restrictions of genetic heterogeneity. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Confirmation of Single-Locus Sex Determination and Female Heterogamety in Willow Based on Linkage Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingnan; Wang, Tiantian; Fang, Lecheng; Li, Xiaoping; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we constructed high-density genetic maps of Salix suchowensis and mapped the gender locus with an F1 pedigree. Genetic maps were separately constructed for the maternal and paternal parents by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and the pseudo-testcross strategy. The maternal map consisted of 20 linkage groups that spanned a genetic distance of 2333.3 cM; whereas the paternal map contained 21 linkage groups that covered 2260 cM. Based on the established genetic maps, it was found that the gender of willow was determined by a single locus on linkage group LG_03, and the female was the heterogametic gender. Aligned with mapped SSR markers, linkage group LG_03 was found to be associated with chromosome XV in willow. It is noteworthy that marker density in the vicinity of the gender locus was significantly higher than that expected by chance alone, which indicates severe recombination suppression around the gender locus. In conclusion, this study confirmed the findings on the single-locus sex determination and female heterogamety in willow. It also provided additional evidence that validated the previous studies, which found that different autosomes evolved into sex chromosomes between the sister genera of Salix (willow) and Populus (poplar).

  8. Confirmation of Single-Locus Sex Determination and Female Heterogamety in Willow Based on Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lecheng; Li, Xiaoping; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we constructed high-density genetic maps of Salix suchowensis and mapped the gender locus with an F1 pedigree. Genetic maps were separately constructed for the maternal and paternal parents by using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and the pseudo-testcross strategy. The maternal map consisted of 20 linkage groups that spanned a genetic distance of 2333.3 cM; whereas the paternal map contained 21 linkage groups that covered 2260 cM. Based on the established genetic maps, it was found that the gender of willow was determined by a single locus on linkage group LG_03, and the female was the heterogametic gender. Aligned with mapped SSR markers, linkage group LG_03 was found to be associated with chromosome XV in willow. It is noteworthy that marker density in the vicinity of the gender locus was significantly higher than that expected by chance alone, which indicates severe recombination suppression around the gender locus. In conclusion, this study confirmed the findings on the single-locus sex determination and female heterogamety in willow. It also provided additional evidence that validated the previous studies, which found that different autosomes evolved into sex chromosomes between the sister genera of Salix (willow) and Populus (poplar). PMID:26828940

  9. Natural mitochondrial proteolysis confirms transcription systematically exchanging/deleting nucleotides, peptides coded by expanded codons.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2017-02-07

    Protein sequences have higher linguistic complexities than human languages. This indicates undeciphered multilayered, overprinted information/genetic codes. Some superimposed genetic information is revealed by detections of transcripts systematically (a) exchanging nucleotides (nine symmetric, e.g. A<->C, fourteen asymmetric, e.g. A->C->G->A, swinger RNAs) translated according to tri-, tetra- and pentacodons, and (b) deleting mono-, dinucleotides after each trinucleotide (delRNAs). Here analyses of two independent proteomic datasets considering natural proteolysis confirm independently translation of these non-canonical RNAs, also along tetra- and pentacodons, increasing coverage of putative, cryptically encoded proteins. Analyses assuming endoproteinase GluC and elastase digestions (cleavages after residues D, E, and A, L, I, V, respectively) detect additional peptides colocalizing with detected non-canonical RNAs. Analyses detect fewer peptides matching GluC-, elastase- than trypsin-digestions: artificial trypsin-digestion outweighs natural proteolysis. Results suggest occurrences of complete proteins entirely matching non-canonical, superimposed encoding(s). Protein-coding after bijective transformations could explain genetic code symmetries, such as along Rumer's transformation.

  10. Anaphylaxis to Spirulina confirmed by skin prick test with ingredients of Spirulina tablets.

    PubMed

    Le, Thuy-My; Knulst, André C; Röckmann, Heike

    2014-12-01

    Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis), blue-green microalgae, has high content in proteins, γ-linoleic acid and vitamins and therefore gained popularity as food supplement. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Spirulina is also an interesting alternative and sustainable protein source with the growing world population. We present a case of a 17-year-old male, who developed anaphylaxis the first time he ingested a Spirulina tablet. Skin prick test with diluted Spirulina tablet was positive. Further skin prick testing with separated ingredients (Spirulina platensis algae, silicon dioxide, inulin and magnesium stearate) was only positive for Spirulina platensis algae and negative in controls, confirming the allergy was caused by Spirulina and not by one of the additives. This case report shows that diagnosis of Spirulina allergy can safely be made by skin prick test with dilutions of the A. platensis or even more simple by skin prick test with the diluted tablet. Since Spirulina has gained popularity as food and nutritional supplement, it is important to realize the potential risk of this dietary supplement. Before Spirulina is produced and consumed on a wider scale, allergenicity risk assessment should be performed, including investigation of potential crossreactivity with well-known inhalant allergens and foods.

  11. NO CONFIRMED NEW ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS IN THE SDSS DATA RELEASE 4

    SciTech Connect

    Agueeros, Marcel A.; Newsom, Emily R.; Posselt, Bettina; Anderson, Scott F.; Rosenfield, Philip; Homer, Lee; Haberl, Frank; Voges, Wolfgang; Margon, Bruce

    2011-06-15

    We report on follow-up observations of candidate X-ray-bright, radio-quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) identified from correlations of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 4 in Agueeros et al. We obtained Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures for 13 candidates in order to pinpoint the source of X-ray emission in optically blank RASS error circles. These observations eliminated 12 targets as good INS candidates. We discuss subsequent observations of the remaining candidate with XMM-Newton, the Gemini North Observatory, and the Apache Point Observatory. We identify this object as a likely extragalactic source with an unusually high log (f{sub X}/f{sub opt}) {approx} 2.4. We also use an updated version of the population synthesis models of Popov et al. to estimate the number of RASS-detected INSs in the SDSS Data Release 7 footprint. We find that these models predict {approx}3-4 INSs in the 11,000 deg{sup 2} imaged by SDSS, which is consistent with the number of known INSs that fall within the survey footprint. In addition, our analysis of the four new INS candidates identified in the SDSS footprint implies that they are unlikely to be confirmed as INSs; together, these results suggest that new INSs are not likely to be found from further correlations of the RASS and SDSS.

  12. Dense surface seismic data confirm non-double-couple source mechanisms induced by hydraulic fracturing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pesicek, Jeremy; Cieślik, Konrad; Lambert, Marc-André; Carrillo, Pedro; Birkelo, Brad

    2016-01-01

    We have determined source mechanisms for nine high-quality microseismic events induced during hydraulic fracturing of the Montney Shale in Canada. Seismic data were recorded using a dense regularly spaced grid of sensors at the surface. The design and geometry of the survey are such that the recorded P-wave amplitudes essentially map the upper focal hemisphere, allowing the source mechanism to be interpreted directly from the data. Given the inherent difficulties of computing reliable moment tensors (MTs) from high-frequency microseismic data, the surface amplitude and polarity maps provide important additional confirmation of the source mechanisms. This is especially critical when interpreting non-shear source processes, which are notoriously susceptible to artifacts due to incomplete or inaccurate source modeling. We have found that most of the nine events contain significant non-double-couple (DC) components, as evident in the surface amplitude data and the resulting MT models. Furthermore, we found that source models that are constrained to be purely shear do not explain the data for most events. Thus, even though non-DC components of MTs can often be attributed to modeling artifacts, we argue that they are required by the data in some cases, and can be reliably computed and confidently interpreted under favorable conditions.

  13. Confirming improved detection of gadolinium in bone using in vivo XRF.

    PubMed

    Lord, M L; McNeill, F E; Gräfe, J L; Galusha, A L; Parsons, P J; Noseworthy, M D; Howard, L; Chettle, D R

    2017-02-01

    The safety of using Gd in MRI contrast agents has recently been questioned, due to recent evidence of the retention of Gd in individuals with healthy renal function. Bone has proven to be a storage site for Gd, as unusually high concentrations have been measured in femoral heads of patients undergoing hip replacement surgery, as well as in autopsy samples. All previous measurements of Gd in bone have been invasive and required the bone to be removed from the body. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) offers a non-invasive and non-destructive method for carrying out in vivo measurements of Gd in humans. An updated XRF system provides improved detection limits in a short measurement time of 30-min. A new four-detector system and higher activity Cd-109 excitation source of 5GBq results in minimum detection limits (MDLs) of 1.64-1.72μgGd/g plaster for an average overlaying tissue thickness of the tibia. These levels are well within the range of previous in vitro Gd measurements. Additional validation through comparison with ICP-MS measurements has confirmed the ability of the XRF system for detecting Gd further, proving it is a feasible system to carry out human measurements.

  14. OGLE-2015-BLG-0196: Ground-based Gravitational Microlens Parallax Confirmed by Space-based Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Udalski, A.; Gould, A.; Zhu, Wei; and; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; The OGLE Collaboration; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Calchi Novati, S.; Carey, S.; Bryden, C.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, Calen B.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; The Spitzer Microlensing Team

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0196. The event lasted for almost a year, and the light curve exhibited significant deviations from the lensing model based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion, enabling us to measure the microlens parallax. The ground-based microlens parallax is confirmed by the data obtained from space-based microlens observations using the Spitzer telescope. By additionally measuring the angular Einstein radius from the analysis of the resolved caustic crossing, the physical parameters of the lens are determined up to the twofold degeneracy, u0 < 0 and u0 > 0, solutions caused by the well-known “ecliptic” degeneracy. It is found that the binary lens is composed of two M dwarf stars with similar masses, M1 = 0.38 ± 0.04 M⊙ (0.50 ± 0.05 M⊙) and M2 = 0.38 ± 0.04 M⊙ (0.55 ± 0.06 M⊙), and the distance to the lens is DL = 2.77 ± 0.23 kpc (3.30 ± 0.29 kpc). Here the physical parameters outside and inside the parentheses are for the u0 < 0 and u0 > 0 solutions, respectively.

  15. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  16. Consumer satisfaction with OTC drugs: an analysis using the confirmation/disconfirmation model.

    PubMed

    Ho, F N; Mursch, J D; Ong, B S; Perttula, B

    1997-01-01

    This study explored the determinants of consumer satisfaction with OTC drugs using the confirmation/disconfirmation model. A revised confirmation/disconfirmation model specifically for OTC drugs was proposed and tested using structural equation modeling with a specific product category: cold medications. The results of this study found that the confirmation/disconfirmation of a consumer's expectation and perceived performance of an OTC drug is important in predicting consumer satisfaction. Theoretical and managerial implications for pharmaceutical marketers are discussed.

  17. CHANDRA Observations of V407 Vul: Confirmation of the Spin-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T.

    2004-01-01

    V407 Vu1 (RX J1914.4+2456) is a candidate double-degenerate binary with a putative 1.756 mHz (9.5 min) orbital frequency. In a previous timing study using archival ROSAT and ASCA data we reported evidence for an increase of this frequency at a rate consistent with expectations for gravitational radiation from a detached ultracompact binary system. Here we report the results of new Chandra timing observations which confirm the previous indications of spin-up of the X-ray frequency, and provide much tighter constraints on the frequency derivative, nu (raised dot). We obtained with Chandra a total of 90 ksec of exposure in two epochs separated in time by 11.5 months. The total time span of the archival ROSAT, ASCA and new Chandra data is now approximately equal to 10.5 years. This more than doubles the interval spanned by the ROSAT and ASCA data alone, providing much greater sensitivity to a frequency derivative. With the addition of the Chandra data an increasing frequency is unavoidable, and the mean nu (raised dot) is 7.0 plus or minus 0.8 x l0(exp -18) Hz per second. Although a long-term spin-up trend is confirmed, there is excess variance in the phase timing residuals, perhaps indicative of shorter timescale torque fluctuations or phase instability associated with the source of the X-ray flux. Power spectral searches for periods longward of the 9.5 minute period do not find any significant modulations, however, the sensitivity of searches in this frequency range are somewhat compromised by the dithering of the Chandra attitude. The observed spin-up is of a magnitude consistent with that expected from gravitational radiation decay, however, the factor of approximately equal to 3 variations in flux combined with the timing noise could conceivably result from accretion-induced spin-up of a white dwarf. Continued monitoring to explore correlations of torque with X-ray flux could provide a further test of this hypothesis.

  18. A confirmation of the quench-cryoannealing relaxation protocol for identifying reduction states of freeze-trapped nitrogenase intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Hoffman, Brian M

    2014-04-07

    We have advanced a mechanism for nitrogenase catalysis that rests on the identification of a low-spin EPR signal (S = 1/2) trapped during turnover of a MoFe protein as the E4 state, which has accumulated four reducing equivalents as two [Fe-H-Fe] bridging hydrides. Because electrons are delivered to the MoFe protein one at a time, with the rate-limiting step being the off-rate of oxidized Fe protein, it is difficult to directly control, or know, the degree of reduction, n, of a trapped intermediate, denoted En, n = 1-8. To overcome this previously intractable problem, we introduced a quench-cryoannealing relaxation protocol for determining n of an EPR-active trapped En turnover state. The trapped "hydride" state was allowed to relax to the resting E0 state in frozen medium, which prevents additional accumulation of reducing equivalents; binding of reduced Fe protein and release of oxidized protein from the MoFe protein both are abolished in a frozen solid. Relaxation of En was monitored by periodic EPR analysis at cryogenic temperature. The protocol rests on the hypothesis that an intermediate trapped in the frozen solid can relax toward the resting state only by the release of a stable reduction product from FeMo-co. In turnover under Ar, the only product that can be released is H2, which carries two reducing equivalents. This hypothesis implicitly predicts that states that have accumulated an odd number of electrons/protons (n = 1, 3) during turnover under Ar cannot relax to E0: E3 can relax to E1, but E1 cannot relax to E0 in the frozen state. The present experiments confirm this prediction and, thus, the quench-cryoannealing protocol and our assignment of E4, the foundation of the proposed mechanism for nitrogenase catalysis. This study further gives insights into the identity of the En intermediates with high-spin EPR signals, 1b and 1c, trapped under high electron flux.

  19. New process additive reduces HF cloud-forming potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sheckler, J.C.; Hammershaimb, H.U. ); Ross, L.J. ); Comey, K.R. III )

    1994-08-22

    The Texaco-UOP HF additive technology has demonstrated significant aerosol reduction in both small-scale and large-scale releases. The pilot plant testing did not indicate any adverse impact on the alkylation reaction, as was confirmed in a short trial at Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc.'s El Dorado, Kan., refinery in 1992. Equipment to enable continuous addition of the additive was installed in the second quarter of 1994 at the refinery. The paper discusses HF alkylation, mitigation technology, additive development, aerosol reduction, and testing on pilot scale and large scale.

  20. Computational simulations of frictional losses in pipe networks confirmed in experimental apparatusses designed by honors students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, Nicholas A.; Hynes, Eric; Kutz, April

    2015-11-01

    Lectures in introductory fluid mechanics at NIU are a combination of students with standard enrollment and students seeking honors credit for an enriching experience. Most honors students dread the additional homework problems or an extra paper assigned by the instructor. During the past three years, honors students of my class have instead collaborated to design wet-lab experiments for their peers to predict variable volume flow rates of open reservoirs driven by gravity. Rather than learn extra, the honors students learn the Bernoulli head-loss equation earlier to design appropriate systems for an experimental wet lab. Prior designs incorporated minor loss features such as sudden contraction or multiple unions and valves. The honors students from Spring 2015 expanded the repertoire of available options by developing large scale set-ups with multiple pipe networks that could be combined together to test the flexibility of the student team's computational programs. The engagement of bridging the theory with practice was appreciated by all of the students such that multiple teams were able to predict performance within 4% accuracy. The challenges, schedules, and cost estimates of incorporating the experimental lab into an introductory fluid mechanics course will be reported.

  1. Gyrokinetic GDC turbulence simulations: confirming a new instability regime in LAPD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, M. J.; Rossi, G.; Told, D.; Terry, P. W.; Jenko, F.; Carter, T. A.

    2016-10-01

    Recent high-beta experiments at the LArge Plasma Device have found significant parallel magnetic fluctuations in the region of large pressure gradients. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show the dominant instability at these radii to be the gradient-driven drift coupling (GDC) mode, a non-textbook mode driven by pressure gradients and destabilized by the coupling of ExB and grad-B∥ drifts. Unlike in previous studies, the large parallel extent of the device allows for finite-kz versions of this instability in addition to kz = 0 . The locations of maximum linear growth match very well with experimentally observed peaks of B∥ fluctuations. Local nonlinear simulations reproduce many features of the observations fairly well, with the exception of Bperp fluctuations, for which experimental profiles suggest a source unrelated to pressure gradients. In toto, the results presented here show that turbulence and transport in these experiments are driven by the GDC instability, that important characteristics of the linear instability carry over to nonlinear simulations, and - in the context of validation - that the gyrokinetic framework performs surprisingly well far outside its typical area of application, increasing confidence in its predictive abilities. Supported by U.S. DOE.

  2. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  3. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... SNIPEND SNIPSTART Find A Radiation Oncologist SNIPEND Additional Treatment Options SNIPSTART A A SNIPEND Chemotherapy Medicines prescribed ... such as antibodies, to fight cancer. Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  4. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  5. Confirmation of an exoplanet using the transit color signature: Kepler-418b, a blended giant planet in a multiplanet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, B.; Parviainen, H.; Gandolfi, D.; Deeg, H. J.; Palle, E.; Montañés Rodriguez, P.; Murgas, F.; Alonso, R.; Bruntt, H.; Fridlund, M.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We announce confirmation of Kepler-418b, one of two proposed planets in this system. This is the first confirmation of an exoplanet based primarily on the transit color signature technique. Methods: We used the Kepler public data archive combined with multicolor photometry from the Gran Telescopio de Canarias and radial velocity follow-up using FIES at the Nordic Optical Telescope for confirmation. Results: We report a confident detection of a transit color signature that can only be explained by a compact occulting body, entirely ruling out a contaminating eclipsing binary, a hierarchical triple, or a grazing eclipsing binary. Those findings are corroborated by our radial velocity measurements, which put an upper limit of ~1 MJup on the mass of Kepler-418b. We also report that the host star is significantly blended, confirming the ~10% light contamination suspected from the crowding metric in the Kepler light curve measured by the Kepler team. We report detection of an unresolved light source that contributes an additional ~30% to the target star, which would not have been detected without multicolor photometric analysis. The resulting planet-star radius ratio is 0.110 ± 0.0025, more than 25% more than the 0.087 measured by Kepler leading to a radius of 1.20 ± 0.16 RJup instead of the 0.94 RJup measured by the Kepler team. Conclusions: This is the first confirmation of an exoplanet candidate based primarily on the transit color signature, demonstrating that this technique is viable from ground for giant planets. It is particularly useful for planets with long periods such as Kepler-418b, which tend to have long transit durations. While this technique is limited to candidates with deep transits from the ground, it may be possible to confirm earth-like exoplanet candidates with a few hours of observing time with an instrument like the James Webb Space Telescope. Additionally, multicolor photometric analysis of transits can reveal unknown stellar neighbors

  6. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage 1. Volume 1. Technical Report. Sections 1-3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-28

    flnIdad Secuty ClMaIJAC-lJ) IR Phase II, Stage I, Problem Confirmation Study, Castle AFB Ca. I 12. PERSONAL AUT64ORIS) Alison L. Dunn, D.L. Jones...III, Ph.D., P.G. was the project manager. In April 1985, Katherine A. Sheedy, P.G., became project manager. Alison L. Dunn, P.G., was the technical...Registered Professional Geologist, 11 years experience in hydrogeology and environmental geology. Alison L. Dunn, P.G., Project Geologist: M.S. in

  7. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  8. Artificial cloud test confirms volcanic ash detection using infrared spectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Prata, A. J.; Dezitter, F.; Davies, I.; Weber, K.; Birnfeld, M.; Moriano, D.; Bernardo, C.; Vogel, A.; Prata, G. S.; Mather, T. A.; Thomas, H. E.; Cammas, J.; Weber, M.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne volcanic ash particles are a known hazard to aviation. Currently, there are no means available to detect ash in flight as the particles are too fine (radii < 30 μm) for on-board radar detection and, even in good visibility, ash clouds are difficult or impossible to detect by eye. The economic cost and societal impact of the April/May 2010 Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull generated renewed interest in finding ways to identify airborne volcanic ash in order to keep airspace open and avoid aircraft groundings. We have designed and built a bi-spectral, fast-sampling, uncooled infrared camera device (AVOID) to examine its ability to detect volcanic ash from commercial jet aircraft at distances of more than 50 km ahead. Here we report results of an experiment conducted over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of France, confirming the ability of the device to detect and quantify volcanic ash in an artificial ash cloud created by dispersal of volcanic ash from a second aircraft. A third aircraft was used to measure the ash in situ using optical particle counters. The cloud was composed of very fine ash (mean radii ~10 μm) collected from Iceland immediately after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption and had a vertical thickness of ~200 m, a width of ~2 km and length of between 2 and 12 km. Concentrations of ~200 μg m−3 were identified by AVOID at distances from ~20 km to ~70 km. For the first time, airborne remote detection of volcanic ash has been successfully demonstrated from a long-range flight test aircraft. PMID:27156701

  9. Artificial cloud test confirms volcanic ash detection using infrared spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Prata, A J; Dezitter, F; Davies, I; Weber, K; Birnfeld, M; Moriano, D; Bernardo, C; Vogel, A; Prata, G S; Mather, T A; Thomas, H E; Cammas, J; Weber, M

    2016-05-09

    Airborne volcanic ash particles are a known hazard to aviation. Currently, there are no means available to detect ash in flight as the particles are too fine (radii < 30 μm) for on-board radar detection and, even in good visibility, ash clouds are difficult or impossible to detect by eye. The economic cost and societal impact of the April/May 2010 Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull generated renewed interest in finding ways to identify airborne volcanic ash in order to keep airspace open and avoid aircraft groundings. We have designed and built a bi-spectral, fast-sampling, uncooled infrared camera device (AVOID) to examine its ability to detect volcanic ash from commercial jet aircraft at distances of more than 50 km ahead. Here we report results of an experiment conducted over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of France, confirming the ability of the device to detect and quantify volcanic ash in an artificial ash cloud created by dispersal of volcanic ash from a second aircraft. A third aircraft was used to measure the ash in situ using optical particle counters. The cloud was composed of very fine ash (mean radii ~10 μm) collected from Iceland immediately after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption and had a vertical thickness of ~200 m, a width of ~2 km and length of between 2 and 12 km. Concentrations of ~200 μg m(-3) were identified by AVOID at distances from ~20 km to ~70 km. For the first time, airborne remote detection of volcanic ash has been successfully demonstrated from a long-range flight test aircraft.

  10. Artificial cloud test confirms volcanic ash detection using infrared spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, A. J.; Dezitter, F.; Davies, I.; Weber, K.; Birnfeld, M.; Moriano, D.; Bernardo, C.; Vogel, A.; Prata, G. S.; Mather, T. A.; Thomas, H. E.; Cammas, J.; Weber, M.

    2016-05-01

    Airborne volcanic ash particles are a known hazard to aviation. Currently, there are no means available to detect ash in flight as the particles are too fine (radii < 30 μm) for on-board radar detection and, even in good visibility, ash clouds are difficult or impossible to detect by eye. The economic cost and societal impact of the April/May 2010 Icelandic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull generated renewed interest in finding ways to identify airborne volcanic ash in order to keep airspace open and avoid aircraft groundings. We have designed and built a bi-spectral, fast-sampling, uncooled infrared camera device (AVOID) to examine its ability to detect volcanic ash from commercial jet aircraft at distances of more than 50 km ahead. Here we report results of an experiment conducted over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of France, confirming the ability of the device to detect and quantify volcanic ash in an artificial ash cloud created by dispersal of volcanic ash from a second aircraft. A third aircraft was used to measure the ash in situ using optical particle counters. The cloud was composed of very fine ash (mean radii ~10 μm) collected from Iceland immediately after the Eyjafjallajökull eruption and had a vertical thickness of ~200 m, a width of ~2 km and length of between 2 and 12 km. Concentrations of ~200 μg m‑3 were identified by AVOID at distances from ~20 km to ~70 km. For the first time, airborne remote detection of volcanic ash has been successfully demonstrated from a long-range flight test aircraft.

  11. Career moves of urban science teachers: Negotiating constancy, change, and confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinke, Carol Riegelman

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation addresses the issue of teacher retention in urban science classrooms, in which a revolving door of new teachers leads to an inexperienced teaching force and reduced academic attainment for students. Urban science teachers are particularly susceptible to attrition due to extensive professional opportunities outside the classroom. This study follows eight case study teachers in an urban school district in order to better understand how today's urban science teachers think about their careers and career moves. Based on traditional research on teacher retention and existing literature on teachers' professional lives, this study focuses in particular on urban science teachers' professional priorities, community participation, and process of career decision making in order to determine the ways in which these factors may be consequential for their career paths. The study uses a qualitative case study methodology. Data collection methods include a survey of all first, second, and third year science teachers in one urban district followed by the selection of eight case study teachers using a variety of demographic, certification, and workplace characteristics. In-depth case studies included monthly interviews and professional observations over parts of two school years. The experiences and perspectives of the eight case study teachers revealed three patterns. First, the eight case study teachers followed two distinct paths through the profession, those who aimed to integrate and were oriented toward the educational system and those who wanted to participate and oriented themselves away from the educational system. These professional trajectories were influential in shaping case study teachers' experiences in schools as well as their career directions. Second, the eight case study teachers continually considered their professional alternatives, either within or outside of the educational system. Finally, the case study teachers aimed to get past the

  12. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  13. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  14. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  15. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  16. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  17. 49 CFR 40.95 - What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for... Laboratories § 40.95 What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests? (a) As a laboratory, you must use the cutoff concentrations for the initial and confirmation adulterant testing...

  18. 49 CFR 40.95 - What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for... Laboratories § 40.95 What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests? (a) As a laboratory, you must use the cutoff concentrations for the initial and confirmation adulterant testing...

  19. 49 CFR 40.95 - What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for... Laboratories § 40.95 What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests? (a) As a laboratory, you must use the cutoff concentrations for the initial and confirmation adulterant testing...

  20. 49 CFR 40.95 - What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for... Laboratories § 40.95 What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests? (a) As a laboratory, you must use the cutoff concentrations for the initial and confirmation adulterant testing...

  1. 49 CFR 40.95 - What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for... Laboratories § 40.95 What are the adulterant cutoff concentrations for initial and confirmation tests? (a) As a laboratory, you must use the cutoff concentrations for the initial and confirmation adulterant testing...

  2. 16 CFR 1633.5 - Prototype pooling and confirmation testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prototype pooling and confirmation testing... Prototype pooling and confirmation testing requirements. (a) Prototype pooling. One or more manufacturers may rely on a qualified prototype produced by another manufacturer or prototype developer...

  3. 16 CFR 1633.5 - Prototype pooling and confirmation testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prototype pooling and confirmation testing... Prototype pooling and confirmation testing requirements. (a) Prototype pooling. One or more manufacturers may rely on a qualified prototype produced by another manufacturer or prototype developer...

  4. 16 CFR 1633.5 - Prototype pooling and confirmation testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prototype pooling and confirmation testing... Prototype pooling and confirmation testing requirements. (a) Prototype pooling. One or more manufacturers may rely on a qualified prototype produced by another manufacturer or prototype developer...

  5. Using NAEP to Confirm State Test Results in the No Child Left Behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoneberg, Bert D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education has not yet published an official guidance document for using NAEP achievement level scores to confirm state testing results. A review of the literature, however, identified four principles that inform the valid use of NAEP scores in a confirming analysis. The principles address the appropriate NAEP statistics to…

  6. New fossils from Koobi Fora in northern Kenya confirm taxonomic diversity in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Meave G; Spoor, Fred; Dean, M Christopher; Feibel, Craig S; Antón, Susan C; Kiarie, Christopher; Leakey, Louise N

    2012-08-09

    Since its discovery in 1972 (ref. 1), the cranium KNM-ER 1470 has been at the centre of the debate over the number of species of early Homo present in the early Pleistocene epoch of eastern Africa. KNM-ER 1470 stands out among other specimens attributed to early Homo because of its larger size, and its flat and subnasally orthognathic face with anteriorly placed maxillary zygomatic roots. This singular morphology and the incomplete preservation of the fossil have led to different views as to whether KNM-ER 1470 can be accommodated within a single species of early Homo that is highly variable because of sexual, geographical and temporal factors, or whether it provides evidence of species diversity marked by differences in cranial size and facial or masticatory adaptation. Here we report on three newly discovered fossils, aged between 1.78 and 1.95 million years (Myr) old, that clarify the anatomy and taxonomic status of KNM-ER 1470. KNM-ER 62000, a well-preserved face of a late juvenile hominin, closely resembles KNM-ER 1470 but is notably smaller. It preserves previously unknown morphology, including moderately sized, mesiodistally long postcanine teeth. The nearly complete mandible KNM-ER 60000 and mandibular fragment KNM-ER 62003 have a dental arcade that is short anteroposteriorly and flat across the front, with small incisors; these features are consistent with the arcade morphology of KNM-ER 1470 and KNM-ER 62000. The new fossils confirm the presence of two contemporary species of early Homo, in addition to Homo erectus, in the early Pleistocene of eastern Africa.

  7. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATION AND REFINED PARAMETERS OF THE HOT JUPITER XO-5b

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, A.; Bakos, G. A.; Fernandez, J.; Sipocz, B.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Sasselov, D. D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Stefanik, R. P.; Kovacs, Geza; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Isaacson, H.; Butler, R. P.; Shporer, A.; Mazeh, T.

    2009-07-20

    We present HATNet observations of XO-5b, confirming its planetary nature based on evidence beyond that described in the announcement of Burke et al., namely, the lack of significant correlation between spectral bisector variations and orbital phase. In addition, using extensive spectroscopic measurements spanning multiple seasons, we investigate the relatively large scatter in the spectral line bisectors. We also examine possible blended stellar configurations (hierarchical triples, chance alignments) that can mimic the planet signals, and we are able to show that none are consistent with the sum of all the data. The analysis of the S activity index shows no significant stellar activity. Our results for the planet parameters are consistent with values in Burke et al., and we refine both the stellar and the planetary parameters using our data. XO-5b orbits a slightly evolved, late G type star with mass M{sub *} = 0.88 {+-} 0.03 M{sub sun}, radius R{sub *} = 1.08 {+-} 0.04 R{sub sun}, and metallicity close to solar. The planetary mass and radius are 1.059 {+-} 0.028 M {sub J} and 1.109 {+-} 0.050 R{sub J}, respectively, corresponding to a mean density of 0.96{sub -0.11}{sup +0.14} g cm{sup -3}. The ephemeris for the orbit is P = 4.187757 {+-} 0.000011 days, E = 2454552.67168 {+-} 0.00029 (BJD) with transit duration of 0.1307 {+-} 0.0013 days. By measuring four individual transit centers, we found no signs for transit timing variations. The planet XO-5b is notable for its anomalously high Safronov number and has a high surface gravity when compared to other transiting exoplanets with similar period.

  8. Confirmation and Characterization of a Previously Unmapped Northeast Extension of the Cheraw Fault, Southeast Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellman, M.; Ostenaa, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent geologic field mapping, shallow geophysical surveys, and boreholes, combined with interpretation of reprocessed industry 2D seismic reflection profiles, provide new constraints for the structural characterization of the Cheraw Fault in southeastern Colorado. A previously unmapped topographic scarp extending northeast from of the mapped fault trace exhibits northeast-oriented fractures in Cretaceous Niobrara shale and an apparent ~3m down-to-the-northwest offset across a bedrock/alluvium contact observed in exposures of the scarp near of Haswell, CO. Shallow seismic surveys and a transect of 4 shallow borings across the scarp confirm the vertical displacement estimates. Two industry 2D seismic refraction profiles that cross this scarp were licensed, reprocessed, and depth-migrated. Preliminary analyses of the seismic profiles show ~ 100m or less of down-to-the-northwest displacement across a primary fault that is coincident with the topographic scarp and extends through Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata into Precambrian basement. Fault dip constraints and are pending further seismic data interpretation and analysis. These data show that 1) the Cheraw fault extends an additional 15 km from its currently mapped northern termination, for a minimum total fault length of ~60 km, 2) offset of an early (?) Quaternary pediment along the northeast extension near the town of Haswell of ~3 m, is similar in magnitude to the offset in a late Pleistocene channel reported by Crone et al. (1997) along the main trace of the fault, and 3) seismic reflection data show that the fault extends into crystalline basement rock, supporting a tectonic feature rather than dissolution collapse.

  9. Unbiased descriptor and parameter selection confirms the potential of proteochemometric modelling

    PubMed Central

    Freyhult, Eva; Prusis, Peteris; Lapinsh, Maris; Wikberg, Jarl ES; Moulton, Vincent; Gustafsson, Mats G

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteochemometrics is a new methodology that allows prediction of protein function directly from real interaction measurement data without the need of 3D structure information. Several reported proteochemometric models of ligand-receptor interactions have already yielded significant insights into various forms of bio-molecular interactions. The proteochemometric models are multivariate regression models that predict binding affinity for a particular combination of features of the ligand and protein. Although proteochemometric models have already offered interesting results in various studies, no detailed statistical evaluation of their average predictive power has been performed. In particular, variable subset selection performed to date has always relied on using all available examples, a situation also encountered in microarray gene expression data analysis. Results A methodology for an unbiased evaluation of the predictive power of proteochemometric models was implemented and results from applying it to two of the largest proteochemometric data sets yet reported are presented. A double cross-validation loop procedure is used to estimate the expected performance of a given design method. The unbiased performance estimates (P2) obtained for the data sets that we consider confirm that properly designed single proteochemometric models have useful predictive power, but that a standard design based on cross validation may yield models with quite limited performance. The results also show that different commercial software packages employed for the design of proteochemometric models may yield very different and therefore misleading performance estimates. In addition, the differences in the models obtained in the double CV loop indicate that detailed chemical interpretation of a single proteochemometric model is uncertain when data sets are small. Conclusion The double CV loop employed offer unbiased performance estimates about a given proteochemometric

  10. Confirmation of Fasciola hepatica resistant to triclabendazole in naturally infected Australian beef and dairy cattle☆

    PubMed Central

    Brockwell, Yvette M.; Elliott, Timothy P.; Anderson, Glenn R.; Stanton, Rex; Spithill, Terry W.; Sangster, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    Triclabendazole (TCBZ) is the drug of choice for Fasciola hepatica control and reports of F. hepatica resistant to this drug from a wide range of geographic regions are very concerning. This study investigated the presence of TCBZ resistance in F. hepatica in naturally infected Australian beef and dairy cattle herds and evaluated methods of measuring the levels of resistance. Faecal egg count and coproantigen reduction tests (FECRT and CRT, respectively) were conducted on 6 South-eastern Australian beef properties and one dairy property where treatment failure by triclabendazole (TCBZ) was suspected. The CRT was conducted on an additional beef property. On each property 15 animals were treated with an oral preparation of TCBZ at the recommended dose and 15 animals remained as untreated controls. Fluke eggs in faeces were counted and coproantigen levels were measured before treatment and 21 days after treatment and in the untreated control animals. These data were evaluated using three different methods to calculate % reductions compared with controls. Resistance (<90% reduction) was detected on the dairy property using both FEC and CRT, and on 3/6 beef properties using FECRT and 4/7 beef properties using CRT. Using the FECRT, reductions of 6.1–14.1% were observed in dairy cattle and 25.9–65.5% in beef cattle. Using the CRT, reductions of 0.4–7.6% were observed in dairy cattle and 27.0–69.5% in beef cattle. Live flukes were recovered at slaughter following TCBZ treatment of 6 cattle from 3 of the beef properties, confirming the TCBZ resistance status of F. hepatica in these cattle. This is the first report of F. hepatica resistant to TCBZ in cattle in Australia and the results suggest that resistance is widespread in the South-eastern region. The CRT is shown to be a robust alternative to the FECRT for evaluation of TCBZ resistance in F. hepatica in cattle. PMID:24596668

  11. Waste analysis plan for confirmation or completion of Tank Farms backlog waste designation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This waste analysis plan satisfies the requirements of Item 3 of Ecology Order 93NM-201 as amended per the Settlement Agreement. Item 3 states: ``Within forty (40) calendar days of receipt of this Order, the US Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) shall provide Ecology with a plan for review and approval detailing the established criteria and procedures for waste inspection, segregation, sampling, designation, and repackaging of all containers reported in item {number_sign}1. The report shall include sampling plan criteria for different contaminated media, i.e., soils, compactable waste, high-efficiency particular air (HEPA) filters, etc., and a schedule for completing the work within the time allowed under this Order.`` Item 3 was amended per the Settlement Agreement as follows: ``In addition to the waste inspection plans for the ``unknowns`` previously provided and currently being supplemented, DOE-RL and WHC shall provide a draft waste analysis plan for the containers reported in Item 1 of the Order to Ecology by July 12, 1993. A final, DOE-RL approved waste analysis plan shall be submitted to Ecology by September 1, 1993, for Ecology`s written approval by September 15, 1993.`` Containers covered by the Order, Settlement Agreement, and this waste analysis plan consist of all those reported under Item 1 of the Order, less any containers that have been identified in unusual occurrences reported by Tank Farms. This waste analysis plan describes the procedures that will be undertaken to confirm or to complete designation of the solid waste identified in the Order.

  12. VLT Observations Confirm that the Universe Was Hotter in the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-12-01

    . However, slight temperature variations in different directions have been measured, most recently by means of detailed observations from a balloon above Antarctica (the Boomerang experiment). Since the universe is expanding, it must have been denser in the past. A particular prediction of the Big Bang theory is also that the temperature of the CMBR must have been higher at earlier times. However, although quite a few attempts have been made, no clear observational confirmation of this has been possible so far. In fact, the best observations until now have only been able to establish upper limits to the cosmic temperature at earlier epochs. But proof is now available from new observations carried out with the Ultra-violet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope on Paranal . Very demanding observations The further we look out into the Universe, the further we look back in time. It was actually suggested more than 30 years ago that the predicted increase of temperature with distance (redshift) could be tested by observing specific absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars. The idea is simply that at earlier epochs, the CMBR was hot enough to excite certain atomic levels, and thus to give rise to particular absorption lines in the spectrum of a celestial object. Some faint absorption lines of neutral carbon atoms were found to be especially promising, in the sense that they were predicted to be very sensitive to the surrounding temperature. However, previous generations of (smaller) astronomical telescopes were unable to achieve spectra of sufficient quality of these faint absorption lines in faint and remote objects in the distant (i.e., early) Universe. The need to isolate the CMBR effects The advent of 8-m class telescopes has now changed this situation. A few years ago, the 10-m Keck telescope (Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA) obtained a spectrum of a quasar that was sufficiently detailed to determine an upper limit to the temperature of

  13. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  14. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  15. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  16. Children, Additive Change, and Calculus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; And Others

    Students can learn to solve problems of qualitative integration and differentiation independently of their study of formal calculus or algebra. This exploratory study investigated the basic intuitions that elementary school children construct in their daily experience with physical and symbolic change. Elementary school children (n=18) were…

  17. The effects of zinc addition on the environmental stability of Al-Li alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilmer, Raymond J.; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1990-01-01

    It was found that relatively small addition of Zn can improve the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Al-Li alloys. However, the mechanism by which this is accomplished is unclear. The role that Zn plays in altering the behavior of Alloy 8090 is investigated. Early results suggest that Zn additions increase the volume fraction of delta(Al3Li) precipitation and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on these alloys confirms this. The four alloys studied each had initial compositions lying in the 8090 window and had varying amounts of Zn added to them. Alloy 8090, like other Al-Li alloys, displays a delta' precipitate free zone (PFZ) upon artificial aging along the grain and subgrain boundaries. However Zn additions greatly decreased or eliminated a delta' PFZ after 100 hours at 160 C. This implies that the subgrain boundary precipitation kinetics are being altered and suppressed. Furthermore, there appears to be a window of Zn concentration above which a delta ' PFZ can reappear with the nucleation and growth of a currently unidentified precipitate on the boundaries. Polarization experiments were performed and the results presented. The experiments were performed in deaerated 3.5 w/o NaCl in both as received (T3) condition and at peak aging of 100 hours at 160 C. The aging profile was determined via Vickers Hardness tests.

  18. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  19. Child Sexual Abuse Confirmed by Forensic Examination in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Welington Dos Santos; Barroso-Junior, Ubirajara de Oliveira

    2017-03-01

    Child sexual abuse is a worldwide public health issue. The objective of this study was to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of children in cases of sexual abuse confirmed by material evidence at forensic examination. Cases of children younger than 12 years examined for suspected sexual abuse at the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, were reviewed retrospectively. The period evaluated was between 2005 and 2010. The inclusion criterion was the coroner's confirmation of sexual abuse based on material evidence. The mean age of the children in whom sexual abuse was confirmed was 8.2 (SD, 2.9) years, and 208 cases were female (83.9%). In 94% of the cases, the reason for carrying out the forensic examination was a report of sexual abuse. Less than 1% of the aggressors were female. A ruptured hymen was the finding that confirmed sexual abuse in 172 cases, corresponding to 83% of cases in girls. There were 2 cases of pregnancy. Recent anal or perianal lesions were present in 35 (87.5%) of the confirmed cases involving boys. Laboratory confirmation based on the detection of spermatozoa or prostate-specific antigen occurred in only 4.2% of cases. In all these cases, sample collection was performed within 24 hours of the alleged abuse. Thus, in the majority of cases with material evidence of sexual abuse, the confirmation criteria consisted of a ruptured hymen and recent perianal lesions.

  20. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF UV-BRIGHT WHITE DWARFS FROM THE SANDAGE TWO-COLOR SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, Sebastien; Bergeron, P.; Lanning, Howard H.

    2011-03-15

    We present spectroscopic observations confirming the identification of hot white dwarfs among UV-bright sources from the Sandage Two-color Survey of the Galactic Plane and listed in the Lanning (Lan) catalog of such sources. A subsample of 213 UV-bright Lan sources have been identified as candidate white dwarfs based on the detection of a significant proper motion. Spectroscopic observations of 46 candidates with the KPNO 2.1 m telescope confirm 30 sources to be hydrogen white dwarfs with subtypes in the DA1-DA6 range, and with one of the stars (Lan 161) having an unresolved M dwarf as a companion. Five more sources are confirmed to be helium white dwarfs, with subtypes from DB3 to DB6. One source (Lan 364) is identified as a DZ 3 white dwarf, with strong lines of calcium. Three more stars are found to have featureless spectra (to within detection limits) and are thus classified as DC white dwarfs. In addition, three sources are found to be hot subdwarfs: Lan 20 and Lan 480 are classified as sdOB, and Lan 432 is classified sdB. The remaining four objects are found to be field F star interlopers. Physical parameters of the DA and DB white dwarfs are derived from model fits.

  1. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  2. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  3. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  4. Asphalt and asphalt additives. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Contents: use of asphalt emulsions for in-place recycling: oregon experience; gap-graded cold asphalt concrete: benefits of polymer-modified asphalt cement and fibers; cold in-place recycling for rehabilitation and widening of low-volume flexible pavements in indiana; in situ cold recycling of bituminous pavements with polymer-modified high float emulsions; evaluation of new generation of antistripping additives; correlation between performance-related characteristics of asphalt cement and its physicochemical parameters using corbett's fractions and hpgc; reaction rates and hardening susceptibilities as determined from pressure oxygen vessel aging of asphalts; evaluation of aging characteristics of asphalts by using tfot and rtfot at different temperature levels; summary of asphalt additive performance at selected sites; relating asphalt absorption to properties of asphalt cement and aggregate; study of the effectiveness of styrene-butadiene rubber latex in hot mix asphalt mixes; stability of straight and polymer-modified asphalts.

  5. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  6. Ripple morphology under oscillatory flow: 2. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, F.; GarcíA, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    Recent large-scale laboratory experiments on the formation of ripples under oscillatory flow are presented. The experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water-Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, using 250 μm silica sand as sediment. The dimensions of the ripples formed under a wide range of flow conditions are compared with some of the existing predictors and with a new predictor presented in a companion paper. For a given near-bed water excursion the size of the ripples is observed to initially decrease with the increase of the maximum orbital velocity, as has been suggested before. However, an abrupt change of the ripple size and the transition to large round-crested ripples is observed when the maximum orbital velocity becomes larger than 0.5 m/s. Above this value the size of these round-crested ripples continuously increased with the increase of the maximum orbital velocity. Additionally, anorbital ripples were never formed despite the long water excursions used in several of our experiments, confirming that anorbital ripples are only formed in fine sands. Finally, the performance of the existing planform geometry predictors and a newly proposed predictor is evaluated using our new experimental data. The results confirm that the bed planform geometry is controlled by the wave Reynolds number and the particle size. The comparison or the new data with previous results from narrow facilities shows that the facility width can restrict the development of bed form three-dimensionality.

  7. Kepler-9: a system of multiple planets transiting a Sun-like star, confirmed by timing variations.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Ragozzine, Darin; Ford, Eric B; Steffen, Jason H; Welsh, William F; Lissauer, Jack J; Latham, David W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Walkowicz, Lucianne M; Batalha, Natalie M; Jenkins, Jon M; Rowe, Jason F; Cochran, William D; Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Buchhave, Lars A; Sasselov, Dimitar D; Borucki, William J; Koch, David G; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy M; Caldwell, Douglas A; Charbonneau, David; Dunham, Edward W; Gautier, Thomas N; Geary, John C; Gilliland, Ronald L; Haas, Michael R; Howell, Steve B; Ciardi, David R; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Fürész, Gábor; Hartman, Joel D; Isaacson, Howard; Johnson, John A; MacQueen, Phillip J; Moorhead, Althea V; Morehead, Robert C; Orosz, Jerome A

    2010-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is monitoring more than 150,000 stars for evidence of planets transiting those stars. We report the detection of two Saturn-size planets that transit the same Sun-like star, based on 7 months of Kepler observations. Their 19.2- and 38.9-day periods are presently increasing and decreasing at respective average rates of 4 and 39 minutes per orbit; in addition, the transit times of the inner body display an alternating variation of smaller amplitude. These signatures are characteristic of gravitational interaction of two planets near a 2:1 orbital resonance. Six radial-velocity observations show that these two planets are the most massive objects orbiting close to the star and substantially improve the estimates of their masses. After removing the signal of the two confirmed giant planets, we identified an additional transiting super-Earth-size planet candidate with a period of 1.6 days.

  8. Chromatography as Method for Analytical Confirmation of Paracetamol in Postmortem Material Together with Psychoactive Substances

    PubMed Central

    Biscevic-Tokic, Jasmina; Tokic, Nedim; Ibrahimpasic, Elma

    2015-01-01

    for determining the drug, and the drug substance. Used GC-MS instrument was an Agilent 7890A with helium as the carrier gas. Results: The analysis of blood samples, urine, bile and stomach contents, obtained after the autopsy of deceased persons, by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, in analytical manner confirmed the fact that paracetamol is a very common component of psychoactive substances poisoning. In our assay of samples we detected psychoactive substances (heroin, codeine, morphine, sertraline, diazepam), and almost all were found in the combination with paracetamol, indicating the poor quality of illicit drugs sold on the market. Discussion: Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) is a very common component in mixtures of street drugs. Such mixtures almost anyone can afford, but the very quality of these drugs has become extremely low, because it does not sell the pure substance, but is mixed with various medications. According to research Pantazia et al. the heroin mixture proportion of the heroin is very small so a lot of that mixture has only 3% of heroin, a large number of cases can be only 1% of pure heroin. Most of the time it replaces caffeine and paracetamol. According to the Risser et al. reason why acetaminophen component is present in these mixtures is because it can be purchased without a prescription, it is cheap, well tolerated by most people and shows no side effects. Conclusion: When we talk about illegal drugs, we must emphasize the fact that there is no quality control, or the composition of the drug. The composition of the drug purchased on the black market is still unknown to potential user. While reaching the final drug users it pass through many hands, and at each step something is added to increase earnings. Most often present additives or impurities in narcotic drugs that are added are caffeine, ephedrine, acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and additives such as powders, cement and chalk. PMID:26635443

  9. Multi-class determination and confirmation of antibiotic residues in honey using LC-MS/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-class method was developed for the determination and confirmation in honey of tetracyclines (chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, and sarafloxacin), macrolides (tylosin), lincosamides (lin...

  10. 75 FR 41921 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology Administration...

  11. 78 FR 60997 - Agency Information Collection: Activity Under OMB Review: Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection: Activity Under OMB Review: Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space--BTS Form 251 AGENCY: Research & Innovative...

  12. 77 FR 18305 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space--BTS Form 251 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology... of Transportation Statistics, Research and Innovative Technology Administration. BILLING CODE...

  13. 77 FR 33808 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space--BTS Form 251 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology..., DC, on May 31, 2012. Patricia Hu, Director, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Research...

  14. 78 FR 43272 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Passengers Denied Confirmed Space--BTS Form 251 AGENCY: Research & Innovative Technology..., Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Research and Innovative Technology Administration. BILLING CODE...

  15. INDUCED SPUTUM DERIVES FROM THE CENTRAL AIRWAYS: CONFIRMATION USING A RADIOLABELED AEROSOL BOLUS DELIVERY TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indirect evidence suggests that induced sputum derives from the surfaces of the bronchial airways. To confirm this experimentally, we employed a radiolabeled aerosol bolus delivery technique that preferentially deposits aerosol in the central airways in humans. We hypothesized th...

  16. Transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 in a patient with kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Kim, Silvia S; Burns, Jane C

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 that developed after a child received intravenous immunoglobulin and infliximab for acute Kawasaki disease.

  17. Meltwater Origin of the 2005 Mount Steller Landslide Confirmed by Analysis of Global Fiducials Program Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.; Angeli, K.

    2012-12-01

    Alaska's Mt. Steller, a 3,236 m Chugach Mountains peak, is one of the target areas of the Bering Glacier Global Fiducials Program (GFP) site. On September 14, 2005, a large mass of rock, glacier ice, and snow, with a volume of ~50 million cubic meters, fell from just below Mt. Steller's south-facing summit and landed on the surface of a tributary to Bering Glacier, nearly 2,500 m below. The slide, which extended ~8 km down-glacier, was actually an ice-rock avalanche. The impact generated a seismic signal recorded with a magnitude of up to 5.2. Oblique aerial photography of the mountain, the head scarp, and the slide mass was collected for the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) on September 15, 2005. The photography delineated the morphology of the failed south-facing slope of the mountain and showed details of the sheared, near-summit hanging glacier and snow mass. Based on the photography, the AVO calculated the slide volume and length. Several weeks later, the AVO provided the first author with digital copies of the September 15 photography. These images were enhanced and examined in order to determine properties of the slide and to evaluate if the cause of the event could be determined. A number of features observed led to the conclusion that meltwater was probably responsible for destabilizing the glacier ice-bedrock contact and triggering the landslide. Specifically, a 10-15 m diameter englacial stream channel was seen in the truncated glacier ice that comprised the east wall of the landslide scarp and a water-polished channel opening was noted on the west wall scarp. Additionally, several depressions were noted that might have temporarily stored water. To confirm these observations, new cloud-free GFP imagery was obtained on October 24 and 28, 2005. Analysis of both sets of imagery documented that: (1) more than a month after the event, meltwater was exiting the east wall scarp channel and flowing down the face of the mountain; (2) the

  18. The Frontiers of Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, Christopher John

    2016-03-03

    Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, has become a ubiquitous tool in science for its precise control over mechanical design. For additive manufacturing to work, a 3-D structure is split into thin 2D slices, and then different physical properties, such as photo-polymerization or melting, are used to grow the sequential layers. The level of control allows not only for devices to be made with a variety of materials: e.g. plastics, metals, and quantum dots, but to also have finely controlled structures leading to other novel properties. While 3-D printing is widely used by hobbyists for making models, it also has industrial applications in structural engineering, biological tissue scaffolding, customized electric circuitry, fuel cells, security, and more.

  19. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  20. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-02-05

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  1. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  2. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    ScienceCinema

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-07-12

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  3. Nanoengineered Additives for Active Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    commercial ad bial activ component from the coating, leading to eventual depletion of the film. Small TPU samples were evaluated using a Kirby - Bauer ...7 Table 5. Summary of 24-hr ASTM E 2180 tests with 1 weight-percent additive in PUr (solvent dispersible) based on 6-log loading of...Noveon X-1150). The ASTM E 2180 test is run in triplicate (Note that alternative ro 1° amines) was suspended in dry tetrahydrofuran (THF) (150 mL) in

  4. Reversible Oxidative Addition at Carbon.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Antonius F; Fuchs, Sonja; Flock, Marco; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2017-04-07

    The reactivity of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and cyclic alkyl amino carbenes (cAACs) with arylboronate esters is reported. The reaction with NHCs leads to the reversible formation of thermally stable Lewis acid/base adducts Ar-B(OR)2 ⋅NHC (Add1-Add6). Addition of cAAC(Me) to the catecholboronate esters 4-R-C6 H4 -Bcat (R=Me, OMe) also afforded the adducts 4-R-C6 H4 Bcat⋅cAAC(Me) (Add7, R=Me and Add8, R=OMe), which react further at room temperature to give the cAAC(Me) ring-expanded products RER1 and RER2. The boronate esters Ar-B(OR)2 of pinacol, neopentylglycol, and ethyleneglycol react with cAAC at RT via reversible B-C oxidative addition to the carbene carbon atom to afford cAAC(Me) (B{OR}2 )(Ar) (BCA1-BCA6). NMR studies of cAAC(Me) (Bneop)(4-Me-C6 H4 ) (BCA4) demonstrate the reversible nature of this oxidative addition process.

  5. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; ...

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  6. Livers provide a reliable matrix for real-time PCR confirmation of avian botulism.

    PubMed

    Le Maréchal, Caroline; Ballan, Valentine; Rouxel, Sandra; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Baudouard, Marie-Agnès; Morvan, Hervé; Houard, Emmanuelle; Poëzevara, Typhaine; Souillard, Rozenn; Woudstra, Cédric; Le Bouquin, Sophie; Fach, Patrick; Chemaly, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis of avian botulism is based on clinical symptoms, which are indicative but not specific. Laboratory investigations are therefore required to confirm clinical suspicions and establish a definitive diagnosis. Real-time PCR methods have recently been developed for the detection of Clostridium botulinum group III producing type C, D, C/D or D/C toxins. However, no study has been conducted to determine which types of matrices should be analyzed for laboratory confirmation using this approach. This study reports on the comparison of different matrices (pooled intestinal contents, livers, spleens and cloacal swabs) for PCR detection of C. botulinum. Between 2013 and 2015, 63 avian botulism suspicions were tested and 37 were confirmed as botulism. Analysis of livers using real-time PCR after enrichment led to the confirmation of 97% of the botulism outbreaks. Using the same method, spleens led to the confirmation of 90% of botulism outbreaks, cloacal swabs of 93% and pooled intestinal contents of 46%. Liver appears to be the most reliable type of matrix for laboratory confirmation using real-time PCR analysis.

  7. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  8. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  9. Confirming the Potential of Systems Containing Strangeness for 3D Structure Studies of the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Salina; Horn, Tanja; Carmignotto, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The additional flavor degree of freedom in kaon electroproduction provides a unique opportunity to study the mechanism underlying strangeness production and the transition from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom in exclusive processes. At sufficiently high energies, where soft non-perturbative and hard physics have been shown to factorize, the Generalized Parton Distributions provide a spatial tomography of the nucleon. The applicability of this formalism can be experimentally verified. The E12-09-011 experiment at the 12 GeV Jefferson Lab aims to test the expected approach of the hard scattering regime through precision measurements of the fully separated exclusive kaon production cross section, and in particular the relative contributions and kinematic dependencies of the longitudinal and transverse cross sections. The longitudinal cross section also allows one to test the kaon pole dominance and could allow for kaon form factor extractions. In this talk, I will present the current status and discuss the outlook on future studies of strange quarks with kaon production as well as the particle identification requirements, and possible kaon form factor extractions at a 12-GeV Jefferson Lab. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418.

  10. Genetic evidence confirms polygamous mating system in a crustacean parasite with multiple hosts.

    PubMed

    Jossart, Quentin; Wattier, Rémi A; Kastally, Chedly; Aron, Serge; David, Bruno; De Ridder, Chantal; Rigaud, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mating systems are diverse in animals, notably in crustaceans, but can be inferred from a limited set of parameters. Baeza and Thiel (2007) proposed a model predicting mating systems of symbiotic crustaceans with three host characteristics and the risk of predation. These authors proposed five mating systems, ranging from monogamy to polygynandry (where multiple mating occurs for both genders). Using microsatellite loci, we tested the putatively mating system of the ectoparasite crab Dissodactylus primitivus. We determined the mating frequencies of males and females, parentage assignment (COLONY & GERUD software) as well as the contents of female spermathecae. Our results are globally consistent with the model of Baeza and Thiel and showed, together with previous aquarium experiments, that this ectoparasite evolved a polygamous mating system where males and females move between hosts for mate search. Parentage analyses revealed that polyandry is frequent and concerns more than 60% of clutches, with clutches being fertilized by up to 6 different fathers. Polygyny is supported by the detection of eight males having sired two different broods. We also detected a significant paternity skew in 92% of the multipaternal broods. Moreover, this skew is probably higher than the estimation from the brood because additional alleles were detected in most of spermathecae. This high skew could be explained by several factors as sperm competition or cryptic female choice. Our genetic data, combined with previous anatomic analyses, provide consistent arguments to suggest sperm precedence in D. primitivus.

  11. Why the Afshar experiment does not refute complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, R. E.

    A modified version of Young's experiment by Shahriar Afshar demonstrates that, prior to what appears to be a "which-way" measurement, an interference pattern exists. Afshar has claimed that this result constitutes a violation of the Principle of Complementarity. This paper discusses the implications of this experiment and considers how Cramer's Transactional Interpretation easily accommodates the result. It is also shown that the Afshar experiment is analogous in key respects to a spin one-half particle prepared as "spin up along x ", subjected to a nondestructive confirmation of that preparation, and post-selected in a specific state of spin along z . The terminology "which-way" or "which-slit" is critiqued; it is argued that this usage by both Afshar and his critics is misleading and has contributed to confusion surrounding the interpretation of the experiment. Nevertheless, it is concluded that Bohr would have had no more problem accounting for the Afshar result than he would in accounting for the aforementioned pre- and post-selection spin experiment, in which the particle's preparation state is confirmed by a nondestructive measurement prior to post-selection. In addition, some new inferences about the interpretation of delayed choice experiments are drawn from the analysis.

  12. Industrial application experiment series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluhm, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The deployment of parabolic dish systems into the industrial sector for the purpose of providing users, suppliers, sponsors, and developers with a realistic assessment of system feasibility in selected near-term industrial applications will be accomplished initially through the industrial module experiment and later through additional experiments involving thermal, electric, and combined thermal and electrical systems. The approach is to progress through steps, from single module to multi-module systems, from thermal-only applications to more complex combined thermal and electric applications. The experience of other solar thermal experiments, particularly those involving parabolic dish hardware, will be utilized to the fullest extent possible in experiment planning and implementation.

  13. Assessment of Recent HIV-1 Infection by a Line Immunoassay for HIV-1/2 Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Gebhardt, Martin D; Tomasik, Zuzana; Niederhauser, Christoph; Yerly, Sabine; Bürgisser, Philippe; Matter, Lukas; Gorgievski, Meri; Dubs, Rolf; Schultze, Detlev; Steffen, Ingrid; Andreutti, Corinne; Martinetti, Gladys; Güntert, Bruno; Staub, Roger; Daneel, Synove; Vernazza, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    INNO-LIA algorithms. Window-based estimation with BED-EIA yielded 41% (95% confidence interval 36%–46%). Conclusions Recency information can be extracted from INNO-LIA-based confirmatory testing at no additional costs. This method should improve epidemiologic surveillance in countries that routinely use INNO-LIA for HIV confirmation. PMID:18052604

  14. The Mozart Effect: Additional Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R.

    2002-04-01

    After the review of the Mozart effect was published in this journal (Hughes JR. Epilepsy Behav 2001;2:369-417), additional data from the music of Haydn and Liszt have been analyzed that may account for the decrease in seizure activity originally reported during Mozart music. Even with these added data Mozart music continued to score significantly higher than the selections from the other six composers in one of the important characteristics of this music, namely, the repetition of the melody. However Haydn's values were second highest among Mozart, J. S. Bach, Wagner, Beethoven, Chopin, and Liszt.

  15. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  16. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  17. Theatre fleet's vital additional capacity.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Vanguard Healthcare's fleet of mobile surgical facilities has been deployed to healthcare sites throughout Europe and beyond for over a decade, providing vital additional clinical capacity when existing buildings are refurbished or upgraded, in the event of flood or fire, or simply to help hospitals cater for rising demand. It is a combination of careful planning, teamwork, and the specialist expertise of Vanguard's personnel--many with a clinical background--that ensures not only each unit's successful installation, but equally its subsequent running, servicing, and maintenance, the company explains.

  18. Shale JP-4 Additive Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    8217. •% . , ’ ,,,r ,% . -- - ,.-. ’ ’ 4,w% %’. " - ,’ . . . * ’, .* . TABLE OF CONTENTS .4q ,4 . * SECTION PAGE I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. TEST PARAMETERS 2 1...42 PRECEDING PAGE BLANK TABLE OF CONTENTS (CON’T) SECT ION PAGE V. CONCLUSIONS 44 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A Drum to Test Sample Relationship 47 APPENDIX...B.O.C.L.E. Results 40 vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 Antioxidants 3 2 Raw Shale/Petroleum Fuel Properties 10 3 Drum Sample Additive Content 13 4

  19. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  20. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  1. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this gap by conducting a county-level cross-sectional analysis of interactions between Environmental Quality Index (EQI) domain indices on preterm birth in the Unites States from 2000-2005.METHODS: The EQI, a county-level index constructed for the 2000-2005 time period, was constructed from five domain-specific indices (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic) using principal component analyses. County-level preterm birth rates (n=3141) were estimated using live births from the National Center for Health Statistics. Linear regression was used to estimate prevalence differences (PD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing worse environmental quality to the better quality for each model for a) each individual domain main effect b) the interaction contrast and c) the two main effects plus interaction effect (i.e. the “net effect”) to show departure from additive interaction for the all U.S counties. Analyses were also performed for subgroupings by four urban/rural strata. RESULTS: We found the suggestion of antagonistic interactions but no synergism, along with several purely additive (i.e., no interaction) associations. In the non-stratified model, we observed antagonistic interac

  2. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  3. Microgravity Experiments On Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, B. P.; Leon, H.; Hogan, R.; Clarke, B.; Tollinger, D.

    1991-01-01

    Paper describes experiments on animal subjects planned for Spacelab Life Sciences 1 mission. Laboratory equipment evaluated, and physiological experiments performed. Represents first step in establishing technology for maintaining and manipulating rodents, nonhuman primates, amphibians, and plants during space flight without jeopardizing crew's environment. In addition, experiments focus on effects of microgravity on cardiopulmonary, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal systems; on regulation of volume of blood and production of red blood cells; and on calcium metabolism and gravity receptors.

  4. Bubble formation in additive manufacturing of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Peters, Daniel C.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-05-01

    Bubble formation is a common problem in glass manufacturing. The spatial density of bubbles in a piece of glass is a key limiting factor to the optical quality of the glass. Bubble formation is also a common problem in additive manufacturing, leading to anisotropic material properties. In glass Additive Manufacturing (AM) two separate types of bubbles have been observed: a foam layer caused by the reboil of the glass melt and a periodic pattern of bubbles which appears to be unique to glass additive manufacturing. This paper presents a series of studies to relate the periodicity of bubble formation to part scan speed, laser power, and filament feed rate. These experiments suggest that bubbles are formed by the reboil phenomena why periodic bubbles result from air being trapped between the glass filament and the substrate. Reboil can be detected using spectroscopy and avoided by minimizing the laser power while periodic bubbles can be avoided by a two-step laser melting process to first establish good contact between the filament and substrate before reflowing the track with higher laser power.

  5. Effects of some polymeric additives on the cocrystallization of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihae; Kim, Il Won

    2011-11-01

    Effects of polymeric additives on the model cocrystallization were examined. The model cocrystal was made from caffeine and oxalic acid, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly( L-lactide) (PLLA), poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were the additives. The cocrystals were formed as millimeter-sized crystals without additives, and they became microcrystals with PLLA and PCL, and nanocrystals with PAA. XRD and IR revealed that the cocrystal structure was unchanged despite the strong effects of the additives on the crystal morphology, although some decrease in crystallinity was observed with PAA as confirmed by DSC. The DSC study also showed that the cocrystal melted and recrystallized to form α-caffeine upon heating. The present study verified that the polymeric additives can be utilized to modulate the size and morphology of the cocrystals without interfering the intermolecular interactions essential to the integrity of the cocrystal structures.

  6. 21 CFR 170.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 170.20 General principles for...) Upon written request describing the proposed use of an additive and the proposed experiments to... additive whether he believes the experiments planned will yield data adequate for an evaluation of...

  7. Screening Characteristics of Bedside Ultrasonography in Confirming Endotracheal Tube Placement; a Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Moghadam, Hamid; Sharifi, Mohamad Davood; Rajabi, Hasan; Mousavi Bazaz, Mojtaba; Alamdaran, Ali; Jafari, Niazmohammad; Hashemian, Seyed Amir Masoud; Talebi Deloei, Morteza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Confirmation of proper endotracheal tube placement is one of the most important and lifesaving issues of tracheal intubation. The present study was aimed to evaluate the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography by emergency residents in this regard. Method: This was a prospective, cross sectional study for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in endotracheal tube placement confirmation compared to a combination of 4 clinical confirmation methods of chest and epigastric auscultation, direct laryngoscopy, aspiration of the tube, and pulse oximetry (as reference test). Results: 150 patients with the mean age of 58.52 ± 1.73 years were included (56.6% male). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and positive and negative likelihood ratio of tracheal ultrasonography in endotracheal tube confirmation were 96 (95% CI: 92-99), 88 (95% CI: 62-97), 98 (95% CI: 94-99), 78 (95% CI: 53-93), 64 (95% CI: 16-255), and 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1-0.6), respectively. Conclusion: The present study showed that tracheal ultrasonography by trained emergency medicine residents had excellent sensitivity (>90%) and good specificity (80-90) for confirming endotracheal tube placement. Therefore, it seems that ultrasonography is a proper screening tool in determining endotracheal tube placement. PMID:28286826

  8. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  9. Amine-intercalated α-zirconium phosphates as lubricant additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huaping; Dai, Wei; Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham; Liang, Hong

    2015-02-01

    In this study, three types of amines intercalated α-zirconium phosphate nanosheets with different interspaces were synthesized and examined as lubricant additives to a mineral oil. Results from tribological experiments illustrated that these additives improved lubricating performance. Results of rheological experiments showed that the viscosity of the mineral oil was effectively reduced with the addition of α-zirconium phosphate nanosheets. The two-dimensional structure, with larger interspaces, resulting from amine intercalation, exhibited improved effectiveness in reducing viscosity. This study demonstrates that the nanosheet structure of α-zirconium phosphates is effective in friction reduction. The manufacture of lubricants with tailored viscosity is possible by using different intercalators.

  10. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder.

  11. The consistency principle in interpersonal communication: consequences of preference confirmation and disconfirmation in collective decision making.

    PubMed

    Mojzisch, Andreas; Kerschreiter, Rudolf; Faulmüller, Nadira; Vogelgesang, Frank; Schulz-Hardt, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Interpersonal cognitive consistency is a driving force in group behavior. In this article, we propose a new model of interpersonal cognitive consistency in collective decision making. Building on ideas from the mutual enhancement model (Wittenbaum, Hubbell, & Zuckerman, 1999), we argue that group members evaluate one another more positively when they mention information confirming each other's preferences instead of information disconfirming these preferences. Furthermore, we argue that this effect is mediated by perceived information quality: Group members evaluate one another more positively when they mention information confirming each other's preferences because they perceive this information to be more important and accurate than information disconfirming each other's preferences. Finally, we hypothesize that group members who communicate information confirming each other's preferences receive positive feedback for doing so, which, in turn, leads group members to mention even more of this information. The results of 3 studies with pseudo and face-to-face interacting dyads provide converging support for our model.

  12. Exploring Selective Exposure and Confirmation Bias as Processes Underlying Employee Work Happiness: An Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paige; Kern, Margaret L.; Waters, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Employee psychological capital (PsyCap), perceptions of organizational virtue (OV), and work happiness have been shown to be associated within and over time. This study examines selective exposure and confirmation bias as potential processes underlying PsyCap, OV, and work happiness associations. As part of a quasi-experimental study design, school staff (N = 69) completed surveys at three time points. After the first assessment, some staff (n = 51) completed a positive psychology training intervention. Results of descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analyses on the intervention group provide some support for selective exposure and confirmation bias as explanatory mechanisms. In focusing on the processes through which employee attitudes may influence work happiness this study advances theoretical understanding, specifically of selective exposure and confirmation bias in a field study context. PMID:27378978

  13. Additively Manufactured and Surface Biofunctionalized Porous Nitinol.

    PubMed

    Gorgin Karaji, Z; Speirs, M; Dadbakhsh, S; Kruth, J-P; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A; Amin Yavari, S

    2017-01-18

    Enhanced bone tissue regeneration and improved osseointegration are among the most important goals in design of multifunctional orthopedic biomaterials. In this study, we used additive manufacturing (selective laser melting) to develop multifunctional porous nitinol that combines superelasticity with a rationally designed microarchitecture and biofunctionalized surface. The rational design based on triply periodic minimal surfaces aimed to properly adjust the pore size, increase the surface area (thereby amplifying the effects of surface biofunctionalization), and resemble the curvature characteristics of trabecular bone. The surface of additively manufactured (AM) porous nitinol was biofunctionalized using polydopamine-immobilized rhBMP2 for better control of the release kinetics. The actual morphological properties of porous nitinol measured by microcomputed tomography (e.g., open/close porosity, and surface area) closely matched the design values. The superelasticity originated from the austenite phase formed in the nitinol porous structure at room temperature. Polydopamine and rhBMP2 signature peaks were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests. The release of rhBMP2 continued until 28 days. The early time and long-term release profiles were found to be adjustable independent of each other. In vitro cell culture showed improved cell attachment, cell proliferation, cell morphology (spreading, spindle-like shape), and cell coverage as well as elevated levels of ALP activity and increased calcium content for biofunctionalized surfaces as compared to as-manufactured specimens. The demonstrated functionalities of porous nitinol could be used as a basis for deployable orthopedic implants with rationally designed microarchitectures that maximize bone tissue regeneration performance by release of biomolecules with adjustable and well-controlled release profiles.

  14. Improved surface property of PVDF membrane with amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer as membrane additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Hua; Li, Mi-Zi; Miao, Jing; Wang, Jia-Bin; Shao, Xi-Sheng; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2012-06-01

    An attempt to improve hydrophilicity and anti-fouling properties of PVDF membranes, a novel amphiphilic zwitterionic copolymer poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PVDF-g-PSBMA) was firstly synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and used as amphiphilic copolymer additive in the preparation of PVDF membranes. The PVDF-g-PSBMA/PVDF blend membranes were prepared by immersion precipitation process. Fourier transform infrared attenuated reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirmed that PSBMA brushes from amphiphilic additives were preferentially segregated to membrane-coagulant interface during membrane formation. The morphology of membranes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Water contact angle measurements showed that the surface hydrophilicity of PVDF membranes was improved significantly with the increasing of amphiphilic copolymer PVDF-g-PSBMA in cast solution. Protein static adsorption experiment and dynamic fouling resistance experiment revealed that the surface enrichment of PSBMA brush endowed PVDF blend membrane great improvement of surface anti-fouling ability.

  15. Reliability of veterinary drug residue confirmation: high resolution mass spectrometry versus tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2015-01-26

    Confirmation of suspected residues has been a long time domain of tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ). The currently most widely used confirmation strategy relies on the use of two selected reaction monitoring signals (SRM). The details of this confirmation procedure are described in detail in the Commission Decision 93/256/EC (CD). On the other hand, high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is nowadays increasingly used for trace analysis. Yet its utility for confirmatory purposes has not been well explored and utilized, since established confirmation strategies like the CD do not yet include rules for modern HRMS technologies. It is the focus of this paper to evaluate the likelihood of false positive and false negative confirmation results, when using a variety of HRMS based measurement modes as compared to conventional QqQ mass spectrometry. The experimental strategy relies on the chromatographic separation of a complex blank sample (bovine liver extract) and the subsequent monitoring of a number of dummy transitions respectively dummy accurate masses. The term "dummy" refers to precursor and derived product ions (based on a realistic neutral loss) whose elemental compositions (CxHyNzOdCle) were produced by a random number generator. Monitoring a large number of such hypothetical SRM's, or accurate masses inevitably produces a number of mass traces containing chromatographic peaks (false detects) which are caused by eluting matrix compounds. The number and intensity of these peaks were recorded and standardized to permit a comparison among the two employed MS technologies. QqQ performance (compounds which happen to produce a response in two SRM traces at identical retention time) was compared with a number of different HRMS(1) and HRMS(2) detection based modes. A HRMS confirmation criterion based on two full scans (an unfragmented and an all ion fragmented) was proposed. Compared to the CD criteria, a significantly lower probability of false

  16. Inspection of additive-manufactured layered components.

    PubMed

    Cerniglia, D; Scafidi, M; Pantano, A; Rudlin, J

    2015-09-01

    Laser powder deposition (LPD) is a rapid additive manufacturing process to produce, layer upon layer, 3D geometries or to repair high-value components. Currently there is no nondestructive technique that can guarantee absence of flaws in LPD products during manufacturing. In this paper a laser ultrasonic technique for in-line inspection of LPD components is proposed. Reference samples were manufactured from Inconel and machined flaws were created to establish the sensitivity of the technique. Numerical models of laser-generated ultrasonic waves have been created to gain a deeper understanding of physics, to optimize the set-up and to verify the experimental measurements. Results obtained on two sets of reference samples are shown. A proof-of-concept prototype has been demonstrated on some specific deposition samples with induced flaws, that were confirmed by an ultra-high sensitivity X-ray technique. Experimental outcomes prove that typical micro-defects due to the layer-by-layer deposition process, such as near-surface and surface flaws in a single layer deposit, can be detected.

  17. [How to confirm acute fatty liver of pregnancy in case of emergency].

    PubMed

    Homer, L; Hebert, T; Nousbaum, J-B; Bacq, Y; Collet, M

    2009-03-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a rare disease of which prognosis could be adverse if diagnosis is delayed. Certain diagnosis is sometimes made complex because of undercurrent symptoms with pre-eclampsia or hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme, low platelet (HELLP) syndrome. Several reports announce an increase of incidence and illustrate cases confirmed by non-invasive methods. They permit early diagnosis and improve morbidity and mortality. Reviewing seven of the most important series of AFLP, we demonstrate how to use ultrasonography or computed tomography scan to confirm AFLP. However, liver biopsy should be realised after delivery in case of uncertain diagnosis.

  18. Agenesis of dorsal pancreas confirmed by three-dimensional reconstruction CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Chen, Munan; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas (ADP) is a rare congenital pancreatic malformation in which all or part of the dorsal pancreatic body is absent. ADP is usually confirmed by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), but these methods are undesirable to patients because of strict limitations or invasiveness. We propose abdominal contrast-enhanced and three-dimensional reconstruction CT images as an improved method for ADP diagnosis, and present a case study of ADP confirmed with these methods. PMID:25356189

  19. Functional modelling of an equine bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteome provides experimental confirmation and functional annotation of equine genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Bright, L A; Mujahid, N; Nanduri, B; McCarthy, F M; Costa, L R R; Burgess, S C; Swiderski, C E

    2011-08-01

    The equine genome sequence enables the use of high-throughput genomic technologies in equine research, but accurate identification of expressed gene products and interpreting their biological relevance require additional structural and functional genome annotation. Here, we employ the equine genome sequence to identify predicted and known proteins using proteomics and model these proteins into biological pathways, identifying 582 proteins in normal cell-free equine bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We improved structural and functional annotation by directly confirming the in vivo expression of 558 (96%) proteins, which were computationally predicted previously, and adding Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for 174 proteins, 108 of which lacked functional annotation. Bronchoalveolar lavage is commonly used to investigate equine respiratory disease, leading us to model the associated proteome and its biological functions. Modelling of protein functions using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified carbohydrate metabolism, cell-to-cell signalling, cellular function, inflammatory response, organ morphology, lipid metabolism and cellular movement as key biological processes in normal equine BALF. Comparative modelling of protein functions in normal cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage proteomes from horse, human, and mouse, performed by grouping GO terms sharing common ancestor terms, confirms conservation of functions across species. Ninety-one of 92 human GO categories and 105 of 109 mouse GO categories were conserved in the horse. Our approach confirms the utility of the equine genome sequence to characterize protein networks without antibodies or mRNA quantification, highlights the need for continued structural and functional annotation of the equine genome and provides a framework for equine researchers to aid in the annotation effort.

  20. Site-specific glycoproteomics confirms that protein structure dictates formation of N-glycan type, core fucosylation and branching.

    PubMed

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H

    2012-11-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the individualized and highly reproducible N-glycan repertoires on each protein glycosylation site modulate function. Relationships between protein structures and the resulting N-glycoforms have previously been observed, but remain to be quantitatively confirmed and examined in detail to define the responsible mechanisms in the conserved mammalian glycosylation machinery. Here, we investigate this relationship by manually extracting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative site-specific glycoprofiling data from 117 research papers. Specifically, N-glycan structural motifs were correlated with the structure of the protein carriers, focusing on the solvent accessibility of the individual glycosylation sites and the physicochemical properties of the surrounding polypeptide chains. In total, 474 glycosylation sites from 169 mammalian N-glycoproteins originating from different tissues/body fluids were investigated. It was confirmed statistically that the N-glycan type, degree of core fucosylation and branching are strongly influenced by the glycosylation site accessibility. For these three N-glycan features, glycosylation sites carrying highly processed glycans were significantly more solvent-accessible than those carrying less processed counterparts. The glycosylation site accessibilities could be linked to molecular signatures at the primary and secondary protein levels, most notably to the glycoprotein size and the proportion of glycosylation sites located in accessible β-turns. In addition, the subcellular location of the glycoproteins influenced the formation of the N-glycan structures. These data confirm that protein structures dictate site-specific formation of several features of N-glycan structures by affecting the biosynthetic pathway. Mammals have, as such, evolved mechanisms enabling proteins to influence the N-glycans they present to the extracellular environment.