Science.gov

Sample records for additional field work

  1. Working Memory and Children's Mental Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, John W.; Hitch, Graham J.

    1997-01-01

    Two experiments investigated extent to which English- and German-speaking childrens' mental arithmetic was constrained by working memory. Found higher mental addition spans when numbers were visible throughout calculation than when not. Variation in addition span with age and arithmetical operation difficulty approximated to a linear function of…

  2. Additive empirical force field for hexopyranose monosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; Greene, Shannon N.; Kamath, Ganesh; Brady, John W.; Venable, Richard M.; Pastor, Richard W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    We present an all-atom additive empirical force field for the hexopyranose monosaccharide form of glucose and its diastereomers allose, altrose, galactose, gulose, idose, mannose, and talose. The model is developed to be consistent with the CHARMM all-atom biomolecular force fields, and the same parameters are used for all diastereomers, including both the α- and β-anomers of each monosaccharide. The force field is developed in a hierarchical manner and reproduces the gas-phase and condensed-phase properties of small-molecule model compounds corresponding to fragments of pyranose monosaccharides. The resultant parameters are transferred to the full pyranose monosaccharides and additional parameter development is done to achieve a complete hexopyranose monosaccharide force field. Parametrization target data include vibrational frequencies, crystal geometries, solute – water interaction energies, molecular volumes, heats of vaporization, and conformational energies, including those for over 1800 monosaccharide conformations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G(d) level of theory. Though not targeted during parametrization, free energies of aqueous solvation for the model compounds compare favorably with experimental values. Also well-reproduced are monosaccharide crystal unit cell dimensions and ring pucker, densities of concentrated aqueous glucose systems, and the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the exocyclic torsion in dilute aqueous systems. The new parameter set expands the CHARMM additive force field to allow for simulation of heterogeneous systems that include hexopyranose monosaccharides in addition to proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. PMID:18470966

  3. Social Work Program. Field Placement Manual for Social Work Field Placement I, Social Work Field Placement II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Howard J.; And Others

    This document is a manual for a social work field placement program. The social work field placement is described as a learning experience designed to translate the students' interests, interpersonal abilities, and academic knowledge and theory into the capability of enabling others to solve problems. Expectations of skills to be learned in the…

  4. Approximate additions and working memory in individuals with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Belacchi, Carmen; Passolunghi, Maria Chiara; Brentan, Elena; Dante, Arianna; Persi, Lara; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2014-05-01

    There is some evidence that individuals with Down syndrome (DS) may have a poorer mathematical performance and a poorer working memory (WM) than typically developing (TD) children of the same mental age. In both typical and atypical individuals, different aspects of arithmetic and their relationships with WM have been largely studied, but the specific contribution of WM to the representation and elaboration of non-symbolic quantities has received little attention. The present study examined whether individuals with DS are as capable as TD children matched for fluid intelligence of estimating numerosity both of single sets and of added sets resulting when two sequentially presented sets are added together, also considering how these tasks related to verbal and visuospatial WM. Results showed that the DS group's performance was significantly worse than the TD group's in numerosity estimation involving one set, but not when estimating the numerosity resulting from the addition. Success in the addition task was related to success in the working memory tasks, but only for the group with DS; this applied especially to the visuospatial component, which (unlike the verbal component) was not impaired in the group with DS. It is concluded that the two numerosity tasks involve different processes. It is concluded that the arithmetical and working memory difficulties of individuals with DS are not general, and they can draw on their WM resources when estimating the numerosity of additions. PMID:24602332

  5. A field work experience in mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Beardslee, G R

    1976-01-01

    A graduate student specializing in mental retardation found few pertinent electives as well as little opportunity for field work experience. A special arrangement was made for appropriate field work experiences in three types of settings--a large residential institution, school programs, and nursing care facilities. There was little time to view client changes, and rapport with patients and staff was difficult to develop. The advantages included more time with her supervisor, more exposure to organizational and administrative duties, and more exposure to a variety of settings and to the professional roles of numerous therapists. More such field work experiences should be developed to encourage new therapists to choose mental retardation as a specialty. PMID:984162

  6. Working group on chromospheric fields - Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, H. P.

    1985-01-01

    Although there are many points of uncertainty and controversy, the working group on chromospheric fields focussed its discussion on the concept of canopies; i.e., no one disagreed that a central issue relating to magnetic fields and chromospheric models is to learn how the photospheric field spreads with height. However, it quickly became apparent that in the time available, there was little prospect of building new unified models of magnetic field phenomena in the chromosphere beyond the scope of the formal presentations. Thus, the discussion was devoted to formulating questions which seemed both possible to address in future work and important for advancing understanding of the chromosphere. It began by discussing unresolved physical issues (almost everything) and then proceeded to consider means, both observational and synthetic, to address them.

  7. Far-field environment working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Pearcy, E.C.; Cady, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the potential impacts of underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes on the far-field environment.

  8. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all‐atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26841080

  9. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. PMID:26841080

  10. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs.

  11. Additional electric field in real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, R. K.; Aslanova, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    In real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode (TMBS diode) additional electric field (AEF) the whole is formed in the near contact region of the semiconductor and its propagation space is limited with the barrier metal and the metallic electrodes of MOS structures. Effective potential barrier height TMBS diode is formed via resulting electric field of superposition AEF and electric field of space charge region (SCR) semiconductor. The dependence of the resulting electric field intensity of the distance towards the inside the semiconductor is nonlinear and characterized by a peak at a certain distance from the interface. The thickness of the SCR in TMBS diode becomes equal to the trench depth. Force and energy parameters of the AEF, and thus resulting electric field in the SCR region, become dependent on the geometric design parameters TMBS diode. The forward I-V characteristic TMBS diode is described by the thermionic emission theory as in conventional flat Scottky diode, and in the reverse bias, current is virtually absent at initial voltage, appears abruptly at a certain critical voltage.

  12. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  13. Measuring exposed magnetic fields of welders in working time.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Ojima, Jun; Sekino, Masaki; Hojo, Minoru; Saito, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of the occupational electromagnetic field exposure of welders is of great importance, especially in shielded-arc welding, which uses relatively high electric currents of up to several hundred amperes. In the present study, we measured the magnetic field exposure level of welders in the course of working. A 3-axis Hall magnetometer was attached to a subject's wrist in order to place the sensor probe at the closest position to the magnetic source (a cable from the current source). Data was acquired every 5 s from the beginning of the work time. The maximum exposed field was 0.35-3.35 mT (Mean ± SD: 1.55 ± 0.93 mT, N=17) and the average value per day was 0.04-0.12 mT (Mean ± SD: 0.07 ± 0.02 mT, N=17). We also conducted a finite element method-based analysis of human hand tissue for the electromagnetic field dosimetry. In addition, the magnetic field associated with grinders, an air hammer, and a drill using electromagnetic anchorage were measured; however, the magnetic fields were much lower than those generated in the welding process. These results agreed well with the results of the electromagnetic field dosimetry (1.49 mT at the wrist position), and the calculated eddy current (4.28 mA/m(2)) was much lower than the well-known guideline thresholds for electrical nerve or muscular stimulation.

  14. 46 CFR 167.43-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 167.43-25... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Work Vests § 167.43-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  15. 46 CFR 78.36-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 78.36-25... OPERATIONS Work Vests § 78.36-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in...

  16. 46 CFR 78.36-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 78.36-25... OPERATIONS Work Vests § 78.36-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in...

  17. 46 CFR 97.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 97.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 97.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  18. 46 CFR 196.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 196.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 196.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  19. 46 CFR 97.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 97.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 97.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  20. 46 CFR 196.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 196.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 196.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  1. 46 CFR 167.43-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 167.43-25... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Work Vests § 167.43-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  2. 46 CFR 167.43-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 167.43-25... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Work Vests § 167.43-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  3. 46 CFR 78.36-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 78.36-25... OPERATIONS Work Vests § 78.36-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in...

  4. 46 CFR 97.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 97.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 97.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  5. 46 CFR 167.43-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 167.43-25... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Work Vests § 167.43-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  6. 46 CFR 97.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 97.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 97.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  7. 46 CFR 196.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 196.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 196.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  8. 46 CFR 97.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 97.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 97.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  9. 46 CFR 78.36-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 78.36-25... OPERATIONS Work Vests § 78.36-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in...

  10. 46 CFR 78.36-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 78.36-25... OPERATIONS Work Vests § 78.36-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in...

  11. 46 CFR 196.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 196.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 196.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  12. 46 CFR 167.43-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 167.43-25... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Work Vests § 167.43-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed,...

  13. 77 FR 4654 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Final Rule, Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... on September 1, 2010. 75 FR 53786. Previously, an interim final rule (IFR) on performance measures... an Additional Indicator for Volunteer Work, on November 23, 2010. 75 FR 71514. The additional... benefits of volunteer work for the elderly and the positive impact their volunteer work has on the...

  14. 46 CFR 35.03-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 35.03-25... § 35.03-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in accordance with...

  15. 46 CFR 35.03-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 35.03-25... § 35.03-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in accordance with...

  16. 46 CFR 35.03-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 35.03-25... § 35.03-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in accordance with...

  17. 46 CFR 35.03-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 35.03-25... § 35.03-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in accordance with...

  18. 46 CFR 35.03-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 35.03-25... § 35.03-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid PFD's must be— (1) Used, stowed, and maintained in accordance with...

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Livestock poisoning from oil field drilling fluids, muds and additives.

    PubMed

    Edwards, W C; Gregory, D G

    1991-10-01

    The use and potential toxicity of various components of oil well drilling fluids, muds and additives are presented. Many components are extremely caustic resulting in rumenitis. Solvent and petroleum hydrocarbon components may cause aspiration pneumonia and rumen dysfunction. Some additives cause methemoglobinemia. The most frequently encountered heavy metals are lead, chromium, arsenic, lithium and copper. Considerations for investigating livestock poisoning cases and several typical cases are reviewed.

  1. Livestock poisoning from oil field drilling fluids, muds and additives

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.C.; Gregory, D.G. )

    1991-10-01

    The use and potential toxicity of various components of oil well drilling fluids, muds and additives are presented. Many components are extremely caustic resulting in rumenitis. Solvent and petroleum hydrocarbon components may cause aspiration pneumonia and rumen dysfunction. Some additives cause methemoglobinemia. The most frequently encountered heavy metals are lead, chromium, arsenic, lithium and copper. Considerations for investigating livestock poisoning cases and several typical cases are reviewed.

  2. Field Practicum Experiences of Bilingual Social Work Students Working with Limited English Proficiency Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, David W.; Min, Jong Won; Gamble, Lara

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the field internship experiences of bilingual graduate social work students who worked with limited English proficiency (LEP) clients. Data were collected via a Web-based survey from 55 bilingual social work students. Respondents reported that LEP clients required more time and work and generally had more complicated cases than…

  3. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  4. Integrating Evidence-Based Practice and Social Work Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmond, Tonya; Megivern, Deborah; Williams, Cynthia; Rochman, Estelle; Howard, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The social work academic community is currently considering and critiquing the idea of evidence-based practice (EBP). Given the vital part that practicum education plays in the social work profession, understanding the views of field instructors on this subject is essential. The George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University…

  5. Work in the Healthcare Field: Artisanal or Industrial Models?

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    This text analyzes work within the health field and the differences and similarities with artisanal and industrial work models. In this framework, we consider the object of work, the worker, the work process, relational and organizational aspects, industrial logics, and ways of acquiring knowledge, influence of the general management theory, the role of language, symbolic aspects and enjoyment. The humanizing elements that care work maintains as a type of artisanal work are highlighted, and the costs, not just economic, of reducing care work to industrial logics, with a subsequent depersonalization of the process not just for the worker but also for the user, health teams, health institutions, and social groups are discussed.

  6. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103... Cleaning/Water Blasting, Tank Cleaning, Welding, Burning, Brazing, Blacksmithing, Machining (inside...

  7. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103... Cleaning/Water Blasting, Tank Cleaning, Welding, Burning, Brazing, Blacksmithing, Machining (inside...

  8. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103... alteration, modification, or repair. The following functions are identified as direct production:...

  9. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103... alteration, modification, or repair. The following functions are identified as direct production:...

  10. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... include: Testing, Quality Assurance (inspection), Engineering (support), Planning (including involvement... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103..., Painting, Boilermaking, Pipe Fitting, Engineering (Production), Sheetmetal Work, Staging/Scaffolding,...

  11. Effect of Mg or Ag addition on the evaporation field of Al.

    PubMed

    Aruga, Yasuhiro; Nako, Hidenori; Tsuneishi, Hidemasa; Hasegawa, Yuki; Tao, Hiroaki; Ichihara, Chikara; Serizawa, Ai

    2013-09-01

    It is known that the distribution of the charge-states as well as the evaporation field shift to higher values as the specimen temperature is decreased at a constant rate of evaporation. This study has explored the effect of Mg or Ag addition on the evaporation field of Al in terms of the charge state distribution of the field evaporated Al ions. The fractional abundance of Al(2+) ions with respect to the total Al ions in Al-Mg alloy is lower than that in pure Al, whereas it shows higher level in the Al-Ag alloy at lower temperatures. The temperature dependence of the fractional abundance of Al(2+) ions has been also confirmed, suggesting that Al atoms in the Al-Mg alloy need lower evaporation field, while higher field is necessary to evaporate Al atoms in the Al-Ag alloy, compared with pure Al. This tendency is in agreement with that of the evaporation fields estimated theoretically by means of measurements of the work function and calculations of the binding energy of the pure Al, Al-Mg and Al-Ag alloys.

  12. Work in the Lives of Social Work Clients: Perspectives of Field Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Lawrence S.; Choi, Y. Joon

    2011-01-01

    Although employment is central to the lives of social work clients, it is seldom a focus in social work education. The authors conducted a survey of field instructors in a large MSW program to assess the importance of work-related issues in the lives of those they serve in their social service agencies. This experienced group of practitioners…

  13. Graduate Social Work Students' Experiences with Group Work in the Field and the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriet; Knight, Carolyn; Khudododov, Khudodod

    2014-01-01

    For decades, group work scholars have described a discrepancy between student preparation for group work practice and opportunities to work with groups in the field practicum and professional practice. Educators in related disciplines such as counseling and psychology have expressed similar concerns. This article reports findings of a study of MSW…

  14. Compassion Fatigue among Social Work Students in Field Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harr, Cynthia; Moore, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study, conducted with BSW and MSW field students at a public university in Southwestern United States, explored the psychological effect of compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction on social work students in field placements. Results from the Professional Quality of Life Scale's compassion satisfaction and fatigue subscales…

  15. Principles of Effective Practice in International Social Work Field Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the conditions under which international social work field placements may be effectively administered. The positive and negative potential of international placements is examined. A review of empirical and theoretical literature in the related fields of service learning and international volunteering reveals that role taking,…

  16. Achievement Motivation and Outcome in Social Work Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortune, Anne E.; Lee, Mingun; Cavazos, Alonzo

    2005-01-01

    For this study, 188 students from 4 social work programs completed a questionnaire about their motivation and performance in field practicum. Achievement motivation included task value, intrinsic motivation, perception of task difficulty, confidence, and self-efficacy. Students were more satisfied with field education and rated their social work…

  17. Prolonged Field Care Working Group Fluid Therapy Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Baker, Benjamin L; Powell, Doug; Riesberg, Jamie; Keenan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Prolonged Field Care Working Group concurs that fresh whole blood (FWB) is the fluid of choice for patients in hemorrhagic shock, and the capability to transfuse FWB should be a basic skill set for Special Operations Forces (SOF) Medics. Prolonged field care (PFC) must also address resuscitative and maintenance fluid requirements in nonhemorrhagic conditions. PMID:27045508

  18. Work of Adhesion in Al/SiC Composites with Alloying Element Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2013-11-01

    In the current work, a general methodology was proposed to demonstrate how to calculate the work of adhesion in a reactive multicomponent alloy/ceramic system. Applying this methodology, the work of adhesion of Al alloy/SiC systems and the influence of different alloying elements were predicted. Based on the thermodynamics of interfacial reaction and calculation models for component activities, the equilibrium compositions of the melts in Al alloy/SiC systems were calculated. Combining the work of adhesion models for reactive metal/ceramic systems, the work of adhesion in Al alloy/SiC systems both before and after the reaction was calculated. The results showed that the addition of most alloying elements, such as Mg, Si, and Mn, could increase the initial work of adhesion, while Fe had a slightly decreasing effect. As for the equilibrium state, the additions of Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ti, and La could increase the equilibrium work of adhesion, but the additions of Mg and Zn had an opposite effect. Si was emphasized due to its suppressing effect on the interfacial reaction.

  19. Field evaluation of some bait additives against Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica) (Rodentia: Hystricidae).

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Hussain, Iftikhar; Mian, Afsar; Munir, Shahid; Ahmed, Irfan; Khan, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    This research study evaluated the effect of different additives on the bait consumption by Indian crested porcupine, a serious forest and agricultural pest, under field conditions. Different additives (saccharin, common salt, bone meal, fish meal, peanut butter, egg yolk, egg shell powder, yeast powder, mineral oil and coconut oil) at 2 and 5% each were tested for their relative preference, using groundnut-maize (1:1) as basic bait. All the additives were tested under a no-choice test pattern. For control tests, no additive was mixed with the basic bait. Saccharin at 5% concentration significantly enhanced the consumption of bait over the basic bait, while 2% saccharin supplemented bait resulted in a non-significant bait consumption. All other additives did not enhance the consumption of the bait material; rather, these worked as repellents. However, the repellency was lowest with the common salt, followed by egg yolk, egg shell powder, bone meal, peanut butter, mineral oil, fish meal and yeast powder, while coconut remained the most repellent compound. The present study suggested that groundnut-maize (1:1) supplemented with 5% saccharin was the preferred bait combination, and can be used with different rodenticides for the management of Indian crested porcupine. PMID:24020467

  20. Field evaluation of some bait additives against Indian crested porcupine (Hystrix indica) (Rodentia: Hystricidae).

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Hussain, Iftikhar; Mian, Afsar; Munir, Shahid; Ahmed, Irfan; Khan, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    This research study evaluated the effect of different additives on the bait consumption by Indian crested porcupine, a serious forest and agricultural pest, under field conditions. Different additives (saccharin, common salt, bone meal, fish meal, peanut butter, egg yolk, egg shell powder, yeast powder, mineral oil and coconut oil) at 2 and 5% each were tested for their relative preference, using groundnut-maize (1:1) as basic bait. All the additives were tested under a no-choice test pattern. For control tests, no additive was mixed with the basic bait. Saccharin at 5% concentration significantly enhanced the consumption of bait over the basic bait, while 2% saccharin supplemented bait resulted in a non-significant bait consumption. All other additives did not enhance the consumption of the bait material; rather, these worked as repellents. However, the repellency was lowest with the common salt, followed by egg yolk, egg shell powder, bone meal, peanut butter, mineral oil, fish meal and yeast powder, while coconut remained the most repellent compound. The present study suggested that groundnut-maize (1:1) supplemented with 5% saccharin was the preferred bait combination, and can be used with different rodenticides for the management of Indian crested porcupine.

  1. 46 CFR 196.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 196.34-25 Section 196.34-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH... the same method of operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on board....

  2. The Involvement of Working Memory in Children's Exact and Approximate Mental Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caviola, Sara; Mammarella, Irene C.; Cornoldi, Cesare; Lucangeli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of working memory (WM) was examined in two types of mental calculation tasks: exact and approximate. Specifically, children attending Grades 3 and 4 of primary school were involved in three experiments that examined the role of verbal and visuospatial WM in solving addition problems presented in vertical or horizontal format. For…

  3. Laboratory or field tests for evaluating firefighters' work capacity?

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = -0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = -0.82) and bench press (rs = -0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = -0.83) and bench press (rs = -0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = -0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = -0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  4. Supervisor Attachment, Supervisory Working Alliance, and Affect in Social Work Field Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susanne; Mohr, Jonathan; Deal, Kathleen Holtz; Hwang, Jeongha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study focused on interrelationships among supervisor attachment, supervisory working alliance, and supervision-related affect, plus the moderating effect of a field instructor training. Method: The researchers employed a pretest-posttest follow-up design of 100 randomly assigned field instructors and 64 students in two…

  5. The significance of field work in monographic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this paper is to document the clear and obvious advantages of field work for monographic studies. These advantages include: 1) ability to understand published distributions better and greatly expand these data, 2) access to taxonomic data obscured on herbarium sheets (as colors, odors, ...

  6. Geography and Field Work: An Exercise for the Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green-Milberg, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Maintains that geography field work is enjoyable for students and provides them with real-world experiences. Describes an activity where students visit a supermarket in order to gather data for a graph and a shopping center to investigate the store layout and shopping traffic. Provides pre-visit preparation guidelines and post-visit activities.…

  7. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    Using the field emission retarding potential method true work functions have been measured for the following monocrystalline substrates: W(110), W(111), W(100), Nb(100), Ni(100), Cu(100), Ir(110) and Ir(111). The electron elastic and inelastic reflection coefficients from several of these surfaces have also been examined near zero primary beam energy.

  8. CHARMM additive and polarizable force fields for biophysics and computer-aided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Mechanics (MM) is the method of choice for computational studies of biomolecular systems owing to its modest computational cost, which makes it possible to routinely perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on chemical systems of biophysical and biomedical relevance. Scope of Review As one of the main factors limiting the accuracy of MD results is the empirical force field used, the present paper offers a review of recent developments in the CHARMM additive force field, one of the most popular bimolecular force fields. Additionally, we present a detailed discussion of the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, anticipating a growth in the importance and utilization of polarizable force fields in the near future. Throughout the discussion emphasis is placed on the force fields’ parametrization philosophy and methodology. Major Conclusions Recent improvements in the CHARMM additive force field are mostly related to newly found weaknesses in the previous generation of additive force fields. Beyond the additive approximation is the newly available CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, which allows for MD simulations of up to 1 microsecond on proteins, DNA, lipids and carbohydrates. General Significance Addressing the limitations ensures the reliability of the new CHARMM36 additive force field for the types of calculations that are presently coming into routine computational reach while the availability of the Drude polarizable force fields offers a model that is an inherently more accurate model of the underlying physical forces driving macromolecular structures and dynamics. PMID:25149274

  9. The involvement of working memory in children's exact and approximate mental addition.

    PubMed

    Caviola, Sara; Mammarella, Irene C; Cornoldi, Cesare; Lucangeli, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    The involvement of working memory (WM) was examined in two types of mental calculation tasks: exact and approximate. Specifically, children attending Grades 3 and 4 of primary school were involved in three experiments that examined the role of verbal and visuospatial WM in solving addition problems presented in vertical or horizontal format. For Experiment 1, the children were required to solve addition problems with carrying. For Experiment 2, they were required to solve addition problems without carrying. Then, for Experiment 3, the children needed to solve approximate problems with and without carrying. Results confirmed that different WM components are involved in solving mental addition problems. In Experiment 1, horizontally presented addition problems were more impaired than vertically presented ones, according to a verbal WM load; conversely, vertically presented addition problems were more affected by a visuospatial WM load, especially when the children were required to perform approximate calculations. In Experiment 2, this pattern emerged in neither exact nor approximate calculations. Finally, in Experiment 3, the specific involvement of WM components was observed only in problems with carrying. Overall, these results reveal that both approximate calculation and carrying procedures demand particularly high WM resources that vary according to the task's constraints. PMID:22436893

  10. Field tests for evaluating the aerobic work capacity of firefighters.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Désirée; Malm, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter's ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters' aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (r(s) = -0.65 and -0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL · min(-1)) and relative (mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (r(s) = -0.79 to 0.55 and -0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters' work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s · kg(-1)), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter's aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

  11. Additional work of breathing imposed by endotracheal tubes, breathing circuits, and intensive care ventilators.

    PubMed

    Bersten, A D; Rutten, A J; Vedig, A E; Skowronski, G A

    1989-07-01

    A disadvantage of spontaneous breathing through an endotracheal tube (ETT) and connector attached to a breathing circuit and/or ventilator (breathing device) is an increase in the work of breathing. The work of breathing associated with ETT of 6 to 9-mm diameter and eight breathing devices was determined, using a lung simulator to mimic spontaneous inspiration at flow rates of 20 to 100 L/min and a tidal volume of 500 ml, at both zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) and 10 cm H2O continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Work associated with the breathing devices alone (WCIR) ranged from -0.002 kg.m/L (Servo 900-C ventilator, 7-mm ETT, 20 L/min, ZEEP) to 0.1 kg.m/L (continuous flow circuit, 7-mm ETT, 100 L/min, CPAP), the latter representing 196% of the work of normal breathing. When the devices were attached to ETT, total apparatus work (WAPP) ranged from 0.009 kg.m/L (Mapleson-D circuit, 9-mm ETT, 20 L/min, ZEEP) to 0.25 kg.m/L (Drager EV-A, 6-mm ETT, 100 L/min, ZEEP), the latter representing 490% of the work of normal breathing. This additional work imposed by the ETT varied considerably among devices. Spontaneous breathing through modern ventilators, circuits and ETT imposes a burden of increased work, most of which is associated with the presence of the ETT and connector. Whether this burden represents an impediment to the weaning patient, or has training value for the ultimate resumption of unassisted spontaneous ventilation, remains to be determined.

  12. Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = −0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = −0.82) and bench press (rs = −0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.83) and bench press (rs = −0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = −0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = −0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  13. Addition of magnetic field capability to existing extremely-low-frequency electric field exposure systems.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Miller, M C; Kaune, W T

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic field systems were added to existing electric field exposure apparatuses for exposing cell suspensions in vitro and small animals in vivo. Two horizontally oriented, rectangular coils, stacked one directly above the other, have opposite electric currents. This configuration minimizes leakage fields and allows sham- and field-exposure systems to be placed in the same room or incubator. For the in vitro system, copper plates formed the loop-pair, with up to 900 A supplied by a 180:1 transformer. Electric fields were supplied via electrodes at the ends of cell-culture tubes, eight of which can be accommodated by each exposure system. Two complete systems are situated in an incubator to allow simultaneous sham and field exposure up to 1 mT. For the in vivo system, four pairs of 0.8 x 2.7-m coils made of copper bus bar are employed. This arrangement is energized from the power grid via a 30:1 transformer; horizontal magnetic flux densities up to 1 mT can be generated. Pairs of electrode plates spaced 30.5 cm apart provide electric field exposure of up to 130 kV/m. Four systems with a capacity of 48 rats each are located in one room. For both the in vitro and in vivo systems, magnetic exposure fields are uniform to within +/- 2.5%, and sham levels are at least 2,500-fold lower than exposure levels. Potential confounding factors, such as heating and vibration, were examined and found to be minimal. PMID:2712843

  14. Near-field environment/processes working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.M.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the near-field environment to geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The near-field environment may be affected by thermal perturbations from the waste, and by disturbances caused by the introduction of exotic materials during construction of the repository. This group also discussed the application of modelling of performance-related processes.

  15. Work function measurements using a field emission retarding potential technique.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, M H M O; Dall'Agnol, F F; Pimentel, V L; Mammana, V P; Tatsch, P J; den Engelsen, D

    2016-03-01

    Herein we describe the measurement of the work function of a metal with advanced equipment based on the field emission retarding potential (FERP) method using a carbon nanotube (CNT) as cathode. The accuracy of the FERP method using a CNT emitter is described and a comparison between measurements of the work functions of aluminum, barium, calcium, gold, and platinum with published data will be presented. Our FERP equipment could be optimized with the aid of particle tracing simulations. These simulations led us to insert a magnetic collimator to improve the collection efficiency at the anode. PMID:27036828

  16. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W.; Swanson, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the theoretical foundation of the field electron retarding potential method, and review of its experimental application to the measurement of single crystal face work functions. The results obtained from several substrates are discussed. An interesting and useful fallout from the experimental approach described is the ability to accurately measure the elastic and inelastic reflection coefficient for impinging electrons to near zero-volt energy.

  17. The application of additive technologies in creation a medical simulator-trainer of the human head operating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.; Pashaev, B. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the work was to determine the possible application of additive manufacturing technology during the manufacturing process as close as possible to reality of medical simulator-trainers. In work were used some additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), binder Jetting. As a result, a prototype of simulator-trainer of the human head operating field, which based on the CT real patient, was manufactured and conducted its tests. It was found that structure, which is obtained with the use of 3D-printers ProJet 160, most appropriate and closest to the real properties of the bone.

  18. Near-field thermodynamics: Useful work, efficiency, and energy harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Latella, Ivan Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Lapas, Luciano C.; Miguel Rubi, J.

    2014-03-28

    We show that the maximum work that can be obtained from the thermal radiation emitted between two planar sources in the near-field regime is much larger than that corresponding to the blackbody limit. This quantity, as well as an upper bound, for the efficiency of the process is computed from the formulation of thermodynamics in the near-field regime. The case when the difference of temperatures of the hot source and the environment is small, relevant for energy harvesting, is studied in detail. We also show that thermal radiation energy conversion can be more efficient in the near-field regime. These results open new possibilities for the design of energy converters that can be used to harvest energy from sources of moderate temperature at the nanoscale.

  19. Inspiratory pressure support compensates for the additional work of breathing caused by the endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Brochard, L; Rua, F; Lorino, H; Lemaire, F; Harf, A

    1991-11-01

    Breathing through an endotracheal tube and a demand valve may increase the work performed by the respiratory muscles. Inspiratory pressure support (PS) is known to reduce this work and might therefore compensate for this increased requirement. To test this hypothesis, we measured the work of breathing (WOB) in 11 patients whose tracheas were intubated. Five had no intrinsic lung disease, but six had chronic obstructive lung disease. We compared WOB measurements taken under several sets of conditions: during assisted breathing at four levels of PS, during unassisted breathing and connection to a T-piece, and after extubation of the trachea. During unassisted breathing via the ventilator circuit (PS set at 0 cmH20), the WOB per minute was greater than that after extubation, with a mean increase (+/- standard deviation) of 68 +/- 38% (10.3 +/- 5.1 vs. 6.5 +/- 3.7 J.min-1, P less than 0.01). While breathing through the T-piece, the WOB was 27 +/- 18% greater than after tracheal extubation (8.2 +/- 5.1 vs. 6.5 +/- 3.7 J.min-1, P less than 0.05). The principal reason why inspiratory work decreased after extubation was that the ventilatory requirement decreased. For each patient, we determined retrospectively, after extubation, the level of PS that had reduced WOB to its postextubation value and obtained levels ranging from 3.4 to 14.4 cmH2O. The PS level at which additional WOB was compensated for, was greater in patients with chronic lung disease than in those free of lung disease (12.0 +/- 1.9 vs. 5.7 +/- 1.5 cm H2O, P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Field and laboratory determination of a poly(vinyl/vinylidene chloride) additive in brick mortar.

    PubMed

    Law, S L; Newman, J H; Ptak, F L

    1990-02-01

    A polymerized vinyl/vinylidene chloride additive, used in brick mortar during the 60s and 70s, is detected at the building site by the field method, which employs a commercially available chloride test strip. The field test results can then be verified by the laboratory methods. In one method, total chlorine in the mortar is determined by an oxygen-bomb method and the additive chloride is determined by difference after water-soluble chlorides have been determined on a separate sample. In the second method, the polymerized additive is extracted directly from the mortar with tetrahydrofuran (THF). The difference in weight before and after extraction of the additive gives the weight of additive in the mortar. Evaporation of the THF from the extract leaves a thin film of the polymer, which gives an infrared "fingerprint" spectrum characteristic of the additive polymer.

  1. Use of additive technologies for practical working with complex models for foundry technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhovik, E.; Butsanets, A. A.; Ageeva, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The article presents the results of research of additive technology (3D printing) application for developing a geometrically complex model of castings parts. Investment casting is well known and widely used technology for the production of complex parts. The work proposes the use of a 3D printing technology for manufacturing models parts, which are removed by thermal destruction. Traditional methods of equipment production for investment casting involve the use of manual labor which has problems with dimensional accuracy, and CNC technology which is less used. Such scheme is low productive and demands considerable time. We have offered an alternative method which consists in printing the main knots using a 3D printer (PLA and ABS) with a subsequent production of castings models from them. In this article, the main technological methods are considered and their problems are discussed. The dimensional accuracy of models in comparison with investment casting technology is considered as the main aspect.

  2. Helping managers to manage: work schedules of field-workers in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Koblinsky, M A; Brechin, S J; Clark, S D; Hasan, M Y

    1989-01-01

    The Maternal-Child Health/Family Planning (MCH/FP) Extension Project in Bangladesh identifies and examines barriers to implementation of the national MCH/FP program, and determines strategies to overcome them. This study analyzes field-workers' ability to carry out more tasks than they do presently, and how their performance might be improved when additional field-workers are hired. In two experimental subdistricts, researchers observed the work of family welfare assistants (FWAs), the female family planning field-workers, to determine the duration and frequency of their home visits with village women and the content of their exchanges. While many factors influence the FWA's work, researchers found that the preplanned monthly work schedules could be manipulated relatively easily to improve duration and frequency of program contact with village women. With more time available to spend with women, the potential to improve the quality of services is enhanced. PMID:2772996

  3. Working with Soil - Soil science in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, Jacqueline; Lacelles, Bruce; Owen, Jason; Thompson, Dick; Jones, Bob; Towers, Willie

    2015-04-01

    Working with Soil is the Professional Competency Scheme developed by the British Society of Soil Science's Professional Practice Committee, formerly the Institute of Professional Soil Scientists. Ten competency documents cover the required qualifications, skills and knowledge for different aspects of applied soil science. The Society is currently engaged in a five year plan to translate the competency documents into a comprehensive set of training courses. Foundation skills in field-based science are covered by three separate training courses - Exposing and describing a soil profile (Course 1), Soil classification (Course 2), and Soil survey techniques (Course 3). Course 1 has run successfully twice a year since 2013. The other two courses are under development and are scheduled to start in 2015. The primary objective of Foundation Skills Course 1 is to develop confidence and familiarity with field soil investigation and description, understanding the soil underfoot and putting soils into a wider landscape context. Delegates excavate a soil profile pit, and describe and sample the exposed soil to standard protocols. Delegates work in teams of 4 or 5 so that an element of shared learning is part of the process. This has been a very positive aspect of the courses we have run to date. The course has attracted professionals from agricultural and environmental consultancies but is also very popular with research students and has formed a part of an Advanced Training Programme in Soil Science for postgraduates. As there is only one soil science degree course remaining in the UK, many students on their admission do not have a background in field-based pedology and lack an understanding of soil in the context of landscape scale soil functions. Feedback to date has been very positive.

  4. Quench echo and work statistics in integrable quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Pálmai, T; Sotiriadis, S

    2014-11-01

    We propose a boundary thermodynamic Bethe ansatz calculation technique to obtain the Loschmidt echo and the statistics of the work done when a global quantum quench is performed on an integrable quantum field theory. We derive an analytic expression for the lowest edge of the probability density function and find that it exhibits universal features, in the sense that its scaling form depends only on the statistics of excitations. We perform numerical calculations on the sinh-Gordon model, a deformation of the free boson theory, and we obtain that by turning on the interaction the density function develops fermionic properties. The calculations are facilitated by a previously unnoticed property of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz construction.

  5. A Two-week Field Course with Deferred Papers: A Possible Solution to the Problem of Undergraduate Field Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dando, William A.; Wiedel, Joseph W.

    1971-01-01

    Field work is an important but often neglected facet of undergraduate geography training. Kinds of field work and field training are analyzed including selection of study areas and camp site selection. A two week field camp with deferred papers is a workable solution for undergraduate programs. (NH)

  6. Matching of additive and polarizable force fields for multiscale condensed phase simulations

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher M.; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion of electronic polarization effects is one of the key aspects in which the accuracy of current biomolecular force fields may be improved. The principal drawback of such approaches is the computational cost, which typically ranges from 3 – 10 times that of the equivalent additive model, and may be greater for more sophisticated treatments of polarization or other many-body effects. Here, we present a multiscale approach which may be used to enhance the sampling in simulations with polarizable models, by using the additive model as a tool to explore configuration space. We use a method based on information theory to determine the charges for an additive model that has optimal overlap with the polarizable one, and we demonstrate the feasibility of enhancing sampling via a hybrid replica exchange scheme for several model systems. An additional advantage is that, in the process, we obtain a systematic method for deriving charges for an additive model that will be the natural complement to its polarizable parent. The additive charges are found by an effective coarse-graining of the polarizable force field, rather than by ad hoc procedures. PMID:23997691

  7. Decoding complex flow-field patterns in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Christophel, Thomas B; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2014-05-01

    There has been a long history of research on visual working memory. Whereas early studies have focused on the role of lateral prefrontal cortex in the storage of sensory information, this has been challenged by research in humans that has directly assessed the encoding of perceptual contents, pointing towards a role of visual and parietal regions during storage. In a previous study we used pattern classification to investigate the storage of complex visual color patterns across delay periods. This revealed coding of such contents in early visual and parietal brain regions. Here we aim to investigate whether the involvement of visual and parietal cortex is also observable for other types of complex, visuo-spatial pattern stimuli. Specifically, we used a combination of fMRI and multivariate classification to investigate the retention of complex flow-field stimuli defined by the spatial patterning of motion trajectories of random dots. Subjects were trained to memorize the precise spatial layout of these stimuli and to retain this information during an extended delay. We used a multivariate decoding approach to identify brain regions where spatial patterns of activity encoded the memorized stimuli. Content-specific memory signals were observable in motion sensitive visual area MT+ and in posterior parietal cortex that might encode spatial information in a modality independent manner. Interestingly, we also found information about the memorized visual stimulus in somatosensory cortex, suggesting a potential crossmodal contribution to memory. Our findings thus indicate that working memory storage of visual percepts might be distributed across unimodal, multimodal and even crossmodal brain regions.

  8. CHARMM additive all-atom force field for carbohydrate derivatives and its utility in polysaccharide and carbohydrate-protein modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; Raman, E. Prabhu; Hatcher, Elizabeth; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Foster, Theresa J.; Jamison, Francis W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Monosaccharide derivatives such as xylose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GlaNAc), glucuronic acid, iduronic acid, and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) are important components of eukaryotic glycans. The present work details development of force-field parameters for these monosaccharides and their covalent connections to proteins via O-linkages to serine or threonine sidechains and via N-linkages to asparagine sidechains. The force field development protocol was designed to explicitly yield parameters that are compatible with the existing CHARMM additive force field for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and small molecules. Therefore, when combined with previously developed parameters for pyranose and furanose monosaccharides, for glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and for proteins, the present set of parameters enables the molecular simulation of a wide variety of biologically-important molecules such as complex carbohydrates and glycoproteins. Parametrization included fitting to quantum mechanical (QM) geometries and conformational energies of model compounds, as well as to QM pair interaction energies and distances of model compounds with water. Parameters were validated in the context of crystals of relevant monosaccharides, as well NMR and/or x-ray crystallographic data on larger systems including oligomeric hyaluronan, sialyl Lewis X, O- and N-linked glycopeptides, and a lectin:sucrose complex. As the validated parameters are an extension of the CHARMM all-atom additive biomolecular force field, they further broaden the types of heterogeneous systems accessible with a consistently-developed force-field model. PMID:22125473

  9. Why does the effective field theory of inflation work?

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Nishant; Ribeiro, Raquel H.; Holman, R. E-mail: raquelhribeiro@case.edu

    2014-06-01

    The effective field theory (EFT) of inflation has become the preferred method for computing cosmological correlation functions of the curvature fluctuation, ζ. It makes explicit use of the soft breaking of time diffeomorphisms by the inflationary background to organize the operators expansion in the action of the Goldstone mode π associated with this breaking. Despite its ascendancy, there is another method for calculating ζ correlators, involving the direct calculation of the so-called Horndeski action order by order in powers of ζ and its derivatives. The question we address in this work is whether or not the ζ correlators calculated in these seemingly different ways are in fact the same. The answer is that the actions to cubic order in either set of variables do indeed give rise to the same ζ bispectra, but that to make this equivalence manifest requires a careful understanding of the non-linear transformations relating π to ζ and how boundary terms in the actions are affected by imposing this relation. As a by product of our study we find that the calculations in the π language can be simplified considerably in a way that allows us to use only the linear part of the π−ζ relation simply by changing the coefficients of some of the operators in the EFT. We also note that a proper accounting of the boundary terms will be of the greatest importance when computing the bispectrum for more general initial states than the Bunch-Davies one.

  10. Internal additive noise effects in stochastic resonance using organic field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Matsubara, Kiyohiko; Asakawa, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Stochastic resonance phenomenon was observed in organic field effect transistor using poly(3-hexylthiophene), which enhances performance of signal transmission with application of noise. The enhancement of correlation coefficient between the input and output signals was low, and the variation of correlation coefficient was not remarkable with respect to the intensity of external noise, which was due to the existence of internal additive noise following the nonlinear threshold response. In other words, internal additive noise plays a positive role on the capability of approximately constant signal transmission regardless of noise intensity, which can be said "homeostatic" behavior or "noise robustness" against external noise. Furthermore, internal additive noise causes emergence of the stochastic resonance effect even on the threshold unit without internal additive noise on which the correlation coefficient usually decreases monotonically.

  11. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  15. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  16. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  17. CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF): A force field for drug-like molecules compatible with the CHARMM all-atom additive biological force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Hatcher, E.; Acharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Zhong, S.; Shim, J.; Darian, E.; Guvench, O.; Lopes, P.; Vorobyov, I.; MacKerell, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used CHARMM additive all-atom force field includes parameters for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. In the present paper an extension of the CHARMM force field to drug-like molecules is presented. The resulting CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) covers a wide range of chemical groups present in biomolecules and drug-like molecules, including a large number of heterocyclic scaffolds. The parametrization philosophy behind the force field focuses on quality at the expense of transferability, with the implementation concentrating on an extensible force field. Statistics related to the quality of the parametrization with a focus on experimental validation are presented. Additionally, the parametrization procedure, described fully in the present paper in the context of the model systems, pyrrolidine, and 3-phenoxymethylpyrrolidine will allow users to readily extend the force field to chemical groups that are not explicitly covered in the force field as well as add functional groups to and link together molecules already available in the force field. CGenFF thus makes it possible to perform “all-CHARMM” simulations on drug-target interactions thereby extending the utility of CHARMM force fields to medicinally relevant systems. PMID:19575467

  18. Professional Competence Development of the Social Work Specialists in the Period of Study in the System of Additional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davletkaliev, Denis Kuanyshevich; Zueva, Natalia Konstantinovna; Lebedeva, Natalya Vasilevna; Mkrtumova, Irina Vladimirovna; Timofeeva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work is the study of psychological-pedagogical approaches to the understanding of the idea of professional competence of social work specialists as well as the role of study in the system of additional educations in professional-personal development of the listeners. In the process of study of this problem we define main…

  19. Additive Factors Do Not Imply Discrete Processing Stages: A Worked Example Using Models of the Stroop Task

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Tom; Gurney, Kevin N.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown experimentally that the psychophysical law known as Piéron’s Law holds for color intensity and that the size of the effect is additive with that of Stroop condition (Stafford et al., 2011). According to the additive factors method (Donders, 1868–1869/1969; Sternberg, 1998), additivity is assumed to indicate independent and discrete processing stages. We present computational modeling work, using an existing Parallel Distributed Processing model of the Stroop task (Cohen et al., 1990) and a standard model of decision making (Ratcliff, 1978). This demonstrates that additive factors can be successfully accounted for by existing single stage models of the Stroop effect. Consequently, it is not valid to infer either discrete stages or separate loci of effects from additive factors. Further, our modeling work suggests that information binding may be a more important architectural property for producing additive factors than discrete stages. PMID:22102842

  20. Student Movement: Pathways, Fields and Links to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredman, Nick

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of coherence between education, training and work in Australia indicated by low proportions of VET graduates who work in occupations related to their qualification and mismatches between qualifications, skills and work. This paper discusses how student flows through tertiary education can further illustrate this lack of coherence.…

  1. Work-Family Enrichment and Conflict: Additive Effects, Buffering, or Balance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareis, Karen C.; Barnett, Rosalind Chait; Ertel, Karen A.; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2009-01-01

    We used data from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS I) (N = 2,031) to compare three models of how work-family conflict and enrichment might operate to predict well-being (mental health, life satisfaction, affect balance, partner relationship quality). We found no support for a relative-difference model in which the…

  2. Influence of Polarization on Carbohydrate Hydration: A Comparative Study Using Additive and Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Poonam; Mallajosyula, Sairam S

    2016-07-14

    Carbohydrates are known to closely modulate their surrounding solvent structures and influence solvation dynamics. Spectroscopic investigations studying far-IR regions (below 1000 cm(-1)) have observed spectral shifts in the libration band (around 600 cm(-1)) of water in the presence of monosaccharides and polysaccharides. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to gain atomistic insight into carbohydrate-water interactions and to specifically highlight the differences between additive (nonpolarizable) and polarizable simulations. A total of six monosaccharide systems, α and β anomers of glucose, galactose, and mannose, were studied using additive and polarizable Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) carbohydrate force fields. Solvents were modeled using three additive water models TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P in additive simulations and polarizable water model SWM4 in polarizable simulations. The presence of carbohydrate has a significant effect on the microscopic water structure, with the effects being pronounced for proximal water molecules. Notably, disruption of the tetrahedral arrangement of proximal water molecules was observed due to the formation of strong carbohydrate-water hydrogen bonds in both additive and polarizable simulations. However, the inclusion of polarization resulted in significant water-bridge occupancies, improved ordered water structures (tetrahedral order parameter), and longer carbohydrate-water H-bond correlations as compared to those for additive simulations. Additionally, polarizable simulations also allowed the calculation of power spectra from the dipole-dipole autocorrelation function, which corresponds to the IR spectra. From the power spectra, we could identify spectral signatures differentiating the proximal and bulk water structures, which could not be captured from additive simulations. PMID:27266974

  3. Causing Students to Choose More Language Arts Work: Enhancing the Validity of the Additive Interspersal Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, Sadonya F.; Skinner, Christopher H.

    2005-01-01

    Research on the additive interspersal procedure was extended by exposing seventh-grade students to curricula-based (e.g., educationally valid) language arts assignments. In Experiment I, each student was given a control language arts assignment containing 20 discrete target items and an experimental assignment containing 24 equivalent target…

  4. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved

  5. The force-field derivation and application of explosive/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The inter-molecular force-field across RDX/(paraffin, fluoropolymer) interfaces are derived from first-principles calculated energies under the GGA+vdW functional. Based on the force-field, the polycrystal structures of mixture explosives are obtained, and a set of thermodynamic properties are calculated, including the elastic constants, thermal expansion coefficient, heat capacity, isothermal curve and the Hugoniot curve. The results are in good agreement with the available experiments, and provide a reasonable prediction about the properties of plastic bonded explosives. We find that the thermal expansion coefficient of a multi-component explosive is not only determined by the properties of the components, but is also affected by the thermal stress at the explosive/additive interfaces.

  6. Enhancing Social Work Research Education through Research Field Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewson, Jennifer A.; Walsh, Christine A.; Bradshaw, Cathryn

    2010-01-01

    The increased focus on the role of research in the social service sector, pressure for practitioners to engage in research and the demand for integration of research and practice challenges faculties about ways in which to engage social work students in research. This paper evaluates a research based practicum program within a social work faculty…

  7. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H . Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H , the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (fc) ]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (fc→∞ ) ; until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise.

  8. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary.

  9. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary. PMID:26224547

  10. Images of Imaging: Notes on Doing Longitudinal Field Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the processes involved in a field study of technological change in radiology and how researchers can design a qualitative study and then collect data in a systematic and explicit manner. Illustrates the social and human problems of gaining entry into a research site, constructing a research role, and managing relationships. (63…

  11. Working While Black: Contours of an Unequal Playing Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Describes the phenomenon of working while black, which suggests that forms of racial profiling exist in the workplace and calls attention to predictable terms and conditions of employment that function to set black workers apart, thereby signifying degrees of marginalization, exclusion, and subordination in the workplace. Ten recommendations for…

  12. Data Mining for Social Work Students: Teaching Practice-Based Research in Conjunction with a Field Work Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Rosenne, Hadas

    2016-01-01

    Although research studies are important for social work students, the students rarely like research classes or see their value. At the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, one group of BSW students was encouraged to carry out the required research in their field work setting, the Hadassah University Medical Center. Students used data mining, that is,…

  13. Dual Mission: An Innovative Field Model for Training Social Work Students for Work with Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selber, Katherine; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive article explores a collaborative model that blends the dual missions of training social work students to work with military personnel, veterans, and their families while serving student veterans on campus. The model consists of 2 main components: (1) a nationally recognized service component for providing academic, health and…

  14. Educational Resource Manual for Baccalaureate Social Work Field Instruction in Gerontology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Consortium of Geriatric Education Centers, Houston.

    This manual was designed to aid undergraduate social work students working in a model field-site program for gerontological social work education. It is based on work completed on an Administration on Aging project in Texas entitled, "A Statewide Faculty Development Program for Undergraduate Social Work Educators in Elder Care." The project's…

  15. Optimization of the CHARMM additive force field for DNA: Improved treatment of the BI/BII conformational equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hart, Katarina; Foloppe, Nicolas; Baker, Christopher M; Denning, Elizabeth J; Nilsson, Lennart; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2012-01-10

    The B-form of DNA can populate two different backbone conformations: BI and BII, defined by the difference between the torsion angles ε and ζ (BI = ε-ζ < 0 and BII = ε-ζ > 0). BI is the most populated state, but the population of the BII state, which is sequence dependent, is significant and accumulating evidence shows that BII affects the overall structure of DNA, and thus influences protein-DNA recognition. This work presents a reparametrization of the CHARMM27 additive nucleic acid force field to increase the sampling of the BII form in MD simulations of DNA. In addition, minor modifications of sugar puckering were introduced to facilitate sampling of the A form of DNA under the appropriate environmental conditions. Parameter optimization was guided by quantum mechanical data on model compounds, followed by calculations on several DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The selected optimized parameters were then validated against a number of DNA duplexes, with the most extensive tests performed on the EcoRI dodecamer, including comparative calculations using the Amber Parm99bsc0 force field. The new CHARMM model better reproduces experimentally observed sampling of the BII conformation, including sampling as a function of sequence. In addition, the model reproduces the A form of the 1ZF1 duplex in 75 % ethanol, and yields a stable Z-DNA conformation of duplex (GTACGTAC) in its crystal environment. The resulting model, in combination with a recent reoptimization of the CHARMM27 force field for RNA, will be referred to as CHARMM36.

  16. Identifying Discrimination at Work: The Use of Field Experiments.

    PubMed

    Pager, Devah; Western, Bruce

    2012-06-01

    Antidiscrimination law offers protection to workers who have been treated unfairly on the basis of their race, gender, religion, or national origin. In order for these protections to be invoked, however, potential plaintiffs must be aware of and able to document discriminatory treatment. Given the subtlety of contemporary forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to identify discrimination when it has taken place. The methodology of field experiments offers one approach to measuring and detecting hiring discrimination, providing direct observation of discrimination in real-world settings. In this article, we discuss the findings of two recent field experiments measuring racial discrimination in low wage labor markets. This research provides several relevant findings for researchers and those interested in civil rights enforcement: (1) it produces estimates of the rate of discrimination at the point of hire; (2) it yields evidence about the interactions associated with discrimination (many of which reveal the subtlety with which contemporary discrimination is practiced); and (3) it provides a vehicle for both research on and enforcement of antidiscrimination law. PMID:24163481

  17. Identifying Discrimination at Work: The Use of Field Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Devah; Western, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Antidiscrimination law offers protection to workers who have been treated unfairly on the basis of their race, gender, religion, or national origin. In order for these protections to be invoked, however, potential plaintiffs must be aware of and able to document discriminatory treatment. Given the subtlety of contemporary forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to identify discrimination when it has taken place. The methodology of field experiments offers one approach to measuring and detecting hiring discrimination, providing direct observation of discrimination in real-world settings. In this article, we discuss the findings of two recent field experiments measuring racial discrimination in low wage labor markets. This research provides several relevant findings for researchers and those interested in civil rights enforcement: (1) it produces estimates of the rate of discrimination at the point of hire; (2) it yields evidence about the interactions associated with discrimination (many of which reveal the subtlety with which contemporary discrimination is practiced); and (3) it provides a vehicle for both research on and enforcement of antidiscrimination law. PMID:24163481

  18. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic additions of fertilizer nitrogen (N) have significantly increased the mole fraction of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the troposphere. Tracking the fate of fertilizer N and its transformation to N2O is important to advance knowledge of greenhouse gas emissions from soils. Transport and transformations are frequently studied using 15N labeling experiments, but instruments capable of continuous measurements of 15N-N2O at the surface of soil have only recently come to the fore. Our primary aim was to quantify emissions of N2O and the fraction of 15N emitted as N2O from an agricultural soil following 15N addition using a mobile Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. We set up a short-term field experiment on a coastal floodplain site near Nowra, New South Wales. We deployed an automated chamber system connected to a multi-pass cell (optical pathlength 24 m) and low resolution FTIR spectrometer to measure fluxes of all N2O isotopologues collected from five 0.25 m2 chambers every three hours. We measured N2O fluxes pre and post-application of 15N-labeled substrate as potassium nitrate (KNO3) or urea [CO(NH2)2] to the soil surface. Root mean square uncertainties for all isotopologue measurements were less than 0.3 nmol mol-1 for 1 minute average concentration measurements, and minimum detectable fluxes for each isotopologue were <0.1 ng N m-2 s-1. Emissions of all N2O isotopologues were evident immediately following 15N addition. Emissions of 14N15NO, 15N14NO and 15N15NO isotopologues subsided within 10 d, but 14N14NO fluxes were evident over the entire experiment. The figure provides an overview of the emissions. Cumulative 15N-N2O fluxes (sum of the three 15N isotopologues) per chamber for the 14 days following 15N addition ranged from 1.5 to 10.3 mg 15N-N2O m-2. The chambers were destructively sampled after 2 weeks and 15N analyzed in soil and plant material using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Approximately 1% (range 0.7 - 1.9%) of the total amount of

  19. Size characterization by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation of silica particles used as food additives.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Ravani, Laura; Passarella, Martina

    2013-07-25

    Four types of SiO2, available on the market as additives in food and personal care products, were size characterized using Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF), SEM, TEM and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). The synergic use of the different analytical techniques made it possible, for some samples, to confirm the presence of primary nanoparticles (10 nm) organized in clusters or aggregates of different dimension and, for others, to discover that the available information is incomplete, particularly that regarding the presence of small particles. A protocol to extract the silica particles from a simple food matrix was set up, enriching (0.25%, w w(-1)) a nearly silica-free instant barley coffee powder with a known SiO2 sample. The SdFFF technique, in conjunction with SEM observations, made it possible to identify the added SiO2 particles and verify the new particle size distribution. The SiO2 content of different powdered foodstuffs was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS); the concentrations ranged between 0.006 and 0.35% (w w(-1)). The protocol to isolate the silica particles was so applied to the most SiO2-rich commercial products and the derived suspensions were separated by SdFFF; SEM and TEM observations supported the size analyses while GFAAS determinations on collected fractions permitted element identification.

  20. Decomposition of conifer tree bark under field conditions: effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes de Gerenyu, Valentin; Kurganova, Irina; Kapitsa, Ekaterina; Shorokhova, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    In forest ecosystems, the processes of decomposition of coarse woody debris (CWD) can contribute significantly to the emission component of carbon (C) cycle and thus accelerate the greenhouse effect and global climate change. A better understanding of decomposition of CWD is required to refine estimates of the C balance in forest ecosystems and improve biogeochemical models. These estimates will in turn contribute to assessing the role of forests in maintaining their long-term productivity and other ecosystems services. We examined the decomposition rate of coniferous bark with added nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers in experiment under field conditions. The experiment was carried out in 2015 during 17 weeks in Moscow region (54o50'N, 37o36'E) under continental-temperate climatic conditions. The conifer tree bark mixture (ca. 70% of Norway spruce and 30% of Scots pine) was combined with soil and placed in piles of soil-bark substrate (SBS) with height of ca. 60 cm and surface area of ca. 3 m2. The dry mass ratio of bark to soil was 10:1. The experimental design included following treatments: (1) soil (Luvisols Haplic) without bark, (S), (2) pure SBS, (3) SBS with N addition in the amount of 1% of total dry bark mass (SBS-N), and (4) SBS with N and P addition in the amount of 1% of total dry bark mass for each element (SBS-NP). The decomposition rate expressed as CO2 emission flux, g C/m2/h was measured using closed chamber method 1-3 times per week from July to early November using LiCor 6400 (Nebraska, USA). During the experiment, we also controlled soil temperature at depths of 5, 20, 40, and 60 cm below surface of SBS using thermochrons iButton (DS1921G, USA). The pattern of CO2 emission rate from SBS depended strongly on fertilizing. The highest decomposition rates (DecR) of 2.8-5.6 g C/m2/h were observed in SBS-NP treatment during the first 6 weeks of experiment. The decay process of bark was less active in the treatment with only N addition. In this

  1. Disrupted Social Work Field Placement: Factors That Contribute to Premature Termination of BSW Students' Field Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Janet

    2012-01-01

    According to R. Wayne ("Legal Guidelines for Dismissing Students Because of Poor Performance in the Field," 2004), there is a widely accepted assumption in social work education that field placement provides the best opportunity to evaluate students' goodness-of-fit with the profession and is therefore used to weed out unsuitable…

  2. Seismic investigations of Antrim shale fracturing: vertical seismic profiling field work. [Rubblization

    SciTech Connect

    Turpening, R.M.; Liskow, A.; Thomson, F.J.

    1980-09-01

    Through the use of surface to downhole shear- and compressional-wave seismic techniques, the subsurface structure through the Antrim shale was studied in Sanilac County, Michigan. This report summarizes the field work, the field instrumentation and the data collection associated with this work.

  3. Validity of Selected Lab and Field Tests of Physical Working Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund J.

    The validity of selected lab and field tests of physical working capacity was investigated. Forty-four male college students were administered a series of lab and field tests of physical working capacity. Lab tests include a test of maximum oxygen uptake, the PWC 170 test, the Harvard Step Test, the Progressive Pulse Ratio Test, Margaria Test of…

  4. The Development of Guidelines for Feedback on Professional Behavior in Level I Field Work Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kautzmann, Lisette

    Guidelines for feedback on professional behavior during field work were developed for students during initial exposure to the clinical practice of occupational therapy. Using Likert's Method of Summed Ratings, brainstorming and a review of the American Occupational Therapy Association Field Work Performance Report resulted in the generation of a…

  5. A Satellite Model for Rural and Remote Social Work Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Wendy; Duncombe, Rohena

    2005-01-01

    Social work field education is expanding in rural areas at a time when rural social work is under great strain. This paper discusses a new model for rural field education. In this "satellite" model, the university employs local senior social workers as university liaison staff to locate, organise, resource, support and assess social work…

  6. The Effect of Educational Disequilibrium in Field Work on Graduate Social Work Students' Self-Concept and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Yu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The author used a mixed methods design to assess field work-related educational disequilibrium and its effect on the self-concept and mental health of MSW students. Twenty-eight advanced, fourth-semester MSW students were compared with 37 entering, first-semester MSW students in practice-related sense of accomplishment. Compared with first-year…

  7. Social Work Field Instructors' Views and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Oxhandler, Holly K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a cross-sectional study of social work field instructors' views of and implementation of the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and compares their responses with non-field instructors. A total of 688 National Association of Social Workers/Texas members (107 of which were field instructors) anonymously…

  8. `Unthinkable' Selves: Identity boundary work in a summer field ecology enrichment program for diverse youth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlone, Heidi B.; Huffling, Lacey D.; Tomasek, Terry; Hegedus, Tess A.; Matthews, Catherine E.; Allen, Melony H.; Ash, Mary C.

    2015-07-01

    The historical under-representation of diverse youth in environmental science education is inextricably connected to access and identity-related issues. Many diverse youth with limited previous experience to the outdoors as a source for learning and/or leisure may consider environmental science as 'unthinkable'. This is an ethnographic study of 16 diverse high school youths' participation, none of who initially fashioned themselves as 'outdoorsy' or 'animal people', in a four-week summer enrichment program focused on herpetology (study of reptiles and amphibians). To function as 'good' participants, youth acted in ways that placed them well outside their comfort zones, which we labeled as identity boundary work. Results highlight the following cultural tools, norms, and practices that enabled youths' identity boundary work: (1) boundary objects (tools regularly used in the program that facilitated youths' engagement with animals and nature and helped them work through fear or discomfort); (2) time and space (responsive, to enable adaptation to new environments, organisms, and scientific field techniques); (3) social support and collective agency; and (4) scientific and anecdotal knowledge and skills. Findings suggest challenges to commonly held beliefs about equitable pedagogy, which assumes that scientific practices must be thinkable and/or relevant before youth engage meaningfully. Further, findings illustrate the ways that fear, in small doses and handled with empathy, may become a resource for youths' connections to animals, nature, and science. Finally, we propose that youths' situated identity boundary work in the program may have the potential to spark more sustained identity work, given additional experiences and support.

  9. Financial administration of work for nonfederal sponsors, DOE Field Office (AL), Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Field Office, Albuquerque (AL) is responsible for managing and controlling nonfederally sponsored work done by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The audit objective was to determine whether the funding of, and accounting for, work done under a 1984 funds-in agreement and work for others in Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 complied with laws, regulations, and policies.

  10. Plasma injection and capture at electron cyclotron resonance in a mirror system with additional rf fields

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.D.; Karyaka, V.I.; Milant'ev, V.P.; Turikov, V.A.

    1980-03-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been carried out to determine how cyclotron-resonance rf fields in an open magnetic mirror system affect the capture and confinement of a plasma injected along the axis. The results show that at electron cyclotron resonance the fields greatly improve the longitudinal plasma confinement.

  11. The work of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Food Additives (EURL) and its support for the authorisation process of feed additives in the European Union: a review

    PubMed Central

    von Holst, Christoph; Robouch, Piotr; Bellorini, Stefano; de la Huebra, María José González; Ezerskis, Zigmas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper describes the operation of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Feed Additives (EURL) and its role in the authorisation procedure of feed additives in the European Union. Feed additives are authorised according to Regulation (EC) No. 1831/2003, which introduced a completely revised authorisation procedure and also established the EURL. The regulations authorising feed additives contain conditions of use such as legal limits of the feed additives, which require the availability of a suitable method of analysis for official control purposes under real world conditions. It is the task of the EURL to evaluate the suitability of analytical methods as proposed by the industry for this purpose. Moreover, the paper shows that one of the major challenges is the huge variety of the methodology applied in feed additive analysis, thus requiring expertise in quite different analytical areas. In order to cope with this challenge, the EURL is supported by a network of national reference laboratories (NRLs) and only the merged knowledge of all NRLs allows for a scientifically sound assessment of the analytical methods. PMID:26540604

  12. End-of-life care as a field of practice in the social work curriculum.

    PubMed

    Murty, Susan Alsop; Sanders, Sara; Stensland, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Attention to end-of-life care in social work education and practice is growing. With funding from the Project on Death in America, in 2001, the University of Iowa, School of Social Work developed and implemented an End-of-Life Field of Practice. Unlike a concentration, a Field of Practice is a set of integrated courses focused on one specific area of focus. This article describes the Field of Practice, the community-based partnerships, and the curriculum that serves as a basis for training the students enrolled in this area. Strategies for other social work programs interested in developing a similar Field of Practice or specialty area in their MSW curricula are provided. These include faculty committed to the content area, comprehensive course offerings to encompass all aspects of end-of-life care, and field sites willing to help train students.

  13. End-of-life care as a field of practice in the social work curriculum.

    PubMed

    Murty, Susan Alsop; Sanders, Sara; Stensland, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Attention to end-of-life care in social work education and practice is growing. With funding from the Project on Death in America, in 2001, the University of Iowa, School of Social Work developed and implemented an End-of-Life Field of Practice. Unlike a concentration, a Field of Practice is a set of integrated courses focused on one specific area of focus. This article describes the Field of Practice, the community-based partnerships, and the curriculum that serves as a basis for training the students enrolled in this area. Strategies for other social work programs interested in developing a similar Field of Practice or specialty area in their MSW curricula are provided. These include faculty committed to the content area, comprehensive course offerings to encompass all aspects of end-of-life care, and field sites willing to help train students. PMID:25869145

  14. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1997-05-16

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

  15. Government regulation and public opposition create high additional costs for field trials with GM crops in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, Thomas; Tribaldos, Theresa; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Field trials with GM crops are not only plant science experiments. They are also social experiments concerning the implications of government imposed regulatory constraints and public opposition for scientific activity. We assess these implications by estimating additional costs due to government regulation and public opposition in a recent set of field trials in Switzerland. We find that for every Euro spent on research, an additional 78 cents were spent on security, an additional 31 cents on biosafety, and an additional 17 cents on government regulatory supervision. Hence the total additional spending due to government regulation and public opposition was around 1.26 Euros for every Euro spent on the research per se. These estimates are conservative; they do not include additional costs that are hard to monetize (e.g. stakeholder information and dialogue activities, involvement of various government agencies). We conclude that further field experiments with GM crops in Switzerland are unlikely unless protected sites are set up to reduce these additional costs.

  16. Addition of the pirani condition to the Mathisson-Papapetrou equations in a Schwarzschild Field

    SciTech Connect

    Plyatsko, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper obtains relations that allow one to distinguish a unique center of mass of a rotating test body as it moves in the equatorial plane of a Schwarzchild field. This center of mass can be thought of as the instantaneous analog of the classical center of mass.

  17. Field Practica in Social Work Administration: Tasks, Auspice, Selection Criteria and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugeboren, Bernard

    1988-01-01

    A study of the field practicum in one master's program in social work administration over 10 years looked at student performance and satisfaction and their relationship to tasks performed by students, the auspice of the field placement agency, and student prior experience. The study and its policy implications are discussed. (MSE)

  18. Does work stress make you shorter? An ambulatory field study of daily work stressors, job control, and spinal shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Igic, Ivana; Ryser, Samuel; Elfering, Achim

    2013-10-01

    Body height decreases throughout the day due to fluid loss from the intervertebral disk. This study investigated whether spinal shrinkage was greater during workdays compared with nonwork days, whether daily work stressors were positively related to spinal shrinkage, and whether job control was negatively related to spinal shrinkage. In a consecutive 2-week ambulatory field study, including 39 office employees and 512 days of observation, spinal shrinkage was measured by a stadiometer, and calculated as body height in the morning minus body height in the evening. Physical activity was monitored throughout the 14 days by accelerometry. Daily work stressors, daily job control, biomechanical workload, and recreational activities after work were measured with daily surveys. Multilevel regression analyses showed that spinal disks shrank more during workdays than during nonwork days. After adjustment for sex, age, body weight, smoking status, biomechanical work strain, and time spent on physical and low-effort activities during the day, lower levels of daily job control significantly predicted increased spinal shrinkage. Findings add to knowledge on how work redesign that increases job control may possibly contribute to preserving intervertebral disk function and preventing occupational back pain.

  19. Occupational exposure to intermediate frequency and extremely low frequency magnetic fields among personnel working near electronic article surveillance systems.

    PubMed

    Roivainen, Päivi; Eskelinen, Tuomo; Jokela, Kari; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2014-05-01

    Cashiers are potentially exposed to intermediate frequency (IF) magnetic fields at their workplaces because of the electronic article surveillance (EAS) systems used in stores to protect merchandise against theft. This study aimed at investigating occupational exposure of cashiers to IF magnetic fields in Finnish stores. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields was also evaluated because cashiers work near various devices operating with 50 Hz electric power. The peak magnetic flux density was measured for IF magnetic fields, and was found to vary from 0.2 to 4 µT at the cashier's seat. ELF magnetic fields from 0.03 to 4.5 µT were found at the cashier's seat. These values are much lower than exposure limits. However, according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) occupational reference levels for IF magnetic fields (141 µT for the peak field) were exceeded in some cases (maximum 189 µT) for short periods of time when cashiers walked through the EAS gates. As the ICNIRP reference levels do not define any minimum time for exposure, additional investigations are recommended to determine compliance with basic restrictions. Even if the basic restrictions are not exceeded, persons working near EAS devices represent an exceptional group of workers with respect to exposure to electromagnetic fields. This group could serve as a basis for epidemiological studies addressing possible health effects of IF magnetic fields. Compliance with the reference levels for IF fields was evaluated using both broadband measurement of peak fields and the ICNIRP summation rule for multiple frequencies. The latter was generally more conservative, and the difference between the two methods was large (>10-fold) for EAS systems using a 58 kHz signal with complex waveform. This indicates that the ICNIRP multiple frequency rule can be unnecessarily conservative when measuring complex waveforms.

  20. The influence of bioaugmentation and biosurfactant addition on bioremediation efficiency of diesel-oil contaminated soil: feasibility during field studies.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Alicja; Ambrożewicz, Damian; Sydow, Mateusz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Marecik, Roman; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    The study focused on assessing the influence of bioaugmentation and addition of rhamnolipids on diesel oil biodegradation efficiency during field studies. Initial laboratory studies (measurement of emitted CO2 and dehydrogenase activity) were carried out in order to select the consortium for bioaugmentation as well as to evaluate the most appropriate concentration of rhamnolipids. The selected consortium consisted of following bacterial taxa: Aeromonas hydrophila, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Gordonia sp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Rhodococcus equi, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Xanthomonas sp. It was established that the application of rhamnolipids at 150 mg/kg of soil was most appropriate in terms of dehydrogenase activity. Based on the obtained results, four treatment methods were designed and tested during 365 days of field studies: I) natural attenuation; II) addition of rhamnolipids; III) bioaugmentation; IV) bioaugmentation and addition of rhamnolipids. It was observed that bioaugmentation contributed to the highest diesel oil biodegradation efficiency, whereas the addition of rhamnolipids did not notably influence the treatment process.

  1. Into the Fields: Mobilizing Students To Work with Farmworkers on Campuses and in Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okie, Alejandra; Wiggins, Melinda

    This manual for college students and faculty outlines ways to mobilize others on campus to learn about, educate, and work with migrant and seasonal farmworkers in their local area. Section I introduces the work and educational situation of migrant workers and the goals of the Into the Fields program, in which student interns provide legal, health,…

  2. Measuring International Service Outcomes: Implications for International Social Work Field Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Benjamin J.; McBride, Amanda Moore; Sherraden, Margaret S.

    2012-01-01

    International field placements are a unique educational opportunity for social work students to develop the skills they need for social work practice in a globalized world; however, outcomes of international placements have not been rigorously studied. This article reports on the International Volunteer Impacts Survey (IVIS), a 48-item survey…

  3. Opening Options: Making Field Education Work in a Private Practice Clinic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooradian, John K.; Knaggs, Constance; Hock, Robert; LaCharite, David

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of social work field placements in a private practice setting to prepare MSW students for clinical work. The authors used "autoethnography", which is personal narrative that explores the writer's experience of life, to describe interpersonal and contextual characteristics, as well as procedures implemented to conduct…

  4. Additional field verification of convective scaling for the lateral dispersion parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, S.K.; Davis, P.A.

    1988-07-01

    The results of a series of diffusion trials over the heterogeneous surface of the Canadian Precambrian Shield provide additional support for the convective scaling of the lateral dispersion parameter. The data indicate that under convective conditions, the lateral dispersion parameter can be scaled with the convective velocity scale and the mixing depth. 10 references.

  5. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks in Lab and Field: Physical, Chemical, and Biological Effects of Fluids (Detecting a Biosurfactant Additive in a Field Irrigation Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Spetzler, Hartmut

    2006-05-01

    We have been exploring a new technology that is based on using low-frequency seismic attenuation data to monitor changes in fluid saturation conditions in two-fluid phase porous materials. The seismic attenuation mechanism is related to the loss of energy due to the hysteresis of resistance to meniscus movement (changes in surface tension, wettability) when a pore containing two fluids is stressed at very low frequencies (< 10 Hz). This technology has potential applications to monitoring changes in (1) leakage at buried waste sites, (2) contaminant remediation, and (3) flooding during enhanced petroleum recovery. We have concluded a three year field study at the Maricopa Agricultural Center site of the University of Arizona. Three sets of instruments were installed along an East-West line perpendicular to the 50m by 50m inigation site. Each set of instruments consisted of one three component seismometer and one tiltmeter. Microseisms and solid Earth-tides served as strain sources. The former have a power peak at a period of about 6 seconds and the tides have about two cycles per day. Installation of instruments commenced in late summer of 2002. The instruments operated nearly continuously until April 2005. During the fall of 2003 the site was irrigated with water and one year later with water containing 150 ppm of a biosurfactant additive. This biodegradable additive served to mimic a class of contaminants that change the surface tension of the inigation fluid. Tilt data clearly show tidal tilts superimposed on local tilts due to agricultural irrigation and field work. When the observed signals were correlated with site specific theoretical tilt signals we saw no anomalies for the water irrigation in 2003, but large anomalies on two stations for the surfactant irrigation in 2004. Occasional failures of seismometers as well as data acquisition systems contributed to less than continuous coverage. These data are noisier than the tilt data, but do also show possible

  6. Thiopeptin, a New Feed-Additive Antibiotic: Biological Studies and Field Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mine, K.; Miyairi, N.; Takano, N.; Mori, S.; Watanabe, N.

    1972-01-01

    Thiopeptin is a new antibiotic, produced by Streptomyces tateyamensis and developed solely for animal use as a feed additive. The antibiotic content in animal tissue and feed was assayed in terms of the antimicrobial activity against Mycoplasma laidlawii A. This antibiotic was found to be relatively nontoxic in rats and mice. In chickens, this antibiotic is excreted into feces within 48 hr of administration and is not absorbed in tissue. It is well tolerated in both broilers and swine and is highly stable in animal feed. Thiopeptin-supplemented feed contributes to the improvement of weight gain, feed efficiency in chickens and swine, and the egg performance in layers. Thus, thiopeptin, when used as a feed additive, is quite suitable for supplementing animal nutrition. PMID:4680812

  7. An Approach to the Classification of Potential Reserve Additions of Giant Oil Fields of the World

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Tennyson, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    This report contains slides and notes for slides for a presentation given to the Committee on Sustainable Energy and the Ad Hoc Group of Experts on Harmonization of Fossil Energy and Mineral Resources Terminology on 17 October 2007 in Geneva, Switzerland. The presentation describes the U.S. Geological Survey study to characterize and quantify petroleum-reserve additions, and the application of this study to help classify the quantities.

  8. 34 CFR 350.55 - What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM How Does the... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for funding? 350.55 Section 350.55 Education Regulations of...

  9. 34 CFR 350.55 - What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM How Does the... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for funding? 350.55 Section 350.55 Education Regulations of...

  10. 34 CFR 350.55 - What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM How Does the... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for funding? 350.55 Section 350.55 Education Regulations of...

  11. 34 CFR 350.55 - What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM How Does the... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for funding? 350.55 Section 350.55 Education Regulations of...

  12. A near-infrared spectroscopic study of young field ultracool dwarfs: additional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, M. C.

    We present additional analysis of the classification system presented in \\citet{allers13}. We refer the reader to \\citet{allers13} for a detailed discussion of our near-IR spectral type and gravity classification system. Here, we address questions and comments from participants of the Brown Dwarfs Come of Age meeting. In particular, we examine the effects of binarity and metallicity on our classification system. We also present our classification of Pleiades brown dwarfs using published spectra. Lastly, we determine SpTs and calculate gravity-sensitive indices for the BT-Settl atmospheric models and compare them to observations.

  13. Additional road markings as an indication of speed limits: results of a field experiment and a driving simulator study.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stijn; Vanrie, Jan; Dreesen, An; Brijs, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Although speed limits are indicated by road signs, road users are not always aware, while driving, of the actual speed limit on a given road segment. The Roads and Traffic Agency developed additional road markings in order to support driver decisions on speed on 70 km/h roads in Flanders-Belgium. In this paper the results are presented of two evaluation studies, both a field study and a simulator study, on the effects of the additional road markings on speed behaviour. The results of the field study showed no substantial effect of the markings on speed behaviour. Neither did the simulator study, with slightly different stimuli. Nevertheless an effect on lateral position was noticed in the simulator study, showing at least some effect of the markings. The role of conspicuity of design elements and expectations towards traffic environments is discussed. Both studies illustrate well some strengths and weaknesses of observational field studies compared to experimental simulator studies.

  14. Using GIS technology to integrate remote sensing and field work data with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, G. ); Ellis, J.M.; Davis, H.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Field work for major projects is becoming more dependent upon contractors who have a variety of training, experience and methodology Contractor gaps in data collected, inconsistent methodology and terminology and out-of-context observations are minimized by using digital templates and remote sensing support. The digital templates utilize off-the-shelf PC software and portable hardware. Some field data can be customized to easily correlate with well logs utilizing computer-aided drafting (CAD) technology. Processed satellite images are georeferenced to a specific map projection, utilizing ground control points determined with Global Positioning System (GPS). Geographical Information System (GIS) technology is being evaluated as an integration tool to make complex tables of field data, CAD base maps, interpretation maps, and images more useful to Earth Scientists. The GIS enables users to: (1) examine their field data, maps, and images in a PC-based environment. (2) better understand spatial relationships between field observations, images and geologic maps. (3) interactively query field data while viewing associated images and maps. (4) ultimately improve database usage, database quality, and geological interpretations. The geologic interpretation of georeferenced images and field work in the Rio Blanco license of Colombia resulted in (1) an improved geologic map with better definition of source-reservoir rock from the hangingwall to the footwall of the main thrust and (2) better surface controlled balanced crossed-sections that led to play definition and to improve seismic planning/field parameters design for refining seismic acquisition.

  15. Using GIS technology to integrate remote sensing and field work data with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, G.; Ellis, J.M.; Davis, H.H.

    1996-12-31

    Field work for major projects is becoming more dependent upon contractors who have a variety of training, experience and methodology Contractor gaps in data collected, inconsistent methodology and terminology and out-of-context observations are minimized by using digital templates and remote sensing support. The digital templates utilize off-the-shelf PC software and portable hardware. Some field data can be customized to easily correlate with well logs utilizing computer-aided drafting (CAD) technology. Processed satellite images are georeferenced to a specific map projection, utilizing ground control points determined with Global Positioning System (GPS). Geographical Information System (GIS) technology is being evaluated as an integration tool to make complex tables of field data, CAD base maps, interpretation maps, and images more useful to Earth Scientists. The GIS enables users to: (1) examine their field data, maps, and images in a PC-based environment. (2) better understand spatial relationships between field observations, images and geologic maps. (3) interactively query field data while viewing associated images and maps. (4) ultimately improve database usage, database quality, and geological interpretations. The geologic interpretation of georeferenced images and field work in the Rio Blanco license of Colombia resulted in (1) an improved geologic map with better definition of source-reservoir rock from the hangingwall to the footwall of the main thrust and (2) better surface controlled balanced crossed-sections that led to play definition and to improve seismic planning/field parameters design for refining seismic acquisition.

  16. [Field work, narrative and knowledge production in contemporary ethnographic research: a contribution to the field of health].

    PubMed

    Trad, Leny Alves Bomfim

    2012-03-01

    In this article I reflect on the peculiarities of contemporary ethnographic research, highlighting some challenges inherent to this process. The discussion focuses in particular on the following aspects: the limits imposed by the clear reduction in immersion time in the field; the challenges in learning about ethnographic work, either in the process of observation or interaction in the field, or in the task of textual production; issues of an epistemological and ethical nature that deserve particular attention on the part of practitioners of the ethnographic approach and the scientific community in general. It is especially appropriate to foster debate around the ethnographic method, addressing its peculiarities, operational complexity and potential as a tool for knowledge production, in the sphere of health/public health, bearing in mind the marked increase of this approach in this field. PMID:22450403

  17. Identifying work related injuries: comparison of methods for interrogating text fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Work-related injuries in Australia are estimated to cost around $57.5 billion annually, however there are currently insufficient surveillance data available to support an evidence-based public health response. Emergency departments (ED) in Australia are a potential source of information on work-related injuries though most ED's do not have an 'Activity Code' to identify work-related cases with information about the presenting problem recorded in a short free text field. This study compared methods for interrogating text fields for identifying work-related injuries presenting at emergency departments to inform approaches to surveillance of work-related injury. Methods Three approaches were used to interrogate an injury description text field to classify cases as work-related: keyword search, index search, and content analytic text mining. Sensitivity and specificity were examined by comparing cases flagged by each approach to cases coded with an Activity code during triage. Methods to improve the sensitivity and/or specificity of each approach were explored by adjusting the classification techniques within each broad approach. Results The basic keyword search detected 58% of cases (Specificity 0.99), an index search detected 62% of cases (Specificity 0.87), and the content analytic text mining (using adjusted probabilities) approach detected 77% of cases (Specificity 0.95). Conclusions The findings of this study provide strong support for continued development of text searching methods to obtain information from routine emergency department data, to improve the capacity for comprehensive injury surveillance. PMID:20374657

  18. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing

  19. NASA's Design and Development of a Field Goniometer Instrument Using Solid Works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark; Sasaki, Glen; Jennings, Ernest (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With NASA suffering severe funding cutbacks, engineers at NASA are required to produce state-of-the-art hardware with limited personnel and financial resources. In light of these constraints, the new NASA mandate is to build better, faster and cheaper. In April of 1998, Stennis Space Center's Commercial Remote Sensing Program contracted to the Systems Engineering Division at NASA Ames Research Center to develop a device known as a Field Goniometer. A Field Goniometer is a device that measures bi-directional reflectance of a target, such as vegetation, relative to the sun and an imaging system in an aircraft or spacecraft. The device is able to provide a spectral fingerprint of the surface it is measuring in wavelengths from 350nm-2500nm using a hyperspectral imager. To accomplish this project, several obstacles had to be overcome. First, the design had to be completed in less than four months. Second, due to the complexity of the design, the use of solid modeling was highly desirable but most of the group's solid modelers were assigned to other jobs. Third, the amount of funding available from the customer was one half to one third the funding typically expended for a job of this nature. Our choices for this project were to design with standard 2-D CAD systems currently used in-house or train additional engineers on our existing solids package or purchase a new solid model package. The use of a 2D CAD system was very undesirable due to the complexity of the design. Using our existing solids modeler would have required a learning curve for our engineers that would be incompatible with our schedule. Prior to this project, a member of our design group researched the solid modeling industry and decided to purchase SolidWorks. After examining the product for ease of use, modeling capability, training time required and cost, we decided our highest probability of success would be to design with Solidworks. During the design phase, our fabrication group was able to provide

  20. Seven rules to live by: accommodations in social work education and the field.

    PubMed

    Neely-Barnes, Susan Louise; McCabe, Heather A; Barnes, Craig P

    2014-01-01

    Students with disabilities are a growing population in higher education (National Center for Education Statistics, 2009 ). Providing accommodations for students with disabilities can raise ethical and social justice questions and pose challenges for social work faculty, administrators, and field instructors. Social work educators must balance the legal mandates for nondiscrimination and reasonable accommodation against ethical obligations around protection of clients and preparation for practice. This article presents case examples in the context of legal analysis to help social work educators make difficult decisions about student academic performance.

  1. Social Work Knowledge of Facts on Aging: Influence of Field and Classroom Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkenmaier, Julie; Rowan, Noell L.; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Lawrance, Frances P.; Volland, Patricia J.

    2009-01-01

    Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz (FAQ) was used to measure aging knowledge outcomes of 323 practicum students engaged in aging-focused practica at pre- and posttest across 11 universities. Significant improvement in knowledge scores (p = 0.0001) was found for graduates of the enhanced field education programs. Taking aging course work was a…

  2. Technology Acceptance in Social Work Education: Implications for the Field Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Alex Don; Bullock, Angela N.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth and sophistication of new information and computer technology (ICT) have greatly influenced human interactions and provided new metaphors for understanding the world. The acceptance and integration of ICT into social work field education are examined here using the technological acceptance model. This article also explores…

  3. 75 FR 53980 - Notice of Field Tours for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Field Tours for the Pinedale Anticline Working Group AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (1976), the Federal Advisory Committee Act (1972), and the Record of Decision (ROD) for...

  4. Social Work and Criminal Justice: Are We Meeting in the Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheyett, Anna; Pettus-Davis, Carrie; McCarter, Susan; Brigham, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Social workers are needed but infrequently involved with criminal justice systems. One way to increase the number of social workers in the criminal justice system is by exposing students to work in these settings. This study examined the number, types, and utilization of criminal justice field placements in MSW programs by surveying field…

  5. The Biotic Indexing of Water Quality and Its Application to Field Work in Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the biotic indexing of water quality and its application to A-level field work with reference to the Trent Biotic Index and Chandler Score system. These indices are related to the classification of water quality used by the Department of the Environment. Interpretations and limitations of the indices are discussed. (Author/DS)

  6. Kero Community School Field Report. Indigenous Mathematics Project. Working Paper 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen L.

    This report summarizes field work at Kero School in Papua New Guinea, one of five community schools participating in the ongoing research and development efforts of the Indigenous Mathematics Project (IMP). The introductory material describes the site, the school setting, and the community setting. Background on the IMP teacher and the size of…

  7. Ororo Community School Field Report. Indigenous Mathematics Project. Working Paper 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lineberger, Julie Diane

    This report summarizes field work in Ororo Community School located in Tokorara, a suburb of Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea. It is one of five community schools participating in the ongoing research and development efforts of the Indigenous Mathematics Project (IMP). The study opens with an introduction to the site, the school…

  8. Andra Community School Field Report. Indigenous Mathematics Project. Working Paper 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Paula

    This report summarizes field work on Andra Island, Papua New Guinea, one of five community schools participating in the ongoing research and development efforts of the Indigenous Mathematics Project (IMP). It opens with an introduction to the site, the school setting, and the community setting. Background on the IMP teacher and the size of classes…

  9. Divanap Community School Field Report. Indigenous Mathematics Project. Working Paper 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearhart, Maryl

    This report summarizes field work in Divanap, Papua New Guinea, one of five community schools participating in the ongoing research and development efforts of the Indigenous Mathematics Project (IMP). The site is described, with detailed comments on the school and the community. Background on the teacher is provided. Sizes of the two grade 2, one…

  10. Muglamp Community School Field Report. Indigenous Mathematics Project. Working Paper 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Robert D.

    This report summarizes field work in Muglamp, Papua New Guinea, one of five community schools participating in the ongoing research and development efforts of the Indigenous Mathematics Project (IMP). It begins with an introduction to the site, the school setting, and the community setting. The teacher's history and the number of students in one…

  11. Electrical Engineers' Perceptions on Education--Electromagnetic Field Theory and Its Connection to Working Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keltikangas, K.; Wallen, H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates electrical engineers' perceptions on their education in Finland, with particular emphasis on the basic electromagnetic field theory courses and their applicability in working life, using two online surveys (n = 99 and n = 120). The answers show a reasonably good satisfaction with the electrical engineering studies in…

  12. Research into lightning protection of distribution systems II - results from Florida Field work 1978 and 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Darveniza, M.; Uman, M.A.

    1984-04-01

    Experience in the Tampa Bay area during August 1978 thunderstorms resulted in significant improvements in the field work carried out during 1979. This paper describes the changes to equipment and data sources, and presents overall results for the 1979 thunderstorm season. Where appropriate, these are linked to 1978 data and to data obtained from equipment which operated on a year-long basis.

  13. Secondary recovery from the Dune Field, Crane County, Texas, is viable through mine workings

    SciTech Connect

    Ayler, M.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Data in Report of Investigations No. 168, published by the Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas, indicate the Dune field is a good candidate for secondary recovery of mobile residual oil through an oil mine as described in US Patent {number sign}4,458,945. If trends identified in RI No. 168 can be extended into adjacent sections, oil recovery in the range of $10.00 per barrel or less should be possible. Mine workings will permit a more detailed mapping field jointing and fracturing, in turn permitting better placement of wells on 1 acre or closer spacing. Shafts to the surface would be a mile or more apart greatly decreasing environmental impact. Wastewater generated could be re-introduced to assist in retaining reservoir pressures. If mine workings are driven in hard limestones, as would be possible in the Dune field, produced mine spoil would be marketable as gravel for the concrete industry.

  14. Work plan for conducting an ecological risk assessment at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland, and activities at the Edgewood Area since World War II have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. The J-Field site was used to destroy chemical agents and munitions by open burning and open detonation. This work plan presents the approach proposed to conduct an ecological risk assessment (ERA) as part of the RI/FS program at J-Field. This work plan identifies the locations and types of field studies proposed for each area of concern (AOC), the laboratory studies proposed to evaluate toxicity of media, and the methodology to be used in estimating doses to ecological receptors and discusses the approach that will be used to estimate and evaluate ecological risks at J-Field. Eight AOCs have been identified at J-Field, and the proposed ERA is designed to evaluate the potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors from contaminated media at each AOC, as well as over the entire J-Field site. The proposed ERA approach consists of three major phases, incorporating field and laboratory studies as well as modeling. Phase 1 includes biotic surveys of the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, biological tissue sampling and analysis, and media toxicity testing at each AOC and appropriate reference locations. Phase 2 includes definitive toxicity testing of media from areas of known or suspected contamination or of media for which the Phase 1 results indicate toxicity or adverse ecological effects. In Phase 3, the uptake models initially developed in Phase 2 will be finalized, and contaminant dose to each receptor from all complete pathways will be estimated.

  15. Empowerment in the field of health promotion: recognizing challenges in working toward equity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Nicole S; Murphy, Jill; Coser, Larissa

    2014-12-01

    Over the last 25 years, the language of empowerment has been woven into the guiding missions and descriptions of institutions, funding and projects globally. Although theoretical understandings of empowerment within the domain of health promotion remain contentious, we have little idea of how a shift toward an empowerment agenda has affected the daily work of those in the field of health promotion. A systematic examination of the implementation of the empowerment agenda is important as it can help us understand how redistributive agendas are received within the multiple institutional contexts in which health promotion work is carried out. The goal of this study, therefore, was to try to understand the empowerment agenda within the context of everyday health promotion. We conducted semi-structured interviews with health promoters from a variety of geographical regions, institutional backgrounds, and job capacities. Essentially we found that empowerment remains conceptually dear to health promoters' understanding of their work, yet at the same time, mainstreaming empowerment is at odds with central trends and initiatives that govern this work. We argue that many of the stumbling blocks that have hindered this specific agenda are actually central stumbling blocks for the wider field of health promotion. We examine some of the barriers to implementing transformational change. Overcoming the primary limitations uncovered in this exploration of empowerment is actually crucial to progressive work in health promotion in general, particularly work that would seek to lessen inequities.

  16. Becoming an IT Person: Field, Habitus and Capital in the Transition from University to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Martyn; Zukas, Miriam; Lent, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Transitions from university study to graduate work in new industries such as information technology (IT) are not well understood. As the IT industry is a significant recruiter of graduates and an important component of the UK economy, the transition into the IT profession needs to be understood better. In addition, understanding the transition…

  17. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management

  18. Semi-empirical equation of limiting current for cobalt electrodeposition in the presence of magnetic field and additive electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudibyo, Aziz, N.

    2016-02-01

    One of the available methods to solve a roughening in cobalt electrodeposition is magneto electrodeposition (MED) in the presence of additive electrolyte. Semi-empirical equation of limiting current under a magnetic field for cobalt MED in the presence of boric acid as an additive electrolyte was successfully developed. This semi empirical equation shows the effects of the electrode area (A), the concentration of the electro active species (C), the diffusion coefficient of the electro active species (D), the kinematic viscosity of the electrolyte (v), magnetic strength (B) and the number of electrons involved in the redox process (n). The presence of boric acid led to decrease in the limiting current, but the acid was found useful as a buffer to avoid the local pH rise caused by parallel hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

  19. Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kuraishy, Hayder M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study investigates the effect of combined treatment with Ginkgo biloba and/or Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and short-term working memory accuracy. Subjects and Methods: A total number of 112 volunteers were enrolled to study the effect of G. biloba and R. rosea on PVT and short-term working memory accuracy as compared to placebo effects, the central cognitive effect was assessed by critical flicker-fusion frequency, PVT, and computerized N-back test. Results: Placebo produced no significant effects on all neurocognitive tests measure P > 0.05 in normal healthy volunteers, G. biloba or R. rosea improve PVT and low to moderate working memory accuracy, The combined effect of R. rosea and G. biloba leading to more significant effect on PVT, all levels of short-term working memory accuracy and critical fusion versus flicker P < 0.01, more than of G. biloba or R. rosea when they used alone. Conclusion: The combined effect of R. rosea and G. biloba leading to a more significant effect on cognitive function than either G. biloba or R. rosea when they used alone. PMID:27069717

  20. The Contribution of Work and Family Roles to Mental Health: An Evaluation of Additive and Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetti, Rena L.

    Rather than ask whether multiple roles, such as employee, wife, and mother, have a protective or harmful effect on women's psychological well being, this study examined the combination of stressors and supports associated with work and family roles. Female clerical workers (N=44) who were married and/or had a child living at home completed…

  1. Field-assisted Densification of Superhard B6O Materials with Y2O3/Al2O3 Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, M.; Raethel, J.; Sempf, K.; Thiele, M.; Bales, A.; Sigalas, I.

    B6O is a possible candidate of superhard materials with a hardness of 45 GPa measured on single crystals. Up to now, densification of these materials was only possible at high pressure. However, recently it was found that different oxides can be utilized as effective sintering additives. In this work the effect of addition of Y2O3/Al2O3 on the densification behaviour as a function of applied pressure, its microstructure evolution, and resulting mechanical properties were investigated. A strong dependence of the densification with increasing pressure was found. The material revealed characteristic triple junctions filled with amorphous residue composed of B2O3, Al2O3 and Y2O3, while no amorphous grain-boundary films were observed along internal interfaces. Mechanical testing revealed on average hardness of 33 GPa, a fracture toughness of 4 MPam1/2, and a strength value of 500 MPa.

  2. International geomagnetic reference field 1980: a report by IAGA Division I working group.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the recommendations of the working group, which suggested additions to IGRF because of the cumulative effect of the inevitable uncertainties in the secular variation models which had led to unacceptable inaccuracies in the IGRF by the late 1970's. The recommendations were accepted by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy on August 15, 1981 at the 4th Scientific Assembly, Edinburgh. An extended table sets out spherical harmonic coefficients of the IGRF 1980.-R.House

  3. Copula regression analysis of simultaneously recorded frontal eye field and inferotemporal spiking activity during object-based working memory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Clark, Kelsey L; Gong, Xiajing; Noudoost, Behrad; Li, Mingyao; Moore, Tirin; Liang, Hualou

    2015-06-10

    Inferotemporal (IT) neurons are known to exhibit persistent, stimulus-selective activity during the delay period of object-based working memory tasks. Frontal eye field (FEF) neurons show robust, spatially selective delay period activity during memory-guided saccade tasks. We present a copula regression paradigm to examine neural interaction of these two types of signals between areas IT and FEF of the monkey during a working memory task. This paradigm is based on copula models that can account for both marginal distribution over spiking activity of individual neurons within each area and joint distribution over ensemble activity of neurons between areas. Considering the popular GLMs as marginal models, we developed a general and flexible likelihood framework that uses the copula to integrate separate GLMs into a joint regression analysis. Such joint analysis essentially leads to a multivariate analog of the marginal GLM theory and hence efficient model estimation. In addition, we show that Granger causality between spike trains can be readily assessed via the likelihood ratio statistic. The performance of this method is validated by extensive simulations, and compared favorably to the widely used GLMs. When applied to spiking activity of simultaneously recorded FEF and IT neurons during working memory task, we observed significant Granger causality influence from FEF to IT, but not in the opposite direction, suggesting the role of the FEF in the selection and retention of visual information during working memory. The copula model has the potential to provide unique neurophysiological insights about network properties of the brain. PMID:26063909

  4. Radiative corrections to the Higgs boson couplings in the model with an additional real singlet scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Kikuchi, Mariko; Yagyu, Kei

    2016-06-01

    We calculate renormalized Higgs boson couplings with gauge bosons and fermions at the one-loop level in the model with an additional isospin singlet real scalar field. These coupling constants can deviate from the predictions in the standard model due to tree-level mixing effects and one-loop contributions of the extra neutral scalar boson. We investigate how they can be significant under the theoretical constraints from perturbative unitarity and vacuum stability and also the condition of avoiding the wrong vacuum. Furthermore, comparing with the predictions in the Type I two Higgs doublet model, we numerically demonstrate how the singlet extension model can be distinguished and identified by using precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings at future collider experiments.

  5. An analysis of the implications of a magnetic field threshold limit value on utility work practices.

    PubMed

    Dillon, R; von Winterfeldt, D

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the implications of a 10 gauss (G) occupational threshold limit value (TLV) on the work practices of a utility that must maintain and repair 500 and 230 kV transmission lines. Three work practices are compared: bare-handed work with live lines (the current practice at the example utility), use of hot sticks, and de-energizing lines prior to work. Bare-handed work with live lines leads to occasional exceedances of the 10 G TLV. Use of hot sticks and de-energizing lines eliminate these exceedances, but they do so at a price. Both practices increase the job duration and, as a result, may increase occupational injury risks. The annual costs for the current live-line, bare-handed practice is approximately $175,000. Use of hot sticks increases this annual cost of maintenance and repair by 30 to 55%. De-energizing lines can increase annual costs by $4 million to $14 million, due to the need for adding additional electricity generation during the planned outages. De-energizing lines also increases the risk to service reliability slightly.

  6. Non-Markovian work fluctuation theorem in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.

    2015-08-01

    The validity of the transient work fluctuation theorem for a charged Brownian harmonic oscillator embedded in a non-Markovian heat bath and under the action of crossed electric and magnetic fields is investigated. The aforementioned theorem is verified to be valid within the context of the generalized Langevin equation with an arbitrary memory kernel and arbitrary dragging in the potential minimum. The fluctuation-dissipation relation of the second kind is assumed to be valid and shows that the non-Markovian stochastic dynamics associated with the particle, in the absence of the external time-dependent electric field, reaches an equilibrium state, as is precisely demanded by such a relation. The Jarzynski equality in this problem is also analyzed.

  7. Accidents at Work and Costs Analysis: A Field Study in a Large Italian Company

    PubMed Central

    BATTAGLIA, Massimo; FREY, Marco; PASSETTI, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Accidents at work are still a heavy burden in social and economic terms, and action to improve health and safety standards at work offers great potential gains not only to employers, but also to individuals and society as a whole. However, companies often are not interested to measure the costs of accidents even if cost information may facilitate preventive occupational health and safety management initiatives. The field study, carried out in a large Italian company, illustrates technical and organisational aspects associated with the implementation of an accident costs analysis tool. The results indicate that the implementation (and the use) of the tool requires a considerable commitment by the company, that accident costs analysis should serve to reinforce the importance of health and safety prevention and that the economic dimension of accidents is substantial. The study also suggests practical ways to facilitate the implementation and the moral acceptance of the accounting technology. PMID:24869894

  8. Social Work Field Training for the Community: A Student Self-Directed Approach in the Environmental Domain in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Al-Makhamreh, Sahar; Alnabulsi, Hana; Asfour, Hana

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines innovative field training methods that foster the abilities of undergraduate social work students so that they are able to empower the local community and raise awareness of environmental issues. In this study, students were engaged in a local community assessment that sought to understand their views on environmental and community impacts of the Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) Project on the lives of the host village's residents. A students' self-directed approach was applied for the fieldwork out of which interventions were developed ( Garrison, 1997). Quantitative data were gathered by eighteen students through a survey of 361 questionnaires targeting Allan society. In addition to students' field notes, pre and post focus groups were used to collect qualitative information. Study findings highlighted the effectiveness of students' self-directed projects in cultivating culturally competent practices; ensuring sustainable development; and providing evidence-based knowledge on social work practice involving environmental issues. PMID:27559202

  9. The influence of Ag+Mg additions on the nucleation of strengthening precipitates in a non-cold-worked Al-Cu-Li alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum-copper-lithium alloys generally require cold work to attain their highest strengths in artificially aged tempers. These alloys are usually strengthened by a combination of the metastable delta prime (Al3Li) and theta prime (Al2Cu) phases and the equilibrium T sub 1 (Al2CuLi) phase, and where the T sub 1 phase is a more potent strengthener than the delta prime. Various investigators have shown that the high strengths obtained after artificial aging associated with cold work result from the heterogeneous precipitation of T sub 1 on matrix dislocations. The objective here is to elucidate the mechanism by which the Ag+Mg additions stimulate the precipitation of T sub 1 type precipitates without cold work. To accomplish this, the microstructure of an Al-6.3Cu-1.3Li-0.14Zr model alloy was evaluated in a T6 type temper with and without the Ag+Mg addition.

  10. Field-Emission from Chemically Functionalized Diamond Surfaces: Does Electron Affinity Picture Work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Miyazaki, Takehide; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Okushi, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-03-01

    By means of the time-dependent density functional electron dynamics, we have revisited the field-emission efficiency of chemically functionalized diamond (100) surfaces. In order to achieve high efficiency and high (chemical) stability, proper chemical species are needed to terminate diamond surfaces. Hydrogen (H) termination is well known to achieve the negative electron affinity (NEA) of diamond surface which indeed enhances field emission performance than that of clean surface with positive electron affinity (PEA). Yet, the durability of H-terminated diamond surface was concerned for long-time operation of the field-emission. Meantime, oxidation, or hydroxyl (OH) termination was considered to achieve chemical stability of the surface but presence of oxygen (O) atom should reduce the emission efficiency. Recently, H- OH-co-terminated surface is reported as NEA and was expected to achieve both emission efficiency and chemical stability. However, our simulation showed that emission efficiency of the H- OH- co-terminated surface is much lower than clean surface with PEA, thus we note that the electron affinity cannot be a unique measure to determine the emission efficiency. In this talk, we introduce necessity of new concept to understand the emission efficiency which needs to know detailed potential profile from bulk to vacuum through surface, which is strongly dependent on the surface chemical functionalization. This work was supported by ALCA project conducted by Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  11. Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    James Spillane

    2005-10-01

    The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

  12. Different developmental trajectories across feature types support a dynamic field model of visual working memory development

    PubMed Central

    Simmering, Vanessa R.; Miller, Hilary E.; Bohache, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Research on visual working memory has focused on characterizing the nature of capacity limits as “slots” or “resources” based almost exclusively on adults’ performance with little consideration for developmental change. Here we argue that understanding how visual working memory develops can shed new light onto the nature of representations. We present an alternative model, the Dynamic Field Theory (DFT), which can capture effects that have been previously attributed either to “slot” or “resource” explanations. The DFT includes a specific developmental mechanism to account for improvements in both resolution and capacity of visual working memory throughout childhood. Here we show how development in the DFT can account for different capacity estimates across feature types (i.e., color and shape). The current paper tests this account by comparing children’s (3, 5, and 7 years of age) performance across different feature types. Results showed that capacity for colors increased faster over development than capacity for shapes. A second experiment confirmed this difference across feature types within subjects, but also showed that the difference can be attenuated by testing memory for less-familiar colors. Model simulations demonstrate how developmental changes in connectivity within the model—purportedly arising through experience—can capture differences across feature types. PMID:25737253

  13. [Regulation requirements for the protection of workers against electromagnetic fields occurring in the work environment].

    PubMed

    Aniołczyk, Halina; Zmyślony, Marek

    2006-01-01

    In Poland, electromagnetic fields (EMF), one of potentially hazardous physical factors occurring in the work environment, are subjected to compulsory surveillance. In 2001, the Directive issued by the Minister of Labor and Social Policy substantially changed the approach towards the protection of workers against EMF. The Directive regulates the whole range of EMF frequencies and electromagnetic radiation, namely from 0 Hz to 300 GHz, which means the possibility of assessing worker's EMF exposure, determined by exposure index, along with the hygiene assessment of EMF sources, defined by protection zones. In 2003-2005, a number of amended executive and supplementary regulations were issued. However, it should be emphasized that in the process of their elaboration, striving after perfection, numerous incoherent and ambiguous provisions were adopted, which finally created difficulties in the interpretation of individual regulations. This is also linked with doubts and discussions on their practical application by services responsible for control, measurements and monitoring of working conditions under the exposure to EMF. In this work an attempt was made to clarify all issues and arrange them according to the faced problems. The authors also present proposals how to solve all these problems.

  14. Developing a health and safety plan for hazardous field work in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Gochfeld, Michael; Volz, Conrad D; Burger, Joanna; Jewett, Stephen; Powers, Charles W; Friedlander, Barry

    2006-12-01

    Developing health and safety plans (HASPs) is a common feature of occupational safety and health for many workplaces. Formal HASPs are a requirement for hazardous waste work, requiring the anticipation and identification of hazards and embodying the training, equipping, and evaluation of workers. Aside from OSHA, there are relatively few manuals or examples and virtually no papers that provide practical guidance in what a HASP should cover or how to create and implement one. Moreover, existing guidance refers to spatially circumscribed worksites. This article details development of a HASP to cover field researchers and ship personnel conducting scientific research in a remote area of the world (Amchitka Island in the western Aleutians), hundreds of kilometers from the nearest emergency room. It required characterizing the kinds of work to be performed and anticipating the hazards that could be encountered. It illustrates the meshing of a general HASP with a ship safety plan, a dive safety plan, and specialized topics, including stop-work authority, rock climbing, firearms, vehicle safety, and communication strategy. Remote area operations are a growing challenge facing the profession. An expedition of this sort requires extensive planning and experienced safety personnel and cannot rely on luck to ensure the safe return of participants.

  15. MSW Foundation Students in the Field: Reflections on the Nature and Quality of Group Work Assignments and Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPorte, Heidi Heft; Sweifach, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Commentators find that education in social group work has diminished over the past three decades, creating a shortage in group work-trained field instructors. The role of instructing group work students may appear relatively easy; however, quality instruction requires careful planning, time, energy, and specialized knowledge. Without knowledge and…

  16. Thermodynamics of the interconversion of heat and work via plasma electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-12-15

    Thermodynamics of a system where a group of cold charged particles locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of temperature T and volume V (V{sub P}work via isothermal compression/expansion of plasma electric field (associated with charged particles) in a plasma heat pump and ES heat engine cycle is demonstrated. The efficiency of the plasma heat pump is discussed in terms of its power efficiency {eta}{sub P} and is shown to be close to unity

  17. Inter-conversion of Work and Heat With Plasma Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-11-23

    Thermodynamics of a model system where a group of cold charged particles locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of temperature T and fixed volume V (V{sub P}<work is demonstrated via a Striling like engine cycle involving ES isothermal compression of plasma electric fields.

  18. Testing the dynamic field theory: working memory for locations becomes more spatially precise over development.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Anne R; Spencer, John P; Schöner, Gregor

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic field theory predicts that biases toward remembered locations depend on the separation between targets, and the spatial precision of interactions in working memory that become enhanced over development. This was tested by varying the separation between A and B locations in a sandbox. Children searched for an object 6 times at an A location, followed by 3 trials at a B location. Two- and 4-year-olds', but not 6-year-olds', responses were biased toward A when A and B were 9-in. and 6-in. apart. When A and B were separated by 2 in., however, 4- and 6-year-olds' responses were biased toward A. Thus, the separation at which responses were biased toward A decreased across age groups, supporting the predictions of the theory.

  19. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Haffenden, R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of an RI/FS is to characterize the nature and extent of the risks posed by contaminants present at a site and to develop and evaluate options for remedial actions. The overall objective of the RI is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of site conditions, types and quantities of contaminants present, release mechanisms and migration pathways, target populations, and risks to human health and the environment. The information developed during the RI provides the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions during the FS. The purpose of this RI Work Plan is to define the tasks that will direct the remedial investigation of the J-Field site at APG.

  20. Frontal eye fields involved in shifting frame of reference within working memory for scenes.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Roepstorff, Andreas; Burgess, Neil

    2008-01-31

    Working memory (WM) evoked by linguistic cues for allocentric spatial and egocentric spatial aspects of a visual scene was investigated by correlating fMRI BOLD signal (or "activation") with performance on a spatial-relations task. Subjects indicated the relative positions of a person or object (referenced by the personal pronouns "he/she/it") in a previously shown image relative to either themselves (egocentric reference frame) or shifted to a reference frame anchored in another person or object in the image (allocentric reference frame), e.g. "Was he in front of you/her?" Good performers had both shorter response time and more correct responses than poor performers in both tasks. These behavioural variables were entered into a principal component analysis. The first component reflected generalised performance level. We found that the frontal eye fields (FEF), bilaterally, had a higher BOLD response during recall involving allocentric compared to egocentric spatial reference frames, and that this difference was larger in good performers than in poor performers as measured by the first behavioural principal component. The frontal eye fields may be used when subjects move their internal gaze during shifting reference frames in representational space. Analysis of actual eye movements in three subjects revealed no difference between egocentric and allocentric recall tasks where visual stimuli were also absent. Thus, the FEF machinery for directing eye movements may also be involved in changing reference frames within WM. PMID:17915262

  1. Depth distribution of radiocesium in Fukushima paddy fields and implications for ongoing decontamination works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, H.; Evrard, O.; Onda, Y.; Lefèvre, I.; Laceby, J. P.; Ayrault, S.

    2014-09-01

    Large quantities of radiocesium were deposited across a 3000 km2 area northwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant after the March 2011 accident. Although many studies have investigated the fate of radiocesium in soil in the months following the accident, the potential migration of this radioactive contaminant in rice paddy fields requires further examination after the typhoons that occurred in this region. Such investigations will help minimize potential human exposure in rice paddy fields or transfer of radioactive contaminants from soils to rice. Radionuclide activity concentrations and organic content were analysed in 10 soil cores sampled from paddy fields in November 2013, 20 km north of the Fukushima power plant. Our results demonstrate limited depth migration of radiocesium with the majority concentrated in the uppermost layers of soils (< 5 cm). More than 30 months after the accident, 81.5 to 99.7% of the total 137Cs inventories was still found within the < 5 cm of the soil surface, despite cumulative rainfall totalling 3300 mm. Furthermore, there were no significant correlations between radiocesium migration depth and total organic carbon content. We attributed the maximum depth penetration of 137Cs to maintenance (grass cutting - 97% of 137Cs in the upper 5 cm) and farming operations (tilling - 83% of 137Cs in the upper 5 cm). As this area is exposed to erosive events, ongoing decontamination works may increase soil erodibility. We therefore recommend the rapid removal of the uppermost - contaminated - layer of the soil after removing the vegetation to avoid erosion of contaminated material during the subsequent rainfall events. Remediation efforts should be concentrated on soils characterised by radiocesium activities > 10 000 Bq kg-1 to prevent the contamination of rice. Further analysis is required to clarify the redistribution of radiocesium eroded on river channels.

  2. Control of hydrogen sulfide production in oil fields by managing microbial communities through nitrate or nitrite addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey R. J.

    Nitrate or nitrite injection into oil reservoirs during water flooding has the potential to control biological souring, the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Souring control is essential because sulfide is toxic, sulfide precipitates can plug reservoir formations, souring lowers crude oil value, and SRB induce corrosion. Nitrate and nitrite can stimulate heterotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (hNRB) and nitrate- or nitrite-reducing, sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NRSOB). Nitrite also inhibits SRB activity by blocking the sulfate reduction pathway. Continuous up-flow packed-bed bioreactors were inoculated with produced water from the Coleville oil field to establish sulfide-producing biofilms similar to those found in sour reservoirs. Nitrate or nitrite addition to bioreactors indicated that the dose required for hNRB or NR-SOB to control souring depended on the concentration of oil organics. Either mechanism mediates the net removal of oil organics (lactate) with nitrate or nitrite, with lower doses of nitrate required due to its greater oxidative power. Microbial community analysis by reverse sample genome probing (RSGP) revealed that NR-SOB mediated sulfide removal at low nitrate or nitrite concentrations when lactate was still available to SRB and the redox potential was low. At high nitrate doses hNRB oxidized lactate directly, produced nitrite and maintained a high redox potential, thus excluding SRB activity. Facultatively chemolithotrophic Campylobacter sp. strains were isolated from the bioreactors and incorporated into RSGP analyses, revealing their dominance in both NR-SOB- and hNRB-containing communities. The metabolic flexibility of these strains may confer a competitive advantage over obligate chemolithotrophs like Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO or hNRB that do not have NR-SOB activity like newly isolated Thauera sp. and Rhodobacter sp. strains. A single high dose of nitrite resulted in immediate

  3. [The prevalence of infertility and the importance of nursing work in this field].

    PubMed

    Guillén Pérez, M; Candelario Madariaga, M; Cruz Roja, Z; Leonard Castillo, A; Padrón Durán, R S

    1992-01-01

    A survey in the health area of "Héroes del Moncada" Polyclinics in Plaza de la Revolución municipality from Havana City was carried out by means of a multistage sampling in which 352 women in reproductive age (15-49 years old) were randomly chosen. A questionnaire designed by the World Health Organization for this kind of investigation was applied and a work of information and orientation was carried out for the infertile women. Prevalence of infertility in this health area was moderate and was found in 9.1% of the total number of women studied (12.1% of married women). Primary infertility was found in 0.6% of the total number of the women studied (12.1% of married women) and secondary infertility was found in 8.5% (11.3% of married women). A 43.8% of infertile women wanted to be pregnant what inversely correlated with the age and the number of children. The efficacy of the educational work of nursing was evidenced because 85.7% of infertile women who wanted to be pregnant attended the specialized consultation after the interview by the nurse. It is recommended to increase the nursing activity in the field of human reproduction. PMID:1342748

  4. Addition of straw or sawdust to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from slurry produced by housed cattle: a field incubation study.

    PubMed

    van der Weerden, Tony J; Luo, Jiafa; Dexter, Moira

    2014-07-01

    The use of housed wintering systems (e.g., barns) associated with dairy cattle farming is increasing in southern New Zealand. Typically, these wintering systems use straw or a woodmix as bedding material. Ammonia (NH) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (nitrous oxide [NO] and methane [CH]) associated with storage of slurry + bedding material from wintering systems is poorly understood. A field incubation study was conducted to determine such emissions from stored slurry where bedding material (straw and sawdust) was added at two rates and stored for 7 mo. During the first 4 mo of storage, compared with untreated slurry, the addition of sawdust significantly reduced NH and CH emissions from 29 to 3% of the initial slurry nitrogen (N) content and from 0.5 to <0.01% of the initial slurry carbon (C) content. However, sawdust enhanced NO emissions to 0.7% of the initial slurry-N content, compared with <0.01% for untreated slurry. Straw generally had an intermediate effect. Extending the storage period to 7 mo increased emissions from all treatments. Ammonia emissions were inversely related to the slurry C:N ratio and total solid (TS) content, and CH emissions were inversely related to slurry TS content. Mitigation of GHG emissions from stored slurry can be achieved by reducing the storage period as much as possible after winter slurry collection, providing ground conditions allow access for land spreading and nutrient inputs match pasture requirements. Although adding bedding material can reduce GHG emissions during storage, increased manure volumes for carting and spreading need to be considered. PMID:25603082

  5. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

  6. Outreach through archeo Astronomy field work : Experience from the Jantar Mantar observatories of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnasree, Nandivada

    2015-08-01

    Archeo astronomy heritage sites and related instruments, have tremendous potential for very effective Astronomy outreach. Very rewarding field work towards archeo astronomy compilation of instrument properties has been ongoing, parallel with effective outreach, and with each stream of work feeding into the other, in relation to the four extant Jantar Mantar observatories in India - located at Jaipur, Delhi, Varanasi and Ujjain.Jantar Mantar observatory instruments are tactile manifestaions of spherical trigonometry concepts, which are usually difficult to comprehend for a beginner, particulalrly from laminar pages of a text book. Thus, active observational and measurement work with different aspects of these instruments gives a very good grounding in basic Astronomy for any beginner and fosters a retention of this interest for a student who may go on to undertake research in Astronomy in a more modern setup later.In the specific context of the Jantar Mantar observatories, careful positonal Astronomy observations using different aspects of all the observatory instruments, can be used to characterise the errors and construction/instrumental properties of these instruments in their current state.While there have been alterations of the surface instrumental markings for many of these instruments over time, the base structures for most of the instruments are thought to have been unaltered since their construction. Thus, observations conducted using the base structures of the instruments give an archeo Astronomical picture of true accuracies which were achievable by these instruments, through actual observations. Work of this kind is beng done for the first time with the four extant Jantar Mantar observatories in India, since they fell into disuse following the death of their creator in 1743.In the particular case of the Jantar Mantar observatory situated inside the Manmandir complex at Varanasi, there are no records of any night time observations having been undertaken

  7. Teaching evidence-based social work in foundation practice courses: learning from pedagogical choices of allied fields.

    PubMed

    Traube, Dorian E; Pohle, Cara E; Barley, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The field of social work is attuned to the need to incorporate evidence-based practice education into masters-level curriculum. One question remaining is how to integrate evidence-based practice in the foundation practice courses. Integration of evidence-based practice across the foundation-level curriculum coincides with the Council on Social Work Education's mandate that student's engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research. Through a discussion of definitions, criticisms, and pedagogy across the allied fields of medicine, nursing, and social work the authors address the current status of evidence-based practice curriculum in foundation-level education. The authors incorporate the lessons learned from allied fields and a Masters of Social Work student's analyses of their experience of evidence-based practice learning to propose an adult-learner model to improve evidence-based practice pedagogy in Social Work. PMID:22694131

  8. International Social Work Field Placement or Volunteer Tourism? Developing an Asset-Based Justice-Learning Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sossou, Marie-Antoinette; Dubus, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a developing model for building an international social work placement that meets the needs of the host agency and community first. The paper addresses the challenges for social work departments to develop a strong learning environment while also keeping primary the needs of the host community and agency.

  9. Working with Real Data: Getting Analytic Element Groundwater Model Results to Honor Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congdon, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Models of groundwater flow often work best when very little field data exist. In such cases, some knowledge of the depth to the water table, annual precipitation totals, and basic geological makeup is sufficient to produce a reasonable-looking and potentially useful model. However, in this case where a good deal of information is available regarding depth to bottom of a dune field aquifer, attempting to incorporate the data set into the model has variously resulted in convergence, failure to achieve target water level criteria, or complete failure to converge. The first model did not take the data set into consideration, but used general information that the aquifer was thinner in the north and thicker in the south. This model would run and produce apparently useful results. The first attempt at satisfying the data set; in this case 51 wells showing the bottom elevation of a Pacific coast sand dune aquifer, was to use the isopach interpretation of Robinson (OFR 73-241). Using inhomogeneities (areas of equal characteristics) delineated by Robinson's isopach diagram did not enable an adequate fit to the water table lakes, and caused convergence problems when adding pumping wells. The second attempt was to use a Thiessen polygon approach, creating an aquifer thickness zone for each data point. The results for the non-pumping scenario were better, but run times were considerably greater. Also, there were frequent runs with non-convergence, especially when water supply wells were added. Non-convergence may be the result of the lake line-sinks crossing the polygon boundaries or proximity of pumping wells to inhomogeneity boundaries. The third approach was to merge adjacent polygons of similar depths; in this case within 5% of each other. The results and run times were better, but matching lake levels was not satisfactory. The fourth approach was to reduce the number of inhomogeneities to four, and to average the depth data over the inhomogeneity. The thicknesses were

  10. Collaborative Technology Assessments Of Transient Field Processing And Additive Manufacturing Technologies As Applied To Gas Turbine Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Szabo, Attila; Ucok, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    ORNL partnered with GE Power & Water to investigate the effect of thermomagnetic processing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of GE Power & Water newly developed wrought Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. Exploration of the effects of high magnetic field process during heat treatment of the alloys indicated conditions where applications of magnetic fields yields significant property improvements. The alloy aged using high magnetic field processing exhibited 3 HRC higher hardness compared to the conventionally-aged alloy. The alloy annealed at 1785 F using high magnetic field processing demonstrated an average creep life 2.5 times longer than that of the conventionally heat-treated alloy. Preliminary results show that high magnetic field processing can improve the mechanical properties of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and potentially extend the life cycle of the gas turbine components such as nozzles leading to significant energy savings.

  11. Applications of a Compact Portable Raman Spectrometer for the Field Analysis of Pigments in Works of Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, S.; Guglielmi, V.

    The importance of Raman micro-spectroscopy for the identification of pigments in works of art is well established. In recent times, portable Raman spectrometers have been introduced which allows users to perform field analysis directly where the artefacts are placed (churches, museums, archaeological sites, etc.). The present work reports results obtained by a remarkably compact instrument, in particular, on frescoes and illuminated parchments.

  12. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roger Kaplan, Acting Director, Audits and Self-Inspection, Office of Field Operations, at 202-325-4543 or by e-mail at Roger.Kaplan@dhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  13. Getting from Here to There. The Bridges to Work Demonstration. First Report to the Field. Field Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palubinsky, Beth Z.; Watson, Bernardine H.

    Research has shown that three main barriers impede the ability of inner-city, low-income job seekers to find employment in the suburbs: an administrative or information barrier, a physical barrier, and a social barrier. The Bridges to Work demonstration program was designed to test the idea that improved access to suburban jobs can significantly…

  14. Additional focusing of a high-intensity laser beam in a plasma with a density ramp and a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Devki Nandan; Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2007-08-20

    Propagation of a high power Gaussian laser beam through a plasma with a density ramp where a magnetic field is present has been investigated. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma due to the role of a plasma density ramp. The studies show that the combined effect of a plasma density ramp and a magnetic field enhances the self-focusing property of the laser beam. Both factors not only reduce the spot size of the laser beam but also maintain it with only a mild ripple over several Rayleight lengths.

  15. 34 CFR 350.55 - What are the additional considerations for selecting Field-Initiated Project applications for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM How Does the... Field-Initiated Project applications for funding? 350.55 Section 350.55 Education Regulations of the... Project applications for funding? (a) The Secretary reserves funds to support some or all of the...

  16. Strong enhancement of high-field critical current properties and irreversibility field of MgB2 superconducting wires by coronene active carbon source addition via the new B powder carbon-coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shu Jun; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi; Chao Zhang, Yun; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    We report an effective carbon-containing additive, coronene (C24H12), for MgB2 superconducting wires. We used B powder coated with C24H12 to fabricate MgB2 wires using the powder-in-tube (PIT) and internal Mg diffusion (IMD) processes. The in-field critical current properties are strongly enhanced for both PIT- and IMD-processed MgB2 wires. For PIT MgB2 wires, a critical current density (Jc) value of 1.8 × 104 A cm-2 is obtained at 4.2 K and 10 T. For IMD MgB2 wires, we obtained a Jc of 1.07 × 105 A cm-2 and an engineering Jc (Je) of 1.12 × 104 A cm-2 at 4.2 K and 10 T. These Jc and Je values are similar to the highest values reported for MgB2 wires thus far. Furthermore, the irreversibility field, Birr, determined with a current density criterion of 100 A cm-2, is strongly enhanced to 25 T at 4.2 K, which is also the highest value reported for MgB2 superconducting wires thus far. Coronene is an active carbon source for MgB2 superconducting wires because (1) coronene has a high carbon content (96 wt%) with a small amount of hydrogen (impurity), (2) the decomposition temperature for coronene is near the reaction temperature between Mg and B, and (3) uniform dispersion of coronene on the B surface can be obtained due to the melting point of coronene being lower than the decomposition temperature. Carbon substitution for B caused by the coronene active carbon source is mainly responsible for the high field critical current properties and the high Birr obtained in this work.

  17. Husbandry, working practices and field performance when using draught oxen in land preparation in Shambat, Nile Valley, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Makki, Elsamawal Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Little quantitative information is available on animal power in the Nile Valley in Sudan, despite that it is being used in the area for centuries and playing an important role in agriculture in the present day. A survey was conducted to assess draught oxen management and its association with field capacity and efficiency at the farm level and to identify potential areas for intervention. A sample of 50 farmers was selected for this purpose using the systematic random sampling technique. The main management parameters discussed were animal health, feeding, housing, work strategy and care for yoke and plough. The results showed that most of the farmers poorly manage their animals, and this was reflected in low working speeds and field efficiencies. The main dimensions of poor management were in veterinary care (78 % did not take their animals to the veterinary centre), feeding (66 % feed their animals shortly before work) and care for yoke (80 % did not follow daily care measures for their yokes) and plough (74 % did not follow plough care measure before and after work). Low working speeds (0.90–2.0 km/h) were recorded by the majority of the farmers (64 %). The majority of the farmers (70 %) recorded field capacities between 0.06 and 0.10 ha/h, while all of them worked at high field efficiencies of >86 %. The only parameter that significantly affected field capacity was the yoke-related wounds (p = 0.019). Extension advice and capacity building in husbandry and working practices were identified as principal entry points for intervention.

  18. Impact of a Paid Urban Field Experience on Teacher Candidates' Willingness to Work in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grande, Marya; Burns, Barbara; Schmidt, Raquel; Marable, Michele A.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a paid field experience designed to investigate teacher candidates' willingness to teach in urban schools. Seventy-three teacher candidates each participated in an urban field experience including 90 hours of tutoring and 12 hours of training. Data from pre and post surveys indicated no significant difference as the number…

  19. Multiplexing Effect Due to Exposure of the Working Substance of a Spin Echo Processor to Magnetic Field Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakov, I. V.; Popov, P. S.; Kuzmin, Yu. I.; Dudkin, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a spin echo processor that uses a magnetically ordered material (ferrite) as a working substance. It is shown that it is possible to achieve suppression of the crosstalk (spurious signals) excited by radio-frequency pulses from different chains arriving at the system if the working substance is affected by sufficiently long magnetic field pulses. Thus, time-division multiplexing of the information processes can be carried out.

  20. Remarkable enhancement of charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymer field-effect transistors upon incorporating an ionic additive

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hewei; Yu, Chenmin; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Broch, Katharina; Hu, Yuanyuan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Jiang, Lang; Qi, Penglin; Cai, Zhengxu; Sirringhaus, Henning; Zhang, Deqing

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors with high charge carrier mobilities are crucial for flexible electronic applications. Apart from designing new conjugated frameworks, different strategies have been explored to increase charge carrier mobilities. We report a new and simple approach to enhancing the charge carrier mobility of DPP-thieno[3,2-b]thiophene–conjugated polymer by incorporating an ionic additive, tetramethylammonium iodide, without extra treatments into the polymer. The resulting thin films exhibit a very high hole mobility, which is higher by a factor of 24 than that of thin films without the ionic additive under the same conditions. On the basis of spectroscopic grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy studies as well as theoretical calculations, the remarkable enhancement of charge mobility upon addition of tetramethylammonium iodide is attributed primarily to an inhibition of the torsion of the alkyl side chains by the presence of the ionic species, facilitating a more ordered lamellar packing of the alkyl side chains and interchain π-π interactions. PMID:27386541

  1. Remarkable enhancement of charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymer field-effect transistors upon incorporating an ionic additive.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hewei; Yu, Chenmin; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Broch, Katharina; Hu, Yuanyuan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Jiang, Lang; Qi, Penglin; Cai, Zhengxu; Sirringhaus, Henning; Zhang, Deqing

    2016-05-01

    Organic semiconductors with high charge carrier mobilities are crucial for flexible electronic applications. Apart from designing new conjugated frameworks, different strategies have been explored to increase charge carrier mobilities. We report a new and simple approach to enhancing the charge carrier mobility of DPP-thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-conjugated polymer by incorporating an ionic additive, tetramethylammonium iodide, without extra treatments into the polymer. The resulting thin films exhibit a very high hole mobility, which is higher by a factor of 24 than that of thin films without the ionic additive under the same conditions. On the basis of spectroscopic grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy studies as well as theoretical calculations, the remarkable enhancement of charge mobility upon addition of tetramethylammonium iodide is attributed primarily to an inhibition of the torsion of the alkyl side chains by the presence of the ionic species, facilitating a more ordered lamellar packing of the alkyl side chains and interchain π-π interactions.

  2. Remarkable enhancement of charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymer field-effect transistors upon incorporating an ionic additive.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hewei; Yu, Chenmin; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Broch, Katharina; Hu, Yuanyuan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Jiang, Lang; Qi, Penglin; Cai, Zhengxu; Sirringhaus, Henning; Zhang, Deqing

    2016-05-01

    Organic semiconductors with high charge carrier mobilities are crucial for flexible electronic applications. Apart from designing new conjugated frameworks, different strategies have been explored to increase charge carrier mobilities. We report a new and simple approach to enhancing the charge carrier mobility of DPP-thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-conjugated polymer by incorporating an ionic additive, tetramethylammonium iodide, without extra treatments into the polymer. The resulting thin films exhibit a very high hole mobility, which is higher by a factor of 24 than that of thin films without the ionic additive under the same conditions. On the basis of spectroscopic grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy studies as well as theoretical calculations, the remarkable enhancement of charge mobility upon addition of tetramethylammonium iodide is attributed primarily to an inhibition of the torsion of the alkyl side chains by the presence of the ionic species, facilitating a more ordered lamellar packing of the alkyl side chains and interchain π-π interactions. PMID:27386541

  3. Mentoring Formerly Incarcerated Adults: Insights from the Ready4Work Reentry Initiative. Field Report Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauldry, Shawn; Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; McClanahan, Wendy S.; McMaken, Jennifer; Kotloff, Lauren J.

    2009-01-01

    This report explores mentoring as a tool for supporting the successful reintegration of formerly incarcerated individuals within the context of a larger reentry strategy--in this case, the "Ready4Work" model. "Ready4Work" was a three-year national demonstration designed to address the needs of the growing ex-prisoner population and to test the…

  4. Employers Talk about Building a School-to-Work System: Voices from the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Joan L., Ed.

    This document contains background information on the school-to-work (STW) movement and 20 essays written by employers and intermediaries involved in STW program planning and implementation. Four points are highlighted: (1) it takes time to assemble an STW system; (2) the number of students participating in structured work-based learning remains…

  5. Seasonal Patterns of Soil Respiration and Related Soil Biochemical Properties under Nitrogen Addition in Winter Wheat Field.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guopeng; Houssou, Albert A; Wu, Huijun; Cai, Dianxiong; Wu, Xueping; Gao, Lili; Li, Jing; Wang, Bisheng; Li, Shengping

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the changes of soil respiration under increasing N fertilizer in cropland ecosystems is crucial to accurately predicting global warming. This study explored seasonal variations of soil respiration and its controlling biochemical properties under a gradient of Nitrogen addition during two consecutive winter wheat growing seasons (2013-2015). N was applied at four different levels: 0, 120, 180 and 240 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) (denoted as N0, N12, N18 and N24, respectively). Soil respiration exhibited significant seasonal variation and was significantly affected by soil temperature with Q10 ranging from 2.04 to 2.46 and from 1.49 to 1.53 during 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 winter wheat growing season, respectively. Soil moisture had no significant effect on soil respiration during 2013-2014 winter wheat growing season but showed a significant and negative correlation with soil respiration during 2014-2015 winter wheat growing season. Soil respiration under N24 treatment was significantly higher than N0 treatment. Averaged over the two growing seasons, N12, N18 and N24 significantly increased soil respiration by 13.4, 16.4 and 25.4% compared with N0, respectively. N addition also significantly increased easily extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EEG), soil organic carbon (SOC), total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. In addition, soil respiration was significantly and positively correlated with β-glucosidase activity, EEG, SOC, total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. The results indicated that high N fertilization improved soil chemical properties, but significantly increased soil respiration. PMID:26629695

  6. Seasonal Patterns of Soil Respiration and Related Soil Biochemical Properties under Nitrogen Addition in Winter Wheat Field.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guopeng; Houssou, Albert A; Wu, Huijun; Cai, Dianxiong; Wu, Xueping; Gao, Lili; Li, Jing; Wang, Bisheng; Li, Shengping

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the changes of soil respiration under increasing N fertilizer in cropland ecosystems is crucial to accurately predicting global warming. This study explored seasonal variations of soil respiration and its controlling biochemical properties under a gradient of Nitrogen addition during two consecutive winter wheat growing seasons (2013-2015). N was applied at four different levels: 0, 120, 180 and 240 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) (denoted as N0, N12, N18 and N24, respectively). Soil respiration exhibited significant seasonal variation and was significantly affected by soil temperature with Q10 ranging from 2.04 to 2.46 and from 1.49 to 1.53 during 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 winter wheat growing season, respectively. Soil moisture had no significant effect on soil respiration during 2013-2014 winter wheat growing season but showed a significant and negative correlation with soil respiration during 2014-2015 winter wheat growing season. Soil respiration under N24 treatment was significantly higher than N0 treatment. Averaged over the two growing seasons, N12, N18 and N24 significantly increased soil respiration by 13.4, 16.4 and 25.4% compared with N0, respectively. N addition also significantly increased easily extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EEG), soil organic carbon (SOC), total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. In addition, soil respiration was significantly and positively correlated with β-glucosidase activity, EEG, SOC, total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. The results indicated that high N fertilization improved soil chemical properties, but significantly increased soil respiration.

  7. Seasonal Patterns of Soil Respiration and Related Soil Biochemical Properties under Nitrogen Addition in Winter Wheat Field

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guopeng; Houssou, Albert A.; Wu, Huijun; Cai, Dianxiong; Wu, Xueping; Gao, Lili; Li, Jing; Wang, Bisheng; Li, Shengping

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the changes of soil respiration under increasing N fertilizer in cropland ecosystems is crucial to accurately predicting global warming. This study explored seasonal variations of soil respiration and its controlling biochemical properties under a gradient of Nitrogen addition during two consecutive winter wheat growing seasons (2013–2015). N was applied at four different levels: 0, 120, 180 and 240 kg N ha-1 year-1 (denoted as N0, N12, N18 and N24, respectively). Soil respiration exhibited significant seasonal variation and was significantly affected by soil temperature with Q10 ranging from 2.04 to 2.46 and from 1.49 to 1.53 during 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 winter wheat growing season, respectively. Soil moisture had no significant effect on soil respiration during 2013–2014 winter wheat growing season but showed a significant and negative correlation with soil respiration during 2014–2015 winter wheat growing season. Soil respiration under N24 treatment was significantly higher than N0 treatment. Averaged over the two growing seasons, N12, N18 and N24 significantly increased soil respiration by 13.4, 16.4 and 25.4% compared with N0, respectively. N addition also significantly increased easily extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EEG), soil organic carbon (SOC), total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. In addition, soil respiration was significantly and positively correlated with β-glucosidase activity, EEG, SOC, total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. The results indicated that high N fertilization improved soil chemical properties, but significantly increased soil respiration. PMID:26629695

  8. Conduct of Geologic Field Work During Planetary Exploration: Why Geology Matters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2010-01-01

    The science of field geology is the investigative process of determining the distribution of rock units and structures on a planet s surface, and it is the first order data set that informs all subsequent studies of a planet, such as geochemistry, geochronology, geophysics or remote sensing. These allied sciences, as important as they are, derive the basis of their understanding from the knowledge of the geology of a given location. When we go back to the Moon, and on to Mars, the surface systems we deploy will need to support the conduct of field geology if these endeavors are to be scientifically useful. This lecture will consider what field geology is about - why it s important, how we do it, how the conduct of field geology informs many other sciences, and how it will affect the design of surface systems and implementation of operations in the future.

  9. Conduct of Geologic Field Work During Planetary Exploration: Why Geology Matters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2010-01-01

    The science of field geology is the investigative process of determining the distribution of rock units and structures on a planet fs surface, and it is the first-order data set that informs all subsequent studies of a planet, such as geochemistry, geochronology, geophysics, or remote sensing. For future missions to the Moon and Mars, the surface systems deployed must support the conduct of field geology if these endeavors are to be scientifically useful. This lecture discussed what field geology is all about.why it is important, how it is done, how conducting field geology informs many other sciences, and how it affects the design of surface systems and the implementation of operations in the future.

  10. Relative importance of fertiliser addition to plants and exclusion of predators for aphid growth in the field.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine B; Fellowes, Mark D E; Godfray, H Charles J

    2005-04-01

    Herbivore dynamics and community structure are influenced both by plant quality and the actions of natural enemies. A factorial experiment manipulating both higher and lower trophic levels was designed to explore the determinants of colony growth of the aphid Aphis jacobaeae, a specialist herbivore on ragwort Senecio jacobaea. Potential plant quality was manipulated by regular addition of NPK-fertiliser and predator pressure was reduced by interception traps; the experiment was carried out at two sites. The size and persistence of aphid colonies were measured. Fertiliser addition affected plant growth in only one site, but never had a measurable effect on aphid colony growth. In both habitats the action of insect predators dominated, imposing strong and negative effects on aphid colony performance. Ants were left unmanipulated in both sites and their performance on the aphid colonies did not significantly differ between sites or between treatments. Our results suggest that, at least for aphid herbivores on S. jacobaea, the action of generalist insect predators appears to be the dominant factor affecting colony performance and can under certain conditions even improve plant productivity. PMID:15756583

  11. Tests of the Dynamic Field Theory and The Spatial Precision Hypothesis: Capturing a Qualitative Developmental Transition in Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Anne R.; Spencer, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested a dynamic field theory (DFT) of spatial working memory and an associated spatial precision hypothesis (SPH). Between 3 and 6 years of age, there is a qualitative shift in how children use reference axes to remember locations: 3-year-olds' spatial recall responses are biased toward reference axes after short memory delays, whereas…

  12. What's in It for Us? Making the Case for Interprofessional Field Education Experiences for Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Grant; Barring, Vena; Lake, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    There continues to be resistance amongst the various healthcare professions regarding implementing an interprofessional agenda in practice and education settings. This partly is due to the protection of professional turf. This article describes the experiences of Canadian social work students participating in an interprofessional field education…

  13. A Conceptual Application of Attachment Theory and Research to the Social Work Student-Field Instructor Supervisory Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susanne; Saks, Loretta Vitale

    2006-01-01

    This article conceptualizes an attachment-based model of the student-field instructor relationship, based on empirical research concerning internal working models of attachment, which continue into adulthood and serve as templates for life-long relating. Supportive relationships within a noncritical context are salient for effective supervision;…

  14. Field Experience + Inclusive ECE Classrooms = Increased Preservice Teacher Efficacy in Working with Students with Developmental Delays or Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atiles, Julia T.; Jones, Jennifer L.; Kim, Hyunjin

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined whether field placements within an inclusive classroom are associated with improved preservice teacher's efficacy when working with children with developmental delays or disabilities. Study participants were 165 undergraduate students enrolled in primary teacher education classes at a Midwestern university. Participants…

  15. 77 FR 40637 - Wyatt VI, Inc., A Division of Wyatt Field Service Company, Working On-Site at Hovensa Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Employment and Training Administration Wyatt VI, Inc., A Division of Wyatt Field Service Company, Working On-Site at Hovensa Oil Refinery, Christiansted, St. Croix, VI; Notice of Affirmative Determination... Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of Wyatt VI, Inc., a division of...

  16. Putting Working-Class Mothers in Their Place: Social Stratification, the Field of Education, and Pierre Bourdieu's Theory of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how a small sample of working-class mothers encounters the field of education. In the management of family and their children's schooling, mothers bring to bear and replicate ways of knowing that are embodied, are historical and that offer many-sided insights into profoundly stratified societies. Here I draw on Bourdieu's…

  17. Coronary heart diseases: assessment of risk associated with work exposure to ultralow-frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyna, N G; Villoresi, G; Kopytenko, Y A; Kudrin, V A; Tyasto, M I; Kopytenko, E A; Iucci, N; Voronov, P M; Zaitsev, D B

    1996-01-01

    The present analysis was stimulated by previous findings on the possible influence of natural ultralow-frequency (ULF; 0.001-10 Hz) geomagnetic field variations on the cardiovascular system and indications of an effect of man-made ULF magnetic fields on the rate of myocardial infarction. In the present study, we considered the occupational health hazards of the strongest ULF magnetic fields in densely populated urban areas. Measurements of ULF magnetic field fluctuations produced by trains powered by DC electricity were performed by means of a computer-based, highly sensitive, three-component magnetometer. We found that the magnitude of magnetic field pulses inside the driver's cab of electric locomotives (ELs) could be > or = 280 microT in the horizontal component perpendicular to the rails and up to approximately 130 microT in the vertical component, and, in the driver's compartment of electric motor unit (EMU) trains, they were approximately 50 and 35 microT, respectively. We have investigated the relationships between the occupational exposure to ULF magnetic field fluctuations produced by electric trains and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among railroad workers in the former Soviet Union. We have analyzed medical statistical data for a period of 3 years for approximately 45,000 railroad workers and 4,000 engine drivers. We have also analyzed 3 years of morbidity data for three subgroups of engine drivers (approximately 4,000 in each group) operating different types of trains. We find that EL drivers have a twofold increase in risk (2.00 +/- 0.27) of coronary heart diseases (CHDs) compared with EMU drivers. Because our analysis of major CVDs shows that the examined subpopulations of drivers can be considered to have had equal exposure to all known risk factors, the elevated CHD risk among EL drivers could be attributed to the increased occupational exposure to ULF magnetic fields.

  18. Field of smart structures as seen by those working in it: survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, William B., Jr.; Sirkis, James S.; Gardiner, Peter T.

    1995-04-01

    There has been considerable discussion in the technical community on a number of questions concerned with smart materials and structures, such as what they are, whether smart materials can be considered a subset of smart structures, whether a smart structure and an intelligent structure are the same thing, etc. This discussion is both fueled and confused by the technical community due to the truly multidisciplinary nature of this new field. Smart materials and structures research involves so many technically diverse fields that it is quite common for one field to completely misunderstand the terminology and state-of-the-art in other fields. In order to ascertain whether a consensus is emerging on a number of these questions, the technical community was surveyed in a number of ways including via the Internet and by direct contact. The purpose of this survey in the final analysis was to better define the smart materials and structures field, its current status and its potential benefits. Results of the survey are presented and discussed.

  19. FY 1991 environmental research programs for the DOE Field Office, Nevada: Work plan and quarterly reports, fourth quarter report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    This research includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which required DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. In accordance with specific contract requirements for each activity, DRI will produce summary, status and final reports and, in some cases, journal articles which will present the results of specific research efforts. This document contains the work plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

  20. Nutrient reduction in field wetlands: do they work for dissolved nutrients?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favaretto, N.; Ockenden, M. C.; Deasy, C.; Quinton, J. N.

    2012-04-01

    Pollution of natural waters arises from both point sources (direct inputs) and diffuse inputs (many small sources entering the waterways by numerous pathways). Legislation has ensured that pollution from point sources has been reduced, thus increasing the significance of diffuse sources, and the contribution from agriculture in particular. Field wetlands (small sediment and nutrient trapping features, < 500 m2), constructed along runoff pathways, are one set of options for diffuse pollution mitigation. Polluted surface runoff as well as subsurface drainage is slowed down by passage through the field wetland, allowing more opportunity for sediment and associated nutrients to settle out. However, the nutrients transported from soil to water are not only attached to the sediment but also in soluble form, and field drains have been identified as a fast pathway for dissolved nutrients to reach the waterways. The soluble form is critical in the short term because it is readily available for aquatic organisms. On the other hand, the particulate form (associated with sediment) is a reservoir for growth and development of aquatic organisms and represents a problem in the long term. The ability of field wetlands to reduce both the particulate and dissolved nutrient loads is being tested in the UK as part of a project on Mitigation Options for Phosphorus and Sediment. Ten field wetlands have been built on farms in the UK, capturing surface runoff and subsurface field drainage, to quantify the sediment and nutrient retention under a range of different conditions. At Whinton Hill in Cumbria (sandy soil), samples from the inlet and outlet of a field wetland system showed an average decrease in the concentration of total solids of 11%. Total phosphorus (TP) was reduced by an average of 43%. However, soluble reactive phosphorus, which accounted for approximately 50% of the TP at the inlet, was reduced by an average of 74%, showing that this wetland made a significant difference to

  1. Compressed-air work is entering the field of high pressures.

    PubMed

    Le Péchon, J Cl; Gourdon, G

    2010-01-01

    Since 1850, compressed-air work has been used to prevent shafts or tunnels under construction from flooding. Until the 1980s, workers were digging in compressed-air environments. Since the introduction of tunnel boring machines (TBMs), very little digging under pressure is needed. However, the wearing out of cutter-head tools requires inspection and repair. Compressed-air workers enter the pressurized working chamber only occasionally to perform such repairs. Pressures between 3.5 and 4.5 bar, that stand outside a reasonable range for air breathing, were reached by 2002. Offshore deep diving technology had to be adapted to TBM work. Several sites have used mixed gases: in Japan for deep shaft sinking (4.8 bar), in The Netherlands at Western Scheldt Tunnels (6.9 bar), in Russia for St. Petersburg Metro (5.8 bar) and in the United States at Seattle (5.8 bar). Several tunnel projects are in progress that may involve higher pressures: Hallandsås (Sweden) interventions in heliox saturation up to 13 bar, and Lake Mead (U.S.) interventions to about 12 bar (2010). Research on TBMs and grouting technologies tries to reduce the requirements for hyperbaric works. Adapted international rules, expertise and services for saturation work, shuttles and trained personnel matching industrial requirements are the challenges. PMID:20737925

  2. Forestry Impacts on Mercury Mobility, Methylation, and Bioaccumulation - A Field Experiment with Enriched Stable Mercury Isotope Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Haynes, Kristine; Mazur, Maxwell; Fidler, Nathan; Eckley, Chris; Kolka, Randy; Eggert, Susan; Sebestyen, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Forest harvesting has clear impacts on terrestrial hydrology at least over the short term. Similar biogeochemical impacts, such as augmented mercury fluxes or downstream impacts on ecosystems are not as clear, and recent studies have not demonstrated consistent or predictable impacts across systems. To gain a better process understanding of mercury cycling in upland forest-lowland peatland ecosystems, we undertook a field-scale experiment at a study site in northern Minnesota (USA) where shallow subsurface hillslope runoff flows into an adjacent peatland ecosystem. Starting in 2009, three upland forest plots (< 1 hectare each) were delineated and hydrometric infrastructure such as runoff trenches, snow lysimeters, soil moisture probes, shallow piezometers, and throughfall gauges were installed in each plot. We added 14.2 to 16.7 μg/m2 of enriched mercury-200 and mercury-204 (as dilute mercuric nitrate) in the spring of 2011 and 2012, respectively, to distinguish between contemporary and legacy mercury and to provide some insight into the duration of contemporary mercury mobility in impacted terrestrial ecosystems. During the late winter of 2012, one of the study plots was clearcut and approximately 80% of slash was removed. We clearcut a second plot without slash removal, and left the third plot as a control. Throughout the study, we have monitored (including isotopes): mercury in runoff, soil-air gaseous Hg fluxes, methylation potentials in the adjacent peatland, and bioaccumulation into invertebrates inhabiting the adjacent peatland. Early results mostly indicate that slash removal actually lessens the impacts of clearcutting on mercury mobility (although forest harvesting in general does have a significant impact) and that forestry operations at this scale have little to no impact on methylation or bioaccumulation in downstream peatlands. Thus far, the greatest impact of slash removal in forest harvested systems is an increase in mercury evasion, likely as a

  3. Raising Awareness of Australian Aboriginal Peoples Reality: Embedding Aboriginal Knowledge in Social Work Education through the Use of Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duthie, Deb; King, Julie; Mays, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    Effective social work practice with Aboriginal peoples and communities requires knowledge of operational communication skills and practice methods. In addition, there is also a need for practitioners to be aware of the history surrounding white engagement with Aboriginal communities and their cultures. Indeed, the Australian Association of Social…

  4. The Voyage of the Beagle: Field Work Lessons from Charles Darwin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes Charles Darwin's letters to his family during his voyage on H.M.S. Beagle. Relates the information to the development of Darwin's professional identity and the degree to which the concepts, field methods, and research methods revealed in Darwin's personal correspondence are useful to students of educational administration. (MD)

  5. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Information and College Access: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Information and College Access: Evidence From a Randomized Field Experiment" examined the impact of offering an online informational video and financial aid materials to high school students on: (1) their postsecondary aspirations, (2) the accuracy of their understanding of financial aid availability, and (3) the accuracy of their estimates of…

  6. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism. NBER Working Paper No. 15672

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the concern that student plagiarism has become increasingly common, there is relatively little objective data on the prevalence or determinants of this illicit behavior. This study presents the results of a natural field experiment designed to address these questions. Over 1,200 papers were collected from the students in undergraduate…

  7. Multicultural Group Work on Field Excursions to Promote Student Teachers' Intercultural Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendel, Nina; Aksit, Fisun; Aksit, Selahattin; Schrüfer, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    As a response to the intercultural challenges of Geography Education, this study seeks to determine factors fostering intercultural competence of student teachers. Based on a one-week multicultural field excursion of eight German and eight Turkish students in Kayseri (Turkey) on Education for Sustainable Development, we used qualitative interviews…

  8. Temporary Anchors, Impermanent Shelter: Can the Field of Education Model a New Approach to Academic Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jody; Lesnick, Alice; Himeles, Darla

    2007-01-01

    Through a discussion of three pedagogical instances--based on classroom discourse, student writing, and program development--the authors examine education as an academic field, arguing that its disciplinary practices and perspectives invite interdisciplinarity and extra-disciplinarity to bridge from the academy to issues, problems, and strengths…

  9. [Risk assessment of work related stress: examination and operative difficulties in sanitary field].

    PubMed

    Garofano, G; Piscina, G; Fantasia, D; Bologna, I; Murri, G; Tobia, L; Paoletti, A

    2012-01-01

    Work related stress can highly negatively affect not only company's productivity but also other aspects causing increased costs for absenteeism, increased number of work accident and near miss, higher turnover, reduced quality of products and services, reduced capability of renewal, and so on. In agreement with the Italian legislative decree 81/08 we evaluated stress level of workers of three different sanitary structures located in the middle of Italy. 305 workers (physicians, nurses, technicians, auxiliary nurse, white collars) were submitted to a questionnaire designed by our team of work. The sector reporting higher stress level was represented by nurses, the sector with lower stress level was made of technicians. We proposed a set of measures aiming to reduce the load of stress based on the assumption that in this sector is fundamental to develop strategies of intervention both at organizational and individual level. PMID:23405757

  10. Work-Based Learning; Discipline, Field or Discursive Space or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Paul; Costley, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Work-based learning (WBL) is predicated on a form of transdisciplinarity (Costley & Portwood, 2000; Garrick & Rhodes, 2000; Boud & Solomon, 2001) within the community of higher education academics over about the last 10 years. The broad area of WBL in higher education draws its academic focus from high-level practical knowledge and learning, in a…

  11. Social Justice and Teacher Education: A Systematic Review of Empirical Work in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Carmen; Ballantyne, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Teachers play a crucial role in promoting more equitable educational outcomes for marginalized students from low socio-economic backgrounds. Correspondingly, there is a clear warrant for preservice teacher education to work toward the development of teachers who are socially just in their beliefs and practices. This article comprises a systematic…

  12. Local changes of work function near rough features on Cu surfaces operated under high external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Djurabekova, Flyura Ruzibaev, Avaz; Parviainen, Stefan; Holmström, Eero; Hakala, Mikko

    2013-12-28

    Metal surfaces operated under high electric fields produce sparks even if they are held in ultra high vacuum. In spite of extensive research on the topic of vacuum arcs, the mystery of vacuum arc origin still remains unresolved. The indications that the sparking rates depend on the material motivate the research on surface response to extremely high external electric fields. In this work by means of density-functional theory calculations we analyze the redistribution of electron density on (100) Cu surfaces due to self-adatoms and in presence of high electric fields from −1 V/nm up to −2 V/nm (−1 to −2 GV/m, respectively). We also calculate the partial charge induced by the external field on a single adatom and a cluster of two adatoms in order to obtain reliable information on charge redistribution on surface atoms, which can serve as a benchmarking quantity for the assessment of the electric field effects on metal surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the modifications of work function around rough surface features, such as step edges and self-adatoms.

  13. Encounters with fierce dogs and itchy bedbugs: why my first field work failed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This essay, which is the fifth in the series “Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology”, is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies. The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes. PMID:24885471

  14. Encounters with fierce dogs and itchy bedbugs: why my first field work failed.

    PubMed

    Svanberg, Ingvar

    2014-01-01

    This essay, which is the fifth in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology", is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies. The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes.

  15. Successful trilogy of geology teaching: computers, guided design, and field work

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Although the use of lecture and laboratory methods are used in the Geology department at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, in many instances three other teaching techniques are being combined for more effective learning: computer analysis; guided design; and field studies. The integration of the three techniques make it possible for teachers to simultaneously accomplish two goals: 1) teaching subject matter and 2) developing decision-making skills. Within each method the student is free to inquire, think, and express independent view points. In the introductory courses students are moved to the field in their first week of class where, in an observational setting and by the use of the guided design method, the students develop an initial ability to open their eyes and minds and learn to integrate what they have previously learned in the classroom to a real world setting. The complexity of the problems to be completed increase in difficulty from designing a solar home with the use of computer analysis and guided design in an introductory Earth Science course to such problems as the engineering geology project such as a dam, tunnel or roadway in their Senior level coursework. By the time a degree is earned, the students have learned how to plan, prepare, and collect the essential data in the field so an analysis, often by computer, can be completed. As the three teaching techniques have been used the ability of the students to use their acquired knowledge has increased. This has been substantiated by detailed, on-going surveys.

  16. Additional ECR heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes in a rippled magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Girka, I. O.

    2006-12-15

    A theoretical study is made of the possibility of additional heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma in confinement systems with a rippled magnetic field via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes with frequencies below the electron gyrofrequency in the local resonance region, {epsilon}{sub 1} (r{sub 1}) = [2{pi}c/({omega}L)]{sup 2}, where {epsilon}{sub 1} is the diagonal element of the plasma dielectric tensor in the hydrodynamic approximation, L is the period of a constant external rippled magnetic field, and the radical coordinate r{sub 1} determines the position of the local resonance. It is found that the high-frequency power absorbed near the local resonance is proportional to the square of the ripple amplitude of the external magnetic field. The mechanism proposed is shown to ensure the absorption of the energy of surface flute modes and, thereby, the heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma.

  17. Large magnetic field-induced work output in a NiMnGa seven-layered modulated martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagounis, E.; Szczerba, M. J.; Chulist, R.; Laufenberg, M.

    2015-10-01

    We report the performance of a Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal with a seven-layered lattice modulation (14M martensite), demonstrating large actuation work output driven by an external magnetic field. A magnetic field-induced strain of 11.2%, a twinning stress of 0.64 MPa, and a magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy of 195 kJ/m3 are measured at room temperature, which exceed the best results reported in Ni-Mn-Ga 14M martensites. The produced magnetically induced work output of about 70 kJ/m3 makes the material attractive for actuator applications. Detailed XRD investigation reveals that the studied 14M martensite is stress-induced. With increasing compression stress, the stress-induced intermartensitic transformation sequence 10M → 14M → NM was demonstrated.

  18. How self-organized criticality works: A unified mean-field picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespignani, Alessandro; Zapperi, Stefano

    1998-06-01

    We present a unified dynamical mean-field theory, based on the single site approximation to the master-equation, for stochastic self-organized critical models. In particular, we analyze in detail the properties of sandpile and forest-fire (FF) models. In analogy with other nonequilibrium critical phenomena, we identify an order parameter with the density of ``active'' sites, and control parameters with the driving rates. Depending on the values of the control parameters, the system is shown to reach a subcritical (absorbing) or supercritical (active) stationary state. Criticality is analyzed in terms of the singularities of the zero-field susceptibility. In the limit of vanishing control parameters, the stationary state displays scaling characteristics of self-organized criticality (SOC). We show that this limit corresponds to the breakdown of space-time locality in the dynamical rules of the models. We define a complete set of critical exponents, describing the scaling of order parameter, response functions, susceptibility and correlation length in the subcritical and supercritical states. In the subcritical state, the response of the system to small perturbations takes place in avalanches. We analyze their scaling behavior in relation with branching processes. In sandpile models, because of conservation laws, a critical exponents subset displays mean-field values (ν=12 and γ=1) in any dimensions. We treat bulk and boundary dissipation and introduce a critical exponent relating dissipation and finite size effects. We present numerical simulations that confirm our results. In the case of the forest-fire model, our approach can distinguish between different regimes (SOC-FF and deterministic FF) studied in the literature, and determine the full spectrum of critical exponents.

  19. [A need to implement new tools for diagnosing tobacco-addition syndrome and readiness/motivation to quit smoking in the working-age population in Poland].

    PubMed

    Broszkiewicz, Marzenna; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    High rates of tobacco use is still observed in working-age population in Poland. The present level of the state tobacco control has been achieved through adopting legal regulations and population-based interventions. In Poland a sufficient contribution of health professionals to the diagnosis of the tobacco-addition syndrome (TAS) and the application of the 5A's (ask, advice, assess, assist, arrange follow-up) brief intervention, has not been confirmed by explicit research results. Systemic solutions of the health care system of the professional control, specialist health care, health professional trainings and reference centres have not as yet been elaborated. The tools for diagnosing tobacco dependence and motivation to quit smoking, developed over 30 years ago and recommended by experts to be used in clinical and research practice, have not met the current addiction criteria. In this paper other tools than those previously recommended - tests developed in the first decade of the 21st century (including Cigarette Dependence Scale and Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale), reflecting modern concepts of nicotine dependence are presented. In the literature on the readiness/motivation to change health behaviors, a new approach dominates. The motivational interviewing (MI) by Miller and Rollnick concentrates on a smoking person and his or her internal motivation. Motivational interviewing is recommended by the World Health Organization as a 5R's (relevance, risks, rewards, roadblocks, repetition) brief motivational advice, addressed to tobacco users who are unwilling to make a quit attempt. In Poland new research studies on the implementation of new diagnostic tools and updating of binding guidelines should be undertaken, to strengthen primary health care in treating tobacco dependence, and to incorporate MI and 5R's into trainings in TAS diagnosing and treating addressed to health professionals. PMID:27044722

  20. [A need to implement new tools for diagnosing tobacco-addition syndrome and readiness/motivation to quit smoking in the working-age population in Poland].

    PubMed

    Broszkiewicz, Marzenna; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    High rates of tobacco use is still observed in working-age population in Poland. The present level of the state tobacco control has been achieved through adopting legal regulations and population-based interventions. In Poland a sufficient contribution of health professionals to the diagnosis of the tobacco-addition syndrome (TAS) and the application of the 5A's (ask, advice, assess, assist, arrange follow-up) brief intervention, has not been confirmed by explicit research results. Systemic solutions of the health care system of the professional control, specialist health care, health professional trainings and reference centres have not as yet been elaborated. The tools for diagnosing tobacco dependence and motivation to quit smoking, developed over 30 years ago and recommended by experts to be used in clinical and research practice, have not met the current addiction criteria. In this paper other tools than those previously recommended - tests developed in the first decade of the 21st century (including Cigarette Dependence Scale and Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale), reflecting modern concepts of nicotine dependence are presented. In the literature on the readiness/motivation to change health behaviors, a new approach dominates. The motivational interviewing (MI) by Miller and Rollnick concentrates on a smoking person and his or her internal motivation. Motivational interviewing is recommended by the World Health Organization as a 5R's (relevance, risks, rewards, roadblocks, repetition) brief motivational advice, addressed to tobacco users who are unwilling to make a quit attempt. In Poland new research studies on the implementation of new diagnostic tools and updating of binding guidelines should be undertaken, to strengthen primary health care in treating tobacco dependence, and to incorporate MI and 5R's into trainings in TAS diagnosing and treating addressed to health professionals.

  1. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners: a comprehensive survey in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; De Vocht, Frank; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there is insufficient insight into the exposure variability that characterizes routine MRI work practice. However, this is an essential component of risk assessment and epidemiological studies. This paper describes the results of a measurement survey of shift-based personal exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) (B) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (dB/dt) among workers at 15 MRI facilities in the Netherlands. With the use of portable magnetic field dosimeters, >400 full-shift and partial shift exposure measurements were collected among various jobs involved in clinical and research MRI. Various full-shift exposure metrics for B and motion-induced dB/dt exposure were calculated from the measurements, including instantaneous peak exposure and time-weighted average (TWA) exposures. We found strong correlations between levels of static (B) and time-varying (dB/dt) exposure (r = 0.88-0.92) and between different metrics (i.e. peak exposure, TWA exposure) to express full-shift exposure (r = 0.69-0.78). On average, participants were exposed to MRI-related SMFs during only 3.7% of their work shift. Average and peak B and dB/dt exposure levels during the work inside the MRI scanner room were highest among technical staff, research staff, and radiographers. Average and peak B exposure levels were lowest among cleaners, while dB/dt levels were lowest among anaesthesiology staff. Although modest exposure variability between workplaces and occupations was observed, variation between individuals of the same occupation was substantial, especially among research staff. This relatively large variability between workers with the same job suggests that exposure classification

  2. Field, experimental and numerical model developments in outburst flood understanding and opportunities for future work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Local-scale risks to society from a rapidly changing cryosphere include a range of mass flows and floods. Most of these slides, slumps, falls and flow events have been attributed to climatically-induced permafrost degradation, to glaciological mass loss and consequent meltwater production and sudden drainage of glacier lakes, or to volcano-ice interactions. This presentation will firstly overview outburst flood research and knowledge to date and it will do this from a field, experimental and numerical modeling perspective. Fieldwork examples from around the world and including Iceland, New Zealand, Greenland, and the European Alps will be argued to underpin all understanding but to be severely limited in spatiotemporal coverage. Laboratory experiments will be argued to be overly generalised and narrowly-focussed. Numerical models will be argued to be omitting or over-generalising major processes; particularly sediment transport and morphodynamics. This presentation will then look forwards, by placing an emphasis on several recent and major technological advances that should be enabling much improved monitoring and measurement in both the field and the laboratory. The opportunity for new numerical modelling approaches will be discussed from two viewpoints; that of the researcher interested in process mechanisms, and that of the natural hazard manager wishing for real-time information.

  3. Quantum work statistics of charged Dirac particles in time-dependent fields.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2015-09-01

    The quantum Jarzynski equality is an important theorem of modern quantum thermodynamics. We show that the Jarzynski equality readily generalizes to relativistic quantum mechanics described by the Dirac equation. After establishing the conceptual framework we solve a pedagogical, yet experimentally relevant, system analytically. As a main result we obtain the exact quantum work distributions for charged particles traveling through a time-dependent vector potential evolving under Schrödinger as well as under Dirac dynamics, and for which the Jarzynski equality is verified. Special emphasis is put on the conceptual and technical subtleties arising from relativistic quantum mechanics.

  4. Quantum work statistics of charged Dirac particles in time-dependent fields

    SciTech Connect

    Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2015-09-28

    The quantum Jarzynski equality is an important theorem of modern quantum thermodynamics. We show that the Jarzynski equality readily generalizes to relativistic quantum mechanics described by the Dirac equation. After establishing the conceptual framework we solve a pedagogical, yet experimentally relevant, system analytically. As a main result we obtain the exact quantum work distributions for charged particles traveling through a time-dependent vector potential evolving under Schrödinger as well as under Dirac dynamics, and for which the Jarzynski equality is verified. Thus, special emphasis is put on the conceptual and technical subtleties arising from relativistic quantum mechanics.

  5. Can music with prosocial lyrics heal the working world? A field intervention in a call center

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Music with lyrics about helping is shown to reduce aggression in the laboratory. This paper tests whether the prosocial lyric effect generalizes to reducing customer aggression in the workplace. A field experiment involved changing the hold music played to customers of a call center. The results of a 3 week study suggested that music significantly affected customers, but not in the way suggested by previous laboratory experiments; compared with days when instrumental background music was played, caller anger and employee exhaustion were lower on days when callers were played popular music with neutral, but not prosocial, lyrics. The findings suggest that music influences customer aggression, but that the prosocial lyric effect may not generalize from the laboratory to the call center. PMID:26052159

  6. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE PAGES

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore » bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  7. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  8. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Lora R; Wilkins, Michael J; Williams, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  9. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites. PMID:26382047

  10. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Lora R; Wilkins, Michael J; Williams, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites. PMID:26382047

  11. [An analysis of industrial accidents in the working field with a particular emphasis on repeated accidents].

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, I; Yanagihashi, T; Tomari, T; Sato, M

    1990-03-01

    The present study is based on an analysis of routinely submitted reports of occupational accidents experienced by the workers of industrial enterprises under the jurisdiction of Kagoshima Labor Standard Office during a 5-year period 1983 to 1987. Officially notified injuries serious enough to keep employees away from their job for work at least 4 days were utilized in this study. Data was classified so as to give an observed frequency distribution for workers having any specified number of accidents. Also, the accident rate which is an indicator of the risk of accident was compared among different occupations, between age groups and between the sexes. Results obtained are as follows; 1) For the combined total of 6,324 accident cases for 8 types of occupation (Construction, Transportation, Mining & Quarrying, Forestry, Food manufacture, Lumber & Woodcraft, Manufacturing industry and Other business), the number of those who had at least one accident was 6,098, of which 5,837 were injured only once, 208 twice, 21 three times and 2 four times. When occupation type was fixed, however, the number of workers having one, two, three and four times of accidents were 5,895, 182, 19 and 2, respectively. This suggests that some workers are likely to have experienced repeated accidents in more than one type of occupation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2131982

  12. [An analysis of industrial accidents in the working field with a particular emphasis on repeated accidents].

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, I; Yanagihashi, T; Tomari, T; Sato, M

    1990-03-01

    The present study is based on an analysis of routinely submitted reports of occupational accidents experienced by the workers of industrial enterprises under the jurisdiction of Kagoshima Labor Standard Office during a 5-year period 1983 to 1987. Officially notified injuries serious enough to keep employees away from their job for work at least 4 days were utilized in this study. Data was classified so as to give an observed frequency distribution for workers having any specified number of accidents. Also, the accident rate which is an indicator of the risk of accident was compared among different occupations, between age groups and between the sexes. Results obtained are as follows; 1) For the combined total of 6,324 accident cases for 8 types of occupation (Construction, Transportation, Mining & Quarrying, Forestry, Food manufacture, Lumber & Woodcraft, Manufacturing industry and Other business), the number of those who had at least one accident was 6,098, of which 5,837 were injured only once, 208 twice, 21 three times and 2 four times. When occupation type was fixed, however, the number of workers having one, two, three and four times of accidents were 5,895, 182, 19 and 2, respectively. This suggests that some workers are likely to have experienced repeated accidents in more than one type of occupation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Can head louse repellents really work? Field studies of piperonal 2% spray

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christine M.; Burgess, Nazma A.; Kaufman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Background. Many families find regular checking of children’s heads for head louse infestation too onerous and would prefer to be able to prevent infestation by use of a topical application that deters lice from infesting the head. Identification in the laboratory of a repellent activity for piperonal provided the basis for developing a spray product to repel lice. Methods. A proof of principle field study in Dhaka, Bangladesh, compared the effect of using 2% piperonal spray with that of a placebo in 105 children and adults from three communities with infestation levels close to 100%. All participants were treated for infestation and subsequent incidence of reinfestation monitored daily by investigators. A second randomised, controlled, double blind, study in North London, UK, evaluated the effect of the product in normal use. One hundred and sixty-three children from schools with a high level (20–25%) of infestation were treated and confirmed louse free and randomly divided between 2% piperonal, a placebo spray, and a control group for up to 22 weeks. Parents applied the spray and monitored for infestation. Regular investigator visits confirmed the parental monitoring and replenished supplies of spray. Results. In Dhaka, over 18 days there were only 4 infestations in the piperonal group and 8 in the placebo group. This difference was not significant (p = 0.312). In North London, there were 41 cases of infestation over the course of the study. Although there were fewer infestations in the piperonal group, analysis of time to first infestation showed a no significant (p = 0.4368) difference between groups. Conclusion. Routine use of 2% piperonal spray in communities with a high prevalence of head louse infestation may provide some protection from infestation. However, the difference between use of the product and no active intervention was sufficiently small that regular checking for presence of lice is likely to be a more practical and cost effective approach

  14. Addition of trim coils to the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U) magnet system to improve the magnetic field mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.L.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Baldwin, D.E.; Hibbs, S.M.; Hill, D.N.; Hornady, R.H.; Jackson, M.C.

    1985-11-14

    The mapping of the magnetic flux bundle from the center cell to the Plasma Potential Control plates (PPC) on the end fan of the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U), was improved by the addition of trim coils (12,000 amp-turns) on each side of each end fan next to the pump beam magnetic shields. The coils' axes are oriented perpendicular to the machine centerline. These coils made the necessary corrections to the field-line mapping, while keeping the field in the nearby pump beam magnetic shield below the saturation threshold. This paper briefly describes the problem, discusses the design as it evolved, and presents the results of the field testing. The disturbance to the field mapping and the appropriate corrections were determined using the code GFUN (a three dimensional electromagnetic field analysis code that includes the presence of permeable materials). The racetrack-shaped coils have dimensions of 1.5 feet by 3 feet and are powered by a renovated 600 kW Bart-Messing power supply controlled by the machine's magnet control system. The magnets were fabricated from polyimide-coated magnet wire. They are rated to 200/sup 0/C, although in pulsed operation they rise only a few degrees centigrade. The coils are placed outside of the vacuum system, and thus are considerably simpler than the other machine magnets. The restraints are designed to withstand a force of 1000 pounds per coil and a turning moment of 1000 foot pounds. The calculated field strengths were verified on the machine by inserting a Hall probe along the axis. The perturbations to the neutral beam magnetic shields were also measured. A brief description of the improvement in the machine performance is also included.

  15. 43 CFR 3207.12 - What work am I required to perform each year for BLM to continue the initial and additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... year for BLM to continue the initial and additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? 3207.12... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Lease Terms and... additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? (a) To continue the initial extension of the...

  16. 43 CFR 3207.12 - What work am I required to perform each year for BLM to continue the initial and additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... year for BLM to continue the initial and additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? 3207.12... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Lease Terms and... additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? (a) To continue the initial extension of the...

  17. 43 CFR 3207.12 - What work am I required to perform each year for BLM to continue the initial and additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... year for BLM to continue the initial and additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? 3207.12... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Lease Terms and... additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? (a) To continue the initial extension of the...

  18. 43 CFR 3207.12 - What work am I required to perform each year for BLM to continue the initial and additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... year for BLM to continue the initial and additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? 3207.12... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING Lease Terms and... additional extensions of the primary term of my lease? (a) To continue the initial extension of the...

  19. Field Work Proposal: PUBLIC OUTREACH EVENT FOR ACCELERATOR STEWARDSHIP TEST FACILITY PILOT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, Andrew; Areti, Hari

    2015-03-05

    Jefferson Lab’s outreach efforts towards the goals of Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Pilot Program consist of the lab’s efforts in three venues. The first venue, at the end of March is to meet with the members of Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center (VTCRC) (http://www.vtcrc.com/tenant-directory/) in Blacksburg, Virginia. Of the nearly 160 members, we expect that many engineering companies (including mechanical, electrical, bio, software) will be present. To this group, we will describe the capabilities of Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. The description will include not only the facilities but also the intellectual expertise. No funding is requested for this effort. The second venue is to reach the industrial exhibitors at the 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC’15). Jefferson Lab will host a booth at the conference to reach out to the >75 industrial exhibitors (https://www.jlab.org/conferences/ipac2015/SponsorsExhibitors.php) who represent a wide range of technologies. A number of these industries could benefit if they can access Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. In addition to the booth, where written material will be available, we plan to arrange a session A/V presentation to the industry exhibitors. The booth will be hosted by Jefferson Lab’s Public Relations staff, assisted on a rotating basis by the lab’s scientists and engineers. The budget with IPAC’15 designations represents the request for funds for this effort. The third venue is the gathering of Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) university presidents. Here we plan to reach the research departments of the universities who can benefit by availing themselves to the infrastructure (material sciences, engineering, medical schools, material sciences, to name a few). Funding is requested to allow for attendance at the SURA Board Meeting. We are coordinating with DOE regarding these costs to raise the projected conference

  20. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  1. Preparation of nickel oxide powder by decomposition of basic nickel carbonate in microwave field with nickel oxide seed as a microwave absorbing additive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Ke, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) powder is prepared by decomposition of basic nickel carbonate (mNi(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}nNiCO{sub 3}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) in microwave field with NiO seed as a microwave absorbing additive. Basic nickel carbonate (BNC) can decompose completely to NiO powder in a short time. Firstly, the heat for BNC decomposition is provided by NiO seed which absorbs microwave and then by NiO product which also absorbs microwave. The decomposition process of BNC can be accelerated by increasing the amount of BNC, the amount of NiO seed or the microwave field power. The size of NiO powder product is about 180nm when the size of BNC used is about 160nm.

  2. On a two-dimensional Schrödinger equation with a magnetic field with an additional quadratic integral of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marikhin, V. G.

    2011-10-01

    The problem of commuting quadratic quantum operators with a magnetic field has been considered. It has been shown that any such pair can be reduced to the canonical form, which makes it possible to construct an almost complete classification of the solutions of equations that are necessary and sufficient for a pair of operators to commute with each other. The transformation to the canonical form is performed through the change of variables to the Kovalevskaya-type variables; this change is similar to that in the theory of integrable tops. As an example, this procedure has been considered for the two-dimensional Schrödinger equation with the magnetic field; this equation has an additional quantum integral of motion.

  3. Drastic Improvement in Wettability of 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene by Addition of Silica Nanoparticles for Solution-Processable Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Saori; Hamada, Takashi; Nagase, Takashi; Tokai, Sakae; Yoshikawa, Masashi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Michiwaki, Yoshiki; Watase, Seiji; Watanabe, Mitsuru; Matsukawa, Kimihiro; Naito, Hiroyoshi

    2010-09-01

    It is essential to control the wettability of soluble organic semiconductors on polymer gate dielectrics to realize low-cost, flexible, and large-area electronic circuits employing organic field-effect transistors using solution processes. We find that the addition of a small amount of silica nanoparticles (SNPs) drastically improves the wettability of the soluble organic semiconductor of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene onto the hydrophobic polymer gate dielectric of poly(methylsilsesquioxane) in the spin-coating process. The improvement in wettability by the addition of SNPs is also demonstrated in the ink-jet printing process, which allows the direct patterning of soluble organic semiconductors on polymer gate dielectrics.

  4. Importance of Field Work in Natural Disaster Risk Assessments in High Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckinney, D. C.; Somos-valenzuela, M. A.; Byers, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Increase in glacier melting leads to the formation of new glacier lakes at the snout of glaciers in high elevations. It is common to find moraine-dammed lakes and glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs) in different glacierized regions. GLOFs can affect fragile mountain ecosystems as well as economic activities due to the large magnitude of the flow. The complexity of this problem is increased by the remoteness of the areas and the lack of data, and the majority of risk assessments are based on remote observations such as satellite imaginary and aerial photography. The Dudh Koshi basin contains twelve of the twenty potentially dangerous glacial lakes of Nepal. In May 2012 ground penetrating radar surveys were completed at three glacier lakes in Nepal to measure the moraine thickness and detect the presence of ice in the moraines. The lakes were: Dudh Pokhari, considered to be high risk due to its volume; Tama Pokhari, considered to be low risk after a 1998 GLOF; and Imja Lake, considered to be high risk due to its large volume. Due to expansion in the direction of the Imja glacier instead of the moraine during the last decade and the extensive terminal moraine complex there has been a belief that Imja lake will not have a GLOF in the near future. This work highlights the idea that to have an accurate risk assessment, fieldwork needs to be one of the main sources of information, which could be mixed with remote sensing and numerical modeling. For these lakes we found: Dudh Pokhari does not show evident risk since it does not have evident triggers such as overhanging ice. Tama Pokhari was drained considerably in the 1998 GLOF; however, some risk remains since there are many hanging glaciers and the volume of the lake is not well known. Community members mentioned that twice some ice has fallen into the lake producing waves, which overtopped the moraine and generated floods downstream. At Imja Lake, extensive GPR surveys were run at the terminal moraine and indicated the

  5. Work Plan for the Feasibility Study for Remedial Action at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Haffenden, R.; Goyette, M.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Yuen, C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the feasibility study is to gather sufficient information to develop and evaluate alternative remedial actions to address contamination at J-Field in compliance with the NCP, CERCLA, and SARA. This FS Work Plan summarizes existing environmental data for each AOC and outlines the tasks to be performed to evaluate and select remedial technologies. The tasks to be performed will include (1) developing remedial action objectives and identifying response actions to meet these objectives; (2) identifying and screening remedial action technologies on the basis of effectiveness, implementability, and cost; (3) assembling technologies into comprehensive alternatives for J-Field; (4) evaluating, in detail, each alternative against the nine EPA evaluation criteria and comparing the alternatives to identify their respective strengths and weaknesses; and (5) selecting the preferred alternative for each operable unit.

  6. On the works of S. S. Nezhdanovsky in the field of flight based on reactive principles, 1880 - 1895

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolskiy, V. N.

    1977-01-01

    The work of a Soviet scientist and inventor of the 19th century, S. S. Nezhdanovsky, is discussed. Investigations in the field of aircraft science and technology are emphasized in relation to Nezhdanovsky's studies of using the jet principle in solving the problem of human flight. Nezhdanovsky dealt with calculations of the speed at which combustion products flow, and considered such problems as fuel feeding into the combustion chamber by means of pumps, and the use of one of the fuel components for cooling the walls of the combustion chamber.

  7. A review of the work of the EU Reference Laboratory supporting the authorisation process of feed additives in the EU. [corrected].

    PubMed

    von Holst, Christoph; Robouch, Piotr; Bellorini, Stefano; González de la Huebra, María José; Ezerskis, Zigmas

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the operation of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Feed Additives (EURL) and its role in the authorisation procedure of feed additives in the European Union. Feed additives are authorised according to Regulation (EC) No. 1831/2003, which introduced a completely revised authorisation procedure and also established the EURL. The regulations authorising feed additives contain conditions of use such as legal limits of the feed additives, which require the availability of a suitable method of analysis for official control purposes under real world conditions. It is the task of the EURL to evaluate the suitability of analytical methods as proposed by the industry for this purpose. Moreover, the paper shows that one of the major challenges is the huge variety of the methodology applied in feed additive analysis, thus requiring expertise in quite different analytical areas. In order to cope with this challenge, the EURL is supported by a network of national reference laboratories (NRLs) and only the merged knowledge of all NRLs allows for a scientifically sound assessment of the analytical methods.

  8. Aiming towards "moral equilibrium": health care professionals' views on working within the morally contested field of antenatal screening

    PubMed Central

    Farsides, B; Williams, C; Alderson, P

    2004-01-01

    Design: Qualitative study incorporating semistructured interviews with health practitioners followed by multidisciplinary discussion groups led by a health care ethicist. Setting: Inner city teaching hospital and district general hospital situated in South East England. Participants: Seventy practitioners whose work relates directly or indirectly to perinatal care. Results: Practitioners managed the interface between their professional and private moral values in a variety of ways. Two key categories emerged: "tolerators", and "facilitators". The majority of practitioners fell into the "facilitator" category. Many "facilitators" felt comfortable with the prevailing ethos within their unit, and appeared unlikely to feel challenged unless the ethos was radically challenged. For others, the separation of personal and professional moral values was a daily struggle. In the "tolerator" group, some practitioners sought to influence the service offered directly, whereas others placed limits on how they themselves would contribute to practices they considered immoral. Conclusions: The "official" commitment to non-directiveness does not encourage open debate between professionals working in morally contested fields. It is important that practical means can be found to support practitioners and encourage debate. Otherwise, it is argued, these fields may come to be staffed by people with homogeneous moral views. This lack of diversity could lead to a lack of critical analysis and debate among staff about the ethos and standards of care within their unit. PMID:15467090

  9. Hydrogeochemical tool to identify salinization or freshening of coastal aquifers determined from combined field work, experiments, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Russak, Amos; Sivan, Orit

    2010-06-01

    This study proposes a hydrogeochemical tool to distinguish between salinization and freshening events of a coastal aquifer and quantifies their effect on groundwater characteristics. This is based on the chemical composition of the fresh-saline water interface (FSI) determined from combined field work, column experiments with the same sediments, and modeling. The experimental results were modeled using the PHREEQC code and were compared to field data from the coastal aquifer of Israel. The decrease in the isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (delta(13)C(DIC)) of the saline water indicates that, during seawater intrusion and coastal salinization, oxidation of organic carbon occurs. However, the main process operating during salinization or freshening events in coastal aquifers is cation exchange. The relative changes in Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and K(+) concentrations during salinization and freshening events are used as a reliable tool for characterizing the status of a coastal aquifer. The field data suggest that coastal aquifers may switch from freshening to salinization on a seasonal time scale.

  10. Work and Inter-subjectivity: a theoretical reflection on its dialectics in the field of health and nursing.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez; Peduzzi, Marina; Mandú, Edir Nei Teixeira; Ayres, José Ricardo de Carvalho Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical reflection intends to show the inter-subjective relationship that takes place in health and nursing practices under the following theoretical perspectives: Institutional Analysis, Psychodynamics of Labor and the Theory of Communicative Action, with an emphasis on the latter. Linking these concepts to the Marxist approach to work in the field of health emerges from recognizing the need for its continuous reconstruction-in this case, with a view to understand the interaction and communication intrinsic to work in action. The theory of Communicative Action seeks to consider these two inextricable dimensions: work as productive action and as interaction. The first corresponds to instrumental action based on technical rules with a production-guided rationale. The second refers to the interaction that takes place as communicative action and seeks understanding among subjects. We assume that adopting this theoretical perspective in the analysis of health and nursing practices opens new possibilities for clarifying its social and historical process and inter-subjective connections. PMID:22481717

  11. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 9: Aerothermodynamics (M-3). A: Statement. B: Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Twelve aerothermodynamic space technology needs were identified to reduce the design uncertainties in aerodynamic heating and forces experienced by heavy lift launch vehicles, orbit transfer vehicles, and advanced single stage to orbit vehicles for the space transportation system, and for probes, planetary surface landers, and sample return vehicles for solar system exploration vehicles. Research and technology needs identified include: (1) increasing the fluid dynamics capability by at least two orders of magnitude by developing an advanced computer processor for the solution of fluid dynamic problems with improved software; (2) predicting multi-engine base flow fields for launch vehicles; and (3) developing methods to conserve energy in aerothermodynamic ground test facilities.

  12. On the two-dimensional classical motion of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field with an additional quadratic integral of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marikhin, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of quadratic Hamiltonians with an electromagnetic field commuting in the sense of the standard Poisson brackets has been considered. It has been shown that, as in the quantum case, any such pair can be reduced to the canonical form, which makes it possible to construct the complete classification of the solutions in the class of meromorphic solutions for the main function of one variable. The transformation to the canonical form is performed through the change of variables to the Kovalevskaya-type variables, which is similar to that in the theory of integrable tops. This transformation has been considered for the two-dimensional Hamiltonian of a charged particle with an additional quadratic integral of motion.

  13. Impact of 2'-hydroxyl sampling on the conformational properties of RNA: update of the CHARMM all-atom additive force field for RNA.

    PubMed

    Denning, Elizabeth J; Priyakumar, U Deva; Nilsson, Lennart; Mackerell, Alexander D

    2011-07-15

    Here, we present an update of the CHARMM27 all-atom additive force field for nucleic acids that improves the treatment of RNA molecules. The original CHARMM27 force field parameters exhibit enhanced Watson-Crick base pair opening which is not consistent with experiment, whereas analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show the 2'-hydroxyl moiety to almost exclusively sample the O3' orientation. Quantum mechanical (QM) studies of RNA related model compounds indicate the energy minimum associated with the O3' orientation to be too favorable, consistent with the MD results. Optimization of the dihedral parameters dictating the energy of the 2'-hydroxyl proton targeting the QM data yielded several parameter sets, which sample both the base and O3' orientations of the 2'-hydroxyl to varying degrees. Selection of the final dihedral parameters was based on reproduction of hydration behavior as related to a survey of crystallographic data and better agreement with experimental NMR J-coupling values. Application of the model, designated CHARMM36, to a collection of canonical and noncanonical RNA molecules reveals overall improved agreement with a range of experimental observables as compared to CHARMM27. The results also indicate the sensitivity of the conformational heterogeneity of RNA to the orientation of the 2'-hydroxyl moiety and support a model whereby the 2'-hydroxyl can enhance the probability of conformational transitions in RNA.

  14. Competition among Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ Monovalent Ions for DNA in Molecular Dynamics Simulations using the Additive CHARMM36 and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we report on interactions of and competition between monovalent ions for two DNA sequences in MD simulations. Efforts included the development and validation of parameters for interactions among the first-group monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+, and DNA in the Drude polarizable and additive CHARMM36 force fields (FF). The optimization process targeted gas-phase QM interaction energies of various model compounds with ions and osmotic pressures of bulk electrolyte solutions of chemically relevant ions. The optimized ionic parameters are validated against counterion condensation theory and buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy measurements providing quantitative data on the competitive association of different monovalent ions with DNA. Comparison between experimental and MD simulation results demonstrates that, compared to the additive CHARMM36 model, the Drude FF provides an improved description of the general features of the ionic atmosphere around DNA and leads to closer agreement with experiment on the ionic competition within the ion atmosphere. Results indicate the importance of extended simulation systems on the order of 25 Å beyond the DNA surface to obtain proper convergence of ion distributions. PMID:25751286

  15. Review of ASME code criteria for control of primary loads on nuclear piping system branch connections and recommendations for additional development work

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report collects and uses available data to reexamine the criteria for controlling primary loads in nuclear piping branch connections as expressed in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In particular, the primary load stress indices given in NB-3650 and NB-3683 are reexamined. The report concludes that the present usage of the stress indices in the criteria equations should be continued. However, the complex treatment of combined branch and run moments is not supported by available information. Therefore, it is recommended that this combined loading evaluation procedure be replaced for primary loads by the separate leg evaluation procedure specified in NC/ND-3653.3(c) and NC/ND-3653.3(d). No recommendation is made for fatigue or secondary load evaluations for Class 1 piping. Further work should be done on the development of better criteria for treatment of combined branch and run moment effects.

  16. Tests of the Dynamic Field Theory and the Spatial Precision Hypothesis: Capturing a Qualitative Developmental Transition in Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Anne R.; Spencer, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested a dynamic field theory (DFT) of spatial working memory and an associated spatial precision hypothesis (SPH). Between three and six years of age there is a qualitative shift in how children use reference axes to remember locations: 3-year-olds’ spatial recall responses are biased toward reference axes after short memory delays, whereas 6-year-olds’ responses are biased away from reference axes. According to the DFT and the SPH, quantitative improvements over development in the precision of excitatory and inhibitory working memory processes lead to this qualitative shift. Simulations of the DFT in Experiment 1 predict that improvements in precision should cause the spatial range of targets attracted toward a reference axis to narrow gradually over development with repulsion emerging and gradually increasing until responses to most targets show biases away from the axis. Results from Experiment 2 with 3- to 5-year-olds support these predictions. Simulations of the DFT in Experiment 3 quantitatively fit the empirical results and offer insights into the neural processes underlying this developmental change. PMID:19968430

  17. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    PC and the FieldMoveTM software, in order to ease the subsequent data processing. 2) Findings from the field work were visualised in 3D using the MoveTM software suite. Applying its specific tools and incorporating own field data, the structure's near-surface 3D settings was modelled. In a second step, the combined use of surface and subsurface data helped to predict their trend with increasing distance from the surface, bypassing a height difference of partially more than 2000m. Field work shows that the remote-sensing structural map fits very well with the field observations. Nevertheless, the shear zone map underwent an iterative refinement process, based on own observations in the field as well as on already existing maps. It now clearly describes the lithological subdivision of the study area. The incorporation of the data into the 3D modelling software points towards the fact, that own large-scale data fits very well with small-scale structures provided by recent studies in the same area. Yet, their exact interplay in terms of orientation, kinematics and evolution is not clear. Additional analysis is needed in order to gain more detailed insight into the deformation history of the rocks in the study area.

  18. Solving the Big Data (BD) Problem in Advanced Manufacturing (Subcategory for work done at Georgia Tech. Study Process and Design Factors for Additive Manufacturing Improvement)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Brett W.; Diaz, Kimberly A.; Ochiobi, Chinaza Darlene; Paynabar, Kamran

    2015-09-01

    3D printing originally known as additive manufacturing is a process of making 3 dimensional solid objects from a CAD file. This ground breaking technology is widely used for industrial and biomedical purposes such as building objects, tools, body parts and cosmetics. An important benefit of 3D printing is the cost reduction and manufacturing flexibility; complex parts are built at the fraction of the price. However, layer by layer printing of complex shapes adds error due to the surface roughness. Any such error results in poor quality products with inaccurate dimensions. The main purpose of this research is to measure the amount of printing errors for parts with different geometric shapes and to analyze them for finding optimal printing settings to minimize the error. We use a Design of Experiments framework, and focus on studying parts with cone and ellipsoid shapes. We found that the orientation and the shape of geometric shapes have significant effect on the printing error. From our analysis, we also determined the optimal orientation that gives the least printing error.

  19. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  20. 41 CFR 102-5.75 - What circumstances do not establish a basis for authorizing home-to-work transportation for field...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... investigators assigned to a defense contractor plant). Note to § 102-5.75: For instances where an employee is... located in a Government office, these employees are not performing field work. Like all...

  1. 41 CFR 102-5.75 - What circumstances do not establish a basis for authorizing home-to-work transportation for field...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... investigators assigned to a defense contractor plant). Note to § 102-5.75: For instances where an employee is... located in a Government office, these employees are not performing field work. Like all...

  2. Detecting environmental change using time series, high resolution imagery and field work - a case study in the Sahel of Mali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, M.; Samimi, C.; Romankiewicz, C.; Spiekermann, R.

    2012-04-01

    Climatic changes and population pressure have caused major environmental change in the Sahel during the last fifty years. Many studies use coarse resolution NDVI time series such as GIMMS to detect environmental trends; however explanations for these trends remain largely unknown. We suggest a five-step methodology for the validation of trends with a case study on the Dogon Plateau, Mali. The first step is to monitor long-term trends with coarse scale time series. Instead of GIMMS, we use a combination of LTDR (derived from AVHRR) and SPOT VGT NDVI data, covering the period from 1982-today with a temporal resolution of 10 days and a spatial resolution of 5.6 km. Areas with significant trends are further analysed in a second step. Here we use a decomposed MODIS time series with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Due to the large scaled MODIS dataset, trends can be identified at a local scale / village level. Using very high resolution imagery (e.g. SPOT, Quickbird) areas of interest can be compared with pre-drought Corona-imagery. This offers a detailed overview of the environmental change at tree-level. Yet many explanations for the changes identified remain unclear. On-site field work provides information on the land use systems, vegetation composition and the current environmental condition. Still many explanations for change can only be speculated and hypothesized. For this reason, interviews with the local population are vital for providing missing details. In this case study, an area near Fiko is introduced and analysed, where significant negative NDVI-trends are observed at a coarse scale. Using the MODIS dataset, the spatial pattern shows areas with both positive and negative trends within the same area. A comparison of high resolution imagery with the Corona images show major land use changes over the past fifty years. What used to be dense bush cover has partially been converted to farmer managed agro-forestry and a significant proportion is now degraded land

  3. A four-part working bibliography of neuroethics: part 1: overview and reviews – defining and describing the field and its practices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroethics entails investigations of neurocognitive mechanisms of morality and ethics; and studies and address of the ethical issues spawned by the use of neuroscience and its technologies to investigate cognition, emotion and actions. These two principal emphases, or what have been called “traditions” of neuroethics both mirror traditional bioethical discussions (such as debates about the safety of technological and pharmaceutical advances and ethical implications of new scientific and technological discoveries), and engage discourse about neuroscientific investigations of (proto-moral and moral) cognition, emotions and behaviors, and what such findings may mean for human beliefs and conduct - from the individual to the political levels. Given the growth, range, and rapid maturation of the field of neuroethics we provide an iterative, four-part document that affords a repository of international papers, books, and chapters that address the field in overview, and present discussion(s) of more particular aspects and topics of neuroethics. This first installment lists reviews and overviews of the discipline, and broad summaries of basic developments and issues of the field. Methods To systematically survey the neuroethics literature, searches were performed by accessing 11 databases, 8 additional literature depositories, and 4 individual journal searches using indexing language for National Library of Medicine (NLM) Medical Subject Heading databases. Searches and assurance against overlapping coverage were conducted using the RefWorks citation management program. Results Overview, review and reflections upon the history and multicultural perspectives of neuroethics were obtained and relevant listings from international journals, books, and book chapters are provided. Part I will be followed by three installments that will address a): the neuroscience of morality and ethics, including discussions of free will, and personal autonomy; b)

  4. Holographic fabrication of large-constant concave gratings for wide-range flat-field spectrometers with the addition of a concave lens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Li, Xinghui; Ni, Kai; Tian, Rui; Pang, Jinchao

    2016-01-25

    We present a new design for the fabrication of concave gratings with large grating constants for flat-field miniature spectrometers with a wide spectral band. In this new design, one of the two optical paths for the holographic lithography of a curved grating structure with variable line spacing is modified by adding a concave lens in front of the point source. The addition of the concave lens allows the real point source, as well as the spatial filter for generating this point source, to be moved back. In this manner, the two spatial filters for generating two point sources are separated. Avoiding the physical conflict between these two spatial filters reduces the difficulty of fabricating large-constant concave gratings. Experimental results verify the feasibility of the proposed design in fabricating concave gratings with large grating constants. The resolution of a spectrometer using the fabricated concave grating is evaluated and found to be better than 1.1 nm across a spectral band ranging from 360 nm to 825 nm.

  5. Evaluation of the hearing protector in a real work situation using the field-microphone-in-real-ear method.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Clayton Henrique; Longo, Isadora Altero; Moreira, Renata Rodrigues; Samelli, Alessandra Giannella

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of the attenuation of a hearing protector (HP) in a real work situation using the field-microphone-in-real-ear method (f-MIRE). Methods Eighteen individuals of both genders (mean age of 47.17±8 years) participated in this study. In the workplace, the personal attenuation level of the HP was assessed using the f-MIRE method, followed by orientation about the importance of using the HP, cleaning and storing the device, and training for effective placement. Results The analyses showed a significant statistic attenuation for all of the collected data (total noise, by frequency band and dose) when the noise levels in the lapel microphone and the probe microphone were compared. In the comparison of the attenuation values provided by the manufacturer and those found in this study, we observed higher values for the manufacturer in all frequency bands. No difference was observed for the noise levels in the different activities and times evaluated. Conclusion The findings of this study enabled us to know the personal level of attenuation of the HP during a real work situation, which was within the limits of tolerance. It was also possible to collect information about the environmental noise to which these workers are exposed. We noticed situations where this level exceeded the safety values, and therefore it is recommended the use of the HP. It is important that more studies are conducted using the f-MIRE method, because it may be an ally to assess the effectiveness of the HP attenuation in the workplace.

  6. Evaluation of the hearing protector in a real work situation using the field-microphone-in-real-ear method.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Clayton Henrique; Longo, Isadora Altero; Moreira, Renata Rodrigues; Samelli, Alessandra Giannella

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of the attenuation of a hearing protector (HP) in a real work situation using the field-microphone-in-real-ear method (f-MIRE). Methods Eighteen individuals of both genders (mean age of 47.17±8 years) participated in this study. In the workplace, the personal attenuation level of the HP was assessed using the f-MIRE method, followed by orientation about the importance of using the HP, cleaning and storing the device, and training for effective placement. Results The analyses showed a significant statistic attenuation for all of the collected data (total noise, by frequency band and dose) when the noise levels in the lapel microphone and the probe microphone were compared. In the comparison of the attenuation values provided by the manufacturer and those found in this study, we observed higher values for the manufacturer in all frequency bands. No difference was observed for the noise levels in the different activities and times evaluated. Conclusion The findings of this study enabled us to know the personal level of attenuation of the HP during a real work situation, which was within the limits of tolerance. It was also possible to collect information about the environmental noise to which these workers are exposed. We noticed situations where this level exceeded the safety values, and therefore it is recommended the use of the HP. It is important that more studies are conducted using the f-MIRE method, because it may be an ally to assess the effectiveness of the HP attenuation in the workplace. PMID:27191871

  7. Melting experiments and field work on Komornı´ Hùrka volcano, Bohemia, by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Susanne; Kreher-Hartmann, Birgit; Heide, K.

    2001-09-01

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832), eminent author, was also state minister and scientist as well as experimentalist in geology. Together with Döbereiner, a chemist in Jena during that time, he carried out melting experiments in porcelain and pottery kilns with rocks and minerals from the volcanic and pseudo-volcanic edifices in NW Bohemia. These experiments were to prove Goethe's theory, that remelting of an archetype rock would result in volcanic and pseudo-volcanic rocks. Especially the formation of the Komornı´ Hùrka (Kammerberg) volcano in NW Bohemia attracted Goethe during all his life. He visited this location 19 times in 1808, 1820 and 1822 and made very exact field observations. But the interpretation of these observations varied between volcanistic and neptunistic. In order to find arguments, he examined the effect of fire on rocks and minerals using porcelain and pottery kilns. The experiments did not provide the expected results and thus failed to explain the formation of Komornı´ Hùrka. During Goethe's geognostic work, including the "pyro-technical" experiments, the neptunism-volcanism-controversy about the formation of basalt raged in Europe, and, more general, about rock formation: neptunism-plutonism. Especially the effect of heat on rocks and minerals, i.e. the phenomenology of fire, played an important role in that discussion. Goethe swayed during his lifetime between neptunism and volcanism. He did not fully accept plutonism because he believed, that processes of nature are generally non-violent and that volcanic eruptions and other catastrophic phenomena are the exception rather than the rule. Therefore he tended to neptunistic ideas. In Goethe's notes there are many indications of this conflict. In contrast, the melting experiments are mentioned only few times. It was, however, possible to establish a picture of his experimental work and his fundamental concepts and ideas.

  8. The Experience of Servant Leaders Who Work in the Field of Corporate Information Technology: A Phenomenological Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Greggory S.

    2013-01-01

    The field of IT is a service-based field where professionals help others with technical, computer-related issues by supporting organizational goals. Therefore, the field of IT, even unknowingly, practices parts or all aspects of servant leadership. Little research is published on servant leadership models and practices within the field of…

  9. 78 FR 32462 - Wyatt Virgin Islands (V.I.), Inc., a Division of Wyatt Field Service Company, Working On-Site at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Company, Working On-Site at Hovensa, LLC Oil Refinery, Christiansted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands... Field Service Company, working on-site at HOVENSA, LLC Oil Refinery, Christiansted, St. Croix, U.S... Department's Notice of negative determination was published in the Federal Register on April 19, 2012 (77...

  10. For Those of Us at the Borders: Recognition and Evaluation of Faculty Work in the Academic Field of Film and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, E. Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Artistic, scholarly, and professional works by individual faculty members in the field of film and digital media are not being adequately recognized or rewarded as scholarship activity during performance evaluation in institutions of higher learning. Conventional systems for the recognition and evaluation of work prioritize scientism and compel…

  11. Non-degenerate n-type doping by hydrazine treatment in metal work function engineered WSe₂ field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inyeal; Rathi, Servin; Li, Lijun; Lim, Dongsuk; Khan, Muhammad Atif; Kannan, E S; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2015-11-13

    We report a facile and highly effective n-doping method using hydrazine solution to realize enhanced electron conduction in a WSe2 field-effect transistor (FET) with three different metal contacts of varying work functions-namely, Ti, Co, and Pt. Before hydrazine treatment, the Ti- and Co-contacted WSe2 FETs show weak ambipolar behaviour with electron dominant transport, whereas in the Pt-contacted WSe2 FETs, the p-type unipolar behaviour was observed with the transport dominated by holes. In the hydrazine treatment, a p-type WSe2 FET (Pt contacted) was converted to n-type with enhanced electron conduction, whereas highly n-doped properties were achieved for both Ti- and Co-contacted WSe2 FETs with on-current increasing by three orders of magnitude for Ti. All n-doped WSe2 FETs exhibited enhanced hysteresis in their transfer characteristics, which opens up the possibility of developing memories using transition metal dichalcogenides. PMID:26486939

  12. Educational needs and preferences of young European clinicians and physician researchers working in the field of rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Christian; Ramiro, Sofia; Sivera, Francisca; Mandl, Peter; Machado, Pedro M; Ospelt, Caroline; Moltó, Anna; Radner, Helga; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Bijlsma, Johannes W; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand the educational needs and preferences of young clinicians and physician researchers in the field of rheumatology in Europe. Methods An international online survey was performed as a joint venture of ESCET and EMEUNET. The survey assessed the acceptance of and the access to the current European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) educational portfolio, as well as the unmet educational needs and learning preferences among individuals below the age of 40 years working in rheumatology in Europe. Results Among 568 European clinicians and physician researchers, 65% indicated that the existing EULAR educational portfolio adequately covers their educational needs. Within the EULAR portfolio, the online course on rheumatic diseases and the postgraduate course were the most appreciated. Participants were very much in favour of new educational courses on imaging techniques, and 63% of participants indicated a particular interest in musculoskeletal ultrasound. A strong interest in refresher (60%) and general review (55%) courses was observed. Lack of funding was considered the major obstacle to participating in existing EULAR programmes. Finally, participants showed diverse preferences regarding learning modalities with common interests in live courses and conferences. Conclusions EULAR's training opportunities are well appreciated among young clinicians and physician researchers in rheumatology. The results from this survey will help to develop EULAR's future educational portfolio. PMID:27493789

  13. Field-induced doping-mediated tunability in work function of Al-doped ZnO: Kelvin probe force microscopy and first-principle theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohit; Mookerjee, Sumit; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that the work function of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) can be tuned externally by applying an electric field. Our experimental investigations using Kelvin probe force microscopy show that by applying a positive or negative tip bias, the work function of AZO film can be enhanced or reduced, which corroborates well with the observed charge transport using conductive atomic force microscopy. These findings are further confirmed by calculations based on first-principles theory. Tuning the work function of AZO by applying an external electric field is not only important to control the charge transport across it, but also to design an Ohmic contact for advanced functional devices.

  14. Does the Addition of Involved Field Radiotherapy to High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Improve Outcomes for Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Flowers, Christopher; Xu Zhiheng; Esiashvili, Natia

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adding involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-two patients with relapsed/refractory HL undergoing HDCT and SCT from 1995 to 2008 were analyzed in a case-control design. Forty-six HL patients treated with IFRT within 2 months of SCT were matched to 46 HL patients who did not receive IFRT based on age, stage at relapse, timing of relapse, histology, and year of SCT. All were evaluated for response, survival, and toxicity with a median followup of 63.5 months. Results: There was a trend for better disease control in patients receiving IFRT. Specifically, 10/46 IFRT patients (22%) relapsed/progressed after SCT compared with 17/46 control patients (37%). Of the failures after IFRT, 70% were inside the radiation field, all in sites of bulky disease. In patients with nonbulky disease, IFRT also resulted in significantly improved outcomes (failure rate 6% vs. 33%, respectively). When stratified by disease bulk, the use of IFRT was found to significantly improve DFS (p = 0.032), but did not affect OS. In addition, IFRT and nonbulky disease were found to be positive prognostic indicators for DFS with hazard ratios of 0.357 (p = 0.032) and 0.383 (p = 0.034), respectively. Grade IV/V toxicities were significantly higher in the IFRT vs. non-IFRT group (28% vs. 2%; p < 0.001), observed only in patients receiving a busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Conclusion: Patients with refractory or relapsed HL undergoing HDCT and SCT have a high risk of relapse in sites of prior disease involvement, especially in sites of bulky disease. The use of IFRT is associated with a lower risk of disease progression in these sites; however bulky disease sites are still difficult to control. Toxicity risk is significant, particularly when busulfan-based conditioning is combined with IFRT, and alternative

  15. Rationale, design and methods of the Study of Work and Pain (SWAP): a cluster randomised controlled trial testing the addition of a vocational advice service to best current primary care for patients with musculoskeletal pain (ISRCTN 52269669)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain is a major contributor to short and long term work absence. Patients seek care from their general practitioner (GP) and yet GPs often feel ill-equipped to deal with work issues. Providing a vocational case management service in primary care, to support patients with musculoskeletal problems to remain at or return to work, is one potential solution but requires robust evaluation to test clinical and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design This protocol describes a cluster randomised controlled trial, with linked qualitative interviews, to investigate the effect of introducing a vocational advice service into general practice, to provide a structured approach to managing work related issues in primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain who are absent from work or struggling to remain in work. General practices (n = 6) will be randomised to offer best current care or best current care plus a vocational advice service. Adults of working age who are absent from or struggling to remain in work due to a musculoskeletal pain problem will be invited to participate and 330 participants will be recruited. Data collection will be through patient completed questionnaires at baseline, 4 and 12 months. The primary outcome is self-reported work absence at 4 months. Incremental cost-utility analysis will be undertaken to calculate the cost per additional QALY gained and incremental net benefits. A linked interview study will explore the experiences of the vocational advice service from the perspectives of GPs, nurse practitioners (NPs), patients and vocational advisors. Discussion This paper presents the rationale, design, and methods of the Study of Work And Pain (SWAP) trial. The results of this trial will provide evidence to inform primary care practice and guide the development of services to provide support for musculoskeletal pain patients with work-related issues. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52269669. PMID:25012813

  16. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars; Thibault, Nicolas; Stemmerik, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The chalk must undergo several phases of grain reorganisation and chemical reactions during its diagenetic evolution from a carbonaceous ooze to a sedimentary rock. Some of these transformations could be observed on structures from the kilometre- to the micrometre-scale with seismic reflection and cores analyses, respectively. However, few sites allow to combine all the different scale of observation for chalk diagenesis. Onshore and offshore high resolution seismics, two fully cored >350 m wells with wireline logging tools and very high quality exposures from a coastal cliff and a quarry form such an exceptional dataset in the Stevns peninsula area, eastern Danish Basin (Denmark). The studied chalk interval in the area is of Maastrichtian to Danian age. The chalk has been divided in 4 lithofacies, chalk-marl alternations, white chalk, white chalk with flint layers and bryozoan chalk. Advanced stratigraphic works have been performed with astronomical calibration based on stable isotope stratigraphy, wireline logs as well as several palaeontological proxies and detailed sedimentological analysis. Since a couple of decades, a specific kind of fractures has been described in the Chalk of Denmark, the so-called hairline fractures. They have recently been interpreted as compaction bands associated with the pore collapse of the chalk. We have observed these fractures on the field and on the cores in specific intervals. At depth, these fractures are in genetic relation with the formation of some stylolithes. The pressure-solution allows the formation of carbonate seams in the hairline fractures. At larger scale, on the field are observed faults which are sealed with flint precipitations. They slightly offset (<1 m) strata underlined by flint bands. On the onshore and offshore seismic reflection profiles, numerous strata-bound faults form noisy intervals as well as amplitude anomalies. Their normal offsets are less than 25 m. Their branching patterns, and their restriction

  17. On the energy losses of hot worked Nd-Fe-B magnets and ferrites in a small alternating magnetic field perpendicular to a bias field

    SciTech Connect

    Staa, F. von; Hempel, K.A.; Artz, H.

    1995-11-01

    Torsion pendulum magnetometer measurements on ferrites and on neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets are presented. The damping of the oscillation of the pendulum leads to information on the magnetic energy losses of the magnets in a small alternating magnetic field applied perpendicular to a bias field. The origin of the energy absorption is explained by the magnetization reversal of single-domain particles. It is shown experimentally that the energy absorption mechanism requires the ferromagnetic order of the sample, and that the magnetic field strength of maximal energy absorption coincides with the effective anisotropy field strength.

  18. Design of adaptation actions to compensate the hydrological impact of the river regulation by dams on the Ebro Delta (Spain): combining modeling and field work.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Darío; Jurado, Alicia; Carpintero, Miriam; Rovira, Albert; Polo, María J.

    2016-04-01

    River regulation by dams for both flood control and water storage has allowed to decrease both uncertainty and risks associated to extreme hydrological events. However, the alteration of the natural river flow regime and the detraction of high water volumes usually lead to significant effects downstream on the morphology, water quality, ecological status of water… and this is particularly relevant in the transitional waters since the sea level rise poses an additional threat on such conditions. The Ebro River, in northeastern Spain, is one of the highly regulated rivers in Spain with the dams located in the mainstream. Besides an estimated decrease of a 30% of the freshwater inputs, the sediment delivery to the final delta in the Mediterranean has dramatically been decreased up to a 99%, with environmental risks associated to the reduction of the emerged areas from the loss of sediment supply, the impact on the subsidence dynamics, and the sea level rise. The Ebro Delta suffers a mean regression of 10 m per year, and the persistence of macrophyte development in the final reach of the river due to the low water mean flow regime. The project LIFE EBRO-ADMICLIM (ENV/ES/001182), coordinated by the IRTA in Catalonia (Spain), puts forwards pilot actions for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change in the Ebro Delta. An integrated approach is proposed for managing water, sediment and habitats (rice fields and wetlands), with the multiple aim of optimizing ground elevation, reducing coastal erosion, increasing the accumulation (sequestration) of carbon in the soil, reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and improving water quality. This work presents the pilot actions included in the project to mitigate the loss of water flow and sediment supply to the delta. Sediment injections at different points upstream have been designed to calibrate and validate a sediment transport model coupled to a 2D-hydrodinamic model of the river. The combination of an a

  19. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  20. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  1. National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) Field Test Methodology Report, 2004. Working Paper Series. NCES 2004-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuer, R. E.; Cahalan, M.; Fahimi, M.; Curry-Tucker, J. L.; Carley-Baxter, L.; Curtin, T. R.; Hinsdale, M.; Jewell, D. M.; Kuhr, B. D.; McLean, L.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the methodology and findings of the NSOPF:04 field test that took place during the 2002?03 academic year. The NSOPF:04 field test was used to plan, implement, and evaluate methodological procedures, instruments, and systems proposed for use in the full-scale study scheduled for the 2003-04 academic year. The field test was…

  2. Cognitive Style: Field Dependence-Independence. Lektos: Interdisciplinary Working Papers in Language Sciences, Vol. 2, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huteau, Michel

    The nature of the cognitive style of field articulation and its relationship to differentiation of personality are discussed. A short historical summary of research on field dependence-independence is presented, and problems of measurement, stability, and evolution of the dimension of field articulation are discussed. The connections between field…

  3. Soil microbial biomass and community structure affected by repeated additions of sewage sludge in four Swedish long-term field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, G.; Kätterer, T.; Kirchmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter is a key attribute of soil fertility. The pool of soil organic C can be increased, either by mineral fertilisers or by adding organic amendments such as sewage sludge. Sewage sludge has positive effects on agricultural soils through the supply of organic matter and essential plant nutrients, but sludge may also contain unwanted heavy metals, xenobiotic substances and pathogens. One obvious effect of long-term sewage sludge addition is a decrease in soil pH, caused by N mineralisation followed by nitrification, sulphate formation and presence of organic acids with the organic matter added. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sewage sludge on the microbial biomass and community structure. Materials and methods We analysed soil samples from four sites where sewage sludge has been repeatedly applied in long-term field experiments situated in different parts of Sweden; Ultuna (59°49'N, 17°39'E, started 1956), Lanna (58°21'N, 13°06'E, started 1997-98), Petersborg (55°32'N, 13°00'E, started 1981) and Igelösa (55°45'N, 13°18'E, started 1981). In these four experiments, at least one sewage sludge treatment is included in the experimental design. In the Ultuna experiment, all organic fertilisers, including sewage sludge, are applied every second year, corresponding to 4 ton C ha-1. The Lanna experiment has a similar design, with 8 ton dry matter ha-1 applied every second year. Lanna also has an additional treatment in which metal salts (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) are added together with sewage sludge. At Petersborg and Igelösa, two levels of sewage sludge (4 or 12 ton dry matter ha-1 every 4th year) are compared with three levels of NPK fertiliser (0 N, ½ normal N and normal N). Topsoil samples (0-20 cm depth) from the four sites were analysed for total C, total N, pH and PLFAs (phospholipid fatty acids). In addition, crop yields were recorded. Results At all four sites, sewage sludge has had a positive effect on crop yields

  4. Impact of additional Pt and NiSi crystal orientation on channel stress induced by Ni silicide film in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuo, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Kudo, Shuichi; Hirose, Yukinori; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsuchimoto, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Nobuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The impact of additional Pt and Ni monosilicide (NiSi) crystal orientation on channel stress from Ni silicide in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) has been demonstrated. The channel stress generation mechanism can be explained by the NiSi crystal orientation. In pure Ni silicide films, the channel stress in the p-type substrate is much larger than that in the n-type one, since the NiSi a-axis parallel to the channel direction is strongly aligned on the p-type substrate compared with on the n-type one. On the other hand, in NiPt silicide films, the difference in the channel stress between the p- and n-type substrates is small, because the NiSi crystal orientation on the p-type substrate is similar to that on the n-type one. These results can be explained by the Pt segregation at the interface between the NiSi film and the Si surface. Segregated Pt atoms cause the NiSi b-axis to align normal to the Si(001) surface in the nucleation step owing to the expansion of the NiSi lattice spacing at the NiSi/Si interface. Furthermore, the Pt segregation mechanism is considered to be caused by the grain boundary diffusion in the Ni2Si film during NiSi formation. We confirmed that the grains of Ni2Si on the p-type substrate are smaller than those on the n-type one. The Ni2Si film on the p-type substrate has more grain boundary diffusion paths than that on the n-type one. Therefore, the amount of Pt segregation at the NiSi/Si interface on the p-type substrate is larger than that on the n-type one. Consequently, the number of NiSi grains with the b-axis aligned normal to the Si(001) in the p-type substrate is larger than that in the n-type one. As a result, the channel stress induced by NiPt silicide in PMOS is larger than that in NMOS. According to this mechanism, controlling the Pt concentration at the NiSi/Si interface is one of the key factors for channel stress engineering.

  5. English as an Additional Language: Changing Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Constant, Ed.; Cable, Carrie, Ed.

    This volume highlights the language and learning needs of pupils with English as an additional language in the United Kingdom. It includes chapters by British teachers and researchers working in this field. The book addresses a number of issues of interest to practitioners, scholars, teacher educators, and policy makers. Each chapter is prefaced…

  6. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  7. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  8. Field evaluation of in situ remediation of Cd-contaminated soil using four additives, two foliar fertilisers and two varieties of pakchoi.

    PubMed

    Feng, Renwei; Qiu, Weiwen; Lian, Fei; Yu, Zhihong; Yang, YiXin; Song, Zhengguo

    2013-07-30

    This study was conducted to determine the optimal planting mode for pakchoi (Brassica rapa chinensis) in Cd-contaminated soil to reduce the accumulation of Cd in the edible parts while maintaining yields. Four additives (red mud (RM), silicon calcium fertiliser (SC), spodium (SP) and calcium magnesium phosphate (CMP)), two foliar fertilisers (Ca and Zn) and two varieties of pakchoi (Aijiaohuang (AJ) and Baixuegongzhu (BX)) were used in this study. The results show that the addition of SC and RM had an effect, but the other additives did not appear to increase the biomasses of AJ and BX. In some cases, the growth responses of AJ and BX to the same treatment were different. Extra additions of Ca or Zn to additive-treated pakchoi did not help the additives stimulate the growth of AJ and BX, except for SC-treated AJ and BX and SP-treated AJ. The SC and CMP additives significantly reduced the available Cd concentration in both the AJ soil and the BX soil; however, they did not significantly decrease the Cd concentration in the aboveground parts of AJ and BX. The RM treatments (for both levels) and some treatments containing SP reduced the available Cd concentration in the soils and reduced the accumulation of Cd in the two pakchoi varieties. Additions of Ca or Zn fertiliser significantly reduced the Cd concentration in the aboveground parts of AJ and BX. However, when Ca or Zn was sprayed on the additive-treated AJ and BX, they did not help the additives reduce the Cd accumulation in the aboveground parts of AJ and BX, except for the additive CMP. This study shows that RM may be an optimal amendment to reduce the accumulation of Cd in the edible part of pakchoi while simultaneously maintaining yields. The utilisation of Ca or Zn as a foliar fertiliser to additive-treated pakchoi showed positive effects only under some conditions.

  9. Field evaluation of in situ remediation of Cd-contaminated soil using four additives, two foliar fertilisers and two varieties of pakchoi.

    PubMed

    Feng, Renwei; Qiu, Weiwen; Lian, Fei; Yu, Zhihong; Yang, YiXin; Song, Zhengguo

    2013-07-30

    This study was conducted to determine the optimal planting mode for pakchoi (Brassica rapa chinensis) in Cd-contaminated soil to reduce the accumulation of Cd in the edible parts while maintaining yields. Four additives (red mud (RM), silicon calcium fertiliser (SC), spodium (SP) and calcium magnesium phosphate (CMP)), two foliar fertilisers (Ca and Zn) and two varieties of pakchoi (Aijiaohuang (AJ) and Baixuegongzhu (BX)) were used in this study. The results show that the addition of SC and RM had an effect, but the other additives did not appear to increase the biomasses of AJ and BX. In some cases, the growth responses of AJ and BX to the same treatment were different. Extra additions of Ca or Zn to additive-treated pakchoi did not help the additives stimulate the growth of AJ and BX, except for SC-treated AJ and BX and SP-treated AJ. The SC and CMP additives significantly reduced the available Cd concentration in both the AJ soil and the BX soil; however, they did not significantly decrease the Cd concentration in the aboveground parts of AJ and BX. The RM treatments (for both levels) and some treatments containing SP reduced the available Cd concentration in the soils and reduced the accumulation of Cd in the two pakchoi varieties. Additions of Ca or Zn fertiliser significantly reduced the Cd concentration in the aboveground parts of AJ and BX. However, when Ca or Zn was sprayed on the additive-treated AJ and BX, they did not help the additives reduce the Cd accumulation in the aboveground parts of AJ and BX, except for the additive CMP. This study shows that RM may be an optimal amendment to reduce the accumulation of Cd in the edible part of pakchoi while simultaneously maintaining yields. The utilisation of Ca or Zn as a foliar fertiliser to additive-treated pakchoi showed positive effects only under some conditions. PMID:23603772

  10. International Cooperation in the Field of International Space Station Payload Safety: Overcoming Differences and Working for Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Ozawa, Masayuki; Takeyasu, Yoshioka; Griffith, Gerald; Goto, Katsuhito; Mitsui, Masami

    2010-09-01

    The importance of international cooperation among the International Space Station(ISS) Program participants is ever increasing as the ISS nears assembly complete. In the field of payload safety assurance, NASA and JAXA have enhanced their cooperation level. The authors describe the evolution of cooperation between the two agencies and the challenges encountered and overcame. NASA and JAXA have been working toward development of a NASA Payload Safety Review Panel(PSRP) franchise panel at JAXA for several years. When the JAXA Safety Review Panel(SRP) becomes a fully franchised panel of the NASA PSRP, the JAXA SRP will have the authority review and approve all JAXA ISS payloads operated on USOS and JEM, although NASA and JAXA joint reviews may be conducted as necessary. A NASA PSRP franchised panel at JAXA will streamline the conventional review process. Japanese payload organizations will not have to go through both JAXA and NASA payload safety reviews, while NASA will be relieved of a certain amount of review activities. The persistent efforts have recently born fruit. For the past two years, NASA and JAXA have increased emphasis on efforts to develop a NASA PSRP Franchised Panel at JAXA with concrete results. In 2009, NASA and JAXA signed Charter and Joint Development Plan. At the end of 2009, NASA PSRP transferred some review responsibility to the JAXA SRP under the franchising charter. Although JAXA had long history of reviewing payloads by their own panel prior to NASA PSRP reviews, it took several years for JAXA to receive NASA PSRP approval for delegation of franchised review authority to JAXA. This paper discusses challenges JAXA and NAXA faced. Considerations were required in developing a franchise at JAXA for history and experiences of the JAXA SRP as well as language and cultural differences. The JAXA panel, not only had its own well-established processes and supporting organizational structures which had some differences from its NASA PSRP counterparts

  11. Encoding of rat working memory by power of multi-channel local field potentials via sparse non-negative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Liu, Tiao-Tiao; Bai, Wen-Wen; Yi, Hu; Li, Shuang-Yan; Tian, Xin

    2013-06-01

    Working memory plays an important role in human cognition. This study investigated how working memory was encoded by the power of multi-channel local field potentials (LFPs) based on sparse nonnegative matrix factorization (SNMF). SNMF was used to extract features from LFPs recorded from the prefrontal cortex of four Sprague-Dawley rats during a memory task in a Y maze, with 10 trials for each rat. Then the power-increased LFP components were selected as working memory-related features and the other components were removed. After that, the inverse operation of SNMF was used to study the encoding of working memory in the time-frequency domain. We demonstrated that theta and gamma power increased significantly during the working memory task. The results suggested that postsynaptic activity was simulated well by the sparse activity model. The theta and gamma bands were meaningful for encoding working memory.

  12. Working the Indian Field Days: The Economy of Authenticity and the Question of Agency in Yosemite Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cothran, Boyd

    2010-01-01

    Originally conceived by National Park Service (NPS) officials as a way to "revive and maintain the interest of Indians in their own games and industries," the Yosemite Indian Field Days were part rodeo, part pageant, and part craft fair. Through its activities, the Field Days offered white tourists the opportunity to encounter "real" Indians whose…

  13. Realizing the Now-or-Never bottleneck and Chunk-and-Pass processing with Item-Order-Rank working memories and masking field chunking networks.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Christiansen & Chater's (C&C's) key goals for a language system have been realized by neural models for short-term storage of linguistic items in an Item-Order-Rank working memory, which inputs to Masking Fields that rapidly learn to categorize, or chunk, variable-length linguistic sequences, and choose the contextually most predictive list chunks while linguistic inputs are stored in the working memory. PMID:27561607

  14. Work plan for focused feasibility study of the toxic burning pits area at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Biang, C.; Benioff, P.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCIA). J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA)(predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-0021355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today-

  15. Large-scale compensation of errors in pairwise-additive empirical force fields: comparison of AMBER intermolecular terms with rigorous DFT-SAPT calculations.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Otyepka, Michal; Sponer, Jirí; Hobza, Pavel; Jurecka, Petr

    2010-09-21

    The intermolecular interaction energy components for several molecular complexes were calculated using force fields available in the AMBER suite of programs and compared with Density Functional Theory-Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (DFT-SAPT) values. The extent to which such comparison is meaningful is discussed. The comparability is shown to depend strongly on the intermolecular distance, which means that comparisons made at one distance only are of limited value. At large distances the coulombic and van der Waals 1/r(6) empirical terms correspond fairly well with the DFT-SAPT electrostatics and dispersion terms, respectively. At the onset of electronic overlap the empirical values deviate from the reference values considerably. However, the errors in the force fields tend to cancel out in a systematic manner at equilibrium distances. Thus, the overall performance of the force fields displays errors an order of magnitude smaller than those of the individual interaction energy components. The repulsive 1/r(12) component of the van der Waals expression seems to be responsible for a significant part of the deviation of the force field results from the reference values. We suggest that further improvement of the force fields for intermolecular interactions would require replacement of the nonphysical 1/r(12) term by an exponential function. Dispersion anisotropy and its effects are discussed. Our analysis is intended to show that although comparing the empirical and non-empirical interaction energy components is in general problematic, it might bring insights useful for the construction of new force fields. Our results are relevant to often performed force-field-based interaction energy decompositions.

  16. Level Playing Field? Feminist Observations on Global/local Articulations of the Re-Gendering and Restructuring of Educational Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmore, Jill

    1997-09-01

    In the world of educational work since the mid 1980s there has been much talk of restructuring. This reflects postmodern thinking, which favours decentralizing decisions to those at the work face, and encouraging multi-skilled and flexible workers. This article presents a feminist analysis of how such policies are reflected at the local level in four instances: Australia, Sweden, New Zealand and Israel. These examples indicate that management practices tend to be more modernist (hierarchical, controlling and centralizing) than postmodernist, and often have highly inequitable effects for women teachers. The article asserts that gender inequities in educational work have assumed a different form but have not been eliminated. However, the author argues that such global tendencies need to be considered in the light of specific cultural, economic and geographical factors, which affect how work is structured and how education is shaped.

  17. Coordination of Education Policies with Policies in Other Fields: A Synthesis. Reports, Studies Working Series No. S.139.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallen, Dennis

    Issues pertinent to the coordination of educational policies with those in other fields for innovative policy formation are presented in this synthesis. The first section details objectives of the interdisciplinary approach, of which the development of common frameworks and methodological tools that are adaptable to specific countries or regions…

  18. Field Dependence-Independence as Visuospatial and Executive Functioning in Working Memory: Implications for Instructional Systems Design and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittschof, Kent A.

    2010-01-01

    Field dependence-independence (FDI) has long been conceptualized and discussed as a cognitive style relevant to numerous educational approaches and outcomes. However, the FDI construct is most often measured as a cognitive ability, as opposed to a style, using instruments such as the Group-Embedded Figures test (GEFT) or the Hidden Figures Test…

  19. Boundary-Work in the Health Research Field: Biomedical and Clinician Scientists' Perceptions of Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Mathieu; Laberge, Suzanne; Hodges, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Funding agencies in Canada are attempting to break down the organizational boundaries between disciplines to promote interdisciplinary research and foster the integration of the social sciences into the health research field. This paper explores the extent to which biomedical and clinician scientists' perceptions of social science research operate…

  20. Curricular Orientations, Experiences, and Actions: Graduate Students in Science and Mathematics Fields Work in Urban High School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christodoulou, Nikoletta; Varelas, Maria; Wenzel, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    We examined curricular orientations that graduate students in science and mathematics fields held as they experienced urban high-school science and mathematics classrooms. We analyzed how these educators (called Fellows) saw themselves, students, teachers, schools, education, and the sense they made of mathematics and science education in urban,…

  1. Do Employers Prefer Workers Who Attend For-Profit Colleges? Evidence from a Field Experiment. Working Paper No. WR-1054

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darolia, Rajeev; Koedel, Cory; Martorell, Paco; Wilson, Katie; Perez-Arce, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports results from a resume-based field experiment designed to examine employer preferences for job applicants who attended for-profit colleges. For-profit colleges have seen sharp increases in enrollment in recent years despite alternatives such as public community colleges being much cheaper. We sent almost 9,000 fictitious resumes…

  2. Validity Decay in STEM and Non-STEM Fields of Study. ACT Working Paper Series. WP-2014-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westrick, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if validity coefficients for ACT scores and high school grade point average (HSGPA) decayed or held stable over eight semesters of undergraduate study in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields at civilian four-year institutions, and whether the decay patterns differed from those…

  3. Sending Farmers Back to School: The Impact of Farmer Field Schools in Indonesia. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feder, Gershon; Murgai, Rinku; Quizon, Jaime B.

    A study evaluated the impact of Farmer Field Schools in Indonesia, an intensive participatory training program emphasizing integrated pest management. Focus was on whether program participation improved yields and reduced pesticide use among graduates and neighbors who gained knowledge through informal communications. It used a modified…

  4. A Comparative Field Study To Evaluate Practical Approaches in Implementing Work Team Groups in an Organizational System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splett, Martin

    A study examined the problems encountered when organizations adopt management strategies based on teamwork and total quality management (TQM) and the effectiveness of training in avoiding such problems. Survey instruments were mailed to 85 individuals involved in implementing work teams at 85 companies in 4 Missouri cities; 23 responses (27.1%…

  5. Using a Thinking Skills System to Guide Discussions during a Working Conference on Students with Disabilities Pursuing STEM Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Stefanich, Greg P.

    2012-01-01

    Students with sensory or motor disabilities are often dissuaded from pursuing science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) careers. They are frequently under-prepared to succeed in post-secondary STEM coursework because of inadequate high school preparation and limited post-secondary accommodations. A two-day working conference…

  6. How E-Gov in Greece Affects Life-Long Learning for Public Servants, Working on Technical Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulas, Dimitrios; Valkanos, Efthymios; Droulia, Kassiani

    2016-01-01

    Engineers that work as civil servants cover a wide range of competences, administrative and scientific, which implies that they deal with many difficulties in the exercise of their duties as executives. Electronic government (e-gov), through the use of new Technologies of Information and Communications (ICT) at public technical services, has…

  7. Additional flow field studies of the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 30-percent chord Fowler flap including slot-gap variations and cove shape modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Ostowari, C.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental measurements were made to determine the effects of slot gap opening and flap cove shape on flap and airfoil flow fields. Test model was the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 0.30c Fowler flap deflected 35 degrees. Tests were conducted with optimum, wide and narrow gaps, and with three cove shapes. Three test angles were selected, corresponding to pre-stall and post-stall conditions. Reynolds number was 2,200,000 and Mach number was 0.13. Force, surface pressure, total pressure, and split-film turbulence measurements were made. Results were compared with theory for those parameters for which theoretical values were available.

  8. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: Phase II. Selection and/or Modification of COTS Field Portable Waste Water Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Michael; Mertz, Carol; Kivenas, Nadia; Magnuson, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    After an accidental or malicious release of radioactivity, large urban areas may be contaminated, compromising response efforts by first responders and law enforcement officials. In addition, some public services (e.g., drinking water and wastewater treatment, electrical power distribution, etc.) may be disrupted. In such an event, it may be important to deploy mitigation efforts in certain areas to restore response activities and public services (Fig. S-1). This report explores the state-of-the-art approach for a system to rapidly return critical infrastructure components to service following a cesium-137 (Cs-137) radiological dispersal device (RDD) release while avoiding the spread of Cs-137 beyond its original deposition area and minimizing the amount of Cs-137-contaminated wastewater. Specifically, we describe a wash system consisting of chemical additives added to fire hydrant water and irreversible solid sequestering agents added as the water is collected and treated for recycle in situ. The wash system is intended to be a rapidly deployable, cost-effective means of mitigating an urban setting for the purpose of restoring critical infrastructure and operational activities after a radiological release.

  9. A quasi-Hertzian stress field from an internal source: A possible working model for the Vredefort structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, L. A. G.; Reimold, W. U.; Colliston, W. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Vredefort structure is a large domal feature about 110 km southeast of Johannesburg, South Africa, situated within and almost central to the large intracratonic Witwatersrand Basin. This structure consists of an Archean core of ca. 45 km in diameter, consisting largely of granitic gneiss, surrounded by a collar of metasedimentary and metavolcanic supracrustal rocks of the Dominian Group, Witwatersrand and Ventersdorp Supergroups, and Transvaal Sequence. The interpretation of images of the gravity and magnetic fields over Vredefort has permitted the delineation of several important features of the structure and of its environment. The outline of the collar strata is a prominent feature of both the gravity and the magnetic fields. The Vredefort structure shares this distinctive geometry with other structures (e.g., Manicouagan, Decaturville, Sierra Madera) of debated impact origin. In all these, successively older strata with steep outward dips are encountered while traversing inward to the center of the structure. A further attribute of these structures is the shortening of the outcrop of a particular stratigraphic unit compared to the original perimeter of that unit. To account for the geometric attributes of the Vredefort structure a mechanical scheme is required where there is radial movement of horizontal strata toward, with uplift in, the center of the Vredefort structure. Two models can be proposed: (1) one in which there is a rapid rise and violent disruption of cover rocks in response to expansion of a fluid accumulation; and (2) one in which there is, in contrast, a nonexplosive, quasi-Hertzian stress field resulting from a diapiric process. Both models can accommodate the geometry and structural components of Vredefort.

  10. Analysis of sequences from field samples reveals the presence of the recently described pepper vein yellows virus (genus Polerovirus) in six additional countries.

    PubMed

    Knierim, Dennis; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Kenyon, Lawrence

    2013-06-01

    Polerovirus infection was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 29 pepper plants (Capsicum spp.) and one black nightshade plant (Solanum nigrum) sample collected from fields in India, Indonesia, Mali, Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan. At least two representative samples for each country were selected to generate a general polerovirus RT-PCR product of 1.4 kb length for sequencing. Sequence analysis of the partial genome sequences revealed the presence of pepper vein yellows virus (PeVYV) in all 13 samples. A 1990 Australian herbarium sample of pepper described by serological means as infected with capsicum yellows virus (CYV) was identified by sequence analysis of a partial CP sequence as probably infected with a potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) isolate.

  11. The development and field testing of a system for determination of ultrafine activity particle size distribution and working levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1990-10-31

    Recent investigations of radon decay products in indoor air have shown that what has been called the unattached'' fraction is in fact an ultrafine size aerosol with diameters in the range of 0.5 to 10 nm. There are a number of difficulties in characterizing particles in this size range. Classical diffusion batteries using screens with high mesh numbers do not have the resolution to give detailed information for the ultra fine range. The use of single screens of differing mesh numbers (Graded Screen Arrays) either in parallel or in a stack configuration can be used to provide these results. However, accurately measuring the activity directly attached to the screens is difficult because of the attachment of some activity to the back side of the screen and the distribution of activity around the individual screen wires. A continuous monitoring system that provides information on both the size and charge distributions on these important size range particles has been constructed and its behavior characterized in the laboratory. It has now been field tested and employed in several field studies to determine the exposure of individuals to radon progeny in the indoor environment. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  13. Recruiting and retaining child welfare workers: is preparing social work students enough for sustained commitment to the field?

    PubMed

    Barbee, Anita P; Antle, Becky; Sullivan, Dana J; Huebner, Ruth; Fox, Steve; Hall, Jon Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Graduates of specialized BSW child welfare education programs are more likely to be retained after two years of service in the agency, but many leave at the four year mark. Two studies explored possible reasons for departure at this time. The first study found that graduates of specialized child welfare programs were significantly more likely to engage in best practices in nine areas than workers from other fields. Thus, frustration with practice skill was ruled out as a cause. The second qualitative study found that poor supervision, lack of coworker support, and organizational stress among other variables prompted these high-functioning workers to leave the agency. Suggestions for innovative interventions to enhance retention at this critical juncture are included.

  14. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    Soil venting is effective for the physical removal of volatile hydrocarbons from unsaturated soils, and is also effective as a source of oxygen for biological degradation of the volatile and non-volatile fractions of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil. Treatment of soil venting off-gas is expensive, constituting a minimum of 50% of soil venting remediation costs. In this research, methods for enhancing biodegradation through soil venting were investigated, with the goal of eliminating the need for expensive off-gas treatment. A seven-month field investigation was conducted at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), Florida, where past jet fuel storage had resulted in contamination of a sandy soil. The contaminated area was dewatered to maintain approximately 1.6 meters of unsaturated soil. Soil hydrocarbon concentrations ranged from 30 to 23,000 mg/kg. Contaminated and uncontaminated test plots were vented for 188 days. Venting was interrupted five times during operation to allow for measurement of biological activity (CO{sub 2} production and O{sub 2} consumption) under varying moisture and nutrient conditions.

  15. Collaborative adaptations in social work intervention research in real-world settings: lessons learned from the field.

    PubMed

    Blank Wilson, Amy; Farkas, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Social work research has identified the crucial role that service practitioners play in the implementation of evidence-based practices. This has led some researchers to suggest that intervention research needs to incorporate collaborative adaptation strategies in the design and implementation of studies focused on adapting evidence-based practices to real-world practice settings. This article describes a collaborative approach to service adaptations that was used in an intervention study that integrated evidence-based mental health and correctional services in a jail reentry program for people with serious mental illness. This description includes a discussion of the nature of the collaboration engaged in this study, the implementation strategies that were used to support this collaboration, and the lessons that the research team has learned about engaging a collaborative approach to implementing interventions in research projects being conducted in real-world social service delivery settings.

  16. Compendation of SSC lattice optics in the presence of dipole field errors: Report of the Correction Element Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Bintinger, D.; Chao, A.; Forest, E.

    1989-02-01

    The assignment of the Correction Element Working Group (CEWG) is to advance the designs of various candidate correction schemes to a point where they can be compared and distilled down to a single plan. Choosing among, the options often involves consideration of incommensurate factors such as cost, practicality, and theoretical performance. Except for minor issues, the CEWG purpose is to gather and array the facts in a form from which these decisions can be rationally made, but not to make the decisions. The present report analyses various schemes for compensating nonlinear multipole errors in the main arc dipoles of the Superconducting Super Collider. Emphasis is on comparing lumped and distributed compensation, on minimizing the total number of correction elements, and on reducing the sensitivity to closed-orbit errors.

  17. A large-scale field trial of malathion as an insecticide for antimalarial work in southern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Najera, J. A.; Shidrawi, G. R.; Gibson, F. D.; Stafford, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    Malathion shows promise as a substitute for chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticides in the control of malaria whenever the latter are unsuitable because of Anopheles resistance or other reasons. A field trial of malathion was carried out in 1963-64, covering an area of about 500 km2 with a population of about 26 000, in Masaka District, southern Uganda. All houses and animal shelters were sprayed with malathion at 2 g/m2 at roughly 4-month intervals. The average combined densities of the females of the two main malaria vectors, Anopheles funestus and An. gambiae, fell from an average of 66 per shelter per day in a pre-trial survey in 1960-61 to 0.0011 at the end of 1964 in the sprayed area; no significant changes were noted in unsprayed comparison areas. The transmission of the infection in humans was apparently interrupted when allowance was made for imported cases. The presence of unsprayed surfaces in houses which had recently been built or altered interfered somewhat with complete coverage. Case detection was reliable and achieved excellent coverage. No toxic effects of malathion in humans were noted, while the effect on mosquitos was considerable even in the absence of direct contact. This effect of malathion lasted for a considerably shorter period of time in houses roofed with corrugated iron than with thatch; this should be borne in mind in the design of spraying programmes. PMID:5299860

  18. Perception of health risks of electromagnetic fields by MRI radiographers and airport security officers compared to the general Dutch working population: a cross sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The amount of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) at work is mainly determined by an individual's occupation and may differ from exposure at home. It is, however, unknown how different occupational groups perceive possible adverse health effects of EMF. Methods Three occupational groups, the general Dutch working population (n = 567), airport security officers who work with metal detectors (n = 106), and MRI radiographers who work with MRI (n = 193), were compared on perceived risk of and positive and negative feelings towards EMF in general and of different EMF sources, and health concerns by using analyses of variances. Data were collected via an internet survey. Results Overall, MRI radiographers had a lower perceived risk, felt less negative, and more positive towards EMF and different sources of EMF than the general working population and the security officers. For security officers, feeling more positive about EMF was not significantly related to perceived risk of EMF in general or EMF of domestic sources. Feeling positive about a source did not generalize to a lower perceived risk, while negative feelings were stronger related to perceived risk. MRI radiographers had fewer health concerns regarding EMF than the other two groups, although they considered it more likely that EMF could cause physical complaints. Conclusions These data show that although differences in occupation appear to be reflected in different perceptions of EMF, the level of occupational exposure to EMF as such does not predict the perceived health risk of EMF. PMID:22070906

  19. Exposure of baboons to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields does not produce work stoppage or affect operant performance on a match-to-sample task

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, J.L.; Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors examined the effects of combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic field (EMF) exposure on performance of delayed match-to-sample (MTS) procedure involving the flash rate of a light as the stimulus. Six baboons (Papio cynocephalus) fully acquired the task; four others functioned accurately only when cued. All ten subjects were assigned to EMF-exposed or sham-exposed groups of five and were used to test for a work-stoppage effect that was previously observed with initial exposure to electric fields (EF) of 30 or 60 kV/m. Here, the authors report the results of two experiments, each consisting of 6 week preexposure, exposure, and postexposure periods. They found no evidence of work stoppage with fields of 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or with 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G). In neither experiment was there evidence of an adverse effect of 60 Hz EMF exposure on MTS performance.

  20. Geophysical Field Work for Educators: Teachers Use Ground-Penetrating Radar to Study San Jacinto Battlefield Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, A. T.; Sawyer, D. S.; Milliken, K.

    2008-12-01

    In July 2008, a group of Houston area K-12 teachers investigated San Jacinto Battlefield Park in La Porte, Texas, utilizing ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to image the subsurface and global positioning system (GPS) units to map surface features. Participants were in-service K-12 teachers from urban Houston school districts where the majority of students are members of historically underrepresented minority groups. Over a period of two weeks, participants acquired and interpreted GPR profiles in the park, mapped surface features using hand-held GPS units, and analyzed the data using ArcGIS software. This summer experience was followed by a content-intensive academic year course in Earth Science. The Battle of San Jacinto took place on April 21, 1836, and was the decisive battle in the Texas Revolution. The site is thought to contain numerous in-situ artifacts dropped by the Texan and Mexican armies, as well as unmarked burials from the early 1800's. Two stratigraphic units were identified from the GPR profiles and matched to strata exposed through archaeological excavations. The stratigraphic units are interpreted as recent flood/storm deposits with soil formation on Pleistocene deltaic deposits of a previous sea-level highstand. In addition to the stratigraphy, a number of isolated subsurface anomalies (possibly artifacts) were identified. Participants also interpreted past shoreline positions using vintage aerial photographs and acquired several transects of GPS positions along the shoreline. Participants confirmed that the area is in fact subsiding, rather than being eroded. Participants not only experienced the scientific process but also utilized geophysics for community service (i.e. contributing educational material to the park). Through background research, they derived a rich historical context for their investigation and learned to appreciate the multi-disciplinary aspect of solving real- world scientific problems.

  1. Effect of nitrogen addition on the band gap, core level shift, surface energy, and the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, H. J.; Chen, X. F.; Pan, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Sun, Chang Q.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of nitrogen (N) doping on the behavior of field emission, surface energy and the band structure of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) thin films coated on silicon tip arrays has been examined in detail. Measurements using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, water contact angle and field emission testing revealed that the optimal 50%-nitrogen partial pressure (PN) could improve substantially the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 films accompanied with narrowed band gap, lowered surface energy and work function and a negative energy shift of the N 1s level from 404 to 396 eV. Results evidence consistently the presence of the nonbonding lone pairs and the lone pair induced antibonding dipoles upon tetrahedron formation which is responsible for the observations. At PN below and above the optimal value physisorption and hydrogen bond likes formation like to occur.

  2. Standardisation of a European measurement method for the determination of total gaseous mercury: results of the field trial campaign and determination of a measurement uncertainty and working range.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J C; Pirrone, N; van Hoek, C; Sprovieri, F; Fernandez, R; Toté, K

    2010-03-01

    Working Group 25 of the European Committee for Standardisation's (CEN) Technical Committee 264 'Air Quality' is currently finalising a standard method for the measurement of total gaseous mercury (TGM) in ambient air, in response to the requirements of the European Union's Fourth Air Quality Daughter Directive (4(th) DD). We report the results of a programme of field measurements and the statistical analysis performed to assess the uncertainty of the proposed standard method, define its working range and determine its compliance with the required data quality objectives of the Fourth Air Quality Daughter Directive. The statistical analysis has shown that the maximum relative expanded uncertainty of 50% allowed by the 4(th) DD is met down to a mercury mass concentration of approximately 0.75 ng m(-3), and that the dominant contribution to this uncertainty is systematic bias between instruments, mainly arising from the uncertainty in the calibration of the instruments.

  3. Tuning the work function of randomly oriented ZnO nanostructures by capping with faceted Au nanostructure and oxygen defects: enhanced field emission experiments and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arnab; Guha, Puspendu; Thapa, Ranjit; Selvaraj, Sinthika; Kumar, Mohit; Rakshit, Bipul; Dash, Tapan; Bar, Rajshekhar; Ray, Samit K.; Venkata Satyam, Parlapalli

    2016-03-01

    The lowering of the work function (Φ) can lead to a better field emission (FE) behavior at lower threshold fields. We report on enhanced FE from randomly oriented and faceted Au-capped ZnO hetero-nanostructures (HNs) having more oxygen defects. Large-area arrays of non-aligned, faceted Au-capped ZnO HNs, such as nanowires (NWs) and triangular nanoflakes (TNFs) are grown using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Enhanced FE properties from the TNF sample resulted in a turn-on field as low as 0.52 V μm-1 at a current density of 0.1 mA cm-2 and a field enhancement factor (β) as high as ≈5.16 × 105. Under similar experimental conditions, drawing the same current density from an NW specimen needs a higher turn-on field (0.86 V μm-1) and to exhibit nearly four times less field enhancement factor compared to the TNFs samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements confirm the presence of more oxygen defects in the TNF samples compared to the NW samples. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements show the average local work function to be 4.70 ± 0.1 eV for the TNF sample, which is ≈ 0.34 eV lower than the NW sample. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the estimated Φ values are found to be 4.98 eV for ZnO(0001), 4.17 eV for Au(001)/ZnO(0001) and 3.91 eV for Au(001)/Ovac-ZnO(0001) surfaces. The DFT results are qualitatively in agreement with our experimental results. The presence of Au nanostructures on top of O-deficient and sharp-tipped TNFs results in enhanced FE performance following their reduced tunneling barrier via pinning of effective Φ.

  4. Tuning the work function of randomly oriented ZnO nanostructures by capping with faceted Au nanostructure and oxygen defects: enhanced field emission experiments and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Guha, Puspendu; Thapa, Ranjit; Selvaraj, Sinthika; Kumar, Mohit; Rakshit, Bipul; Dash, Tapan; Bar, Rajshekhar; Ray, Samit K; Satyam, Parlapalli Venkata

    2016-03-29

    The lowering of the work function (Φ) can lead to a better field emission (FE) behavior at lower threshold fields. We report on enhanced FE from randomly oriented and faceted Au-capped ZnO hetero-nanostructures (HNs) having more oxygen defects. Large-area arrays of non-aligned, faceted Au-capped ZnO HNs, such as nanowires (NWs) and triangular nanoflakes (TNFs) are grown using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Enhanced FE properties from the TNF sample resulted in a turn-on field as low as 0.52 V μm(-1) at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2) and a field enhancement factor (β) as high as ≈5.16 × 10(5). Under similar experimental conditions, drawing the same current density from an NW specimen needs a higher turn-on field (0.86 V μm(-1)) and to exhibit nearly four times less field enhancement factor compared to the TNFs samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements confirm the presence of more oxygen defects in the TNF samples compared to the NW samples. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements show the average local work function to be 4.70 ± 0.1 eV for the TNF sample, which is ≈ 0.34 eV lower than the NW sample. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the estimated Φ values are found to be 4.98 eV for ZnO(0001), 4.17 eV for Au(001)/ZnO(0001) and 3.91 eV for Au(001)/Ovac-ZnO(0001) surfaces. The DFT results are qualitatively in agreement with our experimental results. The presence of Au nanostructures on top of O-deficient and sharp-tipped TNFs results in enhanced FE performance following their reduced tunneling barrier via pinning of effective Φ. PMID:26883495

  5. ISR meets SAR outside: additive action of the endophyte Bacillus pumilus INR7 and the chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole, on induced resistance against bacterial spot in field-grown pepper

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hwe-Su; Yang, Jung Wook; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Induced resistance has been recognized as an attractive tool for plant disease management in modern agriculture. During the last two decades, studies on chemically- and biologically elicited induced resistance have revealed previously unknown features of the plant defense response including defense priming. As a biological trigger for induced resistance, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a group of root-associated bacteria that can reduce plant disease severity and incidence, and augment plant growth and yield under greenhouse and field conditions. We evaluated the potential of an endophytic PGPR, Bacillus pumilus INR7, to induce systemic resistance against bacterial spot caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in pepper. Trials in the greenhouse showed significantly less symptom development in pepper plants inoculated with strain INR7 compared to a water treatment. Furthermore, a single dipping treatment with INR7 before transplantation of pepper plants into the field elicited an induced systemic resistance response against bacterial spot caused by artificially infiltration of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and even against naturally occurring bacterial spot disease. We identified an additive effect on induced resistance after administration of a combination treatment composed of strain INR7 with a chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole (BTH) in the field. The combination treatment stimulated expression of pepper defense marker genes CaPR1, CaTin1, and CaPR4 to a greater extent than did treatment with either agent alone. Similar experiments conducted with tobacco revealed no additive effects under field conditions. Interestingly, co-application of plants with INR7 lifted the growth repressing effect of BTH. Application of BTH onto pepper and tobacco did not affect rhizosphere colonization but supported a higher population density inside plant roots when compared to water-treated control plants. Our results indicate that PGPR can be used in

  6. ISR meets SAR outside: additive action of the endophyte Bacillus pumilus INR7 and the chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole, on induced resistance against bacterial spot in field-grown pepper.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hwe-Su; Yang, Jung Wook; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-01-01

    Induced resistance has been recognized as an attractive tool for plant disease management in modern agriculture. During the last two decades, studies on chemically- and biologically elicited induced resistance have revealed previously unknown features of the plant defense response including defense priming. As a biological trigger for induced resistance, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a group of root-associated bacteria that can reduce plant disease severity and incidence, and augment plant growth and yield under greenhouse and field conditions. We evaluated the potential of an endophytic PGPR, Bacillus pumilus INR7, to induce systemic resistance against bacterial spot caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in pepper. Trials in the greenhouse showed significantly less symptom development in pepper plants inoculated with strain INR7 compared to a water treatment. Furthermore, a single dipping treatment with INR7 before transplantation of pepper plants into the field elicited an induced systemic resistance response against bacterial spot caused by artificially infiltration of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and even against naturally occurring bacterial spot disease. We identified an additive effect on induced resistance after administration of a combination treatment composed of strain INR7 with a chemical inducer, benzothiadiazole (BTH) in the field. The combination treatment stimulated expression of pepper defense marker genes CaPR1, CaTin1, and CaPR4 to a greater extent than did treatment with either agent alone. Similar experiments conducted with tobacco revealed no additive effects under field conditions. Interestingly, co-application of plants with INR7 lifted the growth repressing effect of BTH. Application of BTH onto pepper and tobacco did not affect rhizosphere colonization but supported a higher population density inside plant roots when compared to water-treated control plants. Our results indicate that PGPR can be used in

  7. Field Work: Outreach to Migrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naismith, Rachael

    1982-01-01

    Discusses programs of three libraries utilizing information and referral techniques to provide library services to migrant farm workers--Fresno County Public Library, California; Stanislaus County Public Library, California; and Cumberland County Library, New Jersey. Problems including illiteracy, physical inaccessibility, and lack of English…

  8. Tracking and understanding volcanic emissions through cross-disciplinary integration of field, textural, geochemical and geophysical data: A textural working group. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gurioli, L.

    2013-12-01

    Relating magma ascent to eruption style using information preserved in pyroclastic deposits is a major challenge in modern volcanology. Because magma ascent and fragmentation are inaccessible to direct observation, one way to obtain quantitative information for conduit dynamics is through textural quantification of the sampled products (i.e., full definition of the rock vesicle and crystal properties). Many workers have shown that quantification of vesicle and crystal size distributions yields valuable insights into the processes that created the pyroclasts. However, the physical characteristics of individual pyroclasts must not be considered in isolation from information regarding: (i) the deposits from which they are taken; (ii) their chemistry; (iii) geophysical signatures of the related explosive events; and (iv) results from petrological and/or analogue experiments. As a result, attempts to understand eruption dynamics have increasingly involved the coupling of traditional field and sample-return analyses with geophysical measurements made synchronous with sample collection. In spite of this progress, we remain far from developing a definitive methods that allows us to sample, correlate and/or compare the multitude of parameters that can be measured at an actively building field deposits. As a result, no study has yet been able to correlate all derivable textural parameters with the full range of available multidisciplinary data. To discuss these issues, a working group met during 6-7 November 2012 at the Maison International of the Université Blaise Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand, France). The workshop was supported by the European Science Foundation and was held under the title: 'Tracking and understanding volcanic emissions through cross-disciplinary integration: A textural working group'. Our main objective was to gather an advisory group to define measurements, methods, formats and standards to be applied to integration of geophysical and physical

  9. Effect of Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions on the energy spectrum, chemical potential, addition energy and spin-splitting in a many-electron parabolic GaAs quantum dot in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-11-01

    The effect of electron-electron interaction and the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on the electronic properties of a many-electron system in a parabolically confined quantum dot placed in an external magnetic field is studied. With a simple and physically reasonable model potential for electron-electron interaction term, the problem is solved exactly to second-order in the spin-orbit coupling constants to obtain the energy spectrum, the chemical potential, addition energy and the spin-splitting energy.

  10. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  11. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 2, Work plan: Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  12. Working with a domestic assessment system to estimate the need of support and care of elderly and disabled persons: results from field studies.

    PubMed

    Hein, Andreas; Steen, Enno-Edzard; Thiel, Andreas; Hülsken-Giesler, Manfred; Wist, Thorben; Helmer, Axel; Frenken, Thomas; Isken, Melvin; Schulze, Gisela C; Remmers, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of field studies performed over a period between five months and 24 months. The objectives of these studies were to collect long-term real-life data to evaluate how these data can be mapped to items on standardized assessment tests and which presentation method is most suitable to inform caregivers about critical situations and changes in health or care needs. A Home-monitoring system which uses modern sensor technologies was developed for and used in these field studies. It was installed in living environments of seven people (three who were not in need of care, two in need of care, and two with mental disabilities). The data were generated by sensor data acquisition and questionnaire reporting. Four types of data analysis and representation were evaluated to support caregivers. Results show that sensor data can be used to determine information directly or indirectly, which can be mapped to relevant assessment items and presented with different degrees of granularity. It is also feasible to determine and present additional information of potential interest which cannot be directly mapped to any assessment item. Sensor data can also be displayed in a live view. This live data representation led to a decrease in the caregivers' workload when assessed according to the German version of the Perceived Stress Questionnaire. PMID:25148558

  13. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey 'Plan of Proposed Additions to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey 'Plan of Proposed Additions to Captain's Quarters B, Navy Yard Washington, Civil Engineer's Office September 25 1868.' Photocopy of original drawing on file at Naval Station Public Works Department, Washington, D. C. - Navy Yard, Quarters B, East Side of Drill Field, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. Time-Dependent Deformation at Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Field (Nevada) Measured With Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Modeled with Multiple Working Hypotheses of Coupled Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, K. L.; Ali, S. T.; Akerley, J.; Baluyut, E.; Cardiff, M. A.; Davatzes, N. C.; Foxall, W.; Fratta, D.; Kreemer, C.; Mellors, R. J.; Lopeman, J.; Spielman, P.; Wang, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    To measure time-dependent deformation at the Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in western Nevada, we analyze interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired between 2004 and 2014 by five satellite missions, including: ERS-2, Envisat, ALOS, TerraSAR-X, and TanDEM-X. The resulting maps of deformation show an elliptical subsiding area that is ~4 km by ~1.5 km. Its long axis coincides with the strike of the dominant normal-fault system at Brady. Within this bowl of subsidence, the interference pattern shows several smaller features with length scales of the order of ~1 km. This signature occurs consistently in all of the well-correlated interferometric pairs spanning several months. Results from inverse modeling suggest that the deformation is a result of volumetric contraction in shallow units, no deeper than 600 m, that are probably associated with damaged regions where faults interact via thermal (T), hydrological (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes. Such damaged zones are expected to extend downward along steeply dipping fault planes, providing high-permeability conduits to the production wells. Using time series analysis, we test the hypothesis that geothermal production drives the observed deformation. We find a good correlation between the observed deformation rate and the rate of production in the shallow wells. We explore first-order models to calculate the time-dependent deformation fields produced by coupled processes, including: thermal contraction of rock (T-M coupling), decline in pore pressure (H-M coupling), and dissolution of minerals over time (H-C-M coupling). These processes are related to the heterogeneity of hydro-geological and material properties at the site. This work is part of a project entitled "Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology" (PoroTomo) http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo.

  15. [Autoimmune processes after long-term low-level exposure to electromagnetic fields (the results of an experiment). Part 1. Mobile communications and changes in electromagnetic conditions for the population. Needs for additional substantiation of the existing hygienic standards].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Grigor'ev, O A; Ivanov, A A; Liaginskaia, A M; Merkulov, A V; Stepanov, V S; Shagina, N B

    2010-01-01

    Mobile communications provides a new source of electromagnetic exposure for almost the whole population of the Russian Federation. For the first time in the history of civilization the brain of mobile phone users was exposed to localized radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF). Population exposure from the base stations is also considered to be specific. However, existing standards for limiting the exposure do not account for this special EMF source and may not ensure the absence of health effects. There was a need for reliable information that would extend databases used for development of new standards. As recommended by the World Health Organization an additional experiment was performed under the supervision of foreign experts, which showed changes in autoimmune status in rats after long-term low-level RF EMF exposure with an incident power density of 500 microW/cm2.

  16. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Herwig; Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance Ron,dyn vs. the breakdown voltage Vbd. In literature, it has been shown that with a high Vbd, Ron,dyn is deteriorated. The impairment of Ron,dyn is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  17. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  18. Field-Based Teacher Research: How Teachers and Scientists Working Together Answers Questions about Turtle Nesting Ecology while Enhancing Teachers' Inquiry Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, J. M.; Jungblut, D.; Catena, A. N.; Rubenstein, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    Providing rigorous academic supplement to a professional development program for teachers, QUEST is a fusion of Drexel University's environmental science research department with Princeton University's Program in Teacher Preparation. Completed in the summers of 2012 (in partnership with Earthwatch) and 2013 in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey, QUEST's terrapin field research program enhances K-12 teachers' ecological knowledge, develops inquiry-based thinking in the classroom, and builds citizen science engagement. With a focus on quality question development and data analysis to answer questions, teachers are coached in developing, implementing, and presenting independent research projects on diamondback terrapin nesting ecology. As a result, teachers participating in QUEST's week long program bring a realistic example of science in action into their classrooms, helping to develop their own students' critical thinking skills. For teachers, this program provides training towards educating students on how to do real and imaginative science - subsequently sending students to university better prepared to engage in their own independent research. An essential component of the collaboration through QUEST, in addition to the teacher's experience during and after the summer institute, is the research data collected which supplements that of the Principal Investigator. In 2012, by documenting terrapin nest site predators, teachers gained valuable scientific experience, while Drexel acquired important ecological data which would have not been able to be collected otherwise. In 2013, teachers helped answer important questions about terrapin nesting success post Superstorm Sandy. In fact, the 2013 QUEST teachers are the first to visualize the frighteningly increased erosion of a primary terrapin nesting site due to Sandy; showing how most terrapin nests now lie in the bay, instead of safe on shore. Teachers comment that interacting with scientists in the field, and contributing to

  19. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) sponsored by the DOE's Advanced Manufacturing Office. The MDF is focusing on R&D of both metal and polymer AM pertaining to in-situ process monitoring and closed-loop controls; implementation of advanced materials in AM technologies; and demonstration, characterization, and optimization of next-generation technologies. ORNL is working directly with industry partners to leverage world-leading facilities in fields such as high performance computing, advanced materials characterization, and neutron sciences to solve fundamental challenges in advanced manufacturing. Specifically, MDF is leveraging two of the world's most advanced neutron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured components.

  20. Ready for Work? How Afterschool Programs Can Support Employability through Social and Emotional Learning. Beyond the Bell: Research to Practice in the Afterschool and Expanded Learning Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaney, Elizabeth; Moroney, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the knowledge, attitudes, and skills that ultimately contribute to success in school, work, and life is a priority for educators and employers. Young people need a variety of important skills to be ready to work, including understanding key work habits and having a strong work ethic. But another aspect of employability has gained…

  1. Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002/12) Third Follow-up Field Test Report. Working Paper Series. NCES 2012-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingels, Steven J.; Pratt, Daniel J.; Jewell, Donna M.; Mattox, Tiffany; Dalton, Ben; Rosen, Jeffrey; Lauff, Erich; Hill, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the methodologies and results of the third follow-up Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002/12) field test which was conducted in the summer of 2011. The field test report is divided into six chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Field Test Survey Design and Preparation; (3) Data Collection Procedures and Results; (4) Field…

  2. Collaborative Navigation as a Solution for PNT Applications in GNSS Challenged Environments - Report on Field Trials of a Joint FIG/IAG Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealy, Allison; Retscher, Guenther; Toth, Charles; Hasnur-Rabiain, Azmir; Gikas, Vassilis; Grejner-Brzezinska, Dorota; Danezis, Chris; Moore, Terry

    2015-12-01

    PNT stands for Positioning, Navigation, and Timing. Space-based PNT refers to the capabilities enabled by GNSS, and enhanced by Ground and Space-based Augmentation Systems (GBAS and SBAS), which provide position, velocity, and timing information to an unlimited number of users around the world, allowing every user to operate in the same reference system and timing standard. Such information has become increasingly critical to the security, safety, prosperity, and overall qualityof-life of many citizens. As a result, space-based PNT is now widely recognized as an essential element of the global information infrastructure. This paper discusses the importance of the availability and continuity of PNT information, whose application, scope and significance have exploded in the past 10-15 years. A paradigm shift in the navigation solution has been observed in recent years. It has been manifested by an evolution from traditional single sensor-based solutions, to multiple sensor-based solutions and ultimately to collaborative navigation and layered sensing, using non-traditional sensors and techniques - so called signals of opportunity. A joint working group under the auspices of the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG) and the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), entitled `Ubiquitous Positioning Systems' investigated the use of Collaborative Positioning (CP) through several field trials over the past four years. In this paper, the concept of CP is discussed in detail and selected results of these experiments are presented. It is demonstrated here, that CP is a viable solution if a `network' or `neighbourhood' of users is to be positioned / navigated together, as it increases the accuracy, integrity, availability, and continuity of the PNT information for all users.

  3. Collaborative Navigation as a Solution for PNT Applications in GNSS Challenged Environments - Report on Field Trials of a Joint FIG / IAG Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kealy, Allison; Retscher, Guenther; Toth, Charles; Hasnur-Rabiain, Azmir; Gikas, Vassilis; Grejner-Brzezinska, Dorota; Danezis, Chris; Moore, Terry

    2015-12-01

    PNT stands for Positioning, Navigation, and Timing. Space-based PNT refers to the capabilities enabled by GNSS, and enhanced by Ground and Space-based Augmentation Systems (GBAS and SBAS), which provide position, velocity, and timing information to an unlimited number of users around the world, allowing every user to operate in the same reference system and timing standard. Such information has become increasingly critical to the security, safety, prosperity, and overall qualityof-life of many citizens. As a result, space-based PNT is now widely recognized as an essential element of the global information infrastructure. This paper discusses the importance of the availability and continuity of PNT information, whose application, scope and significance have exploded in the past 10-15 years. A paradigm shift in the navigation solution has been observed in recent years. It has been manifested by an evolution from traditional single sensor-based solutions, to multiple sensor-based solutions and ultimately to collaborative navigation and layered sensing, using non-traditional sensors and techniques - so called signals of opportunity. A joint working group under the auspices of the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG) and the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), entitled `Ubiquitous Positioning Systems' investigated the use of Collaborative Positioning (CP) through several field trials over the past four years. In this paper, the concept of CP is discussed in detail and selected results of these experiments are presented. It is demonstrated here, that CP is a viable solution if a `network' or `neighbourhood' of users is to be positioned / navigated together, as it increases the accuracy, integrity, availability, and continuity of the PNT information for all users.

  4. Direct observation of an anisotropic in-plane residual stress induced by B addition as an origin of high magnetic anisotropy field of Ru/FeCoB film

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Gomi, Shunsuke; Mashiko, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2010-05-15

    Although boron-free FeCo films prepared on a Ru underlayer exhibits isotropic in-plane magnetic property, boron added FeCoB films prepared on Ru underlayer revealed large in-plane magnetic anisotropy with a high anisotropy field of 500 Oe. The effect of boron addition on the in-plane anisotropic residual stress in FeCoB film was investigated using sin{sup 2} {psi} method of x-ray diffraction analysis. Large isotropic compressive stress was observed in Ru/FeCo film. In contrast, anisotropic in-plane residual stress was observed in Ru/FeCoB film. The compressive stress along the easy axis of Ru/FeCoB film is released more than that along the hard axis. Such anisotropic residual stress is regarded as an origin of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy through inverse magnetostriction effect. Owing to the configuration of the facing targets sputtering system, boron atoms are sputtered and deposited anisotropically, and so they penetrate FeCo crystals and release the compressive stress along the incidence direction.

  5. Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Bill

    1993-01-01

    Reports the results of a field trip to measure the intensity of electromagnetic fields generated by electronic devices in the home, in cars, at work, outside, and in places people visit during the day. Found that a person gets more intense exposure while working at a computer than by living next to an electrical substation. (MDH)

  6. Universities and Fields of Study in Argentina: A Public-Private Comparison from the Supply and Demand Side. PROPHE Working Paper Series. WP No. 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabossi, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Private higher education literature recognizes large public-private differentiation in terms of field of study. Relative to public counterparts, private universities tend to offer their services in fields that require low initial investments and present at least relatively attractive internal private rates of return. Thus, the main objective of…

  7. High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) Base-Year Field Test Report. Working Paper Series. NCES 2011-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingels, Steven J.; Herget, Deborah; Pratt, Daniel J.; Dever, Jill; Copello, Elizabeth; Leinwand, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the results of the field test for the base year of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). The general purposes of the field test were, in anticipation of the base-year full-scale effort, to test instruments, forms, and procedures; to experiment with different approaches to questionnaire content and survey…

  8. [Nurses working in poison and toxicovigilance centres].

    PubMed

    Geveaux, Christine; Marquis, Armelle

    2016-04-01

    Some nurses have chosen to work The skills acquired through their professional experience in the field, combined with specific training in clinical toxicology, equip them to fulfil their role in innovative missions. Their main activity consists in manning the emergency helpline with additional toxicovigilance missions.

  9. Public Works Employment Act of 1977; Hearings before the Subcommittee on Regional and Community Development of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Fifth Congress, First Session on S. 427, a Bill to Provide Additional Authorizations for the Public Works Employment Program, to Authorize a Program for Employment of Teenaged Youth in Community Improvement Projects, and for Other Purposes. February 2, 3, and 4, 1977. Serial No. 95-H5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report covers the hearings on Senate bill 427, Public Works Employment Act of 1977, which provides $4 billion in new support for the public works employment program, to establish a program to provide employment, work experience, and skill training to youths in areas of aggravated unemployment, and for other purposes. Included are letters of…

  10. Report on the operations of the coal-testing plant of the United States Geological Survey at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Saint Louis, Missouri, 1904: Part I.--Field work, classification of coals, chemical work

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, E.W.; Holmes, J.A.; Campbell, M.R.

    1906-01-01

    Notwithstanding these delays, the committee feels that through the hearty and patriotic cooperation of a large number of manufacturers of apparatus and machinery it was able to collect and install, within a notably short time, a testing plant that was well suited for such pioneer work.

  11. The future of gerontological social work: what we know and what we don't know about student interest in the field.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alishia

    2015-01-01

    As baby boomers age, social work leaders predict there will be a significant shortage of gerontological social workers to care for the older population. Research to explore this predicted shortage has focused on reasons why social work students do not appear interested in working with the older population. Most reasons cluster around three broad research constructs that include: (a) attitudes toward the older population, (b) knowledge about the older population, and (c) personal and professional experience with the older population. In this article the author presents a systematic review of current research to determine what we do and do not know about social work student interest in working with the older population. PMID:25661892

  12. Summary of measured radiofrequency electric and magnetic fields (10 kHz to 30 GHz) in the general and work environment.

    PubMed

    Mantiply, E D; Pohl, K R; Poppell, S W; Murphy, J A

    1997-01-01

    We have plotted data from a number of studies on the range of radiofrequency (RF) field levels associated with a variety of environmental and occupational sources. Field intensity is shown in units of volts/meter (V/m) for electric field strength and amps/meter (A/m) for magnetic field strength. Duty factors, modulation frequencies, and modulation indices are also reported for some sources. This paper is organized into seven sections, each cataloging sources into appropriate RF frequency bands from very-low frequency (VLF) to super-high frequency (SHF), and covers frequencies from 10 kHz to 30 GHz. Sources included in this summary are the following: Coast Guard navigational transmitters, a Navy VLF transmitter, computer visual display terminals (VDTs), induction stoves or range tops, industrial induction and dielectric heaters, radio and television broadcast transmitters, amateur and citizens band (CB) transmitters, medical diathermy and electrosurgical units, mobile and handheld transmitters, cordless and cellular telephones, microwave ovens, microwave terrestrial relay and satellite uplinks, and police, air traffic, and aircraft onboard radars. For the sources included in this summary, the strongest fields are found near industrial induction and dielectric heaters, and close to the radiating elements or transmitter leads of high power antenna systems. Handheld transmitters can produce near fields of about 500 V/m at the antenna. Fields in the general urban environment are principally associated with radio and TV broadcast services and measure about 0.1 V/m root-mean-square (rms). Peak fields from air traffic radars sampled in one urban environment were about 10 V/m, 300 times greater than the rms value of 0.03 V/m when the duty factor associated with antenna rotation and pulsing are factored in.

  13. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  14. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  15. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  16. Work of the cosmonaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demin, L. S.

    1980-01-01

    The necessity for the cosmonaut to receive broad training in many fields in order to carry out his multifaceted work is discussed. The work includes: scientific research, engineering, operator's work, participation in technical commissions and councils, training on simulators, and the study of technology and sports.

  17. Modeling Student Choice of STEM Fields of Study: Testing a Conceptual Framework of Motivation, High School Learning, and Postsecondary Context of Support. WISCAPE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xueli

    2012-01-01

    This study draws upon social cognitive career theory and higher education literature to propose and test a conceptual framework for understanding the selection of postsecondary STEM fields of study by recent high school graduates who attend four-year institutions. Results suggest that high school math achievement, exposure to math and science…

  18. Holding Accountability to Account: How Scholarship and Experience in Other Fields Inform Exploration of Performance Incentives in Education. Working Paper 2008-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Accountability and performance incentive plans in education are compromised by goal distortion, gaming, and corruption. Education policy makers who design such plans have paid insufficient attention to similar experiences in other fields. This paper describes institutions in health care, job training and welfare administration, and in the private…

  19. Effects of Adult Education Vouchers on the Labor Market: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 11-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwerdt, Guido; Messer, Dolores; Woessmann, Ludger; Wolter, Stefan C.

    2011-01-01

    Lifelong learning is often promoted in ageing societies, but little is known about its returns or governments' ability to advance it. This paper evaluates the effects of a large-scale randomized field experiment issuing vouchers for adult education in Switzerland. We find no significant average effects of voucher-induced adult education on…

  20. Work-family conflicts and work performance.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lawrence; David, Emily M

    2009-08-01

    Prior research indicates that work-family conflict interferes with family far more than it interferes with work. Conservation of resources provides a possible explanation: when shifting resources from family is no longer sufficient to maintain satisfactory work performance, then workers must acquire additional resources or reduce investments in work. One source of such additional resources could be high performance peers in the work group. The performance of workers with resource-rich peers may be less adversely affected by work-family conflict. In this study, 136 employees of a wholesale distribution firm (61% women, 62% minority) working in groups of 7 to 11 in manual labor and low-level administrative jobs rated their own work-to-family conflict. Their supervisors rated workers' performance. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that work-to-family conflict increasingly adversely affected job performance as work group performance decreased. Hence, work group performance may be an important moderator of the effects of work-family conflict.

  1. Combined additive manufacturing approaches in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Giannitelli, S M; Mozetic, P; Trombetta, M; Rainer, A

    2015-09-01

    Advances introduced by additive manufacturing (AM) have significantly improved the control over the microarchitecture of scaffolds for tissue engineering. This has led to the flourishing of research works addressing the optimization of AM scaffolds microarchitecture to optimally trade-off between conflicting requirements (e.g. mechanical stiffness and porosity level). A fascinating trend concerns the integration of AM with other scaffold fabrication methods (i.e. "combined" AM), leading to hybrid architectures with complementary structural features. Although this innovative approach is still at its beginning, significant results have been achieved in terms of improved biological response to the scaffold, especially targeting the regeneration of complex tissues. This review paper reports the state of the art in the field of combined AM, posing the accent on recent trends, challenges, and future perspectives.

  2. Prioritizing sleep for healthy work schedules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Good sleep is advantageous to the quality of life. Sleep-related benefits are particularly helpful for the working class, since poor or inadequate amounts of sleep degrade work productivity and overall health. This review paper explores the essential role of sleep in healthy work schedules and primarily focuses on the timing of sleep in relation to the work period (that is, before, during and after work). Data from laboratory, field and modeling studies indicate that consistent amounts of sleep prior to work are fundamental to improved performance and alertness in the workplace. In addition, planned naps taken during work maintain appropriate levels of waking function for both daytime and night-time work. Clearly, sufficient sleep after work is vital in promoting recovery from fatigue. Recent data also suggest that the time interval between shifts should be adjusted according to the biological timing of sleep. Although sleep is more likely to be replaced by job and other activities in the real life, research shows that it is worthwhile to revise the work schedules in order to optimize sleep before, sometime during and after the work period. Therefore, we suggest establishing work-sleep balance, similar to work-life balance, as a principle for designing and improving work schedules. PMID:22738292

  3. Occupational Activities of Nonacademic and Academic Pedagogues Working in the Field of Childhood Education--An Investigation of Differences and Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smidt, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Nonacademic and academic pedagogues working in childhood education are involved in multiple occupational activities. Theoretical frameworks focussing on career development and processes of professionalisation may provide hints about differences in the occupational activities of nonacademic and academic pedagogues as well as with regard to how…

  4. Yoga for Children in the Mirror of the Science: Working Spectrum and Practice Fields of the Training of Relaxation with Elements of Yoga for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stueck, M.; Gloeckner, N.

    2005-01-01

    The latest research work showed a clear increase in stress consequences for younger children related to experience, behaviour and health (among other things, fear to fail and psychosomatic disorders). In contrast, only a few stress-handling programmes are available specifically for children; a large part covers stress-handling training courses…

  5. The Social Dynamics of Color, Class, and Gender: Afro-American Work and Community in the Southern West Virginia Coal Fields, 1915-1932.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Joe W.

    This essay focuses on southern West Virginia between 1915 and 1932 to explore the dynamics of Afro-American work and community life in the Appalachian region. More specifically, it analyzes the rise and expansion of the black coal mining proletariat, the role of black men and women in the process, and the impact of the proletarianization on black…

  6. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: A review of current work. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Jackson, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, the authors developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60 (Co sources). Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections.

  7. Shuttle Experimental Radar for Geological Exploration (SERGE) project: Field work relating to the Shuttle Experimental Radar A (SIR-A) in Brazil (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balieiro, M. G.; Martini, P. R.; Dossantos, J. R.; Demattos, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The ground observations undertaken over the northern position of Minas Gerais State, and part of Distrito Federal from 7 to 12 December 1982, along the Space Shuttle 2 flying orbit 22 of November 1981 are described. Field data related mostly with lithology, geological structures and forest cover, and specific geomorphological and pedological aspects were collected. Ground data are applied to evaluate the SIR-A Experiment, developed in the Space Shuttle-2 mission for natural resources mapping and prospecting.

  8. Working Group 7 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

    2012-06-10

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  9. On the neurocomputer model of the "living state" of matter and its "biological field" (in the light of G. Ling and E. Bauer's works)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made on the basis of the works of G. Ling (USA) and E. Bauer (USSR) to describe and analyze from a unified theoretical and experimental position the neurocomputer model of the "living state" of matter, the physical nature and the mechanisms of physiological resting-state and activity. These are considered as a precondition of understanding anticipatory phenomena in biosystems.

  10. Combining Field and Laboratory Experiments in Order to Understand Interactions Between Flow, Sediment, Vegetation And Bank Erosion in Riparian Rehabilitation Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Gorrick, S.; Kalma, J.; Cook, N.; Outhet, D.; Raine, A.

    2005-12-01

    Riparian lands are important for maintaining viable ecosystems, improving water quality and reducing sediment yields. Yet, riparian lands are frequently neglected, degraded and poorly managed. In many Australian riverine zones clearing or grazing of native riparian vegetation has resulted in varying degrees of erosion, sedimentation and degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Reintroducing riparian vegetation is one of the preferred methods for improving bank stability, reducing bank erosion to natural rates and rehabilitating channels. The present research aims to explore how reintroduced riparian vegetation modifies the flow and sediment transport patterns and at the same time how the vegetation is affected by flow and sediment. Both field experimentation and laboratory studies will lead to basic understanding of the processes involved and will help the efficient design of plantings for riparian rehabilitation. In order to be able to reproduce the most important processes in a laboratory physical model, a field site with a relatively simple geometry has been selected for the study. The site is on a small sand bed stream in the Hunter Valley in NSW. The reach has a large radius bend with no riparian vegetation on the outer bank, where erosion occurs periodically. Reintroduction of vegetation is planned for October 2005, with pre and post monitoring stages running from March 2005 to August 2008. Laboratory physical modelling based on field characteristics and with varying flow discharges and plant arrangement will provide information to help develop, adapt and test quantitative models of flow dynamics, sediment transport and bank erosion incorporating the effects of vegetation. These results can then be used by river managers when they are developing rehabilitation strategies.

  11. Supporting Field Instructors' Efforts to Help Students Improve Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Jessica M.; Holody, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Field instructors have often not felt empowered to address their concerns about a critical skill in their students' professional development: their students' writing. In this article, we explain ways that field education departments and social work faculty can support field instructors to improve their students' writing. In addition, we provide…

  12. Application of industrial hygiene techniques for work-place exposure assessment protocols related to petro-chemical exploration and production field activities

    SciTech Connect

    Koehn, J.

    1995-12-31

    Standard industrial hygiene techniques for recognition, evaluation, and control can be directly applied to development of technical protocols for workplace exposure assessment activities for a variety of field site locations. Categories of occupational hazards include chemical and physical agents. Examples of these types of hazards directly related to oil and gas exploration and production workplaces include hydrocarbons, benzene, oil mist, hydrogen sulfide, Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), asbestos-containing materials, and noise. Specific components of well process chemicals include potential hazardous chemical substances such as methanol, acrolein, chlorine dioxide, and hydrochloric acid. Other types of exposure hazards may result from non-routine conduct of sandblasting and painting operations.

  13. Evolution of a highly dilatant fault zone in the grabens of Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA - integrating field work, ground penetrating radar and airborne imagery analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; Grützner, C.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.; Reicherter, K.; Mertens, J.

    2015-03-01

    The grabens of the Canyonlands National Park are a young and active system of sub-parallel, arcuate grabens, whose evolution is the result of salt movement in the subsurface and a slight regional tilt of the faulted strata. We present results of ground penetrating radar surveys in combination with field observations and analysis of high resolution airborne imagery. GPR data show intense faulting of the Quaternary sediments at the flat graben floors, implying a more complex fault structure than visible at the surface. Direct measurements of heave and throw at several locations to infer fault dips at depth, combined with observations of primary joint surfaces in the upper 100 m suggest a model of the highly dilatant fault geometry in profile. Sinkholes observed in the field as well as in airborne imagery give insights in local massive dilatancy and show where water and sediments are transported underground. Based on correlations of paleosols observed in outcrops and GPR profiles, we argue that the grabens in Canyonlands National Park are either older than previously assumed, or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

  14. Proper use of sludge-control additives in residential heating oil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tatnall, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Discussed are various aspects of heating oil `sludge`: How it forms, typical problems it causes, how sludge-control additives work, what should be expected of them, and what happens in a contaminated system when such additives are used. Test results from laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that performance of commercially available additives varies greatly. The concept of `end-of-the-line` treatment is described and compared with bulk fuel treatment. A procedure is described whereby a retailer can test additives himself, and thus determine just what those additives will or will not do for his business. Finally, the economics of an effective treatment program are outlined.

  15. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-03-04

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) to demonstrate Big Area Additive Manufacturing which increases the speed of the additive manufacturing (AM) process by over 1000X, increases the size of parts by over 10X and shows a cost reduction of over 100X. ORNL worked with CI to transition the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology from a proof-of-principle (TRL 2-3) demonstration to a prototype product stage (TRL 7-8).

  16. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  17. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  18. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  19. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  20. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  1. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  2. [The voluntary medical care during the First World War. The work of the nursing staff in the military field hospitals on the eastern and western frontlines].

    PubMed

    Stölzle, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The voluntary medical care consisted of civilians who were provided to the medical corps in the First World War for the first time in this great dimension. The nursing staff on the eastern and the western German frontlines were sending letters back home, some of them were drafting diaries due to the special event or recorded their experiences after the war. Besides the narratives of their private impressions, these documents are reflecting their nursing work, which the nursing staff had to achieve. An important factor was, that the patients were soldiers. Conflicts in the cooperation with the medical staff and among the nurses did not seem to have influenced a good quality of care, however it facilitated a harmonic coexistence and above all, it helped to sustain behind the fronts. The study of the nursing care and the relationship with patients and among the staff reflects on the meaning of nursing care for the staff.

  3. Effect of combined addition of nano-SiC and nano-Ho2O3 on the in-field critical current density of MgB2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Neson; Vinod, K.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Roy, S. B.; Syamaprasad, U.

    2010-01-01

    MgB2 superconducting samples added with nano-Ho2O3 (n-Ho2O3) and/or nano-SiC (n-SiC) have been prepared by an in situ solid state reaction method to investigate and compare the combined and individual effects of n-SiC and n-Ho2O3 on a crystal structure, critical temperature (TC), and critical current density (JC) of MgB2. All the doped samples exhibit significantly enhanced in-field JC and the codoped sample with 2.5 wt % n-Ho2O3 and 5 wt % n-SiC gives the best performance in in-field JC, and the enhancement is around 100 times and 2 times greater than the undoped and monodoped n-SiC samples, respectively, at 5 K and 8 T. For the n-SiC added sample, lattice distortions due to C substitution on the B site and the formation of reacted phase Mg2Si as flux pinners cause enhanced JC up to the maximum field studied (8 T). While in the n-Ho2O3 added sample, a reacted phase HoB4 having a strong magnetic moment forms, without any substitution at the Mg or B site, which acts as a flux pinner in order to enhance the in-field JC. Accordingly the best codoped sample exhibits these combined benefits of n-SiC and n-Ho2O3 in MgB2 superconductor.

  4. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  5. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  6. 75 FR 72815 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Reclamation-- Ephrata Field Office, 32 C Street, NW., Ephrata, WA. NPA: Good Works, Inc., Spokane, WA... Instrumentation (PEO STRI), 12350 Research Parkway, Orlando, FL. NPA: Able Forces, Inc., Front Royal,...

  7. The lost micro-deserts of the Patuxent River using landscape history, insect and plant specimens, and field work to detect and define a unique community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Droege, S.; Davis, C.A.; Steiner, W.E.; =Mawdsley, J.

    2009-01-01

    Historical and recent records of both plants and insects are synthesized for uplands along the eastern edge of Maryland?s Patuxent River from the edge of the Piedmont south to Jug Bay. This strip is characterized by deep sandy soils found in the Evesboro and Galestown sandy loams soil series. Within this narrow strip there exists a unique flora and fauna adapted to open dry sandy soils and occurring in small remnant patches associated with old sand mining operations and scattered protected areas. We illustrate the uniqueness of these sites using four groups, vascular plants, tenebrionid beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae), and bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila). Within each of these groups, rare species were detected whose populations were locally restricted to this soil type and whose nearest known populations were often hundreds of kilometers away. In addition to documenting the direct conservation importance of these small sandy openings along the Patuxent, we contrast the lack of any indication from vertebrate inventories that this region is unique. The combination of plant and insect inventories appears to be a better means of clarifying a site?s importance than does any survey of a single taxonomic group.

  8. Neogene carbonate exploration play concepts for Northern New Guinea: New iteration from field work and seismic stratigraphy along the Northern New Guinea Fault Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Pigott, J.D.; Geiger, C. )

    1994-07-01

    Recent field reconnaissance, petrography, nanno and foraminifera age determinations, and seismic stratigraphy of the Sepik and Piore subbasins of northern New Guinea reveal the existence of an extensive, tectonically unstable, Miocene-Pliocene carbonate shelf system. These findings represent the first recorded evidence of northern Papuan limestones coeval in age to those of the hydrocarbon productive Salawati Basin of Irian Jaya. Moreover, these observations also demonstrate the significance of episodic activities of the northern New Guinea fault zone upon the changes in carbonate sedimentation and diagenesis. During the Neogene, algal biosparites to foraminiferal biomicrites defined the clean portion of a mixed clastic-carbonate shelf system of the northern New Guinea basin, which began at the central New Guinea cordillera and deepened northward. This shelf was interrupted by coral-coralline algal boundstone fringing- to patch-reef buildups with associated skeletal grainstones. Clean carbonates were spatially and temporally restricted to basement blocks, which episodically underwent uplift while terrigenous dilutes carbonates were more common in adjacently subsiding basement block bathymetric lows. These tectonic expressions were caused by the spatially transient nature of constraining bends of the evolving north New Guinea faults. As shown by seismic stratigraphy, by the late Miocene to the early Pliocene the uplift of the Bewani-Torricelli Mountains sagittally divided the shelf of the northern New Guinea basin into the Ramu-Sepik and the Piore basins. Continued regional sinistral transpression between the Pacific and the New Guinea leading edge of the Indo-Australian plates led to the reverse tilting of the Piore basin, the shallowing of the former distal shelf with concomitant extensive biolithite development (e.g., on subsiding volcanic islands) eventual uplifting of the Oenake Range, and en echelon faulting of the Bewani-Torricelli Mountains.

  9. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  10. Work Evaluation in Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruitt, Walter, Ed.; Pacinelli, Ralph N., Ed.

    The papers included in the document were prepared for the National Institute on Work Evaluation by well-known and emerging experts in the field of work evaluation, and provided them the opportunity to express their views, experience and acquired knowledge on specific aspects of the subject and the state-of-the-art. Titles of the papers are: Work…

  11. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  12. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  13. Laboratory and field evaluation of formulated Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis as a feed additive and using topical applications for control of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) larvae in caged-poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Mwamburi, L A; Laing, M D; Miller, R

    2011-02-01

    Infestations of house flies, Musca domestica L., are a continual problem around poultry establishments. Acute toxicity of two commercial Bacillus thuringiensis variety israelensis (Bti) formulations (water-dispersible granules and bran formulation) was evaluated against larvae in the laboratory and against natural populations of M. domestica larvae in the field applied in feed to chickens and as topical applications in the poultry houses. Bioassay data showed that susceptibility of M. domestica larvae increased to a given concentration of Bti as the duration of exposure increased. In the laboratory studies, the LC(50) values of Bti for the larvae ranged between 65 and 77.4 μg/ml. In the field, a concentration of 10 g Bti/kg of feed resulted in 90% reduction of larvae at 4 wk after treatment. A higher concentration (2 g/liter) of Bti in spray applications was not significantly more effective than the lower concentration of 1 g/liter. Adding Bti to chicken feed is potentially an efficient measure for the management and control of house flies in caged-poultry facilities. PMID:22182611

  14. Laboratory and field evaluation of formulated Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis as a feed additive and using topical applications for control of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) larvae in caged-poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Mwamburi, L A; Laing, M D; Miller, R

    2011-02-01

    Infestations of house flies, Musca domestica L., are a continual problem around poultry establishments. Acute toxicity of two commercial Bacillus thuringiensis variety israelensis (Bti) formulations (water-dispersible granules and bran formulation) was evaluated against larvae in the laboratory and against natural populations of M. domestica larvae in the field applied in feed to chickens and as topical applications in the poultry houses. Bioassay data showed that susceptibility of M. domestica larvae increased to a given concentration of Bti as the duration of exposure increased. In the laboratory studies, the LC(50) values of Bti for the larvae ranged between 65 and 77.4 μg/ml. In the field, a concentration of 10 g Bti/kg of feed resulted in 90% reduction of larvae at 4 wk after treatment. A higher concentration (2 g/liter) of Bti in spray applications was not significantly more effective than the lower concentration of 1 g/liter. Adding Bti to chicken feed is potentially an efficient measure for the management and control of house flies in caged-poultry facilities.

  15. Working Mothers

    MedlinePlus

    ... for their child when child care arrangements have broken down, or to take their child to necessary appointments. When to Return to Work A woman’s decision to return to work must take into account her own needs as well as those of her family. If you are considering returning to work, try ...

  16. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  17. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  18. Interprofessional leadership training in MCH social work.

    PubMed

    Pecukonis, Edward; Doyle, Otima; Acquavita, Shauna; Aparicio, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Maya; Vanidestine, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The need to train health social workers to practice interprofessionally is an essential goal of social work education. Although most health social workers have exposure to multidisciplinary practice within their field work, few social work education programs incorporate interprofessional learning as an integrated component of both course work and field experiences (McPherson, Headrick, & Moss, 2001; Reeves, Lewin, Espin, & Zwaranstein, 2010; Weinstein, Whittington, & Leiba, 2003). In addition, little is written about the kinds of curricula that would effectively promote interdisciplinary training for social work students. These findings are particularly puzzling since there is increasing and compelling evidence that interdisciplinary training improves health outcomes (IOM, 2001). This article describes a social work education program that incorporates an Interprofessional education and leadership curriculum for Maternal and Child Health Social Work (MCHSW) at the University of Maryland's School of Social Work. The University of Maryland's Interprofesisonal Training Model is described along with the components needed to formulate an interdisciplinary learning experience. Various outcomes and lessons learned are discussed. PMID:23947539

  19. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  20. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  1. Design Methodology of an Equalizer for Unipolar Non Return to Zero Binary Signals in the Presence of Additive White Gaussian Noise Using a Time Delay Neural Network on a Field Programmable Gate Array

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Suárez, Santiago T.; Travieso González, Carlos M.; Alonso Hernández, Jesús B.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a design methodology for designing an artificial neural network as an equalizer for a binary signal. Firstly, the system is modelled in floating point format using Matlab. Afterward, the design is described for a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) using fixed point format. The FPGA design is based on the System Generator from Xilinx, which is a design tool over Simulink of Matlab. System Generator allows one to design in a fast and flexible way. It uses low level details of the circuits and the functionality of the system can be fully tested. System Generator can be used to check the architecture and to analyse the effect of the number of bits on the system performance. Finally the System Generator design is compiled for the Xilinx Integrated System Environment (ISE) and the system is described using a hardware description language. In ISE the circuits are managed with high level details and physical performances are obtained. In the Conclusions section, some modifications are proposed to improve the methodology and to ensure portability across FPGA manufacturers.

  2. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  3. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  4. Sarks as additional fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Frampton, Paul H.; Jack Ng, Y.; Nishino, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Osamu

    1991-03-01

    An extension of the standard model is proposed. The gauge group is SU(2) X ⊗ SU(3) C ⊗ SU(2) S ⊗ U(1) Q, where all gauge symmetries are unbroken. The colour and electric charge are combined with SU(2) S which becomes strongly coupled at approximately 500 GeV and binds preons to form fermionic and vector bound states. The usual quarks and leptons are singlets under SU(2) X but additional fermions, called sarks. transform under it and the electroweak group. The present model explains why no more than three light quark-lepton families can exist. Neutral sark baryons, called narks, are candidates for the cosmological dark matter having the characteristics designed for WIMPS. Further phenomenological implications of sarks are analyzed i including electron-positron annihilation. Z 0 decay, flavor-changing neutral currents. baryon-number non-conservation, sarkonium and the neutron electric dipole moment.

  5. Social Work and Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Meyer, Ed.

    Of special interest for social work students, teachers, and practitioners, the collection of 94 articles presents a broad survey of the field of mental retardation particularly as it relates to social work. The articles indicate both past work and the current status of social work practice with the mentally retarded. Material includes background…

  6. Working Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    The resurgence of "lifelong learning" has renewed consideration of the nature of "working knowledge." Lifelong learning has many aspects, including construction and distribution of individuals' very self-hood, educational institutions' role in capturing informal experiences, and the juggling required between family and work-based responsibilities.…

  7. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  8. Influence of an Electric Field on the Propagation of a Photon in a Magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a constant and uniform magnetic field is less than the Schwinger critical value. In turn, an additional constant and uniform electric field is taken much smaller than the magnetic field value. The propagation of a photon in this electromagnetic field is investigating. In particular, in the presence of a weak electric field, the root divergence is absent in the photon effective mass near the thresholds of pair creation. The effective mass of a real photon with a preset polarization is considered in the quantum energy region as well as in the quasiclassical one.

  9. Lichenometry: Field Work for Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Douglas P.; Newton, Lynn D.

    1989-01-01

    Lichenometry is described for use in the study of biology and physical weathering. Discussed are lichens in general and an outline for studying growth and ecology. A problem solving format is used. (CW)

  10. Water Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van De Walle, Carol

    1988-01-01

    Describes a two-day field trip, along with follow-up classroom activities and experiments which relate to water resources and water quality. Discusses how trips to a lake and water treatment facilities can enhance appreciation of water. (TW)

  11. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  12. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  13. Interactive effects of nutrient additions and predation on infaunal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Posey, M.H.; Alphin, T.D.; Cahoon, L.; Lindquist, D.; Becker, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrient additions represent an important anthropogenic stress on coastal ecosystems. At moderate levels, increased nutrients may lead to increased primary production and, possibly, to increased biomass of consumers although complex trophic interactions may modify or mask these effects. We examined the influence of nutrient additions and interactive effects of trophic interactions (predation) on benthic infaunal composition and abundances through small-scale field experiments in 2 estuaries that differed in ambient nutrient conditions. A blocked experimental design was used that allowed an assessment of direct nutrient effects in the presence and absence of predation by epibenthic predators as well as an assessment of the independent effects of predation. Benthic microalgal production increased with experimental nutrient additions and was greater when infaunal abundances were lower, but there were no significant interactions between these factors. Increased abundances of one infaunal taxa, Laeonereis culveri, as well as the grazer feeding guild were observed with nutrient additions and a number of taxa exhibited higher abundances with predator exclusion. In contrast to results from freshwater systems there were no significant interactive effects between nutrient additions and predator exclusion as was predicted. The infaunal responses observed here emphasize the importance of both bottom-up (nutrient addition and primary producer driven) and top-down (predation) controls in structuring benthic communities. These processes may work at different spatial and temporal scales, and affect different taxa, making observation of potential interactive effects difficult.

  14. [Wet work].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Krecisz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Wet work is one of the most important risk factors of occupational skin diseases. Exposure of hands to the wet environment for more than 2 hours daily, wearing moisture-proof protective gloves for a corresponding period of time or necessity to wash hands frequently lead to the disruption of epidermal stratum corneum, damage to skin barrier function and induction of irritant contact dermatitis. It may also promote penetration of allergens into the skin and increase the risk of sensitization to occupational allergens. Exposure to wet work plays a significant role in occupations, such as hairdressers and barbers, nurses and other health care workers, cleaning staff, food handlers and metalworkers. It is more common among women because many occupations involving wet work are female-dominated. The incidence of wet-work-induced occupational skin diseases can be reduced by taking appropriate preventive measures. These include identification of high-risk groups, education of workers, organization of work enabling to minimize the exposure to wet work, use of personal protective equipment and skin care after work.

  15. Additive Manufacturing: Making Imagination the Major Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yuwei; Lados, Diana A.; LaGoy, Jane L.

    2014-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) refers to an advanced technology used for the fabrication of three-dimensional near-net-shaped functional components directly from computer models, using unit materials. The fundamentals and working principle of AM offer several advantages, including near-net-shape capabilities, superior design and geometrical flexibility, innovative multi-material fabrication, reduced tooling and fixturing, shorter cycle time for design and manufacturing, instant local production at a global scale, and material, energy, and cost efficiency. Well suiting the requests of modern manufacturing climate, AM is viewed as the new industrial revolution, making its way into a continuously increasing number of industries, such as aerospace, defense, automotive, medical, architecture, art, jewelry, and food. This overview was created to relate the historical evolution of the AM technology to its state-of-the-art developments and emerging applications. Generic thoughts on the microstructural characteristics, properties, and performance of AM-fabricated materials will also be discussed, primarily related to metallic materials. This write-up will introduce the general reader to specifics of the AM field vis-à-vis advantages and common techniques, materials and properties, current applications, and future opportunities.

  16. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  17. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  18. Is New Work Good Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Andy

    Some new work is good work. Quality is ultimately defined by the individual. However, these perceptions are inevitably colored by the circumstances in which people find themselves, by the time, place, and wide range of motivations for having to do a particular job in the first place. One person's quality may be another's purgatory and vice versa.…

  19. Team Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, David

    1999-01-01

    Explains how a team cleaning approach can be cost-effective and efficient means of school maintenance. Assigning staffing responsibilities and work schedules are addressed and the advantages of using a team system are explained. (GR)

  20. Working Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the family's values, fathers may assume more responsibility for child care and housework than has traditionally ... and fatigue as they try to juggle their responsibilities at home and at work. If you are ...

  1. [Team and team work].

    PubMed

    Richer, E

    1990-01-01

    The coordinator draws conclusions on the symposium day devoted to the teams. After defining "team" he gives several thoughts on the team's work its advantages and its difficulties. During this day the teams talked about their questions and their certainties in the various fields of their work. They also discussed their hard ships and their need of psychological support which the hospital departments do not have the means to satisfy.

  2. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  3. FFTF Work Control Center

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A centralized Work Control Center (WCC) is responsible for assuring that maintenance and modification of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is performed in accordance with written procedures that ensure design integrity, personnel and public safety, and equipment and system availability for the computerized Master Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS). Each maintenance task is logged into MIDAS from a Work Request from that has been reviewed and prioritized by the WCC. Thereafter, MIDAS is used to track schedule, manpower and material requirements; authorize field work; and close out the maintenance activity.

  4. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  5. Military Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Nikki R.

    2015-01-01

    Military social work is a specialized field of practice spanning the micro-macro continuum and requiring advanced social work knowledge and skills. The complex behavioral health problems and service needs of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans highlight the need for highly trained social work professionals who can provide militarily relevant and…

  6. Working Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students need space to gather, share ideas, talk, develop common understanding and work to create greater knowledge. This focus on collaboration has put a strain on group study spaces. Students need to collaborate spontaneously, and scheduling time in a study room is not conducive to spur-of-the-moment collaboration. At many education…

  7. Working Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Annemaree; Somerville, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore the contribution that an information literacy approach to the empirical study of workplace learning can make to how people understand and conceptualise workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: Three cohorts of fire-fighters working in two regional locations in NSW, Australia were…

  8. Wetlands Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Linda; Blanchard, Pamela Borne

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how a biology teacher's search for a cross-curricular project in science, math, history, and environmental science, that would help her students connect what they were learning in the classroom to their everyday life, resulted in an ongoing stewardship project. Working together with the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program…

  9. Biotechnology Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Spenciner, Loraine

    There have been few initiatives addressing the improvement of science education for students with disabilities. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Biotechnology Works is a summer institute in immunology and genetics for students with disabilities, high school science teachers, and high school counselors. During the 1998 summer session,…

  10. Toward a Youth Work Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emslie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in the professionalization of the youth work field in Australia and the United States. In this article I draw on relevant literature from the sociology of professions to explore the appeal of professionalization for youth work. The interest in professionalism is examined along with the strategies youth work practitioners…

  11. Leading Work with Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Roger, Ed.; Benjamin, Cathy, Ed.; Curran, Sheila, Ed.; Hunter, Rob, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Leading Work with Young People" provides a selection of writing from a complex and dynamic field of work. The editors bring together key readings and newly commissioned material to present a variety of theoretical and practical perspectives on leading and managing work with young people. The book will equip students with the knowledge, skills,…

  12. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  13. Aspects of quantum work.

    PubMed

    Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Various approaches of defining and determining work performed on a quantum system are compared. Any operational definition of work, however, must allow for two facts: first, that work characterizes a process rather than an instantaneous state of a system and, second, that quantum systems are sensitive to the interactions with a measurement apparatus. We compare different measurement scenarios on the basis of the resulting postmeasurement states and the according probabilities for finding a particular work value. In particular, we analyze a recently proposed work meter for the case of a Gaussian pointer state and compare it with the results obtained by two projective and, alternatively, two Gaussian measurements. In the limit of a strong effective measurement strength the work distribution of projective two energy measurements can be recovered. In the opposite limit the average of work becomes independent of any measurement. Yet the fluctuations about this value diverge. The performance of the work meter is illustrated by the example of a spin in a suddenly changing magnetic field.

  14. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  15. The "working" of working memory.

    PubMed

    Miller, Earl K

    2013-12-01

    This review examines the evidence for a neurobiological explanation of executive functions of working memory. We suggest that executive control stems from information about task rules acquired by mixed selective, adaptive coding, multifunctional neurons in the prefrontal cortex. The output of these neurons dynamically links the cortex-wide networks needed to complete the task. The linking may occur via synchronizing of neural rhythms, which may explain why we have a limited capacity for simultaneous thought.

  16. Additive Manufacturing: From Rapid Prototyping to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers tremendous promise for the rocket propulsion community. Foundational work must be performed to ensure the safe performance of AM parts. Government, industry, and academia must collaborate in the characterization, design, modeling, and process control to accelerate the certification of AM parts for human-rated flight.

  17. Combining Dedicated Online Training and Apprenticeships in the Field to Assist in Professionalization of Humanitarian Aid Workers: a 2-year Pilot Project for Anesthesia and Intensive Care Residents Working in Resource Constrained and Low-income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Foletti, Marco; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Ripoll Gallardo, Alba; Burkle, Frederick M.; Della Corte, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As a result of the gaps in humanitarian response highlighted by several reports, the international community called for an increased professionalization of humanitarian aid workers. This paper describes a pilot project by an Italian university and a non-profit, non-governmental organization to implement a medical apprenticeship in low-income countries during Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine residencies. Methods: Before deployment, participants were required to complete a dedicated online training course about safety and security in the field, principles of anesthesia at the district hospital level, emergency and essential surgical care, essentials of medical treatment in resource-constrained environments and psychological support in emergencies. Results: At the end of the program, a qualitative self-evaluation questionnaire administered to participants highlighted how the project allowed the participants to advance their professional skills when working in a low-resource environment, while also mastering their adapting skills and the ability to interact and cooperate with local healthcare personnel. The project also proved to be a means for personal growth, making these experiences a recommendation for all residents as a necessary step for the professionalization of healthcare personnel involved in humanitarian aid. PMID:25642362

  18. Possibilities of obtaining an additional water supply near Hingham, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brashears, M.L.

    1942-01-01

    In February 1942 the War Production Board requested the U.S. Geological Survey to furnish information on the possibilities of obtaining additional water supply near the shore at Hingham, Mass. It was estimated that 300,000 to 500,000 gallons a day was needed. On February 25 and 26, 1942, a brief field study of the ground-water conditions was made in an area about 2 miles wide along the shore of Hingham Bay at Hingham, Mass. Most of this area is shown on the topographic map of the Weymouth Quadrangle, Mass., surveyed by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1936. The field work of the ground-water study consisted mainly of surface transverses and the examination of road cuts and gravel pits. In addition, well records and other data were collected from well drillers and public officials. Acknowledgement is made to H. B. Kinnison, district engineer, U.S. Geological Survey, at Boston, Mass., for his assistance and suggestions.

  19. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Cancer.gov

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  20. Social Work Practice In Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, Rex A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes a program of social services provided by a large corporation for employees with personal problems. Graduate students in social work help in the program for field experience. Results indicate a significant drop in absenteeism within the company. (HMV)

  1. Technical work plan for Surface Impoundments Operable Unit engineering support studies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a comprehensive work plan which, when utilized as a data collection guide for field activities, will provide the necessary information required to complete a report on geotechnical properties of the sediments contained in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Detailed guidance is provided for the following activities: collection of samples from the impoundments; compressive strength testing of the raw sediments; compressive strength testing of the structurally modified (lime and cement additives) sediments; testing for sediment physical properties and settling rates; testing for sediment dewatering characteristics; testing for radiation activity during the field work; testing for polymer additions that may enhance settling. The work plan additionally provides guidance and examples for the preparation of documents necessary to establish readiness for safe and satisfactory performance of the field activities. An outline for the format requested for a report of these data is also provided.

  2. Evidence for direct effect of magnetic fields on neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F. ); Benane, S.G.; House, D.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Electric fields can cause changes in cell responses both in vitro and in vivo. Alternating magnetic fields have been proposed to act through the electric fields induced in the conducting medium surrounding the cells. We have used a simple exposure system to test the relative contribution of magnetic fields compared to induced electric fields in a standard PC-12 cell culture assay, in which cells respond to nerve growth factor by producing neurites. This response to stimulation by nerve growth factor is inhibited by sinusoidal, 50-Hz magnetic fields at field strengths below 10 [mu]T (100 mG). A standard procedure to distinguish magnetic- vs. electric-field effects demonstrates that the induced electric field is not involved. Additional work is necessary to identify the critical reaction site (or sites), and to establish the molecular mechanisms responsible for these result, 27 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  4. [Patch-testing methods: additional specialised or additional series].

    PubMed

    Cleenewerck, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The tests in the European standard battery must occasionally be supplemented by specialised or additional batteries, particularly where the contact allergy is thought to be of occupational origin. These additional batteries cover all allergens associated with various professional activities (hairdressing, baking, dentistry, printing, etc.) and with different classes of materials and chemical products (glue, plastic, rubber...). These additional tests may also include personal items used by patients on a daily basis such as cosmetics, shoes, plants, textiles and so on.

  5. Effects of maternally exposed colouring food additives on cognitive performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Doguc, Duygu Kumbul; Ceyhan, Betul Mermi; Ozturk, Mustafa; Gultekin, Fatih

    2013-08-01

    Artificial food colourings and additives (AFCAs) have long been suggested to adversely affect the learning and behaviour in children. In this study, we aimed to provide additional data to clarify the possible side effects of colouring additives on behaviour and memory. We administered acceptable daily intake values of AFCAs as a mixture (Eritrosin, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red AC, Sunset Yellow FCF, Tartrazin, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Azorubin and Indigotin) to female rats before and during gestation and then tested their effects on behaviour and on spatial working memory in their offspring. Effects on spatial learning and memory were evaluated by Morris water maze, behavioural effects were evaluated by open-field test and forced swim test. Our results showed that commonly used artificial food colourings have no adverse effects on spatial working memory and did not create a depressive behaviour in offspring. But they showed a few significant effects on locomotor activity as AFCAs increased some parameters of locomotor activity. PMID:22323474

  6. Engaging Students: The Next Level of Working on the Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlechty, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    In Phillip Schlechty's best-selling book "Working on the Work", he outlined a motivational framework for improving student performance by improving the quality of schools designed for students. "Engaging Students" offers a next-step resource in which Schlechty incorporates what he's learned from the field and from the hundreds of workshops he and…

  7. The Work, the Workplace, and the Work Force of Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Claudia

    1995-01-01

    Ann McLaughlin, a former secretary of labor, discusses her views on the future of the workplace. She feels that to solve the impending problem of educational deficits among the work force, employers will begin their own educational programs, improving both employee loyalty and work force mobility. Includes predictions for future growth fields.…

  8. Revisiting Additivity Violation of Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Motohisa

    2014-12-01

    We prove additivity violation of minimum output entropy of quantum channels by straightforward application of -net argument and Lévy's lemma. The additivity conjecture was disproved initially by Hastings. Later, a proof via asymptotic geometric analysis was presented by Aubrun, Szarek and Werner, which uses Dudley's bound on Gaussian process (or Dvoretzky's theorem with Schechtman's improvement). In this paper, we develop another proof along Dvoretzky's theorem in Milman's view, showing additivity violation in broader regimes than the existing proofs. Importantly,Dvoretzky's theorem works well with norms to give strong statements, but these techniques can be extended to functions which have norm-like structures-positive homogeneity and triangle inequality. Then, a connection between Hastings' method and ours is also discussed. In addition, we make some comments on relations between regularized minimum output entropy and classical capacity of quantum channels.

  9. The Training and Field Work Experiences of Community Health Workers conducting non-invasive, population-based screening for Cardiovascular Disease in Four Communities in Low and Middle-Income Settings

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Catalina A.; Montano, Carlos Mendoza; Gaziano, Thomas A.; Levitt, Naomi; Rivera-Andrade, Alvaro; Carrasco, Diana Munguía; Zulu, Jabu; Khanam, Masuma Akter; Puoane, Thandi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and is proving difficult to combat due to the emphasis on improving outcomes in maternal and child health and infectious diseases, against a backdrop of severe human resource and infrastructure constraints. Effective task-sharing from physicians or nurses to community health workers (CHWs) to conduct population-based screening for persons at risk, has the potential to mitigate the impact of CVD on vulnerable populations. CHWs in Bangladesh, Guatemala, Mexico, and South Africa were trained to conduct non-invasive population-based screening for persons at high risk for CVD. Objective (s) The objectives of this study were to quantitatively assess the performance of CHWs during training and to qualitatively capture their training and fieldwork experiences while conducting non-invasive screening for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in their communities. Methods Written tests were used to assess CHWs’ acquisition of content knowledge during training, and focus group discussions conducted to capture their training and fieldwork experiences. Results Training was effective at increasing the CHWs’ content knowledge of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and this knowledge was largely retained up to six months after the completion of field work. Common themes which need to be addressed when designing task sharing with CHWs in chronic diseases are identified, including language, respect, and compensation. The importance of having intimate knowledge of the community receiving services from design to implementation is underscored. Conclusions Effective training for screening for CVD in community settings should have a strong didactic core that is supplemented with culture-specific adaptations in the delivery of instruction. The incorporation of expert and intimate knowledge of the communities themselves is critical, from the design to implementation phases of training. Challenges such

  10. Anaerobic sludge digestion with a biocatalytic additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Fedde, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of a lactobacillus additive an anaerobic sludge digestion under normal, variable, and overload operating conditions. The additive was a whey fermentation product of an acid-tolerant strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus fortified with CaCO/sub 3/, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/, ferrous lactate, and lactic acid. The lactobacillus additive is multifunctional in nature and provides growth factors, metabolic intermediates, and enzymes needed for substrate degradation and cellular synthesis. The experimental work consisted of several pairs of parallel mesophilic (35/sup 0/C) digestion runs (control and test) conducted in five experimental phases. Baseline runs without the additive showed that the two experimental digesters had the same methane content, gas production rate (GPR), and ethane yield. The effect of the additive was to increase methane yield and GPR by about 5% (which was statistically significant) during digester operation at a loading rate (LR) of 3.2 kg VS/m/sup 3/-day and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 14 days. Data collected from the various experimental phases showed that the biochemical additive increased methane yield, gas production rate, and VS reduction, and decreased volatile acids accumulation. In addition, it enhanced digester buffer capacity and improved the fertilizer value and dewatering characteristics of the digested residue.

  11. Military Social Work: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Work Education

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Nikki R.

    2015-01-01

    Military social work is a specialized field of practice spanning the micro-macro continuum and requiring advanced social work knowledge and skills. The complex behavioral health problems and service needs of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans highlight the need for highly trained social work professionals who can provide militarily-relevant and culturally-responsive evidence-informed services. Responding to the military behavioral health workforce and service needs of recently returned veterans presents both opportunities and challenges for military social work education. This article discusses the rationale for a military social work specialization, the need for military social work education, and opportunities and challenges for social work education. An integrated model of intellectual capital is proposed to guide strategic planning for future military social work education. PMID:26089628

  12. Why Social Work Needs Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Relative to other fields, social work has been slow to adopt geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool for research and practice. This paper argues that GIS can benefit social work by: (1) continuing and strengthening the social survey tradition; (2) providing a framework for understanding human behavior; (3) identifying community needs and…

  13. Diesel fuel detergent additive performance and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, M.W.; Papachristos, M.J.; Williams, D.; Burton, J.

    1994-10-01

    Diesel fuel detergent additives are increasingly linked with high quality automotive diesel fuels. Both in Europe and in the USA, field problems associated with fuel injector coking or fouling have been experienced. In Europe indirect injection (IDI) light duty engines used in passenger cars were affected, while in the USA, a direct injection (DI) engine in heavy duty truck applications experienced field problems. In both cases, a fuel additive detergent performance test has evolved using an engine linked with the original field problem, although engine design modifications employed by the manufacturers have ensured improved operation in service. Increasing awareness of the potential for injector nozzle coking to cause deterioration in engine performance is coupled with a need to meet ever more stringent exhaust emissions legislation. These two requirements indicate that the use of detergency additives will continue to be associated with high quality diesel fuels. The paper examines detergency performance evaluated in a range of IDI and DI engines and correlates performance in the two most widely recognised test engines, namely the Peugeot 1.9 litre IDI, and Cummins L10 DI engines. 17 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  15. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  16. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  17. NASA-JSC antenna near-field measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, W. P.; Friederich, P. G.; Jenkins, B. M.; Jameson, C. R.; Estrada, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Work was completed on the near-field range control software. The capabilities of the data processing software were expanded with the addition of probe compensation. In addition, the user can process the measured data from the same computer terminal used for range control. The design of the laser metrology system was completed. It provides precise measruement of probe location during near-field measurements as well as position data for control of the translation beam and probe cart. A near-field range measurement system was designed, fabricated, and tested.

  18. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  19. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  20. Cormorant: Development of a complex field

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, J.H.; McKee, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Cormorant Field provides an example of the numerous changes which are required to the development plan for a large, complex field as the nature of its complexity becomes better known. Changes in the basic development and displacement pattern, the number and spacing of wells, and completion method have occurred as the structural, stratigraphic and diagenetic nature of the field has been uncovered. In addition, a better understanding of a key development constraint, the drilling reach, has allowed changes with significant cost savings. While a well thought out initial development plan was formulated for the field, close surveillance of geological results and field performance has been necessary to allow its almost continuous updating. This paper discusses studies and evaluations undertaken by Esso Exporation and Production U.K. to evaluate such changes. In addition to a discussion of each of the four fault blocks comprising the field, the following are addressed: (1) the role of detailed reservoir description work, (2) use of partial perforation techniques for waterflood control, and (3) the tailoring of reservoir monitoring to the specific problems of Cormorant. These studies were done to complement work done by the operator, Shell U.K. Exploration and Production, who prepared the base development plan and subsequent updates.