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Sample records for additional functional roles

  1. Functional role of the additional domains in inulosucrase (IslA) from Leuconostoc citreum CW28

    PubMed Central

    del Moral, Sandra; Olvera, Clarita; Rodriguez, Maria Elena; Munguia, Agustin Lopez

    2008-01-01

    Background Inulosucrase (IslA) from Leuconostoc citreum CW28 belongs to a new subfamily of multidomain fructosyltransferases (FTFs), containing additional domains from glucosyltransferases. It is not known what the function of the additional domains in this subfamily is. Results Through construction of truncated versions we demonstrate that the acquired regions are involved in anchoring IslA to the cell wall; they also confer stability to the enzyme, generating a larger structure that affects its kinetic properties and reaction specificity, particularly the hydrolysis and transglycosylase ratio. The accessibility of larger molecules such as EDTA to the catalytic domain (where a Ca2+ binding site is located) is also affected as demonstrated by the requirement of 100 times higher EDTA concentrations to inactivate IslA with respect to the smallest truncated form. Conclusion The C-terminal domain may have been acquired to anchor inulosucrase to the cell surface. Furthermore, the acquired domains in IslA interact with the catalytic core resulting in a new conformation that renders the enzyme more stable and switch the specificity from a hydrolytic to a transglycosylase mechanism. Based on these results, chimeric constructions may become a strategy to stabilize and modulate biocatalysts based on FTF activity. PMID:18237396

  2. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  3. Theoretical elucidation on the functional role of pyrrolidine-type ionic liquids in inducing stereoselectivity of the Michael addition of cyclohexanone with trans-β-nitrostyrene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Zhang, Dongju

    2011-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been carried out to elucidate the stereoselectivity of the Michael addition of cyclohexanone with trans-β-nitrostyrene, induced by a chiral ionic liquid (CIL) pyrrolidine-imidazolium bromide. By comparison of the C-C bond forming processes in the absence and presence of Br(-) anion, we found that intermolecular H-bonds between the imidazolium cation and the nitro group of trans-β-nitrostyrene and the steric hindrance of the imidazolium cation moiety on the Si-face of enamine dominate the stereoselectivity of the Michael addition. The presence of Br(-) anion obviously reduces the barrier by increasing the polarity of the C4=C5 bond of enamine. The theoretical results rationalize well the early experimental finding, and reveal a valuable clue for the further CIL design with high catalytic efficiency.

  4. On the role(s) of additives in bioinspired silicification.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Clarson, Stephen J; Perry, Carole C

    2005-03-01

    Biological organisms are able to direct the formation of patterned and hierarchical biomineral structures. Extractable organic materials have been found entrapped in diatom, sponge and plant biosilica, some of which have been isolated by selective chemical dissolution methods and their composition and structure studied. Information gained from the bioextracts has inspired materials chemists to design biomimetic analogues and develop bioinspired synthetic schemes for silica formation. The results obtained from bioinspired silicification investigations are hypothesised to arise from specific modes of action of the organic additives, which are described in this review. Specifically, additives in bioinspired silicification act either as catalysts, aggregation promoting agents or structure-directing agents or more typically, exhibit a combination of these behaviours.

  5. Additive functions in boolean models of gene regulatory network modules.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  6. Additive Functions in Boolean Models of Gene Regulatory Network Modules

    PubMed Central

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H.; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in Boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a Boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred Boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  7. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  8. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies. PMID:1280464

  9. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies.

  10. Some new addition formulae for Weierstrass elliptic functions

    PubMed Central

    Eilbeck, J. Chris; England, Matthew; Ônishi, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    We present new addition formulae for the Weierstrass functions associated with a general elliptic curve. We prove the structure of the formulae in n-variables and give the explicit addition formulae for the 2- and 3-variable cases. These new results were inspired by new addition formulae found in the case of an equianharmonic curve, which we can now observe as a specialization of the results here. The new formulae, and the techniques used to find them, also follow the recent work for the generalization of Weierstrass functions to curves of higher genus. PMID:25383018

  11. Hyperbolic tangential function-based progressive addition lens design.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Gufeng; Cui, Xudong

    2015-12-10

    The diopter distribution is key to the successful design of a progressive addition lens. A hyperbolic tangential function is then introduced to describe well the desired diopter distribution on the lens. Simulation and fabrication show that the astigmia on the whole surface is very close to the addition, exhibiting superior performance than that of currently used high-order polynomials and cosine functions. Our investigations found that once the diopter distribution design is reasonable, both the direct and indirect methods of constructing a progressive addition lens can give consistent results. With this function we are able to effectively control the design of critical areas, the position, sizes of far-view and near-view zones, as well as the channel of the lens. This study would provide an efficient way to customize different progressive lenses not only for presbyopia, but also for anti-fatigue, office progressive usages, etc. PMID:26836863

  12. Project organization, roles and functions.

    PubMed

    1986-06-01

    This discussion of the roles and functions in the integrated project which provides services in maternal and child health, family planning; nutrition, environmental sanitation, and income-generating projects in the Philippines covers the functions of the National Coordinating Committee, the Provincial Coordinating Committee, the Municipal Coordinating Committee, implementing units, the teams of development workers (TDWs), and coordinating/monitoring units. The National Coordinating Committee provides general directions and guidelines for the implementation of the project through the POPCOM/JICA central staff based at the POPCOM central office in Metro Manila. Functions of the Provincial Coordinating Committee include: resolve problems arising from issues of coordination involving members of the TDWs; ensure participation of provincial units of the various participating ministries; provide guidelines on the delivery of integrated services by TDWs; monitor the activities of TDWs, the municipal coordinating committee, and its various units; and review and endorse the city/provincial integrated project work plan to the regional office. The Municipal Coordinating Committee recommends policies to the national coordinating committee through the provincial coordinating committee to strenthen project implementation in the municipalities. Its functions include: resolve problems arising from issues involving the members of the TDWs; regularly monitor the activities of the TDWs; and provide assistance to the TDWs in the implementation of guidelines. Actual implementation of the project is carried out by the local government, represented by the barangay captain. He is assisted by the TDWs which come from various participating ministries of the government. The TDWs are in effect the task force of the municipal mayor who assist the barangay captain in the delivery of services and the conduct of information, education, and communication campaigns. 3 units assist the various

  13. The role of natural color additives in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C D; Hallagan, J B; Taylor, S L

    2001-01-01

    A critical evaluation of the available information demonstrates that reactions to natural color additives are rare. Studies of turmeric and carotenoid pigments administered in mixtures with other food colorings failed to definitely identify reactions to either color additive. For carotenoids, the one case report of an adverse reaction was not conclusive. An anaphylactic reaction to saffron does suggest an IgE-mediated reaction, but the high use of saffron as compared with this single report of an adverse reaction suggests that sensitivity to saffron is extremely rare. Numerous reports of reactions to grapes or grape products have been reported in the literature, but no reports of sensitivities to grape skin extract or grape color extract were found. In rare cases, annatto dye may provoke a severe, adverse reaction in individuals with an uncommon hypersensitivity, and may aggravate the symptoms of patients suffering from recurrent urticaria. In its long history of use, there has been only one reported case of anaphylaxis resulting from the ingestion of annatto. Studies designed to investigate the role of annatto in recurrent urticaria sufferers were limited due to the absence of double-blind challenge and placebo controls. A number of cases of adverse reactions to carmine following ingestion have been reported in the literature. These adverse reactions suggest an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. In many of the reported cases, the cause of sensitization to carmine was topical exposure from the use of carmine-containing cosmetics or occupational exposure to carmine and not from ingestion of carmine-containing foods and beverages. Following sensitization, affected individuals would be sensitive to carmine and the amounts present in foods and beverages could elicit allergic reactions. It is not known whether all individuals with carmine sensitivity induced through topical use are sensitive to the ingestion of carmine in foods. However, reactions to carmine solely because

  14. Development of additional tasks for the executive function performance test.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Bridget; Baum, Carolyn; Moore, Jennifer; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Spoeri, Susan; Doherty, Meghan; Wolf, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) is a reliable and valid performance-based assessment of executive function for people with stroke. The objective of this study was to enhance the clinical utility of the EFPT by developing and testing additional tasks for the EFPT in the Alternate EFPT (aEFPT). METHOD. We performed a cross-sectional study with poststroke participants (n = 25) and healthy control participants (n = 25). All participants completed a neuropsychological assessment battery and both the EFPT and the aEFPT. RESULTS. No statistically significant differences were found between the EFPT and the aEFPT when examining total scores, construct scores, and two overall task scores. Correlations between the aEFPT and the neuropsychological measures were adequate to strong (r2s = .59-.83). CONCLUSION. The aEFPT tasks are comparable to the original EFPT tasks, providing occupational therapy practitioners with additional tasks that can be used clinically to identify performance-based executive function deficits in people with stroke. PMID:25397771

  15. Functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged intracellular organelles. Perturbations in autophagy are found in gastric cancer. In host gastric cells, autophagy can be induced by Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori) infection, which is associated with the oncogenesis of gastric cancer. In gastric cancer cells, autophagy has both pro-survival and pro-death functions in determining cell fate. Besides, autophagy modulates gastric cancer metastasis by affecting a wide range of pathological events, including extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, and tumor microenvironment. In addition, some of the autophagy-related proteins, such as Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), and p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have certain prognostic values for gastric cancer. In this article, we review the recent studies regarding the functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer. PMID:26910278

  16. Nonlinear responses in salt marsh functioning to increased nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Lucía; Irvine, Irina C; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2015-04-01

    Salt marshes provide storm protection to shorelines, sequester carbon (C), and mitigate coastal eutrophication. These valuable coastal ecosystems are confronted with increasing nitrogen (N) inputs from anthropogenic sources, such as agricultural runoff, wastewater, and atmospheric deposition. To inform predictions of salt marsh functioning and sustainability in the future, we characterized the response of a variety of plant, microbial, and sediment responses to a seven-level gradient of N addition in three Californian salt marshes after 7 and 14 months of N addition. The marshes showed variable responses to the experimental N gradient that can be grouped as neutral (root biomass, sediment respiration, potential carbon mineralization, and potential net nitrification), linear (increasing methane flux, decreasing potential net N mineralization, and increasing sediment inorganic N), and nonlinear (saturating aboveground plant biomass and leaf N content, and exponentially increasing sediment inorganic and organic N). The three salt marshes showed quantitative differences in most ecosystem properties and processes rates; however, the form of the response curves to N addition were generally consistent across the three marshes, indicating that the responses observed may be applicable to other marshes in the region. Only for sediment properties (inorganic and organic N pool) did the shape of the response differ significantly between marshes. Overall, the study suggests salt marshes are limited in their ability to sequester C and N with future increases in N, even without further losses in marsh area. PMID:26230015

  17. Quantum algorithm for an additive approximation of Ising partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Akira; Fujii, Keisuke; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-08-01

    We investigate quantum-computational complexity of calculating partition functions of Ising models. We construct a quantum algorithm for an additive approximation of Ising partition functions on square lattices. To this end, we utilize the overlap mapping developed by M. Van den Nest, W. Dür, and H. J. Briegel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 117207 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.117207] and its interpretation through measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC). We specify an algorithmic domain, on which the proposed algorithm works, and an approximation scale, which determines the accuracy of the approximation. We show that the proposed algorithm performs a nontrivial task, which would be intractable on any classical computer, by showing that the problem that is solvable by the proposed quantum algorithm is BQP-complete. In the construction of the BQP-complete problem coupling strengths and magnetic fields take complex values. However, the Ising models that are of central interest in statistical physics and computer science consist of real coupling strengths and magnetic fields. Thus we extend the algorithmic domain of the proposed algorithm to such a real physical parameter region and calculate the approximation scale explicitly. We found that the overlap mapping and its MBQC interpretation improve the approximation scale exponentially compared to a straightforward constant-depth quantum algorithm. On the other hand, the proposed quantum algorithm also provides partial evidence that there exist no efficient classical algorithm for a multiplicative approximation of the Ising partition functions even on the square lattice. This result supports the observation that the proposed quantum algorithm also performs a nontrivial task in the physical parameter region.

  18. The role of conceptual understanding in children's addition problem solving.

    PubMed

    Canobi, K H; Reeve, R A; Pattison, P E

    1998-09-01

    The study examined the relationship between children's conceptual understanding and addition problem-solving procedures. Forty-eight 6- to 8-year-olds solved addition problems and, in a 2nd task, were prompted to judge whether a puppet could use the arithmetic properties of one problem to solve the next problem. Relational properties between consecutive problems were manipulated to reflect aspects of additive composition, commutativity, and associativity principles. Conceptual understanding was assessed by the ability to spontaneously use such relational properties in problem solving (Task 1) and to recognize and explain them when prompted (Task 2). Results revealed that conceptual understanding was related to using order-indifferent, decomposition, and retrieval strategies and speed and accuracy in solving unrelated problems. The importance of conceptual understanding for addition development is discussed.

  19. The Role of Drugs, Diet, and Food Additives in Hyperactivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harshbarger, Mary E.

    A variety of causes have been suggested for hyperactivity: anoxia and other adverse birth conditions, genetic factors, delayed maturation, maternal smoking and drinking during pregnancy, interaction of temperament and environment, lead poisoning, radiation stress, allergy and food additives, and deprivation of required stimulation. Treatments…

  20. Children's Additive Concepts: Promoting Understanding and the Role of Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Katherine M.; Dube, Adam K.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the promotion of children's understanding and acquisition of arithmetic concepts and the effects of inhibitory skills. Children in Grades 3, 4, and 5 solved two sets of three-term addition and subtraction problems (e.g., 3 + 24 - 24, 3 + 24 - 22) and completed an inhibition task. Half of the participants received a…

  1. The functional role of time compression

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Eckart; Derichs, Christina; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration provides continuous and stable perception from separate sensory inputs. Here, we investigated the functional role of temporal binding between the visual and the tactile senses. To this end we used the paradigm of compression that induces shifts in time when probe stimuli are degraded, e.g., by a visual mask (Zimmermann et al. 2014). Subjects had to estimate the duration of temporal intervals of 500 ms defined by a tactile and a visual, masked stimulus. We observed a strong (~100 ms) underestimation of the temporal interval when the stimuli from both senses appeared to occur at the same position in space. In contrast, when the positions of the visual and tactile stimuli were spatially separate, interval perception was almost veridical. Temporal compression furthermore depended on the correspondence of probe features and was absent when the orientation of the tactile and visual probes was incongruent. An additional experiment revealed that temporal compression also occurs when objects were presented outside the attentional focus. In conclusion, these data support a role for spatiotemporal binding in temporal compression, which is at least in part selective for object features. PMID:27180810

  2. The role of additional pulses in electropermeabilization protocols.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Cecilia; Soba, Alejandro; Maglietti, Felipe; Olaiz, Nahuel; Marshall, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Electropermeabilization (EP) based protocols such as those applied in medicine, food processing or environmental management, are well established and widely used. The applied voltage, as well as tissue electric conductivity, are of utmost importance for assessing final electropermeabilized area and thus EP effectiveness. Experimental results from literature report that, under certain EP protocols, consecutive pulses increase tissue electric conductivity and even the permeabilization amount. Here we introduce a theoretical model that takes into account this effect in the application of an EP-based protocol, and its validation with experimental measurements. The theoretical model describes the electric field distribution by a nonlinear Laplace equation with a variable conductivity coefficient depending on the electric field, the temperature and the quantity of pulses, and the Penne's Bioheat equation for temperature variations. In the experiments, a vegetable tissue model (potato slice) is used for measuring electric currents and tissue electropermeabilized area in different EP protocols. Experimental measurements show that, during sequential pulses and keeping constant the applied voltage, the electric current density and the blackened (electropermeabilized) area increase. This behavior can only be attributed to a rise in the electric conductivity due to a higher number of pulses. Accordingly, we present a theoretical modeling of an EP protocol that predicts correctly the increment in the electric current density observed experimentally during the addition of pulses. The model also demonstrates that the electric current increase is due to a rise in the electric conductivity, in turn induced by temperature and pulse number, with no significant changes in the electric field distribution. The EP model introduced, based on a novel formulation of the electric conductivity, leads to a more realistic description of the EP phenomenon, hopefully providing more accurate

  3. The Role of Additional Pulses in Electropermeabilization Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Cecilia; Soba, Alejandro; Maglietti, Felipe; Olaiz, Nahuel; Marshall, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Electropermeabilization (EP) based protocols such as those applied in medicine, food processing or environmental management, are well established and widely used. The applied voltage, as well as tissue electric conductivity, are of utmost importance for assessing final electropermeabilized area and thus EP effectiveness. Experimental results from literature report that, under certain EP protocols, consecutive pulses increase tissue electric conductivity and even the permeabilization amount. Here we introduce a theoretical model that takes into account this effect in the application of an EP-based protocol, and its validation with experimental measurements. The theoretical model describes the electric field distribution by a nonlinear Laplace equation with a variable conductivity coefficient depending on the electric field, the temperature and the quantity of pulses, and the Penne's Bioheat equation for temperature variations. In the experiments, a vegetable tissue model (potato slice) is used for measuring electric currents and tissue electropermeabilized area in different EP protocols. Experimental measurements show that, during sequential pulses and keeping constant the applied voltage, the electric current density and the blackened (electropermeabilized) area increase. This behavior can only be attributed to a rise in the electric conductivity due to a higher number of pulses. Accordingly, we present a theoretical modeling of an EP protocol that predicts correctly the increment in the electric current density observed experimentally during the addition of pulses. The model also demonstrates that the electric current increase is due to a rise in the electric conductivity, in turn induced by temperature and pulse number, with no significant changes in the electric field distribution. The EP model introduced, based on a novel formulation of the electric conductivity, leads to a more realistic description of the EP phenomenon, hopefully providing more accurate

  4. The role of additional pulses in electropermeabilization protocols.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Cecilia; Soba, Alejandro; Maglietti, Felipe; Olaiz, Nahuel; Marshall, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Electropermeabilization (EP) based protocols such as those applied in medicine, food processing or environmental management, are well established and widely used. The applied voltage, as well as tissue electric conductivity, are of utmost importance for assessing final electropermeabilized area and thus EP effectiveness. Experimental results from literature report that, under certain EP protocols, consecutive pulses increase tissue electric conductivity and even the permeabilization amount. Here we introduce a theoretical model that takes into account this effect in the application of an EP-based protocol, and its validation with experimental measurements. The theoretical model describes the electric field distribution by a nonlinear Laplace equation with a variable conductivity coefficient depending on the electric field, the temperature and the quantity of pulses, and the Penne's Bioheat equation for temperature variations. In the experiments, a vegetable tissue model (potato slice) is used for measuring electric currents and tissue electropermeabilized area in different EP protocols. Experimental measurements show that, during sequential pulses and keeping constant the applied voltage, the electric current density and the blackened (electropermeabilized) area increase. This behavior can only be attributed to a rise in the electric conductivity due to a higher number of pulses. Accordingly, we present a theoretical modeling of an EP protocol that predicts correctly the increment in the electric current density observed experimentally during the addition of pulses. The model also demonstrates that the electric current increase is due to a rise in the electric conductivity, in turn induced by temperature and pulse number, with no significant changes in the electric field distribution. The EP model introduced, based on a novel formulation of the electric conductivity, leads to a more realistic description of the EP phenomenon, hopefully providing more accurate

  5. Functions of Propolis as a natural feed additive in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propolis is a resinous hive product collected by honeybees from various sources of plants. Numerous scientific investigations have been focused on the biological activities of propolis and its functions as a health supplement in humans. It could have similar function in other animals, such as poultr...

  6. Occupational Therapy: Roles and Functions in British Columbia Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Linda E.; Backman, Catherine L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 73 school districts in British Columbia (Canada) evaluated availability of occupational therapy (OT) services, the most important aspects of OT evaluation, OT treatment and services in general, additional training needed by occupational therapists, demographic information on therapists, and therapists' current roles and functions. (DB)

  7. The Role and Function of Presidential Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Linda

    This paper identifies various elements of presidential libraries. The advantages and disadvantages of the libraries' centralization or decentralization are discussed, and some common misconceptions held by the public as to the role and function of presidential libraries are identified. Criticism and debate from the professional community about…

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Functional Elements on Sheet Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Adam; Ahuja, Bhrigu; Butzhammer, Lorenz; Osterziel, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael; Merklein, Marion

    Laser Beam Melting (LBM) process with its advantages of high design flexibility and free form manufacturing methodology is often applied limitedly due to its low productivity and unsuitability for mass production compared to conventional manufacturing processes. In order to overcome these limitations, a hybrid manufacturing methodology is developed combining the additive manufacturing process of laser beam melting with sheet forming processes. With an interest towards aerospace and medical industry, the material in focus is Ti-6Al-4V. Although Ti-6Al-4V is a commercially established material and its application for LBM process has been extensively investigated, the combination of LBM of Ti-6Al-4V with sheet metal still needs to be researched. Process dynamics such as high temperature gradients and thermally induced stresses lead to complex stress states at the interaction zone between the sheet and LBM structure. Within the presented paper mechanical characterization of hybrid parts will be performed by shear testing. The association of shear strength with process parameters is further investigated by analyzing the internal structure of the hybrid geometry at varying energy inputs during the LBM process. In order to compare the hybrid manufacturing methodology with conventional fabrication, the conventional methodologies subtractive machining and state of the art Laser Beam Melting is evaluated within this work. These processes will be analyzed for their mechanical characteristics and productivity by determining the build time and raw material consumption for each case. The paper is concluded by presenting the characteristics of the hybrid manufacturing methodology compared to alternative manufacturing technologies.

  9. The roles of steroidogenic factor-1 in reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Parker, K L; Ikeda, Y; Luo, X

    1996-04-01

    The cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases are expressed in a tissue-specific and developmentally regulated manner, and the orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) participates in both aspects of regulated expression. SF-1 is expressed in mouse embryos from the inception of adrenal and gonadal development, suggesting that SF-1 plays important roles in their differentiation. SF-1 is also expressed in the embryonic pituitary gland and ventral diencephalon, suggesting additional roles within the hypothalamic-pituitary-steroidogenic organ axis. To examine the roles of SF-1 in vivo, we used targeted gene disruption to "knock out" the mouse gene encoding SF-1. Analyses of these knockout mice established roles of SF-1 at levels of endocrine development that include adrenal and gonadal differentiation, pituitary gonadotrope function, and formation of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. These results indicate that SF-1 plays multiple roles in endocrine development that are essential for reproduction.

  10. Copper-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions using hydrocarbon additives: efficiency of catalyst and roles of additives.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Imanishi, Reiko; Shimizu, Ryohei; Kuniyasu, Hitoshi; Terao, Jun; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2014-09-19

    Cross-coupling of alkyl halides with alkyl Grignard reagents proceeds with extremely high TONs of up to 1230000 using a Cu/unsaturated hydrocarbon catalytic system. Alkyl fluorides, chlorides, bromides, and tosylates are all suitable electrophiles, and a TOF as high as 31200 h(-1) was attained using an alkyl iodide. Side reactions of this catalytic system, i.e., reduction, dehydrohalogenation (elimination), and the homocoupling of alkyl halides, occur in the absence of additives. It appears that the reaction involves the β-hydrogen elimination of alkylcopper intermediates, giving rise to olefins and Cu-H species, and that this process triggers both side reactions and the degradation of the Cu catalyst. The formed Cu-H promotes the reduction of alkyl halides to give alkanes and Cu-X or the generation of Cu(0), probably by disproportionation, which can oxidatively add to alkyl halides to yield olefins and, in some cases, homocoupling products. Unsaturated hydrocarbon additives such as 1,3-butadiene and phenylpropyne play important roles in achieving highly efficient cross-coupling by suppressing β-hydrogen elimination, which inhibits both the degradation of the Cu catalyst and undesirable side reactions.

  11. Copper-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions using hydrocarbon additives: efficiency of catalyst and roles of additives.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takanori; Imanishi, Reiko; Shimizu, Ryohei; Kuniyasu, Hitoshi; Terao, Jun; Kambe, Nobuaki

    2014-09-19

    Cross-coupling of alkyl halides with alkyl Grignard reagents proceeds with extremely high TONs of up to 1230000 using a Cu/unsaturated hydrocarbon catalytic system. Alkyl fluorides, chlorides, bromides, and tosylates are all suitable electrophiles, and a TOF as high as 31200 h(-1) was attained using an alkyl iodide. Side reactions of this catalytic system, i.e., reduction, dehydrohalogenation (elimination), and the homocoupling of alkyl halides, occur in the absence of additives. It appears that the reaction involves the β-hydrogen elimination of alkylcopper intermediates, giving rise to olefins and Cu-H species, and that this process triggers both side reactions and the degradation of the Cu catalyst. The formed Cu-H promotes the reduction of alkyl halides to give alkanes and Cu-X or the generation of Cu(0), probably by disproportionation, which can oxidatively add to alkyl halides to yield olefins and, in some cases, homocoupling products. Unsaturated hydrocarbon additives such as 1,3-butadiene and phenylpropyne play important roles in achieving highly efficient cross-coupling by suppressing β-hydrogen elimination, which inhibits both the degradation of the Cu catalyst and undesirable side reactions. PMID:25010426

  12. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Jakob; Tahor, Maayan; Wircer, Einav; Levkowitz, Gil

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors (TF), secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms. PMID:25954163

  13. 21 CFR 14.142 - Functions of a color additive advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Functions of a color additive advisory committee. 14.142 Section 14.142 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Color Additive Advisory Committees § 14.142 Functions of a color additive...

  14. Role of PPARγ in the Differentiation and Function of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.; Utreras, Elias; Cabezas-Opazo, Fabián A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal processes (neurites and axons) have an important role in brain cells communication and, generally, they are damaged in neurodegenerative diseases. Recent evidence has showed that the activation of PPARγ pathway promoted neuronal differentiation and axon polarity. In addition, activation of PPARγ using thiazolidinediones (TZDs) prevented neurodegeneration by reducing neuronal death, improving mitochondrial function, and decreasing neuroinflammation in neuropathic pain. In this review, we will discuss important evidence that supports a possible role of PPARγ in neuronal development, improvement of neuronal health, and pain signaling. Therefore, activation of PPARγ is a potential target with therapeutic applications against neurodegenerative disorders, brain injury, and pain regulation. PMID:25246934

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocomposite Polymer Membranes Containing Functionalized SnO2 Additives

    PubMed Central

    Scipioni, Roberto; Gazzoli, Delia; Teocoli, Francesca; Palumbo, Oriele; Paolone, Annalisa; Ibris, Neluta; Brutti, Sergio; Navarra, Maria Assunta

    2014-01-01

    In the research of new nanocomposite proton-conducting membranes, SnO2 ceramic powders with surface functionalization have been synthesized and adopted as additives in Nafion-based polymer systems. Different synthetic routes have been explored to obtain suitable, nanometer-sized sulphated tin oxide particles. Structural and morphological characteristics, as well as surface and bulk properties of the obtained oxide powders, have been determined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies, N2 adsorption, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermal investigations, water uptake (WU) measurements, and ionic exchange capacity (IEC) tests have been used as characterization tools for the nanocomposite membranes. The nature of the tin oxide precursor, as well as the synthesis procedure, were found to play an important role in determining the morphology and the particle size distribution of the ceramic powder, this affecting the effective functionalization of the oxides. The incorporation of such particles, having sulphate groups on their surface, altered some peculiar properties of the resulting composite membrane, such as water content, thermo-mechanical, and morphological characteristics. PMID:24957125

  16. STAT6: its role in interleukin 4-mediated biological functions.

    PubMed

    Takeda, K; Kishimoto, T; Akira, S

    1997-05-01

    Interleukin (IL) 4 is known to be a cytokine which plays a central role in the regulation of immune response. Studies on cytokine signal transduction have clarified the mechanism by which IL4 exerts its functions. Two cytoplasmic proteins, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 6 and IL4-induced phosphotyrosine substrate/insulin receptor substrate 2 (4PS/IRS2), are activated in IL4 signal transduction. Recent studies from STAT6-deficient mice have revealed the essential role of STAT6 in IL4-mediated biological actions. In addition, STAT6 has also been demonstrated to be important for the functions mediated by IL13, which is related to IL4. IL4 and IL13 have been shown to induce the production of IgE, which is a major mediator in an allergic response. These findings indicate that STAT6 activation is involved in IL4- and IL13-mediated disorders such as allergy.

  17. The role of BMPs in endothelial cell function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Laura A; Pi, Xinchun; Patterson, Cam

    2014-09-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of proteins has a multitude of roles throughout the body. In embryonic development, BMPs promote endothelial specification and subsequent venous differentiation. The BMP pathway also plays important roles in the adult vascular endothelium, promoting angiogenesis and mediating shear and oxidative stress. The canonical BMP pathway functions through the Smad transcription factors; however, other intracellular signaling cascades can be activated, and receptor complexes beyond the traditional type I and type II receptors add additional layers of regulation. Dysregulated BMP signaling has been linked to vascular diseases including pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. This review addresses recent advances in the roles of BMP signaling in the endothelium and how BMPs affect endothelial dysfunction and human disease. PMID:24908616

  18. The functional neuroanatomy of thematic role and locative relational knowledge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Denise H; Waller, Sara; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2007-09-01

    Lexical-semantic investigations in cognitive neuroscience have focused on conceptual knowledge of concrete objects. By contrast, relational concepts have been largely ignored. We examined thematic role and locative knowledge in 14 left-hemisphere-damage patients. Relational concepts shift cognitive focus away from the object to the relationship between objects, calling into question the relevance of traditional sensory-functional accounts of semantics. If extraction of a relational structure is the critical cognitive process common to both thematic and locative knowledge, then damage to neural structures involved in such an extraction would impair both kinds of knowledge. If the nature of the relationship itself is critical, then functional neuroanatomical dissociations should occur. Using a new lesion analysis method, we found that damage to the lateral temporal cortex produced deficits in thematic role knowledge and damage to inferior fronto-parietal regions produced deficits in locative knowledge. In addition, we found that conceptual knowledge of thematic roles dissociates from its mapping onto language. These relational knowledge deficits were not accounted for by deficits in processing nouns or verbs or by a general deficit in making inferences. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that manners of visual motion serve as a point of entry for thematic role knowledge and networks dedicated to eye gaze, whereas reaching and grasping serve as a point of entry for locative knowledge. Intermediary convergence zones that are topographically guided by these sensory-motor points of entry play a critical role in the semantics of relational concepts.

  19. Functional Roles of Bestrophins in Ocular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Cross, Harold E.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2009-01-01

    There are four members of the bestrophin family of proteins in the human genome, of which two are known to be expressed in the eye. The gene BEST1 (formerly VMD2) which encodes the protein bestrophin-1 (Best1) was first identified in 1998. Mutations in this gene have now been associated with four clinically distinguishable human eye diseases, collectively referred to as “bestrophinopathies”. Over the last decade, laboratories have sought to understand how Best1 mutations could result in eye diseases that range in presentation from macular degeneration to nanophthalmos. The majority of our knowledge comes from studies that have sought to understand how Best1 mutations or dysfunction could induce the classical symptoms of the most common of these diseases: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD). BVMD is a dominant trait that is characterized electrophysiologically by a diminished electrooculogram light peak with a normal clinical electroretinogram. This together with the localization of Best1 to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) basolateral plasma membrane and data from heterologous expression studies, have led to the proposal that Best1 generates the light peak, and that bestrophins are a family of Ca2+ activated Cl- channels (CaCCs). However, data from Best1 knock-out and knock-in mice, coupled with the recent discovery of a recessive bestrophinopathy suggest that Best1 does not generate the light peak. Recently Best2 was found to be expressed in non-pigmented epithelia in the ciliary body. However, aqueous dynamics in Best2 knock-out mice do not support a role for Best2 as a Cl- channel. Thus, the purported CaCC function of the bestrophins and how loss of this function relates to clinical disease needs to be reassessed. In this article, we examine data obtained from tissue-type and animal models and discuss the current state of bestrophin research, what roles Best1 and Best2 may play in ocular epithelia and ocular electrophysiology, and how perturbation

  20. Aegerolysins: Structure, function, and putative biological role

    PubMed Central

    Berne, Sabina; Lah, Ljerka; Sepčić, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Aegerolysins, discovered in fungi, bacteria and plants, are highly similar proteins with interesting biological properties. Certain aegerolysins possess antitumoral, antiproliferative, and antibacterial activities. Further possible medicinal applications include their use in the prevention of atherosclerosis, or as vaccines. Additional biotechnological value of fungal aegerolysins lies in their involvement in development, which could improve cultivation of commercially important edible mushrooms. Besides, new insights on microheterogeneity of raft-like membrane domains could be gained by using aegerolysins as specific markers in cell and molecular biology. Although the exact function of aegerolysins in their producing organisms remains to be explained, they are biochemically well characterized all-β structured proteins sharing the following common features: low isoelectric points, similar molecular weights (15–17 kDa), and stability in a wide pH range. PMID:19309687

  1. Improving solubilization in microemulsions with additives. 1. The lipophilic linker role

    SciTech Connect

    Graciaa, A.; Lachaise, J.; Cucuphat, C. ); Bourrel, M. ); Salager, J.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Very lipophilic additives are able to substantially improve the solubilization in surfactant-oil-water microemulsions. The so-called lipophilic linker effect is studied, and its role is discussed. It is shown that the presence of a very lipophilic amphiphilic additive may improve substantially the solubilization in microemulsions. This substance is called a lipophilic linker because its preferential orientation in the oil layers next to the interface might provide some ordering of the oil molecules as well as an additional link with the surfactant. Both effects result in a higher interaction on the oil side of the interface. 21 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. On the role of DNA in DNA-based catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Ewold W; Boersma, Arnold J; Feringa, Ben L; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-09-01

    A kinetic study of DNA-based catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation and Michael addition reactions showed that DNA affects the rate of these reactions significantly. Whereas in the presence of DNA, a large acceleration was found for the Friedel-Crafts alkylation and a modest acceleration in the Michael addition of dimethyl malonate, a deceleration was observed when using nitromethane as nucleophile. Also, the enantioselectivities proved to be dependent on the DNA sequence. In comparison with the previously reported Diels-Alder reaction, the results presented here suggest that DNA plays a similar role in both cycloaddition and conjugate addition reactions.

  3. Role of Na+ and K+ in enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Page, Michael J; Di Cera, Enrico

    2006-10-01

    Metal complexation is a key mediator or modifier of enzyme structure and function. In addition to divalent and polyvalent metals, group IA metals Na+ and K+ play important and specific roles that assist function of biological macromolecules. We examine the diversity of monovalent cation (M+)-activated enzymes by first comparing coordination in small molecules followed by a discussion of theoretical and practical aspects. Select examples of enzymes that utilize M+ as a cofactor (type I) or allosteric effector (type II) illustrate the structural basis of activation by Na+ and K+, along with unexpected connections with ion transporters. Kinetic expressions are derived for the analysis of type I and type II activation. In conclusion, we address evolutionary implications of Na+ binding in the trypsin-like proteases of vertebrate blood coagulation. From this analysis, M+ complexation has the potential to be an efficient regulator of enzyme catalysis and stability and offers novel strategies for protein engineering to improve enzyme function.

  4. Functional roles of non-coding Y RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Madzia P; Krude, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    Non-coding RNAs are involved in a multitude of cellular processes but the biochemical function of many small non-coding RNAs remains unclear. The family of small non-coding Y RNAs is conserved in vertebrates and related RNAs are present in some prokaryotic species. Y RNAs are also homologous to the newly identified family of non-coding stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) in nematodes, for which potential physiological functions are only now emerging. Y RNAs are essential for the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in vertebrates and, when bound to the Ro60 protein, they are involved in RNA stability and cellular responses to stress in several eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. Additionally, short fragments of Y RNAs have recently been identified as abundant components in the blood and tissues of humans and other mammals, with potential diagnostic value. While the number of functional roles of Y RNAs is growing, it is becoming increasingly clear that the conserved structural domains of Y RNAs are essential for distinct cellular functions. Here, we review the biochemical functions associated with these structural RNA domains, as well as the functional conservation of Y RNAs in different species. The existing biochemical and structural evidence supports a domain model for these small non-coding RNAs that has direct implications for the modular evolution of functional non-coding RNAs.

  5. Functional roles of non-coding Y RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Madzia P.; Krude, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs are involved in a multitude of cellular processes but the biochemical function of many small non-coding RNAs remains unclear. The family of small non-coding Y RNAs is conserved in vertebrates and related RNAs are present in some prokaryotic species. Y RNAs are also homologous to the newly identified family of non-coding stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) in nematodes, for which potential physiological functions are only now emerging. Y RNAs are essential for the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in vertebrates and, when bound to the Ro60 protein, they are involved in RNA stability and cellular responses to stress in several eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. Additionally, short fragments of Y RNAs have recently been identified as abundant components in the blood and tissues of humans and other mammals, with potential diagnostic value. While the number of functional roles of Y RNAs is growing, it is becoming increasingly clear that the conserved structural domains of Y RNAs are essential for distinct cellular functions. Here, we review the biochemical functions associated with these structural RNA domains, as well as the functional conservation of Y RNAs in different species. The existing biochemical and structural evidence supports a domain model for these small non-coding RNAs that has direct implications for the modular evolution of functional non-coding RNAs. PMID:26159929

  6. [Recent development in platelet functions: roles beyond thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Yukio; Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    In addition to their roles in thrombosis and hemostasis, there is an increasing body of evidence to suggest that platelets have diverse functions in various biological reactions. Of these, synthesis of specific proteins in a timely manner, involvement in inflammation, roles in anti-bacteria and anti-parasite protection, and supportive roles in liver regeneration have attracted the attention of a number of scientists. We have recently found a novel platelet-activating receptor, CLEC-2, which reacts with a snake venom, Rhodocytin. CLEC-2 has an intracellular signal transduction pathway quite similar to that of GOVI, except for its hemi-Y-xx-L motif. The endogenous ligand for CLEC-2 was identified by us as podoplanin, which is present in renal podocytes, lung alveolar macrophages, and lymphatic endothelial cells, and some types of malignant tumors. We found that CLEC-2/podoplanin interaction plays an important role in the metastasis of tumor cells with podoplanin expression. We have also found that hemophilic interaction between CLEC-2 molecules contributes to thrombus formation in vivo. CLEC-2 interaction with podoplan expressed on lymphatic endothelial cells appears to play an important role in the separation between veins and lymphatic vessels during the stage of fetal development. PMID:22416457

  7. Role of extracellular vesicles in de novo mineralization: an additional novel mechanism of cardiovascular calcification.

    PubMed

    New, Sophie E P; Aikawa, Elena

    2013-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membrane micro/nanovesicles secreted by many cell types into the circulation and the extracellular milieu in physiological and pathological conditions. Evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles, known as matrix vesicles, play a role in the mineralization of skeletal tissue, but emerging ultrastructural and in vitro studies have demonstrated their contribution to cardiovascular calcification as well. Cells involved in the progression of cardiovascular calcification release active vesicles capable of nucleating hydroxyapatite on their membranes. This review discusses the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular calcification and elaborates on this additional mechanism of calcification as an alternative pathway to the currently accepted mechanism of biomineralization via osteogenic differentiation.

  8. 21 CFR 14.142 - Functions of a color additive advisory committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Functions of a color additive advisory committee. 14.142 Section 14.142 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE A PUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE Color Additive Advisory Committees §...

  9. Preparation and ageing-resistant properties of polyester composites modified with functional nanoscale additives.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gang; Shi, Qiwu; Luo, Yanbing; Fan, Rangrang; Zhou, Liangxue; Qian, Zhiyong; Yu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated ageing-resistant properties of carboxyl-terminated polyester (polyethylene glycol terephthalate) composites modified with nanoscale titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2). The nano-TiO2 was pretreated by a dry coating method, with aluminate coupling agent as a functional grafting additive. The agglomeration resistance was evaluated, which exhibited significant improvement for the modified nanoparticles. Then, the effects of the modified nano-TiO2 on the crosslinking and ageing-resistant properties of the composites were studied. With a real-time Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurement, the nano-TiO2 displayed promoting effect on the crosslinking of polyester resin with triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) as crosslinking agent. Moreover, the gloss retention, colour aberration and the surface morphologies of the composites during accelerated UV ageing (1500 hours) were investigated. The results demonstrated much less degree of ageing degradation for the nanocomposites, indicating an important role of the nano-TiO2 in improving the ageing-resistant properties of synthetic polymer composites. PMID:24872802

  10. Switch of SpnR function from activating to inhibiting quorum sensing by its exogenous addition.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuriko; Kato, Norihiro

    2016-09-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Serratia marcescens AS-1 produces the N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6HSL) receptor SpnR, a homologue of LuxR from Vibrio fischeri, which activates pig clusters to produce the antibacterial prodigiosin. In this study, we attempted to artificially regulate quorum sensing (QS) by changing the role of SpnR in N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. SpnR was obtained as a fusion protein tagged with maltose-binding protein (MBP) from overexpression in Escherichia coli, and its specific affinity to C6HSL was demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance analysis and AHL-bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Prodigiosin production was effectively inhibited by externally added MBP-SpnR in both wild-type AS-1 and the AHL synthase-defective mutant AS-1(ΔspnI). For the mutant, the induced amount of prodigiosin was drastically reduced to approximately 4% with the addition of 18 μM MBP-SpnR to the liquid medium, indicating 81% trapping of C6HSL. A system for inhibiting QS can be constructed by adding exogenous AHL receptor to the culture broth to keep the concentration of free AHL low, whereas intracellular SpnR naturally functions as the activator in response to QS. PMID:27387237

  11. Preparation and ageing-resistant properties of polyester composites modified with functional nanoscale additives.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gang; Shi, Qiwu; Luo, Yanbing; Fan, Rangrang; Zhou, Liangxue; Qian, Zhiyong; Yu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated ageing-resistant properties of carboxyl-terminated polyester (polyethylene glycol terephthalate) composites modified with nanoscale titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2). The nano-TiO2 was pretreated by a dry coating method, with aluminate coupling agent as a functional grafting additive. The agglomeration resistance was evaluated, which exhibited significant improvement for the modified nanoparticles. Then, the effects of the modified nano-TiO2 on the crosslinking and ageing-resistant properties of the composites were studied. With a real-time Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurement, the nano-TiO2 displayed promoting effect on the crosslinking of polyester resin with triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) as crosslinking agent. Moreover, the gloss retention, colour aberration and the surface morphologies of the composites during accelerated UV ageing (1500 hours) were investigated. The results demonstrated much less degree of ageing degradation for the nanocomposites, indicating an important role of the nano-TiO2 in improving the ageing-resistant properties of synthetic polymer composites.

  12. Preparation and ageing-resistant properties of polyester composites modified with functional nanoscale additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gang; Shi, Qiwu; Luo, Yanbing; Fan, Rangrang; Zhou, Liangxue; Qian, Zhiyong; Yu, Jie

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated ageing-resistant properties of carboxyl-terminated polyester (polyethylene glycol terephthalate) composites modified with nanoscale titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2). The nano-TiO2 was pretreated by a dry coating method, with aluminate coupling agent as a functional grafting additive. The agglomeration resistance was evaluated, which exhibited significant improvement for the modified nanoparticles. Then, the effects of the modified nano-TiO2 on the crosslinking and ageing-resistant properties of the composites were studied. With a real-time Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurement, the nano-TiO2 displayed promoting effect on the crosslinking of polyester resin with triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) as crosslinking agent. Moreover, the gloss retention, colour aberration and the surface morphologies of the composites during accelerated UV ageing (1500 hours) were investigated. The results demonstrated much less degree of ageing degradation for the nanocomposites, indicating an important role of the nano-TiO2 in improving the ageing-resistant properties of synthetic polymer composites.

  13. Preparation and ageing-resistant properties of polyester composites modified with functional nanoscale additives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated ageing-resistant properties of carboxyl-terminated polyester (polyethylene glycol terephthalate) composites modified with nanoscale titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2). The nano-TiO2 was pretreated by a dry coating method, with aluminate coupling agent as a functional grafting additive. The agglomeration resistance was evaluated, which exhibited significant improvement for the modified nanoparticles. Then, the effects of the modified nano-TiO2 on the crosslinking and ageing-resistant properties of the composites were studied. With a real-time Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurement, the nano-TiO2 displayed promoting effect on the crosslinking of polyester resin with triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) as crosslinking agent. Moreover, the gloss retention, colour aberration and the surface morphologies of the composites during accelerated UV ageing (1500 hours) were investigated. The results demonstrated much less degree of ageing degradation for the nanocomposites, indicating an important role of the nano-TiO2 in improving the ageing-resistant properties of synthetic polymer composites. PMID:24872802

  14. Switch of SpnR function from activating to inhibiting quorum sensing by its exogenous addition.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuriko; Kato, Norihiro

    2016-09-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Serratia marcescens AS-1 produces the N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone (C6HSL) receptor SpnR, a homologue of LuxR from Vibrio fischeri, which activates pig clusters to produce the antibacterial prodigiosin. In this study, we attempted to artificially regulate quorum sensing (QS) by changing the role of SpnR in N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated QS. SpnR was obtained as a fusion protein tagged with maltose-binding protein (MBP) from overexpression in Escherichia coli, and its specific affinity to C6HSL was demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance analysis and AHL-bioassay with Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Prodigiosin production was effectively inhibited by externally added MBP-SpnR in both wild-type AS-1 and the AHL synthase-defective mutant AS-1(ΔspnI). For the mutant, the induced amount of prodigiosin was drastically reduced to approximately 4% with the addition of 18 μM MBP-SpnR to the liquid medium, indicating 81% trapping of C6HSL. A system for inhibiting QS can be constructed by adding exogenous AHL receptor to the culture broth to keep the concentration of free AHL low, whereas intracellular SpnR naturally functions as the activator in response to QS.

  15. Asymmetric Catalytic Enantio- and Diastereoselective Boron Conjugate Addition Reactions of α-Functionalized α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl Substrates.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian-Bo; Lin, Siqi; Qiao, Shuo; Li, Guigen

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic system has been established for the asymmetric boron conjugate addition of B2pin2 onto α-functionalized (involving C, N, O, and Cl) α,β-unsaturated carbonyls under mild, neutral conditions involving Cu[(S)-(R)-ppfa]Cl, AgNTf2, and alcohols. The dual additives of AgNTf2 and alcohols were found to play crucial roles for achieving high catalytic activity and enantio- and diastereoselectivity (up to 98% ee and 70:1 dr).

  16. Generalized neurofuzzy network modeling algorithms using Bézier-Bernstein polynomial functions and additive decomposition.

    PubMed

    Hong, X; Harris, C J

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces a new neurofuzzy model construction algorithm for nonlinear dynamic systems based upon basis functions that are Bézier-Bernstein polynomial functions. This paper is generalized in that it copes with n-dimensional inputs by utilising an additive decomposition construction to overcome the curse of dimensionality associated with high n. This new construction algorithm also introduces univariate Bézier-Bernstein polynomial functions for the completeness of the generalized procedure. Like the B-spline expansion based neurofuzzy systems, Bézier-Bernstein polynomial function based neurofuzzy networks hold desirable properties such as nonnegativity of the basis functions, unity of support, and interpretability of basis function as fuzzy membership functions, moreover with the additional advantages of structural parsimony and Delaunay input space partition, essentially overcoming the curse of dimensionality associated with conventional fuzzy and RBF networks. This new modeling network is based on additive decomposition approach together with two separate basis function formation approaches for both univariate and bivariate Bézier-Bernstein polynomial functions used in model construction. The overall network weights are then learnt using conventional least squares methods. Numerical examples are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of this new data based modeling approach.

  17. Functional neuroanatomy of developmental dyslexia: the role of orthographic depth

    PubMed Central

    Richlan, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Orthographic depth (OD) (i.e., the complexity, consistency, or transparency of grapheme-phoneme correspondences in written alphabetic language) plays an important role in the acquisition of reading skills. Correspondingly, developmental dyslexia is characterized by different behavioral manifestations across languages varying in OD. This review focuses on the question of whether these different behavioral manifestations are associated with different functional neuroanatomical manifestations. It provides a review and critique of cross-linguistic brain imaging studies of developmental dyslexia. In addition, it includes an analysis of state-of-the-art functional neuroanatomical models of developmental dyslexia together with orthography-specific predictions derived from these models. These predictions should be tested in future brain imaging studies of typical and atypical reading in order to refine the current neurobiological understanding of developmental dyslexia, especially with respect to orthography-specific and universal aspects. PMID:24904383

  18. The role of laminins in basement membrane function

    PubMed Central

    AUMAILLEY, MONIQUE; SMYTH, NEIL

    1998-01-01

    Laminins are a family of multifunctional macromolecules, ubiquitous in basement membranes, and represent the most abundant structural noncollagenous glycoproteins of these highly specialised extracellular matrices. Their discovery started with the difficult task of isolating molecules produced by cultivated cells or extracted from tissues. The development of molecular biology techniques has facilitated and accelerated the identification and the characterisation of new laminin variants making it feasible to identify full-length polypeptides which have not been purified. Further, genetically engineered laminin fragments can be generated for studies of their structure-function relationship, permitting the demonstration that laminins are involved in multiple interactions with themselves, with other components of the basal lamina, and with cells. It endows laminins with a central role in the formation, the architecture, and the stability of basement membranes. In addition, laminins may both separate and connect different tissues, i.e. the parenchymal and the interstitial connective tissues. Laminins also provide adjacent cells with a mechanical scaffold and biological information either directly by interacting with cell surface components, or indirectly by trapping growth factors. In doing so they trigger and control cellular functions. Recently, the structural and biological diversity of the laminins has started to be elucidated by gene targeting and by the identification of laminin defects in acquired or inherited human diseases. The consequent phenotypes highlight the pivotal role of laminins in determining heterogeneity in basement membrane functions. PMID:9758133

  19. The role of estradiol in male reproductive function

    PubMed Central

    Schulster, Michael; Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, testosterone and estrogen have been considered to be male and female sex hormones, respectively. However, estradiol, the predominant form of estrogen, also plays a critical role in male sexual function. Estradiol in men is essential for modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis. Estrogen receptors, as well as aromatase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen, are abundant in brain, penis, and testis, organs important for sexual function. In the brain, estradiol synthesis is increased in areas related to sexual arousal. In addition, in the penis, estrogen receptors are found throughout the corpus cavernosum with high concentration around neurovascular bundles. Low testosterone and elevated estrogen increase the incidence of erectile dysfunction independently of one another. In the testes, spermatogenesis is modulated at every level by estrogen, starting with the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, followed by the Leydig, Sertoli, and germ cells, and finishing with the ductal epithelium, epididymis, and mature sperm. Regulation of testicular cells by estradiol shows both an inhibitory and a stimulatory influence, indicating an intricate symphony of dose-dependent and temporally sensitive modulation. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the overall contribution of estradiol to male sexual function by looking at the hormone's effects on erectile function, spermatogenesis, and libido. PMID:26908066

  20. The role of estradiol in male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Schulster, Michael; Bernie, Aaron M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, testosterone and estrogen have been considered to be male and female sex hormones, respectively. However, estradiol, the predominant form of estrogen, also plays a critical role in male sexual function. Estradiol in men is essential for modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis. Estrogen receptors, as well as aromatase, the enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen, are abundant in brain, penis, and testis, organs important for sexual function. In the brain, estradiol synthesis is increased in areas related to sexual arousal. In addition, in the penis, estrogen receptors are found throughout the corpus cavernosum with high concentration around neurovascular bundles. Low testosterone and elevated estrogen increase the incidence of erectile dysfunction independently of one another. In the testes, spermatogenesis is modulated at every level by estrogen, starting with the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, followed by the Leydig, Sertoli, and germ cells, and finishing with the ductal epithelium, epididymis, and mature sperm. Regulation of testicular cells by estradiol shows both an inhibitory and a stimulatory influence, indicating an intricate symphony of dose-dependent and temporally sensitive modulation. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the overall contribution of estradiol to male sexual function by looking at the hormone's effects on erectile function, spermatogenesis, and libido. PMID:26908066

  1. Academic and Social Achievement Goals: Their Additive, Interactive, and Specialized Effects on School Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Students' pursuit of academic and social goals has implications for school functioning. However, studies on academic and social achievement goals have been relatively independent and mainly conducted with students in culturally Western settings. Aims: Guided by multiple-goal perspectives, this study examined the role of academic and…

  2. Tailoring magnetic properties in arrays of pulse-electrodeposited Co nanowires: The role of Cu additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Ramazani, A.; Montazer, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aim to report the role of Cu additive in arrays of pulse-electrodeposited Co nanowires (NWs) with diameters from 30 to 75 nm, embedded in porous aluminum oxide templates. This features the role of Cu additive in composition and crystalline characteristics as well as in the magnetic properties of Co NWs. Increasing the duration of off-time between pulses during the electrodeposition of Co NWs made it possible to increase the amount of Cu content, so that Co-rich CoCu NWs were obtained. The parallel coercivity and squareness values increased up to 1500 Oe and 0.8 for 30 nm diameter Co94Cu6 NWs, starting from 500 Oe and 0.3 for pure Co NWs. On the other hand, although there was a substantial difference between the crystalline characteristics of 75 nm diameter pure Co and CoCu NWs, no considerable change in their magnetic properties was observed using hysteresis loop measurements. In this respect, the first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis revealed strong inter-wire magnetostatic interactions for the CoCu NWs. Moreover, we studied the effect of thermal annealing, which resulted in an increase in the coercivity of CoCu NWs with different diameters up to 15%. As a result, the addition of small amount of Cu provides an alternative approach to tailoring the magnetic properties of Co NWs.

  3. Narcissism, Sex Roles, and Self-Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, P. J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines the relationship between gender, sex role, and narcissism. Data indicated that males and masculine individuals were not higher in their levels of maladaptive narcissism, that an adjusted narcissism was more obvious in males and in masculine subjects, and that femininity appeared to inhibit the display of an unhealthy exploitative…

  4. Brain and Retinal Pericytes: Origin, Function and Role.

    PubMed

    Trost, Andrea; Lange, Simona; Schroedl, Falk; Bruckner, Daniela; Motloch, Karolina A; Bogner, Barbara; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Strohmaier, Clemens; Runge, Christian; Aigner, Ludwig; Rivera, Francisco J; Reitsamer, Herbert A

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are specialized mural cells located at the abluminal surface of capillary blood vessels, embedded within the basement membrane. In the vascular network these multifunctional cells fulfil diverse functions, which are indispensable for proper homoeostasis. They serve as microvascular stabilizers, are potential regulators of microvascular blood flow and have a central role in angiogenesis, as they for example regulate endothelial cell proliferation. Furthermore, pericytes, as part of the neurovascular unit, are a major component of the blood-retina/brain barrier. CNS pericytes are a heterogenic cell population derived from mesodermal and neuro-ectodermal germ layers acting as modulators of stromal and niche environmental properties. In addition, they display multipotent differentiation potential making them an intriguing target for regenerative therapies. Pericyte-deficiencies can be cause or consequence of many kinds of diseases. In diabetes, for instance, pericyte-loss is a severe pathological process in diabetic retinopathy (DR) with detrimental consequences for eye sight in millions of patients. In this review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of CNS pericyte origin and function, with a special focus on the retina in the healthy and diseased. Finally, we highlight the role of pericytes in de- and regenerative processes. PMID:26869887

  5. Brain and Retinal Pericytes: Origin, Function and Role

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Andrea; Lange, Simona; Schroedl, Falk; Bruckner, Daniela; Motloch, Karolina A.; Bogner, Barbara; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Strohmaier, Clemens; Runge, Christian; Aigner, Ludwig; Rivera, Francisco J.; Reitsamer, Herbert A.

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are specialized mural cells located at the abluminal surface of capillary blood vessels, embedded within the basement membrane. In the vascular network these multifunctional cells fulfil diverse functions, which are indispensable for proper homoeostasis. They serve as microvascular stabilizers, are potential regulators of microvascular blood flow and have a central role in angiogenesis, as they for example regulate endothelial cell proliferation. Furthermore, pericytes, as part of the neurovascular unit, are a major component of the blood-retina/brain barrier. CNS pericytes are a heterogenic cell population derived from mesodermal and neuro-ectodermal germ layers acting as modulators of stromal and niche environmental properties. In addition, they display multipotent differentiation potential making them an intriguing target for regenerative therapies. Pericyte-deficiencies can be cause or consequence of many kinds of diseases. In diabetes, for instance, pericyte-loss is a severe pathological process in diabetic retinopathy (DR) with detrimental consequences for eye sight in millions of patients. In this review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of CNS pericyte origin and function, with a special focus on the retina in the healthy and diseased. Finally, we highlight the role of pericytes in de- and regenerative processes. PMID:26869887

  6. The role of tight junctions in mammary gland function.

    PubMed

    Stelwagen, Kerst; Singh, Kuljeet

    2014-03-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are cellular structures that facilitate cell-cell communication and are important in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of epithelia. It is only during the last two decades that the molecular make-up of TJ is becoming unravelled, with two major transmembrane-spanning structural protein families, called occludin and claudins, being the true constituents of the TJ. These TJ proteins are linked via specific scaffolding proteins to the cell's cytoskeleton. In the mammary gland TJ between adjacent secretory epithelial cells are formed during lactogenesis and are instrumental in establishing and maintaining milk synthesis and secretion, whereas TJ integrity is compromised during mammary involution and also as result of mastitis and periods of mammary inflamation (including mastitis). They prevent the paracellular transport of ions and small molecules between the blood and milk compartments. Formation of intact TJ at the start of lactation is important for the establishment of the lactation. Conversely, loss of TJ integrity has been linked to reduced milk secretion and mammary function and increased paracellular transport of blood components into the milk and vice versa. In addition to acting as a paracellular barrier, the TJ is increasingly linked to playing an active role in intracellular signalling. This review focusses on the role of TJ in mammary function of the normal, non-malignant mammary gland, predominantly in ruminants, the major dairy producing species.

  7. A uniform nonlinearity criterion for rational functions applied to calibration curve and standard addition methods.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna Maria; Asuero, Agustin G; Martin, Julia; Alonso, Esteban; Jurado, Jose Marcos; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2014-12-01

    Rational functions of the Padé type are used for the calibration curve (CCM), and standard addition (SAM) methods purposes. In this paper, the related functions were applied to results obtained from the analyses of (a) nickel with use of FAAS method, (b) potassium according to FAES method, and (c) salicylic acid according to HPLC-MS/MS method. A uniform, integral criterion of nonlinearity of the curves, obtained according to CCM and SAM, is suggested. This uniformity is based on normalization of the approximating functions within the frames of a unit area.

  8. Kisspeptin: a novel role in the regulation of reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Nijher, Gurjinder K; Dhillo, Waljit S; Bloom, Stephen R

    2009-12-01

    Kisspeptin appears to have a pivotal role in the regulation of reproductive function and may have a therapeutic role in the treatment of disorders of reproduction. In this review we summarise the evidence regarding kisspeptin and its function in the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis and also examine future therapeutic applications.

  9. Brief Report: Additive and Subtractive Counterfactual Reasoning of Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeer, Sander; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Lunenburg, Patty; Stegge, Hedy

    2009-01-01

    The development of additive ("If only I had done...") and subtractive ("If only I had not done....") counterfactual reasoning was examined in children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (HFASD) (n = 72) and typically developing controls (n = 71), aged 6-12 years. Children were presented four stories where they could generate…

  10. [Endothelial function: role, assessment and limits].

    PubMed

    Puissant, C; Abraham, P; Durand, S; Humeau-Heurtier, A; Faure, S; Rousseau, P; Mahé, G

    2014-02-01

    For several years, detecting and preventing cardiovascular diseases have become a major issue. Different methods have been developed to evaluate endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first steps leading to atherosclerosis. This review presents an insight into endothelial function, the interests of its assessment and methods for studying endothelial function. To date, the vascular endothelium must be considered as a specific organ with its own functions that contribute to the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Endothelial dysfunction typically corresponds to a decrease of nitric oxide NO bioavailability. Biological or physico-chemical methods may be used to assess dysfunction. Biological methods allow measuring NO metabolites and pro-inflammatory and vasoconstrictor mediators released by the endothelium. The physico-chemical methods include intra-coronary injections, plethysmography, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), digital plethysmography and optical techniques using laser (laser Doppler single-point, laser Doppler imager, laser speckle contrast imaging) that can be coupled with provocation tests (iontophoresis, microdialysis, post-ischemic hyperemia, local heating). The principle of each technique and its use in clinical practice are discussed. Studying endothelial dysfunction is a particularly promising field because of new drugs being developed. Nevertheless, assessment methodology still needs further development to enable reliable, non-invasive, reproducible, and inexpensive ways to analyze endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Functional roles of low calorie sweeteners on gut function.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Gerspach, A C; Wölnerhanssen, B; Beglinger, C

    2016-10-01

    This short review summarizes the effects of low calorie sweeteners (fructose, non-nutritive low calorie sweeteners) on gut functions focusing on the gut sweet taste receptor system. The effects of these molecules on secretion of gut peptides associated with glycemic homeostasis and appetite regulation is reviewed as well as effects on gastric emptying and glucose absorption.

  12. The Role of Attachment Functions in Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Jeremy; Severino, Sally K.; Morrison, Nancy K.

    2000-01-01

    The authors propose to clarify concepts of emotional attunement and failures of attunement in early development derived from theoretical and clinical work (Kohut) and infant psychiatry (Stern). Early attunement failures are experienced as shameful by the infant/child, and without repair they form a nidus for later destructive adult interpersonal relationships, “social blindness,” and depression. The authors present a case illustrating these ideas. The role of empathic attunement experienced in the unique setting/structure of psychotherapy emerges as the single critical variable for a successful outcome. PMID:10608906

  13. The Role of Cocoa as a Cigarette Additive: Opportunities for Product Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ryan David; Connolly, Gregory N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act prohibited the use of characterizing flavors in cigarettes; however, some of these flavors are still used in cigarettes at varying levels. We reviewed tobacco industry internal documents to investigate the role of one of these flavors, cocoa, with the objective of understanding its relationship to sensory and risk perception, promotion of dependence, and enhancement of attractiveness and acceptability. Methods: We used the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library to identify documents relevant to our research questions. Initial search terms were generated following an examination of published literature on cocoa, other cigarette additives, and sensory and risk perception. Further research questions and search terms were generated based on review of documents generated from the initial search terms. Results: Cocoa is widely applied to cigarettes and has been used by the tobacco industry as an additive since the early 20th century. Cocoa can alter the sensory properties of cigarette smoke, including by providing a more appealing taste and decreasing its harshness. The tobacco industry has experimented with manipulating cocoa levels as a means of achieving sensory properties that appeal to women and youth. Conclusions: Although cocoa is identified as a flavor on tobacco industry Web sites, it may serve other sensory purposes in cigarettes as well. Eliminating cocoa as an additive from tobacco products may affect tobacco product abuse liability by altering smokers’ perceptions of product risk, and decreasing product appeal, especially among vulnerable populations. PMID:24610479

  14. Role of caspase-8 in thymus function

    PubMed Central

    Pozzesi, N; Fierabracci, A; Liberati, A M; Martelli, M P; Ayroldi, E; Riccardi, C; Delfino, D V

    2014-01-01

    The thymus is the primary organ responsible for de novo generation of immunocompetent T cells that have a diverse repertoire of antigen recognition. During the developmental process, 98% of thymocytes die by apoptosis. Thus apoptosis is a dominant process in the thymus and occurs through either death by neglect or negative selection or through induction by stress/aging. Caspase activation is an essential part of the general apoptosis mechanism, and data suggest that caspases may have a role in negative selection; however, it seems more probable that caspase-8 activation is involved in death by neglect, particularly in glucocorticoid-induced thymocyte apoptosis. Caspase-8 is active in double-positive (DP) thymocytes in vivo and can be activated in vitro in DP thymocytes by T-cell receptor (TCR) crosslinking to induce apoptosis. Caspase-8 is a proapoptotic member of the caspase family and is considered an initiator caspase, which is activated upon stimulation of a death receptor (e.g., Fas), recruitment of the adaptor molecule FADD, and recruitment and subsequent processing of procaspase-8. The main role of caspase-8 seems to be pro-apoptotic and, in this review, we will discuss about the involvement of caspase-8 in (1) TCR-triggered thymic apoptosis; (2) death receptor-mediated thymic apoptosis; and (3) glucocorticoid-induced thymic apoptosis. Regarding TCR triggering, caspase-8 is active in medullary, semi-mature heat-stable antigenhi (HAShi SP) thymocytes as a consequence of strong TCR stimulation. The death receptors Fas, FADD, and FLIP are involved upstream of caspase-8 activation in apoptosis; whereas, Bid and HDAC7 are involved downstream of caspase-8. Finally, caspase-8 is involved in glucocortocoid-induced thymocyte apoptosis through an activation loop with the protein GILZ. GILZ activates caspase-8, promoting GILZ sumoylation and its protection from proteasomal degradation. PMID:24270406

  15. Stringent test for non-additive, non-interacting, kinetic energy functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kaili; Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) provides an ideal framework for testing and developing new approximations to the non-additive and non-interacting kinetic energy functional (Tsnadd [ {nα } ]), understood as a functional of the set of fragment ground-state densities. We present our progress on both of these fronts: (1) Systematic comparison of the performance of various existing approximations to Tsnadd [ {nα } ] ; and (2) Development of new approximations. We find that a re-parametrization of the GGA enhancement factor employed for the construction of Tsnadd [ {nα } ] through the conjointness conjecture captures essential features of the functional derivatives of Tsnadd [ {nα } ] . A physically-motivated two-orbital approximation for Tsnadd [ {nα } ] is shown to outperform most other approximations for the case of He2, and an intriguing one-parameter formula makes this approximation accurate for all noble-gas diatomics.

  16. The Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function Small Satellite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Horais, Brian J; Love, Lonnie J; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2013-01-01

    The use of small satellites in constellations is limited only by the growing functionality of smallsats themselves. Additive manufacturing provides exciting new design opportunities for development of multifunction CubeSat structures that integrate such functions as propulsion and thermal control into the satellite structures themselves. Manufacturing of these complex multifunction structures is now possible in lightweight, high strength, materials such as titanium by using existing electron beam melting additive manufacturing processes. However, the use of today's additive manufacturing capabilities is often cost-prohibitive for small companies due to the large capital investments required. To alleviate this impediment the U.S. Department of Energy has established a Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at their Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee that provides industry access to a broad range of energy-efficient additive manufacturing equipment for collaborative use by both small and large organizations. This paper presents a notional CubeSat multifunction design that integrates the propulsion system into a three-unit (3U) CubeSat structure. The full-scale structure has been designed and fabricated at the ORNL MDF. The use of additive manufacturing for spacecraft fabrication is opening up many new possibilities in design and fabrication capabilities for what had previously been impossible structures to fabricate.

  17. A functional role for the colleters of coffee flowers

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Carmello-Guerreiro, Sandra Maria; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Colleters are protuberances or trichomes that produce and release an exudate that overlays vegetative or reproductive buds. Colleters have a functional definition, as they are thought to protect young tissues against dehydration and pest attack. Decaffeinated coffee plants, named Decaffito®, have recently been obtained through chemical mutagenesis, and in addition to the absence of the alkaloid, the flowers of these plants open precociously. Decaffito mutants exhibit minimal production and secretion of the exudate by the colleters. We compared these mutants with normal coffee plants to infer the functional role of colleters and the secreted exudate covering flower buds. Decaffito mutants were obtained by sodium azide mutagenesis of Coffea arabica cv. Catuaí seeds. Wild-type plants were used as controls and are referred to as Catuaí. The flower colleters were analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in addition to histochemical analysis. Histochemical analysis indicated the presence of heterogeneous exudate in the secretory cells of the colleters of both variants of coffee trees. Alkaloids were detected in Catuaí but not in Decaffito. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the secretory cells in the Catuaí colleters possessed the normal and common characteristics found in secretory structures. In the secretory cells of the Decaffito colleters, it was not possible to identify any organelles or even the nucleus, but the cells had a darkened central cytoplasm, indicating that the secretion is produced in low amounts but not released. Our results offer a proof of concept of colleters in coffee, strongly indicating that the exudate covering the flower parts works as an adhesive to keep the petals together and the flower closed, which in part helps to avoid dehydration. Additionally, the exudate itself helps to prevent water loss from the epidermal cells of the petals.

  18. Contact pair correlation functions and equation of state for additive hard disk fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C.; Solana, J. R.

    2001-10-01

    The contact pair correlation functions and the equation of state for a binary mixture of additive hard disks is obtained using a procedure similar to that leading to the Boublı´k-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland equation of state for mixtures of additive hard spheres. The results from the derived equations are tested against new Monte Carlo data obtained for several diameter ratios and mole fractions. The overall agreement is excellent. The equation of state reproduces exactly the second virial coefficient of the mixture and the third with great accuracy. Predicted values of the fourth and fifth virial coefficients are also in very good agreement with numerical data.

  19. On the role of block copolymer additives for calcium carbonate crystallization: small angle neutron scattering investigation by applying contrast variation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hitoshi; Schwahn, Dietmar; Cölfen, Helmut

    2004-05-15

    The role of the double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly(ethylen glycol)-block-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEG-b-PMAA) on the morphogenesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was studied by applying the contrast variation small angle neutron scattering technique. The morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals is strongly affected by the addition of PEG-b-PMAA. In order to determine the partial scattering functions of the polymer and CaCO3 mineral, we developed both an experimental and theoretical approach with a sophisticated method of their determination from the scattering intensity. Partial scattering functions give detailed information for each component. In particular, the partial scattering function of the polymer, Spp, shows a monotonic slope with Q(-2 to -3) where the scattering vector Q is low (Q < 0.01 Angstrom(-1)), which is a clear evidence that the polymer within the CaCO3 mineral has a mass fractal dimension. The other partial scattering functions reflected the geometry of the CaCO3 particles or the "interaction" of polymer and CaCO3 on a microscopic scale, which leads to a coherent view with Spp.

  20. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  1. Risk assessment of nitrate and oxytetracycline addition on coastal ecosystem functions.

    PubMed

    Feng-Jiao, Liu; Shun-Xing, Li; Feng-Ying, Zheng; Xu-Guang, Huang; Yue-Gang, Zuo; Teng-Xiu, Tu; Xue-Qing, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms dominate phytoplankton communities in the well-mixed coastal and upwelling regions. Coastal diatoms are often exposed to both aquaculture pollution and eutrophication. But how these exposures influence on coastal ecosystem functions are unknown. To examine these influences, a coastal centric diatom, Conticribra weissflogii was maintained at different concentrations of nitrate (N) and/or oxytetracycline (OTC). Algal density, cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malonaldehyde (MDA) were determined for the assessment of algal biomass, lifetime, nutritional value, photosynthesis and respiration, antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation, respectively. When N addition was combined with OTC pollution, the cell growth cycles were shortened by 56-73%; algal density, SOD activities, the concentrations of chlorophyll a, protein, and MDA varied between 73 and 121%, 19 and 397%, 52 and 693%, 19 and 875%, and 66 and 2733% of the values observed in N addition experiments, respectively. According to P-value analysis, the influence of OTC on algal density and SOD activity was not significant, but the effect on cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, and MDA were significant (P<0.05). The influence of N addition with simultaneous OTC pollution on the above six end points was significant. Algal biomass, lifetime, nutrition, antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation, photosynthesis, and respiration were all affected by the addition of OTC and N. Coastal ecosystem functions were severely affected by N and OTC additions, and the influence was increased in the order: Nfunctions.

  2. Synthesis of prostaglandin models and prostaglandins by conjugate addition of a functionalized organocopper reagent.

    PubMed

    Kluge, A F; Untch, K G; Fried, J H

    1972-11-01

    2 methods are described for the preparation of an oxygen functionalized vinylcopper reagent. Reactions of this reagent with cyclic and acyclic enones give products of 1,4 addition. The labile methoxyisopropyl group was used as an alcohol protecting group for ease of formation and removal. The influence of reaction conditions such as solvents and temperature on the mode of addition and yield is discussed. (S)-1-Iodo-trans-1-octen-3-ol (16a) was prepared from (S)-1-octyn-3-ol (17). The optically pure iodovinylcarbinol was converted to the cuprate 2 and 1,4 addition to the hydroxy-protected cyclopentenone 14c afforded (-)-PGE1 (18b). PMID:5076755

  3. Structural and functional roles of carotenoids in chlorosomes.

    PubMed

    Pšencík, Jakub; Arellano, Juan B; Collins, Aaron M; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Torkkeli, Mika; Löflund, Benita; Serimaa, Ritva E; Blankenship, Robert E; Tuma, Roman; Butcher, Sarah J

    2013-04-01

    Chlorosomes are large light-harvesting complexes found in three phyla of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are primarily composed of self-assembling pigment aggregates. In addition to the main pigment, bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e, chlorosomes also contain variable amounts of carotenoids. Here, we use X-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy, complemented with absorption spectroscopy and pigment analysis, to compare the morphologies, structures, and pigment compositions of chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus grown under two different light conditions and Chlorobaculum tepidum. High-purity chlorosomes from C. aurantiacus contain about 20% more carotenoid per bacteriochlorophyll c molecule when grown under low light than when grown under high light. This accentuates the light-harvesting function of carotenoids, in addition to their photoprotective role. The low-light chlorosomes are thicker due to the overall greater content of pigments and contain domains of lamellar aggregates. Experiments where carotenoids were selectively extracted from intact chlorosomes using hexane proved that they are located in the interlamellar space, as observed previously for species belonging to the phylum Chlorobi. A fraction of the carotenoids are localized in the baseplate, where they are bound differently and cannot be removed by hexane. In C. tepidum, carotenoids cannot be extracted by hexane even from the chlorosome interior. The chemical structure of the pigments in C. tepidum may lead to π-π interactions between carotenoids and bacteriochlorophylls, preventing carotenoid extraction. The results provide information about the nature of interactions between bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids in the protein-free environment of the chlorosome interior.

  4. Role of Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphatase in Neuronal Function.

    PubMed

    Kamceva, Marija; Benedict, Jessie; Nairn, Angus C; Lombroso, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a CNS-enriched protein implicated in multiple neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. STEP regulates key signaling proteins required for synaptic strengthening as well as NMDA and AMPA receptor trafficking. Both high and low levels of STEP disrupt synaptic function and contribute to learning and behavioral deficits. High levels of STEP are present in human postmortem samples and animal models of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia and in animal models of fragile X syndrome. Low levels of STEP activity are present in additional disorders that include ischemia, Huntington's chorea, alcohol abuse, and stress disorders. Thus the current model of STEP is that optimal levels are required for optimal synaptic function. Here we focus on the role of STEP in Alzheimer's disease and the mechanisms by which STEP activity is increased in this illness. Both genetic lowering of STEP levels and pharmacological inhibition of STEP activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease reverse the biochemical and cognitive abnormalities that are present. These findings suggest that STEP is an important point for modulation of proteins required for synaptic plasticity. PMID:27190655

  5. Role of Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphatase in Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    Lombroso, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a CNS-enriched protein implicated in multiple neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. STEP regulates key signaling proteins required for synaptic strengthening as well as NMDA and AMPA receptor trafficking. Both high and low levels of STEP disrupt synaptic function and contribute to learning and behavioral deficits. High levels of STEP are present in human postmortem samples and animal models of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia and in animal models of fragile X syndrome. Low levels of STEP activity are present in additional disorders that include ischemia, Huntington's chorea, alcohol abuse, and stress disorders. Thus the current model of STEP is that optimal levels are required for optimal synaptic function. Here we focus on the role of STEP in Alzheimer's disease and the mechanisms by which STEP activity is increased in this illness. Both genetic lowering of STEP levels and pharmacological inhibition of STEP activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease reverse the biochemical and cognitive abnormalities that are present. These findings suggest that STEP is an important point for modulation of proteins required for synaptic plasticity. PMID:27190655

  6. Interactive effects between N addition and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Annika; Strengbom, Joachim; From, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    In management of boreal forests, nitrogen (N) enrichment from atmospheric deposition or from forest fertilization can appear in combination with land-use related disturbances, i.e. tree harvesting by clear-felling. Long-term interactive effects between N enrichment and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function are, however, poorly known. We investigated effects of N enrichment by forest fertilization done > 25 years ago on forest understory species composition in old-growth (undisturbed) forests, and in forests clear-felled 10 years ago (disturbed). In clear-felled forests we also investigated effects of the previous N addition on growth of tree saplings. The results show that the N enrichment effect on the understory species composition was strongly dependent on the disturbance caused by clear-felling. In undisturbed forests, there were small or no effects on understory species composition from N addition. In contrast, effects were large in forests first exposed to N addition and subsequently disturbed by clear-felling. Effects of N addition differed among functional groups of plants. Abundance of graminoids increased (+232%) and abundance of dwarf shrubs decreased (-44%) following disturbance in N fertilized forests. For vascular plants, the two perturbations had contrasting effects on α-(within forests) and β-diversity (among forests): in disturbed forests, N addition reduced, or had no effect on α-diversity, while β-diversity increased. For bryophytes, negative effects of disturbance on α-diversity were smaller in N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized, while neither N addition nor disturbance had any effects on β-diversity. Moreover, sapling growth in forests clear-felled 10 years ago was significantly higher in previously N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized. Our study show that effects of N addition on plant communities may appear small, short-lived, or even absent until exposed to a disturbance. This

  7. Microplastic moves pollutants and additives to worms, reducing functions linked to health and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Browne, Mark Anthony; Niven, Stewart J; Galloway, Tamara S; Rowland, Steve J; Thompson, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    Inadequate products, waste management, and policy are struggling to prevent plastic waste from infiltrating ecosystems [1, 2]. Disintegration into smaller pieces means that the abundance of micrometer-sized plastic (microplastic) in habitats has increased [3] and outnumbers larger debris [2, 4]. When ingested by animals, plastic provides a feasible pathway to transfer attached pollutants and additive chemicals into their tissues [5-15]. Despite positive correlations between concentrations of ingested plastic and pollutants in tissues of animals, few, if any, controlled experiments have examined whether ingested plastic transfers pollutants and additives to animals. We exposed lugworms (Arenicola marina) to sand with 5% microplastic that was presorbed with pollutants (nonylphenol and phenanthrene) and additive chemicals (Triclosan and PBDE-47). Microplastic transferred pollutants and additive chemicals into gut tissues of lugworms, causing some biological effects, although clean sand transferred larger concentrations of pollutants into their tissues. Uptake of nonylphenol from PVC or sand reduced the ability of coelomocytes to remove pathogenic bacteria by >60%. Uptake of Triclosan from PVC diminished the ability of worms to engineer sediments and caused mortality, each by >55%, while PVC alone made worms >30% more susceptible to oxidative stress. As global microplastic contamination accelerates, our findings indicate that large concentrations of microplastic and additives can harm ecophysiological functions performed by organisms. PMID:24309271

  8. Microplastic moves pollutants and additives to worms, reducing functions linked to health and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Browne, Mark Anthony; Niven, Stewart J; Galloway, Tamara S; Rowland, Steve J; Thompson, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    Inadequate products, waste management, and policy are struggling to prevent plastic waste from infiltrating ecosystems [1, 2]. Disintegration into smaller pieces means that the abundance of micrometer-sized plastic (microplastic) in habitats has increased [3] and outnumbers larger debris [2, 4]. When ingested by animals, plastic provides a feasible pathway to transfer attached pollutants and additive chemicals into their tissues [5-15]. Despite positive correlations between concentrations of ingested plastic and pollutants in tissues of animals, few, if any, controlled experiments have examined whether ingested plastic transfers pollutants and additives to animals. We exposed lugworms (Arenicola marina) to sand with 5% microplastic that was presorbed with pollutants (nonylphenol and phenanthrene) and additive chemicals (Triclosan and PBDE-47). Microplastic transferred pollutants and additive chemicals into gut tissues of lugworms, causing some biological effects, although clean sand transferred larger concentrations of pollutants into their tissues. Uptake of nonylphenol from PVC or sand reduced the ability of coelomocytes to remove pathogenic bacteria by >60%. Uptake of Triclosan from PVC diminished the ability of worms to engineer sediments and caused mortality, each by >55%, while PVC alone made worms >30% more susceptible to oxidative stress. As global microplastic contamination accelerates, our findings indicate that large concentrations of microplastic and additives can harm ecophysiological functions performed by organisms.

  9. Role of Carbon-Addition and Hydrogen-Migration Reactions in Soot Surface Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Hou, Dingyu; Law, Chung K; You, Xiaoqing

    2016-02-11

    Using density functional theory and master equation modeling, we have studied the kinetics of small unsaturated aliphatic molecules reacting with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules having a diradical character. We have found that these reactions follow the mechanism of carbon addition and hydrogen migration (CAHM) on both spin-triplet and open-shell singlet potential energy surfaces at a rate that is about ten times those of the hydrogen-abstraction-carbon-addition (HACA) reactions at 1500 K in the fuel-rich postflame region. The results also show that the most active reaction sites are in the center of the zigzag edges of the PAHs. Furthermore, the reaction products are more likely to form straight rather than branched aliphatic side chains in the case of reacting with diacetylene. The computed rate constants are also found to be independent of pressure at conditions of interest in soot formation, and the activation barriers of the CAHM reactions are linearly correlated with the diradical characters.

  10. Role of Carbon-Addition and Hydrogen-Migration Reactions in Soot Surface Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Hou, Dingyu; Law, Chung K; You, Xiaoqing

    2016-02-11

    Using density functional theory and master equation modeling, we have studied the kinetics of small unsaturated aliphatic molecules reacting with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules having a diradical character. We have found that these reactions follow the mechanism of carbon addition and hydrogen migration (CAHM) on both spin-triplet and open-shell singlet potential energy surfaces at a rate that is about ten times those of the hydrogen-abstraction-carbon-addition (HACA) reactions at 1500 K in the fuel-rich postflame region. The results also show that the most active reaction sites are in the center of the zigzag edges of the PAHs. Furthermore, the reaction products are more likely to form straight rather than branched aliphatic side chains in the case of reacting with diacetylene. The computed rate constants are also found to be independent of pressure at conditions of interest in soot formation, and the activation barriers of the CAHM reactions are linearly correlated with the diradical characters. PMID:26799641

  11. The Role of Executive Functions in Numerical Magnitude Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolkman, Meijke E.; Hoijtink, Herbert J. A.; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Leseman, Paul P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Executive functions (EF) are closely related to math performance. Little is known, however, about the role of EF in numerical magnitude skills (NS), although these skills are widely acknowledged to be important precursors of math learning. The current study focuses on the different roles of updating, shifting, and inhibition in NS. EF and NS were…

  12. Nitric oxide and S-nitrosoglutathione function additively during plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Yun, Byung-Wook; Skelly, Michael J; Yin, Minghui; Yu, Manda; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Lee, Sang-Uk; Hussain, Adil; Spoel, Steven H; Loake, Gary J

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a key regulator of diverse plant cellular processes. A major route for the transfer of NO bioactivity is S-nitrosylation, the addition of an NO moiety to a protein cysteine thiol forming an S-nitrosothiol (SNO). Total cellular levels of protein S-nitrosylation are controlled predominantly by S-nitrosoglutathione reductase 1 (GSNOR1) which turns over the natural NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). In the absence of GSNOR1 function, GSNO accumulates, leading to dysregulation of total cellular S-nitrosylation. Here we show that endogenous NO accumulation in Arabidopsis, resulting from loss-of-function mutations in NO Overexpression 1 (NOX1), led to disabled Resistance (R) gene-mediated protection, basal resistance and defence against nonadapted pathogens. In nox1 plants both salicylic acid (SA) synthesis and signalling were suppressed, reducing SA-dependent defence gene expression. Significantly, expression of a GSNOR1 transgene complemented the SNO-dependent phenotypes of paraquat resistant 2-1 (par2-1) plants but not the NO-related characters of the nox1-1 line. Furthermore, atgsnor1-3 nox1-1 double mutants supported greater bacterial titres than either of the corresponding single mutants. Our findings imply that GSNO and NO, two pivotal redox signalling molecules, exhibit additive functions and, by extension, may have distinct or overlapping molecular targets during both immunity and development.

  13. Patient advocacy in the USA: key communication role functions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donald R; Tipton, Bryan K

    2007-09-01

    Researchers have long documented the importance of patient advocacy programs as a means of providing customer service in health-care organizations. Yet, while effective communication is often acknowledged as key to effective patient advocacy, knowledge of the specific communication role functions enacted by patient advocates remains limited, as does our understanding of the function of patient advocacy at the organizational level. This qualitative investigation not only provides a typology of communication roles enacted by patient advocates while solving problems on behalf of patients and their family members, but also integrates scholarly research on "boundary-spanning" as a means of theoretically contextualizing the advocacy role at the organizational level. PMID:17688476

  14. Accessing siloxane functionalized polynorbornenes via vinyl-addition polymerization for CO2 separation membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori; Long, Brian K.; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Hong, Eunice; Maroon, Christopher R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, the vinyl addition polymerization of norbornylbased monomers bearing polar functional groups is often problematic, leading to low molecular weight polymers in poor yield. Herein, we provide proof-of-principle evidence that addition-type homopolymers of siloxane substituted norbornyl-based monomers may be readily synthesized using the catalyst trans-[Ni(C6F5)2(SbPh3)2]. Polymerizations using this catalyst reached moderate to high conversion in just 5 min of polymerization and produced siloxanesubstituted polymers with molecular weights exceeding 100 kg/mol. These polymers showed excellent thermal stability (Td ≥ 362 °C) and were cast into membranes that displayed high CO2 permeability and enhanced CO2/N2 selectivity as compared to related materials.

  15. Contact pair correlation functions of binary mixtures of additive hard spheres from the virial expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C.; Solana, J. R.

    2003-08-01

    Density expansions of the contact pair correlation functions for binary mixtures of additive hard spheres are obtained from the virial expansion of the equation of state. The procedure is based on the use consistency conditions. The resulting expansions are exact up to first order in the density. This corresponds to the third virial coefficient which is exactly known for these mixtures. Analytical expressions for the second and third order terms are obtained on the basis of very accurate approximate analytical expressions for the fourth and fifth virial coefficients. It is found that the series converge slowly, but the convergency can be accelerated by means of a resummation procedure.

  16. Asymmetric functional organozinc additions to aldehydes catalyzed by 1,1'-bi-2-naphthols (BINOLs).

    PubMed

    Pu, Lin

    2014-05-20

    Chiral alcohols are ubiquitous in organic structures. One efficient method to generate chiral alcohols is the catalytic asymmetric addition of a carbon nucleophile to a carbonyl compound since this process produces a C-C bond and a chiral center simultaneously. In comparison with the carbon nucleophiles such as an organolithium or a Grignard reagent, an organozinc reagent possesses the advantages of functional group tolerance and more mild reaction conditions. Catalytic asymmetric reactions of aldehydes with arylzincs, vinylzincs, and alkynylzincs to generate functional chiral alcohols are discussed in this Account. Our laboratory has developed a series of 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL)-based chiral catalysts for the asymmetric organozinc addition to aldehydes. It is found that the 3,3'-dianisyl-substituted BINOLs are not only highly enantioselective for the alkylzinc addition to aldehydes, but also highly enantioselective for the diphenylzinc addition to aldehydes. A one-step synthesis has been achieved to incorporate Lewis basic amine groups into the 3,3'-positions of the partially hydrogenated H8BINOL. These H8BINOL-amine compounds have become more generally enantioselective and efficient catalysts for the diphenylzinc addition to aldehydes to produce various types of chiral benzylic alcohols. The application of the H8BINOL-amine catalysts is expanded by using in situ generated diarylzinc reagents from the reaction of aryl iodides with ZnEt2, which still gives high enantioselectivity and good catalytic activity. Such a H8BINOL-amine compound is further found to catalyze the highly enantioselective addition of vinylzincs, in situ generated from the treatment of vinyl iodides with ZnEt2, to aldehydes to give the synthetically very useful chiral allylic alcohols. We have discovered that the unfunctionalized BINOL in combination with ZnEt2 and Ti(O(i)Pr)4 can catalyze the terminal alkyne addition to aldehydes to produce chiral propargylic alcohols of high synthetic

  17. Role of astrocytes in brain function and disease.

    PubMed

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Lee, Eunsook; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes assume multiple roles in maintaining an optimally suited milieu for neuronal function. Select astrocytic functions include the maintenance of redox potential, the production of trophic factors, the regulation of neurotransmitter and ion concentrations, and the removal of toxins and debris from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Impairments in these and other functions, as well as physiological reactions of astrocytes to injury, can trigger or exacerbate neuronal dysfunction. This review addresses select metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes and emphasizes the role of astrocytes in mediating and amplifying the progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), hyperammonemia (HA), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and ischemia.

  18. Recyclable functionalization of silica with alcohols via dehydrogenative addition on hydrogen silsesquioxane.

    PubMed

    Moitra, Nirmalya; Kamei, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Shimada, Toyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Synthesis of class II hybrid silica materials requires the formation of covalent linkage between organic moieties and inorganic frameworks. The requirement that organosilylating agents be present to provide the organic part limits the synthesis of functional inorganic oxides, however, due to the water sensitivity and challenges concerning purification of the silylating agents. Synthesis of hybrid materials with stable molecules such as simple alcohols, rather than with these difficult silylating agents, may therefore provide a path to unprecedented functionality. Herein, we report the novel functionalization of silica with organic alcohols for the first time. Instead of using hydrolyzable organosilylating agents, we used stable organic alcohols with a Zn(II) catalyst to modify the surface of a recently discovered highly reactive macro-mesoporous hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ, HSiO1.5) monolith, which was then treated with water with the catalyst to form surface-functionalized silica. These materials were comprehensively characterized with FT-IR, Raman, solid-state NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal analysis, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements. The results obtained from these measurements reveal facile immobilization of organic moieties by dehydrogenative addition onto surface silane (Si-H) at room temperature with high loading and good tolerance of functional groups. The organic moieties can also be retrieved from the monoliths for recycling and reuse, which enables cost-effective and ecological use of the introduced catalytic/reactive surface functionality. Preservation of the reactivity of as-immobilized organic alcohols has been confirmed, moreover, by successfully performing copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" reactions on the immobilized silica surfaces. PMID:23977900

  19. Addition reaction of alkyl radical to C60 fullerene: Density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Functionalized fullerenes are known as a high-performance molecules. In this study, the alkyl-functionalized fullerenes (denoted by R-C60) have been investigated by means of the density functional theory (DFT) method to elucidate the effects of functionalization on the electronic states of fullerene. Also, the reaction mechanism of alkyl radicals with C60 was investigated. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl radicals (denoted by n = 1-4, where n means the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl radical) were examined as alkyl radicals. The DFT calculation showed that the alkyl radical binds to the carbon atom of C60 at the on-top site, and a strong C-C single bond is formed. The binding energies of alkyl radicals to C60 were distributed in the range of 31.8-35.1 kcal mol-1 at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. It was found that the activation barrier exists before alkyl addition, the barrier heights were calculated to be 2.1-2.8 kcal mol-1. The electronic states of R-C60 complexes were discussed on the basis of the theoretical results.

  20. Evaluation of the Performance of Smoothing Functions in Generalized Additive Models for Spatial Variation in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siangphoe, Umaporn; Wheeler, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized additive models (GAMs) with bivariate smoothing functions have been applied to estimate spatial variation in risk for many types of cancers. Only a handful of studies have evaluated the performance of smoothing functions applied in GAMs with regard to different geographical areas of elevated risk and different risk levels. This study evaluates the ability of different smoothing functions to detect overall spatial variation of risk and elevated risk in diverse geographical areas at various risk levels using a simulation study. We created five scenarios with different true risk area shapes (circle, triangle, linear) in a square study region. We applied four different smoothing functions in the GAMs, including two types of thin plate regression splines (TPRS) and two versions of locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (loess). We tested the null hypothesis of constant risk and detected areas of elevated risk using analysis of deviance with permutation methods and assessed the performance of the smoothing methods based on the spatial detection rate, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, power, and false-positive rate. The results showed that all methods had a higher sensitivity and a consistently moderate-to-high accuracy rate when the true disease risk was higher. The models generally performed better in detecting elevated risk areas than detecting overall spatial variation. One of the loess methods had the highest precision in detecting overall spatial variation across scenarios and outperformed the other methods in detecting a linear elevated risk area. The TPRS methods outperformed loess in detecting elevated risk in two circular areas. PMID:25983545

  1. The Additive Effects of Type-2 Diabetes on Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; van Dulmen, Manfred; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Background. Medical comorbidity has been theorized to contribute to cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) patients. Specifically, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a common coexisting condition among HF patients, may be an independent predictor of cognitive impairment. Nonetheless, the relationships between T2DM and other risk factors for cognitive impairment among persons with HF are unclear. Methods. Persons with HF (N = 169, 34.3% women, age 68.57 ± 10.28 years) completed neuropsychological testing within a framework of an ongoing study. History of T2DM, along with other medical characteristics, was ascertained through a review of participants' medical charts and self-report. Results. Many participants (34.9%) had a comorbid T2DM diagnosis. After adjustment for demographic and medical characteristics, HF patients with T2DM evidenced significantly greater impairments across multiple cognitive domains than HF patients without T2DM: λ = .92, F(5, 156) = 2.82, P = .018. Post hoc tests revealed significant associations between T2DM and attention (P = .003), executive function (P = .032), and motor functioning (P = .008). Conclusion. The findings suggest additive contributions of T2DM and HF to impairments in attention, executive function, and motor function. Future work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which T2DM exacerbates cognitive impairment in HF. PMID:22701196

  2. Improving functionality of whole egg powder by the addition of gelatine, lactose, and pullulan.

    PubMed

    Koç, Mehmet; Koç, Banu; Susyal, Gonca; Yilmazer, Melike Sakin; Bağdatlıoğlu, Neriman; Kaymak-Ertekin, Figen

    2011-01-01

    The addition of gelatine (G), lactose (L), pullulan (P), and their mixtures at equal ratios (gelatine + lactose [GL] and gelatin + pullulan [GP]) to whole egg prior to drying was studied. Their effects on the functional properties (emulsion and gelling ability, water holding capacity of gel, foaming, color) and soluble protein content of spray dried egg powder during the 6 mo of storage at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity were investigated. It was demonstrated that the emulsion and foaming stability, water holding capacity of gel, and color change were significantly affected by the storage time, whereas storage time did not affect the strength of gel texture prepared by egg powders. Gelatine and pullulan improved the foaming stability and water holding capacity. Lactose caused a decrease in emulsion and foaming stability values. The maximum color change was observed for the plain egg powder, showing that mixing whole egg with carbohydrate- and/or protein-based additives before the drying process preserved the color of egg powder. Adding carbohydrate and/or protein caused significant changes in functional properties of egg powder. PMID:22416722

  3. Cinchona Alkaloid Catalyzed Sulfa-Michael Addition Reactions Leading to Enantiopure β-Functionalized Cysteines.

    PubMed

    Breman, Arjen C; Telderman, Suze E M; van Santen, Roy P M; Scott, Jamie I; van Maarseveen, Jan H; Ingemann, Steen; Hiemstra, Henk

    2015-11-01

    Sulfa-Michael additions to α,β-unsaturated N-acylated oxazolidin-2-ones and related α,β-unsaturated α-amino acid derivatives have been enantioselectively catalyzed by Cinchona alkaloids functionalized with a hydrogen bond donating group at the C6' position. The series of Cinchona alkaloids includes known C6' (thio)urea and sulfonamide derivatives and several novel species with a benzimidazole, squaramide or a benzamide group at the C6' position. The sulfonamides were especially suited as bifunctional organocatalysts as they gave the products in very good diastereoselectivity and high enantioselectivity. In particular, the C6' sulfonamides catalyzed the reaction with the α,β-unsaturated α-amino acid derivatives to afford the products in a diastereomeric ratio as good as 93:7, with the major isomer being formed in an ee of up to 99%. The products of the organocatalytic sulfa-Michael addition to α,β-unsaturated α-amino acid derivatives were subsequently converted in high yields to enantiopure β-functionalized cysteines suitable for native chemical ligation.

  4. Relaxin-3 and its role in neuroendocrine function.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Barbara M C; Stanley, Sarah A; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2009-04-01

    The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis and endocrine function. Relaxin-3 is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that belongs to the insulin superfamily of peptides. It is expressed in the nucleus incertus of the brainstem, which has projections to the hypothalamus and is thought to act in the brain via the RXFP3 receptor, although the RXFP1 receptor may also play a role. RXFP3 and RXFP1 are present in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, an area with a well-characterized role in the regulation of energy balance. The paraventricular nucleus also modulates reproductive function by providing inputs to hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons. The physiological roles for relaxin-3 remain to be established. Evidence for a role of relaxin-3 as a hypothalamic orexigenic peptide will be reviewed, including its effects on the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis and energy expenditure. Studies pointing towards a putative role of relaxin-3 in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis will be discussed. Central endocrine effects of relaxin-3 will be compared to relaxin. We conclude that relaxin-3 may act as a hypothalamic signal to coordinate appetite, thyroid function, and reproductive status. Further studies will be required to determine whether these are physiological roles for relaxin-3 and to determine the receptors involved.

  5. Role of point defects and additives in kinetics of hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, Chris

    2010-03-01

    First-principles computational studies of hydrogen interactions with storage materials can provide direct insight into the processes of H uptake and release, and may help in developing guidelines for designing storage media with improved storage capacity and kinetics. One important conclusion is that the defects involved in kinetics of semiconducting or insulating H-storage materials are charged, and hence their formation energy is Fermi-level dependent and can be affected by the presence of impurities that change the Fermi level [1,2]. This provides an explanation for the role played by transition-metal impurities in the kinetics of NaAlH4 and related materials. Desorption of H and decomposition of NaAlH4 requires not only mass transport of H but also of Al and/or Na. This process is mediated by native defects. We have investigated the structure, stability, and migration enthalpy of native defects based on density functional theory. The results allow us to estimate diffusion activation energies for the defects that may be involved in mass transport. Most of the relevant defects exist in charge states other than neutral, and consideration of these charge states is essential for a proper description of kinetics. We propose specific new mechanisms to explain the observed activation energies and their dependence on the presence of impurities. We have also expanded our studies to materials other than NaAlH4. In the case of LiBH4 and Li4BN3H10 we have found that the calculations have predictive power in terms of identifying which impurities will actually enhance kinetics. Other complex hydrides that we are currently investigating include Li2NH and LiNH2. [4pt] [1] A. Peles and C. G. Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. B 76, 214101 (2007). [0pt] [2] C. G. Van de Walle, A. Peles, A. Janotti, and G. B. Wilson-Short, Physica B 404, 793 (2009).

  6. Integrating products of Bessel functions with an additional exponential or rational factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deun, Joris; Cools, Ronald

    2008-04-01

    We provide two MATLAB programs to compute integrals of the form ex∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dxand 0∞xr+x∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dx with Jν_i(x) the Bessel function of the first kind and (real) order ν. The parameter m is a real number such that ∑ν+m>-1 (to assure integrability near zero), r is real and the numbers c and a are all strictly positive. The program can deliver accurate error estimates. Program summaryProgram title: BESSELINTR, BESSELINTC Catalogue identifier: AEAH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1601 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 161 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab (version ⩾6.5), Octave (version ⩾2.1.69) Computer: All supporting Matlab or Octave Operating system: All supporting Matlab or Octave RAM: For k Bessel functions our program needs approximately ( 500+140k) double precision variables Classification: 4.11 Nature of problem: The problem consists in integrating an arbitrary product of Bessel functions with an additional rational or exponential factor over a semi-infinite interval. Difficulties arise from the irregular oscillatory behaviour and the possible slow decay of the integrand, which prevents truncation at a finite point. Solution method: The interval of integration is split into a finite and infinite part. The integral over the finite part is computed using Gauss-Legendre quadrature. The integrand on the infinite part is approximated using asymptotic expansions and this approximation is integrated exactly with the aid of the upper incomplete gamma function. In the case where a rational factor is present, this factor is first expanded in a Taylor series around infinity. Restrictions: Some (and eventually all

  7. CD147 Immunoglobulin Superfamily Receptor Function and Role in Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Kathryn T.; Brown, Amy L.; Greene, Mark I.; Saouaf, Sandra J.

    2008-01-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD147 plays an important role in fetal, neuronal, lymphocyte and extracellular matrix development. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and protein interactions with regard to CD147 function and its role in pathologic conditions including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and cancer. A model linking hypoxic conditions found within the tumor microenvironment to up-regulation of CD147 expression and tumor progression is introduced. PMID:17945211

  8. CD147 immunoglobulin superfamily receptor function and role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Kathryn T; Brown, Amy L; Greene, Mark I; Saouaf, Sandra J

    2007-12-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD147 plays an important role in fetal, neuronal, lymphocyte and extracellular matrix development. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and protein interactions with regard to CD147 function and its role in pathologic conditions including heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, stroke and cancer. A model linking hypoxic conditions found within the tumor microenvironment to upregulation of CD147 expression and tumor progression is introduced. PMID:17945211

  9. Differential Expression of Functional Fc-Receptors and Additional Immune Complex Receptors on Mouse Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suwanichkul, Adisak; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which circulating immune complexes accumulate in the kidney to form deposits in glomerulonephritis are not well understood. In particular, the role of resident cells within glomeruli of the kidney has been widely debated. Immune complexes have been shown to bind one glomerular cell type (mesangial cells) leading to functional responses such as pro-inflammatory cytokine production. To further assess the presence of functional immunoreceptors on resident glomerular cells, cultured mouse renal epithelial, endothelial, and mesangial cells were treated with heat-aggregated mouse IgG or preformed murine immune complexes. Mesangial and renal endothelial cells were found to bind IgG complexes, whereas glomerular epithelial cell binding was minimal. A blocking antibody for Fc-gamma receptors reduced binding to mesangial cells but not renal endothelial cells, suggesting differential immunoreceptor utilization. RT-PCR and immunostaining based screening of cultured renal endothelial cells showed limited low-level expression of known Fc-receptors and Igbinding proteins. The interaction between mesangial cells and renal endothelial cells and immune complexes resulted in distinct, cell-specific patterns of chemokine and cytokine production. This novel pathway involving renal endothelial cells likely contributes to the predilection of circulating immune complex accumulation within the kidney and to the inflammatory responses that drive kidney injury. PMID:23911392

  10. Interactions between cocoa flavanols and inorganic nitrate: additive effects on endothelial function at achievable dietary amounts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Hezel, Michael; Aydin, Hilal; Kelm, Malte; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Heiss, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Dietary intervention studies have shown that flavanols and inorganic nitrate can improve vascular function, suggesting that these two bioactives may be responsible for beneficial health effects of diets rich in fruits and vegetables. We aimed to study interactions between cocoa flavanols (CF) and nitrate, focusing on absorption, bioavailability, excretion, and efficacy to increase endothelial function. In a double-blind randomized, dose-response crossover study, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured in 15 healthy subjects before and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after consumption of CF (1.4-10.9 mg/kg bw) or nitrate (0.1-10 mg/kg bw). To study flavanol-nitrate interactions, an additional intervention trial was performed with nitrate and CF taken in sequence at low and high amounts. FMD was measured before (0 h) and at 1h after ingestion of nitrate (3 or 8.5 mg/kg bw) or water. Then subjects received a CF drink (2.7 or 10.9 mg/kg bw) or a micro- and macronutrient-matched CF-free drink. FMD was measured at 1, 2, and 4 h thereafter. Blood and urine samples were collected and assessed for CF and nitric oxide (NO) metabolites with HPLC and gas-phase reductive chemiluminescence. Finally, intragastric formation of NO after CF and nitrate consumption was investigated. Both CF and nitrate induced similar intake-dependent increases in FMD. Maximal values were achieved at 1 h postingestion and gradually decreased to reach baseline values at 4 h. These effects were additive at low intake levels, whereas CF did not further increase FMD after high nitrate intake. Nitrate did not affect flavanol absorption, bioavailability, or excretion, but CF enhanced nitrate-related gastric NO formation and attenuated the increase in plasma nitrite after nitrate intake. Both flavanols and inorganic nitrate can improve endothelial function in healthy subjects at intake amounts that are achievable with a normal diet. Even low dietary intake of these bioactives may exert relevant effects on endothelial

  11. The role of tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily members in mammalian brain development, function and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, Jason P.; Cuff, Simone M.; Yong, Audrey A.; Wang, Eddie C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members were initially identified as immunological mediators, and are still commonly perceived as immunological molecules. However, our understanding of the diversity of TNFRSF members’ roles in mammalian physiology has grown significantly since the first discovery of TNFRp55 (TNFRSF1) in 1975. In particular, the last decade has provided evidence for important roles in brain development, function and the emergent field of neuronal homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that TNFRSF members are expressed in an overlapping regulated pattern during neuronal development, participating in the regulation of neuronal expansion, growth, differentiation and regional pattern development. This review examines evidence for non-immunological roles of TNFRSF members in brain development, function and maintenance under normal physiological conditions. In addition, several aspects of brain function during inflammation will also be described, when illuminating and relevant to the non-immunological role of TNFRSF members. Finally, key questions in the field will be outlined. PMID:21861782

  12. Cryptic biodiversity effects: importance of functional redundancy revealed through addition of food web complexity.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Stacy M; Pardee, Gabriella L; Gonthier, David J

    2012-05-01

    Interactions between predators and the degree of functional redundancy among multiple predator species may determine whether herbivores experience increased or decreased predation risk. Specialist parasites can modify predator behavior, yet rarely have cascading effects on multiple predator species and prey been evaluated. We examined influences of specialist phorid parasites (Pseudacteon spp.) on three predatory ant species and herbivores in a coffee agroecosystem. Specifically, we examined whether changes in ant richness affected fruit damage by the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) and whether phorids altered multi-predator effects. Each ant species reduced borer damage, and without phorids, increasing predator richness did not further decrease borer damage. However, with phorids, activity of one ant species was reduced, indicating that the presence of multiple ant species was necessary to limit borer damage. In addition, phorid presence revealed synergistic effects of multiple ant species, not observed without the presence of this parasite. Thus, a trait-mediated cascade resulting from a parasite-induced predator behavioral change revealed the importance of functional redundancy, predator diversity, and food web complexity for control of this important pest.

  13. A table of integrals of the error function. II - Additions and corrections.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, M.; Ng, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Integrals of products of error functions with other functions are presented, taking into account a combination of the error function with powers, a combination of the error function with exponentials and powers, a combination of the error function with exponentials of more complicated arguments, definite integrals from Laplace transforms, and a combination of the error function with trigonometric functions. Other integrals considered include a combination of the error function with logarithms and powers, a combination of two error functions, and a combination of the error function with other special functions.

  14. Analyzing the roles of multi-functional proteins in cells: the case of arrestins and GRKs

    PubMed Central

    Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins have multiple functions. Obviously, conventional methods of manipulating the level of the protein of interest in the cell, such as over-expression, knockout or knockdown, affect all of its functions simultaneously. The key advantage of these methods is that over-expression, knockout or knockdown does not require any knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the function(s) of the protein of interest. The disadvantage is that these approaches are inadequate to elucidate the role of an individual function of the protein in a particular cellular process. An alternative is the use of re-engineered proteins, in which a single function is eliminated or enhanced. The use of mono-functional elements of a multi-functional protein can also yield cleaner answers. This approach requires detailed knowledge of the structural basis of each function of the protein in question. Thus, a lot of preliminary structure-function work is necessary to make it possible. However, when this information is available, replacing the protein of interest with a mutant in which individual functions are modified can shed light on the biological role of those particular functions. Here we illustrate this point using the example of protein kinases, most of which have additional non-enzymatic functions, as well as arrestins, known multi-functional signaling regulators in the cell. PMID:26453028

  15. The cerebellum: its role in language and related cognitive and affective functions.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Paquier, Philippe; Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The traditional view on the cerebellum as the sole coordinator of motor function has been substantially redefined during the past decades. Neuroanatomical, neuroimaging and clinical studies have extended the role of the cerebellum to the modulation of cognitive and affective processing. Neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated cerebellar connectivity with the supratentorial association areas involved in higher cognitive and affective functioning, while functional neuroimaging and clinical studies have provided evidence of cerebellar involvement in a variety of cognitive and affective tasks. This paper reviews the recently acknowledged role of the cerebellum in linguistic and related cognitive and behavioral-affective functions. In addition, typical cerebellar syndromes such as the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) and the posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) will be briefly discussed and the current hypotheses dealing with the presumed neurobiological mechanisms underlying the linguistic, cognitive and affective modulatory role of the cerebellum will be reviewed.

  16. Priming word order by thematic roles: no evidence for an additional involvement of phrase structure.

    PubMed

    Pappert, Sandra; Pechmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments are reported that studied the priming of word order in German. Experiment 1 demonstrated priming of the order of case-marked verb arguments. However, order of noun phrases and order of thematic roles were confounded. In Experiment 2, we therefore aimed at disentangling the impact of these two possible factors. By using primes that differed from targets in phrase structure but were parallel with regard to the order of thematic roles, we nevertheless found priming demonstrating the critical impact of thematic roles. Experiment 3 replicated the priming effects from Experiments 1 and 2 within participants and revealed no evidence for a modulation of priming by phrase structure. Consequently, our findings suggest that word order priming crucially depends on the structural outline of thematic roles rather than on the linearization of phrases.

  17. The Human BNST: Functional Role in Anxiety and Addiction.

    PubMed

    Avery, S N; Clauss, J A; Blackford, J U

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of chronic stress on brain structure and function are far reaching. Whereas stress can produce short-term adaptive changes in the brain, chronic stress leads to long-term maladaptive changes that increase vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and addiction. These two disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in the United States, and are typically chronic, disabling, and highly comorbid. Emerging evidence implicates a tiny brain region-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST)-in the body's stress response and in anxiety and addiction. Rodent studies provide compelling evidence that the BNST plays a central role in sustained threat monitoring, a form of adaptive anxiety, and in the withdrawal and relapse stages of addiction; however, little is known about the role of BNST in humans. Here, we review current evidence for BNST function in humans, including evidence for a role in the production of both adaptive and maladaptive anxiety. We also review preliminary evidence of the role of BNST in addiction in humans. Together, these studies provide a foundation of knowledge about the role of BNST in adaptive anxiety and stress-related disorders. Although the field is in its infancy, future investigations of human BNST function have tremendous potential to illuminate mechanisms underlying stress-related disorders and identify novel neural targets for treatment.

  18. Role of inorganic additives on the ballistic performance of gun propellant formulations.

    PubMed

    Damse, R S; Sikder, A K

    2008-06-15

    This paper explores the possibility of increasing the ballistic performance of gun propellant with the addition of inorganic additives viz. aluminium and ammonium perchlorate. Compositions based on propellant NQ containing additional aluminium and ammonium perchlorate in different parts were studied theoretically and experimentally. Performance in respect of ballistic parameters, sensitivity, thermal characteristics, thermal stability and mechanical properties are evaluated and compared with that of the conventional triple base propellant NQ. Experimental data on comparative study indicate that the compositions containing aluminium and ammonium perchlorate are superior to propellant NQ in respect of energy.

  19. Modification of Polymer Network Properties through the Addition of Functional Nanogel Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, JianCheng

    Multifunctional acrylic and methacrylic monomers have been widely applied in many photopolymerization applications to produce crosslinked polymers with advantages such as rapid curing, broad choices of commercially available monomers and desirable physical and mechanical properties. However, there still remain critical challenges for these materials during polymerization including limited conversion and early onset of gelation as well as the generation of significant polymerization shrinkage and stress. This thesis explores the effects of network property modification through the addition of polymeric nanoparticles or nanogels. In order to understand the relationship between nanogel structure and composite material properties, nanogels with different architectures and functionalities were studied during polymerization in terms of kinetics, shrinkage and stress reduction, mechanical performance and reaction mechanisms. Nanogel composite formulations were evaluated to understand the interaction between nanogel structure with the resin matrix during polymerization through adjustment of nanogel branching densities and reactivity of polymer chain ends. It was found that both the chemical crosslinking from reactive chain ends and physical entanglements of high branching density nanogels with the resin matrix dramatically could improve final material mechanical strength. The reductions in overall volumetric shrinkage and shrinkage stress were found to follow at least proportional behavior with respect to nanogel loading concentration while maintaining similar final conversion and modulus results compared with the control resin. Nanogels containing unique functionalities were designed in order to modify reaction mechanism during secondary polymerization. A nanogel containing an integrated photoinitiator and active chain-end RAFT groups was able to initiate secondary polymerization from the nanogel phase so that localized polymerization was achieved from the beginning of

  20. Adding functionality with additive manufacturing: Fabrication of titanium-based antibiotic eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Jamshidi, Parastoo; Eisenstein, Neil M; Webber, Mark A; Hassanin, Hany; Attallah, Moataz M; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Addison, Owen; Grover, Liam M

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have been utilised in healthcare to create patient-specific implants. This study demonstrates the potential to add new implant functionality by further exploiting the design flexibility of these technologies. Selective laser melting was used to manufacture titanium-based (Ti-6Al-4V) implants containing a reservoir. Pore channels, connecting the implant surface to the reservoir, were incorporated to facilitate antibiotic delivery. An injectable brushite, calcium phosphate cement, was formulated as a carrier vehicle for gentamicin. Incorporation of the antibiotic significantly (p=0.01) improved the compressive strength (5.8±0.7MPa) of the cement compared to non-antibiotic samples. The controlled release of gentamicin sulphate from the calcium phosphate cement injected into the implant reservoir was demonstrated in short term elution studies using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Orientation of the implant pore channels were shown, using micro-computed tomography, to impact design reproducibility and the back-pressure generated during cement injection which ultimately altered porosity. The amount of antibiotic released from all implant designs over a 6hour period (<28% of the total amount) were found to exceed the minimum inhibitory concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus (16μg/mL) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (1μg/mL); two bacterial species commonly associated with periprosthetic infections. Antibacterial efficacy was confirmed against both bacterial cultures using an agar diffusion assay. Interestingly, pore channel orientation was shown to influence the directionality of inhibition zones. Promisingly, this work demonstrates the potential to additively manufacture a titanium-based antibiotic eluting implant, which is an attractive alternative to current treatment strategies of periprosthetic infections.

  1. Adding functionality with additive manufacturing: Fabrication of titanium-based antibiotic eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Jamshidi, Parastoo; Eisenstein, Neil M; Webber, Mark A; Hassanin, Hany; Attallah, Moataz M; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Addison, Owen; Grover, Liam M

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have been utilised in healthcare to create patient-specific implants. This study demonstrates the potential to add new implant functionality by further exploiting the design flexibility of these technologies. Selective laser melting was used to manufacture titanium-based (Ti-6Al-4V) implants containing a reservoir. Pore channels, connecting the implant surface to the reservoir, were incorporated to facilitate antibiotic delivery. An injectable brushite, calcium phosphate cement, was formulated as a carrier vehicle for gentamicin. Incorporation of the antibiotic significantly (p=0.01) improved the compressive strength (5.8±0.7MPa) of the cement compared to non-antibiotic samples. The controlled release of gentamicin sulphate from the calcium phosphate cement injected into the implant reservoir was demonstrated in short term elution studies using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Orientation of the implant pore channels were shown, using micro-computed tomography, to impact design reproducibility and the back-pressure generated during cement injection which ultimately altered porosity. The amount of antibiotic released from all implant designs over a 6hour period (<28% of the total amount) were found to exceed the minimum inhibitory concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus (16μg/mL) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (1μg/mL); two bacterial species commonly associated with periprosthetic infections. Antibacterial efficacy was confirmed against both bacterial cultures using an agar diffusion assay. Interestingly, pore channel orientation was shown to influence the directionality of inhibition zones. Promisingly, this work demonstrates the potential to additively manufacture a titanium-based antibiotic eluting implant, which is an attractive alternative to current treatment strategies of periprosthetic infections. PMID:27127071

  2. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  3. The role of prop-1-ene-1,3-sultone as an additive in lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, Julian; Hall, David S.; Madec, Lénaïc; Dahn, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used in conjunction with experimental results to propose decomposition pathways that describe the role and ultimate fate of the PES additive in Li-ion batteries. Oxidation of PES produces carbonyl sulfide gas and ethene at the positive electrode, both experimentally observed byproducts. However, the calculated standard potential for simple PES oxidation, E0ox ∼ 6.7 V vs. Li/Li+, is quite high, suggesting this pathway is unlikely. A "reactive electrode model" is presented, in which the positive electrode material is a reagent in the pseudo-combustion of PES (and other solvents). This spontaneous process produces carbonyl sulfide, carbon dioxide, and a rock salt surface layer, all of which are experimentally observed. At the negative electrode, the reduction of PES occurs via two one-electron steps, where E0red,1 = 0.9 V and E0red,2 = 4.3 V. The reduced species, Li2PES, can react with hydrogen and methyl radicals to produce propene, methylpropene, propane and lithium sulfite. Nucleophilic Li2PES can also react with electrophilic PES, ethylene carbonate, or ethyl methyl carbonate. Eighteen possible organic sulphate 'building blocks' for the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrate that PES reduction indeed results in both lithium sulfite and organic sulphate SEI components.

  4. Role of Functional Electrical Stimulation in Tetraplegia Hand Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bersch, Ines; Fridén, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The use of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to improve upper limb function is an established method in the rehabilitation of persons with tetraplegia after spinal cord injury. Surgical reconstruction is another well-established yet underused technique to improve the performance of the upper extremities. Hand surgery plays an essential role in restoring hand function, mobility, and quality of life in the tetraplegic population. The knowledge about the effects of FES on a structural and functional level is fundamental for understanding how and when FES can be used best to support the effect of hand surgery, both pre- and postoperatively. In this article we discuss principles of FES and how FES improves functional outcome after surgical reconstruction. The reported results are based on preliminary clinical observations. PMID:27233590

  5. Stability of a general mixed additive-cubic functional equation in non-Archimedean fuzzy normed spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Tianzhou; Rassias, John Michael; Xu Wanxin

    2010-09-15

    We establish some stability results concerning the general mixed additive-cubic functional equation in non-Archimedean fuzzy normed spaces. In addition, we establish some results of approximately general mixed additive-cubic mappings in non-Archimedean fuzzy normed spaces. The results improve and extend some recent results.

  6. DNA--a molecule in search of additional functions: recipient of pool wave emissions? A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, Walter

    2010-09-01

    Almost the entire nucleotide sequence of human DNA is functionally unaccounted for, although large parts of the human genome are transcribed. The genes, as defined by current molecular biology, comprise about 1.5-2% of the DNA molecule. It is proposed that DNA encodes additional, hitherto unrecognized functions. In this discussion, the total information inside and outside the universe we live in is termed the pool or the sum total, known or unknown, of all laws, matter, energy, concepts and events. In a hypothetical model, a Gedankenexperiment, it is suggested that the total of all information emits pool waves of an unknown physical nature. They could be related to black energy or have completely different qualities. The designation pool waves should not imply any similarity to electromagnetism. Further, DNA is suggested to have the capability of interacting with the pool waves and thus permit humans - to some partly genetically determined and yet very limited extent - to perceive information from the pool. Pool emissions might be one of the forces that have been instrumental in and are still driving evolution from simple oligonucleotides to DNA with ever more complex recipient capacities. It will be a major challenge for researchers in the field to unravel these and less hypothetical undetected coding principles in DNA. It is uncertain whether the current trend to search the available DNA sequences with ever more refined computer technology on the basis of our present understanding of biology will detect unknown coding systems. For molecular medicine, research into the genetics of the most common human diseases could profit from the elucidation of presently still ephemeral codes in human DNA. Young scientists with a proven record of original research deserve support for the pursuit of unconventional ideas. This concept of granting priorities will be of the utmost importance in advancing the field beyond current concepts in molecular biology.

  7. Syntactic Functions in Functional Discourse Grammar and Role and Reference Grammar: An Evaluative Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the treatment of syntactic functions, and more particularly those traditionally labelled as Subject and Object, in Functional Discourse Grammar and Role and Reference Grammar. Relevant aspects of the overall structure of the two theories are briefly described. The concept of alignment between levels of the…

  8. Highly Functionalized Cyclopentane Derivatives by Tandem Michael Addition/Radical Cyclization/Oxygenation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Holan, Martin; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jones, Peter G; Jahn, Ullrich

    2015-06-26

    Densely functionalized cyclopentane derivatives with up to four consecutive stereocenters are assembled by a tandem Michael addition/single-electron transfer oxidation/radical cyclization/oxygenation strategy mediated by ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate, a recyclable, less toxic single-electron transfer oxidant. Ester enolates were coupled with α-benzylidene and α-alkylidene β-dicarbonyl compounds with switchable diastereoselectivity. This pivotal steering element subsequently controls the diastereoselectivity of the radical cyclization step. The substitution pattern of the radical cyclization acceptor enables a switch of the cyclization mode from a 5-exo pattern for terminally substituted olefin units to a 6-endo mode for internally substituted acceptors. The oxidative anionic/radical strategy also allows efficient termination by oxygenation with the free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl, and two C-C bonds and one C-O bond are thus formed in the sequence. A stereochemical model is proposed that accounts for all of the experimental results and allows the prediction of the stereochemical outcome. Further transformations of the synthesized cyclopentanes are reported.

  9. Erythorbyl laurate as a potential food additive with multi-functionalities: Interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min Joo; Jo, Su-Kyung; Choi, Seung Jun; Lee, JaeHwan; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2017-01-15

    The interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activities of erythorbyl laurate were investigated to provide information on practical applications as a multi-functional food additive. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of erythorbyl laurate was 0.101mM and its foam stability was three times (half-life 24.33±0.94h) higher than that of Tween 20 (8.00±1.63h). In free radical scavenging assay, the negligible decrease in EC50 of erythorbyl laurate compared to erythorbic acid manifested that C-5 selective esterification of erythorbic acid with an acyl group (lauric acid) did not reduce the inherent antioxidant activity of the donor (erythorbic acid). Erythorbyl laurate formed lipid peroxides slower (i.e. retarded oxidation) in an emulsion system than did erythorbic acid. The localization of erythorbyl laurate as an emulsifier allowed the antioxidant molecules to be concentrated at the oil-water interface where oxidation is prevalent, which led to more effective retardation of lipid oxidation. PMID:27542455

  10. Density functional theory study of the effects of alloying additions on sulfur adsorption on nickel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Chen, Zhong; Kulish, Vadym V.; Bai, Kewu; Wu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with Nickel/Ytrria-doped zirconia (Ni/YDZ) anode materials might cause degradation of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells when S containing fuels are used. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to investigate S adsorption on metal (M)-doped and undoped Ni(0 0 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces. Based on the performed calculations, we analyze the effects of 12 alloying additions (Ag, Au, Al, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Sn, Sb, V, and Zn) on the temperature of transition between clean (S atoms do not adsorb on the surfaces) and contaminated (S atoms can adsorb on the surfaces spontaneously) M-doped Ni surfaces for different concentrations of H2S in the fuel. Predicted results are consistent with many experimental studies relevant to S poisoning of both Ni/YDZ and M-doped Ni/YDZ anode materials. This study is important to understand S poisoning phenomena and to develop new S tolerant anode materials.

  11. Erythorbyl laurate as a potential food additive with multi-functionalities: Interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min Joo; Jo, Su-Kyung; Choi, Seung Jun; Lee, JaeHwan; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2017-01-15

    The interfacial characteristics and antioxidant activities of erythorbyl laurate were investigated to provide information on practical applications as a multi-functional food additive. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of erythorbyl laurate was 0.101mM and its foam stability was three times (half-life 24.33±0.94h) higher than that of Tween 20 (8.00±1.63h). In free radical scavenging assay, the negligible decrease in EC50 of erythorbyl laurate compared to erythorbic acid manifested that C-5 selective esterification of erythorbic acid with an acyl group (lauric acid) did not reduce the inherent antioxidant activity of the donor (erythorbic acid). Erythorbyl laurate formed lipid peroxides slower (i.e. retarded oxidation) in an emulsion system than did erythorbic acid. The localization of erythorbyl laurate as an emulsifier allowed the antioxidant molecules to be concentrated at the oil-water interface where oxidation is prevalent, which led to more effective retardation of lipid oxidation.

  12. The Roles and Functions of Medical Directors in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Aman

    2015-03-03

    The medical director is an important member of the healthcare team in a nursing home, and is responsible for overall coordination of care and for implementation of policies related to care of the residents in a nursing home. The residents in nursing homes are frail, medically complex, and have multiple disabilities. The medical director has an important leadership role in assisting nursing home administration in providing quality care that is consistent with current standards of care. This article provides an overview of roles and functions of the medical director, and suggests ways the medical director can be instrumental in achieving excellent care in today's nursing facilities.

  13. Latinas and Postpartum Depression: Role of Partner Relationship, Additional Children, and Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassert, Silva; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson

    2011-01-01

    Breastfeeding, additional children, and partner relationship predicted postpartum depression among 59 Latinas who had an infant who was 6 months old or younger. The most powerful predictor was conflict with partner. Counselors working with Latinas experiencing postpartum depression should explore the partner relationship, particularly relationship…

  14. Testing a Gender Additive Model: The Role of Body Image in Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearman, Sarah Kate; Stice, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that adolescent girls are at greater risk of developing depression than adolescent boys, risk factor models that account for this difference have been elusive. The objective of this research was to examine risk factors proposed by the "gender additive" model of depression that attempts to partially explain the increased…

  15. The Role of Background Knowledge in Text Comprehension for Children Learning English as an Additional Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoyne, Kelly; Whiteley, Helen E.; Hutchinson, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Children learning English as an additional language (EAL) often experience difficulties with reading comprehension relative to their monolingual peers. While low levels of vocabulary appear to be one factor underlying these difficulties, other factors such as a relative lack of appropriate background knowledge may also contribute. Sixteen children…

  16. Limited role of functional differentiation in early diversification of animals

    PubMed Central

    Knope, M.L.; Heim, N.A.; Frishkoff, L.O.; Payne, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of most animal phyla and classes during the Cambrian explosion has been hypothesized to represent an ‘early burst’ of evolutionary exploration of functional ecological possibilities. However, the ecological history of marine animals has yet to be fully quantified, preventing an assessment of the early-burst model for functional ecology. Here we use ecological assignments for 18,621 marine animal genera to assess the relative timing of functional differentiation versus taxonomic diversification from the Cambrian to the present day. We find that functional diversity increased more slowly than would be expected given the history of taxonomic diversity. Contrary to previous inferences of rapid ecological differentiation from the early appearances of all well-fossilized phyla and classes, explicit coding of functional characteristics demonstrates that Cambrian genera occupied comparatively few modes of life. Functional diversity increased in the Ordovician and, especially, during the recoveries from the end-Permian and end-Cretaceous mass extinctions. Permanent shifts in the relationship between functional and taxonomic diversity following the era-bounding extinctions indicates a critical role for these biotic crises in coupling taxonomic and functional diversity. PMID:25737406

  17. The functional role of some tomato products on lipid profile and liver function in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hoda Salama; Ahmed, Lamiaa Ali; El-din, Maha Mohamed Essam

    2008-09-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the functional role of lycopene obtained from powder prepared from fresh tomato, tomato paste, and ketchup that contained equal amounts of lycopene based on levels of intake on body weight gain (BWG), feed intake, feed efficiency ratio (FER), lipid profiles, atherogenic index, and liver enzymes of hyperlipidemic rats. Forty-eight male albino rats were divided into two main groups: the first group (n = 6 rats) was kept on the basal diet as a normal control, while the second group (n = 42 rats) was fed a hyperlipidemic diet for 5 weeks to induce hyperlipidemia. The latter group was divided into seven subgroups: the first subgroup was the positive control group, while the others were supplemented with one of the tomato products at one of two levels (10 or 20 mg of lycopene/kg of diet). BWG, feed intake, and FER were calculated, and blood samples were collected to determine total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein fractions, atherogenic index, and liver function in sera. Relative organ weights were also calculated. Results revealed that administration of various tomato products produced a significant reduction in feed intake except for the hyperlipidemic group that supplemented with the lower lycopene level from tomato paste. In addition, BWG and FER were not influenced by addition of tomato products at any level of intake. Hyperlipidemic rats supplemented with tomato powder, tomato paste, or ketchup showed significant improvement in almost all the parameters studied compared to the positive control group. Results showed that the higher lycopene level from tomato paste produced significant improvement in all lipid parameters, followed by 10 mg of lycopene/kg from tomato paste, which caused significant elevation in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol comparable to that of the negative control group. The lowest atherogenic index was achieved by addition of the lower lycopene level from tomato paste followed by

  18. Functional dyspepsia: the role of visceral hypersensitivity in its pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2006-05-01

    Functional, or non-ulcer, dyspepsia (FD) is one of the most common reasons for referral to gastroenterologists. It is associated with significant morbidity and impaired quality of life. Many authorities believe that functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome represent part of the spectrum of the same disease process. The pathophysiology of FD remains unclear but several theories have been proposed including visceral hypersensitivity, gastric motor dysfunction, Helicobacter pylori infection and psychosocial factors. In this review, we look at the evidence, to date, for the role of visceral hypersensitivity in the aetiology of FD.

  19. Functional roles of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, S; Thampan, RaghavaVarman

    2003-07-01

    A series of emerging data supports the existence and importance of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors in a variety of cells that are targets for the steroid hormone action. When estradiol (E2) binds to the cell surface protein, the ensuing signal transduction event triggers downstream signaling cascades that contribute to important biological functions. Aside from the classical signaling through nuclear estrogen receptors, we have provided evidence for the functional roles of an estrogen receptor localized in the plasma membrane. This review highlights some of the recent advances made in the understanding of the genomic/non-genomic actions of plasma membrane localized estrogen receptors. PMID:15255376

  20. Switching roles: the functional plasticity of adult tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabik, Agnieszka; Jones, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms have to adapt to survive, and the same is true for their tissues. Rates and types of cell production must be rapidly and reversibly adjusted to meet tissue demands in response to both local and systemic challenges. Recent work reveals how stem cell (SC) populations meet these requirements by switching between functional states tuned to homoeostasis or regeneration. This plasticity extends to differentiating cells, which are capable of reverting to SCs after injury. The concept of the niche, the micro-environment that sustains and regulates stem cells, is broadening, with a new appreciation of the role of physical factors and hormonal signals. Here, we review different functions of SCs, the cellular mechanisms that underlie them and the signals that bias the fate of SCs as they switch between roles. PMID:25812989

  1. Emerging role of phenolic compounds as natural food additives in fish and fish products.

    PubMed

    Maqsood, Sajid; Benjakul, Soottawat; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and microbiological deteriorations are principal causes of quality loss of fish and fish products during handling, processing, and storage. Development of rancid odor and unpleasant flavor, changes of color and texture as well as lowering nutritional value in fish can be prevented by appropriate use of additives. Due to the potential health hazards of synthetic additives, natural products, especially antioxidants and antimicrobial agents, have been intensively examined as safe alternatives to synthetic compounds. Polyphenols (PP) are the natural antioxidants prevalent in fruits, vegetables, beverages (tea, wine, juices), plants, seaweeds, and some herbs and show antioxidative and antimicrobial activities in different fish and fish products. The use of phenolic compounds also appears to be a good alternative for sulphiting agent for retarding melanosis in crustaceans. Phenolic compounds have also been successfully employed as the processing aid for texture modification of fish mince and surimi. Thus, plant polyphenolic compounds can serve as potential additives for preventing quality deterioration or to retain the quality of fish and fish products.

  2. A role of BNLT compound addition on structure and properties of PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaita, P.; Watcharapasorn, A.; Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2010-09-01

    In this research, effects of lead-free bismuth sodium lanthanum titanate (BNLT) addition on structure and properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were investigated. PZT ceramics with addition of 0.1-3.0 wt%BNLT were fabricated by a solid-state mixed oxide method and sintering at 1050-1200 °C for 2 h to obtain dense ceramics with at least 96% of theoretical density. X-ray diffraction indicated that complete solid solution occurred for all compositions. Phase identification showed both tetragonal and rhombohedral perovskite structure of PZT with no BNLT phase detected. Scanning electron micrographs of fractured PZT/BNLT ceramics showed equiaxed grain shape with both transgranular and intergranular fracture modes. Addition of BNLT was also found to reduce densification and effectively limited grain growth of PZT ceramic. Optimum Hv and KIC values were found to be 4.85 GPa and 1.56 MPa.m 1/2 for PZT/0.5 wt%BNLT sample. Among PZT/BNLT samples, room temperature dielectric constant seemed to be improved with increasing BNLT content. The maximum piezoelectric coefficient values were observed in pure PZT ceramic and were slightly decreased in BNLT-added samples. Small reduction of remanent polarization and coercive field in hysteresis loops was observed in BNLT-added samples, indicating a slightly suppressed ferroelectric interaction in this material system.

  3. The role of thyroid hormone in testicular development and function.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Márcia Santos; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2008-12-01

    Thyroid hormone is a critical regulator of growth, development, and metabolism in virtually all tissues, and altered thyroid status affects many organs and systems. Although for many years testis has been regarded as a thyroid hormone unresponsive organ, it is now evident that thyroid hormone plays an important role in testicular development and function. A considerable amount of data show that thyroid hormone influences steroidogenesis as well as spermatogenesis. The involvement of tri-iodothyronine (T(3)) in the control of Sertoli cell proliferation and functional maturation is widely accepted, as well as its role in postnatal Leydig cell differentiation and steroidogenesis. The presence of thyroid hormone receptors in testicular cells throughout development and in adulthood implies that T(3) may act directly on these cells to bring about its effects. Several recent studies have employed different methodologies and techniques in an attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying thyroid hormone effects on testicular cells. The current review aims at presenting an updated picture of the recent advances made regarding the role of thyroid hormones in male gonadal function.

  4. Regulation of SIRT1 in cellular functions: role of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sangwoon; Yao, Hongwei; Caito, Samuel; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam; Rahman, Irfan

    2010-09-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is known to deacetylate histones and non-histone proteins including transcription factors thereby regulating metabolism, stress resistance, cellular survival, cellular senescence/aging, inflammation-immune function, endothelial functions, and circadian rhythms. Naturally occurring dietary polyphenols, such as resveratrol, curcumin, quercetin, and catechins, have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties via modulating different pathways, such as NF-kappaB- and mitogen activated protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, these polyphenols have also been shown to activate SIRT1 directly or indirectly in a variety of models. Therefore, activation of SIRT1 by polyphenols is beneficial for regulation of calorie restriction, oxidative stress, inflammation, cellular senescence, autophagy/apoptosis, autoimmunity, metabolism, adipogenesis, circadian rhythm, skeletal muscle function, mitochondria biogenesis and endothelial dysfunction. In this review, we describe the regulation of SIRT1 by dietary polyphenols in various cellular functions in response to environmental and pro-inflammatory stimuli.

  5. Role of Ag addition in L10 ordering of FePt-based nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Vasiliu, F.; Mercioniu, I.; Crisan, O.

    2014-01-01

    The FePt system has important perspectives as high-temperature corrosion-resistant magnets. In the form of rapidly solidified melt-spun ribbons, FePt-based magnets may exhibit in certain cases a two-phase hard-soft magnetic behaviour. The present paper deals with a microstructural and magnetic study of FePtAgB alloys with increasing Ag content. The aim is to identify and confirm the effect of Ag addition in decreasing the temperature of the FePt disorder-order structural phase transformation. A detailed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study is employed, and the alternative disposal of hard and soft regions within the two-phase microstructure is observed and interpreted with respect to the X-ray diffraction results. In the as-cast Ag-containing samples, it is shown that there is an optimum of the Ag content for which best magnetic properties are obtained. Ag addition creates a nonlinear behaviour of the coercive field and the ordering parameter, similar to the RKKY interaction-induced interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) observed in magnetic layers separated by non-magnetic spacer layers. Direct formation of the L10 phase from the as-cast state in the FePtAgB alloys is reported with magnetic parameters compatible to other exchange spring permanent nanomagnets. These findings open novel perspectives into utilization of such alloys in applications requiring magnets operating in high-temperature industrial environments.

  6. Embedding beyond electrostatics—The role of wave function confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nâbo, Lina J.; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Holmgaard List, Nanna; Solanko, Lukasz M.; Wüstner, Daniel; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    We study excited states of cholesterol in solution and show that, in this specific case, solute wave-function confinement is the main effect of the solvent. This is rationalized on the basis of the polarizable density embedding scheme, which in addition to polarizable embedding includes non-electrostatic repulsion that effectively confines the solute wave function to its cavity. We illustrate how the inclusion of non-electrostatic repulsion results in a successful identification of the intense π → π∗ transition, which was not possible using an embedding method that only includes electrostatics. This underlines the importance of non-electrostatic repulsion in quantum-mechanical embedding-based methods.

  7. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase: Potential Roles in Promoting Gut Health in Weanling Piglets and Its Modulation by Feed Additives - A Review.

    PubMed

    Melo, A D B; Silveira, H; Luciano, F B; Andrade, C; Costa, L B; Rostagno, M H

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal environment plays a critical role in maintaining swine health. Many factors such as diet, microbiota, and host intestinal immune response influence the intestinal environment. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) is an important apical brush border enzyme that is influenced by these factors. IAP dephosphorylates bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides, and flagellin, reducing bacterial toxicity and consequently regulating toll-like receptors (TLRs) activation and inflammation. It also desphosphorylates extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate, consequently reducing inflammation, modulating, and preserving the homeostasis of the intestinal microbiota. The apical localization of IAP on the epithelial surface reveals its role on LPS (from luminal bacteria) detoxification. As the expression of IAP is reported to be downregulated in piglets at weaning, LPS from commensal and pathogenic gram-negative bacteria could increase inflammatory processes by TLR-4 activation, increasing diarrhea events during this phase. Although some studies had reported potential IAP roles to promote gut health, investigations about exogenous IAP effects or feed additives modulating IAP expression and activity yet are necessary. However, we discussed in this paper that the critical assessment reported can suggest that exogenous IAP or feed additives that could increase its expression could show beneficial effects to reduce diarrhea events during the post weaning phase. Therefore, the main goals of this review are to discuss IAP's role in intestinal inflammatory processes and present feed additives used as growth promoters that may modulate IAP expression and activity to promote gut health in piglets. PMID:26732323

  8. Role of XPD in cellular functions: To TFIIH and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houten, Bennett Van; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    XPD, as part of the TFIIH complex, has classically been linked to the damage verification step of nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, recent data indicate that XPD, due to its iron-sulfur center interacts with the iron sulfur cluster assembly proteins, and may interact with other proteins in the cell to mediate a diverse set of biological functions including cell cycle regulation, mitosis, and mitochondrial function. In this perspective, after first reviewing the function and some of the key disease causing variants that affect XPD's interaction with TFIIH and the CDK-activating kinase complex (CAK), we investigate these intriguing cellular roles of XPD and highlight important unanswered questions that provide a fertile ground for further scientific exploration. PMID:27262611

  9. The Role of Functional Foods in Cutaneous Anti-aging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soyun

    2014-01-01

    Oral supplementation of micronutrients, or functional foods, to prevent aging has gained much attention and popularity as society ages and becomes more affluent, and as science reveals the pathological mechanisms of aging. Aging of the skin combines biologic aging and extrinsic aging caused predominantly by sunlight and other environmental toxins. Anti-aging functional foods exert their influence mostly through their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thereby abrogating collagen degradation and/or increasing procollagen synthesis. Clinical evidence supporting a role in preventing cutaneous aging is available for oral supplements such as carotenoids, polyphenols, chlorophyll, aloe vera, vitamins C and E, red ginseng, squalene, and omega-3 fatty acids. Collagen peptides and proteoglycans are claimed to provide building blocks of the dermal matrix. This review summarizes the current study findings of these functional foods. PMID:26064850

  10. Functional roles for myosin 1c in cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M.; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2013-01-01

    Cellular signaling pathways underlie the transfer of information throughout the cell and to adjoining cells and so govern most critical cellular functions. Increasing evidence points to the molecular motor myosin 1c as a prominent player in many signaling cascades, from the integrin-dependent signaling involved in cell migration to the signaling events underlying insulin resistance. Myosin 1c functions on these pathways both via an important role in regulating lipid raft recycling and also via direct involvement in signaling cascades. This review provides an overview of the functional involvement of myosin 1c in cellular signaling and discusses the possible potential for myosin 1c as a target for drug-based treatments for human diseases. PMID:23022959

  11. Role of AAA(+)-proteins in peroxisome biogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Immanuel; Erdmann, Ralf; Girzalsky, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the PEX1 gene, which encodes a protein required for peroxisome biogenesis, are the most common cause of the Zellweger spectrum diseases. The recognition that Pex1p shares a conserved ATP-binding domain with p97 and NSF led to the discovery of the extended family of AAA+-type ATPases. So far, four AAA+-type ATPases are related to peroxisome function. Pex6p functions together with Pex1p in peroxisome biogenesis, ATAD1/Msp1p plays a role in membrane protein targeting and a member of the Lon-family of proteases is associated with peroxisomal quality control. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the AAA+-proteins involved in peroxisome biogenesis and function.

  12. Role of Micronutrients in Skin Health and Function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho

    2015-01-01

    Skin is the first line of defense for protecting our bodies against external perturbations, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, mechanical/chemical stress, and bacterial infection. Nutrition is one of many factors required for the maintenance of overall skin health. An impaired nutritional status alters the structural integrity and biological function of skin, resulting in an abnormal skin barrier. In particular, the importance of micronutrients (such as certain vitamins and minerals) for skin health has been highlighted in cell culture, animal, and clinical studies. These micronutrients are employed not only as active compounds in therapeutic agents for treating certain skin diseases, but also as ingredients in cosmetic products. Here, the author describes the barrier function of the skin and the general nutritional requirements for skin health. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential roles and current knowledge of selected micronutrients in skin health and function. PMID:25995818

  13. Layered growth of crayfish gastrolith: about the stability of amorphous calcium carbonate and role of additives.

    PubMed

    Habraken, Wouter J E M; Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Al-Sawalmih, Ali; Glazer, Lilah; Bentov, Shmuel; Fratzl, Peter; Sagi, Amir; Aichmayer, Barbara; Berman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on pre-molt gastroliths have shown a typical onion-like morphology of layers of amorphous mineral (mostly calcium carbonate) and chitin, resulting from the continuous deposition and densification of amorphous mineral spheres on a chitin-matrix during time. To investigate the consequences of this layered growth on the local structure and composition of the gastrolith, we performed spatially-resolved Raman, X-ray and SEM-EDS analysis on complete pre-molt gastrolith cross-sections. Results show that especially the abundance of inorganic phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)/citrate and proteins is not uniform throughout the organ but changes from layer to layer. Based on these results we can conclude that ACC stabilization in the gastrolith takes place by more than one compound and not by only one of these additives.

  14. Genome-wide meta-analysis of maize heterosis reveals the potential role of additive gene expression at pericentromeric loci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    QTL, and also suggests a model for the potential role of additive expression in the formation and conservation of heterosis for GY via dominant, multigenic quantitative trait loci. Our findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the multifactorial phenomenon of heterosis, and thus to the breeding of new high yielding varieties. PMID:24693880

  15. The Use of Functional Communication Training without Additional Treatment Procedures in an Inclusive School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Sean D.; Merical, Cheryl L.

    2006-01-01

    Functional communication training (FCT) is an intervention frequently used for students with developmental disabilities to reduce problematic behaviors and to increase prosocial behaviors. This intervention appears to be very effective when the communication responses trained are matched to the function of the student's problematic behaviors. In…

  16. Kinetics of the addition of olefins to Si-centered radicals: the critical role of dispersion interactions revealed by theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin R; Clarkin, Owen J; Dale, Stephen G; DiLabio, Gino A

    2015-06-01

    Solution-phase rate constants for the addition of selected olefins to the triethylsilyl and tris(trimethylsilyl)silyl radicals are measured using laser-flash photolysis and competition kinetics. The results are compared with predictions from density functional theory (DFT) calculations, both with and without dispersion corrections obtained from the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) model. Without a dispersion correction, the rate constants are consistently underestimated; the errors increase with system size, up to 10(6) s(-1) for the largest system considered. Dispersion interactions preferentially stabilize the transition states relative to the separated reactants and bring the DFT-calculated rate constants into excellent agreement with experiment. Thus, dispersion interactions are found to play a key role in determining the kinetics for addition reactions, particularly those involving sterically bulky functional groups.

  17. Incorporating clonal growth form clarifies the role of plant height in response to nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Gough, Laura; Gross, Katherine L; Cleland, Elsa E; Clark, Christopher M; Collins, Scott L; Fargione, Joseph E; Pennings, Steven C; Suding, Katharine N

    2012-08-01

    Nutrient addition to grasslands consistently causes species richness declines and productivity increases. Competition, particularly for light, is often assumed to produce this result. Using a long-term dataset from North American herbaceous plant communities, we tested whether height and clonal growth form together predict responses to fertilization because neither trait alone predicted species loss in a previous analysis. Species with a tall-runner growth form commonly increased in relative abundance in response to added nitrogen, while short species and those with a tall-clumped clonal growth form often decreased. The ability to increase in size via vegetative spread across space, while simultaneously occupying the canopy, conferred competitive advantage, although typically only the abundance of a single species within each height-clonal growth form significantly responded to fertilization in each experiment. Classifying species on the basis of two traits (height and clonal growth form) increases our ability to predict species responses to fertilization compared to either trait alone in predominantly herbaceous plant communities. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-012-2264-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  18. The role and future of the Laser Technology in the Additive Manufacturing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Gideon N.

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) was, in the early days, strongly inspired by upcoming laser technologies. The trend to apply lasers in manufacturing in the 1970's might be also be seen as the ignition point, as is evident in early precedent patents. During the evolvement of AM processes, many new systems based on various physical principals were evident; alternative energy sources for AM are in use today. Starting with the 'historical' background followed by a detailed classification analyzing the enablers in use, relevant laser technologies have been identified. This paper focuses on powder bed technologies for plastics and metals as the relevant Laser technology. It concentrates on laser influences and state-of-the-art knowledge. The paper will present a generalized, 'big picture' overview indicating 'lessons learned' and where future emphasis should be focused. Opportunities and challenges, including actual development status, will be described in view of the desired outcomes. Finally, future research challenges and conclusions will be stated and several relevant references for further readings will be given.

  19. Combinatorial reshaping of a lipase structure for thermostability: additive role of surface stabilizing single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Ranvir; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2014-05-16

    Thermostable lipases are of high priority for industrial applications. In the present study, targeted improvement of the thermostability of a lipase from metagenomic origin was examined by using a combinatorial protein engineering approach exploring additive effects of single amino acid substitutions. A variant (LipR5) was generated after combination of two thermostabilizing mutations (R214C & N355K). Thermostability of the variant enzyme was analyzed by half-life measurement and circular dichroism (CD). To assess whether catalytic properties were affected by mutation, the optimal reaction conditions were determined. The protein LipR5, displayed optimum activity at 50°C and pH 8.0. It showed two fold enhancement in thermostability (at 60°C) as compared to LipR3 (R214C) and nearly 168 fold enhancement as compared to parent enzyme (LipR1). Circular dichroism and fluorescence study suggest that the protein structure had become more rigid and stable to denaturation. Study of 3D model suggested that Lys355 was involved in formation of a Hydrogen bond with OE1 of Glu284. Lys355 was also making salt bridge with OE2 of Glu284. PMID:24751523

  20. Number line estimation and mental addition: examining the potential roles of language and education.

    PubMed

    Laski, Elida V; Yu, Qingyi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relative importance of language and education to the development of numerical knowledge. Consistent with previous research suggesting that counting systems that transparently reflect the base-10 system facilitate an understanding of numerical concepts, Chinese and Chinese American kindergartners' and second graders' number line estimation (0-100 and 0-1000) was 1 to 2 years more advanced than that of American children tested in previous studies. However, Chinese children performed better than their Chinese American peers, who were fluent in Chinese but had been educated in America, at kindergarten on 0-100 number lines, at second grade on 0-1000 number lines, and at both time points on complex addition problems. Overall, the pattern of findings suggests that educational approach may have a greater influence on numerical development than the linguistic structure of the counting system. The findings also demonstrate that, despite generating accurate estimates of numerical magnitude on 0-100 number lines earlier, it still takes Chinese children approximately 2 years to demonstrate accurate estimates on 0-1000 number lines, which raises questions about how to promote the mapping of knowledge across numerical scales. PMID:24135313

  1. Postural control in response to a perturbation: role of vision and additional support.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vennila; Vennila, Krishnan; Aruin, Alexander S

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the availability of vision and additional support on anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) postural adjustments and their interaction. Eight healthy adults were exposed to external perturbations induced at the shoulder level while standing with and without holding onto a walker in full vision and while blindfolded. Electrical activity of the trunk and leg muscles and center of pressure (COPAP) displacement were recorded and quantified within the time intervals typical of APA and CPA. The results showed that with full vision, there was no difference in both APA and CPA in standing with and without holding onto a walker. With subjects holding onto a walker, CPA in standing blindfolded were comparable to CPA in full vision; this was seen in changes in the electrical activity of most of the muscles at the individual muscle, joint, and the muscle group levels as well as in COPAP displacement. The findings suggest that (1) in conditions where vision is available, vision overrules simultaneously available proprioceptive information from the support, (2) while in conditions where vision is not available, proprioceptive information from the support or support itself could be substituted for vision. It is possible to suggest that using a non-stabilizing support could be a valuable strategy to improve postural control when visual information is not available or compromised.

  2. Number line estimation and mental addition: examining the potential roles of language and education.

    PubMed

    Laski, Elida V; Yu, Qingyi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relative importance of language and education to the development of numerical knowledge. Consistent with previous research suggesting that counting systems that transparently reflect the base-10 system facilitate an understanding of numerical concepts, Chinese and Chinese American kindergartners' and second graders' number line estimation (0-100 and 0-1000) was 1 to 2 years more advanced than that of American children tested in previous studies. However, Chinese children performed better than their Chinese American peers, who were fluent in Chinese but had been educated in America, at kindergarten on 0-100 number lines, at second grade on 0-1000 number lines, and at both time points on complex addition problems. Overall, the pattern of findings suggests that educational approach may have a greater influence on numerical development than the linguistic structure of the counting system. The findings also demonstrate that, despite generating accurate estimates of numerical magnitude on 0-100 number lines earlier, it still takes Chinese children approximately 2 years to demonstrate accurate estimates on 0-1000 number lines, which raises questions about how to promote the mapping of knowledge across numerical scales.

  3. G1/ELE Functions in the Development of Rice Lemmas in Addition to Determining Identities of Empty Glumes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjia; Li, Haifeng; Su, Yali; Li, Wenqiang; Shi, Chunhai

    2016-01-01

    Rice empty glumes, also named sterile lemmas or rudimentary lemmas according to different interpretations, are distinct from lemmas in morphology and cellular pattern. Consistently, the molecular mechanism to control the development of lemmas is different from that of empty glumes. Rice LEAFY HULL STERILE1(OsLHS1) and DROOPING LEAF(DL) regulate the cellular pattern and the number of vascular bundles of lemmas respectively, while LONG STERILE LEMMA1 (G1)/ELONGATED EMPTY GLUME (ELE) and PANICLE PHYTOMER2 (PAP2)/OsMADS34 determine identities of empty glumes. Though some progress has been made, identities of empty glumes remain unclear, and genetic interactions between lemma genes and glume genes have been rarely elucidated. In this research, a new G1/ELE mutant g1–6 was identified and the phenotype was analyzed. Similar to previously reported mutant lines of G1/ELE, empty glumes of g1–6 plants transform into lemma-like organs. Furthermore, Phenotypes of single and double mutant plants suggest that, in addition to their previously described gene-specific functions, G1/ELE and OsLHS1 play redundant roles in controlling vascular bundle number, cell volume, and cell layer number of empty glumes and lemmas. Meanwhile, expression patterns of G1/ELE in osmads1-z flowers and OsLHS1 in g1–6 flowers indicate they do not regulate each other at the level of transcription. Finally, down-regulation of the empty glume gene OsMADS34/PAP2 and ectopic expression of the lemma gene DL, in the g1–6 plants provide further evidence that empty glumes are sterile lemmas. Generally, our findings provided valuable information for better understanding functions of G1 and OsLHS1 in flower development and identities of empty glumes. PMID:27462334

  4. G1/ELE Functions in the Development of Rice Lemmas in Addition to Determining Identities of Empty Glumes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjia; Li, Haifeng; Su, Yali; Li, Wenqiang; Shi, Chunhai

    2016-01-01

    Rice empty glumes, also named sterile lemmas or rudimentary lemmas according to different interpretations, are distinct from lemmas in morphology and cellular pattern. Consistently, the molecular mechanism to control the development of lemmas is different from that of empty glumes. Rice LEAFY HULL STERILE1(OsLHS1) and DROOPING LEAF(DL) regulate the cellular pattern and the number of vascular bundles of lemmas respectively, while LONG STERILE LEMMA1 (G1)/ELONGATED EMPTY GLUME (ELE) and PANICLE PHYTOMER2 (PAP2)/OsMADS34 determine identities of empty glumes. Though some progress has been made, identities of empty glumes remain unclear, and genetic interactions between lemma genes and glume genes have been rarely elucidated. In this research, a new G1/ELE mutant g1-6 was identified and the phenotype was analyzed. Similar to previously reported mutant lines of G1/ELE, empty glumes of g1-6 plants transform into lemma-like organs. Furthermore, Phenotypes of single and double mutant plants suggest that, in addition to their previously described gene-specific functions, G1/ELE and OsLHS1 play redundant roles in controlling vascular bundle number, cell volume, and cell layer number of empty glumes and lemmas. Meanwhile, expression patterns of G1/ELE in osmads1-z flowers and OsLHS1 in g1-6 flowers indicate they do not regulate each other at the level of transcription. Finally, down-regulation of the empty glume gene OsMADS34/PAP2 and ectopic expression of the lemma gene DL, in the g1-6 plants provide further evidence that empty glumes are sterile lemmas. Generally, our findings provided valuable information for better understanding functions of G1 and OsLHS1 in flower development and identities of empty glumes. PMID:27462334

  5. Additional considerations about the role of ion size in charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, A; Hidalgo-Álvarez, R; Quesada-Pérez, M

    2009-10-21

    The effect of the ion size on the charge reversal process is studied via canonical Monte Carlo simulation. To this end, a primitive model of electrolyte is used to analyze the electric double layer formed by an asymmetric electrolyte in the presence of a charged planar wall. Different values of ion diameters and surface charge densities are used so as to determine the conditions at which the charge reversal first occurs. For each case, the apparent surface charge density is calculated as a function of the distance from the charged wall for the different electrolyte concentrations in order to establish the minimal salt concentration required for the charge reversal. We will refer to this electrolyte concentration as the reversal concentration and will show how it depends on the surface charge density and on the ion size. From the apparent surface charge density profiles, the distance from the wall at which the charge reversal arises as well as its intensity can be also inferred. PMID:21715840

  6. Bacteriophage functional genomics and its role in bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Fouts, Derrick E; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2013-07-01

    Emerging and reemerging bacterial infectious diseases are a major public health concern worldwide. The role of bacteriophages in the emergence of novel bacterial pathogens by horizontal gene transfer was highlighted by the May 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreaks that originated in Germany and spread to other European countries. This outbreak also highlighted the pivotal role played by recent advances in functional genomics in rapidly deciphering the virulence mechanism elicited by this novel pathogen and developing rapid diagnostics and therapeutics. However, despite a steady increase in the number of phage sequences in the public databases, boosted by the next-generation sequencing technologies, few functional genomics studies of bacteriophages have been conducted. Our definition of 'functional genomics' encompasses a range of aspects: phage genome sequencing, annotation and ascribing functions to phage genes, prophage identification in bacterial sequences, elucidating the events in various stages of phage life cycle using genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, defining the mechanisms of host takeover including specific bacterial-phage protein interactions and identifying virulence and other adaptive features encoded by phages and finally, using prophage genomic information for bacterial detection/diagnostics. Given the breadth and depth of this definition and the fact that some of these aspects (especially phage-encoded virulence/adaptive features) have been treated extensively in other reviews, we restrict our focus only on certain aspects. These include phage genome sequencing and annotation, identification of prophages in bacterial sequences and genetic characterization of phages, functional genomics of the infection process and finally, bacterial identification using genomic information.

  7. Bacteriophage functional genomics and its role in bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Fouts, Derrick E; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2013-07-01

    Emerging and reemerging bacterial infectious diseases are a major public health concern worldwide. The role of bacteriophages in the emergence of novel bacterial pathogens by horizontal gene transfer was highlighted by the May 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreaks that originated in Germany and spread to other European countries. This outbreak also highlighted the pivotal role played by recent advances in functional genomics in rapidly deciphering the virulence mechanism elicited by this novel pathogen and developing rapid diagnostics and therapeutics. However, despite a steady increase in the number of phage sequences in the public databases, boosted by the next-generation sequencing technologies, few functional genomics studies of bacteriophages have been conducted. Our definition of 'functional genomics' encompasses a range of aspects: phage genome sequencing, annotation and ascribing functions to phage genes, prophage identification in bacterial sequences, elucidating the events in various stages of phage life cycle using genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, defining the mechanisms of host takeover including specific bacterial-phage protein interactions and identifying virulence and other adaptive features encoded by phages and finally, using prophage genomic information for bacterial detection/diagnostics. Given the breadth and depth of this definition and the fact that some of these aspects (especially phage-encoded virulence/adaptive features) have been treated extensively in other reviews, we restrict our focus only on certain aspects. These include phage genome sequencing and annotation, identification of prophages in bacterial sequences and genetic characterization of phages, functional genomics of the infection process and finally, bacterial identification using genomic information. PMID:23520178

  8. Possible functional roles of phase resetting during walking.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Taiga; Nomura, Taishin; Sato, Shunsuke

    2003-06-01

    The walking rhythm is known to show phase shift or "reset" in response to external impulsive perturbations. We tried to elucidate functional roles of the phase reset possibly used for the neural control of locomotion. To this end, a system with a double pendulum as a simplified model of the locomotor control and a model of bipedal locomotion were employed and analyzed in detail. In these models, a movement corresponding to the normal steady-state walking was realized as a stable limit cycle solution of the system. Unexpected external perturbations applied to the system can push the state point of the system away from its limit cycle, either outside or inside the basin of attraction of the limit cycle. Our mathematical analyses of the models suggested functional roles of the phase reset during walking as follows. Function 1: an appropriate amount of the phase reset for a given perturbation can contribute to relocating the system's state point outside the basin of attraction of the limit cycle back to the inside. Function 2: it can also be useful to reduce the convergence time (the time necessary for the state point to return to the limit cycle). In experimental studies during walking of animals and humans, the reset of walking rhythm induced by perturbations was investigated using the phase transition curve (PTC) or the phase resetting curve (PRC) representing phase-dependent responses of the walking. We showed, for the simple double-pendulum model, the existence of the optimal phase control and the corresponding PTC that could optimally realize the aforementioned functions in response to impulsive force perturbations. Moreover, possible forms of PRC that can avoid falling against the force perturbations were predicted by the biped model, and they were compared with the experimentally observed PRC during human walking. Finally, physiological implications of the results were discussed. PMID:12789495

  9. Assessing the factor structure of a role functioning item bank

    PubMed Central

    Ware, John E.; Bjorner, Jakob B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Role functioning (RF) is an important part of health-related quality of life, but is hard to measure due to the wide definition of roles and fluctuations in role participation. This study aims to explore the dimensionality of a newly developed item bank assessing the impact of health on RF. Methods A battery of measures with skip patterns including the new RF bank was completed by 2,500 participants answering only questions on social roles relevant to them. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted for the participants answering items from all conceptual domains (N = 1193). Conceptually based dimensionality and method effects reflecting positively and negatively worded items were explored in a series of models. Results A bi-factor model (CFI = .93, RMSEA = .08) with one general and four conceptual factors (social, family, occupation, generic) was retained. Positively worded items were excluded from the final solution due to misfit. While a single factor model with methods factors had a poor fit (CFI = .88, RMSEA = .13), high loadings on the general factor in the bi-factor model suggest that the RF bank is sufficiently unidimensional for IRT analysis. Conclusions The bank demonstrated sufficient unidimensionality for IRT-based calibration of all the items on a common metric and development of a computerized adaptive test. PMID:21153710

  10. Functional roles of CSPG4/NG2 in chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Nuor S M; Azfer, Asim; Worrell, Harrison; Salter, Donald M

    2016-04-01

    CSPG4/NG2 is a multifunctional transmembrane protein with limited distribution in adult tissues including articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible roles of CSPG4/NG2 in chondrosarcomas and to establish whether this molecule may have potential for targeted therapy. Stable knock-down of CSPG4/NG2 in the JJ012 chondrosarcoma cell line by shRNA resulted in decreased cell proliferation and migration as well as a decrease in gene expression of the MMP (matrix metalloproteinase) 3 protease and ADAMTS4 (aggrecanase). Chondrosarcoma cells in which CSPG4/NG2 was knocked down were more sensitive to doxorubicin than wild-type cells. The results indicate that CSPG4/NG2 has roles in regulating chondrosarcoma cell function in relation to growth, spread and resistance to chemotherapy and that anti-CSPG4/NG2 therapies may have potential in the treatment of surgically unresectable chondrosarcoma.

  11. The Role of Maternal Care in Shaping CNS Function

    PubMed Central

    Nephew, Benjamin; Murgatroyd, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Maternal care involves the consistent and coordinated expression of a variety of behaviours over an extended period of time, and adverse changes in maternal care can have profound impacts on the CNS and behaviour of offspring. This complex behavioural pattern depends on a number of integrated neuroendocrine mechanisms. This review will discuss the use of animal models in the study of the role of maternal care in shaping CNS function, the contributions of corticosteroid releasing hormone, vasopressin, oxytocin, and prolactin in this process, the molecular mechanisms involved, and the translational relevance of this research. PMID:24210943

  12. Functional Gustatory Role of Chemoreceptors in Drosophila Wings.

    PubMed

    Raad, Hussein; Ferveur, Jean-François; Ledger, Neil; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2016-05-17

    Neuroanatomical evidence argues for the presence of taste sensilla in Drosophila wings; however, the taste physiology of insect wings remains hypothetical, and a comprehensive link to mechanical functions, such as flight, wing flapping, and grooming, is lacking. Our data show that the sensilla of the Drosophila anterior wing margin respond to both sweet and bitter molecules through an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Conversely, genetically modified flies presenting a wing-specific reduction in chemosensory cells show severe defects in both wing taste signaling and the exploratory guidance associated with chemodetection. In Drosophila, the chemodetection machinery includes mechanical grooming, which facilitates the contact between tastants and wing chemoreceptors, and the vibrations of flapping wings that nebulize volatile molecules as carboxylic acids. Together, these data demonstrate that the Drosophila wing chemosensory sensilla are a functional taste organ and that they may have a role in the exploration of ecological niches.

  13. Role of topology in complex functional networks of beta cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Christian; Filippi, Simonetta; Gizzi, Alessio; Loppini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    The activity of pancreatic β cells can be described by biological networks of coupled nonlinear oscillators that, via electrochemical synchronization, release insulin in response to augmented glucose levels. In this work, we analyze the emergent behavior of regular and percolated β -cells clusters through a stochastic mathematical model where "functional" networks arise. We show that the emergence and robustness of the synchronized dynamics depend both on intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. In particular, cellular noise level, glucose concentration, network spatial architecture, and cell-to-cell coupling strength are the key factors for the generation of a rhythmic and robust activity. Their role in the functional network topology associated with β -cells clusters is analyzed and discussed.

  14. Covariant density functional theory: The role of the pion

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Karatzikos, S.; Serra, M.; Otsuka, T.; Ring, P.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the role of the pion in covariant density functional theory. Starting from conventional relativistic mean field (RMF) theory with a nonlinear coupling of the {sigma} meson and without exchange terms we add pions with a pseudovector coupling to the nucleons in relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation. In order to take into account the change of the pion field in the nuclear medium the effective coupling constant of the pion is treated as a free parameter. It is found that the inclusion of the pion to this sort of density functionals does not destroy the overall description of the bulk properties by RMF. On the other hand, the noncentral contribution of the pion (tensor coupling) does have effects on single particle energies and on binding energies of certain nuclei.

  15. Terrestrial exposure of oilfield flowline additives diminish soil structural stability and remediative microbial function.

    PubMed

    George, S J; Sherbone, J; Hinz, C; Tibbett, M

    2011-10-01

    Onshore oil production pipelines are major installations in the petroleum industry, stretching many thousands of kilometres worldwide which also contain flowline additives. The current study focuses on the effect of the flowline additives on soil physico-chemical and biological properties and quantified the impact using resilience and resistance indices. Our findings are the first to highlight deleterious effect of flowline additives by altering some fundamental soil properties, including a complete loss of structural integrity of the impacted soil and a reduced capacity to degrade hydrocarbons mainly due to: (i) phosphonate salts (in scale inhibitor) prevented accumulation of scale in pipelines but also disrupted soil physical structure; (ii) glutaraldehyde (in biocides) which repressed microbial activity in the pipeline and reduced hydrocarbon degradation in soil upon environmental exposure; (iii) the combinatory effects of these two chemicals synergistically caused severe soil structural collapse and disruption of microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

  16. The Functional Role of the Periphery in Emotional Language Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Havas, David A.; Matheson, James

    2013-01-01

    Language can impact emotion, even when it makes no reference to emotion states. For example, reading sentences with positive meanings (“The water park is refreshing on the hot summer day”) induces patterns of facial feedback congruent with the sentence emotionality (smiling), whereas sentences with negative meanings induce a frown. Moreover, blocking facial afference with botox selectively slows comprehension of emotional sentences. Therefore, theories of cognition should account for emotion-language interactions above the level of explicit emotion words, and the role of peripheral feedback in comprehension. For this special issue exploring frontiers in the role of the body and environment in cognition, we propose a theory in which facial feedback provides a context-sensitive constraint on the simulation of actions described in language. Paralleling the role of emotions in real-world behavior, our account proposes that (1) facial expressions accompany sudden shifts in wellbeing as described in language; (2) facial expressions modulate emotional action systems during reading; and (3) emotional action systems prepare the reader for an effective simulation of the ensuing language content. To inform the theory and guide future research, we outline a framework based on internal models for motor control. To support the theory, we assemble evidence from diverse areas of research. Taking a functional view of emotion, we tie the theory to behavioral and neural evidence for a role of facial feedback in cognition. Our theoretical framework provides a detailed account that can guide future research on the role of emotional feedback in language processing, and on interactions of language and emotion. It also highlights the bodily periphery as relevant to theories of embodied cognition. PMID:23750145

  17. The functional role of the periphery in emotional language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Havas, David A; Matheson, James

    2013-01-01

    Language can impact emotion, even when it makes no reference to emotion states. For example, reading sentences with positive meanings ("The water park is refreshing on the hot summer day") induces patterns of facial feedback congruent with the sentence emotionality (smiling), whereas sentences with negative meanings induce a frown. Moreover, blocking facial afference with botox selectively slows comprehension of emotional sentences. Therefore, theories of cognition should account for emotion-language interactions above the level of explicit emotion words, and the role of peripheral feedback in comprehension. For this special issue exploring frontiers in the role of the body and environment in cognition, we propose a theory in which facial feedback provides a context-sensitive constraint on the simulation of actions described in language. Paralleling the role of emotions in real-world behavior, our account proposes that (1) facial expressions accompany sudden shifts in wellbeing as described in language; (2) facial expressions modulate emotional action systems during reading; and (3) emotional action systems prepare the reader for an effective simulation of the ensuing language content. To inform the theory and guide future research, we outline a framework based on internal models for motor control. To support the theory, we assemble evidence from diverse areas of research. Taking a functional view of emotion, we tie the theory to behavioral and neural evidence for a role of facial feedback in cognition. Our theoretical framework provides a detailed account that can guide future research on the role of emotional feedback in language processing, and on interactions of language and emotion. It also highlights the bodily periphery as relevant to theories of embodied cognition.

  18. Functional roles affect diversity-succession relationships for boreal beetles.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of "functional" groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience.

  19. Role of PHOSPHO1 in Periodontal Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, L E; Ao, M; Yadav, M; Kuss, P; Narisawa, S; Kolli, T N; Wimer, H F; Farquharson, C; Somerman, M J; Millán, J L; Foster, B L

    2016-07-01

    The tooth root and periodontal apparatus, including the acellular and cellular cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone, are critical for tooth function. Cementum and bone mineralization is regulated by factors including enzymes and extracellular matrix proteins that promote or inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Orphan Phosphatase 1 (Phospho1, PHOSPHO1) is a phosphatase expressed by chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and odontoblasts that functions in skeletal and dentin mineralization by initiating deposition of hydroxyapatite inside membrane-limited matrix vesicles. The role of PHOSPHO1 in periodontal formation remains unknown and we aimed to determine its functional importance in these tissues. We hypothesized that the enzyme would regulate proper mineralization of the periodontal apparatus. Spatiotemporal expression of PHOSPHO1 was mapped during periodontal development, and Phospho1(-/-) mice were analyzed using histology, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, radiography, and micro-computed tomography. The Phospho1 gene and PHOSPHO1 protein were expressed by active alveolar bone osteoblasts and cementoblasts during cellular cementum formation. In Phospho1(-/-) mice, acellular cementum formation and mineralization were unaffected, whereas cellular cementum deposition increased although it displayed delayed mineralization and cementoid. Phospho1(-/-) mice featured disturbances in alveolar bone mineralization, shown by accumulation of unmineralized osteoid matrix and interglobular patterns of protein deposition. Parallel to other skeletal sites, deposition of mineral-regulating protein osteopontin (OPN) was increased in alveolar bone in Phospho1(-/-) mice. In contrast to the skeleton, genetic ablation of Spp1, the gene encoding OPN, did not ameliorate dentoalveolar defects in Phospho1(-/-) mice. Despite alveolar bone mineralization defects, periodontal attachment and function appeared undisturbed in Phospho1(-/-) mice, with normal PDL

  20. "Hotheaded": the role OF TRPV1 in brain functions.

    PubMed

    Martins, D; Tavares, I; Morgado, C

    2014-10-01

    The TRPV1 (vanilloid 1) channel is best known for its role in sensory transmission in the nociceptive neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Although first studied in the dorsal root ganglia as the receptor for capsaicin, TRPV1 has been recently recognized to have a broader distribution in the central nervous system, where it is likely to constitute an atypical neurotransmission system involved in several functions through modulation of both neuronal and glial activities. The endovanilloid-activated brain TRPV1 channels seem to be involved in somatosensory, motor and visceral functions. Recent studies suggested that TRPV1 channels also account for more complex functions, as addiction, anxiety, mood and cognition/learning. However, more studies are needed before the relevance of TRPV1 in brain activity can be clearly stated. This review highlights the increasing importance of TRPV1 as a regulator of brain function and discusses possible bases for the future development of new therapeutic approaches that by targeting brain TRPV1 receptors might be used for the treatment of several neurological disorders.

  1. Voxel-Wise Functional Connectomics Using Arterial Spin Labeling Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Role of Denoising.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate voxel-wise functional connectomics using arterial spin labeling (ASL) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Since ASL signal has an intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the role of denoising is evaluated; in particular, a novel denoising method, dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) combined with the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm is implemented and evaluated. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method in denoising images and in detecting functional networks from noisy data (including the accuracy and sensitivity of detection). In addition, denoising was applied to in vivo ASL datasets, followed by network analysis using graph theoretical approaches. Efficiencies cost was used to evaluate the performance of denoising in detecting functional networks from in vivo ASL fMRI data. Simulations showed that denoising is effective in detecting voxel-wise functional networks from low SNR data and/or from data with small total number of time points. The capability of denoised voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis was also demonstrated with in vivo data. We concluded that denoising is important for voxel-wise functional connectivity using ASL fMRI and that the proposed DT-CWT-NLM method should be a useful ASL preprocessing step.

  2. Molecular aspects of aromatic C additions to soils: Implications of biochar quality for ecosystem functionality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid residues of incomplete combustion (biochar or char) are continuously being added to soils due to natural vegetation fires in many ecosystems. However, new strategies for carbon sequestration in soils are likely to include the active addition of biochar to soils. Since bioc...

  3. Meaning and Function of Dummy Auxiliaries in Adult Acquisition of Dutch as an Additional Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julien, Manuela; van Hout, Roeland; van de Craats, Ineke

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results of experimental data on language production and comprehension. These show that adult learners of Dutch as an additional language, with different language backgrounds, and a L2 proficiency below level A2 (Waystage) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR; Council of Europe, 2001), use…

  4. Response of bacterial community structure and function to experimental rainwater additions in a coastal eutrophic embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teira, Eva; Hernando-Morales, Víctor; Martínez-García, Sandra; Figueiras, Francisco G.; Arbones, Belén; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón

    2013-03-01

    Although recognized as a potentially important source of both inorganic and organic nutrients, the impact of rainwater on microbial populations from marine planktonic systems has been poorly assessed. The effect of rainwater additions on bacterioplankton metabolism and community composition was evaluated in microcosm experiments enclosing natural marine plankton populations from the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain). The experiments were conducted during three different seasons (spring, autumn and winter) using rainwater collected at three different locations: marine, urban and rural sites. Bacterial abundance and production significantly increased up to 1.3 and 1.8-fold, respectively, after urban rainwater additions in spring, when ambient nutrient concentration was very low. Overall, the increments in bacterial production were higher than those in bacterial respiration, which implies that a higher proportion of carbon consumed by bacteria would be available to higher trophic levels. The response of the different bacterial groups to distinct rainwater types differed between seasons. The most responsive bacterial groups were Betaproteobacteria which significantly increased their abundance after urban (in spring and winter) and marine (in spring) rainwater additions, and Bacteroidetes which positively responded to all rainwater treatments in spring and to urban rainwater in autumn. Gammaproteobacteria and Roseobacter responded only to urban (in spring) and marine (in winter) rainwater treatment, respectively. The responses to rainwater additions were moderate and transient, and the resulting bacterial community structure was not importantly altered.

  5. [Roles and functions of military flight nursing: aeromedical evacuation].

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Lan; Hsiao, Yun-Chien; Chen, Chao-Yen

    2012-06-01

    Evacuating the injured is an important part of disaster medicine. Aircraft provide timely access to distant and remote areas and, in an emergency, can evacuate sick or injured individuals in such areas quickly and safely for critical treatment elsewhere. Aeromedical evacuation (AE) comprises the two categories of fixed-wing ambulance service and helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS). Each aims to accomplish unique objectives. In Taiwan, the Second Taiwan Strait Crisis in 1958 established the unique role and functions of medical flight nursing. Significant knowledge and experience has been accumulated in the field since that time in such areas as the effects of high altitude environments on individuals and equipment; physiological, psychological, social and spiritual factors that affect the injured and / or response team members; and emergency care delivery techniques. All have been essential elements in the development and delivery of comprehensive medical flight nurse training. Medical flight nursing belongs in a special professional category, as nurses must master knowledge on general and special-case casualty evacuation procedures, relevant instruments and equipment, triage, in-flight medical care, and aircraft loading requirements related to transporting the sick and injured. The internationalization of medical care has opened the potential to expand medical flight nursing roles and functions into disaster nursing. Although military considerations continue to frame medical flight nursing training and preparation today, the authors feel that creating strategic alliances with disaster nursing specialists and organizations overseas is a future developmental direction for Taiwan's medical flight nursing sector worth formal consideration. PMID:22661029

  6. Movement dynamics reflect a functional role for weak coupling and role structure in dyadic problem solving.

    PubMed

    Abney, Drew H; Paxton, Alexandra; Dale, Rick; Kello, Christopher T

    2015-11-01

    Successful interaction requires complex coordination of body movements. Previous research has suggested a functional role for coordination and especially synchronization (i.e., time-locked movement across individuals) in different types of human interaction contexts. Although such coordination has been shown to be nearly ubiquitous in human interaction, less is known about its function. One proposal is that synchrony supports and facilitates communication (Topics Cogn Sci 1:305-319, 2009). However, questions still remain about what the properties of coordination for optimizing communication might look like. In the present study, dyads worked together to construct towers from uncooked spaghetti and marshmallows. Using cross-recurrence quantification analysis, we found that dyads with loosely coupled gross body movements performed better, supporting recent work suggesting that simple synchrony may not be the key to effective performance (Riley et al. 2011). We also found evidence that leader-follower dynamics-when sensitive to the specific role structure of the interaction-impact task performance. We discuss our results with respect to the functional role of coordination in human interaction.

  7. When Functional Capacity and Real-World Functioning Converge: The Role of Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Veronica; Abel, Stephanie; Bowie, Christopher R.; Tiznado, Denisse; Depp, Colin A.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Jeste, Dilip V.; Mausbach, Brent T.

    2013-01-01

    Although functional capacity is typically diminished, there is substantial heterogeneity in functional outcomes in schizophrenia. Motivational factors likely play a significant role in bridging the capacity-to-functioning gap. Self-efficacy theory suggests that although some individuals may have the capacity to perform functional behaviors, they may or may not have confidence they can successfully perform these behaviors in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the relationship between functional capacity and real-world functioning would be moderated by the individual’s self-efficacy in a sample of 97 middle-aged and older adults with schizophrenia (mean age = 50.9 ± 6.5 years). Functional capacity was measured using the Brief UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment (UPSA-B), self-efficacy with the Revised Self-Efficacy Scale, and Daily Functioning via the Specific Level of Functioning (SLOF) scale and self-report measures. Results indicated that when self-efficacy was low, the relationship between UPSA-B and SLOF scores was not significant (P = .727). However, when self efficacy was high, UPSA-B scores were significantly related to SLOF scores (P = .020). Similar results were observed for self-reported social and work functioning. These results suggest that motivational processes (ie, self-efficacy) may aid in understanding why some individuals have the capacity to function well but do not translate this capacity into real-world functioning. Furthermore, while improvement in capacity may be necessary for improved functioning in this population, it may not be sufficient when motivation is absent. PMID:22328642

  8. Cytokines and macrophage function in humans - role of stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We have begun this study to commence the determination of the role of mild chronic stress in the effects of space flight on macrophage/monocyte function, a component of the immune response. Medical students undergoing regular periods of stress and relaxation have been shown to be an excellent model for determining the effects of stress on immune responses. We have begun using this model using the macrophage/monocyte as model leukocyte. The monocyte/macrophage plays a central role in immunoregulation. The studies to be included in this three year project are the effects of stress on: (1) interactions of monocytes with microbes, (2) monocyte production of cytokines, (3) monocyte phagocytosis and activity, and (4) monocyte expression of cell surface antigens important in immune responses. Stress hormone levels will also be carried out to determine if there is a correlation between stress effects on immune responses and hormonal levels. Psychological testing to insure subjects are actually stressed or relaxed at the time of testing will also be carried out. The results obtained from the proposed studies should be comparable with space flight studies with whole animals and isolated cell cultures. When complete this study should allow the commencement of the establishment of the role of stress as one compartment of the induction of immune alterations by space flight.

  9. Addition of Functional Content during Core Content Instruction with Students with Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Belva C.; Hager, Karen L.; Galloway, Carey Creech

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to add functional content during core content instruction of language arts, science, and math. The investigation involved three middle school students with moderate disabilities who participated in the state's alternate assessment. During instruction using a constant time delay procedure to teach required…

  10. Using Additional Analyses to Clarify the Functions of Problem Behavior: An Analysis of Two Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Steven W.; Dozier, Claudia L.; Neidert, Pamela L.; Jowett, Erica S.; Newquist, Matthew H.

    2014-01-01

    Functional analyses (FA) have proven useful for identifying contingencies that influence problem behavior. Research has shown that some problem behavior may only occur in specific contexts or be influenced by multiple or idiosyncratic variables. When these contexts or sources of influence are not assessed in an FA, further assessment may be…

  11. Steroidogenic factor 1 plays multiple roles in endocrine development and function.

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Ikeda, Y; Luo, X; Caron, K M; Weber, T J; Swain, A; Schimmer, B P; Parker, K L

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor family comprises a group of structurally related transcriptional regulators that mediate the actions of diverse ligands, including steroid hormones, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, and retinoids. The nuclear receptor family also contains members for which activating ligands have not been identified-the orphan nuclear receptors. One of these orphan nuclear receptors, steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), has emerged as an essential regulator of steroidogenic cell function within the adrenal cortex and gonads; SF-1 also plays important roles in reproduction at all three levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. First identified as a tissue-specific regulator of the transcription of the cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases, considerably broader roles for SF-1 were revealed by genetic studies in mice lacking SF-1 due to targeted gene disruption. These SF-1-knockout mice had agenesis of their adrenal glands and gonads, male-to-female sex reversal of their internal and external genitalia, impaired gonadotrope function, and agenesis of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. These studies delineated essential roles of SF-1 in regulating endocrine differentiation and function at multiple levels. Despite these insights into roles of SF-1, the precise mechanisms by which SF-1 exerts its multiple effects remain to be determined. This review highlights experiments that have established SF-1 as a pivotal determinant of endocrine differentiation and function and identifies areas in which additional studies are needed to expand our understanding of SF-1 action.

  12. Functional roles of HIV-1 Tat protein in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Musinova, Yana R; Sheval, Eugene V; Dib, Carla; Germini, Diego; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein is one of the most important regulatory proteins for viral gene expression in the host cell and can modulate different cellular processes. In addition, Tat is secreted by the infected cell and can be internalized by neighboring cells; therefore, it affects both infected and uninfected cells. Tat can modulate cellular processes by interacting with different cellular structures and signaling pathways. In the nucleus, Tat might be localized either in the nucleoplasm or the nucleolus depending on its concentration. Here we review the distinct functions of Tat in the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus in connection with viral infection and HIV-induced oncogenesis. PMID:26507246

  13. Embedding beyond electrostatics-The role of wave function confinement.

    PubMed

    Nåbo, Lina J; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Holmgaard List, Nanna; Solanko, Lukasz M; Wüstner, Daniel; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-09-14

    We study excited states of cholesterol in solution and show that, in this specific case, solute wave-function confinement is the main effect of the solvent. This is rationalized on the basis of the polarizable density embedding scheme, which in addition to polarizable embedding includes non-electrostatic repulsion that effectively confines the solute wave function to its cavity. We illustrate how the inclusion of non-electrostatic repulsion results in a successful identification of the intense π → π(∗) transition, which was not possible using an embedding method that only includes electrostatics. This underlines the importance of non-electrostatic repulsion in quantum-mechanical embedding-based methods. PMID:27634246

  14. Oxalic Acid Has an Additional, Detoxifying Function in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Annerose; Witt-Geiges, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the diseases caused by the necrotroph plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is not well understood. To investigate the role of oxalic acid during infection high resolution, light-, scanning-, transmission electron microscopy and various histochemical staining methods were used. Our inoculation method allowed us to follow degradation of host plant tissue around single hyphae and to observe the reaction of host cells in direct contact with single invading hyphae. After penetration the outer epidermal cell wall matrix appeared degraded around subcuticular hyphae (12-24 hpi). Calcium oxalate crystals were detected in advanced (36-48 hpi) and late (72 hpi) infection stages, but not in early stages. In early infection stages, surprisingly, no toxic effect of oxalic acid eventually secreted by S. sclerotiorum was observed. As oxalic acid is a common metabolite in plants, we propose that attacked host cells are able to metabolize oxalic acid in the early infection stage and translocate it to their vacuoles where it is stored as calcium oxalate. The effects, observed on healthy tissue upon external application of oxalic acid to non-infected, living tissue and cell wall degradation of dead host cells starting at the inner side of the walls support this idea. The results indicate that oxalic acid concentrations in the early stage of infection stay below the toxic level. In plant and fungi oxalic acid/calcium oxalate plays an important role in calcium regulation. Oxalic acid likely could quench calcium ions released during cell wall breakdown to protect growing hyphae from toxic calcium concentrations in the infection area. As calcium antimonate-precipitates were found in vesicles of young hyphae, we propose that calcium is translocated to the older parts of hyphae and detoxified by building non-toxic, stable oxalate crystals. We propose an infection model where oxalic acid plays a detoxifying role in late infection stages. PMID:23951305

  15. Complex esthetic and functional rehabilitation with an additive, minimally invasive restorative approach.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christopher Ck

    2014-06-01

    Historically, the management of patients presenting with extensive tooth wear comprised the use of conventional fixed prosthodontics, an approach that often entailed invasive dentistry and increased biomechanical risk. With the development of adhesive bonding, a dentition can be restored in a much more conservative manner using an additive approach. This case report describes the concepts employed in a complex rehabilitation involving tooth erosion, applying both direct and indirect restorations with minimal biological risk to the patient.

  16. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments.

  17. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments. PMID:26471460

  18. Organocatalyzed cascade aza-Michael/Michael addition for the asymmetric construction of highly functionalized spiropyrazolone tetrahydroquinolines.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Hua; Du, Da-Ming

    2014-11-01

    An organocatalyzed diastereo- and enantioselective cascade aza-Michael/Michael addition of 2-tosylaminoenones to unsaturated pyrazolones has been developed to afford novel chiral spiropyrazolone tetrahydroquinolines containing three contiguous stereocenters. This cascade reaction proceeded well with 2 mol% chiral bifunctional tertiary amine squaramide catalyst to give the desired products in excellent yields (up to 99%) with excellent diastereoselectivity (up to >25:1 diastereomeric ratio) and high enantioselectivity (up to 91% enantiomeric excess).

  19. Functional Roles Affect Diversity-Succession Relationships for Boreal Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of “functional” groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience. PMID:23977350

  20. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  1. Functional occlusion: II. The role of articulators in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Clark, J R; Hutchinson, I; Sandy, J R

    2001-06-01

    Opinion is divided on whether there is a place for the use of semi-adjustable dental articulators in orthodontics. In this review we explore the validity and reproducibility of the techniques involved in mounting study models on a semi-adjustable dental articulator. We also look at the role of articulated study models in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, in the finishing stages of orthodontics and in planning for orthognathic surgery. We report that each of the many stages involved in mounting study models on a semi-adjustable articulator is a potential source of error and that only if the technique is carried out with a high degree of accuracy is it worth the additional chairside time.

  2. Functional roles of alternative splicing factors in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Cieply, Benjamin; Carstens, Russ P

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism used to generate greater transcriptomic and proteomic diversity from a finite genome. Nearly all human gene transcripts are alternatively spliced and can produce protein isoforms with divergent and even antagonistic properties that impact cell functions. Many AS events are tightly regulated in a cell-type or tissue-specific manner, and at different developmental stages. AS is regulated by RNA-binding proteins, including cell- or tissue-specific splicing factors. In the past few years, technological advances have defined genome-wide programs of AS regulated by increasing numbers of splicing factors. These splicing regulatory networks (SRNs) consist of transcripts that encode proteins that function in coordinated and related processes that impact the development and phenotypes of different cell types. As such, it is increasingly recognized that disruption of normal programs of splicing regulated by different splicing factors can lead to human diseases. We will summarize examples of diseases in which altered expression or function of splicing regulatory proteins has been implicated in human disease pathophysiology. As the role of AS continues to be unveiled in human disease and disease risk, it is hoped that further investigations into the functions of numerous splicing factors and their regulated targets will enable the development of novel therapies that are directed at specific AS events as well as the biological pathways they impact. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:311–326. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1276 For further resources related to this article, please visit the http://wires.wiley.com/remdoi.cgi?doi=10.1002/wrna.1276WIREs website. Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. PMID:25630614

  3. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B; Dimitrov, Dimitar M; van Staden, Anton D; Oosthuizen, Gert A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research.

  4. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

  5. The functional role of ascending nociceptive control in defensive behavior.

    PubMed

    Tambeli, Claudia Herrera; Fischer, Luana; Monaliza, Simone Lamana; Menescal-de-Oliveira, Leda; Parada, Carlos Amílcar

    2012-06-29

    Ascending nociceptive control is a novel spino-striato-rostral ventral medulla pain modulation pathway that mediates heterosegmental pain-induced analgesia, i.e., noxious stimulus-induced antinociception. In this study, we used the dorsal immobility response in rats as a model of the defensive responses. We demonstrated that the activation of ascending nociceptive control by peripheral noxious stimulation and spinal AMPA and mGluR1 receptor blockade significantly potentiated the duration of the dorsal immobility response in rats via an opioid-dependent mechanism in the nucleus accumbens. These results demonstrated the functional role of ascending nociceptive control in the modulation of defensive responses and spinal glutamatergic receptors in the dorsal immobility response. The immobility response is an antipredator behavior that reflects the underlying state of fear, and ascending nociceptive control may modulate fear.

  6. Versatile Roles of V-ATPases Accessory Subunit Ac45 in Osteoclast Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Jiake; Dai, Ke R.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuolar-type H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are macromolecular proton pumps that acidify intracellular cargos and deliver protons across the plasma membrane of a variety of specialized cells, including bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Extracellular acidification is crucial for osteoclastic bone resorption, a process that initiates the dissolution of mineralized bone matrix. While the importance of V-ATPases in osteoclastic resorptive function is well-defined, whether V-ATPases facilitate additional aspects of osteoclast function and/or formation remains largely obscure. Here we report that the V-ATPase accessory subunit Ac45 participates in both osteoclast formation and function. Using a siRNA-based approach, we show that targeted suppression of Ac45 impairs intracellular acidification and endocytosis, both are prerequisite for osteoclastic bone resorptive function in vitro. Interestingly, we find that knockdown of Ac45 also attenuates osteoclastogenesis owing to a reduced fusion capacity of osteoclastic precursor cells. Finally, in an effort to gain more detailed insights into the functional role of Ac45 in osteoclasts, we attempted to generate osteoclast-specific Ac45 conditional knockout mice using a Cathepsin K-Cre-LoxP system. Surprisingly, however, insertion of the neomycin cassette in the Ac45-FloxNeo mice resulted in marked disturbances in CNS development and ensuing embryonic lethality thus precluding functional assessment of Ac45 in osteoclasts and peripheral bone tissues. Based on these unexpected findings we propose that, in addition to its canonical function in V-ATPase-mediated acidification, Ac45 plays versatile roles during osteoclast formation and function. PMID:22087256

  7. Organic-inorganic hybrid foams with diatomite addition: Effect on functional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdolotti, L.; D'Auria, M.; Lavorgna, M.; Vollaro, P.; Iannace, S.; Capasso, I.; Galzerano, B.; Caputo, D.; Liguori, B.

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams were prepared by using metakaolin, diatomite as a partial (or total) replacement of metakaolin, as matrix, silicon and whipped protein as pore forming. The foamed systems were hardened at defined temperature and time and then characterized by mechanical point of view through compression tests and by functional point of view through fire reaction and acoustic tests. The experimental findings highlighted that the replacement of diatomite in the formulation affected the morphological structure of the foams and consequently their mechanical properties. In particular, the consolidation mechanism in the diatomite based-hybrid foams changed from geopolymerization to a silicate polycondensation mechanism. Therefore, mechanical performances enhanced with increasing of the diatomite content. Fire reaction tests, such as non-combustibility and cone calorimeter tests, showed positive thermal inertia of samples regardless of the content of diatomite.

  8. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization by Radical Addition Using Hydroxymethylene Groups.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Rubén; Alonso-Núñez, Gabriel; Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Espinoza-Gómez, Heriberto; Vélez-López, Ernesto; Rogel-Hernández, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic methodology and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) function- alized with hydroxymethylene groups are reported. The MWCNTs were synthesized by the spray pyrolysis technique using toluene as carbon source and ferrocene as catalyst. Hydroxymethylation of MWCNTs was carried out by methanol using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) at different quantities (300 to 900 mg); the optimum BPO quantity was 300 mg. The resulting materials were characterized by FT-IR, Raman Spectroscopy, Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The presence of the hydroxymethylene group on the MWCNTs surface was demonstrated by FT-IR, Raman Spectroscopy, TGA, EDS, TEM and Mass Spectrometry. The func- tionalized MWCNTs were not damaged by this methodology. PMID:27398563

  9. Synthesis of Heterocycles Through Classical Ugi and Passerini Reactions Followed by Secondary Transformations Involving One or Two Additional Functional Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Riva, Renata

    The combination of classical isocyanide-based multicomponent reactions (Ugi and Passerini) with a variety of post-condensation transformations, which take advantage of suitably positioned additional functional groups, allows the straightforward synthesis, often in 1-2 synthetic steps, of many diverse nitrogen-containing heterocycles. This review will cover all the applications of this strategy reported to date (September 2009).

  10. [Adiponectin and resistin: a role in the reproductive functions?].

    PubMed

    Reverchon, Maxime; Maillard, Virginie; Froment, Pascal; Ramé, Christelle; Dupont, Joëlle

    2013-04-01

    Adipokines are hormones mainly produced by the white adipose tissue, an endocrine organ involved in energy homeostasis. They play an important role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolisms, in inflammation and immune disorders. New roles for adipokines have recently emerged in the field of fertility and reproduction. Indeed, adipokines such as adiponectin and resistin are able to regulate the functions of male and female gonads and of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. For example, they modulate steroidogenesis of gonadic somatic cells, germ cell maturation and secretion of gonadotrope hormones in various species. The reproductive system is tightly coupled with energy balance, and thereby metabolic abnormalities can lead to the development of physiopathological situations such as the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Obesity and overweight are significantly involved in the declining natural fertility and decrease the effectiveness of treatments. Women with obesity and/or PCOS have abnormal plasma adiponectin and resistin profiles. Thus, these adipokines could be a link between reproduction and energy metabolism and could partly explain some infertility related to obesity or PCOS.

  11. Functional role of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa (maijuana), and their derivatives produce a wide spectrum of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have clinical applications. The discovery of specific cannabinoid receptors and a family of endogenous ligands of those receptors has attracted much attention to the general cannabinoid pharmacology. In recent years, studies on the functional role of cannabinoid receptors in bladder have been motivated by the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids on voiding dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients. In this review, we shall summarize the literature on the expression of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder and the peripheral influence of locally and systemically administered cannabinoids in the bladder. The ongoing search for cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies devoid of psychotropic effects can be complemented with local delivery into bladder by the intravesical route. A greater understanding of the role of the peripheral CB(1) and CB(2) receptor system in lower urinary tract is necessary to allow the development of new treatment for pelvic disorders.

  12. [Adiponectin and resistin: a role in the reproductive functions?].

    PubMed

    Reverchon, Maxime; Maillard, Virginie; Froment, Pascal; Ramé, Christelle; Dupont, Joëlle

    2013-04-01

    Adipokines are hormones mainly produced by the white adipose tissue, an endocrine organ involved in energy homeostasis. They play an important role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolisms, in inflammation and immune disorders. New roles for adipokines have recently emerged in the field of fertility and reproduction. Indeed, adipokines such as adiponectin and resistin are able to regulate the functions of male and female gonads and of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. For example, they modulate steroidogenesis of gonadic somatic cells, germ cell maturation and secretion of gonadotrope hormones in various species. The reproductive system is tightly coupled with energy balance, and thereby metabolic abnormalities can lead to the development of physiopathological situations such as the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Obesity and overweight are significantly involved in the declining natural fertility and decrease the effectiveness of treatments. Women with obesity and/or PCOS have abnormal plasma adiponectin and resistin profiles. Thus, these adipokines could be a link between reproduction and energy metabolism and could partly explain some infertility related to obesity or PCOS. PMID:23621938

  13. Structures and Functions of Oligosaccharins: The Role of Endoglycanases

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Carl W.

    2008-12-05

    The research proposed will investigate two projects that involve studies of the chemistry and biology of protein/protein and protein/carbohydrate interactions involved in host/pathogen interactions. Specifically, the projects involve (i) the interactions between fungal endopolygalacturonases and plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins and (ii) the interactions between fungal endoxylanases and plant arabinoxylans. During pathogenesis fungi secrete families of endoglycanases that fragment the cell wall polysaccharides of the plant host. The result of endoglycanase action on cell wall polysaccharides can include weakening of the wall, penetration of host cells by the pathogen, solubilization of carbohydrate nutrients, and formation of oligosaccharins (oligosaccharides with regulatory function) that can stimulate plant defenses. We have made significant advances during the last funding period to support the hypothesis that the outcome of attempted pathogenesis can be influenced by protein/protein and protein/carbohydrate interactions in the extracellular matrices of the host and pathogen. We plan to expand on those successes by further exploring the mechanism of action of the endoglycanases and their plant-derived inhibitors, the expression of the various members of the endoglycanase families at various stages of infection and their role in the release of oligosaccharins and in pathogenicity, as well as the role played by the polysaccharide substrates in both pathogenicity and endoglycanase-inhibitor interactions.

  14. Gangliosides have a functional role during rotavirus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel Angel; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Cell entry of rotaviruses is a complex process, which involves sequential interactions with several cell surface molecules. Among the molecules implicated are gangliosides, glycosphingolipids with one or more sialic acid (SA) residues. The role of gangliosides in rotavirus cell entry was studied by silencing the expression of two key enzymes involved in their biosynthesis--the UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG), which transfers a glucose molecule to ceramide to produce glucosylceramide GlcCer, and the lactosyl ceramide-α-2,3-sialyl transferase 5 (GM3-s), which adds the first SA to lactoceramide-producing ganglioside GM3. Silencing the expression of both enzymes resulted in decreased ganglioside levels (as judged by GM1a detection). Four rotavirus strains tested (human Wa, simian RRV, porcine TFR-41, and bovine UK) showed a decreased infectivity in cells with impaired ganglioside synthesis; however, their replication after bypassing the entry step was not affected, confirming the importance of gangliosides for cell entry of the viruses. Interestingly, viral binding to the cell surface was not affected in cells with inhibited ganglioside synthesis, but the infectivity of all strains tested was inhibited by preincubation of gangliosides with virus prior to infection. These data suggest that rotaviruses can attach to cell surface in the absence of gangliosides but require them for productive cell entry, confirming their functional role during rotavirus cell entry.

  15. Investigation of the functional role of aldose 1-epimerase in engineered cellobiose utilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sijin; Ha, Suk-Jin; Kim, Hee Jin; Galazka, Jonathan M; Cate, Jamie H D; Jin, Yong-Su; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-10-10

    Functional expression of a cellodextrin transporter and an intracellular β-glucosidase from Neurospora crassa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables simultaneous co-fermentation of cellobiose and non-glucose sugars such as xylose. Here we investigate the functional role of aldose 1-epimerase (AEP) in engineered cellobiose utilization. One AEP (Gal10) and two putative AEPs (Yhr210c and Ynr071c sharing 50.6% and 51.0% amino acid identity with Gal10, respectively) were selected. Deletion of GAL10 led to complete loss of both AEP activity and cell growth on cellobiose, while GAL10 complementation restored the AEP activity and cell growth. In addition, deletion of YHR210C or YNR071C resulted in improved cellobiose utilization. These results suggest that the intracellular mutarotation of β-glucose to α-glucose might be a rate controlling step and Gal10 play a crucial role in cellobiose fermentation by engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:23954547

  16. Improvement of attenuation functions of a clayey sandstone for landfill leachate containment by bentonite addition.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Ana I; Fernández, Raúl; Sánchez Jiménez, Nicanor; Rodríguez Rastrero, Manuel; Regadío, Mercedes; de Soto, Isabel S; Cuevas, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Enhanced sand-clay mixtures have been prepared by using a sandstone arkosic material and have been evaluated for consideration as landfill liners. A lab-scale test was carried out under controlled conditions with different amended natural sandstones whereby leachate was passed through the compacted mixtures. The compacted samples consisted of siliceous sand (quartz-feldspar sand separated from the arkose sandstone) and clay (purified clay from arkose sandstone and two commercial bentonites) materials that were mixed in different proportions. The separation of mineral materials from a common and abundant natural source, for soil protection purposes, is proposed as an economic and environmentally efficient practice. The liner qualities were compared for their mineralogical, physicochemical and major ions transport and adsorption properties. Although all samples fulfilled hydraulic conductivity requirements, the addition of bentonite to arkose sandstone was determined to be an effective strategy to decrease the permeability of the soil and to improve the pollutants retention. The clay materials from arkose sandstone also contributed to pollutant retention by a significant improvement of the cation exchange capacity of the bulk material. However, the mixtures prepared with clay materials from the arkose, exhibited a slight increase of hydraulic conductivity. This effect has to be further evaluated. PMID:22285080

  17. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B; Dimitrov, Dimitar M; van Staden, Anton D; Oosthuizen, Gert A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research. PMID:26504776

  18. Improvement of attenuation functions of a clayey sandstone for landfill leachate containment by bentonite addition.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Ana I; Fernández, Raúl; Sánchez Jiménez, Nicanor; Rodríguez Rastrero, Manuel; Regadío, Mercedes; de Soto, Isabel S; Cuevas, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Enhanced sand-clay mixtures have been prepared by using a sandstone arkosic material and have been evaluated for consideration as landfill liners. A lab-scale test was carried out under controlled conditions with different amended natural sandstones whereby leachate was passed through the compacted mixtures. The compacted samples consisted of siliceous sand (quartz-feldspar sand separated from the arkose sandstone) and clay (purified clay from arkose sandstone and two commercial bentonites) materials that were mixed in different proportions. The separation of mineral materials from a common and abundant natural source, for soil protection purposes, is proposed as an economic and environmentally efficient practice. The liner qualities were compared for their mineralogical, physicochemical and major ions transport and adsorption properties. Although all samples fulfilled hydraulic conductivity requirements, the addition of bentonite to arkose sandstone was determined to be an effective strategy to decrease the permeability of the soil and to improve the pollutants retention. The clay materials from arkose sandstone also contributed to pollutant retention by a significant improvement of the cation exchange capacity of the bulk material. However, the mixtures prepared with clay materials from the arkose, exhibited a slight increase of hydraulic conductivity. This effect has to be further evaluated.

  19. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B.; Dimitrov, Dimitar M.; van Staden, Anton D.; Oosthuizen, Gert A.; Dicks, Leon M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research. PMID:26504776

  20. Is the structural diversity of tripeptides sufficient for developing functional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Liu, Yong-Le; Ning, Jing-Heng; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Fa-Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Multifunctional peptides have attracted increasing attention in the food science community because of their therapeutic potential, low toxicity and rapid intestinal absorption. However, previous study demonstrated that the limited structural variations make it difficult to optimize dipeptide molecules in a good balance between desirable and undesirable properties (F. Tian, P. Zhou, F. Lv, R. Song, Z. Li, J. Pept. Sci. 13 (2007) 549-566). In the present work, we attempt to answer whether the structural diversity is sufficient for a tripeptide to have satisfactory multiple bioactivities. Statistical test, structural examination and energetic analysis confirm that peptides of three amino acids long can bind tightly to human angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and thus exert significant antihypertensive efficacy. Further quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and prediction of all 8000 possible tripeptides reveal that their ACE-inhibitory potency exhibits a good (positive) relationship to antioxidative activity, but has only a quite modest correlation with bitterness. This means that it is possible to find certain tripeptide entities possessing the optimal combination of strong ACE-inhibitory potency, high antioxidative activity and weak bitter taste, which are the promising candidates for developing multifunctional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities. The marked difference between dipeptide and tripeptide can be attributed to the fact that the structural diversity of peptides increases dramatically with a slight change in sequence length.

  1. Pyruvate kinase: function, regulation and role in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Israelsen, William J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and ADP to pyruvate and ATP in glycolysis and plays a role in regulating cell metabolism. There are four mammalian pyruvate kinase isoforms with unique tissue expression patterns and regulatory properties. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) supports anabolic metabolism and is expressed both in cancer and normal tissue. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is allosterically regulated by both intracellular signaling pathways and metabolites; PKM2 thus integrates signaling and metabolic inputs to modulate glucose metabolism according to the needs of the cell. Recent advances have increased our understanding of metabolic regulation by pyruvate kinase, raised new questions, and suggested the possibility of non-canonical PKM2 functions to regulate gene expression and cell cycle progression via protein-protein interactions and protein kinase activity. Here we review the structure, function, and regulation of pyruvate kinase and discuss how these properties enable regulation of PKM2 for cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:26277545

  2. Effects of Germinated Brown Rice Addition on the Flavor and Functionality of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the functional and physicochemical properties of yogurt, supplemented with germinated brown rice (GBR) containing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), during storage. GBR was produced by soaking brown rice at 30℃, and saccharified germinated brown rice (SGBR) was produced by treating brown rice with α- and β-amylase for 1 h, at 80℃ and 60℃, respectively. Yogurt was manufactured using a commercial starter (YC-X11, CHR. Hansen, Denmark) at 37℃ for 12 h. The fatty acids and GABA contents were analyzed using GC and HPLC, respectively. The fatty acids in the cereal samples consisted of oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acid. The portion of oleic acid was the highest, at 35.65% in GBR, and 32.16% in SGBR. During germination, the oleic acid content increased, whereas linolenic and palmitic acid contents from GBR tended to decrease. Although the portion of saturated fatty acids, such as stearic and myristic acid, decreased significantly (p<0.05), that of unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic and linoleic acid, increased with an increase in supplementation of BR, GBR, or SGBR in the yogurt. The yogurt, supplemented with cereal samples, showed a tendency of an increase in the concentration of GABA with an increase in the supplementation of the cereal samples. However, yogurt supplemented with GBR showed the highest concentration of GABA, regardless of the supplementation of the cereal samples. These results indicated that yogurt supplemented with BR, GBR, or SGBR could be a promising dairy product.

  3. The structure and function of the dopamine transporter and its role in CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Patrick C; Buckley, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore the basic science of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of a system that regulates dopamine homeostasis. Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter for several brain functions including locomotor control and reward systems. The transporter structure, function, mechanism of action, localization, and distribution, in addition to gene regulation, are discussed. Over many years, a wealth of information concerning the DAT has been accrued and has led to increased interest in the role of the DAT in a plethora of central nervous system diseases. These DAT characteristics are explored in relation to a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, with a particular focus on the genetics of the DAT. In addition, we discuss the pharmacology of the DAT and how this relates to disease and addiction. PMID:25817874

  4. Effects of Germinated Brown Rice Addition on the Flavor and Functionality of Yogurt.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hye; Ahn, Sung-Il; Lim, Chan-Mook; Jhoo, Jin-Woo; Kim, Gur-Yoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the functional and physicochemical properties of yogurt, supplemented with germinated brown rice (GBR) containing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), during storage. GBR was produced by soaking brown rice at 30℃, and saccharified germinated brown rice (SGBR) was produced by treating brown rice with α- and β-amylase for 1 h, at 80℃ and 60℃, respectively. Yogurt was manufactured using a commercial starter (YC-X11, CHR. Hansen, Denmark) at 37℃ for 12 h. The fatty acids and GABA contents were analyzed using GC and HPLC, respectively. The fatty acids in the cereal samples consisted of oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acid. The portion of oleic acid was the highest, at 35.65% in GBR, and 32.16% in SGBR. During germination, the oleic acid content increased, whereas linolenic and palmitic acid contents from GBR tended to decrease. Although the portion of saturated fatty acids, such as stearic and myristic acid, decreased significantly (p<0.05), that of unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic and linoleic acid, increased with an increase in supplementation of BR, GBR, or SGBR in the yogurt. The yogurt, supplemented with cereal samples, showed a tendency of an increase in the concentration of GABA with an increase in the supplementation of the cereal samples. However, yogurt supplemented with GBR showed the highest concentration of GABA, regardless of the supplementation of the cereal samples. These results indicated that yogurt supplemented with BR, GBR, or SGBR could be a promising dairy product. PMID:27621692

  5. Effects of Germinated Brown Rice Addition on the Flavor and Functionality of Yogurt

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the functional and physicochemical properties of yogurt, supplemented with germinated brown rice (GBR) containing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), during storage. GBR was produced by soaking brown rice at 30℃, and saccharified germinated brown rice (SGBR) was produced by treating brown rice with α- and β-amylase for 1 h, at 80℃ and 60℃, respectively. Yogurt was manufactured using a commercial starter (YC-X11, CHR. Hansen, Denmark) at 37℃ for 12 h. The fatty acids and GABA contents were analyzed using GC and HPLC, respectively. The fatty acids in the cereal samples consisted of oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acid. The portion of oleic acid was the highest, at 35.65% in GBR, and 32.16% in SGBR. During germination, the oleic acid content increased, whereas linolenic and palmitic acid contents from GBR tended to decrease. Although the portion of saturated fatty acids, such as stearic and myristic acid, decreased significantly (p<0.05), that of unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic and linoleic acid, increased with an increase in supplementation of BR, GBR, or SGBR in the yogurt. The yogurt, supplemented with cereal samples, showed a tendency of an increase in the concentration of GABA with an increase in the supplementation of the cereal samples. However, yogurt supplemented with GBR showed the highest concentration of GABA, regardless of the supplementation of the cereal samples. These results indicated that yogurt supplemented with BR, GBR, or SGBR could be a promising dairy product. PMID:27621692

  6. γ-Tocopherol-rich supplementation additively improves vascular endothelial function during smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Mah, Eunice; Pei, Ruisong; Guo, Yi; Ballard, Kevin D; Barker, Tyler; Rogers, Victoria E; Parker, Beth A; Taylor, Alan W; Traber, Maret G; Volek, Jeff S; Bruno, Richard S

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation persist years after smoking cessation thereby limiting the restoration of vascular endothelial function (VEF). Although short-term smoking cessation improves VEF, no studies have examined co-therapy of antioxidants in combination with smoking cessation to improve VEF. We hypothesized that improvements in γ-tocopherol (γ-T) status during smoking cessation would improve VEF beyond that from smoking cessation alone by decreasing oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in otherwise healthy smokers (22 ± 1 years; mean ± SEM) who quit smoking for 7 days with placebo (n=14) or γ-T-rich supplementation (n=16; 500 mg γ-T/day). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), cotinine, and biomarkers of antioxidant status, oxidative stress, and inflammation were measured before and after 7 days of smoking cessation. Smoking cessation regardless of supplementation similarly decreased plasma cotinine, whereas γ-T-rich supplementation increased plasma γ-T by seven times and its urinary metabolite γ-carboxyethyl hydroxychroman by nine times (P<0.05). Smoking cessation with γ-T-rich supplementation increased FMD responses by 1.3% (P<0.05) beyond smoking cessation alone (4.1 ± 0.6% vs 2.8 ± 0.3%; mean ± SEM). Although plasma malondialdehyde decreased similarly in both groups (P<0.05), plasma oxidized LDL and urinary F2-isoprostanes were unaffected by smoking cessation or γ-T-rich supplementation. Plasma TNF-α and myeloperoxidase decreased (P<0.05) only in those receiving γ-T-rich supplements and these were inversely related to FMD (P<0.05; R=-0.46 and -0.37, respectively). These findings demonstrate that short-term γ-T-rich supplementation in combination with smoking cessation improved VEF beyond that from smoking cessation alone in young smokers, probably by decreasing the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α and myeloperoxidase.

  7. The emerging role of Nrf2 in mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2; gene name NFE2L2) allows adaptation and survival under conditions of stress by regulating the gene expression of diverse networks of cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification enzymes as well as proteins that assist in the repair or removal of damaged macromolecules. Nrf2 has a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the biosynthesis, utilization, and regeneration of glutathione, thioredoxin, and NADPH and by controlling the production of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria and NADPH oxidase. Under homeostatic conditions, Nrf2 affects the mitochondrial membrane potential, fatty acid oxidation, availability of substrates (NADH and FADH2/succinate) for respiration, and ATP synthesis. Under conditions of stress or growth factor stimulation, activation of Nrf2 counteracts the increased reactive oxygen species production in mitochondria via transcriptional upregulation of uncoupling protein 3 and influences mitochondrial biogenesis by maintaining the levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, as well as by promoting purine nucleotide biosynthesis. Pharmacological Nrf2 activators, such as the naturally occurring isothiocyanate sulforaphane, inhibit oxidant-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and mitochondrial swelling. Curiously, a synthetic 1,4-diphenyl-1,2,3-triazole compound, originally designed as an Nrf2 activator, was found to promote mitophagy, thereby contributing to the overall mitochondrial homeostasis. Thus, Nrf2 is a prominent player in supporting the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondria, and this role is particularly crucial under conditions of stress. PMID:25975984

  8. Additional F-Functions Useful for Preliminary Design of Shaped-Signature, Low-Boom, Supersonic-Cruise Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Two additional low-boom F-functions have been described for use in designing low-boom, shaped-pressure-signature, supersonic-cruise aircraft. Based on the minimization studies of Seebass and George, the drag-nose shock strength trade-off modification of Darden, and the practical modification of Haglund, their use can aid in the design of conceptual low-boom aircraft, provide additional flexibility in the shaping of the low-boom aircraft nose section, and extend the applicability of shaped-pressure-signature methodology.

  9. Fabrication of Fe-FeAl Functionally Graded Material Using the Wire-Arc Additive Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen; Pan, Zengxi; Cuiuri, Dominic; Roberts, Jon; Li, Huijun

    2016-02-01

    A functionally gradient iron-aluminum wall structure with aluminum composition gradient from 0 at. pct to over 50 at. pct is fabricated using a wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) system. The as-fabricated alloy is investigated using optical microstructure analysis, hardness testing, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction phase characterization, and electron-dispersive spectrometry. The comprehensive analysis of the experimental samples has shown that the WAAM system can be used for manufacturing iron aluminide functionally graded material with full density, desired composition, and reasonable mechanical properties.

  10. Transitioning between Work and Family Roles as a Function of Boundary Flexibility and Role Salience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Doan E.; Clayton, Russell W.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the manner in which people separate their work and family roles and how they manage the boundaries of these two important roles. Specifically, we focus on how role flexibility and salience influence transitions between roles. Results indicate that the ability and willingness to flex a role boundary and role salience are…

  11. An analytical approach to the problem of inverse optimization with additive objective functions: an application to human prehension

    PubMed Central

    Pesin, Yakov B.; Niu, Xun; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of what is being optimized in human actions with respect to various aspects of human movements and different motor tasks. From the mathematical point of view this problem consists of finding an unknown objective function given the values at which it reaches its minimum. This problem is called the inverse optimization problem. Until now the main approach to this problems has been the cut-and-try method, which consists of introducing an objective function and checking how it reflects the experimental data. Using this approach, different objective functions have been proposed for the same motor action. In the current paper we focus on inverse optimization problems with additive objective functions and linear constraints. Such problems are typical in human movement science. The problem of muscle (or finger) force sharing is an example. For such problems we obtain sufficient conditions for uniqueness and propose a method for determining the objective functions. To illustrate our method we analyze the problem of force sharing among the fingers in a grasping task. We estimate the objective function from the experimental data and show that it can predict the force-sharing pattern for a vast range of external forces and torques applied to the grasped object. The resulting objective function is quadratic with essentially non-zero linear terms. PMID:19902213

  12. Functional role of frontal alpha oscillations in creativity.

    PubMed

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Boyle, Michael R; Foulser, A Alban; Mellin, Juliann M; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    Creativity, the ability to produce innovative ideas, is a key higher-order cognitive function that is poorly understood. At the level of macroscopic cortical network dynamics, recent electroencephalography (EEG) data suggests that cortical oscillations in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) are correlated with creative thinking. However, whether alpha oscillations play a functional role in creativity has remained unknown. Here we show that creativity is increased by enhancing alpha power using 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (10 Hz-tACS) of the frontal cortex. In a study of 20 healthy participants with a randomized, balanced cross-over design, we found a significant improvement of 7.4% in the Creativity Index measured by the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT), a comprehensive and most frequently used assay of creative potential and strengths. In a second similar study with 20 subjects, 40 Hz-tACS was used instead of 10 Hz-tACS to rule out a general "electrical stimulation" effect. No significant change in the Creativity Index was found for such frontal 40 Hz stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha activity in frontal brain areas is selectively involved in creativity; this enhancement represents the first demonstration of specific neuronal dynamics that drive creativity and can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation. Our findings agree with the model that alpha recruitment increases with internal processing demands and is involved in inhibitory top-down control, which is an important requirement for creative ideation.

  13. A role for Sv2c in basal ganglia functions.

    PubMed

    Dardou, D; Monlezun, S; Foerch, P; Courade, J P; Cuvelier, L; De Ryck, M; Schiffmann, S N

    2013-04-24

    SV2C is an isoform of the synaptic vesicle 2 protein family that exhibits a particular pattern of brain expression with enriched expression in several basal ganglia nuclei. In the present study, we have investigated SV2C implication in both normal and pathological basal ganglia functioning with a peculiar attention to dopamine neuron containing regions. In SV2C-/- mice, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in midbrain dopaminergic neurons was largely and significantly increased and enkephalin mRNA expression was significantly decreased in the caudate-putamen and accumbens nucleus. The expression of SV2C was studied in two models of dopaminergic denervation (6-OHDA- and MPTP-induced lesions). In dopamine-depleted animals, SV2C mRNA expression was significant increased in the striatum. In order to further understand the role of SV2C, we performed behavioral experiments on SV2C-/- mice and on knock-down mice receiving an injection of adeno-associated virus expressing SV2C miRNA specifically in the ventral midbrain. These modifications of SV2C expression had little or no impact on behavior in open field and elevated plus maze. However, even if complete loss of SV2C had no impact on conditioned place preference induced by cocaine, the specific knock-down of SV2C expression in the dopaminergic neurons completely abolished the development of a CPP while the reaction to an acute drug injection remains similar in these mice compared to control mice. These results showed that SV2C, a poorly functionally characterized protein is strongly involved in normal operation of the basal ganglia network and could be also involved in system adaptation in basal ganglia pathological conditions. PMID:23458503

  14. Functional role of regulatory T cells in B cell lymphoma and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wan, Jun; Xia, Ruixiang; Huang, Zhenqi; Ni, Jing; Yang, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    B cell lymphoma (BCL) has a higher degree of malignancy and complicated pathogenic mechanism. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are known to exert certain immune suppression functions, in addition to immune mediating effects. Recent studies have revealed the role of Treg cells in pathogenesis and progression of multiple malignant tumors. This study therefore investigated the functional role and related mechanism of Treg cells in BCL. A cohort of thirty patients who were diagnosed with BCL in our hospital between January 2013 and December 2014. Another thirty healthy individuals were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated and analyzed for the ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells. The mRNA expression levels of Foxp3, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10 genes were quantified by real-time PCR, while their serum levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Meanwhile all laboratory indexes for patients were monitored during the complete remission (CR) stage. BCL patients significantly elevated ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells, which were decreased at CR stage. mRNA levels of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10, in addition to protein levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10 were potentiated in lymphoma patients but decreased in CR patients (P<0.05 in all cases). CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells exert immune suppressing functions in BCL via regulating cytokines, thereby facilitating the pathogenesis and progression of lymphoma. PMID:26464657

  15. Energy substrates to support glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic function: role of glycogen, glucose and lactate.

    PubMed

    Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2007-12-01

    Maintenance of glutamatergic and GABAergic activity requires a continuous supply of energy since the exocytotic processes as well as high affinity glutamate and GABA uptake and subsequent metabolism of glutamate to glutamine are energy demanding processes. The main energy substrate for the brain under normal conditions is glucose but at the cellular level, i.e., neurons and astrocytes, lactate may play an important role as well. In addition to this the possibility exists that glycogen, which functions as a glucose storage molecule and which is only present in astrocytes, could play a role not only during aglycemia but also during normoglycemia. These issues are discussed and it is concluded that both glucose and lactate are of importance for the maintenance of normal glutamatergic and GABAergic activity. However, with regard to maintenance of an adequate capacity for glutamate transport, it appears that glucose metabolism via the glycolytic pathway plays a fundamental role. Additionally, evidence is presented to support the notion that glycogen turnover may play an important role in this context. Moreover, it should be noted that the amino acid neurotransmitters can be used as metabolic substrates. This requires pyruvate recycling, a process that is discussed as well.

  16. Benchmark calculations of excess electrons in water cluster cavities: balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating diffuse functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-14

    Diffuse functions have been proved to be especially crucial for the accurate characterization of excess electrons which are usually bound weakly in intermolecular zones far away from the nuclei. To examine the effects of diffuse functions on the nature of the cavity-shaped excess electrons in water cluster surroundings, both the HOMO and LUMO distributions, vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and visible absorption spectra of two selected (H2O)24(-) isomers are investigated in the present work. Two main types of diffuse functions are considered in calculations including the Pople-style atom-centered diffuse functions and the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions. It is found that augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions contributes to a better description of the HOMO (corresponding to the VDE convergence), in agreement with previous studies, but also leads to unreasonable diffuse characters of the LUMO with significant red-shifts in the visible spectra, which is against the conventional point of view that the more the diffuse functions, the better the results. The issue of designing extra floating functions for excess electrons has also been systematically discussed, which indicates that the floating diffuse functions are necessary not only for reducing the computational cost but also for improving both the HOMO and LUMO accuracy. Thus, the basis sets with a combination of partial atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions are recommended for a reliable description of the weakly bound electrons. This work presents an efficient way for characterizing the electronic properties of weakly bound electrons accurately by balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions and also by balancing the computational cost and accuracy of the calculated results, and thus is very useful in the relevant calculations of various solvated electron systems and weakly bound anionic systems.

  17. Benchmark calculations of excess electrons in water cluster cavities: balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating diffuse functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-14

    Diffuse functions have been proved to be especially crucial for the accurate characterization of excess electrons which are usually bound weakly in intermolecular zones far away from the nuclei. To examine the effects of diffuse functions on the nature of the cavity-shaped excess electrons in water cluster surroundings, both the HOMO and LUMO distributions, vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and visible absorption spectra of two selected (H2O)24(-) isomers are investigated in the present work. Two main types of diffuse functions are considered in calculations including the Pople-style atom-centered diffuse functions and the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions. It is found that augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions contributes to a better description of the HOMO (corresponding to the VDE convergence), in agreement with previous studies, but also leads to unreasonable diffuse characters of the LUMO with significant red-shifts in the visible spectra, which is against the conventional point of view that the more the diffuse functions, the better the results. The issue of designing extra floating functions for excess electrons has also been systematically discussed, which indicates that the floating diffuse functions are necessary not only for reducing the computational cost but also for improving both the HOMO and LUMO accuracy. Thus, the basis sets with a combination of partial atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions are recommended for a reliable description of the weakly bound electrons. This work presents an efficient way for characterizing the electronic properties of weakly bound electrons accurately by balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions and also by balancing the computational cost and accuracy of the calculated results, and thus is very useful in the relevant calculations of various solvated electron systems and weakly bound anionic systems. PMID:27522987

  18. Functional roles of neuropeptides in the insect central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nässel, D. R.

    With the completion of the Drosophila genome sequencing project we can begin to appreciate the extent of the complexity in the components involved in signal transfer and modulation in the nervous system of an animal with reasonably complex behavior. Of all the different classes of signaling substances utilized by the nervous system, the neuropeptides are the most diverse structurally and functionally. Thus peptidergic mechanisms of action in the central nervous system need to be analyzed in the context of the neuronal circuits in which they act and generalized traits cannot be established. By taking advantage of Drosophila molecular genetics and the presence of identifiable neurons, it has been possible to interfere with peptidergic signaling in small populations of central neurons and monitor the consequences on behavior. These studies and experiments on other insects with large identifiable neurons, permitting cellular analysis of signaling mechanisms, have outlined important principles for temporal and spatial action of neuropeptides in outputs of the circadian clock and in orchestrating molting behavior. Considering the large number of neuropeptides available in each insect species and their diverse distribution patterns, it is to be expected that different neuropeptides play roles in most aspects of insect physiology and behavior.

  19. Functional role of lipid rafts in CD20 activity?

    PubMed

    Janas, Eva; Priest, Richard; Malhotra, Rajneesh

    2005-01-01

    CD20 is a B-lymphocyte-specific integral membrane protein, implicated in the regulation of transmembrane calcium conductance, cell-cycle progression and B-lymphocyte proliferation. CD20 is proposed to function as a SOCC (store-operated calcium channel). SOCCs are activated by receptor-stimulated calcium depletion of intracellular stores. Sustained calcium conductivity across the plasma membrane mediated by SOCC activity is required for long-term calcium-dependent processes, such as transcriptional control and gene expression. Cross-linking of CD20 by antibodies (e.g. Rituxan) has been reported to induce a rapid redistribution of CD20 into specialized microdomains at the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts. Recruitment of CD20 into lipid rafts and its homo-oligomerization are suggested to be crucial for CD20 activity and regulation. This review outlines recent biochemical studies characterizing the role of CD20 in calcium signalling in B-lymphocytes and evaluates an engagement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD20-mediated calcium conductivity.

  20. Role of motor unit structure in defining function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monti, R. J.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Motor units, defined as a motoneuron and all of its associated muscle fibers, are the basic functional units of skeletal muscle. Their activity represents the final output of the central nervous system, and their role in motor control has been widely studied. However, there has been relatively little work focused on the mechanical significance of recruiting variable numbers of motor units during different motor tasks. This review focuses on factors ranging from molecular to macroanatomical components that influence the mechanical output of a motor unit in the context of the whole muscle. These factors range from the mechanical properties of different muscle fiber types to the unique morphology of the muscle fibers constituting a motor unit of a given type and to the arrangement of those motor unit fibers in three dimensions within the muscle. We suggest that as a result of the integration of multiple levels of structural and physiological levels of organization, unique mechanical properties of motor units are likely to emerge. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Interleukin-22 and CD160 play additive roles in the host mucosal response to Clostridium difficile infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sadighi Akha, Amir A; McDermott, Andrew J; Theriot, Casey M; Carlson, Paul E; Frank, Charles R; McDonald, Roderick A; Falkowski, Nicole R; Bergin, Ingrid L; Young, Vincent B; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has shown the significant up-regulation of Il22 and increased phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) as part of the mucosal inflammatory response to Clostridium difficile infection in mice. Others have shown that phosphorylation of STAT3 at mucosal surfaces includes interleukin-22 (IL-22) and CD160-mediated components. The current study sought to determine the potential role(s) of IL-22 and/or CD160 in the mucosal response to C. difficile infection. Clostridium difficile-infected mice treated with anti-IL-22, anti-CD160 or a combination of the two showed significantly reduced STAT3 phosphorylation in comparison to C. difficile-infected mice that had not received either antibody. In addition, C. difficile-infected mice treated with anti-IL-22/CD160 induced a smaller set of genes, and at significantly lower levels than the untreated C. difficile-infected mice. The affected genes included pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and anti-microbial peptides. Furthermore, histopathological and flow cytometric assessments both showed a significantly reduced influx of neutrophils in C. difficile-infected mice treated with anti-IL-22/CD160. These data demonstrate that IL-22 and CD160 are together responsible for a significant fraction of the colonic STAT3 phosphorylation in C. difficile infection. They also underscore the additive effects of IL-22 and CD160 in mediating both the pro-inflammatory and pro-survival aspects of the host mucosal response in this infection. PMID:25327211

  2. The emerging complexity of the vertebrate cilium: new functional roles for an ancient organelle.

    PubMed

    Davis, Erica E; Brueckner, Martina; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2006-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are found on the surface of a strikingly diverse range of cell types. These intriguing organelles, with their unique and highly adapted protein transport machinery, have been studied extensively in the context of cellular locomotion, sexual reproduction, or fluid propulsion. However, recent studies are beginning to show that in vertebrates particularly, cilia have been recruited to perform additional developmental and homeostatic roles. Here, we review advances in deciphering the functional components of cilia, and we explore emerging trends that implicate ciliary proteins in signal transduction and morphogenetic pathways.

  3. Nucleotide deletion and P addition in V(D)J recombination: a determinant role of the coding-end sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Nadel, B; Feeney, A J

    1997-01-01

    During V(D)J recombination, the coding ends to be joined are extensively modified. Those modifications, termed coding-end processing, consist of removal and addition of various numbers of nucleotides. We previously showed in vivo that coding-end processing is specific for each coding end, suggesting that specific motifs in a coding-end sequence influence nucleotide deletion and P-region formation. In this study, we created a panel of recombination substrates containing actual immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor coding-end sequences and dissected the role of each motif by comparing its processing pattern with those of variants containing minimal nucleotide changes from the original sequence. Our results demonstrate the determinant role of specific sequence motifs on coding-end processing and also the importance of the context in which they are found. We show that minimal nucleotide changes in key positions of a coding-end sequence can result in dramatic changes in the processing pattern. We propose that each coding-end sequence dictates a unique hairpin structure, the result of a particular energy conformation between nucleotides organizing the loop and the stem, and that the interplay between this structure and specific sequence motifs influences the frequency and location of nicks which open the coding-end hairpin. These findings indicate that the sequences of the coding ends determine their own processing and have a profound impact on the development of the primary B- and T-cell repertoires. PMID:9199310

  4. Effect of Additives on Green Sand Molding Properties using Design of Experiments and Taguchi's Quality Loss Function - An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Bhagyashree; Mokashi, Pavani; Anand, R. L.; Burli, S. B.; Khandal, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental study aims to underseek the effect of various additives on the green sand molding properties as a particular combination of additives could yield desired sand properties. The input parameters (factors) selected were water and powder (Fly ash, Coconut shell and Tamarind) in three levels. Experiments were planned using design of experiments (DOE). On the basis of plans, experiments were conducted to understand the behavior of sand mould properties such as compression strength, shear strength, permeability number with various additives. From the experimental results it could be concluded that the factors have significant effect on the sand properties as P-value found to be less than 0.05 for all the cases studied. The optimization based on quality loss function was also performed. The study revealed that the quality loss associated with the tamarind powder was lesser compared to other additives selected for the study. The optimization based on quality loss function and the parametric analysis using ANOVA suggested that the tamarind powder of 8 gm per Kg of molding sand and moisture content of 7% yield better properties to obtain sound castings.

  5. Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Indazoles and Furans by C–H Bond Functionalization/Addition/Cyclization Cascades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of operationally straightforward and cost-effective routes for the assembly of heterocycles from simple inputs is important for many scientific endeavors, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials research. In this article we describe the development of a new air-stable cationic Co(III) catalyst for convergent, one-step benchtop syntheses of N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans by C–H bond additions to aldehydes followed by in situ cyclization and aromatization. Only a substoichiometric amount of AcOH is required as an additive that is both low-cost and convenient to handle. The syntheses of these heterocycles are the first examples of Co(III)-catalyzed additions to aldehydes, and reactions are demonstrated for a variety of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic derivatives. The syntheses of both N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans have been performed on 20 mmol scales and should be readily applicable to larger scales. The reported heterocycle syntheses also demonstrate the use of directing groups that have not previously been applied to Co(III)-catalyzed C–H bond functionalizations. Additionally, the synthesis of furans demonstrates the first example of Co(III)-catalyzed functionalization of alkenyl C–H bonds. PMID:25494296

  6. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  7. The DNase of gammaherpesviruses impairs recognition by virus-specific CD8+ T cells through an additional host shutoff function.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jianmin; Thomas, Wendy; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Ressing, Maaike E; Rowe, Martin

    2008-03-01

    The DNase/alkaline exonuclease (AE) genes are well conserved in all herpesvirus families, but recent studies have shown that the AE proteins of gammaherpesviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) exhibit an additional function which shuts down host protein synthesis. One correlate of this additional shutoff function is that levels of cell surface HLA molecules are downregulated, raising the possibility that shutoff/AE genes of gammaherpesviruses might contribute to viral immune evasion. In this study, we show that both BGLF5 (EBV) and SOX (KSHV) shutoff/AE proteins do indeed impair the ability of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell clones to recognize endogenous antigen via HLA class I. Random mutagenesis of the BGLF5 gene enabled us to genetically separate the shutoff and AE functions and to demonstrate that the shutoff function was the critical factor determining whether BGLF5 mutants can impair T-cell recognition. These data provide further evidence that EBV has multiple mechanisms to modulate HLA class I-restricted T-cell responses, thus enabling the virus to replicate and persist in the immune-competent host.

  8. On the performance of low pressure die-cast Al-Cu based automotive alloys: Role of additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Gergis Adel

    The present study focuses on the effect of alloying elements, namely, strontium (Sr), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), scandium (Sc) and silver(Ag) individually or in combination, on the performance of a newly developed Al-2%Cu based alloy. A total of thirteen alloy compositions were used in the study. Tensile test bar castings were prepared employing the low pressure die casting (LPDC) technique. The test bars were solution heat treated at 495°C for 8 hours, followed by quenching in warm water, and then subjected to different isochronal aging treatments using an aging time of 5 hours and aging temperatures of 155°C, 180°C, 200°C, 240°C and 300°C. Tensile testing of as-cast and heat-treated test bars was carried out at room temperature using a strain rate of 4 x 10-4s-1. Five test bars were used per alloy composition/condition. Hardness measurements were also carried out on these alloys using a Brinell hardness tester. The microstructures of selected samples were examined using optical microscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The results showed that adding Ti in the amount of 0.15 wt% in the form of Al-5%Ti-1%B master alloy is sufficient to refine the grains in the cast structure in the presence of 200 ppm Sr (0.02 wt%). Addition of Zr and Sc did not contribute further to the grain refining effect. The main role of addition of these two elements appeared in the formation of complex compounds with Al and Ti. Their presence resulted in extending the aging temperature range before the onset of softening. Mathematical analysis of the hardness and tensile data was carried out using the Minitab statistical software program. It was determined that the alloy containing (0.5wt% Zr + 0.15wt% Ti) is the most effective in maximizing the alloy tensile strength over the range of aging temperatures, from 155°C to 300°C. Addition of Ag is beneficial at high aging temperatures, in the range of 240°C-300°C. However, it is less effective compared to the (Zr + Ti

  9. Separable roles of UFO during floral development revealed by conditional restoration of gene function.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Patrick; Coen, Enrico; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Traas, Jan; Doonan, John

    2003-02-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis including specification of organ identity in the second and third whorls and the proper pattern of primordium initiation in the inner three whorls. UFO is expressed in a dynamic pattern during the early phases of flower development. Here we dissect the role of UFO by ubiquitously expressing it in ufo loss-of-function flowers at different developmental stages and for various durations using an ethanol-inducible expression system. The previously known functions of UFO could be separated and related to its expression at specific stages of development. We show that a 24- to 48-hour period of UFO expression from floral stage 2, before any floral organs are visible, is sufficient to restore normal petal and stamen development. The earliest requirement for UFO is during stage 2, when the endogenous UFO gene is transiently expressed in the centre of the wild-type flower and is required to specify the initiation patterns of petal, stamen and carpel primordia. Petal and stamen identity is determined during stages 2 or 3, when UFO is normally expressed in the presumptive second and third whorl. Although endogenous UFO expression is absent from the stamen whorl from stage 4 onwards, stamen identity can be restored by UFO activation up to stage 6. We also observed floral phenotypes not observed in loss-of-function or constitutive gain-of-function backgrounds, revealing additional roles of UFO in outgrowth of petal primordia. PMID:12506008

  10. The cardiac connexome: Non-canonical functions of connexin43 and their role in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Leo-Macias, Alejandra; Agullo-Pascual, Esperanza; Delmar, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Connexin43 is the major component of gap junctions, an anatomical structure present in the cardiac intercalated disc that provides a low-resistance pathway for direct cell-to-cell passage of electrical charge. Recent studies have shown that in addition to its well-established function as an integral membrane protein that oligomerizes to form gap junctions, Cx43 plays other roles that are independent of channel (or perhaps even hemi-channel) formation. This article discusses non-canonical functions of Cx43. In particular, we focus on the role of Cx43 as a part of a protein interacting network, a connexome, where molecules classically defined as belonging to the mechanical junctions, the gap junctions and the sodium channel complex, multitask and work together to bring about excitability, electrical and mechanical coupling between cardiac cells. Overall, viewing Cx43 as a multi-functional protein, beyond gap junctions, opens a window to better understand the function of the intercalated disc and the pathological consequences that may result from changes in the abundance or localization of Cx43 in the intercalated disc subdomain. PMID:26673388

  11. Separable roles of UFO during floral development revealed by conditional restoration of gene function.

    PubMed

    Laufs, Patrick; Coen, Enrico; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Traas, Jan; Doonan, John

    2003-02-01

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis including specification of organ identity in the second and third whorls and the proper pattern of primordium initiation in the inner three whorls. UFO is expressed in a dynamic pattern during the early phases of flower development. Here we dissect the role of UFO by ubiquitously expressing it in ufo loss-of-function flowers at different developmental stages and for various durations using an ethanol-inducible expression system. The previously known functions of UFO could be separated and related to its expression at specific stages of development. We show that a 24- to 48-hour period of UFO expression from floral stage 2, before any floral organs are visible, is sufficient to restore normal petal and stamen development. The earliest requirement for UFO is during stage 2, when the endogenous UFO gene is transiently expressed in the centre of the wild-type flower and is required to specify the initiation patterns of petal, stamen and carpel primordia. Petal and stamen identity is determined during stages 2 or 3, when UFO is normally expressed in the presumptive second and third whorl. Although endogenous UFO expression is absent from the stamen whorl from stage 4 onwards, stamen identity can be restored by UFO activation up to stage 6. We also observed floral phenotypes not observed in loss-of-function or constitutive gain-of-function backgrounds, revealing additional roles of UFO in outgrowth of petal primordia.

  12. [Novel role of growth factors in ovary function].

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham

    2010-12-01

    The development of the DNA microarray technique facilitated systematic studies of the modulation of gene function. Considerable attention has been focused on members of the growth factor family to elucidate the main regulators of oocyte maturation and ovarian follicle rupture. Among these growth factors, it was found, both in rodents and in humans, that amphiregulin (Ar) and epiregulin (Ep) of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family were dramatically up-regulated by gonadotrophins in the intact ovary and in primary granulosa cells, respectively. Their role in cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation was established in rodents, and their synthesis under LH stimulation in granulosa cells was demonstrated in humans. To be activated, Ar and Ep must be cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) family. However, the precise processing of Ar and Ep by the cumulus cells is still obscure. Future investigations using DNA microarray technique may reveal the repertoire of genes activated in Ar- and Ep-stimulated cumulus cells and may help elucidate the molecular basis of ovulation. EFG-like factors are also involved in triggering ovarian cancer The author hypothesized that the normal ovary maintains cyclicity in the formation of these growth factors preventing the ovary from developing ovarian cancer In ovarian cancer these growth factors are continuously formed in an autocrine manner, leading to transformation and subsequently to ovarian cancer. These growth factors are essential for both normal and neoplastic transformation of the ovary. Taking into consideration these growth factors in the treatment of ovarian malfunction may be one way of curing ovarian cancer. PMID:21916103

  13. A novel role for TRPM8 in visceral afferent function.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea M; Hughes, Patrick A; Martin, Christopher M; Yang, Jing; Castro, Joel; Isaacs, Nicole J; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Brierley, Stuart M

    2011-07-01

    Transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8) is activated by cold temperatures and cooling agents, such as menthol and icilin. Compounds containing peppermint are reported to reduce symptoms of bowel hypersensitivity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action are unclear. Here we determined the role of TRPM8 in colonic sensory pathways. Laser capture microdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and retrograde tracing were used to localise TRPM8 to colonic primary afferent neurons. In vitro extracellular single-fibre afferent recordings were used to determine the effect of TRPM8 channel activation on the chemosensory and mechanosensory function of colonic high-threshold afferent fibres. TRPM8 mRNA was present in colonic DRG neurons, whereas TRPM8 protein was present on nerve fibres throughout the wall of the colon. A subpopulation (24%, n=58) of splanchnic serosal and mesenteric afferents tested responded directly to icilin (5 μmol/L). Subsequently, icilin significantly desensitised afferents to mechanical stimulation (P<.0001; n=37). Of the splanchnic afferents responding to icilin, 21 (33%) also responded directly to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (3 μmol/L), and icilin reduced the direct chemosensory response to capsaicin. Icilin also prevented mechanosensory desensitization and sensitization induced by capsaicin and the TRPA1 agonist AITC (40 μmol/L), respectively. TRPM8 is present on a select population of colonic high threshold sensory neurons, which may also co-express TRPV1. TRPM8 couples to TRPV1 and TRPA1 to inhibit their downstream chemosensory and mechanosensory actions. PMID:21489690

  14. The Unique and Additive Associations of Family Functioning and Parenting Practices with Disordered Eating Behaviors in Diverse Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Loth, Katie A.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the unique and additive associations of family functioning and parenting practices with adolescent disordered eating behaviors (i.e., dieting, unhealthy weight control behaviors, binge eating). Methods Data from EAT (Eating and Activity in Teens) 2010, a population-based study assessing eating and activity among racially/ethnically and socio-economically diverse adolescents (n = 2,793; mean age = 14.4, SD = 2.0; age range = 11–19) was used. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between adolescent dieting and disordered eating behaviors and family functioning and parenting variables, including interactions. All analyses controlled for demographics and body mass index. Results Higher family functioning, parent connection, and parental knowledge about child’s whereabouts (e.g. who child is with, what they are doing, where they are at) were significantly associated with lower odds of engaging in dieting and disordered eating behaviors in adolescents, while parent psychological control was associated with greater odds of engaging in dieting and disordered eating behaviors. Although the majority of interactions were non-significant, parental psychological control moderated the protective relationship between family functioning and disordered eating behaviors in adolescent girls. Conclusions Clinicians and health care providers may want to discuss the importance of balancing specific parenting behaviors, such as increasing parent knowledge about child whereabouts while decreasing psychological control in order to enhance the protective relationship between family functioning and disordered eating behaviors in adolescents. PMID:23196919

  15. The unique and additive associations of family functioning and parenting practices with disordered eating behaviors in diverse adolescents.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jerica M; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Eisenberg, Marla E; Loth, Katie A; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-04-01

    To examine the unique and additive associations of family functioning and parenting practices with adolescent disordered eating behaviors (i.e., dieting, unhealthy weight control behaviors, binge eating). Data from EAT (Eating and Activity in Teens) 2010, a population-based study assessing eating and activity among racially/ethnically and socio-economically diverse adolescents (n = 2,793; mean age = 14.4, SD = 2.0; age range = 11-19) was used. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between adolescent dieting and disordered eating behaviors and family functioning and parenting variables, including interactions. All analyses controlled for demographics and body mass index. Higher family functioning, parent connection, and parental knowledge about child's whereabouts (e.g. who child is with, what they are doing, where they are at) were significantly associated with lower odds of engaging in dieting and disordered eating behaviors in adolescents, while parent psychological control was associated with greater odds of engaging in dieting and disordered eating behaviors. Although the majority of interactions were non-significant, parental psychological control moderated the protective relationship between family functioning and disordered eating behaviors in adolescent girls. Clinicians and health care providers may want to discuss the importance of balancing specific parenting behaviors, such as increasing parent knowledge about child whereabouts while decreasing psychological control in order to enhance the protective relationship between family functioning and disordered eating behaviors in adolescents.

  16. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  17. Role of residual additives in the cytotoxicity and cytokine release caused by polyvinyl chloride particles in pulmonary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; Dinsdale, David; Nemery, Benoit; Hoet, Peter H M

    2003-03-01

    Occupational exposure to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) dust has been linked to pulmonary disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in vitro, the role of additives in the cytotoxicity and the release of inflammatory mediators caused by PVC particles in different cells. We compared two types of emulsion PVC particles (E3 and E8) with their washed (hence, "additive-free") counterparts (W3 and W8). A positive control (crystalline SiO2, Min-U-Sil) and the pure additives, sodium lauryl sulfate (A3) and sodium alkylbenzenesulfonate (A8), were tested concurrently. Cytotoxicity (MTT assay) was assessed in primary cultures of rat alveolar macrophages, rat type II pneumocytes, and human alveolar macrophages (h-AM), and cultures of the A549 cell line (type II cell-derived) and the differentiated THP-1 cell line (macrophage-like). Hemolytic potential was assessed after a 2-h incubation with human erythrocytes. Cytokine release (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-alpha) by A549 cells, THP-1 cells, and h-AM, was measured by ELISA after 4, 16, 24 and/or 48 h of exposure. Cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity of the washed particles were abolished or markedly decreased compared with their nonwashed forms. In A549 cells, E3 and E8 (2.5 mg/ml) caused a 3-fold increase in IL-8 release and a more than 10-fold increase in IL-6 release, whereas W3 and W8 did not elicit any significant response at similar concentrations. Compared with Min-U-Sil (0.1, 0.5, and 2.5 mg/ml), the response to E3 and E8 occurred later and was slightly lower (IL-8) or much more pronounced (IL-6). A3 and A8 exhibited similar responses to E3 and E8, at concentrations corresponding to those present in the particles. In conclusion, the in vitro cytotoxicity and inflammatory potential of some PVC particles appear to be mostly due to their residual additives.

  18. Thioredoxin from Escherichia coli as a Role Model of Molecular Recognition, Folding, Dynamics and Function.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Delfino, Jose Maria; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) catalyzes redox reactions via the reversible oxidation of the conserved active center CGPC and it is involved in multiple biological processes, some of them linked to redox activity while others not. TRX is a globular, thermodynamically stable and monomeric alpha/beta protein with a structure characterized by a central beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. In this review we discuss central aspects of folding, dynamics and function of Escherichia coli TRX (EcTRX), pointing to the characterization of the full-length protein and of relevant fragments. In addition, we focus on the critical role that the C-terminal alpha-helical element plays in a late event in the consolidation of the overall EcTRX fold. Furthermore, we address the characterization of internal molecular motions by NMR and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Finally, we review important aspects of the relationship among structure, dynamics and enzymatic function of this key redox protein. PMID:26149400

  19. Non-Structural Proteins of Arthropod-Borne Bunyaviruses: Roles and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Eifan, Saleh; Schnettler, Esther; Dietrich, Isabelle; Kohl, Alain; Blomström, Anne-Lie

    2013-01-01

    Viruses within the Bunyaviridae family are tri-segmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses. The family includes several emerging and re-emerging viruses of humans, animals and plants, such as Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, Schmallenberg virus and tomato spotted wilt virus. Many bunyaviruses are arthropod-borne, so-called arboviruses. Depending on the genus, bunyaviruses encode, in addition to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the different structural proteins, one or several non-structural proteins. These non-structural proteins are not always essential for virus growth and replication but can play an important role in viral pathogenesis through their interaction with the host innate immune system. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge and understanding of insect-borne bunyavirus non-structural protein function(s) in vertebrate, plant and arthropod. PMID:24100888

  20. Stereoselective synthesis of densely functionalized pyrrolidin-2-ones by a conjugate addition/nitro-Mannich/lactamization reaction.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James C; Horsfall, Lisa R; Kalogirou, Andreas S; Mills, Matthew R; Stepney, Gregory J; Tizzard, Graham J

    2012-07-20

    Copper-catalyzed conjugate addition of diorgano zinc reagents to nitroacrylate 1 followed by a subsequent nitro-Mannich reaction and in situ lactamization leads to an efficient one-pot synthesis of 1,3,5-trisubstituted 4-nitropyrrolidin-2-ones (5). The versatility of the reaction is shown for a wide range of N-p-(methoxy)phenyl protected aldimines 3 derived from alkyl, aryl, and heteroaryl aldehydes. The densely functionalized pyrrolidin-2-ones 5 are isolated as single diastereoisomers (40 examples, 33-84% yield). An enantioselective copper-catalyzed conjugate addition of diethylzinc led to highly crystalline products that could be recrystallized to enantiopurity in high yield. A range of successful chemoselective transformations were investigated, which widens the applicability of the pyrrolidn-2-ones as stereochemically pure building blocks for further organic synthesis. PMID:22708711

  1. Specifying the role of function in infant categorization.

    PubMed

    Booth, Amy E; Schuler, Kathryn; Zajicek, Ruth

    2010-12-01

    Research demonstrates that object functions facilitate artifact categorization in infancy. To explicate the nature and magnitude of this effect, 16-month-olds participated in three studies. In Experiment 1, categorization was facilitated more by object functions than by distinctive motions, suggesting that the motion properties of function cannot fully explain its influence. In Experiment 2, infants failed to categorize when each category exemplar performed a different function, thus revealing the importance of shared functionality in facilitating categorization. In Experiment 3, infants were tested after each new exemplar was introduced. When object functions were provided during training, infants were more likely to appropriately extend the novel categories on the very first trial. This suggests that function reduces the need for exposure to multiple exemplars in forming categories. Together, these findings confirm the conceptual nature of the facilitative effect of function on early categorization. PMID:20951437

  2. Clinical Evaluation of Functional Vision of +1.5 Diopters near Addition, Aspheric, Rotational Asymmetric Multifocal Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Khoramnia, Rahmin; Attia, Mary Safwat; Koss, Michael Janusz; Linz, Katharina; Auffarth, Gerd Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate postoperative outcomes and visual performance in intermediate distance after implantation of a +1.5 diopters (D) addition, aspheric, rotational asymmetric multifocal intraocular lens (MIOL). Methods Patients underwent bilateral cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, asymmetric MIOL with +1.5 D near addition. A complete ophthalmological examination was performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. The main outcome measures were monocular and binocular uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), uncorrected intermediate visual acuity (UIVA), distance corrected intermediate visual acuity (DCIVA), uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA) and distance corrected keratometry, and manifest refraction. The Salzburg Reading Desk was used to analyze unilateral and bilateral functional vision with uncorrected and corrected reading acuity, reading distance, reading speed, and the smallest log-scaled print size that could be read effectively at near and intermediate distances. Results The study comprised 60 eyes of 30 patients (mean age, 68.30 ± 9.26 years; range, 34 to 80 years). There was significant improvement in UDVA and CDVA. Mean UIVA was 0.01 ± 0.09 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) and mean DCIVA was -0.02 ± 0.11 logMAR. In Salzburg Reading Desk analysis for UIVA, the mean subjective intermediate distance was 67.58 ± 8.59 cm with mean UIVA of -0.02 ± 0.09 logMAR and mean word count of 96.38 ± 28.32 words/min. Conclusions The new aspheric, asymmetric, +1.5 D near addition MIOL offers good results for distance visual function in combination with good performance for intermediate distances and functional results for near distance. PMID:27729759

  3. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential. PMID:23138103

  4. Effect of additive particles on mechanical, thermal, and cell functioning properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) cement

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Morshed; Vaughan, Melville B; Morris, Tracy L; White, Jeremiah J; Meng, Zhaotong

    2014-01-01

    The most common bone cement material used clinically today for orthopedic surgery is poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Conventional PMMA bone cement has several mechanical, thermal, and biological disadvantages. To overcome these problems, researchers have investigated combinations of PMMA bone cement and several bioactive particles (micrometers to nanometers in size), such as magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, barium sulfate, and silica. A study comparing the effect of these individual additives on the mechanical, thermal, and cell functional properties of PMMA would be important to enable selection of suitable additives and design improved PMMA cement for orthopedic applications. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of inclusion of magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, barium sulfate, and silica additives in PMMA on the mechanical, thermal, and cell functional performance of PMMA. American Society for Testing and Materials standard three-point bend flexural and fracture tests were conducted to determine the flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness of the different PMMA samples. A custom-made temperature measurement system was used to determine maximum curing temperature and the time needed for each PMMA sample to reach its maximum curing temperature. Osteoblast adhesion and proliferation experiments were performed to determine cell viability using the different PMMA cements. We found that flexural strength and fracture toughness were significantly greater for PMMA specimens that incorporated silica than for the other specimens. All additives prolonged the time taken to reach maximum curing temperature and significantly improved cell adhesion of the PMMA samples. The results of this study could be useful for improving the union of implant-PMMA or bone-PMMA interfaces by incorporating nanoparticles into PMMA cement for orthopedic and orthodontic applications. PMID:24920906

  5. Performance of Forage Mixtures Constructed to Fulfill Multiple Functional Roles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological theory predicts that complex pasture communities that include numerous plant functional types should be more productive, stable, and better at excluding weeds than simple communities with few functional types. In a series of greenhouse and field studies, six unique functional attributes c...

  6. The Education Production Function: Its Evolving Role in Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Production research in education is dominated by attempts to estimate the structural parameters of the education production function. This article explores the meaning of the function, critically reviews past estimation efforts, and gives examples of the use of the function as a source of insight to guide policy-relevant studies. (TJH)

  7. Novel real function based method to construct heterogeneous porous scaffolds and additive manufacturing for use in medical engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Tian, Yanling; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-11-01

    Heterogeneous porous scaffolds have important applications in biomedical engineering, as they can mimic the structures of natural tissues to achieve the corresponding properties. Here, we introduce a new and easy to implement real function based method for constructing complex, heterogeneous porous structures, including hybrid structures, stochastic structures, functionally gradient structures, and multi-scale structures, or their combinations (e.g., hybrid multi-scale structures). Based on micro-CT data, a femur-mimetic structure with gradient morphology was constructed using our method and fabricated using stereolithography. Results showed that our method could generate gradient porosity or gradient specific surfaces and be sufficiently flexible for use with micro-CT data and additive manufacturing (AM) techniques.

  8. An additional cysteine in a typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin of Pseudomonas promotes functional switching between peroxidase and molecular chaperone.

    PubMed

    An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Keun Woo; Lee, Sang Yeol; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-09-14

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) have received considerable attention during recent years. This study demonstrates that two typical Pseudomonas-derived 2-Cys Prx proteins, PpPrx and PaPrx can alternatively function as a peroxidase and chaperone. The amino acid sequences of these two Prx proteins exhibit 93% homology, but PpPrx possesses an additional cysteine residue, Cys112, instead of the alanine found in PaPrx. PpPrx predominates with a high molecular weight (HMW) complex and chaperone activity, whereas PaPrx has mainly low molecular weight (LMW) structures and peroxidase activity. Mass spectrometry and structural analyses showed the involvement of Cys112 in the formation of an inter-disulfide bond, the instability of LMW structures, the formation of HMW complexes, and increased hydrophobicity leading to functional switching of Prx proteins between peroxidase and chaperone. PMID:26278368

  9. Additional stratifications in the equatorial F region at dawn and dusk during geomagnetic storms: Role of electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Balan, N.; Ravindran, Sudha; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Sridharan, R.; Bailey, G. J.

    2009-08-01

    The role of electrodynamics in producing additional stratifications in the equatorial F region (F 3 layer) at dawn and dusk during geomagnetic storms is discussed. Two cases of F 3 layer at dawn (0600-0730 LT on 5 October 2000 and 8 December 2000) and one case of F 3 layer at dusk (1600-1730 LT on 5 October 2000) are observed, for the first time, by the digital ionosonde at the equatorial station Trivandrum (8.5°N 77°E dip ˜ 0.5°N) in India. The unusual F 3 layers occurred during the geomagnetic storms and are associated with southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field B z , suggesting that eastward prompt penetration electric field could be the main cause of the F 3 layers. The dawn F 3 layer on 5 October is modeled using the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model by using the E × B drift estimated from the real height variation of the ionospheric peak during the morning period. The model qualitatively reproduces the dawn F 3 layer. While the existing F 2 layer rapidly drifts upward and forms the F 3 layer and topside ledge, a new layer forming at lower heights develops into the normal F 2 layer.

  10. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 Research, Part I.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Huber, Diane L; Downey, William T

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004. The purpose of this research was to validate the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in 2 parts of an article. Part I discusses the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Manager's Role and Functions Survey Instrument (CMRFSI). The research leads to the identification of 6 new essential functions and 6 new knowledge areas, which describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the survey results and focuses on identifying the empirical activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using factor analysis. It also discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, it summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study.

  11. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 research, part II.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Downey, William T; Huber, Diane L

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004 for the purpose of validating the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in an article of 2 parts. Part I, which was published in the previous issue of this journal, discussed the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Managers' Role and Functions Survey Instrument and the identification of new 6 essential functions and 6 knowledge areas that describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the results and focuses on identifying the empirical (statistically derived) activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using exploratory factor analysis. It discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, Part II summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study.

  12. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 Research, Part I.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Huber, Diane L; Downey, William T

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004. The purpose of this research was to validate the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in 2 parts of an article. Part I discusses the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Manager's Role and Functions Survey Instrument (CMRFSI). The research leads to the identification of 6 new essential functions and 6 new knowledge areas, which describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the survey results and focuses on identifying the empirical activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using factor analysis. It also discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, it summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study. PMID:16444117

  13. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 research, part II.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Downey, William T; Huber, Diane L

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004 for the purpose of validating the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in an article of 2 parts. Part I, which was published in the previous issue of this journal, discussed the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Managers' Role and Functions Survey Instrument and the identification of new 6 essential functions and 6 knowledge areas that describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the results and focuses on identifying the empirical (statistically derived) activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using exploratory factor analysis. It discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, Part II summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study. PMID:16582699

  14. Understanding the role of multifunctional nanoengineered particulate additives on supercritical pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels/propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung Sub

    This dissertation aims to understand the fundamental effects of colloidal nanostructured materials on the supercritical pyrolysis, injection, ignition, and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels/propellants. As a fuel additive, functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) without or with the decoration of metal catalysts, such as platinum (Pt) or polyoxometalates (POM) nanoparticles, were examined against conventional materials including nanometer sized fumed silica and aluminum particles. Supercritical pyrolysis experiments were performed as a function of temperature, residence time, and particle type, using a high pressure and temperature flow reactor designed to provide isothermal and isobaric flow conditions. Supercritical pyrolysis results showed that the addition of FGS-based particles at a loading concentration of 50 ppmw increased the conversion rates and reduced apparent activation energies for methylcyclohexane (MCH) and n-dodecane (n-C12H26) fuels. For example, conversion rates, and formations of C1-C5 n-alkanes and C2-C6 1-alkenes were significantly increased by 43.5 %, 59.1 %, and 50.0 % for MCH decomposition using FGS 19 (50 ppmw) at a temperature of 820 K and reduced pressure of 1.36. In addition, FGS decorated with 20 wt % Pt (20wt%Pt FGS) at a loading concentration of 50 ppmw exhibited additional enhancement in the conversion rate of n-C12H26 by up to 24.0 % compared to FGS. Especially, FGS-based particles seem to alter initiation mechanisms, which could result in higher hydrogen formation. Hydrogen selectivities for both MCH and n-C12H26 decompositions were observed to increase by nearly a factor of 2 and 10, respectively. Supercritical injection and combustion experiments were conducted using a high pressure and temperature windowed combustion chamber coupled to the flow reactor through a feed system. Supercritical injection/combustion experiments indicated that the presence of a small amount of particles (100 ppmw) in the fuel affected the injection, ignition

  15. Changes in the structure and function of microbial communities in drinking water treatment bioreactors upon addition of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Yuen, Wangki; Brown, Jess; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2010-11-01

    Phosphorus was added as a nutrient to bench-scale and pilot-scale biologically active carbon (BAC) reactors operated for perchlorate and nitrate removal from contaminated groundwater. The two bioreactors responded similarly to phosphorus addition in terms of microbial community function (i.e., reactor performance), while drastically different responses in microbial community structure were detected. Improvement in reactor performance with respect to perchlorate and nitrate removal started within a few days after phosphorus addition for both reactors. Microbial community structures were evaluated using molecular techniques targeting 16S rRNA genes. Clone library results showed that the relative abundance of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) Dechloromonas and Azospira in the bench-scale reactor increased from 15.2% and 0.6% to 54.2% and 11.7% after phosphorus addition, respectively. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) experiments revealed that these increases started within a few days after phosphorus addition. In contrast, after phosphorus addition, the relative abundance of Dechloromonas in the pilot-scale reactor decreased from 7.1 to 0.6%, while Zoogloea increased from 17.9 to 52.0%. The results of this study demonstrated that similar operating conditions for bench-scale and pilot-scale reactors resulted in similar contaminant removal performances, despite dramatically different responses from microbial communities. These findings suggest that it is important to evaluate the microbial community compositions inside bioreactors used for drinking water treatment, as they determine the microbial composition in the effluent and impact downstream treatment requirements for drinking water production. This information could be particularly relevant to drinking water safety, if pathogens or disinfectant-resistant bacteria are detected in the bioreactors.

  16. Response of Functional Structure of Soil Microbial Community to Multi-level Nitrogen Additions on the Central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Yuan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The use of fossil fuels and fertilizers has increased the amount of biologically reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere over the past century. Tibet is the one of the most threatened regions by nitrogen deposition, thus understanding how its microbial communities function maybe of high importance to predicting microbial responses to nitrogen deposition. Here we describe a short-time nitrogen addition conducted in an alpine steppe ecosystem to investigate the response of functional structure of soil microbial community to multi-level nitrogen addition. Using a GeoChip 4.0, we showed that functional diversities and richness of functional genes were unchanged at low level of nitrogen fertilizer inputs (<20 kg N ha-1 yr-1), but significantly decreased at higher nitrogen fertilizer inputs (>=40 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Detrended correspondence analysis indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different across the nitrogen gradients. Most C degradation genes whose abundances significantly increased under elevated N fertilizer were those involved in the degradation of relatively labile C (starch, hemicellulose, cellulose), whereas the abundance of certain genes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant C (i.e. lignin) was largely decreased (such as manganese peroxidase, mnp). The results suggest that the elevated N fertilization rates might significantly accelerate the labile C degradation, but might not spur recalcitrant C degradation. The combined effect of gdh and ureC genes involved in N cycling appeared to shift the balance between ammonia and organic N toward organic N ammonification and hence increased the N mineralization potential. Moreover, Urease directly involved in urea mineralization significantly increased. Lastly, Canonical correspondence analysis showed that soil (TOC+NH4++NO3-+NO2-+pH) and plant (Aboveground plant productivity + Shannon Diversity) variables could explain 38.9% of the variation of soil microbial community

  17. Differing Roles of Functional Movement Variability as Experience Increases in Gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Albert; Marina, Michel; Davids, Keith; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa

    2016-06-01

    gymnasts). Longswing assessment allowed us to evaluate inter-trial variability in representative performance context.Coordination variability presented two different configurations across experience levels depending on the variable of interest: either a U-shaped or a L- or \\-shaped graph.Increased inter-trial variability of the functional phase events offered flexibility to adapt the longswing performance in the advanced gymnasts, while decreasing variability in arm-trunk coordination modes was critical to improve longswing and to achieve the most advanced level.In addition, the relationship between variability measures and the global performance outcome (i.e. the swing amplitude) revealed different functional roles of movement variability (exploratory or restrictive) as a function of changes in experience levels. PMID:27274664

  18. Differing Roles of Functional Movement Variability as Experience Increases in Gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Albert; Marina, Michel; Davids, Keith; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa

    2016-06-01

    gymnasts). Longswing assessment allowed us to evaluate inter-trial variability in representative performance context.Coordination variability presented two different configurations across experience levels depending on the variable of interest: either a U-shaped or a L- or \\-shaped graph.Increased inter-trial variability of the functional phase events offered flexibility to adapt the longswing performance in the advanced gymnasts, while decreasing variability in arm-trunk coordination modes was critical to improve longswing and to achieve the most advanced level.In addition, the relationship between variability measures and the global performance outcome (i.e. the swing amplitude) revealed different functional roles of movement variability (exploratory or restrictive) as a function of changes in experience levels.

  19. Differing Roles of Functional Movement Variability as Experience Increases in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Busquets, Albert; Marina, Michel; Davids, Keith; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    gymnasts). Longswing assessment allowed us to evaluate inter-trial variability in representative performance context. Coordination variability presented two different configurations across experience levels depending on the variable of interest: either a U-shaped or a L- or \\-shaped graph. Increased inter-trial variability of the functional phase events offered flexibility to adapt the longswing performance in the advanced gymnasts, while decreasing variability in arm-trunk coordination modes was critical to improve longswing and to achieve the most advanced level. In addition, the relationship between variability measures and the global performance outcome (i.e. the swing amplitude) revealed different functional roles of movement variability (exploratory or restrictive) as a function of changes in experience levels. PMID:27274664

  20. The relationship between cognitive function and life space: the potential role of personal control beliefs.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Andrea C; Wadley, Virginia G; Clay, Olivio J; Parisi, Jeanine M; Rebok, George W; Crowe, Michael

    2012-06-01

    We examined the relationship of cognitive and functional measures with life space (a measure of spatial mobility examining extent of movement within a person's environment) in older adults, and investigated the potential moderating role of personal control beliefs. Internal control beliefs reflect feelings of competence and personal agency, while attributions of external control imply a more dependent or passive point of view. Participants were 2,737 adults from the ACTIVE study, with a mean age of 74 years. Females comprised 76% of the sample, with good minority representation (27% African American). In multiple regression models controlling for demographic factors, cognitive domains of memory, reasoning, and processing speed were significantly associated with life space (p < .001 for each), and reasoning ability appeared most predictive (B = .117). Measures of everyday function also showed significant associations with life space, independent from the traditional cognitive measures. Interactions between cognitive function and control beliefs were tested, and external control beliefs moderated the relationship between memory and life space, with the combination of high objective memory and low external control beliefs yielding the highest life space (t = -2.07; p = .039). In conclusion, older adults with better cognitive function have a larger overall life space. Performance-based measures of everyday function may also be useful in assessing the functional outcome of life space. Additionally, subjective external control beliefs may moderate the relationship between objective cognitive function and life space. Future studies examining the relationships between these factors longitudinally appear worthwhile to further elucidate the interrelationships of cognitive function, control beliefs, and life space.

  1. Stressors, coping resources, functioning, and role limitations among older korean immigrants: gender differences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Hag; GlenMaye, Linnea Flynn

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the differential impacts of stressors and coping resources on the functioning and roles of 246 older Korean immigrant men and women. Older Korean immigrant women were significantly more likely than men to have acculturation and socioeconomic stressors, physical/social functioning problems, and role limitations. English-language barriers and lack of transportation were significantly related to lower functioning and higher role limitations of older Korean women compared to those of older men. Providing social and health care services with bilingual and transportation services to older Korean immigrant women is recommended to increase their physical/social functioning and role performance. PMID:24483283

  2. An additional role for the Brønsted acid-base catalysts of mandelate racemase in transition state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Mitesh; Bearne, Stephen L

    2015-11-10

    Mandelate racemase (MR) catalyzes the interconversion of the enantiomers of mandelate and serves as a paradigm for understanding the enzyme-catalyzed abstraction of an α-proton from a carbon acid substrate with a high pKa. The enzyme utilizes a two-base mechanism with Lys 166 and His 297 acting as Brønsted acid and base catalysts, respectively, in the R → S reaction direction. In the S → R reaction direction, their roles are reversed. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), MR is shown to bind the intermediate/transition state (TS) analogue inhibitor benzohydroxamate (BzH) in an entropy-driven process with a value of ΔCp equal to -358 ± 3 cal mol(-1) K(-1), consistent with an increased number of hydrophobic interactions. However, MR binds BzH with an affinity that is ∼2 orders of magnitude greater than that predicted solely on the basis of hydrophobic interactions [St. Maurice, M., and Bearne, S. L. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 2524], suggesting that additional specific interactions contribute to binding. To test the hypothesis that cation-π/NH-π interactions between the side chains of Lys 166 and His 297 and the aromatic ring and/or the hydroxamate/hydroximate moiety of BzH contribute to the binding of BzH, site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate the MR variants K166M, K166C, H297N, and K166M/H297N and their binding affinity for various ligands determined using ITC. Comparison of the binding affinities of these MR variants with the intermediate/TS analogues BzH and cyclohexanecarbohydroxamate revealed that cation-π/NH-π interactions between His 297 and the hydroxamate/hydroximate moiety and the phenyl ring of BzH contribute approximately 0.26 and 0.91 kcal/mol to binding, respectively, while interactions with Lys 166 contribute approximately 1.74 and 1.74 kcal/mol, respectively. Similarly, comparison of the binding affinities of these mutants with substrate analogues revealed that Lys 166 contributes >2.93 kcal/mol to the binding of (R

  3. An additional role for the Brønsted acid-base catalysts of mandelate racemase in transition state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Mitesh; Bearne, Stephen L

    2015-11-10

    Mandelate racemase (MR) catalyzes the interconversion of the enantiomers of mandelate and serves as a paradigm for understanding the enzyme-catalyzed abstraction of an α-proton from a carbon acid substrate with a high pKa. The enzyme utilizes a two-base mechanism with Lys 166 and His 297 acting as Brønsted acid and base catalysts, respectively, in the R → S reaction direction. In the S → R reaction direction, their roles are reversed. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), MR is shown to bind the intermediate/transition state (TS) analogue inhibitor benzohydroxamate (BzH) in an entropy-driven process with a value of ΔCp equal to -358 ± 3 cal mol(-1) K(-1), consistent with an increased number of hydrophobic interactions. However, MR binds BzH with an affinity that is ∼2 orders of magnitude greater than that predicted solely on the basis of hydrophobic interactions [St. Maurice, M., and Bearne, S. L. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 2524], suggesting that additional specific interactions contribute to binding. To test the hypothesis that cation-π/NH-π interactions between the side chains of Lys 166 and His 297 and the aromatic ring and/or the hydroxamate/hydroximate moiety of BzH contribute to the binding of BzH, site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate the MR variants K166M, K166C, H297N, and K166M/H297N and their binding affinity for various ligands determined using ITC. Comparison of the binding affinities of these MR variants with the intermediate/TS analogues BzH and cyclohexanecarbohydroxamate revealed that cation-π/NH-π interactions between His 297 and the hydroxamate/hydroximate moiety and the phenyl ring of BzH contribute approximately 0.26 and 0.91 kcal/mol to binding, respectively, while interactions with Lys 166 contribute approximately 1.74 and 1.74 kcal/mol, respectively. Similarly, comparison of the binding affinities of these mutants with substrate analogues revealed that Lys 166 contributes >2.93 kcal/mol to the binding of (R

  4. An expanded role for functional neuroimaging in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Callicott, Joseph H

    2003-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a surprisingly versatile tool in the quest for disentangling the complexities of mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. Yet, the identification of pathognomonic physiological features of the illness or even a consensus regarding the interpretation of reported findings remain unfulfilled goals, in spite of the increasing sophistication of this technology. Nonetheless, by providing quantification of brain function during various cognitive challenges, functional MRI has been used to leap ahead of these quandaries to identify relationships between genetic variation and brain function. By examining recent findings and efforts to link these findings to genes, this article will review these exciting developments in schizophrenia research.

  5. Effect of TiO2-Ag2O additives on the formation of calcium phosphate based functionally graded bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Manjubala, I; Sampath Kumar, T S

    2000-10-01

    The combined effect of titanium dioxide and silver oxide on the in situ formation of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics was investigated. Titania (5-20 mol%) was mixed with pure hydroxyapatite (HA) or HA containing Ag2O (10-20 mol%) and was heated to 900 degrees C for 12 h. The sintered samples were found to contain tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) and other phases along with HA depending upon the amount as well as the type of the additives used as evidenced by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic studies. Enhanced TCP formation with reduced impurity phases was observed with TiO2-Ag2O addition. In vitro solubility study in phosphate buffer at physiological conditions shows the resorbable nature of these materials. A functionally graded material (FGM) structure was formed by spreading TiO2-Ag2O mixture on the surface of the HA green compact and heating at 900 degrees C. The FGM shows gradient structure of TCP and HA from the surface to the interior of the pellet in addition to titania and silver phases.

  6. Functional analyses of AGAMOUS family members in Nicotiana benthamiana clarify the evolution of early and late roles of C-function genes in eudicots.

    PubMed

    Fourquin, Chloé; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2012-09-01

    The C-function, according to the ABC model of floral organ identity, is required for stamen and carpel development and to provide floral meristem determinacy. Members of the AG lineage of the large MADS box gene family specify the C-function in a broadly conserved manner in angiosperms. In core eudicots, two sub-lineages co-exist, euAG and PLE, which have been extensively characterized in Antirrhinum majus and Arabidopsis thaliana, where strong sub-functionalization has led to highly divergent contributions of the respective paralogs to the C-function. Various scenarios have been proposed to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the euAG and PLE lineages in eudicots, but detailed functional analyses of the roles of these genes in additional representative species to validate evolutionary hypotheses are scarce. Here, we report functional characterization of euAG- and PLE-like genes in Nicotiana benthamiana through expression analyses and phenotypic characterization of the defects caused by their specific down-regulation. We show that both paralogs redundantly contribute to the C-function in this species, providing insights on the likely evolution of these gene lineages following divergence of the major groups within the eudicots (rosids and asterids). Moreover, we have demonstrated a conserved role for the PLE-like genes in controlling fruit dehiscence, which strongly supports the ancestral role of PLE-like genes in late fruit development and suggests a common evolutionary origin of late developmental processes in dry (dehiscent) and fleshy (ripening) fruits.

  7. Additional Saturday rehabilitation improves functional independence and quality of life and reduces length of stay: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many inpatients receive little or no rehabilitation on weekends. Our aim was to determine what effect providing additional Saturday rehabilitation during inpatient rehabilitation had on functional independence, quality of life and length of stay compared to 5 days per week of rehabilitation. Methods This was a multicenter, single-blind (assessors) randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation and 12-month follow-up conducted in two publically funded metropolitan inpatient rehabilitation facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Patients were eligible if they were adults (aged ≥18 years) admitted for rehabilitation for any orthopedic, neurological or other disabling conditions excluding those admitted for slow stream rehabilitation/geriatric evaluation and management. Participants were randomly allocated to usual care Monday to Friday rehabilitation (control) or to Monday to Saturday rehabilitation (intervention). The additional Saturday rehabilitation comprised physiotherapy and occupational therapy. The primary outcomes were functional independence (functional independence measure (FIM); measured on an 18 to 126 point scale), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D utility index; measured on a 0 to 1 scale, and EQ-5D visual analog scale; measured on a 0 to 100 scale), and patient length of stay. Outcome measures were assessed on admission, discharge (primary endpoint), and at 6 and 12 months post discharge. Results We randomly assigned 996 adults (mean (SD) age 74 (13) years) to Monday to Saturday rehabilitation (n = 496) or usual care Monday to Friday rehabilitation (n = 500). Relative to admission scores, intervention group participants had higher functional independence (mean difference (MD) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5 to 4.1, P = 0.01) and health-related quality of life (MD 0.04, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.07, P = 0.009) on discharge and may have had a shorter length of stay by 2 days (95% CI 0 to 4, P = 0.1) when compared to

  8. The Role of Inhibitory Functioning in Children's Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Josephine N.; Boyle, James M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Executive functions, including inhibition, have been implicated in children's reading ability. This study investigates whether children's performance on an inhibition task is more indicative of reading ability than a measure of another executive function, that is, planning. Fifty-three male participants were administered a reading test and tests…

  9. Evidence for a Role of Executive Functions in Learning Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Sinéad M.; Booth, Josephine N.; Campbell, Lorna Elise; Blythe, Richard A.; Wheate, Nial J.; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2014-01-01

    Research examining cognition and science learning has focused on working memory, but evidence implicates a broader set of executive functions. The current study examined executive functions and learning of biology in young adolescents. Fifty-six participants, aged 12-13?years, completed tasks of working memory (Spatial Working Memory), inhibition…

  10. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  11. Nutritional, Health, and Technological Functionality of Lupin Flour Addition to Bread and Other Baked Products: Benefits and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Villarino, C B J; Jayasena, V; Coorey, R; Chakrabarti-Bell, S; Johnson, S K

    2016-01-01

    Lupin is an undervalued legume despite its high protein and dietary fiber content and potential health benefits. This review focuses on the nutritional value, health benefits, and technological effects of incorporating lupin flour into wheat-based bread. Results of clinical studies suggest that consuming lupin compared to wheat bread and other baked products reduce chronic disease risk markers; possibly due to increased protein and dietary fiber and bioactive compounds. However, lupin protein allergy has also been recorded. Bread quality has been improved when 10% lupin flour is substituted for refined wheat flour; possibly due to lupin-wheat protein cross-linking assisting bread volume and the high water-binding capacity (WBC) of lupin fiber delaying staling. Above 10% substitution appears to reduce bread quality due to lupin proteins low elasticity and the high WBC of its dietary fiber interrupting gluten network development. Gaps in understanding of the role of lupin flour in bread quality include the optimal formulation and processing conditions to maximize lupin incorporation, role of protein cross-linking, antistaling functionality, and bioactivity of its γ-conglutin protein. PMID:25675266

  12. Structural Evolution of Electrochemically Lithiated MoS2 Nanosheets and the Role of Carbon Additive in Li-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure and phase changes associated with conversion-type materials is key to optimizing their electrochemical performance in Li-ion batteries. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) offers a capacity up to 3-fold higher (∼1 Ah/g) than the currently used graphite anodes, but they suffer from limited Coulombic efficiency and capacity fading. The lack of insights into the structural dynamics induced by electrochemical conversion of MoS2 still hampers its implementation in high energy-density batteries. Here, by combining ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) simulation with electrochemical analysis, we found new sulfur-enriched intermediates that progressively insulate MoS2 electrodes and cause instability from the first discharge cycle. Because of this, the choice of conductive additives is critical for the battery performance. We investigate the mechanistic role of carbon additive by comparing equal loading of standard Super P carbon powder and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The latter offer a nearly 2-fold increase in capacity and a 45% reduction in resistance along with Coulombic efficiency of over 90%. These insights into the phase changes during MoS2 conversion reactions and stabilization methods provide new solutions for implementing cost-effective metal sulfide electrodes, including Li–S systems in high energy-density batteries.

  13. Emerging role of autophagy in kidney function, diseases and aging.

    PubMed

    Huber, Tobias B; Edelstein, Charles L; Hartleben, Björn; Inoki, Ken; Jiang, Man; Koya, Daisuke; Kume, Shinji; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Pallet, Nicolas; Quiroga, Alejandro; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Susztak, Katalin; Yoshida, Sei; Dong, Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved process that degrades cellular long-lived proteins and organelles. Accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy plays a critical role in kidney maintenance, diseases and aging. Ischemic, toxic, immunological, and oxidative insults can cause an induction of autophagy in renal epithelial cells modifying the course of various kidney diseases. This review summarizes recent insights on the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and diseases alluding to possible novel intervention strategies for treating specific kidney disorders by modifying autophagy. PMID:22692002

  14. School Personnel Perceptions of Professional School Counselor Role and Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Caron N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine the attitudes held by school-based administrators, teachers, and professional school counselors regarding ideal and actual roles of the professional school counselor. The survey instrument utilized in this research study, the PSCRFA, is grounded in the ASCA model and reflective of current school…

  15. Cadaverine's Functional Role in Plant Development and Environmental Response.

    PubMed

    Jancewicz, Amy L; Gibbs, Nicole M; Masson, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Cadaverine derives from lysine in a pathway that is distinct from that of the other well-characterized ornithine- or arginine-derived polyamines. Despite a multitude of studies in bacterial systems, cadaverine has garnered little attention in plant research. Nonetheless, many plants have been found to synthesize it. For instance, the Leguminosae have been shown to produce cadaverine and use it as a precursor in the biosynthesis of quinolizidine alkaloids, secondary metabolites that are involved in insect defense and also display therapeutic pharmacological properties. Cadaverine is also present in the environment; it can be produced by rhizosphere and phyllosphere microbes. Markedly, exogenous cadaverine application causes alterations in root-system architecture. Previous research suggests cadaverine has a role in stress response, with groups reporting an increase in content upon exposure to heat, drought, salt, and oxidative stress. However, data regarding the role of cadaverine in stress response remains conflicted, as some plant systems show enhanced tolerance to stresses in its presence, while others show increased sensitivity to the same stresses. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the role of cadaverine in plant growth, development, and stress response. We also address the possible roles rhizosphere and phyllosphere microbes may play in the delivery of exogenous cadaverine near plant organs, and discuss our current understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to cadaverine homeostasis and response in plants. PMID:27446107

  16. ACCURACY OF INTERPERSONAL PERCEPTION--A FUNCTION OF SUPERORDINATE ROLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUMBAUGH, ROBERT B.

    ONE ASPECT OF THE PERCEPTUAL ACCURACY OF STUDENT TEACHERS AND THEIR SUPERVISORS IN JUDGING THEIR INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS WAS EXPLORED. A FIELD STUDY OF 40 STUDENT TEACHERS AND THEIR PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERVISING TEACHERS EXPLORED THE POSSIBILITY OF SUBORDINATE ROLE BEING A CORRELATE TO THE ACCURACY OF THEIR INTERPERSONAL PERCEPTION. AT THE END OF 6…

  17. Role of CGRP-Receptor Component Protein (RCP) in CLR/RAMP Function

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) requires an intracellular peripheral membrane protein named CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) for signaling. RCP is required for CGRP and AM receptor signaling, and it has recently been discovered that RCP enables signaling by binding directly to the receptor. RCP is present in most immortalized cell lines, but in vivo RCP expression is limited to specific subsets of cells, usually co-localizing with CGRP-containing neurons. RCP protein expression correlates with CGRP efficacy in vivo, suggesting that RCP regulates CGRP signaling in vivo as it does in cell culture. RCP is usually identified in cytoplasm or membranes of cells, but recently has been observed in nucleus of neurons, suggesting an additional transcriptional role for RCP in cell function. Together, these data support an essential role for RCP in CGRP and AM receptor function, in which RCP expression enhances signaling of the CGRP or AM receptor, and therefore increases the efficacy of CGRP and AM in vivo. PMID:23745704

  18. The role of mitochondrial function in glutamate-dependent metabolism in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Smaili, S S; Ureshino, R P; Rodrigues, L; Rocha, K K; Carvalho, J T; Oseki, K T; Bincoletto, C; Lopes, G S; Hirata, H

    2011-12-01

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in neurons and glial cells and it is one of the keys to the neuron-glial interaction in the brain. Glutamate transmission is strongly dependent on calcium homeostasis and on mitochondrial function. In the present work we presented several aspects related to the role of mitochondria in glutamate signaling and in brain diseases. We focused on glutamateinduced calcium signaling and its relation to the organelle dysfunction with cell death processes. In addition, we have discussed how alterations in this pathway may lead or aggravate a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. We compiled information on how mitochondria can influence cell fate during glutamate stimulation and calcium signaling. These organelles play a pivotal role in neuron and glial exchange, in synaptic plasticity and several pathological conditions related to Aging, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. We have also presented autophagy as a mechanism activated during mitochondrial dysfunction which may function as a protective mechanism during injury. Furthermore, some new perspectives and approaches to treat these neurodegenerative diseases are offered and evaluated.

  19. The Role of Executive Function in Children’s Competent Adjustment to Middle School

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Lisa A.; Williford, Amanda P.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Executive function (EF) skills play an important role in children’s cognitive and social functioning. These skills develop throughout childhood, concurrently with a number of developmental transitions and challenges. One of these challenges is the transition from elementary into middle-level schools, which has the potential to significantly disrupt children’s academic and social trajectories. However, little is known about the role of EF in children’s adjustment during this transition. This study investigated the relation between children’s EF skills, assessed both before and during elementary school, and sixth grade academic and social competence. In addition, the influences of the type of school setting attended in sixth grade on children’s academic and behavioral outcomes were examined. EF assessed prior to and during elementary school significantly predicted sixth grade competence, as rated by teachers and parents, in both academic and social domains, after controlling for background characteristics. The interactions between type of school setting and EF skills were significant: parents tended to report more behavioral problems and less regulatory control in children with weaker EF skills who were attending middle school. In contrast, teachers reported greater academic and behavioral difficulty in students with poorer EF attending elementary school settings. In conclusion, children’s performance-based EF skills significantly affect adjustment to the academic and behavioral demands of sixth grade, with parent report suggesting greater difficulty for children with poorer EF in settings where children are provided with less external supports (e.g., middle school). PMID:21246422

  20. The role of carbohydrate in the assembly and function of polymeric IgG.

    PubMed

    Coloma, M J; Clift, A; Wims, L; Morrison, S L

    2000-12-01

    The carbohydrate present on glycoprotein can influence their biologic and functional properties. In the present paper we have assessed the role of oligosaccharides in the polymerization and effector functions of IgG with the 18 amino acid extension of IgM added to its carboxy terminus (IgGmutp). We found that IgG1mutp and IgG3mutp lacking the carbohydrate addition site in C(H)2, in the tail-piece or both assembled into polymers as well as the glycosylated versions. Aglycosylated polymers retained the ability to activate complement as assayed by C1q binding and hemolysis, although they were not as effective as their wild type polymer counterparts. Although IgGmutp lacking the carbohydrate in the tail-piece was able to bind to FcgammaRII, completely aglycosylated polymers lost the ability to bind to both FcgammaRI and FcgammaRII, suggesting a critical role for the C(H)2 sugar in FcR binding. Absence of the mutp carbohydrate increased the half life of polymeric IgG1, whereas absence of the carbohydrate in C(H)2 accelerated the clearance rate.

  1. Composite scaffolds for osteochondral repair obtained by combination of additive manufacturing, leaching processes and hMSC-CM functionalization.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Alarcón Iniesta, Hernán; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación

    2016-02-01

    Articular repair is a relevant and challenging area for the emerging fields of tissue engineering and biofabrication. The need of significant gradients of properties, for the promotion of osteochondral repair, has led to the development of several families of composite biomaterials and scaffolds, using different effective approaches, although a perfect solution has not yet been found. In this study we present the design, modeling, rapid manufacturing and in vitro testing of a composite scaffold aimed at osteochondral repair. The presented composite scaffold stands out for having a functional gradient of density and stiffness in the bony phase, obtained in titanium by means of computer-aided design combined with additive manufacture using selective laser sintering. The chondral phase is obtained by sugar leaching, using a PDMS matrix and sugar as porogen, and is joined to the bony phase during the polymerization of PDMS, therefore avoiding the use of supporting adhesives or additional intermediate layers. The mechanical performance of the construct is biomimetic and the stiffness values of the bony and chondral phases can be tuned to the desired applications, by means of controlled modifications of different parameters. A human mesenchymal stem cell (h-MSC) conditioned medium (CM) is used for improving scaffold response. Cell culture results provide relevant information regarding the viability of the composite scaffolds used.

  2. Resonance scattering and radiation force calculations for an elastic cylinder using the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-09-15

    The standard Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) of plane waves is extended for the case of any two-dimensional (2D) arbitrarily-shaped monochromatic beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location using an exact methodology based on Graf’s translational addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions. The analysis is exact as it does not require numerical integration procedures. The formulation is valid for any cylinder of finite size and material that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered linear pressure fields are derived, and the analysis is further extended to obtain generalized expressions for the on-axis and off-axis acoustic radiation force components. The wave-fields are expressed using generalized PWSEs involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. The off-axial BSCs are expressed analytically in terms of an infinite PWSE with emphasis on the translational offset distance d. Numerical computations are considered for a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian beam chosen as an example to illustrate the analysis. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. In addition, computations for the radiation force exerted on an elastic cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed.

  3. Resonance scattering and radiation force calculations for an elastic cylinder using the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-09-01

    The standard Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) of plane waves is extended for the case of any two-dimensional (2D) arbitrarily-shaped monochromatic beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location using an exact methodology based on Graf's translational addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions. The analysis is exact as it does not require numerical integration procedures. The formulation is valid for any cylinder of finite size and material that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered linear pressure fields are derived, and the analysis is further extended to obtain generalized expressions for the on-axis and off-axis acoustic radiation force components. The wave-fields are expressed using generalized PWSEs involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. The off-axial BSCs are expressed analytically in terms of an infinite PWSE with emphasis on the translational offset distance d. Numerical computations are considered for a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian beam chosen as an example to illustrate the analysis. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. In addition, computations for the radiation force exerted on an elastic cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed.

  4. Composite scaffolds for osteochondral repair obtained by combination of additive manufacturing, leaching processes and hMSC-CM functionalization.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Alarcón Iniesta, Hernán; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación

    2016-02-01

    Articular repair is a relevant and challenging area for the emerging fields of tissue engineering and biofabrication. The need of significant gradients of properties, for the promotion of osteochondral repair, has led to the development of several families of composite biomaterials and scaffolds, using different effective approaches, although a perfect solution has not yet been found. In this study we present the design, modeling, rapid manufacturing and in vitro testing of a composite scaffold aimed at osteochondral repair. The presented composite scaffold stands out for having a functional gradient of density and stiffness in the bony phase, obtained in titanium by means of computer-aided design combined with additive manufacture using selective laser sintering. The chondral phase is obtained by sugar leaching, using a PDMS matrix and sugar as porogen, and is joined to the bony phase during the polymerization of PDMS, therefore avoiding the use of supporting adhesives or additional intermediate layers. The mechanical performance of the construct is biomimetic and the stiffness values of the bony and chondral phases can be tuned to the desired applications, by means of controlled modifications of different parameters. A human mesenchymal stem cell (h-MSC) conditioned medium (CM) is used for improving scaffold response. Cell culture results provide relevant information regarding the viability of the composite scaffolds used. PMID:26652367

  5. The Contribution of Work and Family Roles to Mental Health: An Evaluation of Additive and Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetti, Rena L.

    Rather than ask whether multiple roles, such as employee, wife, and mother, have a protective or harmful effect on women's psychological well being, this study examined the combination of stressors and supports associated with work and family roles. Female clerical workers (N=44) who were married and/or had a child living at home completed…

  6. Thai and Korean Students' Perceptions about the Roles and Functions of School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangdhanakanond, Kamonwan; Lee, Dong Hun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare Thai and Korean college students on their perceptions of the roles and functions of school psychologists. One hundred and ninety-three Thai college students and 238 Korean counterparts participated in this study. Students rated the importance of various roles/functions of a school psychologist and…

  7. The role and functionality of Veterinary Services in food safety throughout the food chain.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, A I; Hathaway, S C

    2006-08-01

    Both national Veterinary Services and international standard-setting organisations have now embraced risk assessment as an essential tool for achieving their goals. Veterinarians have key roles in all aspects of the control of food-borne hazards of animal origin, but additional specialist skills are necessary for assessing, managing and communicating risk. Further, the deployment of Veterinary Services must reflect the multi-functional aspects of public and animal health activities. A generic risk management framework provides a systematic process whereby food safety standards and other measures are chosen and implemented on the basis of knowledge of risk and evaluation of other factors relevant to protecting human health and promoting non-discriminatory trade practices. In this context, a number of countries are exploring new administrative and structural arrangements for competent authorities. The traditional focus of veterinary involvement in food safety has been in meat hygiene at the level of the slaughterhouse. While this role continues, the emerging 'risk-based' approach to food control requires increased involvement in other segments of the meat food chain, as well as other areas such as production of milk and fish. This more extensive role requires a wider skill base and establishment of effective networks with a different range of stakeholders.

  8. Functional role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis as a therapeutic strategy for mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Jun, Heechul; Mohammed Qasim Hussaini, Syed; Rigby, Michael J; Jang, Mi-Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating new neurons from neural stem cells, plays significant roles in synaptic plasticity, memory, and mood regulation. In the mammalian brain, it continues to occur well into adulthood in discrete regions, namely, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its role in the etiology of mental disorders. In addition, adult hippocampal neurogenesis is highly correlated with the remission of the antidepressant effect. In this paper, we discuss three major psychiatric disorders, depression, schizophrenia, and drug addiction, in light of preclinical evidence used in establishing the neurobiological significance of adult neurogenesis. We interpret the significance of these results and pose questions that remain unanswered. Potential treatments which include electroconvulsive therapy, deep brain stimulation, chemical antidepressants, and exercise therapy are discussed. While consensus lacks on specific mechanisms, we highlight evidence which indicates that these treatments may function via an increase in neural progenitor proliferation and changes to the hippocampal circuitry. Establishing a significant role of adult neurogenesis in the pathogenicity of psychiatric disorders may hold the key to potential strategies toward effective treatment.

  9. The Functional Role of Neural Oscillations in Non-Verbal Emotional Communication

    PubMed Central

    Symons, Ashley E.; El-Deredy, Wael; Schwartze, Michael; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2016-01-01

    Effective interpersonal communication depends on the ability to perceive and interpret nonverbal emotional expressions from multiple sensory modalities. Current theoretical models propose that visual and auditory emotion perception involves a network of brain regions including the primary sensory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). However, relatively little is known about how the dynamic interplay between these regions gives rise to the perception of emotions. In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of neural oscillations in mediating neural communication within and between functional neural networks. Here we review studies investigating changes in oscillatory activity during the perception of visual, auditory, and audiovisual emotional expressions, and aim to characterize the functional role of neural oscillations in nonverbal emotion perception. Findings from the reviewed literature suggest that theta band oscillations most consistently differentiate between emotional and neutral expressions. While early theta synchronization appears to reflect the initial encoding of emotionally salient sensory information, later fronto-central theta synchronization may reflect the further integration of sensory information with internal representations. Additionally, gamma synchronization reflects facilitated sensory binding of emotional expressions within regions such as the OFC, STS, and, potentially, the amygdala. However, the evidence is more ambiguous when it comes to the role of oscillations within the alpha and beta frequencies, which vary as a function of modality (or modalities), presence or absence of predictive information, and attentional or task demands. Thus, the synchronization of neural oscillations within specific frequency bands mediates the rapid detection, integration, and evaluation of emotional expressions. Moreover, the functional coupling of oscillatory activity across multiples

  10. The Functional Role of Neural Oscillations in Non-Verbal Emotional Communication.

    PubMed

    Symons, Ashley E; El-Deredy, Wael; Schwartze, Michael; Kotz, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    Effective interpersonal communication depends on the ability to perceive and interpret nonverbal emotional expressions from multiple sensory modalities. Current theoretical models propose that visual and auditory emotion perception involves a network of brain regions including the primary sensory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). However, relatively little is known about how the dynamic interplay between these regions gives rise to the perception of emotions. In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of neural oscillations in mediating neural communication within and between functional neural networks. Here we review studies investigating changes in oscillatory activity during the perception of visual, auditory, and audiovisual emotional expressions, and aim to characterize the functional role of neural oscillations in nonverbal emotion perception. Findings from the reviewed literature suggest that theta band oscillations most consistently differentiate between emotional and neutral expressions. While early theta synchronization appears to reflect the initial encoding of emotionally salient sensory information, later fronto-central theta synchronization may reflect the further integration of sensory information with internal representations. Additionally, gamma synchronization reflects facilitated sensory binding of emotional expressions within regions such as the OFC, STS, and, potentially, the amygdala. However, the evidence is more ambiguous when it comes to the role of oscillations within the alpha and beta frequencies, which vary as a function of modality (or modalities), presence or absence of predictive information, and attentional or task demands. Thus, the synchronization of neural oscillations within specific frequency bands mediates the rapid detection, integration, and evaluation of emotional expressions. Moreover, the functional coupling of oscillatory activity across multiples

  11. On the role of general system theory for functional neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas Enno

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important goals of neuroscience is to establish precise structure–function relationships in the brain. Since the 19th century, a major scientific endeavour has been to associate structurally distinct cortical regions with specific cognitive functions. This was traditionally accomplished by correlating microstructurally defined areas with lesion sites found in patients with specific neuropsychological symptoms. Modern neuroimaging techniques with high spatial resolution have promised an alternative approach, enabling non-invasive measurements of regionally specific changes of brain activity that are correlated with certain components of a cognitive process. Reviewing classic approaches towards brain structure–function relationships that are based on correlational approaches, this article argues that these approaches are not sufficient to provide an understanding of the operational principles of a dynamic system such as the brain but must be complemented by models based on general system theory. These models reflect the connectional structure of the system under investigation and emphasize context-dependent couplings between the system elements in terms of effective connectivity. The usefulness of system models whose parameters are fitted to measured functional imaging data for testing hypotheses about structure–function relationships in the brain and their potential for clinical applications is demonstrated by several empirical examples. PMID:15610393

  12. Functional and pathological roles of the 12- and 15-lipoxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Dobrian, Anca D.; Lieb, David C.; Cole, Banumathi K.; Taylor-Fishwick, David A.; Chakrabarti, Swarup K.; Nadler, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    The 12/15-lipoxygenase enzymes react with fatty acids producing active lipid metabolites that are involved in a number of significant disease states. The latter include type 1 and type 2 diabetes (and associated complications), cardiovascular disease, hypertension, renal disease, and the neurological conditions Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. A number of elegant studies over the last thirty years have contributed to unraveling the role that lipoxygenases play in chronic inflammation. The development of animal models with targeted gene deletions has led to a better understanding of the role that lipoxygenases play in various conditions. Selective inhibitors of the different lipoxygenase isoforms are an active area of investigation, and will be both an important research tool and a promising therapeutic target for treating a wide spectrum of human diseases. PMID:20970452

  13. The addition of functional task-oriented mental practice to conventional physical therapy improves motor skills in daily functions after stroke*

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.; Tierra-Criollo, Carlos J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental practice (MP) is a cognitive strategy which may improve the acquisition of motor skills and functional performance of athletes and individuals with neurological injuries. Objective To determine whether an individualized, specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional physical therapy (PT), promoted better learning of motor skills in daily functions in individuals with chronic stroke (13±6.5 months post-stroke). Method Nine individuals with stable mild and moderate upper limb impairments participated, by employing an A1-B-A2 single-case design. Phases A1 and A2 included one month of conventional PT, and phase B the addition of MP training to PT. The motor activity log (MAL-Brazil) was used to assess the amount of use (AOU) and quality of movement (QOM) of the paretic upper limb; the revised motor imagery questionnaire (MIQ-RS) to assess the abilities in kinesthetic and visual motor imagery; the Minnesota manual dexterity test to assess manual dexterity; and gait speed to assess mobility. Results After phase A1, no significant changes were observed for any of the outcome measures. However, after phase B, significant improvements were observed for the MAL, AOU and QOM scores (p<0.0001), and MIQ-RS kinesthetic and visual scores (p=0.003; p=0.007, respectively). The significant gains in manual dexterity (p=0.002) and gait speed (p=0.019) were maintained after phase A2. Conclusions Specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional PT, led to improvements in motor imagery abilities combined with increases in the AOU and QOM in daily functions, manual dexterity, and gait speed. PMID:24271094

  14. Functional Role of Neural Injury in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Saboisky, Julian P.; Butler, Jane E.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Eckert, Danny J.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are multifactorial. Neural injury affecting the upper airway muscles due to repetitive exposure to intermittent hypoxia and/or mechanical strain resulting from snoring and recurrent upper airway closure have been proposed to contribute to OSA disease progression. Multiple studies have demonstrated altered sensory and motor function in patients with OSA using a variety of neurophysiological and histological approaches. However, the extent to which the alterations contribute to impairments in upper airway muscle function, and thus OSA disease progression, remains uncertain. This brief review, primarily focused on data in humans, summarizes: (1) the evidence for upper airway sensorimotor injury in OSA and (2) current understanding of how these changes affect upper airway function and their potential to change OSA progression. Some unresolved questions including possible treatment targets are noted. PMID:22715333

  15. Role of FTO in Adipocyte Development and Function: Recent Insights

    PubMed Central

    Merkestein, Myrte; Sellayah, Dyan

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, FTO was identified as the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) gene associated with obesity in humans. Since then, various animal models have served to establish the mechanistic basis behind this association. Many earlier studies focussed on FTO's effects on food intake via central mechanisms. Emerging evidence, however, implicates adipose tissue development and function in the causal relationship between perturbations in FTO expression and obesity. The purpose of this mini review is to shed light on these new studies of FTO function in adipose tissue and present a clearer picture of its impact on obesity susceptibility. PMID:26788058

  16. Toward Additive-Free Small-Molecule Organic Solar Cells: Roles of the Donor Crystallization Pathway and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abdelsamie, Maged; Treat, Neil D; Zhao, Kui; McDowell, Caitlin; Burgers, Mark A; Li, Ruipeng; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Stingelin, Natalie; Bazan, Guillermo C; Amassian, Aram

    2015-12-01

    The ease with which small-molecule donors crystallize during solution processing is directly linked to the need for solvent additives. Donor molecules that get trapped in disordered (H1) or liquid crystalline (T1) mesophases require additive processing to promote crystallization, phase separation, and efficient light harvesting. A donor material (X2) that crystallizes directly from solution yields additive-free solar cells with an efficiency of 7.6%.

  17. Parenting and Adolescent Adjustment: The Role of Parental Reflective Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbassat, Naomi; Priel, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Reflective function (RF) is the capacity to reflect on one's own mental experiences and those of others. This study examined the relationship between parental RF and adolescent adjustment. One hundred and five adolescents, aged 14-18, and their mothers and fathers were interviewed and completed questionnaires during home visits. We measured…

  18. The Role of Family Functioning in Bipolar Disorder in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Findling, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Investigated the association between family functioning and conflict and their links with mood disorder in parents and with children's risk for bipolar disorder. Participants were 272 families with a child between the ages of 5-17 years. Parents' history of psychiatric diagnoses and children's current diagnoses were obtained via semi-structured…

  19. The Role of Functional Form in Causal-Based Categorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehder, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments tested how the "functional form" of the causal relations that link features of categories affects category-based inferences. Whereas "independent causes" can each bring about an effect by themselves, "conjunctive causes" all need to be present for an effect to occur. The causal model view of category…

  20. Emotion Understanding in Preschool Children: The Role of Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Eva Costa; Osório, Ana; Veríssimo, Manuela; Martins, Carla

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at studying the relations between executive functions (EFs) and categorical emotion understanding while controlling for preschoolers' IQ, language ability and theory of mind (ToM). Specifically, we wanted to analyse the association between emotion understanding and set shifting, due to the lack of studies with this EF.…

  1. Functional role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Munehisa, Yoshiko; Koyama, Takashi; Nobori, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2007-10-05

    We investigated the functional role of STIM1, a Ca{sup 2+} sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that regulates store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). STIM1 was mainly localized at the ER and plasma membrane. The knockdown of STIM1 expression by small interfering (si) RNA drastically decreased SOCE. In contrast, an EF-hand mutant of STIM1, STIM1{sup E87A}, produced a marked increase in SOCE, which was abolished by co-transfection with siRNA to transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). In addition, transfection with siRNA against STIM1 suppressed phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and cell growth. These results suggest that STIM1 is an essential component of SOCE and that it is involved in VSMC proliferation.

  2. Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices Regarding the Role of Executive Functions in Reading and Arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Shirley; Rubinsten, Orly; Katzir, Tami

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated early elementary school teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding the role of Executive Functions (EFs) in reading and arithmetic. A new research questionnaire was developed and judged by professionals in the academia and the field. Reponses were obtained from 144 teachers from Israel. Factor analysis divided the questionnaire into three valid and reliable subscales, reflecting (1) beliefs regarding the contribution of EFs to reading and arithmetic, (2) pedagogical practices, and (3) a connection between the cognitive mechanisms of reading and arithmetic. Findings indicate that teachers believe EFs affect students’ performance in reading and arithmetic. These beliefs were also correlated with pedagogical practices. Additionally, special education teachers’ scored higher on the different subscales compared to general education teachers. These findings shed light on the way teachers perceive the cognitive foundations of reading and arithmetic and indicate to which extent these perceptions guide their teaching practices. PMID:27799917

  3. Functional roles of the thalamus for language capacities

    PubMed Central

    Klostermann, Fabian; Krugel, Lea K.; Ehlen, Felicitas

    2013-01-01

    Early biological concepts of language were predominantly corticocentric, but over the last decades biolinguistic research, equipped with new technical possibilities, has drastically changed this view. To date, connectionist models, conceiving linguistic skills as corticobasal network activities, dominate our understanding of the neural basis of language. However, beyond the notion of an involvement of the thalamus and, in most cases also, the basal ganglia (BG) in linguistic operations, specific functions of the respective depth structures mostly remain rather controversial. In this review, some of these issues shall be discussed, particularly the functional configuration of basal network components and the language specificity of subcortical supporting activity. Arguments will be provided for a primarily cortico-thalamic language network. In this view, the thalamus does not engage in proper linguistic operations, but rather acts as a central monitor for language-specific cortical activities, supported by the BG in both perceptual and productive language execution. PMID:23882191

  4. The Role of Sleep in Emotional Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Andrea N.; Walker, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly emerging evidence continues to describe an intimate and causal relationship between sleep and emotional brain function. These findings are mirrored by longstanding clinical observations demonstrating that nearly all mood and anxiety disorders co-occur with one or more sleep abnormalities. This review aims to (1) provide a synthesis of recent findings describing the emotional brain and behavioral benefits triggered by sleep, and conversely, the detrimental impairments following a lack of sleep, (2) outline a proposed framework in which sleep, and specifically rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, supports a process of affective brain homeostasis, optimally preparing the organism for next-day social and emotional functioning, and (3) describe how this hypothesized framework can explain the prevalent relationships between sleep and psychiatric disorders, with a particular focus on post-traumatic stress disorder and major depression. PMID:24499013

  5. Aging of the Planning Process: The Role of Executive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorel, Olivier; Pennequin, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This study tested whether the aging of executive functioning is linked to the decline in planning performance. Participants were divided into three groups: group 1 composed of 15 adults with a mean age of 22.7 years, group 2 composed of 15 adults with a mean age of 68.1 years and group 3 composed of 16 adults with a mean age of 78.75 years. Each…

  6. Regulatory Roles of Fluctuation-Driven Mechanotransduction in Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Imsirovic, Jasmin; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2016-09-01

    Cells in the body are exposed to irregular mechanical stimuli. Here, we review the so-called fluctuation-driven mechanotransduction in which stresses stretching cells vary on a cycle-by-cycle basis. We argue that such mechanotransduction is an emergent network phenomenon and offer several potential mechanisms of how it regulates cell function. Several examples from the vasculature, the lung, and tissue engineering are discussed. We conclude with a list of important open questions. PMID:27511461

  7. Determining firms׳ utility functions and competitive roles from data on market shares using Lotka–Volterra models

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, A.; Picucci, A.; Romano, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we include data on historical and estimated market shares of two markets. In particular, we include annual data on the market shares of the Japanese beer market (1963–2000) and biannual data on the market shares of the mobile phones market in Greece (1998–2007). In addition, we estimate monthly data on market shares for both markets. We show how this data can be used to derive firms’ utility functions and their competitive roles. PMID:27054182

  8. Determining firms׳ utility functions and competitive roles from data on market shares using Lotka-Volterra models.

    PubMed

    Marasco, A; Picucci, A; Romano, A

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we include data on historical and estimated market shares of two markets. In particular, we include annual data on the market shares of the Japanese beer market (1963-2000) and biannual data on the market shares of the mobile phones market in Greece (1998-2007). In addition, we estimate monthly data on market shares for both markets. We show how this data can be used to derive firms' utility functions and their competitive roles.

  9. Determining firms׳ utility functions and competitive roles from data on market shares using Lotka-Volterra models.

    PubMed

    Marasco, A; Picucci, A; Romano, A

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we include data on historical and estimated market shares of two markets. In particular, we include annual data on the market shares of the Japanese beer market (1963-2000) and biannual data on the market shares of the mobile phones market in Greece (1998-2007). In addition, we estimate monthly data on market shares for both markets. We show how this data can be used to derive firms' utility functions and their competitive roles. PMID:27054182

  10. Functional analysis of centipede development supports roles for Wnt genes in posterior development and segment generation.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Luke; Schlosser, Gerhard; Arthur, Wallace

    2015-01-01

    The genes of the Wnt family play important and highly conserved roles in posterior growth and development in a wide range of animal taxa. Wnt genes also operate in arthropod segmentation, and there has been much recent debate regarding the relationship between arthropod and vertebrate segmentation mechanisms. Due to its phylogenetic position, body form, and possession of many (11) Wnt genes, the centipede Strigamia maritima is a useful system with which to examine these issues. This study takes a functional approach based on treatment with lithium chloride, which causes ubiquitous activation of canonical Wnt signalling. This is the first functional developmental study performed in any of the 15,000 species of the arthropod subphylum Myriapoda. The expression of all 11 Wnt genes in Strigamia was analyzed in relation to posterior development. Three of these genes, Wnt11, Wnt5, and WntA, were strongly expressed in the posterior region and, thus, may play important roles in posterior developmental processes. In support of this hypothesis, LiCl treatment of S. maritima embryos was observed to produce posterior developmental defects and perturbations in AbdB and Delta expression. The effects of LiCl differ depending on the developmental stage treated, with more severe effects elicited by treatment during germband formation than by treatment at later stages. These results support a role for Wnt signalling in conferring posterior identity in Strigamia. In addition, data from this study are consistent with the hypothesis of segmentation based on a "clock and wavefront" mechanism operating in this species.

  11. Role of the Contralesional Hemisphere in Post-Stroke Recovery of Upper Extremity Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Buetefisch, Cathrin M.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of optimal treatment strategies to improve recovery is limited by the incomplete understanding of the neurobiological principles of recovery. Motor cortex (M1) reorganization of the lesioned hemisphere (ipsilesional M1) plays a major role in post-stroke motor recovery and is a primary target for rehabilitation therapy. Reorganization of M1 in the hemisphere contralateral to the stroke (contralesional M1) may, however, serve as an additional source of cortical reorganization and related recovery. The extent and outcome of such reorganization depends on many factors, including lesion size and time since stroke. In the chronic phase post-stroke, contralesional M1 seems to interfere with motor function of the paretic limb in a subset of patients, possibly through abnormally increased inhibition of lesioned M1 by the contralesional M1. In such patients, decreasing contralesional M1 excitability by cortical stimulation results in improved performance of the paretic limb. However, emerging evidence suggests a potentially supportive role of contralesional M1. After infarction of M1 or its corticospinal projections, there is abnormally increased excitatory neural activity and activation in contralesional M1 that correlates with favorable motor recovery. Decreasing contralesional M1 excitability in these patients may result in deterioration of paretic limb performance. In animal stroke models, reorganizational changes in contralesional M1 depend on the lesion size and rehabilitation treatment and include long-term changes in neurotransmitter systems, dendritic growth, and synapse formation. While there is, therefore, some evidence that activity in contralesional M1 will impact the extent of motor function of the paretic limb in the subacute and chronic phase post-stroke and may serve as a new target for rehabilitation treatment strategies, the precise factors that specifically influence its role in the recovery process remain to be defined. PMID:26528236

  12. Functional analysis of centipede development supports roles for Wnt genes in posterior development and segment generation.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Luke; Schlosser, Gerhard; Arthur, Wallace

    2015-01-01

    The genes of the Wnt family play important and highly conserved roles in posterior growth and development in a wide range of animal taxa. Wnt genes also operate in arthropod segmentation, and there has been much recent debate regarding the relationship between arthropod and vertebrate segmentation mechanisms. Due to its phylogenetic position, body form, and possession of many (11) Wnt genes, the centipede Strigamia maritima is a useful system with which to examine these issues. This study takes a functional approach based on treatment with lithium chloride, which causes ubiquitous activation of canonical Wnt signalling. This is the first functional developmental study performed in any of the 15,000 species of the arthropod subphylum Myriapoda. The expression of all 11 Wnt genes in Strigamia was analyzed in relation to posterior development. Three of these genes, Wnt11, Wnt5, and WntA, were strongly expressed in the posterior region and, thus, may play important roles in posterior developmental processes. In support of this hypothesis, LiCl treatment of S. maritima embryos was observed to produce posterior developmental defects and perturbations in AbdB and Delta expression. The effects of LiCl differ depending on the developmental stage treated, with more severe effects elicited by treatment during germband formation than by treatment at later stages. These results support a role for Wnt signalling in conferring posterior identity in Strigamia. In addition, data from this study are consistent with the hypothesis of segmentation based on a "clock and wavefront" mechanism operating in this species. PMID:25627713

  13. The important role of epidermal triacylglycerol metabolism for maintenance of the skin permeability barrier function.

    PubMed

    Radner, Franz P W; Fischer, Judith

    2014-03-01

    Survival in a terrestrial, dry environment necessitates a permeability barrier for regulated permeation of water and electrolytes in the cornified layer of the skin (the stratum corneum) to minimize desiccation of the body. This barrier is formed during cornification and involves a cross-linking of corneocyte proteins as well as an extensive remodeling of lipids. The cleavage of precursor lipids from lamellar bodies by various hydrolytic enzymes generates ceramides, cholesterol, and non-esterified fatty acids for the extracellular lipid lamellae in the stratum corneum. However, the important role of epidermal triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism during formation of a functional permeability barrier in the skin was only recently discovered. Humans with mutations in the ABHD5/CGI-58 (α/β hydrolase domain containing protein 5, also known as comparative gene identification-58, CGI-58) gene suffer from a defect in TAG catabolism that causes neutral lipid storage disease with ichthyosis. In addition, mice with deficiencies in genes involved in TAG catabolism (Abhd5/Cgi-58 knock-out mice) or TAG synthesis (acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2, Dgat2 knock-out mice) also develop severe skin permeability barrier dysfunctions and die soon after birth due to increased dehydration. As a result of these defects in epidermal TAG metabolism, humans and mice lack ω-(O)-acylceramides, which leads to malformation of the cornified lipid envelope of the skin. In healthy skin, this epidermal structure provides an interface for the linkage of lamellar membranes with corneocyte proteins to maintain permeability barrier homeostasis. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in epidermal neutral lipid metabolism and the generation of a functional skin permeability barrier. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous

  14. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration.

  15. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F.; Gomez, Marcus V.; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration. PMID:25724498

  16. New roles for “old” microRNAs in nervous system function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Marion; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C.

    2013-01-01

    Since their discovery, microRNAs became prominent candidates providing missing links on how to explain the developmental and phenotypical variation within one species or among different species. In addition, microRNAs were implicated in diseases such as neurodegeneration and cancer. More recently, the regulation of animal behavior was shown to be influenced by microRNAs. In spite of their numerous functions, only a few microRNAs were discovered by using classic genetic approaches. Due to the very mild or redundant phenotypes of most microRNAs or their genomic location within introns of other genes many regulatory microRNAs were missed. In this review, we focus on three microRNAs first identified in a forward genetic screen in invertebrates for their essential function in animal development, namely bantam, let-7, and miR-279. All three are essential for survival, are not located in introns of other genes, and are highly conserved among species. We highlight their important functions in the nervous system and discuss their emerging roles, especially during nervous system disease and behavior. PMID:24399929

  17. Diverse Roles of Axonemal Dyneins in Drosophila Auditory Neuron Function and Mechanical Amplification in Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Karak, Somdatta; Jacobs, Julie S.; Kittelmann, Maike; Spalthoff, Christian; Katana, Radoslaw; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Schon, Michael A.; Kernan, Maurice J.; Eberl, Daniel F.; Göpfert, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Much like vertebrate hair cells, the chordotonal sensory neurons that mediate hearing in Drosophila are motile and amplify the mechanical input of the ear. Because the neurons bear mechanosensory primary cilia whose microtubule axonemes display dynein arms, we hypothesized that their motility is powered by dyneins. Here, we describe two axonemal dynein proteins that are required for Drosophila auditory neuron function, localize to their primary cilia, and differently contribute to mechanical amplification in hearing. Promoter fusions revealed that the two axonemal dynein genes Dmdnah3 (=CG17150) and Dmdnai2 (=CG6053) are expressed in chordotonal neurons, including the auditory ones in the fly’s ear. Null alleles of both dyneins equally abolished electrical auditory neuron responses, yet whereas mutations in Dmdnah3 facilitated mechanical amplification, amplification was abolished by mutations in Dmdnai2. Epistasis analysis revealed that Dmdnah3 acts downstream of Nan-Iav channels in controlling the amplificatory gain. Dmdnai2, in addition to being required for amplification, was essential for outer dynein arms in auditory neuron cilia. This establishes diverse roles of axonemal dyneins in Drosophila auditory neuron function and links auditory neuron motility to primary cilia and axonemal dyneins. Mutant defects in sperm competition suggest that both dyneins also function in sperm motility. PMID:26608786

  18. Diverse Roles of Axonemal Dyneins in Drosophila Auditory Neuron Function and Mechanical Amplification in Hearing.

    PubMed

    Karak, Somdatta; Jacobs, Julie S; Kittelmann, Maike; Spalthoff, Christian; Katana, Radoslaw; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Schon, Michael A; Kernan, Maurice J; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C

    2015-11-26

    Much like vertebrate hair cells, the chordotonal sensory neurons that mediate hearing in Drosophila are motile and amplify the mechanical input of the ear. Because the neurons bear mechanosensory primary cilia whose microtubule axonemes display dynein arms, we hypothesized that their motility is powered by dyneins. Here, we describe two axonemal dynein proteins that are required for Drosophila auditory neuron function, localize to their primary cilia, and differently contribute to mechanical amplification in hearing. Promoter fusions revealed that the two axonemal dynein genes Dmdnah3 (=CG17150) and Dmdnai2 (=CG6053) are expressed in chordotonal neurons, including the auditory ones in the fly's ear. Null alleles of both dyneins equally abolished electrical auditory neuron responses, yet whereas mutations in Dmdnah3 facilitated mechanical amplification, amplification was abolished by mutations in Dmdnai2. Epistasis analysis revealed that Dmdnah3 acts downstream of Nan-Iav channels in controlling the amplificatory gain. Dmdnai2, in addition to being required for amplification, was essential for outer dynein arms in auditory neuron cilia. This establishes diverse roles of axonemal dyneins in Drosophila auditory neuron function and links auditory neuron motility to primary cilia and axonemal dyneins. Mutant defects in sperm competition suggest that both dyneins also function in sperm motility.

  19. Multiple Roles, Multiple Lives: The Protective Effects of Role Responsibilities on the Health Functioning of African American Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Black, Angela Rose; Murry, Velma McBride; Cutrona, Carolyn E.; Chen, Yi-fu

    2009-01-01

    Using data from 747 rural African American mothers, this study incorporated Role Accumulation theory to test direct and indirect effects of stressors, coping behaviors, and role responsibilities on health functioning. Results indicated that demands emerging from financial strain were related to compromised mental health and decreases in mothers' use of effective coping strategies and role responsibility engagement. Conversely, mothers who effectively responded to stressors and fulfilled responsibilities to their children and communities experienced enhanced mental health, which in turn promoted optimal physical health. The results can inform research and intervention with African American women. PMID:19533507

  20. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L; Remmers, Elaine F; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina I; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  1. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J.; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D.; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L.; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  2. Re(de)fining the orthographic neighborhood: the role of addition and deletion neighbors in lexical decision and reading.

    PubMed

    Davis, Colin J; Perea, Manuel; Acha, Joana

    2009-10-01

    The influence of addition and deletion neighbors on visual word identification was investigated in four experiments. Experiments 1 and 2 used Spanish stimuli. In Experiment 1, lexical decision latencies were slower and less accurate for words and nonwords with higher-frequency deletion neighbors (e.g., jugar in juzgar), relative to control stimuli. Experiment 2 showed a similar interference effect for words and nonwords with higher-frequency addition neighbors (e.g., conejo, which has the addition neighbor consejo), relative to control stimuli. Experiment 3 replicated this addition neighbor interference effect in a lexical decision experiment with English stimuli. Across all three experiments, interference effects were always evident for addition/deletion neighbors with word-outer overlap, usually present for those with word-initial overlap, but never present for those with word-final overlap. Experiment 4 replicated the addition/deletion neighbor inhibitory effects in a Spanish sentence reading task in which the participants' eye movements were monitored. These findings suggest that conventional orthographic neighborhood metrics should be redefined. In addition to its methodological implications, this conclusion has significant theoretical implications for input coding schemes and the mechanisms underlying word recognition. PMID:19803656

  3. The role of control functions in mentalizing: dual-task studies of theory of mind and executive function.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rebecca; Phillips, Louise H; Conway, Claire A

    2008-05-01

    Conflicting evidence has arisen from correlational studies regarding the role of executive control functions in Theory of Mind. The current study used dual-task manipulations of executive functions (inhibition, updating and switching) to investigate the role of these control functions in mental state and non-mental state tasks. The 'Eyes' pictorial test of Theory of Mind showed specific dual-task costs when concurrently performed with an inhibitory secondary task. In contrast, interference effects on a verbal 'Stories' task were general, occurring on both mental state and non-mental state tasks, and across all types of executive function. These findings from healthy functioning adults should help to guide decisions about appropriate methods of assessing ToM in clinical populations, and interpreting deficits in performance in such tasks in the context of more general cognitive dysfunction.

  4. Functional role of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vpu.

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, E F; Cohen, E A; Lu, Y C; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of vpu in the replication and cytopathicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), infectious proviruses were constructed that were isogenic except for the ability to produce the protein product of vpu. The vpu-encoded protein is shown to decrease the rate of syncytium formation and cell killing in infected CD4+ human T cells, to increase greatly the export of virus particles from infected cells, and to reduce the rate of accumulation of cell-associated viral proteins. The vpu protein complements in trans the defect in a vpu- HIV-1 provirus but does not affect the simian immunodeficiency virus, which lacks vpu. These observations suggest that vpu may contribute to the AIDS epidemic by increasing the transmission efficiency of the virus. Images PMID:2472639

  5. Diabetes and mitochondrial function: Role of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M. . E-mail: palmeira@ci.uc.pt

    2006-04-15

    Hyperglycemia resulting from uncontrolled glucose regulation is widely recognized as the causal link between diabetes and diabetic complications. Four major molecular mechanisms have been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced tissue damage: activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms via de novo synthesis of the lipid second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG), increased hexosamine pathway flux, increased advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, and increased polyol pathway flux. Hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of superoxide is the causal link between high glucose and the pathways responsible for hyperglycemic damage. In fact, diabetes is typically accompanied by increased production of free radicals and/or impaired antioxidant defense capabilities, indicating a central contribution for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the onset, progression, and pathological consequences of diabetes. Besides oxidative stress, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated a link between various disturbances in mitochondrial functioning and type 2 diabetes. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and decreases in mtDNA copy number have been linked to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The study of the relationship of mtDNA to type 2 diabetes has revealed the influence of the mitochondria on nuclear-encoded glucose transporters, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and nuclear-encoded uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in {beta}-cell glucose toxicity. This review focuses on a range of mitochondrial factors important in the pathogenesis of diabetes. We review the published literature regarding the direct effects of hyperglycemia on mitochondrial function and suggest the possibility of regulation of mitochondrial function at a transcriptional level in response to hyperglycemia. The main goal of this review is to include a fresh consideration of pathways involved in hyperglycemia-induced diabetic complications.

  6. Role of Vitamin C in the Function of the Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, has long been known to participate in several important functions in the vascular bed in support of endothelial cells. These functions include increasing the synthesis and deposition of type IV collagen in the basement membrane, stimulating endothelial proliferation, inhibiting apoptosis, scavenging radical species, and sparing endothelial cell-derived nitric oxide to help modulate blood flow. Although ascorbate may not be able to reverse inflammatory vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, it may well play a role in preventing the endothelial dysfunction that is the earliest sign of many such diseases. Recent Advances: Beyond simply preventing scurvy, evidence is mounting that ascorbate is required for optimal function of many dioxygenase enzymes in addition to those involved in collagen synthesis. Several of these enzymes regulate the transcription of proteins involved in endothelial function, proliferation, and survival, including hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and histone and DNA demethylases. More recently, ascorbate has been found to acutely tighten the endothelial permeability barrier and, thus, may modulate access of ascorbate and other molecules into tissues and organs. Critical Issues: The issue of the optimal cellular content of ascorbate remains unresolved, but it appears that low millimolar ascorbate concentrations are normal in most animal tissues, in human leukocytes, and probably in the endothelium. Although there may be little benefit of increasing near maximal cellular ascorbate concentrations in normal people, many diseases and conditions have either systemic or localized cellular ascorbate deficiency as a cause for endothelial dysfunction, including early atherosclerosis, sepsis, smoking, and diabetes. Future Directions: A key focus for future studies of ascorbate and the vascular endothelium will likely be to determine the mechanisms and clinical relevance of ascorbate effects on endothelial

  7. The role of stratotypes in stratigraphy. Part 1. Stratotype functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Stephen L.

    2005-03-01

    Because our concepts of various "natural" geological events and entities are always subject to modification with new data, we must provide a principled answer to the question: "How much can the scope of a stratigraphic or temporal unit change and yet still be called by the same name?" This issue is clarified by noting that stratotypes have three distinct functions in stratigraphy—the boundary-defining, example-providing, and name-bearing functions. Suggested names to denote these functions are "boundary-defining stratotype" (including unit- and boundary stratotypes), "exemplary stratotype," and "nominal stratotype." The analogy between type specimens in biology and type sections in stratigraphy is valid for nominal and exemplary stratotypes, but invalid for boundary-defining stratotypes. The terms boundary-defining, exemplary, and nominal refer to the functions performed by a given stratotype, whereas the terms holo-, para-, lecto-, neo-, and hypostratotype refer mainly to the historical circumstances under which a given stratotype is designated. Unit- and boundary stratotypes delimit an author's concept of the boundaries of a given stratigraphic entity in a particular section at a given time, but generally cannot be expected to permanently fix those boundaries. Important exceptions are the strict boundary stratotypes known as Global Stratotype Sections and Points (GSSPs). Exemplary stratotypes serve as examples of an author's concept of a given stratigraphic entity, but neither define nor constrain the boundaries of that entity. Nominal stratotypes constrain, but do not define the boundaries of a stratigraphic entity. They are divided into "loose" and "strict" subcategories, the former being appropriate for lithostratigraphic units, the latter for biochronologic units with geographic names. Both kinds of nominal stratotypes are also relevant to standard global chronostratigraphy. The designation of boundary-defining stratotypes for biostratigraphic units with

  8. The Historical Role of the Production Function in Economics and Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David; Vaughan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The production function explains a basic technological relationship between scarce resources, or inputs, and output. This paper offers a brief overview of the historical significance and operational role of the production function in business and economics. The origin and development of this function over time is initially explored. Several…

  9. Aging of the planning process: the role of executive functioning.

    PubMed

    Sorel, Olivier; Pennequin, Valérie

    2008-03-01

    This study tested whether the aging of executive functioning is linked to the decline in planning performance. Participants were divided into three groups: group 1 composed of 15 adults with a mean age of 22.7 years, group 2 composed of 15 adults with a mean age of 68.1 years and group 3 composed of 16 adults with a mean age of 78.75 years. Each participant took tests for shifting, inhibition, updating and processing speed. Planning was evaluated by the Tower of Hanoi task with 3 and 4 disks. Analyses of variance showed a main age effect on the many executive functioning and planning measures assessed. Analyses of regression indicated that combined processing speed and shifting accounted for 58.33% of performance on the 3-disk version, while processing speed accounted for only 36.86% of performance on the 4-disk version. These results are discussed in relation to two levels of the planning process: formulation and execution. PMID:17884265

  10. Cytosolic phospholipase A2: physiological function and role in disease

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Christina C.

    2015-01-01

    The group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2) family is comprised of six intracellular enzymes (GIVA, -B, -C, -D, -E, and -F) commonly referred to as cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2)α, -β, -γ, -δ, -ε, and -ζ. They contain a Ser-Asp catalytic dyad and all except cPLA2γ have a C2 domain, but differences in their catalytic activities and subcellular localization suggest unique regulation and function. With the exception of cPLA2α, the focus of this review, little is known about the in vivo function of group IV enzymes. cPLA2α catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids to arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids that are precursors of numerous bioactive lipids. The regulation of cPLA2α is complex, involving transcriptional and posttranslational processes, particularly increases in calcium and phosphorylation. cPLA2α is a highly conserved widely expressed enzyme that promotes lipid mediator production in human and rodent cells from a variety of tissues. The diverse bioactive lipids produced as a result of cPLA2α activation regulate normal physiological processes and disease pathogenesis in many organ systems, as shown using cPLA2α KO mice. However, humans recently identified with cPLA2α deficiency exhibit more pronounced effects on health than observed in mice lacking cPLA2α, indicating that much remains to be learned about this interesting enzyme. PMID:25838312

  11. Role of Partner Novelty in Sexual Functioning: A Review.

    PubMed

    Morton, Heather; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    This review investigates whether sexual desire and arousal decline in response to partner familiarity, increase in response to partner novelty, and show differential responding in men and women. These questions were considered through the perspective of two leading evolutionary theories regarding human mating strategies: sexual strategies theory and attachment fertility theory. The hypotheses emerging from these theories were evaluated through a critical analysis of several areas of research including habituation of arousal to erotic stimuli, preferences regarding number of sexual partners, the effect of long-term monogamous relationships on sexual arousal and desire, and prevalence and risk factors associated with extradyadic behavior. The current literature best supports the predictions made by sexual strategies theory in that sexual functioning has evolved to promote short-term mating. Sexual arousal and desire appear to decrease in response to partner familiarity and increase in response to partner novelty in men and women. Evidence to date suggests this effect may be greater in men. PMID:25222339

  12. Hantaviral Proteins: Structure, Functions, and Role in Hantavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muyangwa, Musalwa; Martynova, Ekaterina V.; Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Morzunov, Sergey P.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    Hantaviruses are the members of the family Bunyaviridae that are naturally maintained in the populations of small mammals, mostly rodents. Most of these viruses can easily infect humans through contact with aerosols or dust generated by contaminated animal waste products. Depending on the particular Hantavirus involved, human infection could result in either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome or in Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. In the past few years, clinical cases of the Hantavirus caused diseases have been on the rise. Understanding structure of the Hantavirus genome and the functions of the key viral proteins are critical for the therapeutic agents’ research. This paper gives a brief overview of the current knowledge on the structure and properties of the Hantavirus nucleoprotein and the glycoproteins. PMID:26640463

  13. The role of functional neuroimaging in the neuropsychology of depression.

    PubMed

    Liotti, M; Mayberg, H S

    2001-02-01

    Depressed individuals show impaired performance in tests of attention and concentration. They also exhibit PET resting state abnormalities in dorsal prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate, regions known to be substrates of attentional processing in healthy individuals. This chapter outlines a strategy to study neuropsychological mechanisms in emotional disorders using functional imaging methods. It reviews evidence strongly implicating the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, particularly in the right hemisphere, as a key brain structure in emotion/cognition interactions in negative mood states. It will be argued that this neocortical region is a crucial convergence zone, being the substrate of sustained attention to the external environment, and the main target of limbic-cortical influences during changes in mood state across health and disease.

  14. [Arterial baroreflex--physiological role and assessment of functioning].

    PubMed

    Tkaczyszyn, Michał; Rydlewska, Agnieszka; Ponikowska, Beata; Borodulin-Nadzieja, Ludmiła; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2013-08-01

    Arterial baroreflex is one of the key mechanisms responsible for the homeostasis maintenance within the cardiovascular system. Through the modulation of sympathetic and parasympathetic drive within the autonomic nervous system, baroreflex enables to stabilize arterial blood pressure and maintain perfusion within critical organs (e.g. brain, heart). This review provides the physiological background of the baroreflex functioning and describes the methodology for assessing the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Decreased BRS reflects autonomic imbalance and predicts unfavorable outcome in cardiovascular diseases accompanied by the autonomic dysfunction, such as arterial hypertension and heart failure. BRS assessment methods can be divided into those that are performed in resting conditions (the measurements of spontaneous BRS, e.g. the sequence or spectral analysis method) and methods with the application of the external stimuli, which may be either non-invasive (e.g. the controlled breathing method) or invasive (e.g. the phenylephrine method). PMID:24052991

  15. Role of mitochondrial function in cell death and body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the key players in apoptosis and necrosis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted r0 cells were resistant to diverse apoptosis inducers such as TNF-alpha, TNFSF10, staurosporine and p53. Apoptosis resistance was accompanied by the absence of mitochondrial potential loss or cytochrome c translocation. r0 cells were also resistant to necrosis induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) donors due to upregulation of antioxidant enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase. Mitochondria also has a close relationship with autophagy that plays a critical role in the turnover of senescent organelles or dysfunctional proteins and may be included in 'cell death' category. It was demonstrated that autophagy deficiency in insulin target tissues such as skeletal muscle induces mitochondrial stress response, which leads to the induction of FGF21 as a 'mitokine' and affects the whole body metabolism. These results show that mitochondria are not simply the power plants of cells generating ATP, but are closely related to several types of cell death and autophagy. Mitochondria affect various pathophysiological events related to diverse disorders such as cancer, metabolic disorders and aging. PMID:27100503

  16. Role of quantity of additional food to predators as a control in predator-prey systems with relevance to pest management and biological conservation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasu, P D N; Prasad, B S R V

    2011-10-01

    Necessity to understand the role of additional food as a tool in biological control programs is being increasingly felt, particularly due to its eco-friendly nature. A thorough mathematical analysis in this direction revealed the vital role of quality and quantity of the additional food in the controllability of the predator-prey systems. In this article controllability of the additional food--provided predator-prey system is studied from perspectives of pest eradication and biological conservation. Time optimal paths have been constructed to drive the state of the system to a desired terminal state by choosing quantity of the additional food as control variable. The theory developed in this article has been illustrated by solving problems related to pest eradication and biological conservation.

  17. A γ-Secretase Independent Role for Presenilin in Calcium Homeostasis Impacts Mitochondrial Function and Morphology in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sarasija, Shaarika; Norman, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the presenilin (PSEN) encoding genes (PSEN1 and PSEN2) occur in most early onset familial Alzheimer's Disease. Despite the identification of the involvement of PSEN in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) ∼20 years ago, the underlying role of PSEN in AD is not fully understood. To gain insight into the biological function of PSEN, we investigated the role of the PSEN homolog SEL-12 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using genetic, cell biological, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that mutations in sel-12 result in defects in calcium homeostasis, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, consistent with mammalian PSEN, we provide evidence that SEL-12 has a critical role in mediating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium release. Furthermore, we found that in SEL-12-deficient animals, calcium transfer from the ER to the mitochondria leads to fragmentation of the mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, we show that the impact that SEL-12 has on mitochondrial function is independent of its role in Notch signaling, γ-secretase proteolytic activity, and amyloid plaques. Our results reveal a critical role for PSEN in mediating mitochondrial function by regulating calcium transfer from the ER to the mitochondria.

  18. The role of chromatin in adenoviral vector function.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen M; McFall, Emily R; Burns, Joseph K; Parks, Robin J

    2013-06-01

    Vectors based on adenovirus (Ad) are one of the most commonly utilized platforms for gene delivery to cells in molecular biology studies and in gene therapy applications. Ad is also the most popular vector system in human clinical gene therapy trials, largely due to its advantageous characteristics such as high cloning capacity (up to 36 kb), ability to infect a wide variety of cell types and tissues, and relative safety due to it remaining episomal in transduced cells. The latest generation of Ad vectors, helper-dependent Ad (hdAd), which are devoid of all viral protein coding sequences, can mediate high-level expression of a transgene for years in a variety of species ranging from rodents to non-human primates. Given the importance of histones and chromatin in modulating gene expression within the host cell, it is not surprising that Ad, a nuclear virus, also utilizes these proteins to protect the genome and modulate virus- or vector-encoded genes. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of the contribution of chromatin to Ad vector function. PMID:23771241

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: development, functions, and role in atherosclerotic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specialized subset of DCs that links innate and adaptive immunity. They sense viral and bacterial pathogens and release high levels of Type I interferons (IFN-I) in response to infection. pDCs were shown to contribute to inflammatory responses in the steady state and in pathology. In atherosclerosis, pDCs are involved in priming vascular inflammation and atherogenesis through production of IFN-I and chemokines that attract inflammatory cells to inflamed sites. pDCs also contribute to the proinflammatory activation of effector T cells, cytotoxic T cells, and conventional DCs. However, tolerogenic populations of pDCs are found that suppress atherosclerosis-associated inflammation through down-regulation of function and proliferation of proinflammatory T cell subsets and induction of regulatory T cells with potent immunomodulatory properties. Notably, atheroprotective tolerogenic DCs could be induced by certain self-antigens or bacterial antigens that suggests for great therapeutic potential of these DCs for development of DC-based anti-atherogenic vaccines. PMID:25120492

  20. A surprising role for conformational entropy in protein function

    PubMed Central

    Wand, A. Joshua; Moorman, Veronica R.; Harpole, Kyle W.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of high-affinity complexes is critical for the majority of enzymatic reactions involving proteins. The creation of the family of Michaelis and other intermediate complexes during catalysis clearly involves a complicated manifold of interactions that are diverse and complex. Indeed, computing the energetics of interactions between proteins and small molecule ligands using molecular structure alone remains a grand challenge. One of the most difficult contributions to the free energy of protein-ligand complexes to experimentally access is that due to changes in protein conformational entropy. Fortunately, recent advances in solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation methods have enabled the use of measures-of-motion between conformational states of a protein as a proxy for conformational entropy. This review briefly summarizes the experimental approaches currently employed to characterize fast internal motion in proteins, how this information is used to gain insight into conformational entropy, what has been learned and what the future may hold for this emerging view of protein function. PMID:23478875

  1. Aquaporins in the eye: Expression, function, and roles in ocular disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Kevin L.; Wang, Zhen; Wenke, Jamie L.; Qi, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background All thirteen known mammalian aquaporins have been detected in the eye. Moreover, aquaporins have been identified as playing essential roles in ocular functions ranging from maintenance of lens and corneal transparency to production of aqueous humor to maintenance of cellular homeostasis and regulation of signal transduction in the retina. Scope of review This review summarizes the expression and known functions of ocular aquaporins and discusses their known and potential roles in ocular diseases. Major conclusions Aquaporins play essential roles in all ocular tissues. Remarkably, not all aquaporin function as a water permeable channel and the functions of many aquaporins in ocular tissues remain unknown. Given their vital roles in maintaining ocular function and their roles in disease, aquaporins represent potential targets for future therapeutic development. General significance Since aquaporins play key roles in ocular physiology, an understanding of these functions is important to improving ocular health and treating diseases of the eye. It is likely that future therapies for ocular diseases will rely on modulation of aquaporin expression and/or function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Aquaporins. PMID:24184915

  2. On the role of covarying functions in stimulus class formation and transfer of function.

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Rebecca G; Markham, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    This experiment investigated whether directly trained covarying functions are necessary for stimulus class formation and transfer of function in humans. Initial class training was designed to establish two respondent-based stimulus classes by pairing two visual stimuli with shock and two other visual stimuli with no shock. Next, two operant discrimination functions were trained to one stimulus of each putative class. The no-shock group received the same training and testing in all phases, except no stimuli were ever paired with shock. The data indicated that skin conductance response conditioning did not occur for the shock groups or for the no-shock group. Tests showed transfer of the established discriminative functions, however, only for the shock groups, indicating the formation of two stimulus classes only for those participants who received respondent class training. The results suggest that transfer of function does not depend on first covarying the stimulus class functions. PMID:12507017

  3. Re(de)fining the Orthographic Neighborhood: The Role of Addition and Deletion Neighbors in Lexical Decision and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Colin J.; Perea, Manuel; Acha, Joana

    2009-01-01

    The influence of addition and deletion neighbors on visual word identification was investigated in four experiments. Experiments 1 and 2 used Spanish stimuli. In Experiment 1, lexical decision latencies were slower and less accurate for words and nonwords with higher-frequency deletion neighbors (e.g., "jugar" in "juzgar"), relative to control…

  4. Understanding the Role of Additives in Improving the Performance of Polymer:Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Solar cells based on the polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) represent one of the most promising technologies for next-generation solar energy conversion due to their low-cost and scalability. In the last fifteen years, research efforts have led to organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices with power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) ~ 12%, but these values are still insufficient for the devices to become widely marketable. To further improve solar cell performance, a thorough understanding of the complex processing-structure-performance relationships in OPV devices is required. Recently, the use of processing additives have been proved to be one of the most effective methods to tune the nanomorphology of polymer:fullerene active layer, as the incorporation of a small percentage of solvent additives results in a nearly doubling of device efficiency. However, the physics behind these improved performances by processing additives still remains unclear. In this work, by taking advantage of resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSoXS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), we have determined that the solvent additives induce the change in the formation mechanism of polymer:fullerene nanomorphologies in the process of film casting. Progress established in the course of these studies on structural and morphological characterizations will serve as the foundation for further improving the efficiency of polymer solar cells to realize their large-scale commercial use.

  5. Role of additional PCBM layer between ZnO and photoactive layers in inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shinuk; Kim, Kwang-Dae; Heo, Jinhee; Lee, Joo Yul; Cha, Gihoon; Seo, Bo Yeol; Kim, Young Dok; Kim, Yong Soo; Choi, Si-young; Lim, Dong Chan

    2014-01-01

    In order to induce greater light absorption, nano-patterning is often applied to the metal-oxide buffer layer in inverted bulk-heterojunction(BHJ) solar cells. However, current homogeneity was significantly disturbed at the interface, leading to an efficiency that was not fully optimized. In this work, an additional PC61BM layer was inserted between the ZnO ripple and the photoactive layer to enhance the electron extraction. The insertion of additional PC61BM layer provided substantial advantages in the operation of inverted BHJ solar cells; specifically, it enhanced current homogeneity and lowered accumulation and trapping of photogenerated charges at the ZnO interface. Inclusion of the additional PC61BM layer led to effective quenching of electron–hole recombination by a reduction in the number of accumulated charges at the surface of ZnO ripples. This resulted in a 16% increase in the efficiency of inverted BHJ solar cells to 7.7%, compared to solar cells without the additional PC61BM layer. PMID:24603531

  6. Critical role of tissue mast cells in controlling long-term glucose sensor function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Klueh, Ulrike; Kaur, Manjot; Qiao, Yi; Kreutzer, Donald L

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about the specific cells, mediators and mechanisms involved in the loss of glucose sensor function (GSF) in vivo. Since mast cells (MC) are known to be key effector cells in inflammation and wound healing, we hypothesized that MC and their products are major contributors to the skin inflammation and wound healing that controls GSF at sites of sensor implantation. To test this hypothesis we utilized a murine model of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in vivo in both normal C57BL/6 mice (mast cell sufficient), as well as mast cell deficient B6.Cg-Kit(W-sh)/HNihrJaeBsmJ (Sash) mice over a 28 day CGM period. As expected, both strains of mice displayed excellent CGM for the first 7 days post sensor implantation (PSI). CGM in the mast cell sufficient C57BL/6 mice was erratic over the remaining 21 days PSI. CGM in the mast cell deficient Sash mice displayed excellent sensor function for the entire 28 day of CGM. Histopathologic evaluation of implantation sites demonstrated that tissue reactions in Sash mice were dramatically less compared to the reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, mast cells were also seen to be consistently associated with the margins of sensor tissue reactions in normal C57BL/6 mice. Finally, direct injection of bone marrow derived mast cells at sites of sensor implantation induced an acute and dramatic loss of sensor function in both C57BL/6 and Sash mice. These results demonstrate the key role of mast cells in controlling glucose sensor function in vivo. PMID:20226521

  7. Functional role of progestin and the progesterone receptor in the suppression of spermatogenesis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Lue, Yanhe; Wang, Christina; Lydon, John P; Leung, Andrew; Li, James; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic progestins such as levonorgestrel (LNG) are used in combination with testosterone (T) in male contraceptive clinical trials to suppress gonadotropins secretion, but whether progestins have additional direct effects on the testis are not known. This study aimed to examine the effect of a potent progestin, (LNG), alone or in combination with testosterone (T) on spermatogenesis in adult rats, and to evaluate the functional role of the progesterone receptors (PRs) in the testis. In comparison with a low dose of LNG treatment in adult rats for 4 weeks, T and T + LNG treatment decreased testicular sperm count to 64.1 and 40.2% of control levels respectively. LNG induced germ cell apoptosis at stages I-IV and XII-XIV; T increased apoptosis at stages VII-VIII; LNG + T treatment induced greater germ cell apoptosis at a wider range of seminiferous epithelial stages. RT-PCR and Western Blots showed that PR was present in testes and up-regulated during suppression of spermatogenesis induced by testicular hormonal deprivation. PR knockout (PRKO) mice had larger testes, greater sperm production, increased numbers of Sertoli and Leydig cells. Suppression of gonadotropin and intratesticular T by GnRH-antagonist treatment induced PR promoter driven LacZ expression in Leydig cells of PRKO mice. This suggests that GnRH-antagonist treatment while inducing germ cell apoptosis also up-regulates PR. We conclude that (i) LNG + T induced greater suppression of spermatogenesis through increase in germ cell apoptosis involving a wider range of seminiferous epithelial stages than either treatment alone, (ii) up-regulation of PR was associated with inhibition of spermatogenesis, (iii) PR knockout mice showed increased sperm production suggesting that testicular PR activated events play a physiological and pharmacological inhibitory role in the testis. These data support the hypothesis that in addition to its known suppressive effects on gonadotropins, progestins may have direct

  8. Diverse functional roles of monosaccharide transporters and their homologs in vascular plants: a physiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Slewinski, Thomas L

    2011-07-01

    Vascular plants contain two gene families that encode monosaccharide transporter proteins. The classical monosaccharide transporter(-like) gene superfamily is large and functionally diverse, while the recently identified SWEET transporter family is smaller and, thus far, only found to transport glucose. These transporters play essential roles at many levels, ranging from organelles to the whole plant. Many family members are essential for cellular homeostasis and reproductive success. Although most transporters do not directly participate in long-distance transport, their indirect roles greatly impact carbon allocation and transport flux to the heterotrophic tissues of the plant. Functional characterization of some members from both gene families has revealed their diverse roles in carbohydrate partitioning, phloem function, resource allocation, plant defense, and sugar signaling. This review highlights the broad impacts and implications of monosaccharide transport by describing some of the functional roles of the monosaccharide transporter(-like) superfamily and the SWEET transporter family.

  9. Biological Role of Dystroglycan in Schwann Cell Function and Its Implications in Peripheral Nervous System Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Toshihiro; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Dystroglycan is a central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) that links extracellular matrix with cytoskeleton, expressed in a variety of fetal and adult tissues. Dystroglycan plays diverse roles in development and homeostasis including basement membrane formation, epithelial morphogenesis, membrane stability, cell polarization, and cell migration. In this paper, we will focus on biological role of dystroglycan in Schwann cell function, especially myelination. First, we review the molecular architecture of DGC in Schwann cell abaxonal membrane. Then, we will review the loss-of-function studies using targeted mutagenesis, which have revealed biological functions of each component of DGC in Schwann cells. Based on these findings, roles of dystroglycan in Schwann cell function, in myelination in particular, and its implications in diseases will be discussed in detail. Finally, in view of the fact that understanding the role of dystroglycan in Schwann cells is just beginning, future perspectives will be discussed. PMID:20625412

  10. A structural and functional homolog supports a general role for frataxin in cellular iron chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenbin; Cowan, J A

    2010-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis YdhG lacks sequence homology, but demonstrates structural and functional similarity to the frataxin family, supporting a general cellular role for frataxin-type proteins in cellular iron homeostasis.

  11. Structure–Function Relations, Physiological Roles, and Evolution of Mammalian ER-Resident Selenoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shchedrina, Valentina A.; Zhang, Yan; Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Selenium is an essential trace element in mammals. The major biological form of this micronutrient is the amino acid selenocysteine, which is present in the active sites of selenoenzymes. Seven of 25 mammalian selenoproteins have been identified as residents of the endoplasmic reticulum, including the 15-kDa selenoprotein, type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase and selenoproteins K, M, N, S, and T. Most of these proteins are poorly characterized. However, recent studies implicate some of them in quality control of protein folding in the ER, retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins from the ER to the cytosol, metabolism of the thyroid hormone, and regulation of calcium homeostasis. In addition, some of these proteins are involved in regulation of glucose metabolism and inflammation. This review discusses evolution and structure–function relations of the ER-resident selenoproteins and summarizes recent findings on these proteins, which reveal the emerging important role of selenium and selenoproteins in ER function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 839–849. PMID:19747065

  12. [Role of "secondary transmitters" in the exocrine function of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Domshke, V; Konturek, S Ia; Domshke, S

    1981-03-01

    In animals, exogenous secretin produces dose--related increases in pancreatic tissue levels of cyclic AMP which are closely correlated with both bicarbonate and cyclic AMP outputs in pancreatic juice. These effects can be augmented by additional administration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as methylxanthines. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) produces similar though less pronounced effects than secretin. Following secretion or VIP the changes in pancreatic tissue cyclic AMP concentrations precede the physiological response, i.e. enhance water and electrolyte secretion. In man, bicarbonate and cyclic AMP concentrations of pure pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic cannulation of Vater's papilla are significantly correlated in response to both secretin and VIP. VIP however, has a lower efficacy and potency relative to secretin. There is no significant correlation between pancreatic juice cyclic GMP and bicarbonate concentrations or outputs. These observations suggest that cyclic AMP plays an important role in mediating the stimulatory effects of secretin and VIP on hydrokinetic pancreatic exocrine function. However, it still remains to be elucidated in which specific way cyclic AMP initiates the secretory process. In principle, the action of cyclic nucleotides on cell function is thought to occur from their ability to activate cyclic nucleotide--dependent protein kinases which in turn are capable of activating enzymes of protein synthesis by phosphorylation (19). With respect to pancreatic secretion, studies of this kind are currently under way.

  13. Rbg1-Tma46 dimer structure reveals new functional domains and their role in polysome recruitment.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sandrea M; Gas, María-Eugenia; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Bravo, Jeronimo; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2012-11-01

    Developmentally Regulated GTP-binding (DRG) proteins are highly conserved GTPases that associate with DRG Family Regulatory Proteins (DFRP). The resulting complexes have recently been shown to participate in eukaryotic translation. The structure of the Rbg1 GTPase, a yeast DRG protein, in complex with the C-terminal region of its DFRP partner, Tma46, was solved by X-ray diffraction. These data reveal that DRG proteins are multimodular factors with three additional domains, helix-turn-helix (HTH), S5D2L and TGS, packing against the GTPase platform. Surprisingly, the S5D2L domain is inserted in the middle of the GTPase sequence. In contrast, the region of Tma46 interacting with Rbg1 adopts an extended conformation typical of intrinsically unstructured proteins and contacts the GTPase and TGS domains. Functional analyses demonstrate that the various domains of Rbg1, as well as Tma46, modulate the GTPase activity of Rbg1 and contribute to the function of these proteins in vivo. Dissecting the role of the different domains revealed that the Rbg1 TGS domain is essential for the recruitment of this factor in polysomes, supporting further the implication of these conserved factors in translation.

  14. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  15. [Role of "secondary transmitters" in the exocrine function of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Domshke, V; Konturek, S Ia; Domshke, S

    1981-03-01

    In animals, exogenous secretin produces dose--related increases in pancreatic tissue levels of cyclic AMP which are closely correlated with both bicarbonate and cyclic AMP outputs in pancreatic juice. These effects can be augmented by additional administration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as methylxanthines. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) produces similar though less pronounced effects than secretin. Following secretion or VIP the changes in pancreatic tissue cyclic AMP concentrations precede the physiological response, i.e. enhance water and electrolyte secretion. In man, bicarbonate and cyclic AMP concentrations of pure pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic cannulation of Vater's papilla are significantly correlated in response to both secretin and VIP. VIP however, has a lower efficacy and potency relative to secretin. There is no significant correlation between pancreatic juice cyclic GMP and bicarbonate concentrations or outputs. These observations suggest that cyclic AMP plays an important role in mediating the stimulatory effects of secretin and VIP on hydrokinetic pancreatic exocrine function. However, it still remains to be elucidated in which specific way cyclic AMP initiates the secretory process. In principle, the action of cyclic nucleotides on cell function is thought to occur from their ability to activate cyclic nucleotide--dependent protein kinases which in turn are capable of activating enzymes of protein synthesis by phosphorylation (19). With respect to pancreatic secretion, studies of this kind are currently under way. PMID:6265294

  16. The Functional Role of the T1R Family of Receptors in Sweet Taste and Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Treesukosol, Yada; Smith, Kimberly R.; Spector, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the T1R family of Class C G protein-coupled receptors in the peripheral gustatory system a decade ago has been a tremendous advance for taste research, and its conceptual reach has extended to other organ systems. There are three proteins in the family, T1R1, T1R2, and T1R3, encoded by their respective genes, Tas1r1, Tas1r2, and Tas1r3. T1R2 combines with T1R3 to form a heterodimer that binds with sugars and other sweeteners. T1R3 also combines with T1R1 to form a heterodimer that binds with L-amino acids. These proteins are expressed not only in taste bud cells, but one or more of these T1Rs have also been identified in the nasal epithelium, gut, pancreas, liver, kidney, testes and brain in various mammalian species. Here we review current perspectives regarding the functional role of these receptors, concentrating on sweet taste and feeding. We also discuss behavioral findings suggesting that a glucose polymer mixture, Polycose, which rodents avidly prefer, appears to activate a receptor that does not depend on the combined expression of T1R2 and T1R3. In addition, although the T1Rs have been implicated as playing a role in glucose sensing, T1R2 knock-out (KO) and T1R3 KO mice display normal chow and fluid intake as well as normal body weight compared with same-sex littermate wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, regardless of whether they are fasted or not, these KO mice do not differ from their WT counterparts in their Polycose intake across a broad range of concentrations in 30-min intake tests. The functional implications of these results and those in the literature are considered. PMID:21376068

  17. Occurrence, distribution and possible functional roles of simple sequence repeats in phytoplasma genomes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Davis, Robert E; Suo, Xiaobing; Zhao, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Phytoplasmas are unculturable, cell-wall-less bacteria that parasitize plants and insects. This transkingdom life cycle requires rapid responses to vastly different environments, including transitions from plant phloem sieve elements to various insect tissues and alternations among diverse plant hosts. Features that enable such flexibility in other microbes include simple sequence repeats (SSRs) - mutation-prone, phase-variable short DNA tracts that function as 'evolutionary rheostats' and enhance rapid adaptations. To gain insights into the occurrence, distribution and potentially functional roles of SSRs in phytoplasmas, we performed computational analysis on the genomes of five completely sequenced phytoplasma strains, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris'-related strains OYM and AYWB, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense'-related strains CBWB and SLY and 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali'-related strain AP-AT. The overall density of SSRs in phytoplasma genomes was higher than in representative strains of other prokaryotes. While mono- and trinucleotide SSRs were significantly overrepresented in the phytoplasma genomes, dinucleotide SSRs and other higher-order SSRs were underrepresented. The occurrence and distribution of long SSRs in the prophage islands and phytoplasma-unique genetic loci indicated that SSRs played a role in compounding the complexity of sequence mosaics in individual genomes and in increasing allelic diversity among genomes. Findings from computational analyses were further complemented by an examination of SSRs in varied additional phytoplasma strains, with a focus on potential contingency genes. Some SSRs were located in regions that could profoundly alter the regulation of transcription and translation of affected genes and/or the composition of protein products.

  18. Role of glycoprotein IIa (beta 1 subunit of very late activation antigens) in platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, S; Catimel, B; McGregor, L; Leung, L L; McGregor, J L

    1991-10-15

    Very late activation antigens (VLAs) are glycoproteins (GPs) that play a major role in platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix. These GPs, members of the integrin family, are heterodimer complexes with different alpha subunits noncovalently associated with a common beta 1 subunit known as GPIIa. GPIa-IIa (also known as VLA2), GPIc-IIa (VLA5), and GPIc*-IIa (VLA6) are involved, respectively, in platelet adhesion to collagen, fibronectin, and laminin. At this stage, very little is known about the role of GPIIa in platelet adhesive functions. In this study, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (LYP22) directed against GPIIa. Immunoaffinity chromatography using LYP22 combined with two-dimensional nonreduced-reduced sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that the antibody brings down all VLA subunits. Western blots indicate that the binding site of LYP22 on GPIIa is disulfide bridge-dependent. The number of LYP22 binding sites is not increased on stimulation with thrombin and is in the range of what is observed with another anti-GPIIa MoAb (A-1A5). LYP22 is the first anti-GPIIa MoAb to inhibit aggregation and secretion of washed platelets stimulated with collagen, thrombin, or arachidonic acid. Moreover, the lag-phase usually observed on collagen stimulation is significantly prolonged (by 60 seconds) in the presence of LYP22. This lag-phase, mediated by LYP22, is also observed in the presence of plasma proteins and is coupled with a reduced effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In addition, LYP22 affects the adhesion of resting platelets to type III collagen, but not to fibronectin, laminin, or type I collagen. These results strongly indicate that the site on GPIIa, bearing the LYP22 epitope, is an active participant in signal transduction controlling platelet functions.

  19. In situ Raman and electrochemical characterization of the role of electrolyte additives in Li/SOCl2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, M.; Milicev, S.; Kovac, A.; Pejovnik, S.

    1995-05-01

    A simple glass cell has been constructed for in situ Raman characterization of discharge products in Li/SOCl2 batteries with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and LiAl(SO3Cl4) additives. The assembly enables the characterization of catholyte-soluble discharge products in the electrolyte as well as products on the lithium and carbon electrode surfaces. The effect of the additives was also examined by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy and correlated to the voltage delay in batteries. The best results, as regards to the elimination of the delay effect, were obtained with a new electrolyte consisting of LiAlCl4/SOCl2 with an admixture of PVC and LiAl(SO3Cl4).

  20. The Role of Functional and Perceptual Attributes: Evidence from Picture Naming in Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Trevor A.; Grant, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    We examined the performance of a group of people with moderately severe Alzheimer's type dementia on a naming task. We found that functional information plays an important role in determining naming performance on both living and non-living things. Perceptual information may play some role in naming living things. We also found some evidence that…

  1. Representation of roles in biomedical ontologies: a case study in functional genomics.

    PubMed Central

    Burgun, Anita; Bodenreider, Olivier; Le Duff, Franck; Moussouni, Fouzia; Loreal, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Representing roles, i.e. functions of proteins, sequences and structures, is the cornerstone of knowledge representation in functional genomics. The objective of this study is to investigate representation of roles as functional categories or associative relations. We focus on GeneOntology (GO) and the UMLS and take examples from iron metabolism. METHODS: The terms corresponding to the main proteins involved in iron metabolism were mapped to GO (including the annotations) and the UMLS. The representation of their biological roles was then analyzed. RESULTS: Functional aspects are represented in both GO and the UMLS. However, the granularity may not be appropriate. DISCUSSION: Advantages and limits of functional categories and associative relations are discussed. PMID:12463792

  2. Role tuning between caregiver and care receiver during discharge transition: an illustration of role function mode in Roy's adaptation theory.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Y I

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a conceptual framework to explain the interaction between the caregiver and the care receiver during the discharge transition. Data from face-to-face interviews with 12 care receivers and 16 caregivers were subjected to constant comparative analysis. Findings revealed that role tuning was the process used by caregivers and care receivers to achieve a harmonious pattern of caregiving and care receiving during the transition from hospital to home. This empirical finding can illustrate the concept of role function mode in the Roy adaptation theory and sensitize healthcare providers to the needs of the families during the discharge transition.

  3. Cement cake properties in static filtration--On the role of fluid loss control additives on the cake porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Desbrieres, J. )

    1993-11-01

    The mechanism of the action of fluid loss control additives in cementing oilwell operations is principally the reduction of permeability of the cement filter cake. From filtration equations physical characteristics as porosity of the cement filter cake were investigated and compared with experimental data. A good correlation is observed when no adsorption is involved. The smallest pore diameter for obtaining an efficient control of fluid loss is shown to be of the same order of magnitude as the gyration radius of used macromolecular chains.

  4. High quality Y3Al5O12 doped transparent ceramics for laser applications, role of sintering additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminskii, A. A.; Balashov, V. V.; Cheshev, E. A.; Kopylov, Yu L.; Koromyslov, A. L.; Krokhin, O. N.; Kravchenko, V. B.; Lopukhin, K. V.; Shemet, V. V.; Tupitsyn, I. M.

    2016-08-01

    SiO2, ZrO2, B2O3 and MgO oxides and their combinations were used as sintering aids for preparation of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramics doped by Nd2O3, Er2O3, Ho2O3, Tm2O3 and Yb2O3. The influence of these additives on optimal sintering temperature, grain growth, volume of residual pores and optical quality of the ceramics were investigated. The best combination of the sintering additives was found and high quality samples of YAG:Nd (1 at.%) ceramics were obtained. The original method of laser optical quality characterization of ceramics was developed and tested. The main laser parameters of YAG:Nd (1 at.%) ceramics samples are measured and compared with the best well known laser ceramics. The samples of YAG:RE (RE- Er2O3, Ho2O3, Tm2O3 and Yb2O3) ceramics are obtained, and their optical transmittance spectra are measured. Composite structures of YAG:Yb (5 at.%) - YAG were obtained by the simplest method of successive joint compaction of different composition layers.

  5. A general method for determining the functional role of a muscle.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J G

    1985-11-01

    This paper presents a general classification method for determining the functional role of any muscle, and a procedure for determining the sensitivity of that role to small changes in system parameters. The classification method is based on the premise that the system model, when acted upon solely by the muscle of interest, will depart from any initial rest configuration in such a way as to decrease the muscle's length. This method is particularly useful for multiple-joint muscles, and is illustrated by examining a slider-crank mechanism and straight line muscle model to determine the functional role of the hamstrings during a constrained leg flexion motion. PMID:4079362

  6. Structural and functional analysis of Rv0554 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: testing a putative role in menaquinone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jodie M; Jiang, Ming; Guo, Zhihong; Baker, Edward N

    2010-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of tuberculosis, is a devastating human pathogen against which new drugs are urgently needed. Enzymes from the biosynthetic pathway for menaquinone are considered to be valid drug targets. The protein encoded by the open reading frame Rv0554 has been expressed, purified and subjected to structural and functional analysis to test for a putative role in menaquinone biosynthesis. The crystal structure of Rv0554 has been solved and refined in two different space groups at 2.35 and 1.9 A resolution. The protein is dimeric, with an alpha/beta-hydrolase monomer fold. In each monomer, a large cavity adjacent to the catalytic triad is enclosed by a helical lid. Dimerization is mediated by the lid regions. Small-molecule additives used in crystallization bind in the active site, but no binding of ligands related to menaquinone biosynthesis could be detected and functional assays failed to support possible roles in menaquinone biosynthesis. PMID:20693690

  7. Squaramide-tertiary amine catalyzed asymmetric cascade sulfa-Michael/Michael addition via dynamic kinetic resolution: access to highly functionalized chromans with three contiguous stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Yang, Yi; Du, Da-Ming

    2013-03-15

    An efficient asymmetric cascade sulfa-Michael/Michael addition reaction catalyzed by a chiral bifunctional squaramide-tertiary amine catalyst has been developed. This organocatalytic cascade reaction provides easy access to highly functionalized chromans with three contiguous stereocenters, including one quaternary center. In addition, a novel cascade sulfa Michael/retro-sulfa-Michael/sulfa-Michael/Michael reaction process, involving dynamic kinetic resolution, is described.

  8. The Role of Executive Functions in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Testing Predictions from Two Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Donghyung; Riccio, Cynthia A.; Hynd, George W.

    2004-01-01

    The role of executive functions in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) varies considerably depending on the models of ADHD. We examined the interrelationship of two major executive functions (i.e., inhibition and working memory) with behavioral, emotional, and school problems in a group of children who had a comprehensive…

  9. The Role of Family Functioning in the Stress Process of Dementia Caregivers: A Structural Family Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; Lewis, John E.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Czaja, Sara J.; Eisdorfer, Carl; Schulz, Richard; Szapocznik, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of family functioning in the stress process in a sample of caregivers of dementia patients by using a structural family framework. The stress-process model of caregiver distress included family functioning as an intervening variable in the relationship between objective burden and…

  10. A View of Man's Role and Function in a Complex System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Francis H.

    In this paper the roles and functions of man in the evolution and development of two complex specific systems within the Army operational environment are discussed. It is pointed out that throughout the course of historical development, the basic system functions and objectives have remained unchanged even though the system equipments have varied.…

  11. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase: Potential Roles in Promoting Gut Health in Weanling Piglets and Its Modulation by Feed Additives — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Melo, A. D. B.; Silveira, H.; Luciano, F. B.; Andrade, C.; Costa, L. B.; Rostagno, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal environment plays a critical role in maintaining swine health. Many factors such as diet, microbiota, and host intestinal immune response influence the intestinal environment. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) is an important apical brush border enzyme that is influenced by these factors. IAP dephosphorylates bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides, and flagellin, reducing bacterial toxicity and consequently regulating toll-like receptors (TLRs) activation and inflammation. It also desphosphorylates extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate, consequently reducing inflammation, modulating, and preserving the homeostasis of the intestinal microbiota. The apical localization of IAP on the epithelial surface reveals its role on LPS (from luminal bacteria) detoxification. As the expression of IAP is reported to be downregulated in piglets at weaning, LPS from commensal and pathogenic gram-negative bacteria could increase inflammatory processes by TLR-4 activation, increasing diarrhea events during this phase. Although some studies had reported potential IAP roles to promote gut health, investigations about exogenous IAP effects or feed additives modulating IAP expression and activity yet are necessary. However, we discussed in this paper that the critical assessment reported can suggest that exogenous IAP or feed additives that could increase its expression could show beneficial effects to reduce diarrhea events during the post weaning phase. Therefore, the main goals of this review are to discuss IAP’s role in intestinal inflammatory processes and present feed additives used as growth promoters that may modulate IAP expression and activity to promote gut health in piglets. PMID:26732323

  12. The Role of Laser Additive Manufacturing Methods of Metals in Repair, Refurbishment and Remanufacturing - Enabling Circular Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Maija; Pekkarinen, Joonas; Soukka, Risto

    Circular economy is an economy model where products, components, and materials are aimed to be kept at their highest utility and value at all times. Repair, refurbishment and remanufacturing processes are procedures aiming at returning the value of the product during its life cycle. Additive manufacturing (AM) is expected to be an enabling technology in circular economy based business models. One of AM process that enables repair, refurbishment and remanufacturing is Directed Energy Deposition. Respectively Powder Bed Fusion enables manufacturing of replacement components on demand. The aim of this study is to identify the current research findings and state of art of utilizing AM in repair, refurbishment and remanufacturing processes of metallic products. The focus is in identifying possibilities of AM in promotion of circular economy and expected environmental benefits based on the found literature. Results of the study indicate significant potential in utilizing AM in repair, refurbishment and remanufacturing activities.

  13. Functional impairments in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the mediating role of neuropsychological functioning.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, Douglas; Thorell, Lisa B

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with multiple neuropsychological deficits and the present study aimed to investigate to what extent these deficits are related to the functional impairments associated with the disorder. The results showed that all executive functioning deficits and reaction time variability acted as mediators in the relation between ADHD and academic achievement. However, only the effect of working memory for language skills, and the effects of reaction time variability and working memory for mathematics, remained significant when studying independent effects. Regulation of anger was a significant mediator for peer problems. Gender or symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) did not moderate these findings. PMID:24742310

  14. Functional Impairments in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: The Mediating Role of Neuropsychological Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Sjöwall, Douglas; Thorell, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with multiple neuropsychological deficits and the present study aimed to investigate to what extent these deficits are related to the functional impairments associated with the disorder. The results showed that all executive functioning deficits and reaction time variability acted as mediators in the relation between ADHD and academic achievement. However, only the effect of working memory for language skills, and the effects of reaction time variability and working memory for mathematics, remained significant when studying independent effects. Regulation of anger was a significant mediator for peer problems. Gender or symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) did not moderate these findings. PMID:24742310

  15. Self-Conscious emotions’ role in functional outcomes within clinical populations

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Rebecca; Cohen, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Patients with severe mental illnesses (SMI) often experience dysfunction in their ability to efficiently carry out everyday roles and/or skills. These deficits are seen across many domains of daily functioning. We suggest that the “self-conscious emotions” of pride and shame play a role in these functional outcomes. Pride and shame appear to facilitate individuals’ ability to evaluate their group status, detect social threats, and to adjust their behaviors accordingly. This study utilized an objective performance measure of functional capacity and a self-report of quality of life (QoL) to examine the respective roles of pride and shame in functional outcomes within two SMI patient groups (schizophrenia and affective disorder) and a community control group. The influence of neurocognition, affect and symptomatology on functional outcomes was also assessed. The patient groups did not differ in cognitive functioning, QoL, or shame. The schizophrenia group reported significantly higher pride and displayed worse objective performance than the other groups. Within each of the groups, shame had an inverse relationship with QoL, while pride positively associated with QoL. Shame associated with worse functional capacity in the schizophrenia group. Shame associated with better functional capacity, while pride associated with worse functional capacity within the affective disorder group. PMID:24508025

  16. Tumor-promoting/progressing role of additional chromosome instability in hepatic carcinogenesis in Sgo1 (Shugoshin 1) haploinsufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi Y; Zhang, Yuting; Reddy, Arun; Mohammed, Altaf; Lightfoot, Stan; Dai, Wei; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-04-01

    A major etiological risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is infection by Hepatitis viruses, especially hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus do not cause aggressive activation of an oncogenic pathway, but they transactivate a broad array of genes, cause chronic inflammation, and, through interference with mitotic processes, lead to mitotic error-induced chromosome instability (ME-CIN). However, how ME-CIN is involved in the development of HCC remains unclear. Delineating the effect of ME-CIN on HCC development should help in identifying measures to combat HCC. In this study, we used ME-CIN model mice haploinsufficient in Shugoshin 1 (Sgo1(-/+)) to assess the role of ME-CIN in HCC development. Treatment with the carcinogen azoxymethane caused Sgo1(-/+) ME-CIN model mice to develop HCCs within 6 months, whereas control mice developed no HCC (P < 0.003). The HCC development was associated with expression of early HCC markers (glutamine synthetase, glypican 3, heat shock protein 70, and the serum marker alpha fetoprotein), although without fibrosis. ME-CIN preceded the expression of HCC markers, suggesting that ME-CIN is an important early event in HCC development. In 12-month-old untreated Sgo1 mice, persistent DNA damage, altered gene expression, and spontaneous HCCs were observed. Sgo1 protein accumulated in response to DNA damage in vitro. Overall, Sgo1(-/+)-mediated ME-CIN strongly promoted/progressed development of HCC in the presence of an initiator carcinogen, and it had a mild initiator effect by itself. Use of the ME-CIN model mice should help in identifying drugs to counteract the effects of ME-CIN and should accelerate anti-HCC drug development. PMID:25740822

  17. A dominant role of oxygen additive on cold atmospheric-pressure He + O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aijun; Liu, Dingxin E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiaohua E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Kong, Michael G.

    2014-08-15

    We present in this paper how oxygen additive impacts on the cold atmospheric-pressure helium plasmas by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. For the oxygen concentration [O{sub 2}] > ∼0.1%, the influence of oxygen on the electron characteristics and the power dissipation becomes important, e.g., the electron density, the electron temperature in sheath, the electron-coupling power, and the sheath width decreasing by 1.6 to 16 folds with a two-log increase in [O{sub 2}] from 0.1% to 10%. Also the discharge mode evolves from the γ mode to the α mode. The reactive oxygen species are found to peak in the narrow range of [O{sub 2}] = 0.4%–0.9% in the plasmas, similar to their power-coupling values. This applies to their wall fluxes except for those of O* and O{sub 2}{sup −}. These two species have very short lifetimes, thus only when generated in boundary layers within several micrometers next to the electrode can contribute to the fluxes. The dominant reactive oxygen species and the corresponding main reactions are schematically presented, and their relations are quantified for selected applications.

  18. Plasmon excitation in metal slab by fast point charge: The role of additional boundary conditions in quantum hydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; An, Sheng-Bai; Song, Yuan-Hong Wang, You-Nian; Kang, Naijing; Mišković, Z. L.

    2014-10-15

    We study the wake effect in the induced potential and the stopping power due to plasmon excitation in a metal slab by a point charge moving inside the slab. Nonlocal effects in the response of the electron gas in the metal are described by a quantum hydrodynamic model, where the equation of electronic motion contains both a quantum pressure term and a gradient correction from the Bohm quantum potential, resulting in a fourth-order differential equation for the perturbed electron density. Thus, besides using the condition that the normal component of the electron velocity should vanish at the impenetrable boundary of the metal, a consistent inclusion of the gradient correction is shown to introduce two possibilities for an additional boundary condition for the perturbed electron density. We show that using two different sets of boundary conditions only gives rise to differences in the wake potential at large distances behind the charged particle. On the other hand, the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model is seen to cause a reduction in the depth of the potential well closest to the particle, and a reduction of its stopping power. Even for a particle moving in the center of the slab, we observe nonlocal effects in the induced potential and the stopping power due to reduction of the slab thickness, which arise from the gradient correction in the quantum hydrodynamic model.

  19. Role of Cu additive on the dielectric relaxation of Se75Te25 and Se85Te15 glassy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Kumar, S.

    2010-07-01

    The effect of Cu additive on the dielectric relaxation of two binary Se-Te glassy systems, comparing the properties of a-Se75Te25, a-Se85Te15 and a-Se75Te15Cu10 alloys has been reported. The temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric parameters in Glassy Se75Te25, Se85Te15 and Se75Te15Cu10 alloys are studied by measuring capacitance and dissipation factor in the frequency range (1 kHz-5 MHz) and temperature range (300-350 K). A Debye like relaxation of dielectric behavior has been observed. A comprehensive study on the relaxation mechanism revealed that the presence of grains and grain boundaries across the pallet thickness is the basic relaxation process. A detailed analysis shows that the observed dielectric loss is in agreement with the Guintini's theory of dielectric dispersion based on two electron hopping over a potential barrier and is applicable in the present case. Dielectric constant (ɛ’), dielectric loss (ɛ”), loss tangent (δ) and capacitive reactance (Xc) are found highly frequency and temperature dependent. Dependence of these dielectric parameters over the metallic impurity Cu, has also been found in the present glassy system and has been discussed in terms of electronegativity difference between the elements used in making the aforesaid glassy system.

  20. Tissue-specific expression and functional role of dehydrins in heat tolerance of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum).

    PubMed

    Galani, Saddia; Wahid, Abdul; Arshad, Muhammad

    2013-04-01

    Studies on the functional roles of dehydrins (DHNs) in heat tolerance of plants are scarce. This study was conducted to immunohistolocalize DHNs in leaves of heat-tolerant (CP-4333) and heat-sensitive (HSF-240) sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) clones at three phenological stages in order to elucidate their putative roles under heat stress. CP-4333 indicated greater amounts of heat-stable proteins than HSF-240 under heat stress. Western blotting revealed the expression of three DHNs in CP-4333 (13- and 15-kDa peptides at 48 h and an additional 18-kDa band at 72 h) and two (13 and 15 kDa at 48 h) in HSF-240 at formative stage; two DHNs in CP-4333 (20 and 25 kDa) and one in HSF-240 (20 kDa) at grand growth stage, while two DHNs in CP-4333 (20 and 22 kDa) and one in HSF-240 (20 kDa) at maturity stage. Tissue-specific immunohistolocalization showed that DHNs were expressed in stele particularly the phloem and the cells intervening bundle sheath and vascular bundles. Furthermore, DHNs were also found scattered along the epidermal and parenchymatous cells. Recovery of sugarcane from heat stress manifested a gradual disappearance of DHNs in both the clones, being quicker in sensitive clone (HSF-240). Results suggested specific implications for DHNs synthesis. Their synthesis in epidermis appears to protect the mesophyll tissues from heat injury. When associated to vascular tissue, they tend to ensure the normal photoassimilate loading into the sieve element-companion cell complex. DHNs diminution during recovery suggested that their expression was transitory. However, prolonged retention of DHNs by tolerant clone appears to be an adaptive advantage of sugarcane to withstand heat stress.

  1. Improvement in antioxidant functionality and shelf life of yukwa (fried rice snack) by turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) powder addition.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Taik; Han, Jung-Ah

    2016-05-15

    The physico-chemical, oxidative and sensory characteristics of fried rice snack, yukwa with different amounts of turmeric powder (Curcuma longa) were investigated. The moisture content of the pallet ranged from 16.47% to 19.84%. After frying the pallet, a slight decrease in the degree of expansion was obtained with increasing turmeric powder content. The textural properties of yukwa were not changed until the turmeric powder content reached 5%; however, over 8% addition induced a decrease in the hardness and an increase in the crispiness. Oxidative deterioration was effectively inhibited by turmeric powder addition, and more turmeric powder in yukwa led to higher free radical scavenging activity. Based on the sensory characteristics, a 5% addition of turmeric powder was the most acceptable for the yukwa product. In the correlation results among variables, the moisture content of the pallet proved to be the most important factor for yukwa quality. PMID:26776012

  2. Improvement in antioxidant functionality and shelf life of yukwa (fried rice snack) by turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) powder addition.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Taik; Han, Jung-Ah

    2016-05-15

    The physico-chemical, oxidative and sensory characteristics of fried rice snack, yukwa with different amounts of turmeric powder (Curcuma longa) were investigated. The moisture content of the pallet ranged from 16.47% to 19.84%. After frying the pallet, a slight decrease in the degree of expansion was obtained with increasing turmeric powder content. The textural properties of yukwa were not changed until the turmeric powder content reached 5%; however, over 8% addition induced a decrease in the hardness and an increase in the crispiness. Oxidative deterioration was effectively inhibited by turmeric powder addition, and more turmeric powder in yukwa led to higher free radical scavenging activity. Based on the sensory characteristics, a 5% addition of turmeric powder was the most acceptable for the yukwa product. In the correlation results among variables, the moisture content of the pallet proved to be the most important factor for yukwa quality.

  3. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure, Adaptive Function, and Entry into Adult Roles in a Prospective Study of Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Mary Ellen; Kable, Julie A.; Coles, Claire D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although many studies have demonstrated effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on physical, cognitive, and behavioral development in children, few have focused on the long term effects on adults. In this study, data are presented on adaptive function and entry into adult roles in a community sample of young adults with PAE. The expectation was that prenatally exposed adults would show lower adaptive functioning and more difficulty with entry into adult roles than the non-exposed control group and that these effects would be related to the severity of PAE effects. Method The predominantly African-American, low income sample included adults with a wide range of prenatal exposure (n = 123) as well as control groups for socioeconomic (SES) (n = 59) and disability (n = 54) status. The mothers of the alcohol-exposed and SES-control group participants were recruited before birth and offspring have been followed up periodically. The disability control group was recruited in adolescence. The adults were interviewed about adaptive function in day-to-day life and adult role entry. Collateral adults who were well-acquainted with each participant were interviewed concerning adaptive function. Results Results showed that adults who were dysmorphic and/or cognitively affected by PAE had difficulty with adaptive function and entry into adult roles. Males showing cognitive effects with no physical effects were the most severely affected. Results for exposed adults not showing physical or cognitive effects were similar to or more positive than those of the control group for most outcomes. Conclusion PAE has long-term effects on adaptive outcomes in early adulthood. Additional research should focus on possible interventions at this transition and on factors contributing to the adjustment of the exposed, but unaffected participants. PMID:26247662

  4. The ventral pallidum: Subregion-specific functional anatomy and roles in motivated behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Melendez, Roberto I.; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Napier, T. Celeste

    2015-01-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) plays a critical role in the processing and execution of motivated behaviors. Yet this brain region is often overlooked in published discussions of the neurobiology of mental health (e.g., addiction, depression). This contributes to a gap in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. This review is presented to help bridge the gap by providing a resource for current knowledge of VP anatomy, projection patterns and subregional circuits, and how this organization relates to the function of VP neurons and ultimately behavior. For example, ventromedial (VPvm) and dorsolateral (VPdl) VP subregions receive projections from nucleus accumbens shell and core, respectively. Inhibitory GABAergic neurons of the VPvm project to mediodorsal thalamus, lateral hypothalamus, and ventral tegmental area, and this VP subregion helps discriminate the appropriate conditions to acquire natural rewards or drugs of abuse, consume preferred foods, and perform working memory tasks. GABAergic neurons of the VPdl project to subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata, and this VP subregion is modulated by, and is necessary for, drug-seeking behavior. Additional circuits arise from nonGABAergic neuronal phenotypes that are likely to excite rather than inhibit their targets. These subregional and neuronal phenotypic circuits place the VP in a unique position to process motivationally-relevant stimuli and coherent adaptive behaviors. PMID:25857550

  5. The ventral pallidum: Subregion-specific functional anatomy and roles in motivated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Root, David H; Melendez, Roberto I; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Napier, T Celeste

    2015-07-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) plays a critical role in the processing and execution of motivated behaviors. Yet this brain region is often overlooked in published discussions of the neurobiology of mental health (e.g., addiction, depression). This contributes to a gap in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. This review is presented to help bridge the gap by providing a resource for current knowledge of VP anatomy, projection patterns and subregional circuits, and how this organization relates to the function of VP neurons and ultimately behavior. For example, ventromedial (VPvm) and dorsolateral (VPdl) VP subregions receive projections from nucleus accumbens shell and core, respectively. Inhibitory GABAergic neurons of the VPvm project to mediodorsal thalamus, lateral hypothalamus, and ventral tegmental area, and this VP subregion helps discriminate the appropriate conditions to acquire natural rewards or drugs of abuse, consume preferred foods, and perform working memory tasks. GABAergic neurons of the VPdl project to subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata, and this VP subregion is modulated by, and is necessary for, drug-seeking behavior. Additional circuits arise from nonGABAergic neuronal phenotypes that are likely to excite rather than inhibit their targets. These subregional and neuronal phenotypic circuits place the VP in a unique position to process motivationally relevant stimuli and coherent adaptive behaviors.

  6. Biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes: quantifying the functional role of vernal pools in ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, K. A.; Rancatti, R.; Calhoun, A.; Hunter, M.

    2013-12-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots are characterized as small areas within a landscape matrix that show comparably high chemical reaction rates relative to surrounding areas. For small, natural features to generate biogeochemical hotspots within a landscape, their contribution to nutrient dynamics must be significant relative to nutrient demand of the surrounding landscape. In northeastern forests in the US, vernal pools are abundant, small features that typically fill in spring with snow melt and precipitation and dry by the end of the summer. Ephemeral flooding alters soil moisture and the depth of the oxic/anoxic boundary in the soil, which may affect leaf-litter decomposition rates and nutrient dynamics including denitrification. Additionally, pool-breeding organisms may influence nutrient dynamics via consumer-driven nutrient remineralization. We studied the effects of vernal pools on rates of leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification in forested habitats in Maine. Our results indicate leaf-litter decomposition and denitrification rates in submerged habitats of vernal pools were greater than in upland forest habitat. Our data also suggest pool-breeding organisms, such as wood frogs, may play an important role in nutrient dynamics within vernal pools. Together, the results suggest vernal pools may function as biogeochemical hotspots within forested landscapes.

  7. Functional Role of NBS1 in Radiation Damage Response and Translesion DNA Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuichiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2015-01-01

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a recessive genetic disorder characterized by increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR) and a high frequency of malignancies. NBS1, a product of the mutated gene in NBS, contains several protein interaction domains in the N-terminus and C-terminus. The C-terminus of NBS1 is essential for interactions with MRE11, a homologous recombination repair nuclease, and ATM, a key player in signal transduction after the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which is induced by IR. Moreover, NBS1 regulates chromatin remodeling during DSB repair by histone H2B ubiquitination through binding to RNF20 at the C-terminus. Thus, NBS1 is considered as the first protein to be recruited to DSB sites, wherein it acts as a sensor or mediator of DSB damage responses. In addition to DSB response, we showed that NBS1 initiates Polη-dependent translesion DNA synthesis by recruiting RAD18 through its binding at the NBS1 C-terminus after UV exposure, and it also functions after the generation of interstrand crosslink DNA damage. Thus, NBS1 has multifunctional roles in response to DNA damage from a variety of genotoxic agents, including IR.

  8. Functional role of CD95 ligand in concanavalin A-induced intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Ghoreschi, K; Muders, M; Enders, G A

    1998-01-01

    Freshly isolated murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) express CD95 ligand (CD95L), as shown by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Between 15 and 25% of IEL could be stained with an antibody to CD95L. Therefore it was investigated whether the CD95L/CD95 pathway was effective in IEL cytotoxicity. Stimulation of IEL in vitro with concanavalin A (Con A) induced a strong cytotoxic response, which was much higher when using CD95-expressing target cells. This effect was most evident when comparing the specific lysis of CD95-transfected target cells of the leukaemia cell line L1210 with that of the untransfected parental cell line. In addition, an antibody to CD95 was able to dramatically reduce the specific lysis of CD95-expressing target cells. After stimulation with Con A, which is able to bind to CD95L, the effects were more obvious compared with the triggering of the T-cell receptor (TCR)-alphabeta or gamma delta. On the other hand, EGTA reduced the Con A-induced cytotoxicity. Together these findings support a role of the CD95L/CD95 pathway in IEL cytotoxicity, even though the reaction was Ca2+ sensitive. As a function, CD95L-expressing IEL should be able to contribute to the elimination of CD95-expressing target cells in the intestine. Images Figure 1 PMID:9893046

  9. Roles of Hox genes: what we have learnt from gain of function and loss of function mutations in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Mark, M; Lufkin, T; Dollé, P; Dierich, A; LeMeur, M; Chambon, P

    1993-09-01

    Transgenic mice expressing ectopically a gene from one of the Hox complexes, and mice carrying a null mutation in a Hox gene, provide useful tools for studying the roles of this gene family during development. Here, we discuss the phenotypes of two kinds of Hox mutant mice which show that vertebrate Hox genes are functional homologues of Drosophila genes of the HOM-C complex.

  10. A Critical Role for Cysteine 57 in the Biological Functions of Selenium Binding Protein-1.

    PubMed

    Ying, Qi; Ansong, Emmanuel; Diamond, Alan M; Yang, Wancai

    2015-11-18

    The concentration of selenium-binding protein1 (SBP1) is often lower in tumors than in the corresponding tissue and lower levels have been associated with poor clinical outcomes. SBP1 binds tightly selenium although what role selenium plays in its biological functions remains unknown. Previous studies indicated that cysteine 57 is the most likely candidate amino acid for selenium binding. In order to investigate the role of cysteine 57 in SBP1, this amino acid was altered to a glycine and the mutated protein was expressed in human cancer cells. The SBP1 half-life, as well as the cellular response to selenite cytotoxicity, was altered by this change. The ectopic expression of SBP1(GLY) also caused mitochondrial damage in HCT116 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine 57 is a critical determinant of SBP1 function and may play a significant role in mitochondrial function.

  11. From embryonic development to human diseases: The functional role of caveolae/caveolin.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jihee; Brick, Rachel M; Tuan, Rocky S

    2016-03-01

    Caveolae, an almost ubiquitous, structural component of the plasma membrane, play a critical role in many functions essential for proper cell function, including membrane trafficking, signal transduction, extracellular matrix remodeling, and tissue regeneration. Three main types of caveolin proteins have been identified from caveolae since the discovery of caveolin-1 in the early 1990s. All three (Cav-1, Cav-2, and Cav-3) play crucial roles in mammalian physiology, and can effect pathogenesis in a wide range of human diseases. While many biological activities of caveolins have been uncovered since its discovery, their role and regulation in embryonic develop remain largely poorly understood, although there is increasing evidence that caveolins may be linked to lung and brain birth defects. Further investigations are clearly needed to decipher how caveolae/caveolins mediate cellular functions and activities of normal embryogenesis and how their perturbations contribute to developmental disorders. PMID:26991990

  12. A Critical Role for Cysteine 57 in the Biological Functions of Selenium Binding Protein-1.

    PubMed

    Ying, Qi; Ansong, Emmanuel; Diamond, Alan M; Yang, Wancai

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of selenium-binding protein1 (SBP1) is often lower in tumors than in the corresponding tissue and lower levels have been associated with poor clinical outcomes. SBP1 binds tightly selenium although what role selenium plays in its biological functions remains unknown. Previous studies indicated that cysteine 57 is the most likely candidate amino acid for selenium binding. In order to investigate the role of cysteine 57 in SBP1, this amino acid was altered to a glycine and the mutated protein was expressed in human cancer cells. The SBP1 half-life, as well as the cellular response to selenite cytotoxicity, was altered by this change. The ectopic expression of SBP1(GLY) also caused mitochondrial damage in HCT116 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine 57 is a critical determinant of SBP1 function and may play a significant role in mitochondrial function. PMID:26593911

  13. Functional characterization of the Arabidopsis transcription factor bZIP29 reveals its role in leaf and root development

    PubMed Central

    Van Leene, Jelle; Blomme, Jonas; Kulkarni, Shubhada R; Cannoot, Bernard; De Winne, Nancy; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vercruysse, Leen; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Heyndrickx, Ken S; Vanneste, Steffen; Goossens, Alain; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk; De Jaeger, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Plant bZIP group I transcription factors have been reported mainly for their role during vascular development and osmosensory responses. Interestingly, bZIP29 has been identified in a cell cycle interactome, indicating additional functions of bZIP29 in plant development. Here, bZIP29 was functionally characterized to study its role during plant development. It is not present in vascular tissue but is specifically expressed in proliferative tissues. Genome-wide mapping of bZIP29 target genes confirmed its role in stress and osmosensory responses, but also identified specific binding to several core cell cycle genes and to genes involved in cell wall organization. bZIP29 protein complex analyses validated interaction with other bZIP group I members and provided insight into regulatory mechanisms acting on bZIP dimers. In agreement with bZIP29 expression in proliferative tissues and with its binding to promoters of cell cycle regulators, dominant-negative repression of bZIP29 altered the cell number in leaves and in the root meristem. A transcriptome analysis on the root meristem, however, indicated that bZIP29 might regulate cell number through control of cell wall organization. Finally, ectopic dominant-negative repression of bZIP29 and redundant factors led to a seedling-lethal phenotype, pointing to essential roles for bZIP group I factors early in plant development. PMID:27660483

  14. Transition-metal free reactions of boronic acids: cascade addition - ring-opening of furans towards functionalized γ-ketoaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Roscales, S; Csákÿ, A G

    2016-02-18

    We describe the first ring-opening of furfuryl alcohols with boronic acids to afford functionalized γ-ketoaldehydes. The transformation builds a new C-C bond at the original C-4 of the starting furan, and tolerates ring-substitution at C-3 and C-4 positions. The reaction takes place under metal-free conditions by promotion with tartaric acid.

  15. Dynamic Response of Pseudomonas putida S12 to Sudden Addition of Toluene and the Potential Role of the Solvent Tolerance Gene trgI

    PubMed Central

    Volkers, Rita J. M.; Snoek, L. Basten; Ruijssenaars, Harald J.; de Winde, Johannes H.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is exceptionally tolerant to various organic solvents. To obtain further insight into this bacterium’s primary defence mechanisms towards these potentially harmful substances, we studied its genome wide transcriptional response to sudden addition of toluene. Global gene expression profiles were monitored for 30 minutes after toluene addition. During toluene exposure, high oxygen-affinity cytochrome c oxidase is specifically expressed to provide for an adequate proton gradient supporting solvent efflux mechanisms. Concomitantly, the glyoxylate bypass route was up-regulated, to repair an apparent toluene stress-induced redox imbalance. A knock-out mutant of trgI, a recently identified toluene-repressed gene, was investigated in order to identify TrgI function. Remarkably, upon addition of toluene the number of differentially expressed genes initially was much lower in the trgI-mutant than in the wild-type strain. This suggested that after deletion of trgI cells were better prepared for sudden organic solvent stress. Before, as well as after, addition of toluene many genes of highly diverse functions were differentially expressed in trgI-mutant cells as compared to wild-type cells. This led to the hypothesis that TrgI may not only be involved in the modulation of solvent-elicited responses but in addition may affect basal expression levels of large groups of genes. PMID:26181384

  16. Roles, Functions, and Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yiwen; Fullwood, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in cancer. They are involved in chromatin remodeling, as well as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, through a variety of chromatin-based mechanisms and via cross-talk with other RNA species. lncRNAs can function as decoys, scaffolds, and enhancer RNAs. This review summarizes the characteristics of lncRNAs, including their roles, functions, and working mechanisms, describes methods for identifying and annotating lncRNAs, and discusses future opportunities for lncRNA-based therapies using antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:26883671

  17. Nickel superoxide dismutase: structural and functional roles of His1 and its H-bonding network

    DOE PAGES

    Maroney, Michael J.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Ryan, Kelly C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Johnson, Olivia E.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Garman, Scott C.

    2015-01-21

    Crystal structures of nickel-dependent superoxide dismutases (NiSODs) reveal the presence of a H-bonding network formed between the NH group of the apical imidazole ligand from His1 and the Glu17 carboxylate from a neighboring subunit in the hexameric enzyme. This interaction is supported by another intrasubunit H-bond between Glu17 and Arg47. In this study, four mutant NiSOD proteins were produced to experimentally evaluate the roles of this H-bonding network and compare the results with prior predictions from density functional theory calculations. The X-ray crystal structure of H1A-NiSOD, which lacks the apical ligand entirely, reveals that in the absence of the Glu17-His1more » H-bond, the active site is disordered. Characterization of this variant using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that Ni(II) is bound in the expected N₂S₂ planar coordination site. Despite these structural perturbations, the H1A-NiSOD variant retains 4% of wild-type (WT) NiSOD activity. Three other mutations were designed to preserve the apical imidazole ligand but perturb the H-bonding network: R47A-NiSOD, which lacks the intramolecular H-bonding interaction; E17R/R47A-NiSOD, which retains the intramolecular H-bond but lacks the intermolecular Glu17-His1 H-bond; and E17A/R47ANiSOD, which lacks both H-bonding interactions. These variants were characterized by a combination of techniques, including XAS to probe the nickel site structure, kinetic studies employing pulse-radiolytic production of superoxide, and electron paramagnetic resonance to assess the Ni redox activity. The results indicate that in addition to the roles in redox tuning suggested on the basis of previous computational studies, the Glu17-His1 H-bond plays an important structural role in the proper folding of the “Ni-hook” motif that is a critical feature of the active site.« less

  18. Nickel superoxide dismutase: structural and functional roles of His1 and its H-bonding network

    SciTech Connect

    Maroney, Michael J.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Ryan, Kelly C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Johnson, Olivia E.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Garman, Scott C.

    2015-01-21

    Crystal structures of nickel-dependent superoxide dismutases (NiSODs) reveal the presence of a H-bonding network formed between the NH group of the apical imidazole ligand from His1 and the Glu17 carboxylate from a neighboring subunit in the hexameric enzyme. This interaction is supported by another intrasubunit H-bond between Glu17 and Arg47. In this study, four mutant NiSOD proteins were produced to experimentally evaluate the roles of this H-bonding network and compare the results with prior predictions from density functional theory calculations. The X-ray crystal structure of H1A-NiSOD, which lacks the apical ligand entirely, reveals that in the absence of the Glu17-His1 H-bond, the active site is disordered. Characterization of this variant using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that Ni(II) is bound in the expected N₂S₂ planar coordination site. Despite these structural perturbations, the H1A-NiSOD variant retains 4% of wild-type (WT) NiSOD activity. Three other mutations were designed to preserve the apical imidazole ligand but perturb the H-bonding network: R47A-NiSOD, which lacks the intramolecular H-bonding interaction; E17R/R47A-NiSOD, which retains the intramolecular H-bond but lacks the intermolecular Glu17-His1 H-bond; and E17A/R47ANiSOD, which lacks both H-bonding interactions. These variants were characterized by a combination of techniques, including XAS to probe the nickel site structure, kinetic studies employing pulse-radiolytic production of superoxide, and electron paramagnetic resonance to assess the Ni redox activity. The results indicate that in addition to the roles in redox tuning suggested on the basis of previous computational studies, the Glu17-His1 H-bond plays an important structural role in the proper folding of the “Ni-hook” motif that is a critical feature of the active site.

  19. Nickel superoxide dismutase: structural and functional roles of His1 and its H-bonding network.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kelly C; Guce, Abigail I; Johnson, Olivia E; Brunold, Thomas C; Cabelli, Diane E; Garman, Scott C; Maroney, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structures of nickel-dependent superoxide dismutases (NiSODs) reveal the presence of a H-bonding network formed between the NH group of the apical imidazole ligand from His1 and the Glu17 carboxylate from a neighboring subunit in the hexameric enzyme. This interaction is supported by another intrasubunit H-bond between Glu17 and Arg47. In this study, four mutant NiSOD proteins were produced to experimentally evaluate the roles of this H-bonding network and compare the results with prior predictions from density functional theory calculations. The X-ray crystal structure of H1A-NiSOD, which lacks the apical ligand entirely, reveals that in the absence of the Glu17-His1 H-bond, the active site is disordered. Characterization of this variant using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that Ni(II) is bound in the expected N2S2 planar coordination site. Despite these structural perturbations, the H1A-NiSOD variant retains 4% of wild-type (WT) NiSOD activity. Three other mutations were designed to preserve the apical imidazole ligand but perturb the H-bonding network: R47A-NiSOD, which lacks the intramolecular H-bonding interaction; E17R/R47A-NiSOD, which retains the intramolecular H-bond but lacks the intermolecular Glu17-His1 H-bond; and E17A/R47A-NiSOD, which lacks both H-bonding interactions. These variants were characterized by a combination of techniques, including XAS to probe the nickel site structure, kinetic studies employing pulse-radiolytic production of superoxide, and electron paramagnetic resonance to assess the Ni redox activity. The results indicate that in addition to the roles in redox tuning suggested on the basis of previous computational studies, the Glu17-His1 H-bond plays an important structural role in the proper folding of the "Ni-hook" motif that is a critical feature of the active site. PMID:25580509

  20. Nickel superoxide dismutase: structural and functional roles of His1 and its H-bonding network.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kelly C; Guce, Abigail I; Johnson, Olivia E; Brunold, Thomas C; Cabelli, Diane E; Garman, Scott C; Maroney, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structures of nickel-dependent superoxide dismutases (NiSODs) reveal the presence of a H-bonding network formed between the NH group of the apical imidazole ligand from His1 and the Glu17 carboxylate from a neighboring subunit in the hexameric enzyme. This interaction is supported by another intrasubunit H-bond between Glu17 and Arg47. In this study, four mutant NiSOD proteins were produced to experimentally evaluate the roles of this H-bonding network and compare the results with prior predictions from density functional theory calculations. The X-ray crystal structure of H1A-NiSOD, which lacks the apical ligand entirely, reveals that in the absence of the Glu17-His1 H-bond, the active site is disordered. Characterization of this variant using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that Ni(II) is bound in the expected N2S2 planar coordination site. Despite these structural perturbations, the H1A-NiSOD variant retains 4% of wild-type (WT) NiSOD activity. Three other mutations were designed to preserve the apical imidazole ligand but perturb the H-bonding network: R47A-NiSOD, which lacks the intramolecular H-bonding interaction; E17R/R47A-NiSOD, which retains the intramolecular H-bond but lacks the intermolecular Glu17-His1 H-bond; and E17A/R47A-NiSOD, which lacks both H-bonding interactions. These variants were characterized by a combination of techniques, including XAS to probe the nickel site structure, kinetic studies employing pulse-radiolytic production of superoxide, and electron paramagnetic resonance to assess the Ni redox activity. The results indicate that in addition to the roles in redox tuning suggested on the basis of previous computational studies, the Glu17-His1 H-bond plays an important structural role in the proper folding of the "Ni-hook" motif that is a critical feature of the active site.

  1. Evidence for a functional vasodilatatory role for hydrogen sulphide in the human cutaneous microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Kutz, Jessica L; Greaney, Jody L; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Alexander, Lacy M

    2015-01-01

    blood pressure in animal models; however, its specific mechanistic role in the human vasculature remains unclear. In the present study, we report the novel finding that the enzymes responsible for endogenous H2S production, cystathionine-γ-lyase and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulphurtransferase, are expressed in the human cutaneous circulation. Functionally, we show that H2S-induced cutaneous vasodilatation is mediated, in part, by tetraethylammonium-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium channels and not by ATP-sensitive potassium channels. In addition, nitric oxide and cyclo-oxygenase-derived byproducts are required for full expression of exogenous H2S-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation. Future investigations of the potential role for H2S with respect to modulating vascular function in humans may have important clinical implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunction characteristic of multiple cardiovascular pathologies. PMID:25639684

  2. The roles of steroidogenic factor 1 in endocrine development and function.

    PubMed

    Parker, K L

    1998-05-25

    The nuclear hormone receptor family--structurally-related transcriptional regulators that mediate the actions of steroid hormones, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, and retinoids--also includes orphan members that lack known activating ligands. One of these orphan receptors, steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), has recently been shown to play key roles in steroidogenic cell function within the adrenal cortex and gonads. SF-1 also contributes to reproductive function at all three levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Key insights into these roles came from analyses of SF-1 knockout mice, which revealed adrenal and gonadal agenesis with consequent male-to-female sex reversal of their internal and external genitalia, impaired gonadotrope function, and agenesis of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. This report reviews the data that have established SF-1 as a critical mediator of endocrine differentiation and function.

  3. The role of intestinal epithelial barrier function in the development of NEC

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Melissa D; Denning, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial barrier plays an important role in maintaining host health. Breakdown of intestinal barrier function is known to play a role in many diseases such as infectious enteritis, idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease, and neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases. Recently, increasing research has demonstrated the importance of understanding how intestinal epithelial barrier function develops in the premature neonate in order to develop strategies to promote its maturation. Optimizing intestinal barrier function is thought to be key to preventing neonatal inflammatory bowel diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis. In this review, we will first summarize the key components of the intestinal epithelial barrier, what is known about its development, and how this may explain NEC pathogenesis. Finally, we will review what therapeutic strategies may be used to promote optimal development of neonatal intestinal barrier function in order to reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. PMID:25927016

  4. Relationship Between Renal Function and Functional Decline: Role of the Estimating Equation

    PubMed Central

    Pedone, Claudio; Corsonello, Andrea; Bandinelli, Stefania; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Ferrucci, Luigi; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2016-01-01

    Background Several formulas are available to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at the bedside. A decrease in GFR has been associated with poorer performance. We hypothesized that it is related to worsening disability as well. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formulas can predict worsening disability better than the classic Cockcroft-Gault formula or the measured creatinine clearance. Methods We studied 666 participants in the InCHIANTI study with 6 years of follow-up data. We evaluated whether directly measured creatinine clearance and GFR estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and Cockcroft-Gault formulas predict new disability defined as the loss of ≥1 ADL over the 6-year follow-up. Results The mean age was 73.1 years (SD: 6.1), 57.7% were women. Fewer than 5% of participants were disabled at baseline. Eighty-one (12.2%) participants experienced a decline in activities of daily life score at follow-up. Declining GFR was associated with increasing risk of worsening disability (Mantel-Haenszel P < .001), with an increased steepness in the curve at GFR below 60 mL/min. The relative risks for worsening disability in people with GFR less than 60 mL/min/m were 3.19 (95% CI: 2.12–4.79) and 4.40 (95% CI: 2.80–6.94) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and the Cockcroft-Gault equations, respectively. The corresponding figures obtained with measured creatinine clearance was 3.95 (95% CI: 2.60–6.01). After adjustment for potential confounders, however, these estimates were substantially reduced. Conclusion Estimation of renal function with the Cockcroft-Gault or Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formulas can help to identify elderly at risk of worsening disability. The mechanism by which reduced kidney function predicts disability should be further investigated. PMID:21450248

  5. Plant functional traits mediate reproductive phenology and success in response to experimental warming and snow addition in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Dorji, Tsechoe; Totland, Orjan; Moe, Stein R; Hopping, Kelly A; Pan, Jianbin; Klein, Julia A

    2013-02-01

    Global climate change is predicted to have large impacts on the phenology and reproduction of alpine plants, which will have important implications for plant demography and community interactions, trophic dynamics, ecosystem energy balance, and human livelihoods. In this article we report results of a 3-year, fully factorial experimental study exploring how warming, snow addition, and their combination affect reproductive phenology, effort, and success of four alpine plant species belonging to three different life forms in a semiarid, alpine meadow ecosystem on the central Tibetan Plateau. Our results indicate that warming and snow addition change reproductive phenology and success, but responses are not uniform across species. Moreover, traits associated with resource acquisition, such as rooting depth and life history (early vs. late flowering), mediate plant phenology, and reproductive responses to changing climatic conditions. Specifically, we found that warming delayed the reproductive phenology and decreased number of inflorescences of Kobresia pygmaea C. B. Clarke, a shallow-rooted, early-flowering plant, which may be mainly constrained by upper-soil moisture availability. Because K. pygmaea is the dominant species in the alpine meadow ecosystem, these results may have important implications for ecosystem dynamics and for pastoralists and wildlife in the region.

  6. Serum Basal Paraoxonase 1 Activity as an Additional Liver Function Test for the Evaluation of Patients with Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Halappa, Chandrakanth K; Pyati, Sudharani A; Nagaraj; Wali, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnostic accuracy of currently available standard panel of liver function tests is not satisfactory for the reliable diagnosis of chronic liver disorders. Earlier studies have reported that serum basal paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity measurement may add a significant contribution to the liver function tests. Aim To assess whether the measurement of serum basal paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity would be useful as an index of liver function status in chronic hepatitis patients. Materials and Methods The study included 50 chronic hepatitis patients and 50 apparently healthy controls based on inclusion & exclusion criteria. In all the subjects, standard liver function tests were analysed by using standard methods. Basal PON1 activity was estimated using spectrophotometric method by the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylacetate. Student t-test, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, diagnostic validity tests and ROC curve analysis were the methods used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results The serum basal PON1 activity was significantly decreased in chronic hepatitis cases when compared to controls (p< 0.001). Also basal PON1 activity was positively correlated with serum total protein and albumin, and negatively correlated with serum total bilirubin, alanine amino transferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (p< 0.001) in chronic hepatitis cases but not in healthy controls. Diagnostic validity tests showed, basal PON1 activity was a better discriminator of chronic hepatitis than total protein, albumin and ALP with sensitivity of 68%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 75%. ROC curve analysis demonstrated highest diagnostic accuracy for ALT (AUC = 0.999) followed by PON1 (AUC = 0.990), total bilirubin (AUC = 0.977), ALP (AUC = 0.904), total protein (AUC = 0.790) and albumin (AUC = 0.595). Conclusion Diagnostic accuracy of serum PON1 activity is better than total bilirubin, total protein, albumin and

  7. Symbolic integration of a product of two spherical Bessel functions with an additional exponential and polynomial factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremariam, B.; Duguet, T.; Bogner, S. K.

    2010-06-01

    We present a Mathematica package that performs the symbolic calculation of integrals of the form ∫0∞exj(x)j(x)dx where j(x) and j(x) denote spherical Bessel functions of integer orders, with ν⩾0 and μ⩾0. With the real parameter u>0 and the integer n, convergence of the integral requires that n+ν+μ⩾0. The package provides analytical result for the integral in its most simplified form. In cases where direct Mathematica implementations succeed in evaluating these integrals, the novel symbolic method implemented in this work obtains the same result and in general, it takes a fraction of the time required for the direct implementation. We test the accuracy of such analytical expressions by comparing the results with their numerical counterparts. Program summaryProgram title: SymbBesselJInteg Catalogue identifier: AEFY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 275 934 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 399 705 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 7.1 Computer: Any computer running Mathematica 6.0 and later versions. Operating system: Windows Xp, Linux/Unix. RAM: 256 Mb Classification: 5. Nature of problem: Integration, both analytical and numerical, of products of two spherical Bessel functions with an exponential and polynomial multiplying factor can be a very complex task depending on the orders of the spherical Bessel functions. The Mathematica package discussed in this paper solves this problem using a novel symbolic approach. Solution method: The problem is first cast into a related limit problem which can be broken into two related subproblems involving exponential and exponential integral functions. Solving the cores of each

  8. The role of pain acceptance on function in individuals with disabilities: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Smith, Amanda E; Alschuler, Kevin N; Gillanders, David T; Amtmann, Dagmar; Molton, Ivan R

    2016-01-01

    Having higher levels of pain acceptance has been shown to be associated positively with quality of life in patients with chronic pain, but its role in adjustment to chronic pain among individuals with physical disabilities living in the community is not known. Moreover, issues related to item overlap between measures of pain acceptance and measures of patient function have limited the conclusions that can be drawn from previous research in this area. To better understand the role that pain acceptance plays in patient function, we administered measures of pain acceptance, pain intensity, depressive symptoms, and function to 392 individuals with physical disabilities, and the pain, symptom, and function measures were readministered 3.5 years later. Analyses evaluated the main and interaction effects of initial pain acceptance on subsequent changes in pain and function. Having higher levels of pain acceptance-in particular as reflected by a willingness to engage in activities despite pain-resulted in less increase in pain intensity and more improvements in pain interference, physical function, depressive symptoms, and sleep quality. The findings indicate that previous research supporting the importance of pain acceptance to function in patients from health care settings extends to individuals with chronic pain living in the community. Moreover, they indicate that pain acceptance may have long-lasting (up to 3.5 years) beneficial effects on subsequent pain and function and on the association between change in pain and depression. Research to examine the potential benefits of community-based treatments that increase pain acceptance is warranted.

  9. Graphite electrode thermal behavior and solid electrolyte interphase investigations: Role of state-of-the-art binders, carbonate additives and lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestier, Coralie; Grugeon, Sylvie; Davoisne, Carine; Lecocq, Amandine; Marlair, Guy; Armand, Michel; Sannier, Lucas; Laruelle, Stephane

    2016-10-01

    The risk of thermal runaway is, for Li-ion batteries, a critical issue for large-scale applications. This results in manufacturers and researchers placing great emphasis on minimizing the heat generation and thereby mitigating safety-related risks through the search for suitable materials or additives. To this end, an in-depth stepwise investigation has been undertaken to provide a better understanding of the exothermic processes that take place at the negative electrode/electrolyte interface as well as an increased visibility of the role of the state-of-the-art electrode binders, additives and lithium salt by means of the classical DSC technique. A reliable experimental set up helped quantify the beneficial or harmful contribution of binder polymers to the exothermic behavior of the CMC/SBR containing graphite electrode film in contact with 1 M LiPF6 in EC:DMC:EMC (1:1:1 v/v/v) electrolyte. Further, the role of the VC, FEC and VEC electrolyte additives (2 wt%) in reinforcing the protective SEI layer towards thermally induced electrolyte reduction is discussed in the light of infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyzes results. Moreover, after a preliminary corrosion study of LiPF6/LiFSI mixtures, we showed that the 0.66/0.33 M composition can be used in commercial NMC-based LiBs with a positive effect on the thermal runaway.

  10. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs and protein domains to predict RNA splicing-related proteins with functional roles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Tzu-Ya; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Machinery of pre-mRNA splicing is carried out through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA splicing-related proteins (SRPs) (e.g. spliceosome and splicing factors). Alternative splicing, which is an important post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, gives rise to multiple mature mRNA isoforms, which encodes proteins with functional diversities. However, the regulation of RNA splicing is not yet fully elucidated, partly because SRPs have not yet been exhaustively identified and the experimental identification is labor-intensive. Therefore, we are motivated to design a new method for identifying SRPs with their functional roles in the regulation of RNA splicing. The experimentally verified SRPs were manually curated from research articles. According to the functional annotation of Splicing Related Gene Database, the collected SRPs were further categorized into four functional groups including small nuclear Ribonucleoprotein, Splicing Factor, Splicing Regulation Factor and Novel Spliceosome Protein. The composition of amino acid pairs indicates that there are remarkable differences among four functional groups of SRPs. Then, support vector machines (SVMs) were utilized to learn the predictive models for identifying SRPs as well as their functional roles. The cross-validation evaluation presents that the SVM models trained with significant amino acid pairs and functional domains could provide a better predictive performance. In addition, the independent testing demonstrates that the proposed method could accurately identify SRPs in mammals/plants as well as effectively distinguish between SRPs and RNA-binding proteins. This investigation provides a practical means to identifying potential SRPs and a perspective for exploring the regulation of RNA splicing.

  11. Insights on the Application of the Retro Michael-Type Addition on Maleimide-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles in Biology and Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Max R; Winger, Kathleen T; Ghiassian, Sara; Gobbo, Pierangelo; Workentin, Mark S

    2016-03-16

    The glutathione-mediated retro Michael-type addition reaction is demonstrated to take place at the interface of small water-soluble maleimide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Maleimide-AuNP). The retro Michael-type addition reaction can be blocked by hydrolyzing the Michael addition thioether adduct at the nanoparticle's interface under reaction conditions that do not cause AuNP decomposition. This procedure "locks" the molecule of interest onto the Maleimide-AuNP template for potential uses in medical imaging and bioconjugation, ensuring no loss of the molecular cargo from the nanocarrier. On the other hand, the glutathione-mediated retro Michael-type addition reaction can be exploited for delivering a molecular payload. As a proof of concept, a fluorogenic molecular cargo was incorporated onto a Maleimide-AuNP and delivered via the glutathione-mediated retro Michael-type addition reaction.

  12. Role of Invariant Thr80 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Structure, Function, and Viral Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Foulkes, Jennifer E.; Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Cooper, Deyna; Henderson, Gavin J.; Harris, Janera; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2006-01-01

    Sequence variability associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is useful for inferring structural and/or functional constraints at specific residues within the viral protease. Positions that are invariant even in the presence of drug selection define critically important residues for protease function. While the importance of conserved active-site residues is easily understood, the role of other invariant residues is not. This work focuses on invariant Thr80 at the apex of the P1 loop of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus protease. In a previous study, we postulated, on the basis of a molecular dynamics simulation of the unliganded protease, that Thr80 may play a role in the mobility of the flaps of protease. In the present study, both experimental and computational methods were used to study the role of Thr80 in HIV protease. Three protease variants (T80V, T80N, and T80S) were examined for changes in structure, dynamics, enzymatic activity, affinity for protease inhibitors, and viral infectivity. While all three variants were structurally similar to the wild type, only T80S was functionally similar. Both T80V and T80N had decreased the affinity for saquinavir. T80V significantly decreased the ability of the enzyme to cleave a peptide substrate but maintained infectivity, while T80N abolished both activity and viral infectivity. Additionally, T80N decreased the conformational flexibility of the flap region, as observed by simulations of molecular dynamics. Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-1 protease functions best when residue 80 is a small polar residue and that mutations to other amino acids significantly impair enzyme function, possibly by affecting the flexibility of the flap domain. PMID:16809296

  13. The functional O-mannose glycan on α-dystroglycan contains a phospho-ribitol primed for matriglycan addition.

    PubMed

    Praissman, Jeremy L; Willer, Tobias; Sheikh, M Osman; Toi, Ants; Chitayat, David; Lin, Yung-Yao; Lee, Hane; Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Wang, Shuo; Prabhakar, Pradeep Kumar; Nelson, Stanley F; Stemple, Derek L; Moore, Steven A; Moremen, Kelley W; Campbell, Kevin P; Wells, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Multiple glycosyltransferases are essential for the proper modification of alpha-dystroglycan, as mutations in the encoding genes cause congenital/limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. Here we elucidate further the structure of an O-mannose-initiated glycan on alpha-dystroglycan that is required to generate its extracellular matrix-binding polysaccharide. This functional glycan contains a novel ribitol structure that links a phosphotrisaccharide to xylose. ISPD is a CDP-ribitol (ribose) pyrophosphorylase that generates the reduced sugar nucleotide for the insertion of ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage to the glycoprotein. TMEM5 is a UDP-xylosyl transferase that elaborates the structure. We demonstrate in a zebrafish model as well as in a human patient that defects in TMEM5 result in muscular dystrophy in combination with abnormal brain development. Thus, we propose a novel structure-a ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage-for the moiety on which TMEM5, B4GAT1, and LARGE act to generate the functional receptor for ECM proteins having LG domains. PMID:27130732

  14. The functional O-mannose glycan on α-dystroglycan contains a phospho-ribitol primed for matriglycan addition

    PubMed Central

    Praissman, Jeremy L; Willer, Tobias; Sheikh, M Osman; Toi, Ants; Chitayat, David; Lin, Yung-Yao; Lee, Hane; Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Wang, Shuo; Prabhakar, Pradeep Kumar; Nelson, Stanley F; Stemple, Derek L; Moore, Steven A; Moremen, Kelley W; Campbell, Kevin P; Wells, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Multiple glycosyltransferases are essential for the proper modification of alpha-dystroglycan, as mutations in the encoding genes cause congenital/limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. Here we elucidate further the structure of an O-mannose-initiated glycan on alpha-dystroglycan that is required to generate its extracellular matrix-binding polysaccharide. This functional glycan contains a novel ribitol structure that links a phosphotrisaccharide to xylose. ISPD is a CDP-ribitol (ribose) pyrophosphorylase that generates the reduced sugar nucleotide for the insertion of ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage to the glycoprotein. TMEM5 is a UDP-xylosyl transferase that elaborates the structure. We demonstrate in a zebrafish model as well as in a human patient that defects in TMEM5 result in muscular dystrophy in combination with abnormal brain development. Thus, we propose a novel structure—a ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage—for the moiety on which TMEM5, B4GAT1, and LARGE act to generate the functional receptor for ECM proteins having LG domains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14473.001 PMID:27130732

  15. On the fast evaluation of three-center nuclear attraction integrals using one-range addition theorems for Slater functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seçkin Görgün, Nurşen

    2013-06-01

    Using one-range addition theorems, the three-center nuclear attraction integrals are expressed through the overlap integrals containing χ - and χ α -Slater-type orbitals (χ -STOs and χ α -STOs), where - ∞ < α ⩽ 2 and \\chi _{nlm}^\\alpha \\left( {\\zeta ,\\vec r} \\right) = \\frac{1}{{\\left( {2\\zeta r} \\right)^\\alpha }}\\chi _{nlm} \\left( {\\zeta ,\\vec r} \\right) . For the fast calculation, the partial summation is utilized for some indices of series expansion relations which correspond to progressively increasing upper limits. The binomial coefficients are stored in the memory of the computer. The convergence and accuracy of series are tested by calculating concrete cases. The best values are obtained for α = 0 .

  16. Biological roles and functional mechanisms of arenavirus Z protein in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialong; Danzy, Shamika; Kumar, Naveen; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2012-09-01

    Arenaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever diseases in humans, with limited prophylactic or therapeutic measures. A small RING-domain viral protein Z has been shown to mediate the formation of virus-like particles and to inhibit viral RNA synthesis, although its biological roles in an infectious viral life cycle have not been directly addressed. By taking advantage of the available reverse genetics system for a model arenavirus, Pichinde virus (PICV), we provide the direct evidence for the essential biological roles of the Z protein's conserved residues, including the G2 myristylation site, the conserved C and H residues of RING domain, and the poorly characterized C-terminal L79 and P80 residues. Dicodon substitutions within the late (L) domain (PSAPPYEP) of the PICV Z protein, although producing viable mutant viruses, have significantly reduced virus growth, a finding suggestive of an important role for the intact L domain in viral replication. Further structure-function analyses of both PICV and Lassa fever virus Z proteins suggest that arenavirus Z proteins have similar molecular mechanisms in mediating their multiple functions, with some interesting variations, such as the role of the G2 residue in blocking viral RNA synthesis. In summary, our studies have characterized the biological roles of the Z protein in an infectious arenavirus system and have shed important light on the distinct functions of its domains in virus budding and viral RNA regulation, the knowledge of which may lead to the development of novel antiviral drugs.

  17. Forest soil CO2 fluxes as a function of understory removal and N-fixing species addition.

    PubMed

    Li, Haifang; Fu, Shenglei; Zhao, Hongting; Xia, Hanping

    2011-01-01

    We report on the effects of forest management practices of understory removal and N-fixing species (Cassia alata) addition on soil CO2 fluxes in an Eucalyptus urophylla plantation (EUp), Acacia crassicarpa plantation (ACp), 10-species-mixed plantation (Tp), and 30-species-mixed plantation (THp) using the static chamber method in southern China. Four forest management treatments, including (1) understory removal (UR); (2) C. alata addition (CA); (3) understory removal and replacement with C. alata (UR+CA); and (4) control without any disturbances (CK), were applied in the above four forest plantations with three replications for each treatment. The results showed that soil CO2 fluxes rates remained at a high level during the rainy season (from April to September), followed by a rapid decrease after October reaching a minimum in February. Soil CO2 fluxes were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in EUp (132.6 mg/(m2 x hr)) and ACp (139.8 mg/(m2 x hr)) than in Tp (94.0 mg/(m2 x hr)) and THp (102.9 mg/(m2 x hr)). Soil CO2 fluxes in UR and CA were significantly higher (P < 0.01) among the four treatments, with values of 105.7, 120.4, 133.6 and 112.2 mg/(m2 x hr) for UR+CA, UR, CA and CK, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with soil temperature (P < 0.01), soil moisture (P < 0.01), NO3(-)-N (P < 0.05), and litterfall (P < 0.01), indicating that all these factors might be important controlling variables for soil CO2 fluxes. This study sheds some light on our understanding of soil CO2 flux dynamics in forest plantations under various management practices.

  18. [CHAPERONES FUNCTION HSP60 AND HSP90 AND THEIR ROLE IN CARDIAC PATHOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Kazimirko, V K; Kutovoy, V V; Bobyk, V I; Kozak, I O; Ivanitskaya, L M; Dubkova, A G; Silanteva, T S

    2014-01-01

    In review provides information about the function oft the body of chaperones and their role in the development of pathological processes, including--atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Marked comminications systems chaperones to the immune and endocrine systems, and inflammation. PMID:26492771

  19. Individual Differences in Early Numeracy: The Role of Executive Functions and Subitizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroesbergen, E. H.; Van Luit, J. E. H.; Van Lieshout, E. C. D. M.; Van Loosbroek, E.; Van de Rijt, B. A. M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the question was raised how basic cognitive processes are related to math abilities and how it can be best determined which children are at risk for developing those disabilities. The role of four distinct basic processes in the development of early mathematics was investigated: executive functions, fluid intelligence, subitizing,…

  20. Public Libraries and School Libraries, Their Roles and Functions; An Anthology of Opinions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchner Public Library (Ontario).

    This anthology of opinions about the roles and functions of public and school libraries covers the following topics: (1) The School-Housed Public Library--An Evaluation; (2) School and Public Library Relationships; (3) The Case for Independent School Libraries; (4) Report on Killarney Branch Library (Vancouver); (5) Report on the Flint Public…

  1. A Model of School Counseling Supervision: The Goals, Functions, Roles, and Systems Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Chris; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2006-01-01

    The authors outline the Goals, Functions, Roles, and Systems Model (GFRS), a school counseling-specific model for supervising school counselors-in-training (SCITs). The GFRS was created as a guide for assisting in supervising and preparing SCITs for the multifaceted tasks they will undertake in their internships and careers. The components of this…

  2. ROLE OF TYROSINE-SULFATED PROTEINS IN RETINAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Y.; Al-Ubaidi, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a significant role in cellular and retinal health. The study of retinal tyrosine-sulfated proteins is an important first step toward understanding the role of ECM in retinal health and diseases. These secreted proteins are members of the retinal ECM. Tyrosine sulfation was shown to be necessary for the development of proper retinal structure and function. The importance of tyrosine sulfation is further demonstrated by the evolutionary presence of tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases, enzymes that catalyze proteins’ tyrosine sulfation, and the compensatory abilities of these enzymes. Research has identified four tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins: fibulin 2, vitronectin, complement factor H (CFH), and opticin. Vitronectin and CFH regulate the activation of the complement system and are involved in the etiology of some cases of age-related macular degeneration. Analysis of the role of tyrosine sulfation in fibulin function showed that sulfation influences the protein's ability to regulate growth and migration. Although opticin was recently shown to exhibit anti-angiogenic properties, it is not yet determined what role sulfation plays in that function. Future studies focusing on identifying all of the tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins would be instrumental in determining the impact of sulfation on retinal protein function in retinal homeostasis and diseases. PMID:25819460

  3. Teachers' Understanding of the Role of Executive Functions in Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Camilla; Cragg, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychology research has suggested an important role for executive functions, the set of skills that monitor and control thought and action, in learning mathematics. However, there is currently little evidence about whether teachers are aware of the importance of these skills and, if so, how they come by this information. We conducted an…

  4. Building-Level Administrators' Perceptions of the Roles and Functions of Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiDomenico-Sorrento, Tara M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this survey research study is to describe and analyze how building-level high school administrators (BLAB) view the roles and functions of professional school counselors (PSCs), particularly as they relate to the National Model of the American Counseling Association (ASCA) that was developed from the ASCA's National Standards. Online…

  5. The Role of the Verb in Grammatical Function Assignment in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heeju; Kaiser, Elsi

    2014-01-01

    One of the central questions in speech production is how speakers decide which entity to assign to which grammatical function. According to the lexical hypothesis (e.g., Bock & Levelt, 1994), verbs play a key role in this process (e.g., "send" and "receive" result in different entities being assigned to the subject…

  6. Priority Information Used for the Processing of Japanese Sentences: Thematic Roles, Case Particles or Grammatical Functions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamaoka, Katsuo; Sakai, Hiromu; Kawahara, Jun-ichiro; Miyaoka, Yayoi; Lim, Hyunjung; Koizumi, Masatoshi

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated scrambling effects on the processing of Japanese sentences and priority information used among thematic roles, case particles and grammatical functions. Reaction times for correct sentence decisions were significantly prolonged for scrambled active sentences with transitive verbs in the first experiment and with…

  7. Mitochondrial function and toxicity: role of B vitamins on the one-carbon transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Depeint, Flore; Bruce, W Robert; Shangari, Nandita; Mehta, Rhea; O'Brien, Peter J

    2006-10-27

    The B vitamins are water-soluble vitamins that are required as coenzymes for reactions essential for cellular function. This review focuses on the essential role of vitamins in maintaining the one-carbon transfer cycles. Folate and choline are believed to be central methyl donors required for mitochondrial protein and nucleic acid synthesis through their active forms, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and betaine, respectively. Cobalamin (B12) may assist methyltetrahydrofolate in the synthesis of methionine, a cysteine source for glutathione biosynthesis. Pyridoxal, pyridoxine and pyridoxamine (B6) seem to be involved in the regeneration of tetrahydrofolate into the active methyl-bearing form and in glutathione biosynthesis from homocysteine. Other roles of these vitamins that are relevant to mitochondrial functions will also be discussed. However these roles for B vitamins in cell function are mostly theoretically based and still require verification at the cellular level. For instance it is still not known what B vitamins are depleted by xenobiotic toxins or which cellular targets, metabolic pathways or molecular toxic mechanisms are prevented by B vitamins. This review covers the current state of knowledge and suggests where this research field is heading so as to better understand the role vitamin Bs play in cellular function and intermediary metabolism as well as molecular, cellular and clinical consequences of vitamin deficiency. The current experimental and clinical evidence that supplementation alleviates deficiency symptoms as well as the effectiveness of vitamins as antioxidants will also be reviewed.

  8. Identity Diffusion as a Function of Sex-Roles in Adult Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabury, Donald Eugene

    This study sought to demonstrate that the relative degree of adult female identity diffusion, as well as certain personality correlates, would be a function of specific sex roles and their combinations. Three groups of 32 women each were selected as married and noncareer, married and career, or unmarried and career women. They were administered a…

  9. Is There a Role for Executive Functions in the Development of Mathematics Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Clancy; Knipe, Hilary; Gamson, David

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the role of working memory, attention shifting, and inhibitory control executive cognitive functions in the development of mathematics knowledge and ability in children. It suggests that an examination of the executive cognitive demand of mathematical thinking can complement procedural and conceptual knowledge-based…

  10. Role of cilia in normal pancreas function and in diseased states.

    PubMed

    diIorio, Philip; Rittenhouse, Ann R; Bortell, Rita; Jurczyk, Agata

    2014-06-01

    Primary cilia play an essential role in modulating signaling cascades that shape cellular responses to environmental cues to maintain proper tissue development. Mutations in primary cilium proteins have been linked to several rare developmental disorders, collectively known as ciliopathies. Together with other disorders associated with dysfunctional cilia/centrosomes, affected individuals have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, neurologic disorders, and diabetes. In pancreatic tissues, cilia are found exclusively in islet and ductal cells where they play an essential role in pancreatic tissue organization. Their absence or disorganization leads to pancreatic duct abnormalities, acinar cell loss, polarity defects, and dysregulated insulin secretion. Cilia in pancreatic tissues are hubs for cellular signaling. Many signaling components, such as Hh, Notch, and Wnt, localize to pancreatic primary cilia and are necessary for proper development of pancreatic epithelium and β-cell morphogenesis. Receptors for neuroendocrine hormones, such as Somatostatin Receptor 3, also localize to the cilium and may play a more direct role in controlling insulin secretion due to somatostatin's inhibitory function. Finally, unique calcium signaling, which is at the heart of β-cell function, also occurs in primary cilia. Whereas voltage-gated calcium channels trigger insulin secretion and serve a variety of homeostatic functions in β-cells, transient receptor potential channels regulate calcium levels within the cilium that may serve as a feedback mechanism, regulating insulin secretion. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the role of primary cilia in normal pancreas function and in the diseased state. PMID:24861006

  11. The Role and Functionality of Emotions in Feedback at University: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Anna D.; Fitness, Julie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study exploring the role and functionality of emotions in feedback. In-depth interview data from students and lecturers at an Australian university are analysed using cognitive appraisal and prototype theory. Results suggest that students experience a range of positive and negative emotions in feedback contexts…

  12. The Role of Causal and Intentional Judgments in Moral Reasoning in Individuals with High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buon, Marine; Dupoux, Emmanuel; Jacob, Pierre; Chaste, Pauline; Leboyer, Marion; Zalla, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the ability to assign moral responsibility and punishment in adults with high functioning autism or Asperger Syndrome (HFA/AS), using non-verbal cartoons depicting an aggression, an accidental harm or a mere coincidence. Participants were asked to evaluate the agent's causal and intentional roles, his…

  13. Time to Get a New Mountain? The Role of Function in Children's Conceptions of Natural Kinds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiYanni, Cara; Kelemen, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    Prior research indicates that young children are promiscuously teleological, attributing purpose not only to artifacts, but also to living and non-living natural entities. This study further examines the role of function in children's reasoning about different object kinds by indirectly probing children's intuitions about what types of entities…

  14. Early Childcare, Executive Functioning, and the Moderating Role of Early Stress Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Daniel; Willoughby, Michael T.; Blair, Clancy; Ursache, Alexandra; Granger, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention studies indicate that children's childcare experiences can be leveraged to support the development of executive functioning (EF). The role of more normative childcare experiences is less clear. Increasingly, theory and empirical work suggest that individual differences in children's physiological stress systems may be…

  15. Game Changers: The Quest to Rethink Institutional Roles and Functions at U.S. Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Bob

    2014-01-01

    When the 10 members of the American Association of Community College's (AACC's) 21st-Century Implementation Team 7 (nine of whom are community college presidents) sat down in 2013 to talk about reforming institutional roles and functions at the nation's two-year career and technical colleges, everyone in the room knew the work before them would be…

  16. NhaA antiporter functions using 10 helices, and an additional 2 contribute to assembly/stability

    PubMed Central

    Padan, Etana; Danieli, Tsafi; Keren, Yael; Alkoby, Dudu; Masrati, Gal; Haliloglu, Turkan; Ben-Tal, Nir; Rimon, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Na+/H+ antiporter (Ec-NhaA) is the best-characterized of all pH-regulated Na+/H+ exchangers that control cellular Na+ and H+ homeostasis. Ec-NhaA has 12 helices, 2 of which (VI and VII) are absent from other antiporters that share the Ec-NhaA structural fold. This α-hairpin is located in the dimer interface of the Ec-NhaA homodimer together with a β-sheet. Here we examine computationally and experimentally the role of the α-hairpin in the stability, dimerization, transport, and pH regulation of Ec-NhaA. Evolutionary analysis (ConSurf) indicates that the VI–VII helical hairpin is much less conserved than the remaining transmembrane region. Moreover, normal mode analysis also shows that intact NhaA and a variant, deleted of the α-hairpin, share similar dynamics, suggesting that the structure may be dispensable. Thus, two truncated Ec-NhaA mutants were constructed, one deleted of the α-hairpin and another also lacking the β-sheet. The mutants were studied at physiological pH in the membrane and in detergent micelles. The findings demonstrate that the truncated mutants retain significant activity and regulatory properties but are defective in the assembly/stability of the Ec-NhaA dimer. PMID:26417087

  17. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP's Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Phillip; Ceman, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%-60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP's interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10), which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex. PMID:27338369

  18. Insights into the role of connexins in mammary gland morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael K G; Simek, Jamie; Laird, Dale W

    2015-06-01

    Gap junctions formed of connexin subunits link adjacent cells by direct intercellular communication that is essential for normal tissue homeostasis in the mammary gland. The mammary gland undergoes immense remodeling and requires exquisite regulation to control the proliferative, differentiating, and cell death mechanisms regulating gland development and function. The generation of novel genetically modified mice with reduced or ablated connexin function within the mammary gland has advanced our understanding of the role of gap junctions during the complex and dynamic process of mammary gland development. These studies have revealed an important stage-specific role for Cx26 (GJA1) and Cx43 (GJB2), while Cx30 (GJB6) and Cx32 (Gjb1) can be eliminated without compromising the gland. Yet, there remain gaps in our understanding of the role of mammary gland gap junctions.

  19. Using NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the role of molecular motions in enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Lisi, George P; Loria, J Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Conformational motions play an essential role in enzyme function, often facilitating the formation of enzyme-substrate complexes and/or product release. Although considerable debate remains regarding the role of molecular motions in the conversion of enzymatic substrates to products, numerous examples have found motions to be crucial for optimization of enzyme scaffolds, effective substrate binding, and product dissociation. Conformational fluctuations are often rate-limiting to enzyme catalysis, primarily through product release, with the chemical reaction occurring much more quickly. As a result, the direct involvement of motions at various stages along the enzyme reaction coordinate remains largely unknown and untested. In the following review, we describe the use of solution NMR techniques designed to probe various timescales of molecular motions and detail examples in which motions play a role in propagating catalytic effects from the active site and directly participate in essential aspects of enzyme function.

  20. Development of affective theory of mind across adolescence: disentangling the role of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Nora C; Altgassen, Mareike; Phillips, Louise; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Theory of mind, the ability to understand mental states, involves inferences about others' cognitive (cognitive theory of mind) and emotional (affective theory of mind) mental states. The current study explored the role of executive functions in developing affective theory of mind across adolescence. Affective theory of mind and three subcomponents of executive functions (inhibition, updating, and shifting) were measured. Affective theory of mind was positively related to age, and all three executive functions. Specifically, inhibition explained the largest amount of variance in age-related differences in affective theory of mind.

  1. The Role of Partner-Related Fascination in the Association Between Sexual Functioning and Relationship Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Burri, Andrea; Radwan, Sarah; Bodenmann, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have shown strong associations between sexual functioning and interpersonal factors. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the moderating role of partner-related fascination-an important dimension of relationship quality-in the association between sexual functioning and relationship satisfaction in a community sample of Swiss men and women. A total of 70 individuals participated in an anonymous online survey. Variables related to sexual functioning, fascination and relationship satisfaction were subject to correlation, regression and moderation analyses. PMID:25256950

  2. Metal-free oxidative radical addition of carbonyl compounds to α,α-diaryl allylic alcohols: synthesis of highly functionalized ketones.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xue-Qiang; Meng, Hua; Zi, You; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Ji, Shun-Jun

    2014-12-15

    A metal-free direct alkylation of simple carbonyl compounds (ketones, esters, and amides) with α,α-diaryl allylic alcohols is described. The protocol provides facile access to highly functionalized dicarbonyl ketones by a radical addition/1,2-aryl migration cascade. The regioselectivity of the reaction was precisely controlled by the nature of the carbonyl compound.

  3. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive

    PubMed Central

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K.; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10–70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  4. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10-70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  5. Role of Gut Barrier Function in the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Wang, Bangmao

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common forms of chronic liver disease, and its incidence is increasing year by year. Many efforts have been made to investigate the pathogenesis of this disease. Since 1998 when Marshall proposed the conception of “gut-liver axis,” more and more researchers have paid close attention to the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The four aspects of gut barrier function, including physical, chemical, biological, and immunological barriers, are interrelated closely and related to NAFLD. In this paper, we present a summary of research findings on the relationship between gut barrier dysfunction and the development of NAFLD, aiming at illustrating the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25945084

  6. The role of long non-coding RNAs in neurodevelopment, brain function and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas C; Morris, Kevin V; Wood, Matthew J A

    2014-09-26

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts with low protein-coding potential that represent a large proportion of the transcriptional output of the cell. Many lncRNAs exhibit features indicative of functionality including tissue-restricted expression, localization to distinct subcellular structures, regulated expression and evolutionary conservation. Some lncRNAs have been shown to associate with chromatin-modifying activities and transcription factors, suggesting that a common mode of action may be to guide protein complexes to target genomic loci. However, the functions (if any) of the vast majority of lncRNA transcripts are currently unknown, and the subject of investigation. Here, we consider the putative role(s) of lncRNAs in neurodevelopment and brain function with an emphasis on the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Associations of lncRNAs with neurodevelopmental/neuropsychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and brain cancers are also discussed.

  7. Marine reserves lag behind wilderness in the conservation of key functional roles.

    PubMed

    D'agata, Stéphanie; Mouillot, David; Wantiez, Laurent; Friedlander, Alan M; Kulbicki, Michel; Vigliola, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Although marine reserves represent one of the most effective management responses to human impacts, their capacity to sustain the same diversity of species, functional roles and biomass of reef fishes as wilderness areas remains questionable, in particular in regions with deep and long-lasting human footprints. Here we show that fish functional diversity and biomass of top predators are significantly higher on coral reefs located at more than 20 h travel time from the main market compared with even the oldest (38 years old), largest (17,500 ha) and most restrictive (no entry) marine reserve in New Caledonia (South-Western Pacific). We further demonstrate that wilderness areas support unique ecological values with no equivalency as one gets closer to humans, even in large and well-managed marine reserves. Wilderness areas may therefore serve as benchmarks for management effectiveness and act as the last refuges for the most vulnerable functional roles. PMID:27354026

  8. Marine reserves lag behind wilderness in the conservation of key functional roles.

    PubMed

    D'agata, Stéphanie; Mouillot, David; Wantiez, Laurent; Friedlander, Alan M; Kulbicki, Michel; Vigliola, Laurent

    2016-06-29

    Although marine reserves represent one of the most effective management responses to human impacts, their capacity to sustain the same diversity of species, functional roles and biomass of reef fishes as wilderness areas remains questionable, in particular in regions with deep and long-lasting human footprints. Here we show that fish functional diversity and biomass of top predators are significantly higher on coral reefs located at more than 20 h travel time from the main market compared with even the oldest (38 years old), largest (17,500 ha) and most restrictive (no entry) marine reserve in New Caledonia (South-Western Pacific). We further demonstrate that wilderness areas support unique ecological values with no equivalency as one gets closer to humans, even in large and well-managed marine reserves. Wilderness areas may therefore serve as benchmarks for management effectiveness and act as the last refuges for the most vulnerable functional roles.

  9. Marine reserves lag behind wilderness in the conservation of key functional roles

    PubMed Central

    D'agata, Stéphanie; Mouillot, David; Wantiez, Laurent; Friedlander, Alan M.; Kulbicki, Michel; Vigliola, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Although marine reserves represent one of the most effective management responses to human impacts, their capacity to sustain the same diversity of species, functional roles and biomass of reef fishes as wilderness areas remains questionable, in particular in regions with deep and long-lasting human footprints. Here we show that fish functional diversity and biomass of top predators are significantly higher on coral reefs located at more than 20 h travel time from the main market compared with even the oldest (38 years old), largest (17,500 ha) and most restrictive (no entry) marine reserve in New Caledonia (South-Western Pacific). We further demonstrate that wilderness areas support unique ecological values with no equivalency as one gets closer to humans, even in large and well-managed marine reserves. Wilderness areas may therefore serve as benchmarks for management effectiveness and act as the last refuges for the most vulnerable functional roles. PMID:27354026

  10. Burst Firing in the Electrosensory System of Gymnotiform Weakly Electric Fish: Mechanisms and Functional Roles

    PubMed Central

    Metzen, Michael G.; Krahe, Rüdiger; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons across sensory systems and organisms often display complex patterns of action potentials in response to sensory input. One example of such a pattern is the tendency of neurons to fire packets of action potentials (i.e., a burst) followed by quiescence. While it is well known that multiple mechanisms can generate bursts of action potentials at both the single-neuron and the network level, the functional role of burst firing in sensory processing is not so well understood to date. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the known mechanisms and functions of burst firing in processing of electrosensory stimuli in gymnotiform weakly electric fish. We also present new evidence from existing data showing that bursts and isolated spikes provide distinct information about stimulus variance. It is likely that these functional roles will be generally applicable to other systems and species. PMID:27531978

  11. ROLE OF ATP IN REGULATING RENAL MICROVASCULAR FUNCTION AND IN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhengrong; Inscho, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an essential energy substrate for cellular metabolism but it can also influence many biological processes when released into the extracellular milieu. Research has established that extracellular ATP acts as an autocrine/paracrine factor that regulates many physiological functions. Alternatively, excessive extracellular ATP levels contribute to pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and atherosclerosis. Renal P2 receptors are widely distributed throughout glomeruli, vasculature and tubular segments, and participate in controlling renal vascular resistance, mediating renal autoregulation, and regulating tubular transport function. This review will focus on the role of ATP-P2 receptor signaling in regulating renal microvascular function and autoregulation, recent advances on the role of ATP-P2 signaling in hypertension-associated renal vascular injury, and emerging new directions. PMID:21768526

  12. The role of impairment of adrenal mineraloglucocorticoid function in the development of infertility in varicocele patients.

    PubMed

    Mazo, E B; Koryakin, M V; Kudryavtsev JuV; Evseev, L P; Akopyan, A S

    1989-01-01

    The study was aimed at the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of the impairment of spermatogenesis in varicocele patients. The crucial role of tension increase in the venous plexus of the spermatic cord in spermatogenesis damage in the testis on the varicocele side and absence of any effect of haemodynamic abnormalities on spermatogenesis in the complementary testis has been determined. Retrograde blood flow through the central vein of the left adrenal gland in varicocele has been evidenced by X-ray examination. The role of this phenomenon in the changes of functional activity of the adrenal gland is discussed. Results of the study of functional status of adrenal glands revealed their tendency to provide hyperactivity in synthesis of mineraloglucocorticoids. Correlation between cortisol level in peripheral blood and percentage of abnormal sperm in ejaculate was shown. This fact supported the idea about the existence of a causal interrelationship between abnormalities in the functional status of adrenal glands and development of infertility in varicocele patients.

  13. The functional role of long non-coding RNA in digestive system carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Yu; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yan-Qiao

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Recent evidences suggest that lncRNAs play a very important role in digestive system carcinomas. However, the biological function of lncRNAs in the vast majority of digestive system carcinomas remains unclear. Recently, increasing studies has begun to explore their molecular mechanisms and regulatory networks that they are implicated in tumorigenesis. In this review, we highlight the emerging functional role of lncRNAs in digestive system carcinomas. It is becoming clear that lncRNAs will be exciting and potentially useful for diagnosis and treatment of digestive system carcinomas, some of these lncRNAs might function as both diagnostic markers and the treatment targets of digestive system carcinomas.

  14. Role of fluid shear stress in regulating VWF structure, function and related blood disorders.

    PubMed

    Gogia, Shobhit; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest glycoprotein in blood. It plays a crucial role in primary hemostasis via its binding interaction with platelet and endothelial cell surface receptors, other blood proteins and extra-cellular matrix components. This protein is found as a series of repeat units that are disulfide bonded to form multimeric structures. Once in blood, the protein multimer distribution is dynamically regulated by fluid shear stress which has two opposing effects: it promotes the aggregation or self-association of multiple VWF units, and it simultaneously reduces multimer size by facilitating the force-dependent cleavage of the protein by various proteases, most notably ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type repeats, motif 1 type 13). In addition to these effects, fluid shear also controls the solution and substrate-immobilized structure of VWF, the nature of contact between blood platelets and substrates, and the biomechanics of the GpIbα-VWF bond. These features together regulate different physiological and pathological processes including normal hemostasis, arterial and venous thrombosis, von Willebrand disease, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and acquired von Willebrand syndrome. This article discusses current knowledge of VWF structure-function relationships with emphasis on the effects of hydrodynamic shear, including rapid methods to estimate the nature and magnitude of these forces in selected conditions. It shows that observations made by many investigators using solution and substrate-based shearing devices can be reconciled upon considering the physical size of VWF and the applied mechanical force in these different geometries. PMID:26600266

  15. Functional role of induced gamma oscillatory responses in processing noxious and innocuous sensory events in humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, C C; Chien, J H; Chang, Y W; Kim, J H; Anderson, W S; Lenz, F A

    2015-12-01

    Gamma time-frequency responses (TFRs) induced by painful laser in the contralateral primary somatosensory (SI) cortex have been shown to correlate with perceived pain-intensity in human. Given the functional roles of gamma TFRs in the cortical spaces, it remains unclear whether such a relationship is sustained for other brain regions where the laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) are presented. In this study, we delivered the painful laser pluses at random pain-intensity levels (i.e. strong, medium and weak) in a single train to the dorsal hand of six patients with uncontrolled epilepsy. The laser stimulus produced a painful pinprick sensation by activating nociceptors located in the superficial layers of the skin. For each patient, arrays of >64 subdural electrodes were implanted directly covering the contralateral SI, parasylvian (PS) and medial frontal (MF) cortices to study the stimulus related gamma (TFRs) in the neocortex. In addition, using the same stimulation paradigm, the modality specificity of gamma TFRs was further examined by applying innocuous vibrotactile stimuli to the same regions of the dorsal hand in a separated group of five patients. Our results showed that gamma TFRs are not modality specific, but the largest gamma TFRs were consistently found within the SI region and noxious laser elicited significantly stronger gamma TFRs than innocuous nonpainful vibratory stimuli. Furthermore, stronger pain induced stronger gamma TFRs in the cortices of SI (r=0.4, p<0.001) and PS (r=0.29, p=0.005). Given that potentially harmful noxious stimulus would automatically capture greater attention than the innocuous ones, our results support the hypothesis that the degree of SI and PS gamma TFRs is associated with an attentional drive provoked by painful stimuli. PMID:26408986

  16. Role of fluid shear stress in regulating VWF structure, function and related blood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Shobhit; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest glycoprotein in blood. It plays a crucial role in primary hemostasis via its binding interaction with platelet and endothelial cell surface receptors, other blood proteins and extra-cellular matrix components. This protein is found as a series of repeat units that are disulfide bonded to form multimeric structures. Once in blood, the protein multimer distribution is dynamically regulated by fluid shear stress which has two opposing effects: it promotes the aggregation or self-association of multiple VWF units, and it simultaneously reduces multimer size by facilitating the force-dependent cleavage of the protein by various proteases, most notably ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type repeats, motif 1 type 13). In addition to these effects, fluid shear also controls the solution and substrate-immobilized structure of VWF, the nature of contact between blood platelets and substrates, and the biomechanics of the GpIbα–VWF bond. These features together regulate different physiological and pathological processes including normal hemostasis, arterial and venous thrombosis, von Willebrand disease, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and acquired von Willebrand syndrome. This article discusses current knowledge of VWF structure–function relationships with emphasis on the effects of hydrodynamic shear, including rapid methods to estimate the nature and magnitude of these forces in selected conditions. It shows that observations made by many investigators using solution and substrate-based shearing devices can be reconciled upon considering the physical size of VWF and the applied mechanical force in these different geometries. PMID:26600266

  17. Gelation of protein recovered from whole Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) by isoelectric solubilization/precipitation as affected by functional additives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2007-03-01

    This study demonstrated that the novel isoelectric solubilization/precipitation can be applied to recover functional muscle protein in a continuous mode from whole Antarctic krill. Protein recovered from whole krill had a much lower ash content than whole krill, suggesting good removal of inedible impurities (shell, appendages, etc.). Lipids were retained to a higher degree with krill protein solubilized at acidic rather than basic pH. The viscoelastic modulus (G') showed that recovered krill protein failed to form heat-induced gel unless beef plasma protein (BPP) was added. Therefore, protease inhibitors are suggested for development of krill-derived products. Even with BPP, the G' decreased between 45 and 55 degrees C. However, krill protein solubilized at acidic pH had a higher decrease of the G' than the protein solubilized at basic pH, likely due to krill endogenous cathepsin L. Krill protein-based gels developed from protein solubilized at basic pH, especially pH 12.0, had better texture (torsion and Kramer tests and texture profile analysis) than acidic counterparts, possibly due to higher proteolysis and denaturation at acidic pH. Gels made from protein solubilized at acidic pH were brighter and whiter likely due to a higher lipid content.

  18. Effect of COOH-functionalized SWCNT addition on the electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of Malachite Green dye based photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Manik, N. B.

    2014-12-01

    We report the effect of COOH-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-SWCNT) on the electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of Malachite Green (MG) dye based photovoltaic cells. Two different types of photovoltaic cells were prepared, one with MG dye and another by incorporating COOH-SWCNT with this dye. Cells were characterized through different electrical and photovoltaic measurements including photocurrent measurements with pulsed radiation. From the dark current—voltage (I-V) characteristic results, we observed a certain transition voltage (Vth) for both the cells beyond which the conduction mechanism of the cells change sharply. For the MG dye, Vth is 3.9 V whereas for COOH-SWCNT mixed with this dye, Vth drops to 2.7 V. The device performance improves due to the incorporation of COOH-SWCNT. The open circuit voltage and short circuit current density change from 4.2 to 97 mV and from 108 to 965 μA/cm2 respectively. Observations from photocurrent measurements show that the rate of growth and decay of the photocurrent are quite faster in the presence of COOH-SWCNT. This observation indicates a faster charge separation processes due to the incorporation of COOH-SWCNT in the MG dye cells. The high aspect ratio of COOH-SWCNT allows efficient conduction pathways for the generated charge carriers.

  19. Roles of sirtuins in the regulation of antioxidant defense and bioenergetic function of mitochondria under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y-T; Wu, S-B; Wei, Y-H

    2014-09-01

    In addition to serving as the power house of mammalian cells, mitochondria are crucial for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in response to physiological or environmental changes. Several lines of evidence suggest that posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the bioenergetic function of mitochondria. Among them, reversible lysine acetylation of mitochondrial proteins has been established as one of the key mechanisms in cellular response to energy demand by modulating the flux of a number of key metabolic pathways. In this article, we focus on the role of Sirt3-mediated deacetylation in: (1) flexibility of energy metabolism, (2) activation of antioxidant defense, and (3) maintenance of cellular redox status in response to dietary challenge and oxidative stress. We suggest that oxidative stress-elicited down-regulation of Sirt3 plays a role in the pathophysiology of diabetes, cardiac hypotrophy, mitochondrial diseases, and age-related diseases. Besides, the physiological role of newly identified lysine acylation mediated by Sirt5 and its biochemical effects on oxidative metabolism are also discussed. Moreover, we have integrated the regulatory function of several protein kinases that are involved in the phosphorylation of mitochondrial enzymes during oxidative stress. Finally, the functional consequence of the synergistic regulation through diverse protein modifications is emphasized on the maintenance of the bioenergetic homeostasis and metabolic adaptation of the animal and human cells. Together, we have provided an updated review of PTM in mitochondrial biology and their implications in aging and human diseases through an intricate regulation of energy metabolism under oxidative stress.

  20. Role of the ρ1 GABA(C) receptor N-terminus in assembly, trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lik-Wei; Tae, Han-Shen; Cromer, Brett A

    2014-12-17

    The GABAC receptor and closely related GABAA receptor are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) superfamily and mediate inhibitory fast synaptic transmission in the nervous system. Each pLGIC subunit comprises an N-terminal extracellular agonist-binding domain followed by a channel domain and a variable intracellular domain. Available structural information shows that the core of the agonist-binding domain is a β sandwich of ten β-strands, which form the agonist-binding pocket at the subunit interface. This β-sandwich is preceded by an N-terminal α-helix in eukaryotic structures but not in prokaryotic structures. The N-terminal α-helix has been shown to be functionally essential in α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Sequence analysis of GABAC and GABAA receptors predicts an α-helix in a similar position but preceded by 8 to 46 additional residues, of unknown function, which we term the N-terminal extension. To test the functional role of both the N-terminal extension and the putative N-terminal α-helix in the ρ1 GABAC receptor, we created a series of deletions from the N-terminus. The N-terminal extension was not functionally essential, but its removal did reduce both cell surface expression and cooperativity of agonist-gated channel function. Further deletion of the putative N-terminal α-helix abolished receptor function by preventing cell-surface expression. Our results further demonstrate the essential role of the N-terminal α-helix in the assembly and trafficking of eukaryotic pLGICs. They also provide evidence that the N-terminal extension, although not essential, contributes to receptor assembly, trafficking and conformational changes associated with ligand gating.

  1. The functional role of Cys3-Cys4 loop in hydrophobin HGFI.

    PubMed

    Niu, Baolong; Gong, Yanbo; Gao, Xianghua; Xu, Haijin; Qiao, Mingqiang; Li, Wenfeng

    2014-11-01

    Hydrophobins are a large group of low-molecular weight proteins. These proteins are highly surface-active and can form amphipathic membranes by self-assembling at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces. Based on physical properties and hydropathy profiles, hydrophobins are divided into two classes. Upon the analysis of amino acid sequences and higher structures, some models suggest that the Cys3-Cys4 loop regions in class I and II hydrophobins can exhibit remarkable difference in their alignment and conformation, and have a critical role in the rodlets structure formation. To examine the requirement for the Cys3-Cys4 loop in class I hydrophobins, we used protein fusion technology to obtain a mutant protein HGFI-AR by replacing the amino acids between Cys3 and Cys4 of the class I hydrophobin HGFI from Grifola frondosa with those ones between Cys3 and Cys4 of the class II hydrophobin HFBI from Trichoderma reesei. The gene of the mutant protein HGFI-AR was successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris. Water contact angle (WCA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrated that the purified HGFI-AR could form amphipathic membranes by self-assembling at mica and hydrophobic polystyrene surfaces. This property enabled them to alter the surface wettabilities of polystyrene and mica and change the elemental composition of siliconized glass. In comparison to recombinant class I hydrophobin HGFI (rHGFI), the membranes formed on hydrophobic surfaces by HGFI-AR were not robust enough to resist 1 % hot SDS washing. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements indicated that unlike rHGFI, no rodlet structure was observed on the mutant protein HGFI-AR coated mica surface. In addition, when compared to rHGFI, no secondary structural change was detected by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy after HGFI-AR self-assembled at the water-air interface. HGFI-AR could not either be deemed responsible for the fluorescence intensity increase of Thioflavin T (THT) and the

  2. Suppressing Respiration Effects when Geometric Distortion Is Corrected Dynamically by Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding (PLACE) during Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Faraji-Dana, Zahra; Tam, Fred; Chen, J Jean; Graham, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) suffers from geometric distortions caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities, which can be time-varying as a result of small amounts of head motion that occur over seconds and minutes during fMRI experiments, also known as "dynamic geometric distortion". Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding (PLACE) is a promising technique for geometric distortion correction without reduced temporal resolution and in principle can be used to correct for motion-induced dynamic geometric distortion. PLACE requires at least two EPI images of the same anatomy that are ideally acquired with no variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneities. However, head motion and lung ventilation during the respiratory cycle can cause changes in magnetic field inhomogeneities within the EPI pair used for PLACE. In this work, we exploited dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) and averaging to correct the within EPI pair magnetic field inhomogeneities; and hence proposed a combined technique (DORK+PLACE+averaging) to mitigate dynamic geometric distortion in EPI-based fMRI while preserving the temporal resolution. The performance of the combined DORK, PLACE and averaging technique was characterized through several imaging experiments involving test phantoms and six healthy adult volunteers. Phantom data illustrate reduced temporal standard deviation of fMRI signal intensities after use of combined dynamic PLACE, DORK and averaging compared to the standard processing and static geometric distortion correction. The combined technique also substantially improved the temporal standard deviation and activation maps obtained from human fMRI data in comparison to the results obtained by standard processing and static geometric distortion correction, highlighting the utility of the approach. PMID:27258194

  3. Suppressing Respiration Effects when Geometric Distortion Is Corrected Dynamically by Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding (PLACE) during Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Faraji-Dana, Zahra; Tam, Fred; Chen, J. Jean; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) suffers from geometric distortions caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities, which can be time-varying as a result of small amounts of head motion that occur over seconds and minutes during fMRI experiments, also known as “dynamic geometric distortion”. Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding (PLACE) is a promising technique for geometric distortion correction without reduced temporal resolution and in principle can be used to correct for motion-induced dynamic geometric distortion. PLACE requires at least two EPI images of the same anatomy that are ideally acquired with no variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneities. However, head motion and lung ventilation during the respiratory cycle can cause changes in magnetic field inhomogeneities within the EPI pair used for PLACE. In this work, we exploited dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) and averaging to correct the within EPI pair magnetic field inhomogeneities; and hence proposed a combined technique (DORK+PLACE+averaging) to mitigate dynamic geometric distortion in EPI-based fMRI while preserving the temporal resolution. The performance of the combined DORK, PLACE and averaging technique was characterized through several imaging experiments involving test phantoms and six healthy adult volunteers. Phantom data illustrate reduced temporal standard deviation of fMRI signal intensities after use of combined dynamic PLACE, DORK and averaging compared to the standard processing and static geometric distortion correction. The combined technique also substantially improved the temporal standard deviation and activation maps obtained from human fMRI data in comparison to the results obtained by standard processing and static geometric distortion correction, highlighting the utility of the approach. PMID:27258194

  4. Evaluation of calcium and lead interaction, in addition to their impact on thyroid functions in hyper and hypothyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Memon, Nusrat Shahab; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Sahito, Oan Muhammad; Baloch, Shahnawaz; Waris, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence in support of interaction between calcium (Ca) and lead (Pb) in thyroid disorders. The aim of present study was to compare the level of Ca and Pb with thyroid hormones such as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxin (FT4) in serum samples of hyperthyroid (HPRT) and hypothyroid (HPOT) patients of both genders. For comparative purpose, age-matched (25-50 years) subjects having no thyroid disorders were selected as referents/controls. The serum samples were acid-digested prior to analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data indicates that the mean values of Ca in serum samples of HPRT patients were significantly higher than those of referent subjects (p < 0.01), while reverse pattern was observed in the case of HPOT patients. The level of Pb was higher in the serum samples of both types of thyroid patients, but difference was significant in case of HPOT patients as compare to referent subjects (p < 0.01). A negative correlation was observed between serum Ca levels and TSH of HPRT patients (-r = 0.37-0.39, p < 0.01), while FT3 and FT4 have positive correlation (r = 0.49-0.52 and r = 0.46-0.47), p values <0.01. The Pb in serum had positive correlation with TSH (r = 0.48-0.51, p < 0.005), while negative correlation was observed for FT3 and FT4 (-r = 0.55-0.56, 0.5-0.54, p < 0.05) in HPRT patients. On the other hand, a reverse pattern was observed, for correlation of Ca and Pb with thyroid functions in HPOT patients. PMID:26347420

  5. The roles of melanin-concentrating hormone in energy balance and reproductive function: Are they connected?

    PubMed

    Naufahu, Jane; Cunliffe, Adam D; Murray, Joanne F

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is an anabolic neuropeptide with multiple and diverse physiological functions including a key role in energy homoeostasis. Rodent studies have shown that the ablation of functional MCH results in a lean phenotype, increased energy expenditure and resistance to diet-induced obesity. These findings have generated interest among pharmaceutical companies vigilant for potential anti-obesity agents. Nutritional status affects reproductive physiology and behaviours, thereby optimising reproductive success and the ability to meet energetic demands. This complex control system entails the integration of direct or indirect peripheral stimuli with central effector systems and involves numerous mediators. A role for MCH in the reproductive axis has emerged, giving rise to the premise that MCH may serve as an integratory mediator between those discrete systems that regulate energy balance and reproductive function. Hence, this review focuses on published evidence concerning i) the role of MCH in energy homoeostasis and ii) the regulatory role of MCH in the reproductive axis. The question as to whether the MCH system mediates the integration of energy homoeostasis with the neuroendocrine reproductive axis and, if so, by what means has received limited coverage in the literature; evidence to date and current theories are summarised herein.

  6. Subjective Cognitive Complaints and the Role of Executive Cognitive Functioning in the Working Population: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Marklund, Petter; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Theorell, Töres; Nilsson, Lars-Göran

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive functioning is important for managing work and life in general. However, subjective cognitive complaints (SCC), involving perceived difficulties with concentration, memory, decision making, and clear thinking are common in the general and working population and can be coupled with both lowered well-being and work ability. However, the relation between SCC and cognitive functioning across the adult age-span, and in the work force, is not clear as few population-based studies have been conducted on non-elderly adults. Thus, the present study aimed to test the relation between SCC and executive cognitive functioning in a population-based sample of employees. Methods Participants were 233 employees with either high (cases) or low (controls) levels of SCC. Group differences in neuropsychological test performance on three common executive cognitive tests were analysed through a set of analyses of covariance tests, including relevant covariates. Results & Conclusions In line with the a priori hypotheses, a high level of SCC was associated with significantly poorer executive cognitive performance on all three executive cognitive tests used, compared to controls with little SCC. Additionally, symptoms of depression, chronic stress and sleeping problems were found to play a role in the relations between SCC and executive cognitive functioning. No significant associations remained after adjusting for all these factors. The current findings contribute to an increased understanding of what characterizes SCC in the work force and may be used at different levels of prevention of- and intervention for SCC and related problems with executive cognitive functioning. PMID:24386185

  7. In search for a common denominator for the diverse functions of arthropod corazonin: a role in the physiology of stress?

    PubMed

    Boerjan, Bart; Verleyen, Peter; Huybrechts, Jurgen; Schoofs, Liliane; De Loof, Arnold

    2010-04-01

    Corazonin (Crz) is an 11 amino acid C-terminally amidated neuropeptide that has been identified in most arthropods examined with the notable exception of beetles and an aphid. The Crz-receptor shares sequence similarity to the GnRH-AKH receptor family thus suggesting an ancestral function related to the control of reproduction and metabolism. In 1989, Crz was purified and identified as a potent cardioaccelerating agent in cockroaches (hence the Crz name based on "corazon", the Spanish word for "heart"). Since the initial assignment as a cardioacceleratory peptide, additional functions have been discovered, ranging from pigment migration in the integument of crustaceans and in the eye of locusts, melanization of the locust cuticle, ecdysis initiation and in various aspects of gregarization in locusts. The high degree of structural conservation of Crz, its well-conserved (immuno)-localization, mainly in specific neurosecretory cells in the pars lateralis, and its many functions, suggest that Crz is vital. Yet, Crz-deficient insects develop normally. Upon reexamining all known effects of Crz, a hypothesis was developed that the evolutionary ancient function of Crz may have been "to prepare animals for coping with the environmental stressors of the day". This function would then complement the role of pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), the prime hormonal effector of the clock, which is thought "to set a coping mechanism for the night".

  8. Role of CrkII Signaling in RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Seong, Semun; Nam, Kwang-Il; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Keun; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-02-01

    Rac1, a member of small GTPases, is a key regulator of osteoclast differentiation and function. The Crk family adaptor proteins, consisting of Src homology (SH) 2 and SH3 protein-binding domains, regulate cell proliferation, migration, and invasion through Rac1 activation. In this study, we examined the role of CrkII in osteoclast differentiation and function. Retroviral overexpression of CrkII in osteoclast precursors enhanced osteoclast differentiation and resorptive function through Rac1 activation. The knockdown of CrkII in osteoclast precursors using small interfering RNA inhibited osteoclast differentiation and its resorption activity. Unlike wild-type CrkII, overexpression of the three SH domains in mutant forms of CrkII did not enhance either osteoclast differentiation or function. Phosphorylation of p130 Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas) by osteoclastogenic cytokines in preosteoclasts increased the interaction between p130Cas and CrkII, which is known to be involved in Rac1 activation. Furthermore, transgenic mice overexpressing CrkII under control of a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase promoter exhibited a low bone mass phenotype, associated with increased resorptive function of osteoclasts in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that the p130Cas/CrkII/Rac1 signaling pathway plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation and function, both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. The functional role of the alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in cerebral blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Raven, Peter B

    2011-09-01

    Cerebral vasculature is richly innervated by the α-1 adrenergic receptors similar to that of the peripheral vasculature. However, the functional role of the α-1adrenergic receptors in cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation is yet to be established. The traditional thinking being that during normotension and normocapnia sympathetic neural activity does not play a significant role in CBF regulation. Reports in the past have stated that catecholamines do not penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) and therefore only influence cerebral vessels from outside the BBB and hence, have a limited role in CBF regulation. However, with the advent of dynamic measurement techniques, beat-to-beat CBF assessment can be done during dynamic changes in arterial blood pressure. Several studies in the recent years have reported a functional role of the α-1adrenergic receptors in CBF regulation. This review focuses on the recent developments on the role of the sympathetic nervous system, specifically that of the α-1 adrenergic receptors in CBF regulation.

  10. Civil Society Organizations and the Functions of Global Health Governance: What Role within Intergovernmental Organizations?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Amid discussion of how global health governance should and could be strengthened, the potential role of civil society organizations has been frequently raised. This paper considers the role of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in four health governance instruments under the auspices of the World Health Organization – the International Code on the Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, International Health Regulations and Codex Alimentarius - and maps the functions they have contributed to. The paper draws conclusions about the opportunities and limitations CSOs represent for strengthening global health governance (GHG). PMID:27274776

  11. The role of acculturation and family functioning in predicting HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic delinquent youth.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Colleen; Cordova, David; Huang, Shi; Estrada, Yannine; Prado, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the relationship between Berry's acculturation typology and HIV risk behaviors and whether family functioning mediated any such effects. A total of 235 high risk Hispanic adolescents were categorized into one of Berry's four acculturation typologies through the use of cut-off scores on measures of Hispanicism and Americanism. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the effects of acculturation typology on HIV risk behaviors and the indirect effects of acculturation typology on HIV risk behaviors through family functioning. Acculturation typology was related to HIV risk behaviors. Family functioning partially mediated the effects of acculturation typology on the HIV risk behavior outcomes. These findings suggest that both Americanism and Hispanicism play an important role in the etiology of HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic youth and that both, along with family functioning, are important to consider when designing preventive interventions for this population.

  12. The Role of Functional Foods, Nutraceuticals, and Food Supplements in Intestinal Health

    PubMed Central

    Cencic, Avrelija; Chingwaru, Walter

    2010-01-01

    New eating habits, actual trends in production and consumption have a health, environmental and social impact. The European Union is fighting diseases characteristic of a modern age, such as obesity, osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes, allergies and dental problems. Developed countries are also faced with problems relating to aging populations, high energy foods, and unbalanced diets. The potential of nutraceuticals/functional foods/food supplements in mitigating health problems, especially in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, is discussed. Certain members of gut microflora (e.g., probiotic/protective strains) play a role in the host health due to its involvement in nutritional, immunologic and physiological functions. The potential mechanisms by which nutraceuticals/functional foods/food supplements may alter a host’s health are also highlighted in this paper. The establishment of novel functional cell models of the GI and analytical tools that allow tests in controlled experiments are highly desired for gut research. PMID:22254045

  13. Teachers' Understanding of the Role of Executive Functions in Mathematics Learning

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Camilla; Cragg, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychology research has suggested an important role for executive functions, the set of skills that monitor and control thought and action, in learning mathematics. However, there is currently little evidence about whether teachers are aware of the importance of these skills and, if so, how they come by this information. We conducted an online survey of teachers' views on the importance of a range of skills for mathematics learning. Teachers rated executive function skills, and in particular inhibition and shifting, to be important for mathematics. The value placed on executive function skills increased with increasing teaching experience. Most teachers reported that they were aware of these skills, although few knew the term “executive functions.” This awareness had come about through their teaching experience rather than from formal instruction. Researchers and teacher educators could do more to highlight the importance of these skills to trainee or new teachers. PMID:25674156

  14. Formation of the non-functional and functional pools of granule cells in the dentate gyrus: role of neurogenesis, LTP and LTD

    PubMed Central

    Lisman, John

    2011-01-01

    Some aspects of the function of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 regions of the hippocampus are beginning to be understood, notably the way that grid cell inputs from the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) are processed to form place cells in the dentate/CA3. However, one aspect of DG function remains very puzzling: more than 95% of the cells do not fire in any environment. Here, I propose a possible explanation for these non-functional cells. Because of the competition mediated by feedback inhibition, only the most excited DG cells fire. Cells that do not spike nevertheless receive excitatory input from the grid cells of the MEC (these cells fire nearly continuously because they represent a property (space) that is always being processed). Experiments suggest that synapses on such cells will undergo long-term depression (LTD). Cells that have their synapses weakened in this way are less likely to be winners in subsequent competitions. There may thus be a downward spiral in which losers eventually have no chance of winning and thus become non-functional. On the other hand, cells that fire get stronger synapses, making them more likely to be subsequent winners. Because the long-term potentiation (LTP) in these cells balances ongoing LTD, these cells will be relatively stable members of the functional pool. Although these pools are relatively stable, there will nevertheless be some chance that LTD converts a functional cell to a non-functional one; in contrast, the probability of a reverse transition is near zero. Thus, without additional processes, there would be a slow reduction in the size of the functional pool. I suggest that the ongoing generation of new cells by neurogenesis may be a solution to this problem. These cells are highly excitable and may thus win the competition to fire. In this way, the functional pool will be replenished. To test this and other theories about the DG requires an understanding of the role of the DG in memory. Recent experimental and

  15. Functional profiles reveal unique ecological roles of various biological soil crust organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Mau, R.L.; Maestre, F.T.; Escolar, C.; Castillo-Monroy, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    1. At the heart of the body of research on biodiversity effects on ecosystem function is the debate over whether different species tend to be functionally singular or redundant. When we consider ecosystem multi-function, the provision of multiple ecosystem functions simultaneously, we may find that seemingly redundant species may in fact play unique roles in ecosystems. 2. Over the last few decades, the significance of biological soil crusts (BSCs) as ecological boundaries and ecosystem engineers, and their multi-functional nature, has become increasingly well documented. We compiled 'functional profiles' of the organisms in this understudied community, to determine whether functional singularity emerges when multiple ecosystem functions are considered. 3. In two data sets, one representing multiple sites around the semi-arid regions of Spain (regional scale), and another from a single site in central Spain (local scale), we examined correlations between the abundance or frequency of BSC species in a community, and multiple surrogates of ecosystem functioning. There was a wide array of apparent effects of species on specific functions. 4. Notably, in gypsiferous soils and at regional scale, we found that indicators of carbon (C) and phosphorus cycling were apparently suppressed and promoted by the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis and Squamarina lentigera, respectively. The moss Pleurochaete squarrosa appears to promote C cycling in calcareous soils at this spatial scale. At the local scale in gypsiferous soils, D. diacapsis positively correlated with carbon cycling, but negatively with nitrogen cycling, whereas numerous lichens exhibited the opposite profile. 5. We found a high degree of functional singularity, i.e. that species were highly individualistic in their effects on multiple functions. Many functional attributes were not easily predictable from existing functional grouping systems based primarily on morphology. 6. Our results suggest that maintaining

  16. Plant Functional Diversity Can Be Independent of Species Diversity: Observations Based on the Impact of 4-Yrs of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions in an Alpine Meadow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Cheng, Ji-Min; Yu, Kai-Liang; Epstein, Howard E.; Guo, Liang; Jing, Guang-Hua; Zhao, Jie; Du, Guo-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have widely documented the decrease in species diversity in response to addition of nutrients, however functional diversity is often independent from species diversity. In this study, we conducted a field experiment to examine the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization ((NH4)2 HPO4) at 0, 15, 30 and 60 g m-2 yr-1 (F0, F15, F30 and F60) after 4 years of continuous fertilization on functional diversity and species diversity, and its relationship with productivity in an alpine meadow community on the Tibetan Plateau. To this purpose, three community-weighted mean trait values (specific leaf area, SLA; mature plant height, MPH; and seed size, SS) for 30 common species in each fertilization level were determined; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, FRic; functional evenness, FEve; and Rao’s index of quadratic entropy, FRao) were quantified. Our results showed that: (i) species diversity sharply decreased, but functional diversity remained stable with fertilization; (ii) community-weighted mean traits (SLA and MPH) had a significant increase along the fertilization level; (iii) aboveground biomass was not correlated with functional diversity, but it was significantly correlated with species diversity and MPH. Our results suggest that decreases in species diversity due to fertilization do not result in corresponding changes in functional diversity. Functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing aboveground productivity in this alpine meadow community, and our results also support the mass ratio hypothesis; that is, the traits of the dominant species influenced the community biomass production. PMID:26295345

  17. Plant Functional Diversity Can Be Independent of Species Diversity: Observations Based on the Impact of 4-Yrs of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions in an Alpine Meadow.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cheng, Ji-Min; Yu, Kai-Liang; Epstein, Howard E; Guo, Liang; Jing, Guang-Hua; Zhao, Jie; Du, Guo-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have widely documented the decrease in species diversity in response to addition of nutrients, however functional diversity is often independent from species diversity. In this study, we conducted a field experiment to examine the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization ((NH4)2 HPO4) at 0, 15, 30 and 60 g m-2 yr-1 (F0, F15, F30 and F60) after 4 years of continuous fertilization on functional diversity and species diversity, and its relationship with productivity in an alpine meadow community on the Tibetan Plateau. To this purpose, three community-weighted mean trait values (specific leaf area, SLA; mature plant height, MPH; and seed size, SS) for 30 common species in each fertilization level were determined; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, FRic; functional evenness, FEve; and Rao's index of quadratic entropy, FRao) were quantified. Our results showed that: (i) species diversity sharply decreased, but functional diversity remained stable with fertilization; (ii) community-weighted mean traits (SLA and MPH) had a significant increase along the fertilization level; (iii) aboveground biomass was not correlated with functional diversity, but it was significantly correlated with species diversity and MPH. Our results suggest that decreases in species diversity due to fertilization do not result in corresponding changes in functional diversity. Functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing aboveground productivity in this alpine meadow community, and our results also support the mass ratio hypothesis; that is, the traits of the dominant species influenced the community biomass production. PMID:26295345

  18. Plant Functional Diversity Can Be Independent of Species Diversity: Observations Based on the Impact of 4-Yrs of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions in an Alpine Meadow.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cheng, Ji-Min; Yu, Kai-Liang; Epstein, Howard E; Guo, Liang; Jing, Guang-Hua; Zhao, Jie; Du, Guo-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have widely documented the decrease in species diversity in response to addition of nutrients, however functional diversity is often independent from species diversity. In this study, we conducted a field experiment to examine the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization ((NH4)2 HPO4) at 0, 15, 30 and 60 g m-2 yr-1 (F0, F15, F30 and F60) after 4 years of continuous fertilization on functional diversity and species diversity, and its relationship with productivity in an alpine meadow community on the Tibetan Plateau. To this purpose, three community-weighted mean trait values (specific leaf area, SLA; mature plant height, MPH; and seed size, SS) for 30 common species in each fertilization level were determined; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, FRic; functional evenness, FEve; and Rao's index of quadratic entropy, FRao) were quantified. Our results showed that: (i) species diversity sharply decreased, but functional diversity remained stable with fertilization; (ii) community-weighted mean traits (SLA and MPH) had a significant increase along the fertilization level; (iii) aboveground biomass was not correlated with functional diversity, but it was significantly correlated with species diversity and MPH. Our results suggest that decreases in species diversity due to fertilization do not result in corresponding changes in functional diversity. Functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing aboveground productivity in this alpine meadow community, and our results also support the mass ratio hypothesis; that is, the traits of the dominant species influenced the community biomass production.

  19. The roles of evolutionarily conserved functional modules in cilia-related trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ching-Hwa; Leroux, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are present across most eukaryotic phyla and have diverse sensory and motility roles in animal physiology, cell signalling and development. Their biogenesis and maintenance depend on vesicular and intraciliary (intraflagellar) trafficking pathways that share conserved structural and functional modules. The functional units of the interconnected pathways, which include proteins involved in membrane coating as well as small GTPases and their accessory factors, were first experimentally associated with canonical vesicular trafficking. These components are, however, ancient, having been co-opted by the ancestral eukaryote to establish the ciliary organelle, and their study can inform us about ciliary biology in higher organisms. PMID:24296415

  20. The roles of evolutionarily conserved functional modules in cilia-related trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ching-Hwa; Leroux, Michel R

    2013-12-01

    Cilia are present across most eukaryotic phyla and have diverse sensory and motility roles in animal physiology, cell signalling and development. Their biogenesis and maintenance depend on vesicular and intraciliary (intraflagellar) trafficking pathways that share conserved structural and functional modules. The functional units of the interconnected pathways, which include proteins involved in membrane coating as well as small GTPases and their accessory factors, were first experimentally associated with canonical vesicular trafficking. These components are, however, ancient, having been co-opted by the ancestral eukaryote to establish the ciliary organelle, and their study can inform us about ciliary biology in higher organisms.