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Sample records for additional genetic factors

  1. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Carvalho, Livia S; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Cowing, Jill A; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J; Munro, Peter M G; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype-genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1(rd8/rd8)/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling-features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1(rd8/rd8) line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers.

  2. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2014-01-01

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces. PMID:25281725

  3. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakouris, Nikos; Katsoulis, Michail; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ordovas, Jose M; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for several conventional cardiovascular risk factors (ConvRFs), including smoking, hypertension, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), body mass index (BMI), physical activity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Design A case–control study. Setting The general Greek population of the EPIC study. Participants and outcome measures 477 patients with medically confirmed incident CHD and 1271 controls participated in this study. We estimated the ORs for CHD by dividing participants at higher or lower GRS and, alternatively, at higher or lower ConvRF, and calculated the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) as a measure of deviation from additivity. Results The joint presence of higher GRS and higher risk ConvRF was in all instances associated with an increased risk of CHD, compared with the joint presence of lower GRS and lower risk ConvRF. The OR (95% CI) was 1.7 (1.2 to 2.4) for smoking, 2.7 (1.9 to 3.8) for hypertension, 4.1 (2.8 to 6.1) for T2DM, 1.9 (1.4 to 2.5) for lower physical activity, 2.0 (1.3 to 3.2) for high BMI and 1.5 (1.1 to 2.1) for poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet. In all instances, RERI values were fairly small and not statistically significant, suggesting that the GRS and the ConvRFs do not have effects beyond additivity. Conclusions Genetic predisposition to CHD, operationalised through a multilocus GRS, and ConvRFs have essentially additive effects on CHD risk. PMID:24500614

  4. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  5. Explaining additional genetic variation in complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew R.; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of complex traits, discovering >6000 variants associated with >500 quantitative traits and common complex diseases in humans. The associations identified so far represent only a fraction of those which influence phenotype, as there are likely to be very many variants across the entire frequency spectrum, each of which influences multiple traits, with only a small average contribution to the phenotypic variance. This presents a considerable challenge to further dissection of the remaining unexplained genetic variance within populations, which limits our ability to predict disease risk, identify new drug targets, improve and maintain food sources, and understand natural diversity. This challenge will be met within the current framework through larger sample size, better phenotyping including recording of non-genetic risk factors, focused study designs, and an integration of multiple sources of phenotypic and genetic information. The current evidence supports the application of quantitative genetic approaches, and we argue that one should retain simpler theories until simplicity can be traded for greater explanatory power. PMID:24629526

  6. Genetic predisposition, non-genetic risk factors and coronary infarct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Using a genetic predisposition score (GPS), additively integrating the associations of 11 polymorphisms with coronary heart disease (CHD), we examined the consequences of joint presence of high GPS and non-genetic CHD risk factors. Methods: Within the European Prospective Investigation i...

  7. Genetic factors in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Domschke, Katharina; Maron, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Presently available clinical genetic studies point to a considerable heritability of anxiety disorders (30-67%), with multiple vulnerability genes such as 5-HT1A, 5-HTT, MAO-A, COMT, CCK-B, ADORA2A, CRHR1, FKBP5, ACE, RGS2/7 and NPSR1 suggested by molecular genetic association studies. These genes have been shown to partially interact with each other as well as with environmental factors to shape the overall disease risk in a complex genetic model. Additionally, recent studies have pointed out the crucial role of epigenetic signatures such as methylation patterns in modifying environmental influences as well as in driving the functional impact of anxiety disorder risk genes. On a systems level, vulnerability genes of anxiety disorders seem to confer some of the disease risk via intermediate phenotypes like behavioral inhibition, anxiety sensitivity or several neurobiological traits such as increased startle reactivity or dysfunctional corticolimbic activity during emotional processing. Finally, first pharmaco- and psychotherapy-genetic studies provide evidence for certain risk genes to confer interindividual variability in response to a pharmacological or psychotherapeutic intervention in anxiety disorders. Genetic research in anxiety disorders will be discussed regarding its potential to foster innovative and individually tailored therapeutic approaches for patients with anxiety disorders.

  8. Non-additive and Additive Genetic Effects on Extraversion in 3314 Dutch Adolescent Twins and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Hudziak, James J.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of non-additive genetic influences on personality traits has been increasingly reported in adult populations. Less is known, however, with respect to younger samples. In this study, we examine additive and non-additive genetic contributions to the personality trait of extraversion in 1,689 Dutch twin pairs, 1,505 mothers and 1,637 fathers of the twins. The twins were on average 15.5 years (range 12–18 years). To increase statistical power to detect non-additive genetic influences, data on extraversion were also collected in parents and simultaneously analyzed. Genetic modeling procedures incorporating age as a potential modifier of heritability showed significant influences of additive (20–23%) and non-additive genetic factors (31–33%) in addition to unshared environment (46–48%) for adolescents and for their parents. The additive genetic component was slightly and positively related to age. No significant sex differences were found for either extraversion means or for the magnitude of the genetic and environmental influences. There was no evidence of non-random mating for extraversion in the parental generation. Results show that in addition to additive genetic influences, extraversion in adolescents is influenced by non-additive genetic factors. PMID:18240014

  9. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  11. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  12. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  13. Genetic factors affecting dental caries risk.

    PubMed

    Opal, S; Garg, S; Jain, J; Walia, I

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the literature on genetic aspects of dental caries and provides a framework for the rapidly changing disease model of caries. The scope is genetic aspects of various dental factors affecting dental caries. The PubMed database was searched for articles with keywords 'caries', 'genetics', 'taste', 'diet' and 'twins'. This was followed by extensive handsearching using reference lists from relevant articles. The post-genomic era will present many opportunities for improvement in oral health care but will also present a multitude of challenges. We can conclude from the literature that genes have a role to play in dental caries; however, both environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in the aetiology of caries. Additional studies will have to be conducted to replicate the findings in a different population. Identification of genetic risk factors will help screen and identify susceptible patients to better understand the contribution of genes in caries aetiopathogenesis. Information derived from these diverse studies will provide new tools to target individuals and/or populations for a more efficient and effective implementation of newer preventive measures and diagnostic and novel therapeutic approaches in the management of this disease.

  14. Additive and nonadditive genetic variation in avian personality traits.

    PubMed

    van Oers, K; Drent, P J; de Jong, G; van Noordwijk, A J

    2004-11-01

    Individuals of all vertebrate species differ consistently in their reactions to mildly stressful challenges. These typical reactions, described as personalities or coping strategies, have a clear genetic basis, but the structure of their inheritance in natural populations is almost unknown. We carried out a quantitative genetic analysis of two personality traits (exploration and boldness) and the combination of these two traits (early exploratory behaviour). This study was carried out on the lines resulting from a two-directional artificial selection experiment on early exploratory behaviour (EEB) of great tits (Parus major) originating from a wild population. In analyses using the original lines, reciprocal F(1) and reciprocal first backcross generations, additive, dominance, maternal effects ands sex-dependent expression of exploration, boldness and EEB were estimated. Both additive and dominant genetic effects were important determinants of phenotypic variation in exploratory behaviour and boldness. However, no sex-dependent expression was observed in either of these personality traits. These results are discussed with respect to the maintenance of genetic variation in personality traits, and the expected genetic structure of other behavioural and life history traits in general.

  15. Genetic factors influencing alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, R D; Harris, R A; Schuckit, M A

    2008-01-01

    Plentiful data from both animal and human studies support the importance of genetic influences in substance abuse and dependence (Bierut et al., 1998; Tsuang et al., 1998; Kendler et al., 2003). This review summarizes the evidence supporting such genetic influences, places them into perspective regarding animal and human studies, discusses the importance of both genes and environment, and highlights some specific genes of interest regarding the vulnerabilities for problems associated with alcohol use disorders. A long history of repetitive heavy use of alcohol exists across generations as well as the high prevalence of alcohol-related problems in Western societies. Moreover, the information offered here addresses the importance of more general issues regarding genetics and gene expression related to alcohol abuse and dependence. PMID:18362899

  16. Efficient Improvement of Silage Additives by Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Zoe S.; Gilbert, Richard J.; Merry, Roger J.; Kell, Douglas B.; Theodorou, Michael K.; Griffith, Gareth W.

    2000-01-01

    The enormous variety of substances which may be added to forage in order to manipulate and improve the ensilage process presents an empirical, combinatorial optimization problem of great complexity. To investigate the utility of genetic algorithms for designing effective silage additive combinations, a series of small-scale proof of principle silage experiments were performed with fresh ryegrass. Having established that significant biochemical changes occur over an ensilage period as short as 2 days, we performed a series of experiments in which we used 50 silage additive combinations (prepared by using eight bacterial and other additives, each of which was added at six different levels, including zero [i.e., no additive]). The decrease in pH, the increase in lactate concentration, and the free amino acid concentration were measured after 2 days and used to calculate a “fitness” value that indicated the quality of the silage (compared to a control silage made without additives). This analysis also included a “cost” element to account for different total additive levels. In the initial experiment additive levels were selected randomly, but subsequently a genetic algorithm program was used to suggest new additive combinations based on the fitness values determined in the preceding experiments. The result was very efficient selection for silages in which large decreases in pH and high levels of lactate occurred along with low levels of free amino acids. During the series of five experiments, each of which comprised 50 treatments, there was a steady increase in the amount of lactate that accumulated; the best treatment combination was that used in the last experiment, which produced 4.6 times more lactate than the untreated silage. The additive combinations that were found to yield the highest fitness values in the final (fifth) experiment were assessed to determine a range of biochemical and microbiological quality parameters during full-term silage

  17. Genetic Factors of Ophthalmic Importance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Zane F.

    Reviewed are chromosomal anomalies affecting one's eyes. Brief descriptions are given of the genetic etiology of bilateral retinoblastoma (malignant tumors), aniridia (absence of the iris), cataracts, congenital glaucoma, Reginitis Pigmentosa (progressive deterioration of the visual cells), Choroidermia (degeneration of the vascular coat of the…

  18. [Genetic factors in gastric carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ohgaki, H

    1983-02-01

    Genetic control of susceptibility of rats to gastro-carcinogenesis by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was studied in susceptible ACI strain rats, resistant Buffalo strain rats, and their F1 and F2 offsprings. Rats were given MNNG at a concentration of 83 micrograms/ml in drinking water for 32 weeks and sacrificed on week 72. The incidence of gastric adenocarcinomas in F1 was as low as that in Buffalo rats. The results showed that susceptibility to MNNG was controlled genetically and that the resistance of Buffalo strain rats was autosomal dominant. To clarify the mechanisms which determine susceptibility to MNNG, some biochemical parameters such as pH of gastric juice, glutathione content in the gastric mucosa and the binding of MNNG to DNA, were analysed. No difference was observed between ACI and Buffalo strains in regard to the events leading to the binding of MNNG to DNA.

  19. Estimating Additive and Non-Additive Genetic Variances and Predicting Genetic Merits Using Genome-Wide Dense Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Guosheng; Christensen, Ole F.; Ostersen, Tage; Henryon, Mark; Lund, Mogens S.

    2012-01-01

    Non-additive genetic variation is usually ignored when genome-wide markers are used to study the genetic architecture and genomic prediction of complex traits in human, wild life, model organisms or farm animals. However, non-additive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of complex traits. This study presented a genomic BLUP model including additive and non-additive genetic effects, in which additive and non-additive genetic relation matrices were constructed from information of genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. In addition, this study for the first time proposed a method to construct dominance relationship matrix using SNP markers and demonstrated it in detail. The proposed model was implemented to investigate the amounts of additive genetic, dominance and epistatic variations, and assessed the accuracy and unbiasedness of genomic predictions for daily gain in pigs. In the analysis of daily gain, four linear models were used: 1) a simple additive genetic model (MA), 2) a model including both additive and additive by additive epistatic genetic effects (MAE), 3) a model including both additive and dominance genetic effects (MAD), and 4) a full model including all three genetic components (MAED). Estimates of narrow-sense heritability were 0.397, 0.373, 0.379 and 0.357 for models MA, MAE, MAD and MAED, respectively. Estimated dominance variance and additive by additive epistatic variance accounted for 5.6% and 9.5% of the total phenotypic variance, respectively. Based on model MAED, the estimate of broad-sense heritability was 0.506. Reliabilities of genomic predicted breeding values for the animals without performance records were 28.5%, 28.8%, 29.2% and 29.5% for models MA, MAE, MAD and MAED, respectively. In addition, models including non-additive genetic effects improved unbiasedness of genomic predictions. PMID:23028912

  20. 14 CFR 1203.406 - Additional classification factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional classification factors. 1203.406... PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.406 Additional classification factors. In determining the appropriate classification category, the following additional factors should be considered:...

  1. Genetic Factors in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Egan, Brian; Wang, Jinxi

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major cause of disability and imposes huge economic burdens on human society worldwide. Among many factors responsible for LBP, intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is the most common disorder and is a target for intervention. The etiology of IDD is complex and its mechanism is still not completely understood. Many factors such as aging, spine deformities and diseases, spine injuries, and genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of IDD. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in studies on the most promising and extensively examined genetic factors associated with IDD in humans. A number of genetic defects have been correlated with structural and functional changes within the intervertebral disc (IVD), which may compromise the disc’s mechanical properties and metabolic activities. These genetic and proteomic studies have begun to shed light on the molecular basis of IDD, suggesting that genetic factors are important contributors to the onset and progression of IDD. By continuing to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IDD, specific early diagnosis and more effective treatments for this disabling disease will be possible in the future. PMID:27617275

  2. The Genetic and Environmental Factors for Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Shaag, Ariela; Millodot, Michel; Shneor, Einat; Liu, Yutao

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common cornea ectatic disorder. It is characterized by a cone-shaped thin cornea leading to myopia, irregular astigmatism, and vision impairment. It affects all ethnic groups and both genders. Both environmental and genetic factors may contribute to its pathogenesis. This review is to summarize the current research development in KC epidemiology and genetic etiology. Environmental factors include but are not limited to eye rubbing, atopy, sun exposure, and geography. Genetic discoveries have been reviewed with evidence from family-based linkage analysis and fine mapping in linkage region, genome-wide association studies, and candidate genes analyses. A number of genes have been discovered at a relatively rapid pace. The detailed molecular mechanism underlying KC pathogenesis will significantly advance our understanding of KC and promote the development of potential therapies. PMID:26075261

  3. Common genetic risk factors of venous thromboembolism in Western and Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Huang, S S; Liu, Y; Jing, Z C; Wang, X J; Mao, Y M

    2016-03-04

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multifactorial disorder involving both acquired and genetic risk factors. The common genetic factors in Western populations have been studied and reported for several decades, while studies on Asian populations are relatively scarce. Evidence suggests that the prevalence and genetic risk factors of VTE vary significantly among ethnic populations. In this review, we summarize the common genetic risk factors of VTE in both Western and Asian populations. In addition to the development of DNA sequencing technology, genome-wide association studies have many advantages and are becoming more important in identifying new genetic risk factors and susceptible loci. They can therefore help in the prediction and prevention of VTE.

  4. Role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    This article critically reviews the evidence for a role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis and discusses the study approaches commonly used to identify genetic risk factors of this disease. Available data suggest that aggressive periodontitis is caused by mutations in multiple genes, combined with environmental effects. Syndromic periodontal diseases include certain monogenic disorders that express phenotypes showing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the genetic triggering factors of most of these syndromes have been identified. Other periodontal disease phenotypes seem to occur through different genetic predisposition patterns. Case-control and genome-wide studies have been used to investigate the association with gene polymorphisms. Association studies and the familial aggregation of aggressive periodontitis suggest a significant genetic component in the increased predisposition to this disease. There is evidence to support the contribution of a few major genes or of multiple small-effects genes. In addition, there is evidence of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction effects. Early studies suggested an X-linked mode of transmission of aggressive periodontitis, and subsequent studies support an autosomal mode. Genetic studies have the potential to improve the screening programs of subjects at risk for developing aggressive periodontitis and may enhance treatment outcome through gene therapy.

  5. 14 CFR 1203.406 - Additional classification factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional classification factors. 1203.406 Section 1203.406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.406 Additional classification factors. In...

  6. 14 CFR 1203.406 - Additional classification factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Additional classification factors. 1203.406 Section 1203.406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.406 Additional classification factors. In...

  7. 14 CFR 1203.406 - Additional classification factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional classification factors. 1203.406 Section 1203.406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.406 Additional classification factors. In...

  8. Additive Genetic Risk from Five Serotonin System Polymorphisms Interacts with Interpersonal Stress to Predict Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E.; Adam, Emma K.; Redei, Eva E.; Hammen, Constance; Craske, Michelle G.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral genetic research supports polygenic models of depression in which many genetic variations each contribute a small amount of risk, and prevailing diathesis-stress models suggest gene-environment interactions (GxE). Multilocus profile scores of additive risk offer an approach that is consistent with polygenic models of depression risk. In a first demonstration of this approach in a GxE predicting depression, we created an additive multilocus profile score from five serotonin system polymorphisms (one each in the genes HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR2C, and two in TPH2). Analyses focused on two forms of interpersonal stress as environmental risk factors. Using five years of longitudinal diagnostic and life stress interviews from 387 emerging young adults in the Youth Emotion Project, survival analyses show that this multilocus profile score interacts with major interpersonal stressful life events to predict major depressive episode onsets (HR = 1.815, p = .007). Simultaneously, there was a significant protective effect of the profile score without a recent event (HR = 0.83, p = .030). The GxE effect with interpersonal chronic stress was not significant (HR = 1.15, p = .165). Finally, effect sizes for genetic factors examined ignoring stress suggested such an approach could lead to overlooking or misinterpreting genetic effects. Both the GxE effect and the protective simple main effect were replicated in a sample of early adolescent girls (N = 105). We discuss potential benefits of the multilocus genetic profile score approach and caveats for future research. PMID:26595467

  9. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation. PMID:26597662

  10. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation.

  11. [Genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ikari, Katsunori

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common autoimmune diseases, is a systemic, chronic inflammatory disease, which is primarily involves the joints affecting up to 1% of the population. RA is believed to be a complex, multifarious disease that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Disease susceptibility has been estimated to have a genetic component of 60% by data from twin studies. To date, more than 100 RA susceptibility loci, including HLA-DRB1, have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and GWAS meta-analyses. Through a big data approach using large amounts of comprehensive biologic data included GWAS, we identified important information, such as susceptible genes, pathways and cell types that contribute to RA pathogenesis. PMID:27311175

  12. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer.

    PubMed

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Jaspers, Jan P C

    2016-06-01

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors that can predict which counselees are most likely to develop psychological problems after presymptomatic genetic testing. Counselees with a 50 % risk of BRCA1/2 or Lynch syndrome completed questionnaires at three time-points: after receiving a written invitation for a genetic counseling intake (T1), 2-3 days after receiving their DNA test result (T2), and 4-6 weeks later (T3). The psychological impact of the genetic test result was examined shortly and 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Subsequently, the influence of various potentially prognostic factors on psychological impact were examined in the whole group. Data from 165 counselees were analyzed. Counselees with an unfavorable outcome did not have more emotional distress, but showed significantly more cancer worries 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Prognostic factors for cancer worries after genetic testing were pre-existing cancer worries, being single, a high risk perception of getting cancer, and an unfavorable test result. Emotional distress was best predicted by pre-existing cancer worries and pre-existing emotional distress. The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result appears considerable if it is measured as "worries about cancer." Genetic counselors should provide additional guidance to counselees with many cancer worries, emotional distress, a high risk perception or a weak social network.

  13. Environmental and genetic factors in pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Waubant, Emmanuelle; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Pugliatti, Maura; Hanwell, Heather; Mowry, Ellen M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2016-08-30

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs in childhood in about 5% of all patients with MS. The disease in adults has a complex genetic and environmental inheritability. One of the main risk factors, also confirmed in pediatric MS, is HLA DRB1*1501 In addition to genetic factors, a large part of disease susceptibility in adults is conferred by environmental risk factors such as low vitamin D status, exposure to cigarette smoking, and remote Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In children, both exposure to cigarette smoking and prior EBV infection have been reported consistently as risk factors for MS. The role of vitamin D remains to be confirmed in this age category. Finally, although very likely critical in disease processes, few gene-environment interactions and epigenetic changes have been reported for adult and pediatric MS susceptibility. Of interest, some of the risk factors for MS have also been associated with disease course modification, such as low 25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in pediatric and adult MS. Age is also a clear disease modifier of clinical, CSF, and MRI phenotype in children with the disease. Finally, although much has yet to be unraveled regarding molecular processes at play in MS, there is a larger gap in our knowledge of genetic and environmental risk factors for pediatric neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and only collaborative studies will answer those questions. PMID:27572857

  14. 14 CFR § 1203.406 - Additional classification factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional classification factors. § 1203.406 Section § 1203.406 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.406 Additional classification...

  15. Genetic factors in exercise adoption, adherence and obesity.

    PubMed

    Herring, M P; Sailors, M H; Bray, M S

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity and exercise play critical roles in energy balance. While many interventions targeted at increasing physical activity have demonstrated efficacy in promoting weight loss or maintenance in the short term, long term adherence to such programmes is not frequently observed. Numerous factors have been examined for their ability to predict and/or influence physical activity and exercise adherence. Although physical activity has been demonstrated to have a strong genetic component in both animals and humans, few studies have examined the association between genetic variation and exercise adherence. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the non-genetic and genetic predictors of physical activity and adherence to exercise. In addition, we report the results of analysis of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms in six candidate genes examined for association to exercise adherence, duration, intensity and total exercise dose in young adults from the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study. Based on both animal and human research, neural signalling and pleasure/reward systems in the brain may drive in large part the propensity to be physically active and to adhere to an exercise programme. Adherence/compliance research in other fields may inform future investigation of the genetics of exercise adherence.

  16. The Genetic and Environmental Factors Underlying Hypospadias

    PubMed Central

    Pask, Andrew; Heloury, Yves; Sinclair, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Hypospadias results from a failure of urethral closure in the male phallus and affects 1 in 200–300 boys. It is thought to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The development of the penis progresses in 2 stages: an initial hormone-independent phase and a secondary hormone-dependent phase. Here, we review the molecular pathways that contribute to each of these stages, drawing on studies from both human and mouse models. Hypospadias can occur when normal development of the phallus is disrupted, and we provide evidence that mutations in genes underlying this developmental process are causative. Finally, we discuss the environmental factors that may contribute to hypospadias and their potential immediate and transgen erational epigenetic impacts. PMID:26613581

  17. The Genetic and Environmental Factors Underlying Hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Bouty, Aurore; Ayers, Katie L; Pask, Andrew; Heloury, Yves; Sinclair, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias results from a failure of urethral closure in the male phallus and affects 1 in 200-300 boys. It is thought to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The development of the penis progresses in 2 stages: an initial hormone-independent phase and a secondary hormone-dependent phase. Here, we review the molecular pathways that contribute to each of these stages, drawing on studies from both human and mouse models. Hypospadias can occur when normal development of the phallus is disrupted, and we provide evidence that mutations in genes underlying this developmental process are causative. Finally, we discuss the environmental factors that may contribute to hypospadias and their potential immediate and transgenerational epigenetic impacts. PMID:26613581

  18. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one of these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not necessarily mean that the β-cell autoantibodies are pathogenic, but rather that they represent reproducible biomarkers of the pathogenesis. The primary risk factor for β-cell autoimmunity is genetic, mainly occurring in individuals with either HLA-DR3-DQ2 or HLA-DR4-DQ8 haplotypes, or both, but a trigger from the environment is generally needed. The pathogenesis can be divided into three stages: 1, appearance of β-cell autoimmunity, normoglycaemia, and no symptoms; 2, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and no symptoms; and 3, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and symptoms of diabetes. The genetic association with each one of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis. PMID:27302272

  19. Genetic factors in Threatened Species Recovery Plans on three continents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Threatened species' recovery planning is applied globally to stem the current species extinction crisis. Evidence supports a key role of genetic processes, such as inbreeding depression, in determining species viability. We examined whether genetic factors are considered in threa...

  20. Genetic Factors in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Holder, A. M.; Klaassens, M.; Tibboel, D.; de Klein, A.; Lee, B.; Scott, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a relatively common birth defect associated with high mortality and morbidity. Although the exact etiology of most cases of CDH remains unknown, there is a growing body of evidence that genetic factors play an important role in the development of CDH. In this review, we examine key findings that are likely to form the basis for future research in this field. Specific topics include a short overview of normal and abnormal diaphragm development, a discussion of syndromic forms of CDH, a detailed review of chromosomal regions recurrently altered in CDH, a description of the retinoid hypothesis of CDH, and evidence of the roles of specific genes in the development of CDH. PMID:17436238

  1. Genetic and environmental factors in breakfast eating patterns.

    PubMed

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Viken, Richard J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Rose, Richard J

    2004-09-01

    Despite many studies on the prevalence of breakfast eating, we know little about factors that determine breakfast eating patterns. Our aim was to find out to which extent breakfast eating frequency is influenced by genetic and environmental factors using twin and twin-family models in a population sample of 16-year-old twins (n = 5250) and their parents (n = 4663). In common effects sex-limitation models, additive genetic effects explained 41% (95% CI: 21-63%) of the variance in breakfast eating in girls and 66% (95% CI: 47-79%) in boys, and common environmental effects 45% (95% CI: 23-62%) in girls and 14% (95% CI: 5-29%) in boys. Of twin-family models, phenotypic assortment models fitted the data best. Heritability estimates increased somewhat (72%, 95% CI: 46-98% in girls and 63%, 95% CI: 38-89%) in boys. Common family environment remained substantial in both sexes. Cultural transmission was nonsignificant. The relative influence of genetic and family factors on adolescent breakfast eating frequency differs by sex and is generation-specific.

  2. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality. PMID:27450674

  3. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality.

  4. The Evolution of Human Intelligence and the Coefficient of Additive Genetic Variance in Human Brain Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geoffrey F.; Penke, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Most theories of human mental evolution assume that selection favored higher intelligence and larger brains, which should have reduced genetic variance in both. However, adult human intelligence remains highly heritable, and is genetically correlated with brain size. This conflict might be resolved by estimating the coefficient of additive genetic…

  5. Immunologic, metabolic and genetic factors in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, Nora A; Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Torres-Valadez, Rafael; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate disease progression during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the response to treatment are not clearly identified. Numerous studies have demonstrated that a strong host immune response against HCV favors HCV clearance. In addition, genetic factors and metabolic machinery, particularly cholesterol modulation, are involved in HCV infection. It is likely that the interplay between all of these factors contributes to the outcome of HCV infection. In recent years, the world has experienced its largest epidemic of obesity. Mexico and the United States are the leading sufferers from this epidemic at the global level. Obesity is associated with the development of numerous pathologies including hypercholesterolemia which is one of the eight most important risk factors for mortality in Mexico. This may be related to the course of HCV infection in this population. Here, we focus on the urgent need to study the progression of HCV infection in relation to ethnic characteristics. Discoveries are discussed that hold promise in identifying immune, metabolic and genetic factors that, in conjunction, could be therapeutic targets or predictors of the progression of HCV infection. PMID:24707127

  6. Immunologic, metabolic and genetic factors in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Nora A; Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Torres-Valadez, Rafael; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo

    2014-04-01

    The mechanisms that regulate disease progression during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the response to treatment are not clearly identified. Numerous studies have demonstrated that a strong host immune response against HCV favors HCV clearance. In addition, genetic factors and metabolic machinery, particularly cholesterol modulation, are involved in HCV infection. It is likely that the interplay between all of these factors contributes to the outcome of HCV infection. In recent years, the world has experienced its largest epidemic of obesity. Mexico and the United States are the leading sufferers from this epidemic at the global level. Obesity is associated with the development of numerous pathologies including hypercholesterolemia which is one of the eight most important risk factors for mortality in Mexico. This may be related to the course of HCV infection in this population. Here, we focus on the urgent need to study the progression of HCV infection in relation to ethnic characteristics. Discoveries are discussed that hold promise in identifying immune, metabolic and genetic factors that, in conjunction, could be therapeutic targets or predictors of the progression of HCV infection. PMID:24707127

  7. Motivating factors for physician ordering of Factor V Leiden genetic tests

    PubMed Central

    Hindorff, Lucia A.; Burke, Wylie; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Rice, Kenneth M.; Lumley, Thomas; Leppig, Kathleen; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Larson, Eric B.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Factor V Leiden (FVL) genetic test is used by many physicians despite its uncertain clinical utility. This study investigated whether self-reported motivations and behaviors concerning FVL genetic testing differed between two groups of primary care physicians defined by frequency of prior FVL test use. Methods In January 2007, 112 primary care physicians (60 frequent, 52 infrequent FVL test users) at Group Health, a large health care delivery system, were surveyed. Survey content areas included: primary reasons and motivating factors for ordering FVL; likelihood of ordering FVL for hypothetical patients; potential barriers to genetic testing, and practices and skills regarding FVL test ordering. Results Responses between groups agreed concerning most clinical- or patient-related factors. Frequent-FVL physicians were more likely than infrequent-FVL physicians to report ordering FVL for hypothetical patients with mesenteric venous thrombosis (adjusted OR 4.57, 95% CI 1.55, 13.53) or venous thrombosis following hospital discharge (adjusted OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.30, 8.95). Frequent-FVL physicians were also less likely to agree with several potential barriers to genetic testing and more likely to report high confidence in interpreting and explaining FVL test results. Conclusions Generally, both groups of physicians reported similar motivating factors for ordering FVL, and reported behaviors were consistent with existing guidelines. More striking differences were observed for measures such as barriers to and confidence in using genetic tests. Though additional research is necessary to evaluate their impact, these results inform several knowledge-to-practice translation issues that are important to the successful integration of genetic testing into primary care. PMID:19139326

  8. Spontaneous mutagenesis: experimental, genetic and other factors.

    PubMed

    Smith, K C

    1992-08-01

    Spontaneous mutations are "the net result of all that can go wrong with DNA during the life cycle of an organism" (Glickman et al., 1986). Thus, the types and amounts of spontaneous mutations produced are the resultant of all the cellular processes that are mutagenic and those that are antimutagenic. It is not widely appreciated that the types and frequencies of spontaneous mutations change markedly with subtle changes in experimental conditions. All types of mutations are produced spontaneously, i.e., base substitutions, frameshifts, insertions and deletions. However, very few papers have appeared that are devoted exclusively to the study of the mechanisms of spontaneous mutagenesis, and of the subtle experimental factors that affect the types and frequencies of spontaneous mutations. This is unfortunate because spontaneous mutagenesis appears to play a major role in evolution, aging, and carcinogenesis. This review emphasizes subtle experimental variables that markedly affect the results of a spontaneous mutation experiment. A thorough understanding of these variables eliminates the need for a theory of "directed" mutagenesis. The intrinsic instability of DNA, and the types of normal metabolic lesions that are produced in DNA that lead to mutations via errors made in replication, repair, and recombination are reviewed, as is the genetic control of spontaneous mutagenesis. As with spontaneous mutagenesis, spontaneous carcinogenesis can also be considered to be the net result of all that can go wrong with DNA during the life of an organism. PMID:1378531

  9. Heterogeneity of schizophrenia: Genetic and symptomatic factors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sakae

    2013-10-01

    Schizophrenia may have etiological heterogeneity, and may reflect common symptomatology caused by many genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we show the potential existence of heterogeneity in schizophrenia based on the results of our previous studies. In our study of the NOTCH4 gene, there were no significant associations between any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NOTCH4 and schizophrenia. However, exploratory analyses suggested that the SNP, rs3134928 may be associated with early-onset schizophrenia, and that rs387071 may be associated with schizophrenia characterized by negative symptoms. In our highly familial schizophrenia study, the African-American cohort without environmental exposure showed a possible linkage at marker 8p23.1 in the dominant model and in the European-American cohort, a marker at 22q13.32 showed a probable linkage in the recessive model. In the less familial schizophrenia families, these linkages were not shown. Based on our eye movement study, a putative subtype of schizophrenia with severe symptoms related to excitement/hostility, negative symptoms and disorganization may be associated with chromosome 22q11. We consider that a sample stratification approach may clarify the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Therefore, this approach may lead to a more straightforward way of identifying susceptibility genes of schizophrenia.

  10. Epistasis Is a Major Determinant of the Additive Genetic Variance in Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of genetic interactions (epistasis) on the genetic variance of quantitative traits is a major unresolved problem relevant to medical, agricultural, and evolutionary genetics. The additive genetic component is typically a high proportion of the total genetic variance in quantitative traits, despite that underlying genes must interact to determine phenotype. This study estimates direct and interaction effects for 11 pairs of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) affecting floral traits within a single population of Mimulus guttatus. With estimates of all 9 genotypes for each QTL pair, we are able to map from QTL effects to variance components as a function of population allele frequencies, and thus predict changes in variance components as allele frequencies change. This mapping requires an analytical framework that properly accounts for bias introduced by estimation errors. We find that even with abundant interactions between QTLs, most of the genetic variance is likely to be additive. However, the strong dependency of allelic average effects on genetic background implies that epistasis is a major determinant of the additive genetic variance, and thus, the population’s ability to respond to selection. PMID:25946702

  11. Genetic risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Maryam; Armstrong, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in individuals older than 65 years of age. It is a multifactorial disorder and identification of risk factors enables individuals to make lifestyle choices that may reduce the risk of disease. Collaboration between geneticists, ophthalmologists, and optometrists suggests that genetic risk factors play a more significant role in AMD than previously thought. The most important genes are associated with immune system modulation and the complement system, e.g., complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB), factor C3, and serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPING1). Genes associated with membrane transport, e.g., ATP-binding cassette protein (ABCR) and voltage-dependent calcium channel gamma 3 (CACNG3), the vascular system, e.g., fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), fibulin-5, lysyl oxidase-like gene (LOXL1) and selectin-P (SELP), and with lipid metabolism, e.g., apolipoprotein E (APOE) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) have also been implicated. In addition, several other genes exhibit some statistical association with AMD, e.g., age-related maculopathy susceptibility protein 2 (ARMS2) and DNA excision repair protein gene (ERCC6) but more research is needed to establish their significance. Modifiable risk factors for AMD should be discussed with patients whose lifestyle and/or family history place them in an increased risk category. Furthermore, calculation of AMD risk using current models should be recommended as a tool for patient education. It is likely that AMD management in future will be increasingly influenced by assessment of genetic risk as such screening methods become more widely available.

  12. Clinical, Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Congenital Vertebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, P.F.; Raggio, C.L.; Blank, R.D.; McCarty, C.; Broeckel, U.; Pickart, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) pose a significant health problem because they can be associated with spinal deformities, such as congenital scoliosis and kyphosis, in addition to various syndromes and other congenital malformations. Additional information remains to be learned regarding the natural history of congenital scoliosis and related health problems. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the process of somite formation, which gives rise to vertebral bodies, there is a wide gap in our understanding of how genetic factors contribute to CVM development. Maternal diabetes during pregnancy most commonly contributes to the occurrence of CVM, followed by other factors such as hypoxia and anticonvulsant medications. This review highlights several emerging clinical issues related to CVM, including pulmonary and orthopedic outcome in congenital scoliosis. Recent breakthroughs in genetics related to gene and environment interactions associated with CVM development are discussed. The Klippel-Feil syndrome which is associated with cervical segmentation abnormalities is illustrated as an example in which animal models, such as the zebrafish, can be utilized to provide functional evidence of pathogenicity of identified mutations. PMID:23653580

  13. Parametric and Nonparametric Statistical Methods for Genomic Selection of Traits with Additive and Epistatic Genetic Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Réka; Carriquiry, Alicia L.; Beavis, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Parametric and nonparametric methods have been developed for purposes of predicting phenotypes. These methods are based on retrospective analyses of empirical data consisting of genotypic and phenotypic scores. Recent reports have indicated that parametric methods are unable to predict phenotypes of traits with known epistatic genetic architectures. Herein, we review parametric methods including least squares regression, ridge regression, Bayesian ridge regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), Bayesian LASSO, best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP), Bayes A, Bayes B, Bayes C, and Bayes Cπ. We also review nonparametric methods including Nadaraya-Watson estimator, reproducing kernel Hilbert space, support vector machine regression, and neural networks. We assess the relative merits of these 14 methods in terms of accuracy and mean squared error (MSE) using simulated genetic architectures consisting of completely additive or two-way epistatic interactions in an F2 population derived from crosses of inbred lines. Each simulated genetic architecture explained either 30% or 70% of the phenotypic variability. The greatest impact on estimates of accuracy and MSE was due to genetic architecture. Parametric methods were unable to predict phenotypic values when the underlying genetic architecture was based entirely on epistasis. Parametric methods were slightly better than nonparametric methods for additive genetic architectures. Distinctions among parametric methods for additive genetic architectures were incremental. Heritability, i.e., proportion of phenotypic variability, had the second greatest impact on estimates of accuracy and MSE. PMID:24727289

  14. Role of genetic and non-genetic factors in the etiology of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Marinò, M; Latrofa, F; Menconi, F; Chiovato, L; Vitti, P

    2015-03-01

    In spite of the advancements in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of Graves' disease (GD), its ultimate cause remains elusive. The majority of investigators agree that GD is likely a multifactorial disease, due to a complex interplay of genetic and non-genetic factors that lead to the loss of immune tolerance to thyroid antigens and to the initiation of a sustained autoimmune reaction. Twin and family studies support a role of genetic factors, among which the HLA complex, CD40, CTLA-4, PTPN22, FCRL3, thyroglobulin, and the TSH receptor may be involved. Among non-genetic factors, iodine, infections, psychological stress, gender, smoking, thyroid damage, vitamin D, selenium, immune modulating agents, and periods of immune reconstitution may contribute the development of the diseases. Here we review in detail the respective role of genetic and non-genetic factors in the etiology of GD, taking advantage of the great bulk of data generated especially over the past 30 years.

  15. Estimation of Additive, Dominance, and Imprinting Genetic Variance Using Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marcos S.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Janss, Luc; Knol, Egbert F.; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, exploration of genetic variance in humans, plants, and livestock species has been limited mostly to the use of additive effects estimated using pedigree data. However, with the development of dense panels of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the exploration of genetic variation of complex traits is moving from quantifying the resemblance between family members to the dissection of genetic variation at individual loci. With SNPs, we were able to quantify the contribution of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance to the total genetic variance by using a SNP regression method. The method was validated in simulated data and applied to three traits (number of teats, backfat, and lifetime daily gain) in three purebred pig populations. In simulated data, the estimates of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance were very close to the simulated values. In real data, dominance effects account for a substantial proportion of the total genetic variance (up to 44%) for these traits in these populations. The contribution of imprinting to the total phenotypic variance of the evaluated traits was relatively small (1–3%). Our results indicate a strong relationship between additive variance explained per chromosome and chromosome length, which has been described previously for other traits in other species. We also show that a similar linear relationship exists for dominance and imprinting variance. These novel results improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of the evaluated traits and shows promise to apply the SNP regression method to other traits and species, including human diseases. PMID:26438289

  16. The contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation: heritability of personality.

    PubMed

    Dochtermann, Ned A; Schwab, Tori; Sih, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Individual animals frequently exhibit repeatable differences from other members of their population, differences now commonly referred to as 'animal personality'. Personality differences can arise, for example, from differences in permanent environmental effects--including parental and epigenetic contributors--and the effect of additive genetic variation. Although several studies have evaluated the heritability of behaviour, less is known about general patterns of heritability and additive genetic variation in animal personality. As overall variation in behaviour includes both the among-individual differences that reflect different personalities and temporary environmental effects, it is possible for personality to be largely genetically influenced even when heritability of behaviour per se is quite low. The relative contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation can be estimated whenever both repeatability and heritability are estimated for the same data. Using published estimates to address this issue, we found that approximately 52% of animal personality variation was attributable to additive genetic variation. Thus, while the heritability of behaviour is often moderate or low, the heritability of personality is much higher. Our results therefore (i) demonstrate that genetic differences are likely to be a major contributor to variation in animal personality and (ii) support the phenotypic gambit: that evolutionary inferences drawn from repeatability estimates may often be justified.

  17. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  18. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  19. Additive and nonadditive genetic variances for milk yield, fertility, and lifetime performance traits of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, C; Sölkner, J

    1994-04-01

    Additive and nonadditive genetic variances were estimated for yield traits and fertility for three subsequent lactations and for lifetime performance traits of purebred and crossbred dairy cattle populations. Traits were milk yield, energy-corrected milk yield, fat percentage, protein percentage, calving interval, length of productive life, and lifetime FCM of purebred Simmental, Simmental including crossbreds, and Braunvieh crossed with Brown Swiss. Data files ranged from 66,740 to 375,093 records. An approach based on pedigree information for sire and maternal grandsire was used and included additive, dominance, and additive by additive genetic effects. Variances were estimated using the tildehat approximation to REML. Heritability estimated without nonadditive effects in the model was overestimated, particularly in presence of additive by additive variance. Dominance variance was important for most traits; for the lifetime performance traits, dominance was clearly higher than additive variance. Additive by additive variance was very high for milk yield and energy-corrected milk yield, especially for data including crossbreds. Effect of inbreeding was low in most cases. Inclusion of nonadditive effects in genetic evaluation models might improve estimation of additive effects and may require consideration for dairy cattle breeding programs.

  20. Disparities and genetic risk factors in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Katherine A; Patel, Sanjay R

    2016-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an increasingly prevalent condition. A growing body of literature supports substantial racial disparities in the prevalence, risk factors, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. Craniofacial structure among Asians appears to confer an elevated risk of OSA despite lower rates of obesity. Among African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics, OSA prevalence is increased, likely due in part to obesity. The burden of symptoms, particularly excessive daytime sleepiness, is higher among African Americans, although Hispanics more often report snoring. Limited data suggest that African Americans may be more susceptible to hypertension in the setting of OSA. While differences in genetic risk factors may explain disparities in OSA burden, no definitive genetic differences have yet been identified. In addition to disparities in OSA development, disparities in OSA diagnosis and treatment have also been identified. Increased severity of disease at diagnosis among African Americans suggests a delay in diagnosis. Treatment outcomes are also suboptimal among African Americans. In children, tonsillectomy is less likely to cure OSA and more commonly associated with complications in this group. Among adults, adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is substantially lower in African Americans. The reasons for these disparities, particularly in outcomes, are not well understood and should be a research priority. PMID:26428843

  1. Brief Report: Genetic, Prenatal, and Immunologic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Susan L.; Collins, Francis

    1996-01-01

    Evidence for the genetic basis of autism is offered, as is evidence that environmental determinants also play a role. Research involving the Human Genome Project, using linkage analysis with affected autistic sibling pairs to identify polymorphic marker genes, is described and proposed. (DB)

  2. Linking genetic and environmental factors in amphibian disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Anna E; Becker, Carlos G; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2015-01-01

    A central question in evolutionary biology is how interactions between organisms and the environment shape genetic differentiation. The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has caused variable population declines in the lowland leopard frog (Lithobates yavapaiensis); thus, disease has potentially shaped, or been shaped by, host genetic diversity. Environmental factors can also influence both amphibian immunity and Bd virulence, confounding our ability to assess the genetic effects on disease dynamics. Here, we used genetics, pathogen dynamics, and environmental data to characterize L. yavapaiensis populations, estimate migration, and determine relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors in predicting Bd dynamics. We found that the two uninfected populations belonged to a single genetic deme, whereas each infected population was genetically unique. We detected an outlier locus that deviated from neutral expectations and was significantly correlated with mortality within populations. Across populations, only environmental variables predicted infection intensity, whereas environment and genetics predicted infection prevalence, and genetic diversity alone predicted mortality. At one locality with geothermally elevated water temperatures, migration estimates revealed source–sink dynamics that have likely prevented local adaptation. We conclude that integrating genetic and environmental variation among populations provides a better understanding of Bd spatial epidemiology, generating more effective conservation management strategies for mitigating amphibian declines. PMID:26136822

  3. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  4. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  5. Genetic risk factors associated with respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jo, Heui Seung

    2014-04-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) among preterm infants is typically due to a quantitative deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. Aside from the degree of prematurity, diverse environmental and genetic factors can affect the development of RDS. The variance of the risk of RDS in various races/ethnicities or monozygotic/dizygotic twins has suggested genetic influences on this disorder. So far, several specific mutations in genes encoding surfactant-associated molecules have confirmed this. Specific genetic variants contributing to the regulation of pulmonary development, its structure and function, or the inflammatory response could be candidate risk factors for the development of RDS. This review summarizes the background that suggests the genetic predisposition of RDS, the identified mutations, and candidate genetic polymorphisms of pulmonary surfactant proteins associated with RDS.

  6. Genetic Factors Influence Serological Measures of Common Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rubicz, Rohina; Leach, Charles T.; Kraig, Ellen; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John; Yolken, Robert; Göring, Harald H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Antibodies against infectious pathogens provide information on past or present exposure to infectious agents. While host genetic factors are known to affect the immune response, the influence of genetic factors on antibody levels to common infectious agents is largely unknown. Here we test whether antibody levels for 13 common infections are significantly heritable. Methods IgG antibodies to Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, Toxoplasma gondii, adenovirus 36 (Ad36), hepatitis A virus, influenza A and B, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and −2, human herpesvirus-6, and varicella zoster virus were determined for 1,227 Mexican Americans. Both quantitative and dichotomous (seropositive/seronegative) traits were analyzed. Influences of genetic and shared environmental factors were estimated using variance components pedigree analysis, and sharing of underlying genetic factors among traits was investigated using bivariate analyses. Results Serological phenotypes were significantly heritable for most pathogens (h2 = 0.17–0.39), except for Ad36 and HSV-2. Shared environment was significant for several pathogens (c2 = 0.10–0.32). The underlying genetic etiology appears to be largely different for most pathogens. Conclusions Our results demonstrate, for the first time for many of these pathogens, that individual genetic differences of the human host contribute substantially to antibody levels to many common infectious agents, providing impetus for the identification of underlying genetic variants, which may be of clinical importance. PMID:21996708

  7. Identification of genetic risk factors for maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    PubMed

    Alves-Ferreira, M; Pinho, T; Sousa, A; Sequeiros, J; Lemos, C; Alonso, I

    2014-05-01

    Tooth agenesis affects 20% of the world population, and maxillary lateral incisors agenesis (MLIA) is one of the most frequent subtypes, characterized by the absence of formation of deciduous or permanent lateral incisors. Odontogenesis is a complex mechanism regulated by sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, controlled by activators and inhibitors involved in several pathways. Disturbances in these signaling cascades can lead to abnormalities in odontogenesis, resulting in alterations in the formation of the normal teeth number. Our aim was to study a large number of genes encoding either transcription factors or key components in signaling pathways shown to be involved in tooth odontogenesis. We selected 8 genes-MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, SPRY2, TGFA, SPRY4, and WNT10A-and performed one of the largest case-control studies taking into account the number of genes and variants assessed, aiming at the identification of MLIA susceptibility factors. We show the involvement of PAX9, EDA, SPRY2, SPRY4, and WNT10A as risk factors for MLIA. Additionally, we uncovered 3 strong synergistic interactions between MLIA liability and MSX1-TGFA, AXIN2-TGFA, and SPRY2-SPRY4 gene pairs. We report the first evidence of the involvement of sprouty genes in MLIA susceptibility. This large study results in a better understanding of the genetic components and mechanisms underlying this trait.

  8. Genetic and hormonal factors in female-biased autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rubtsov, Anatoly V.; Rubtsova, Kira; Kappler, John W.; Marrack, Philippa

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmunity is controlled both by the environment and by genetic factors. One of the most well defined genetic factors is polymorphisms, with some alleles of particular genes promoting autoimmune diseases, whereas other alleles either not affecting susceptibility to disease or, in some cases actually inhibiting the appearance of such illnesses. Another genetically controlled factor, gender, also plays a profound role in the incidence of autoimmune diseases. For example, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) occurs much more frequently in females than in males in both mice and man. The genetic differences that make some individuals susceptible to autoimmunity and protect others could act in many ways and affect many tissues. In this review we will discuss how gender may act on the cells of the immune system and thereby influence the predisposition of the host to autoimmune diseases. PMID:20144912

  9. [Environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Cottereau, Edouard; de Pauw, Antoine; Elan, Camille; Dagousset, Isabelle; Fourchotte, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lae, Marick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    In France, endometrial cancer is at the first rank of gynecological cancers for cancer incidence, before ovarian and cervical cancers. In fact, the number of incident cases has been estimated to 7275 for the year 2012; the number of death due to endometrial cancer to 2025. This cancer is hormone-dependent and endogenous (reproductive factors) or exogenous (oral combined contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy) causes of exposition to estrogens are the major environmental risk factors for both types of endometrial cancers: type I or well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinomas; and type II including all other histological types: papillary serous adenocarcinomas, clear cell adenocarcinomas and carcinosarcomas, also known as malignant mixed Mullerian tumor, MMMT. Obesity, diabetes mellitus and adjuvant treatment of breast cancer with tamoxifen are also associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Genetic factors may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer either as "minor genetic factors" (susceptibility factors), which remain largely unknown and are responsible for the increased observed risk in relatives of women affected with endometrial cancer; or as major genetic factors responsible for hereditary forms and namely for Lynch syndrome whose genetic transmission is of autosomic dominant type. The appropriate recognition of Lynch syndrome is of critical importance because affected patients and their relatives should benefit from specific care. The aims of this review is to describe major environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial cancer with specific attention to most recent advances in this field and to describe recommendations for care of at-risk women.

  10. Both common and specific genetic factors are involved in polygenic resistance of pepper to several potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Caranta, C; Palloix, A

    1996-01-01

    Absolute resistance to potato virus Y pathotype 0 (PVY 0), potyvirus E and chili veinal mottle virus (CVMV) and a partial resistance to potato virus Y pathotype 1,2 (PVY 1,2) were found in an Indian pepper line, 'Perennial'. In the doubled haploid (DH) progeny from the F1 of a cross 'Perennial' by 'Yolo Wonder', resistance to CVMV was confered by two independent genes, one with a clear dominant effect. Resistance to PVY and potyvirus E was quantitatively expressed and controlled by several recessive genetic factors. Genetic analysis showed that fewer resistance factors were necessary to explain resistance to PVY (0) and potyvirus E than resistance to PVY(1,2). Genetic correlations between resistances to the different potyviruses in the DH progeny showed that most of genetic factors involved in PVY(0) resistance appear to be also involved in potyvirus E resistance, and some of these polyvalent factors may be also involved in PVY(1,2) resistance but, in this case, additional specific genes were necessary. One of the two CVMV resistance genes seems to be implicated in potyvirus E resistance. Thus, the polygenic resistance of 'Perennial' to these potyviruses was due both to polyvalent genetic factors, i.e. factors that apparently interact with several viruses, and strain-specific genetic factors. PMID:24166111

  11. Implementation of the Realized Genomic Relationship Matrix to Open-Pollinated White Spruce Family Testing for Disentangling Additive from Nonadditive Genetic Effects.

    PubMed

    Gamal El-Dien, Omnia; Ratcliffe, Blaise; Klápště, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Charles; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2016-03-01

    The open-pollinated (OP) family testing combines the simplest known progeny evaluation and quantitative genetics analyses as candidates' offspring are assumed to represent independent half-sib families. The accuracy of genetic parameter estimates is often questioned as the assumption of "half-sibling" in OP families may often be violated. We compared the pedigree- vs. marker-based genetic models by analysing 22-yr height and 30-yr wood density for 214 white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] OP families represented by 1694 individuals growing on one site in Quebec, Canada. Assuming half-sibling, the pedigree-based model was limited to estimating the additive genetic variances which, in turn, were grossly overestimated as they were confounded by very minor dominance and major additive-by-additive epistatic genetic variances. In contrast, the implemented genomic pairwise realized relationship models allowed the disentanglement of additive from all nonadditive factors through genetic variance decomposition. The marker-based models produced more realistic narrow-sense heritability estimates and, for the first time, allowed estimating the dominance and epistatic genetic variances from OP testing. In addition, the genomic models showed better prediction accuracies compared to pedigree models and were able to predict individual breeding values for new individuals from untested families, which was not possible using the pedigree-based model. Clearly, the use of marker-based relationship approach is effective in estimating the quantitative genetic parameters of complex traits even under simple and shallow pedigree structure.

  12. Implementation of the Realized Genomic Relationship Matrix to Open-Pollinated White Spruce Family Testing for Disentangling Additive from Nonadditive Genetic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gamal El-Dien, Omnia; Ratcliffe, Blaise; Klápště, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Charles; El-Kassaby, Yousry A.

    2016-01-01

    The open-pollinated (OP) family testing combines the simplest known progeny evaluation and quantitative genetics analyses as candidates’ offspring are assumed to represent independent half-sib families. The accuracy of genetic parameter estimates is often questioned as the assumption of “half-sibling” in OP families may often be violated. We compared the pedigree- vs. marker-based genetic models by analysing 22-yr height and 30-yr wood density for 214 white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] OP families represented by 1694 individuals growing on one site in Quebec, Canada. Assuming half-sibling, the pedigree-based model was limited to estimating the additive genetic variances which, in turn, were grossly overestimated as they were confounded by very minor dominance and major additive-by-additive epistatic genetic variances. In contrast, the implemented genomic pairwise realized relationship models allowed the disentanglement of additive from all nonadditive factors through genetic variance decomposition. The marker-based models produced more realistic narrow-sense heritability estimates and, for the first time, allowed estimating the dominance and epistatic genetic variances from OP testing. In addition, the genomic models showed better prediction accuracies compared to pedigree models and were able to predict individual breeding values for new individuals from untested families, which was not possible using the pedigree-based model. Clearly, the use of marker-based relationship approach is effective in estimating the quantitative genetic parameters of complex traits even under simple and shallow pedigree structure. PMID:26801647

  13. Implementation of the Realized Genomic Relationship Matrix to Open-Pollinated White Spruce Family Testing for Disentangling Additive from Nonadditive Genetic Effects.

    PubMed

    Gamal El-Dien, Omnia; Ratcliffe, Blaise; Klápště, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Charles; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2016-03-01

    The open-pollinated (OP) family testing combines the simplest known progeny evaluation and quantitative genetics analyses as candidates' offspring are assumed to represent independent half-sib families. The accuracy of genetic parameter estimates is often questioned as the assumption of "half-sibling" in OP families may often be violated. We compared the pedigree- vs. marker-based genetic models by analysing 22-yr height and 30-yr wood density for 214 white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] OP families represented by 1694 individuals growing on one site in Quebec, Canada. Assuming half-sibling, the pedigree-based model was limited to estimating the additive genetic variances which, in turn, were grossly overestimated as they were confounded by very minor dominance and major additive-by-additive epistatic genetic variances. In contrast, the implemented genomic pairwise realized relationship models allowed the disentanglement of additive from all nonadditive factors through genetic variance decomposition. The marker-based models produced more realistic narrow-sense heritability estimates and, for the first time, allowed estimating the dominance and epistatic genetic variances from OP testing. In addition, the genomic models showed better prediction accuracies compared to pedigree models and were able to predict individual breeding values for new individuals from untested families, which was not possible using the pedigree-based model. Clearly, the use of marker-based relationship approach is effective in estimating the quantitative genetic parameters of complex traits even under simple and shallow pedigree structure. PMID:26801647

  14. Genetics Home Reference: factor XIII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... This protein plays a critical role in the coagulation cascade, which is a series of chemical reactions ... Biswas A, Ivaskevicius V, Thomas A, Oldenburg J. Coagulation factor XIII deficiency. Diagnosis, prevalence and management of ...

  15. Genetic and environmental factors associated with asthma.

    PubMed

    Bener, A; Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Al-Mutawwa, J; Debuse, P

    1996-06-01

    We investigate the familial and environmental risk factors associated with asthma among United Arab Emirates schoolchildren aged 6-14 years. A cross-sectional study of 850 schoolchildren living in both urban and rural areas (average age 9.36 +/- 2.11 years; 46.8% boys, 53.2% girls) was conducted using self-administered questionnaires between October 1992 and May 1993. The population sample had a high prevalence rate of diagnosed asthma (13.6%) and allergic rhinitis (22.9%). The frequency of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema among parents and siblings reflected the same pattern as that seen in the children. Environmental risk factors associated with asthma were pets, medicine, plants, dust storm, physical exercise, humidity, and perfume. All other factors, such as foods, climate, and parental smoking, showed no apparent relation to the development of asthma. The logistic regression analysis showed that parental asthma, plants, perfume, dust storm, humidity, and pets were the only significant predictors after adjusting for sex and other confounding covariates in the model. In conclusion, risk factors for asthma identified by our study are similar to those found in other community-based studies. Consistencies and discrepancies between our findings and those from other studies with respect to asthma risk factors support the hypothesis that asthma is a multifactorial disease related to both familial and environmental influences.

  16. AP-42 ADDITIONS AND REVISIONS - TRANSPORTABILITY FACTORS FOR FUGITIVE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The product is a table of factors, one for each county in the US, reflecting the portion of fugitive dust removed very close to the source via impaction on vegetation and similar mechanisms. Factors were based on land cover in area (county or grid cell) A praft final product was...

  17. [Asthma: a complex disease determined by genetic and environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Louis, R; Schleich, F; Corhay, J-L; Louis, E

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a complex disease highly dependent of environmental exposure and genetic background. Through linkage analysis, positional cloning and genome wide association studies, novel asthma genes have come out such as ADAM-33 or ORMLD3. Important environmental factors include allergenic exposure, pollutants and especially particulate matters, tobacco, aerosol exposure, viral infections and level of exposure to endotoxin. The effects of environmental factors are modulated by the genetic sequence and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Recently, it has also become clear that environmental factors may alter gene expression by DNA methylation or histone methylation/acetylation without changing the gene sequence and thereby changing asthmatic phenotype.

  18. Quantifying Effects of Environmental and Geographical Factors on Patterns of Genetic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating the factors influencing genetic differentiation is an important task in biology, and the relative contribution from natural selection and genetic drift has long been debated. In this study, we used a regression-based approach to simultaneously estimate the quantitative contributions of environmental adaptation and isolation by distance on genetic variation in Boechera stricta, a wild relative of Arabidopsis. Patterns of discrete and continuous genetic differentiation coexist within this species. For the discrete differentiation between two major genetic groups, environment has larger contribution than geography, and we also identified a significant environment-by-geography interaction effect. Elsewhere in the species range, we found a latitudinal cline of genetic variation reflecting only isolation by distance. To further confirm the effect of environmental selection on genetic divergence, we identified the specific environmental variables predicting local genotypes in allopatric and sympatric regions. Water availability was identified as the possible cause of differential local adaptation in both geographic regions, confirming the role of environmental adaptation in driving and maintaining genetic differentiation between the two major genetic groups. In addition, the environment-by-geography interaction is further confirmed by the finding that water availability is represented by different environmental factors in the allopatric and sympatric regions. In conclusion, this study found that geographical and environmental factors together created stronger and more discrete genetic differentiation than isolation by distance alone, which only produced a gradual, clinal pattern of genetic variation. These findings emphasize the importance of environmental selection in shaping patterns of species-wide genetic variation in the natural environment. PMID:21999331

  19. Factors affecting student performance in an undergraduate genetics course.

    PubMed

    Bormann, J Minick; Moser, D W; Bates, K E

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine some of the factors that affect student success in a genetics course. Genetics for the Kansas State University College of Agriculture is taught in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and covers Mendelian inheritance, molecular genetics, and quantitative/population genetics. Data collected from 1,516 students over 7 yr included year and semester of the course; age; gender; state of residence; population of hometown; Kansas City metro resident or not; instructor of course; American College Testing Program (ACT) scores; number of transfer credits; major; college; preveterinary student or not; freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior grade point average (GPA); semester credits when taking genetics; class standing when enrolled in genetics; cumulative GPA before and after taking genetics; semester GPA in semester taking genetics, number of semesters between the biology prerequisite and genetics; grade in biology; location of biology course; and final percentage in genetics. Final percentage in genetics did not differ due to instructor, gender, state of residence, major, or college (P > 0.16). Transfer students tended to perform better than nontransfer students (P = 0.09), and students from the Kansas City metro outscored students from other areas (P = 0.03). Preveterinary option students scored higher in genetics than non-preveterinary students (P < 0.01). Seniors scored higher than juniors and sophomores, who scored higher than freshmen (P < 0.02). We observed a tendency for students with higher grades in biology to perform better in genetics (P = 0.06). Students who took biology at Kansas State University performed better in genetics than students who transferred the credit (P < 0.01). There was a negative regression of hometown population on score in genetics (P < 0.01), and positive regressions of ACT score, all measures of GPA, course load, and cumulative credits on final percentage in the course (P < 0.02). To

  20. Genetic Factors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Contribution to Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Borgiani, Paola; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Rufini, Sara; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Sili Scavalli, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors exert an important role in determining Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, interplaying with environmental factors. Several genetic studies in various SLE populations have identified numerous susceptibility loci. From a clinical point of view, SLE is characterized by a great heterogeneity in terms of clinical and laboratory manifestations. As widely demonstrated, specific laboratory features are associated with clinical disease subset, with different severity degree. Similarly, in the last years, an association between specific phenotypes and genetic variants has been identified, allowing the possibility to elucidate different mechanisms and pathways accountable for disease manifestations. However, except for Lupus Nephritis (LN), no studies have been designed to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of different phenotypes. In this review, we will report data currently known about this specific association. PMID:26798662

  1. Behavioral risk factors among women presenting for genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Emmons, K M; Kalkbrenner, K J; Klar, N; Light, T; Schneider, K A; Garber, J E

    2000-01-01

    Considerable research attention has been given to the impact of genetic testing on psychological outcomes. Participation in genetic testing also may impact on health behaviors that increase the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. The purpose of this study is to describe behavioral cancer risk factors of women who requested genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility (BRCA1, BRCA2). Before participation in a genetic testing program, 119 women completed a series of questionnaires designed to assess their health behaviors, perception of risk, and depressive symptomatology. Eight percent of participants were current smokers, 27% did not engage in at least moderate exercise, 46% did not regularly protect themselves from the sun, 39% did not consume at least five servings of fruits and vegetables per day, and 9% drank at least one alcoholic beverage per day. Poisson regression analysis revealed that age was the only predictor of behavioral risk profiles, with older women having fewer cancer risk behaviors. These patients who presented for genetic testing generally had better health behaviors than the general population. However, given their possible high-risk status, these patients should consider further improving their preventable cancer risk factors and, in particular, their diet, sun protection, and physical activity levels. Inclusion of behavioral risk factor counseling in the context of the genetic testing process may be an important opportunity to reach this at-risk population.

  2. Factors Associated with Uptake of Genetics Services for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Amirah; Kwan, Andrea; Baxter, Samantha; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common cardiovascular disorder with variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. Clinical guidelines recommend consultation with a genetics professional as part of an initial assessment for HCM, yet there remains an underutilization of genetics services. We conducted a study to assess factors associated with this underutilization within the framework of the Health Belief Model (HBM). An online survey was completed by 306 affected individuals and at risk family members. Thirty-seven percent of individuals (113/306) had visited a genetics professional for reasons related to HCM. Genetic testing was performed on 53 % (162/306). Individuals who had undergone testing were more likely to have seen a genetics professional (p < 0.001), had relatives with an HCM diagnosis (p = 0.002), and have a known familial mutation (p < 0.001). They were also more likely to agree that genetic testing would satisfy their curiosity (p < 0.001), provide reassurance (p < 0.001), aid family members in making healthcare decisions (p < 0.001), and encourage them to engage in a healthier lifestyle (p = 0.002). The HBM components of cues to action and perceived benefits and barriers had the greatest impact on uptake of genetic testing. In order to ensure optimal counseling and care for individuals and families with HCM, awareness and education around HCM and genetic services should be promoted in both physicians and patients alike.

  3. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility. PMID:24520200

  4. Genetic, environmental, and epigenetic factors involved in CAKUT.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Nayia; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Giles, Rachel H; Knoers, Nine V A M

    2015-12-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) refer to a spectrum of structural renal malformations and are the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in children. The genetic diagnosis of CAKUT has proven to be challenging due to genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity and incomplete genetic penetrance. Monogenic causes of CAKUT have been identified using different approaches, including single gene screening, and gene panel and whole exome sequencing. The majority of the identified mutations, however, lack substantial evidence to support a pathogenic role in CAKUT. Copy number variants or single nucleotide variants that are associated with CAKUT have also been identified. Numerous studies support the influence of epigenetic and environmental factors on kidney development and the natural history of CAKUT, suggesting that the pathogenesis of this syndrome is multifactorial. In this Review we describe the current knowledge regarding the genetic susceptibility underlying CAKUT and the approaches used to investigate the genetic basis of CAKUT. We outline the associated environmental risk factors and epigenetic influences on CAKUT and discuss the challenges and strategies used to fully address the involvement and interplay of these factors in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26281895

  5. Telomere shortening as genetic risk factor of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Lucia

    2015-01-14

    Cirrhosis is the main complication of chronic liver disease, leads to progressive liver function impairment and is the main risk factor for the development of liver cancer. Liver failure at endstage cirrhosis is associated with increased mortality with liver transplantation as the only possible treatment at this stage. The pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis is not completely elucidated. Although the common factors leading to liver injury, such as viral hepatitis, alcohol consume or fatty liver disease can be identified in the majority of patients a small percentage of patients have no apparent risk factors. Moreover given the same risk factors, some patients progress to cirrhosis whereas others have a benign course, the reason remains unclear. In order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic tools, it is s essential to understand the pathogenesis of cirrhosis. The identification of genetic risk factors associated with cirrhosis is one of the possible approach to achieve these goal. In the past years several studies have supported the role of telomere shortening and cirrhosis. In the recent year several studies on the relation between several single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and cirrhosis have been published; it has been proposed also a cirrhosis risk score based on seven SNPs. Also epidemiological studies on identical twins and in different ethnic groups have been supporting the importance of the role of genetic risk factors. Finally in the very recent years it has been suggested that telomere shortening may represent a genetic risk factor for the development of cirrhosis. PMID:25593453

  6. Genetic linkage analysis to identify a gene required for the addition of phosphoethanolamine to meningococcal lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christoph M; Stroud, Dave; Mackinnon, Fiona; Makepeace, Katherine; Plested, Joyce; Moxon, E Richard; Chalmers, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is important for the virulence of Neisseria meningitidis, and is the target of immune responses. We took advantage of a monoclonal antibody (Mab B5) that recognises phosphoethanolamine (PEtn) attached to the inner core of meningococcal LPS to identify genes required for the addition of PEtn to LPS. Insertional mutants that lost Mab B5 reactivity were isolated and characterised, but failed to yield genes directly responsible for PEtn substitution. Subsequent genetic linkage analysis was used to define a region of DNA containing a single intact open reading frame which is sufficient to confer B5 reactivity to a B5 negative meningococcal isolate. The results provide an initial characterisation of the genetic basis of a key, immunodominant epitope of meningococcal LPS.

  7. Resiliency to Victimization: The Role of Genetic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; Mancini, Christina; DeLisi, Matt; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    There is a burgeoning line of criminological research examining the genetic underpinnings to a wide array of antisocial phenotypes. From this perspective, genes are typically viewed as risk factors that increase the odds of various maladaptive behaviors. However, genes can also have protective effects that insulate against the deleterious effects…

  8. Effect of multiplicative and additive noise on genetic transcriptional regulatory mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Mei; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Liu, Liang-Gang; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2009-02-01

    A multiplicative noise and an additive noise are introduced in the kinetic model of Smolen-Baxter-Byrne [P. Smolen, D.A. Baxter, J.H. Byrne, Amer. J. Physiol. Cell. Physiol. 274 (1998) 531], in which the expression of gene is controlled by protein concentration of transcriptional activator. The Fokker-Planck equation is solved and the steady-state probability distribution is obtained numerically. It is found that the multiplicative noise converts the bistability to monostability that can be regarded as a noise-induced transition. The additive noise reduces the transcription efficiency. The correlation between the multiplicative noise and the additive noise works as a genetic switch and regulates the gene transcription effectively.

  9. Assessment of the environmental and genetic factors influencing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Gosadi, Ibrahim M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a combination of factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular atherosclerotic diseases including diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure. Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death in the adult Saudi population where the increase in cardiovascular-related mortality is augmented by the rise in the prevalence of MS. Metabolic syndrome is a multi-factorial disorder influenced by interactions between genetic and environmental components. This review aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of studied environmental and genetic factors explaining the prevalence of MS in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Additionally, this review aims to illustrate factors related to the population genetics of Saudi Arabia, which might explain a proportion of the prevalence of MS. PMID:26739969

  10. Genetic association studies in complex disease: disentangling additional predisposing loci from associated neutral loci using a constrained - permutation approach.

    PubMed

    Spijker, G T; Nolte, I M; Jansen, R C; Te Meerman, G J

    2005-01-01

    In the process of genetically mapping a complex disease, the question may arise whether a certain polymorphism is the only causal variant in a region. A number of methods can answer this question, but unfortunately these methods are optimal for bi-allelic loci only. We wanted to develop a method that is more suited for multi-allelic loci, such as microsatellite markers. We propose the Additional Disease Loci Test (ADLT): the alleles at an additional locus are permuted within the subsample of haplotypes that have identical alleles at the predisposing locus. The hypothesis being tested is, whether the predisposing locus is the sole factor predisposing to the trait that is in LD with the additional locus under study. We applied ADLT to simulated datasets and a published dataset on Type 1 Diabetes, genotyped for microsatellite markers in the HLA-region. The method showed the expected number of false-positive results in the absence of additional loci, but proved to be more powerful than existing methods in the presence of additional disease loci. ADLT was especially superior in datasets with less LD or with multiple predisposing alleles. We conclude that the ADLT can be useful in identifying additional disease loci.

  11. Analytical approaches relating genetic evolutionary pathways to prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rohloff, A.C.; Sakach, J.M.; Shackney, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Human solid tumors accumulate multiple genetic abnormalities as they progress to advanced stages. Multiparameter flow cytometry measurements of individual cells within each tumor may be useful in describing the genetic pathways taken by individual tumors during the course of their genetic evolution. In this paper, we analyzed correlated cell-by-cell measurements of cell DNA content, HER-2/neu protein content, and ras protein content obtained by multiparameter flow cytometry studies of primary breast cancers from 92 patients. These laboratory findings were correlated with established clinical prognostic factors for each patient at the time of diagnosis, using a stepwise multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA). The stepwise MANOVA successively splits a group of patients into two mutually exclusive dissimilar groups, selecting the clinical prognostic factor that is most effective in doing so. Using this criterion, formation of the first three groups that were judged most dissimilar on the cytometry parameters was based on the number of positive nodes at the time of diagnosis. We show that ploidy, HER-2/neu protein content, and ras protein content, as measured by multiple parameter flow cytometry, are correlated with nodal status and other known clinical prognostic factors. The cell-by-cell multiparameter data suggest that for some individual tumors there are multiple genetic evolutionary pathways. Multiple genetic evolutionary pathways are also suggested by the MANOVA analysis. Focusing on the identification and analysis of genetic evolutionary pathways within individual tumors and across patients appears to offer a promising approach for defining the prognosis of early cancers. 9 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets.

  13. Factors influencing uptake of familial long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Burns, Charlotte; McGaughran, Julie; Davis, Andrew; Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie

    2016-02-01

    Ongoing challenges of clinical assessment of long QT syndrome (LQTS) highlight the importance of genetic testing in the diagnosis of asymptomatic at-risk family members. Effective access, uptake, and communication of genetic testing are critical for comprehensive cascade family screening and prevention of disease complications such as sudden cardiac death. The aim of this study was to describe factors influencing uptake of LQTS genetic testing, including those relating to access and family communication. We show those who access genetic testing are overrepresented by the socioeconomically advantaged, and that although overall family communication is good, there are some important barriers to be addressed. There were 75 participants (aged 18 years or more, with a clinical and/or genetic diagnosis of LQTS; response rate 71%) who completed a survey including a number of validated scales; demographics; and questions about access, uptake, and communication. Mean age of participants was 46 ± 16 years, 20 (27%) were males and 60 (80%) had genetic testing with a causative gene mutation in 42 (70%). Overall uptake of cascade testing within families was 60% after 4 years from proband genetic diagnosis. All participants reported at least one first-degree relative had been informed of their risk, whereas six (10%) reported at least one first-degree relative had not been informed. Those who were anxious or depressed were more likely to perceive barriers to communicating. Genetic testing is a key aspect of care in LQTS families and intervention strategies that aim to improve equity in access and facilitate effective family communication are needed.

  14. Factors influencing uptake of familial long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Burns, Charlotte; McGaughran, Julie; Davis, Andrew; Semsarian, Christopher; Ingles, Jodie

    2016-02-01

    Ongoing challenges of clinical assessment of long QT syndrome (LQTS) highlight the importance of genetic testing in the diagnosis of asymptomatic at-risk family members. Effective access, uptake, and communication of genetic testing are critical for comprehensive cascade family screening and prevention of disease complications such as sudden cardiac death. The aim of this study was to describe factors influencing uptake of LQTS genetic testing, including those relating to access and family communication. We show those who access genetic testing are overrepresented by the socioeconomically advantaged, and that although overall family communication is good, there are some important barriers to be addressed. There were 75 participants (aged 18 years or more, with a clinical and/or genetic diagnosis of LQTS; response rate 71%) who completed a survey including a number of validated scales; demographics; and questions about access, uptake, and communication. Mean age of participants was 46 ± 16 years, 20 (27%) were males and 60 (80%) had genetic testing with a causative gene mutation in 42 (70%). Overall uptake of cascade testing within families was 60% after 4 years from proband genetic diagnosis. All participants reported at least one first-degree relative had been informed of their risk, whereas six (10%) reported at least one first-degree relative had not been informed. Those who were anxious or depressed were more likely to perceive barriers to communicating. Genetic testing is a key aspect of care in LQTS families and intervention strategies that aim to improve equity in access and facilitate effective family communication are needed. PMID:26544151

  15. Genetic polymorphisms as a risk factor for dyslipidemia in children.

    PubMed

    Santos, Izabela R; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Sousa, Marinez O; Ferreira, Cláudia N; Gomes, Karina B

    2013-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important etiological factor for development of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of deaths in adults. Given the growing global epidemic of dyslipidemia, lipoprotein metabolism disorders have become an important health problem not only in adulthood, but have also emerged as an increasingly risk factor in childhood. Although several genome-wide association studies in multiple large population-based cohorts of adults and meta-analyses have identified susceptibility genes or loci, especially in lipid-related traits, it is of great importance to evaluate genetic predisposition at an early age. Recent findings suggest that the identification of polymorphisms in the metabolism of lipids in childhood may help fight subclinical atherosclerosis and its progression to cardiovascular complications in adulthood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review genetic polymorphisms as risk factors associated with dyslipidemia in children and adolescents. PMID:27625842

  16. Genetic polymorphisms as a risk factor for dyslipidemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Izabela R.; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Sousa, Marinez O.; Ferreira, Cláudia N.; Gomes, Karina B.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important etiological factor for development of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of deaths in adults. Given the growing global epidemic of dyslipidemia, lipoprotein metabolism disorders have become an important health problem not only in adulthood, but have also emerged as an increasingly risk factor in childhood. Although several genome-wide association studies in multiple large population-based cohorts of adults and meta-analyses have identified susceptibility genes or loci, especially in lipid-related traits, it is of great importance to evaluate genetic predisposition at an early age. Recent findings suggest that the identification of polymorphisms in the metabolism of lipids in childhood may help fight subclinical atherosclerosis and its progression to cardiovascular complications in adulthood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review genetic polymorphisms as risk factors associated with dyslipidemia in children and adolescents. PMID:27625842

  17. The contribution of epigenetics to understanding genetic factors in autism.

    PubMed

    Hall, Layla; Kelley, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a grouping of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social communication and language, as well as by repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. While the environment is believed to play a role in the development of autism spectrum disorder, there is now strong evidence for a genetic link to autism. Despite such evidence, studies investigating a potential single-gene cause for autism, although insightful, have been highly inconclusive. A consideration of an epigenetic approach proves to be very promising in clarifying genetic factors involved in autism. The present article is intended to provide a review of key findings pertaining to epigenetics in autism in such a way that a broader audience of individuals who do not have a strong background in genetics may better understand this highly specific and scientific content. Epigenetics refers to non-permanent heritable changes that alter expression of genes without altering the DNA sequence itself and considers the role of environment in this modulation of gene expression. This review provides a brief description of epigenetic processes, highlights evidence in the literature of epigenetic dysregulation in autism, and makes use of noteworthy findings to illustrate how a consideration of epigenetic factors can deepen our understanding of the development of autism. Furthermore, this discussion will present a promising new way for moving forward in the investigation of genetic factors within autism.

  18. FEMALE AND MALE GENETIC EFFECTS ON OFFSPRING PATERNITY: ADDITIVE GENETIC (CO)VARIANCES IN FEMALE EXTRA-PAIR REPRODUCTION AND MALE PATERNITY SUCCESS IN SONG SPARROWS (MELOSPIZA MELODIA)

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically. PMID:24724612

  19. Female and male genetic effects on offspring paternity: additive genetic (co)variances in female extra-pair reproduction and male paternity success in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia).

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-08-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically.

  20. Analysis of Genetic and Non-Genetic Factors Influencing Timing and Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Alex J.; Meck, Warren H.; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.

    2015-01-01

    Performance on different psychophysical tasks measuring the sense of time indicates a large amount of individual variation in the accuracy and precision of timing in the hundredths of milliseconds-to-minutes range. Quantifying factors with an influence on timing is essential to isolating a biological (genetic) contribution to the perception and estimation of time. In the largest timing study to date, 647 participants completed a duration-discrimination task in the sub-second range and a time-production task in the supra-second range. We confirm the stability of a participant’s time sense across multiple sessions and substantiate a modest sex difference on time production. Moreover, we demonstrate a strong correlation between performance on a standardized cognitive battery and performance in both duration-discrimination and time-production tasks; we further show that performance is uncorrelated with age after controlling for general intelligence. Additionally, we find an effect of ethnicity on time sense, with African Americans and possibly Hispanics in our cohort differing in accuracy and precision from other ethnic groups. Finally, a preliminary genome-wide association and exome chip study was performed on 148 of the participants, ruling out the possibility for a single common variant or groups of low-frequency coding variants within a single gene to explain more than ~18% of the variation in the sense of time. PMID:26641268

  1. Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Huchard, E; Charmantier, A; English, S; Bateman, A; Nielsen, J F; Clutton-Brock, T

    2014-09-01

    Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a cooperative mongoose. Our results indicate that (i) the correlation between early growth (prior to nutritional independence) and adult mass is positive but weak, and there are frequent changes (compensatory growth) in post-independence growth trajectories; (ii) among parameters describing growth trajectories, those describing growth rate (prior to and at nutritional independence) show undetectable heritability while associated size parameters (mass at nutritional independence and asymptotic mass) are moderately heritable (0.09 ≤ h(2) < 0.3); and (iii) additive genetic effects, rather than early environmental effects, mediate the covariance between early growth and adult mass. These results reveal that meerkat growth trajectories remain plastic throughout development, rather than showing early and irreversible divergence, and that the weak effects of early growth on adult mass, an important determinant of breeding success, are partly genetic. In contrast to most cooperative invertebrates, the acquisition of breeding status is often determined after sexual maturity and strongly impacted by chance in many cooperative vertebrates, who may therefore retain the ability to adjust their morphology to environmental changes and social opportunities arising throughout their development, rather than specializing early.

  2. Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Huchard, E; Charmantier, A; English, S; Bateman, A; Nielsen, J F; Clutton-Brock, T

    2014-09-01

    Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a cooperative mongoose. Our results indicate that (i) the correlation between early growth (prior to nutritional independence) and adult mass is positive but weak, and there are frequent changes (compensatory growth) in post-independence growth trajectories; (ii) among parameters describing growth trajectories, those describing growth rate (prior to and at nutritional independence) show undetectable heritability while associated size parameters (mass at nutritional independence and asymptotic mass) are moderately heritable (0.09 ≤ h(2) < 0.3); and (iii) additive genetic effects, rather than early environmental effects, mediate the covariance between early growth and adult mass. These results reveal that meerkat growth trajectories remain plastic throughout development, rather than showing early and irreversible divergence, and that the weak effects of early growth on adult mass, an important determinant of breeding success, are partly genetic. In contrast to most cooperative invertebrates, the acquisition of breeding status is often determined after sexual maturity and strongly impacted by chance in many cooperative vertebrates, who may therefore retain the ability to adjust their morphology to environmental changes and social opportunities arising throughout their development, rather than specializing early. PMID:24962704

  3. Familial Influences on Conduct Disorder Reflect 2 Genetic Factors and 1 Shared Environmental Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Aggen, Steven H.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Context Prior studies suggest that antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence reflects multiple symptomatic dimensions. However, to our knowledge, no prior study has evaluated the underlying nature of the etiologic influences contributing to conduct disorder (CD) symptoms as defined in the DSM. Objective To determine the structure of genetic and environmental risk factors for CD. Design Population-based twin registry. Setting Virginia. Participants Two thousand seven hundred sixty-nine members of male-male twin pairs from the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders. Main Outcome Measure Retrospective self-reported symptoms of CD. Results The best-fitting multivariate twin model included 2 genetic factors, 1 shared environmental common factor, and 1 nonshared environmental common factor, along with criterion-specific genetic and nonshared environmental effects. The CD criteria with the strongest loadings on the 2 genetic factors were, respectively, those reflecting rule breaking (eg, playing hooky) and overt aggressive acts (eg, hurting people). The shared environ mental common factor had salient loadings on a distinct set of criteria reflecting covert delinquent acts (eg, stealing and hurting animals). Loadings on the single non-shared environmental common factor were more uniform and less selective. Scores on the 3 familial CD factors were differentially associated with a range of personality, psychopathology, and demographic factors. Conclusions From a genetic perspective, the DSM criteria for CD do not reflect a single dimension of liability. The familial risk to CD is composed of 2 discrete dimensions of genetic risk, reflecting rule breaking and overt aggression, and 1 dimension of shared environmental risk, reflecting covert delinquency. These 3 familial factors differ meaningfully in their association with a range of relevant validators. PMID:23117573

  4. Dynamics of the ovarian reserve and impact of genetic and epidemiological factors on age of menopause.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Emanuele; Simonsick, Eleanor; Forabosco, Antonino; Garcia-Ortiz, Jose Elias; Schlessinger, David

    2015-05-01

    The narrow standard age range of menopause, ∼50 yr, belies the complex balance of forces that govern the underlying formation and progressive loss of ovarian follicles (the "ovarian reserve" whose size determines the age of menopause). We show here the first quantitative graph of follicle numbers, distinguished from oocyte counts, across the reproductive lifespan, and review the current state of information about genetic and epidemiological risk factors in relation to possible preservation of reproductive capacity. In addition to structural X-chromosome changes, several genes involved in the process of follicle formation and/or maintenance are implicated in Mendelian inherited primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), with menopause before age 40. Furthermore, variants in a largely distinct cohort of reported genes-notably involved in pathways relevant to atresia, including DNA repair and cell death-have shown smaller but additive effects on the variation in timing of menopause in the normal range, early menopause (age <45), and POI. Epidemiological factors show effect sizes comparable to those of genetic factors, with smoking accounting for about 5% of the risk of early menopause, equivalent to the summed effect of the top 17 genetic variants. The identified genetic and epidemiological factors underline the importance of early detection of reproductive problems to enhance possible interventions.

  5. Geoepidemiology, Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for PBC.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Carbone, Marco; Lleo, Ana; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is the most paradigmatic autoimmune liver disease with still several controversial issues in epidemiology, diagnosis, causation, and therapy. Although we are witnessing an enormous increase in the quantum of our basic knowledge of the disease with an initial translation in clinical practice, there are still a number of key open questions in PBC. Among them are the following questions: Why are there vast geographical variations in disease frequency? What are the reasons for female preponderance? Why do only small-size bile ducts get affected: What is the real role of genetics and epigenetics in its development? In particular, the prevalence of PBC is known to vary both on an international and a regional level, suggesting the existence of substantive geographical differences in terms of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. New theories on potential environmental triggers, such as chemical xenobiotics, which lead to the breaking of self-tolerance within a unique immunological milieu of the liver, have been suggested. On the other hand, new and solid data on the genetic architecture of PBC are now obtained from recent high-throughput studies, together with data on sex chromosomes defects, and epigenetic abnormalities, thus strongly suggesting a role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the triggering and perpetuation of the autoimmune aggression in PBC. Based on these evidences, a number of novel drugs directed against specific immune-related molecules are currently under development. In this paper, we review a comprehensive collection of current epidemiological reports from various world regions. We also discuss here the most recent data regarding candidate genetic and environmental risk factors for PBC.

  6. Do Environmental Factors Modify the Genetic Risk of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard B.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Isaacs, William B.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many SNPs influence prostate cancer risk. To what extent genetic risk can be reduced by environmental factors is unknown. Methods We evaluated effect modification by environmental factors of the association between susceptibility SNPs and prostate cancer in 1,230 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,361 controls, all white and similar ages, nested in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Trial. Genetic risk scores were calculated as number of risk alleles for 20 validated SNPs. We estimated the association between higher genetic risk (≥ 12 SNPs) and prostate cancer within environmental factor strata and tested for interaction. Results Men with ≥12 risk alleles had 1.98, 2.04, and 1.91 times the odds of total, advanced, and nonadvanced prostate cancer, respectively. These associations were attenuated with the use of selenium supplements, aspirin, ibuprofen, and higher vegetable intake. For selenium, the attenuation was most striking for advanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and no selenium, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.67–2.55] in nonusers and 0.99 (0.38–2.58) in users (Pinteraction = 0.031). Aspirin had the most marked attenuation for nonadvanced prostate cancer: compared with <12 alleles and nonusers, the OR for ≥12 alleles was 2.25 (1.69–3.00) in nonusers and 1.70 (1.25–2.32) in users (Pinteraction = 0.009). This pattern was similar for ibuprofen (Pinteraction = 0.023) and vegetables (Pinteraction = 0.010). Conclusions This study suggests that selenium supplements may reduce genetic risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas aspirin, ibuprofen, and vegetables may reduce genetic risk of nonadvanced prostate cancer. PMID:25342390

  7. Risk factors of allergic rhinitis: genetic or environmental?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-Yun

    2005-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis represent a global health problem, affecting 10%–25% of the world population. There is clear evidence to support the concept that allergic diseases are influenced by genetic predisposition and environmental exposure. Polymorphisms of candidate genes have been associated with clinical expression of these diseases. However, characterization of these susceptibility markers in discriminating an “allergic individual” from the general population has not yet been achieved, and the value of how this genetic insight leading to recognition of specific subtypes of these disorders still needs to be confirmed. Environmental factors (eg, air pollution and bacterial/viral infection) also play an important role in the development of the diseases. A number of epidemiologic studies have supported the “hygiene hypothesis”, which is based on the observations that Th1 responses induced by microbial stimulation can counterbalance allergen-induced Th2 responses. Future studies are needed to identify the key genes or their haplotypes for atopic phenotypes and to investigate the interactions between genetic and environmental factors that influence the complex trait of allergic diseases. This will help us to further understand the etiology of the diseases and develop new avenues for genetically oriented diagnosis and more effective measures of prevention and intervention. PMID:18360551

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  9. Effects of genetic and environmental factors on muscle glycogen content in Japanese Black cattle

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Tomohiko; Shoji, Noriaki; Saito, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Monosaccharides such as glucose contribute to the development of meat flavor upon heating via the Maillard reaction; therefore, monosaccharide content is related to beef palatability. Here, we analyzed the effects of genetic and environmental factors on the content of glycogen, one of the precursors of monosaccharides, in the muscles of 958 fattened Japanese Black cattle from Yamagata Prefecture. Analysis of variance showed that muscle glycogen content was affected by the farm and postmortem periods, but not by sex, slaughter age, slaughter month or number of days detained at the slaughter yard. Additionally, consumption of digestible brown rice feed elevated muscle glycogen levels. Glycogen heritability was estimated to be 0.34, and genetic correlations between glycogen and carcass weight (CW) or beef marbling standard (BMS) were weak. The predicted breeding values varied among paternal lines. These results demonstrated that genetic factors might improve muscle glycogen content and therefore beef palatability, but do not influence CW or BMS. PMID:24716455

  10. Effects of genetic and environmental factors on muscle glycogen content in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Tomohiko; Shoji, Noriaki; Saito, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    Monosaccharides such as glucose contribute to the development of meat flavor upon heating via the Maillard reaction; therefore, monosaccharide content is related to beef palatability. Here, we analyzed the effects of genetic and environmental factors on the content of glycogen, one of the precursors of monosaccharides, in the muscles of 958 fattened Japanese Black cattle from Yamagata Prefecture. Analysis of variance showed that muscle glycogen content was affected by the farm and postmortem periods, but not by sex, slaughter age, slaughter month or number of days detained at the slaughter yard. Additionally, consumption of digestible brown rice feed elevated muscle glycogen levels. Glycogen heritability was estimated to be 0.34, and genetic correlations between glycogen and carcass weight (CW) or beef marbling standard (BMS) were weak. The predicted breeding values varied among paternal lines. These results demonstrated that genetic factors might improve muscle glycogen content and therefore beef palatability, but do not influence CW or BMS.

  11. Genetic rearrangements of six wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P addition lines revealed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Han, Haiming; Bai, Li; Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat-A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  12. Shared Genetic Factors Influence Amygdala Volumes and Risk for Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Dager, Alecia D; McKay, D Reese; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Knowles, Emma; Sprooten, Emma; Göring, Harald HH; Dyer, Thomas D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Lovallo, William R; Duggirala, Ravi; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence (alcohol use disorders, AUDs) are associated with brain shrinkage. Subcortical structures including the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, dorsal striatum, and thalamus subserve reward functioning and may be particularly vulnerable to alcohol-related damage. These structures may also show pre-existing deficits impacting the development and maintenance of AUD. It remains unclear whether there are common genetic features underlying both subcortical volumes and AUD. In this study, structural brain images were acquired from 872 Mexican-American individuals from extended pedigrees. Subcortical volumes were obtained using FreeSurfer, and quantitative genetic analyses were performed in SOLAR. We hypothesized the following: (1) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with lifetime AUD relative to unrelated controls; (2) reduced subcortical volumes in individuals with current relative to past AUD; (3) in non-AUD individuals, reduced subcortical volumes in those with a family history of AUD compared to those without; and (4) evidence for common genetic underpinnings (pleiotropy) between AUD risk and subcortical volumes. Results showed that individuals with lifetime AUD showed larger ventricular and smaller amygdala volumes compared to non-AUD individuals. For the amygdala, there were no differences in volume between current vs past AUD, and non-AUD individuals with a family history of AUD demonstrated reductions compared to those with no such family history. Finally, amygdala volume was genetically correlated with the risk for AUD. Together, these results suggest that reduced amygdala volume reflects a pre-existing difference rather than alcohol-induced neurotoxic damage. Our genetic correlation analysis provides evidence for a common genetic factor underlying both reduced amygdala volumes and AUD risk. PMID:25079289

  13. Genetic and non-genetic factors affecting morphometry of Sirohi goats

    PubMed Central

    Dudhe, S. D.; Yadav, S. B. S.; Nagda, R. K.; Pannu, Urmila; Gahlot, G. C.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to estimate genetic and non-genetic factors affecting morphometric traits of Sirohi goats under field condition. Materials and Methods: The detailed information of all animals on body measurements at birth, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age was collected from farmer’s flock under field condition born during 2007-2013 to analyze the effect of genetic and non-genetic factors. The least squares maximum likelihood program was used to estimate genetic and non-genetic parameters affecting morphometric traits. Results and Discussion: Effect of sire, cluster, year of birth, and sex was found to be highly significant (p<0.01) on all three morphometric traits, parity was highly significant (p<0.01) for body height (BH) and body girth (BG) at birth. The h2 estimates for morphometric traits ranged among 0.528±0.163 to 0.709±0.144 for BH, 0.408±0.159 to 0.605±0.192 for body length (BL), and 0.503±0.197 to 0.695±0.161 for BG. Conclusion: The effect of sire was highly significant (p<0.01) and also h² estimate of all morphometric traits were medium to high; therefore, it could be concluded on the basis of present findings that animals with higher body measurements at initial phases of growth will perform better with respect to even body weight traits at later stages of growth. PMID:27047043

  14. Heritability of heterozygosity offers a new way of understanding why dominant gene action contributes to additive genetic variance.

    PubMed

    Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2015-07-01

    Whenever allele frequencies are unequal, nonadditive gene action contributes to additive genetic variance and therefore the resemblance between parents and offspring. The reason for this has not been easy to understand. Here, we present a new single-locus decomposition of additive genetic variance that may give greater intuition about this important result. We show that the contribution of dominant gene action to parent-offspring resemblance only depends on the degree to which the heterozygosity of parents and offspring covary. Thus, dominant gene action only contributes to additive genetic variance when heterozygosity is heritable. Under most circumstances this is the case because individuals with rare alleles are more likely to be heterozygous, and because they pass rare alleles to their offspring they also tend to have heterozygous offspring. When segregating alleles are at equal frequency there are no rare alleles, the heterozygosities of parents and offspring are uncorrelated and dominant gene action does not contribute to additive genetic variance. PMID:26100570

  15. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: review of implicated genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Ackerman, Michael J; Marazita, Mary L; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M

    2007-04-15

    Genetic studies in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) have been motivated by clinical, epidemiological, and/or neuropathological observations in SIDS victims, with subsequent pursuit of candidate genes in five categories: (1) genes for ion channel proteins based on electrocardiographic evidence of prolonged QT intervals in SIDS victims, (2) gene for serotonin transporter based on decreased serotonergic receptor binding in brainstems of SIDS victims, (3) genes pertinent to the early embryology of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) (and with a link to the 5-HT system) based on reports of ANS dysregulation in SIDS victims, (4) genes for nicotine metabolizing enzymes based on evidence of cigarette smoking as a modifiable risk factor for SIDS, and (5) genes regulating inflammation, energy production, hypoglycemia, and thermal regulation based on reports of postnatal infection, low birth weight, and/or overheating in SIDS victims. Evidence for each of these classes of candidate genes is reviewed in detail. As this review indicates, a number of genetically controlled pathways appear to be involved in at least some cases of SIDS. Given the diversity of results to date, genetic studies support the clinical impression that SIDS is heterogeneous with more than one entity and with more than one possible genetic etiology. Future studies should consider expanded phenotypic features that might help clarify the heterogeneity and improve the predictive value of the identified genetic factors. Such features should be evaluated to the extent possible in both SIDS victims and their family members. With 2,162 infants dying from SIDS in 2003 in the U.S. alone, and improved but still imperfect parent and caretaker compliance with known modifiable risk factors for SIDS, it behooves clinicians, researchers, and parents to combine efforts to reach a common goal. The message of the "Back to Sleep" campaign needs to be re-introduced/re-engineered to reach families and caretakers of all

  16. Genetic and epigenetic factors influencing chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Smyth, L J; Duffy, S; Maxwell, A P; McKnight, A J

    2014-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a serious public health problem because of its associated morbidity, premature mortality, and attendant healthcare costs. The rising number of persons with CKD is linked with the aging population structure and an increased prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. There is an inherited risk associated with developing CKD, as evidenced by familial clustering and differing prevalence rates across ethnic groups. Previous studies to determine the inherited risk factors for CKD rarely identified genetic variants that were robustly replicated. However, improvements in genotyping technologies and analytic methods are now helping to identify promising genetic loci aided by international collaboration and multiconsortia efforts. More recently, epigenetic modifications have been proposed to play a role in both the inherited susceptibility to CKD and, importantly, to explain how the environment dynamically interacts with the genome to alter an individual's disease risk. Genome-wide, epigenome-wide, and whole transcriptome studies have been performed, and optimal approaches for integrative analysis are being developed. This review summarizes recent research and the current status of genetic and epigenetic risk factors influencing CKD using population-based information.

  17. Genetic Factors Are Not the Major Causes of Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The risk of acquiring a chronic disease is influenced by a person's genetics (G) and exposures received during life (the 'exposome', E) plus their interactions (G×E). Yet, investigators use genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to characterize G while relying on self-reported information to classify E. If E and G×E dominate disease risks, this imbalance obscures important causal factors. To estimate proportions of disease risk attributable to G (plus shared exposures), published data from Western European monozygotic (MZ) twins were used to estimate population attributable fractions (PAFs) for 28 chronic diseases. Genetic PAFs ranged from 3.4% for leukemia to 48.6% for asthma with a median value of 18.5%. Cancers had the lowest PAFs (median = 8.26%) while neurological (median = 26.1%) and lung (median = 33.6%) diseases had the highest PAFs. These PAFs were then linked with Western European mortality statistics to estimate deaths attributable to G for heart disease and nine cancer types. Of 1.53 million Western European deaths in 2000, 0.25 million (16.4%) could be attributed to genetics plus shared exposures. Given the modest influences of G-related factors on the risks of chronic diseases in MZ twins, the disparity in coverage of G and E in etiological research is problematic. To discover causes of disease, GWAS should be complemented with exposome-wide association studies (EWAS) that profile chemicals in biospecimens from incident disease cases and matched controls. PMID:27105432

  18. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation-selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. "Animal model" analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population.

  19. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    PubMed

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes.

  20. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    PubMed

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes. PMID:26801640

  1. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  2. Genetic diagnosis of factor V Leiden using heteroduplex technology.

    PubMed

    Bowen, D J; Standen, G R; Granville, S; Bowley, S; Wood, N A; Bidwell, J

    1997-01-01

    A new genetic test has been developed for detection of the mutation known as factor V Leiden. The test employs heteroduplex technology and comprises a single PCR reaction followed immediately by PCR product analysis. It therefore represents the minimum practical route from blood/tissue sample to genetic result. A cohort of 100 patients with a history of thrombosis have been screened using both the new heteroduplex test and a previously described PCR-restriction endonuclease test. Results gave 100% correlation: normals 75 (75%), heterozygotes 24 (24%) and homozygotes 1 (1%). The heteroduplex test has been shown to give straightforward diagnosis in three different analytical systems: standard polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), mini-gel PAGE and capillary electrophoresis. The latter system is semiautomated, therefore rapid through-put of large sample numbers is now possible. PMID:9031460

  3. MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase as an Autism Genetic Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yun; Huentelman, Matthew; Smith, Christopher; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we will briefly discuss recent literature on the role of MET receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) in brain development and how perturbation of MET signaling may alter normal neurodevelopmental outcomes. Recent human genetic studies have established MET as a risk factor for autism, and the molecular and cellular underpinnings of this genetic risk are only beginning to emerge from obscurity. Unlike many autism risk genes that encode synaptic proteins, the spatial and temporal expression pattern of MET RTK indicates this signaling system is ideally situated to regulate neuronal growth, functional maturation, and establishment of functional brain circuits, particularly in those brain structures involved in higher levels of cognition, social skills, and executive functions. PMID:24290385

  4. Potential Genetic Risk Factors for Chronic TMD: Genetic Associations from the OPPERA Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, Dylan; Greenspan, Joel; Dubner, Ron; Fillingim, Roger; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Slade, Gary; Bair, Eric; Gibson, Dustin G.; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Weir, Bruce; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2011-01-01

    Genetic factors play a role in the etiology of persistent pain conditions, putatively by modulating underlying processes such as nociceptive sensitivity, psychological well-being, inflammation, and autonomic response. However, to date, only a few genes have been associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). This study evaluated 358 genes involved in pain processes, comparing allelic frequencies between 166 cases with chronic TMD and 1442 controls enrolled in the OPPERA (Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment) study cooperative agreement. To enhance statistical power, 182 TMD cases and 170 controls from a similar study were included in the analysis. Genotyping was performed using the Pain Research Panel, an Affymetrix gene chip representing 3295 single nucleotide polymorphisms, including ancestry-informative markers that were used to adjust for population stratification. Adjusted associations between genetic markers and TMD case status were evaluated using logistic regression. The OPPERA findings provided evidence supporting previously-reported associations between TMD and two genes: HTR2A and COMT. Other genes were revealed as potential new genetic risk factors for TMD, including NR3C1, CAMK4, CHRM2, IFRD1, and GRK5. While these findings need to be replicated in independent cohorts, the genes potentially represent important markers of risk for TMD and they identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22074755

  5. Genetic factors affecting statin concentrations and subsequent myopathy: a HuGENet systematic review.

    PubMed

    Canestaro, William J; Austin, Melissa A; Thummel, Kenneth E

    2014-11-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, have proven efficacy in both lowering low-density-lipoprotein levels and preventing major coronary events, making them one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States. Statins exhibit a class-wide side effect of muscle toxicity and weakness, which has led regulators to impose both dosage limitations and a recall. This review focuses on the best-characterized genetic factors associated with increased statin muscle concentrations, including the genes encoding cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5), a mitochondrial enzyme (GATM), an influx transporter (SLCO1B1), and efflux transporters (ABCB1 and ABCG2). A systematic literature review was conducted to identify relevant research evaluating the significance of genetic variants predictive of altered statin concentrations and subsequent statin-related myopathy. Studies eligible for inclusion must have incorporated genotype information and must have associated it with some measure of myopathy, either creatine kinase levels or self-reported muscle aches and pains. After an initial review, focus was placed on seven genes that were adequately characterized to provide a substantive review: CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, GATM, SLCO1B1, ABCB1, and ABCG2. All statins were included in this review. Among the genetic factors evaluated, statin-related myopathy appears to be most strongly associated with variants in SLCO1B1.

  6. Genetic factors affecting statin concentrations and subsequent myopathy: a HuGENet systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Canestaro, William J.; Austin, Melissa A.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, have proven efficacy in both lowering low-density-lipoprotein levels and preventing major coronary events, making them one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States. Statins exhibit a class-wide side effect of muscle toxicity and weakness, which has led regulators to impose both dosage limitations and a recall. This review focuses on the best-characterized genetic factors associated with increased statin muscle concentrations, including the genes encoding cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5), a mitochondrial enzyme (GATM), an influx transporter (SLCO1B1), and efflux transporters (ABCB1 and ABCG2). A systematic literature review was conducted to identify relevant research evaluating the significance of genetic variants predictive of altered statin concentrations and subsequent statin-related myopathy. Studies eligible for inclusion must have incorporated genotype information and must have associated it with some measure of myopathy, either creatine kinase levels or self-reported muscle aches and pains. After an initial review, focus was placed on seven genes that were adequately characterized to provide a substantive review: CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, GATM, SLCO1B1, ABCB1, and ABCG2. All statins were included in this review. Among the genetic factors evaluated, statin-related myopathy appears to be most strongly associated with variants in SLCO1B1. PMID:24810685

  7. Genetic, metabolic and environmental factors involved in the development of liver cirrhosis in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A; Panduro, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is a chronic illness caused by inflammatory responses and progressive fibrosis. Globally, the most common causes of chronic liver disease include persistent alcohol abuse, followed by viral hepatitis infections and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, regardless of the etiological factors, the susceptibility and degree of liver damage may be influenced by genetic polymorphisms that are associated with distinct ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Consequently, metabolic genes are influenced by variable environmental lifestyle factors, such as diet, physical inactivity, and emotional stress, which are associated with regional differences among populations. This Topic Highlight will focus on the genetic and environmental factors that may influence the metabolism of alcohol and nutrients in the setting of distinct etiologies of liver disease. The interaction between genes and environment in the current-day admixed population, Mestizo and Native Mexican, will be described. Additionally, genes involved in immune regulation, insulin sensitivity, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix deposition may modulate the degree of severity. In conclusion, LC is a complex disease. The onset, progression, and clinical outcome of LC among the Mexican population are influenced by specific genetic and environmental factors. Among these are an admixed genome with a heterogenic distribution of European, Amerindian and African ancestry; a high score of alcohol consumption; viral infections; a hepatopathogenic diet; and a high prevalence of obesity. The variance in risk factors among populations suggests that intervention strategies directed towards the prevention and management of LC should be tailored according to such population-based features. PMID:26556986

  8. Host genetic factors predisposing to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Levine, Andrew J

    2014-09-01

    The success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in transforming the lives of HIV-infected individuals with access to these drugs is tempered by the increasing threat of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) to their overall health and quality of life. Intensive investigations over the past two decades have underscored the role of host immune responses, inflammation, and monocyte-derived macrophages in HAND, but the precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying HAND remain only partially delineated. Complicating research efforts and therapeutic drug development are the sheer complexity of HAND phenotypes, diagnostic imprecision, and the growing intersection of chronic immune activation with aging-related comorbidities. Yet, genetic studies still offer a powerful means of advancing individualized care for HIV-infected individuals at risk. There is an urgent need for 1) longitudinal studies using consistent phenotypic definitions of HAND in HIV-infected subpopulations at very high risk of being adversely impacted, such as children, 2) tissue studies that correlate neuropathological changes in multiple brain regions with genomic markers in affected individuals and with changes at the RNA, epigenomic, and/or protein levels, and 3) genetic association studies using more sensitive subphenotypes of HAND. The NIH Brain Initiative and Human Connectome Project, coupled with rapidly evolving systems biology and machine learning approaches for analyzing high-throughput genetic, transcriptomic and epigenetic data, hold promise for identifying actionable biological processes and gene networks that underlie HAND. This review summarizes the current state of understanding of host genetic factors predisposing to HAND in light of past challenges and suggests some priorities for future research to advance the understanding and clinical management of HAND in the cART era. PMID:24996618

  9. Toxicological safety assessment of genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis with additional N-acyl homoserine lactonase gene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Donghai; Zhou, Chenfei; Chen, Shouwen; Ruan, Lifang; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the toxicology safety to mammals of a genetically modified (GM) Bacillus thuringiensis with an additional N-acyl homoserine lactones gene (aiiA), which possesses insecticidal activity together with restraint of bacterial pathogenicity and is intended for use as a multifunctional biopesticide. Safety assessments included an acute oral toxicity test and 28-d animal feeding study in Wistar rats, primary eye and dermal irritation in Zealand White rabbits, and delayed contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. Tests were conducted using spray-dried powder preparation. This GM product showed toxicity neither in oral acute toxicity test nor in 28-d animal feeding test at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. During the animal feeding test, there were no significant differences in growth, food and water consumption, hematology, blood biochemical indices, organ weights, and histopathology finding between rats in controls and tested groups. Tested animals in primary eye and dermal irritation and delayed contact hypersensitivity test were also devoid of any toxicity compared to controls. All the above results demonstrated that the GM based multifunctional B. thuringiensis has low toxicity and low eye and dermal irritation and would not cause hypersensitivity to laboratory mammals and therefore could be regarded as safe for use as a pesticide.

  10. New insights on inflammation in chronic kidney disease-genetic and non-genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Stenvinkel, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). As traditional risk factors cannot alone explain the unacceptable high prevalence and incidence of CVD in this population, inflammation (which is interrelated to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, wasting and endothelial dysfunction) has been suggested to be a significant contributor. Indeed, several different inflammatory biomarkers, such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to independently predict mortality in CKD patients. The causes of the highly prevalent state of inflammation in CKD are multiple and include factors such as volume overload, co-morbidity, intercurrent clinical events, the dialysis procedure per se as well as genetic factors. Indeed, multiple cytokine DNA polymorphisms may affect the inflammatory state, the clinical phenotype as well as outcome in this patient population.

  11. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future.

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  13. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  14. Genetic Factors Are Not the Major Causes of Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The risk of acquiring a chronic disease is influenced by a person’s genetics (G) and exposures received during life (the ‘exposome’, E) plus their interactions (G×E). Yet, investigators use genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to characterize G while relying on self-reported information to classify E. If E and G×E dominate disease risks, this imbalance obscures important causal factors. To estimate proportions of disease risk attributable to G (plus shared exposures), published data from Western European monozygotic (MZ) twins were used to estimate population attributable fractions (PAFs) for 28 chronic diseases. Genetic PAFs ranged from 3.4% for leukemia to 48.6% for asthma with a median value of 18.5%. Cancers had the lowest PAFs (median = 8.26%) while neurological (median = 26.1%) and lung (median = 33.6%) diseases had the highest PAFs. These PAFs were then linked with Western European mortality statistics to estimate deaths attributable to G for heart disease and nine cancer types. Of 1.53 million Western European deaths in 2000, 0.25 million (16.4%) could be attributed to genetics plus shared exposures. Given the modest influences of G-related factors on the risks of chronic diseases in MZ twins, the disparity in coverage of G and E in etiological research is problematic. To discover causes of disease, GWAS should be complemented with exposome-wide association studies (EWAS) that profile chemicals in biospecimens from incident disease cases and matched controls. PMID:27105432

  15. Biology, Genetics, and Environment: Underlying Factors Influencing Alcohol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wall, Tamara L; Luczak, Susan E; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)--particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles--have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person's alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity).

  16. Biology, Genetics, and Environment: Underlying Factors Influencing Alcohol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wall, Tamara L; Luczak, Susan E; Hiller-Sturmhöfel, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Gene variants encoding several of the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are among the largest genetic associations with risk for alcohol dependence. Certain genetic variants (i.e., alleles)--particularly the ADH1B*2, ADH1B*3, ADH1C*1, and ALDH2*2 alleles--have been associated with lower rates of alcohol dependence. These alleles may lead to an accumulation of acetaldehyde during alcohol metabolism, which can result in heightened subjective and objective effects. The prevalence of these alleles differs among ethnic groups; ADH1B*2 is found frequently in northeast Asians and occasionally Caucasians, ADH1B*3 is found predominantly in people of African ancestry, ADH1C*1 varies substantially across populations, and ALDH2*2 is found almost exclusively in northeast Asians. Differences in the prevalence of these alleles may account at least in part for ethnic differences in alcohol consumption and alcohol use disorder (AUD). However, these alleles do not act in isolation to influence the risk of AUD. For example, the gene effects of ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 seem to interact. Moreover, other factors have been found to influence the extent to which these alleles affect a person's alcohol involvement, including developmental stage, individual characteristics (e.g., ethnicity, antisocial behavior, and behavioral undercontrol), and environmental factors (e.g., culture, religion, family environment, and childhood adversity). PMID:27163368

  17. [Questions safety and tendency of using genetically modified microorganisms in food, food additives and food derived].

    PubMed

    Khovaev, A A

    2008-01-01

    In this article analysis questions of using genetically modified microorganisms in manufacture food production, present new GMM used in manufacture -food ferments; results of medical biological appraisal/ microbiological and genetic expert examination/ of food, getting by use microorganisms or there producents with indication modern of control methods.

  18. Genetic, psychosocial and clinical factors associated with hippocampal volume in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Janowitz, D; Schwahn, C; Borchardt, U; Wittfeld, K; Schulz, A; Barnow, S; Biffar, R; Hoffmann, W; Habes, M; Homuth, G; Nauck, M; Hegenscheid, K; Lotze, M; Völzke, H; Freyberger, H J; Debette, S; Grabe, H J

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus—crucial for memory formation, recall and mood regulation—is involved in the pathophysiology of dementia and depressive disorders. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified five genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume (HV). Previous studies have described psychosocial and clinical factors (for example, smoking, type 2 diabetes and hypertension) to have an impact on HV. However, the interplay between genetic, psychosocial and clinical factors on the HV remains unclear. Still, it is likely that genetic variants and clinical or psychosocial factors jointly act in modifying HV; it might be possible they even interact. Knowledge of these factors might help to quantify ones individual risk of or rather resilience against HV loss. We investigated subjects (N=2463; 55.7% women; mean age 53 years) from the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-2; SHIP-TREND-0) who underwent whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and genotyping. HVs were estimated with FreeSurfer. For optimal nonlinear model fitting, we used regression analyses with restricted cubic splines. Genetic variants and associated psychosocial or clinical factors were jointly assessed for potential two-way interactions. We observed associations between HV and gender (P<0.0001), age (P<0.0001), body height (P<0.0001), education (P=0.0053), smoking (P=0.0058), diastolic blood pressure (P=0.0211), rs7294919 (P=0.0065), rs17178006 (P=0.0002), rs6581612 (P=0.0036), rs6741949 (P=0.0112) and rs7852872 (P=0.0451). In addition, we found three significant interactions: between rs7294919 and smoking (P=0.0473), rs7294919 and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.0447) and between rs7852872 and rs6581612 (P=0.0114). We suggest that these factors might have a role in the individual susceptibility to hippocampus-associated disorders. PMID:25313508

  19. Planning additional drilling campaign using two-space genetic algorithm: A game theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Ozer, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Grade and tonnage are the most important technical uncertainties in mining ventures because of the use of estimations/simulations, which are mostly generated from drill data. Open pit mines are planned and designed on the basis of the blocks representing the entire orebody. Each block has different estimation/simulation variance reflecting uncertainty to some extent. The estimation/simulation realizations are submitted to mine production scheduling process. However, the use of a block model with varying estimation/simulation variances will lead to serious risk in the scheduling. In the medium of multiple simulations, the dispersion variances of blocks can be thought to regard technical uncertainties. However, the dispersion variance cannot handle uncertainty associated with varying estimation/simulation variances of blocks. This paper proposes an approach that generates the configuration of the best additional drilling campaign to generate more homogenous estimation/simulation variances of blocks. In other words, the objective is to find the best drilling configuration in such a way as to minimize grade uncertainty under budget constraint. Uncertainty measure of the optimization process in this paper is interpolation variance, which considers data locations and grades. The problem is expressed as a minmax problem, which focuses on finding the best worst-case performance i.e., minimizing interpolation variance of the block generating maximum interpolation variance. Since the optimization model requires computing the interpolation variances of blocks being simulated/estimated in each iteration, the problem cannot be solved by standard optimization tools. This motivates to use two-space genetic algorithm (GA) approach to solve the problem. The technique has two spaces: feasible drill hole configuration with minimization of interpolation variance and drill hole simulations with maximization of interpolation variance. Two-space interacts to find a minmax solution

  20. Maternal and genetic factors determine early life telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Muhammad; Bensch, Staffan; Tarka, Maja; Hansson, Bengt; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    In a broad range of species—including humans—it has been demonstrated that telomere length declines throughout life and that it may be involved in cell and organismal senescence. This potential link to ageing and thus to fitness has triggered recent interest in understanding how variation in telomere length is inherited and maintained. However, previous studies suffer from two main drawbacks that limit the possibility of understanding the relative importance of genetic, parental and environmental influences on telomere length variation. These studies have been based on (i) telomere lengths measured at different time points in different individuals, despite the fact that telomere length changes over life, and (ii) parent–offspring regression techniques, which do not enable differentiation between genetic and parental components of inheritance. To overcome these drawbacks, in our study of a songbird, the great reed warbler, we have analysed telomere length measured early in life in both parents and offspring and applied statistical models (so-called ‘animal models') that are based on long-term pedigree data. Our results showed a significant heritability of telomere length on the maternal but not on the paternal side, and that the mother's age was positively correlated with their offspring's telomere length. Furthermore, the pedigree-based analyses revealed a significant heritability and an equally large maternal effect. Our study demonstrates strong maternal influence on telomere length and future studies now need to elucidate possible underlying factors, including which types of maternal effects are involved. PMID:25621325

  1. Evolvability of individual traits in a multivariate context: partitioning the additive genetic variance into common and specific components.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Blows, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Genetic covariation among multiple traits will bias the direction of evolution. Although a trait's phenotypic context is crucial for understanding evolutionary constraints, the evolutionary potential of one (focal) trait, rather than the whole phenotype, is often of interest. The extent to which a focal trait can evolve independently depends on how much of the genetic variance in that trait is unique. Here, we present a hypothesis-testing framework for estimating the genetic variance in a focal trait that is independent of variance in other traits. We illustrate our analytical approach using two Drosophila bunnanda trait sets: a contact pheromone system comprised of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), and wing shape, characterized by relative warps of vein position coordinates. Only 9% of the additive genetic variation in CHCs was trait specific, suggesting individual traits are unlikely to evolve independently. In contrast, most (72%) of the additive genetic variance in wing shape was trait specific, suggesting relative warp representations of wing shape could evolve independently. The identification of genetic variance in focal traits that is independent of other traits provides a way of studying the evolvability of individual traits within the broader context of the multivariate phenotype.

  2. Genetic variation and prediction of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits in an Angus-Brahman multibreed herd.

    PubMed

    Elzo, M A; West, R L; Johnson, D D; Wakeman, D L

    1998-07-01

    Estimates of covariances and sire expected progeny differences of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits were obtained using records from 486 straightbred and crossbred steers from 121 sires born between 1989 and 1995 in the Angus-Brahman multibreed herd of the University of Florida. Steers were slaughtered at a similar carcass composition end point. Covariances were estimated by REML procedures, using a generalized expectation-maximization algorithm applied to multibreed populations. Straightbred and crossbred estimates of heritabilities and additive genetic correlations were within ranges found in the literature for steers slaughtered on an age- or weight-constant basis for hot carcass weight, longissimus muscle area, and shear force but equal to or less than the lower bound of these ranges for fat-related traits. Maximum values of interactibilities (i.e., ratios of nonadditive variances to phenotypic variances in the F1) and nonadditive genetic correlations were smaller than heritabilities and additive genetic correlations in straightbreds and crossbred groups. Sire additive and total direct genetic predictions for longissimus muscle area, marbling, and shear force tended to decrease with the fraction of Brahman alleles, whereas those for hot carcass weight and fat thickness over the longissimus were higher, and those for kidney fat were lower in straightbreds and F1 than in other crossbred groups. Nonadditive genetic predictions were similar across sire groups of all Angus and Brahman fractions. These results suggest that slaughtering steers on a similar carcass composition basis reduces variability of fat-related traits while retaining variability for non-fat-related traits comparable to slaughtering steers on a similar age or weight basis. Selection for carcass traits within desirable (narrow) ranges and slaughter of steers at similar compositional end point seems to be a good combination to help produce meat products of consistent

  3. Genetic variation and prediction of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits in an Angus-Brahman multibreed herd.

    PubMed

    Elzo, M A; West, R L; Johnson, D D; Wakeman, D L

    1998-07-01

    Estimates of covariances and sire expected progeny differences of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits were obtained using records from 486 straightbred and crossbred steers from 121 sires born between 1989 and 1995 in the Angus-Brahman multibreed herd of the University of Florida. Steers were slaughtered at a similar carcass composition end point. Covariances were estimated by REML procedures, using a generalized expectation-maximization algorithm applied to multibreed populations. Straightbred and crossbred estimates of heritabilities and additive genetic correlations were within ranges found in the literature for steers slaughtered on an age- or weight-constant basis for hot carcass weight, longissimus muscle area, and shear force but equal to or less than the lower bound of these ranges for fat-related traits. Maximum values of interactibilities (i.e., ratios of nonadditive variances to phenotypic variances in the F1) and nonadditive genetic correlations were smaller than heritabilities and additive genetic correlations in straightbreds and crossbred groups. Sire additive and total direct genetic predictions for longissimus muscle area, marbling, and shear force tended to decrease with the fraction of Brahman alleles, whereas those for hot carcass weight and fat thickness over the longissimus were higher, and those for kidney fat were lower in straightbreds and F1 than in other crossbred groups. Nonadditive genetic predictions were similar across sire groups of all Angus and Brahman fractions. These results suggest that slaughtering steers on a similar carcass composition basis reduces variability of fat-related traits while retaining variability for non-fat-related traits comparable to slaughtering steers on a similar age or weight basis. Selection for carcass traits within desirable (narrow) ranges and slaughter of steers at similar compositional end point seems to be a good combination to help produce meat products of consistent

  4. New Genetic Susceptibility Factors for Sjögren's Syndrome Revealed

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 March 2014 (historical) New Genetic Susceptibility Factors for Sjögren’s Syndrome Revealed By ... the journal Nature Genetics, could help researchers develop new strategies to diagnose and treat the condition. In ...

  5. Host genetic variation is a contributable factor for imperfectly-immunizing vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine protective efficacy is determined by multiple factors including host genetics, vaccine type, vaccine dosage, challenge virus virulence, challenge virus dose, and interval between vaccination and exposure to challenge viruses. About two decades ago, studies conducted to evaluate host genetic ...

  6. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  7. Sarcoidosis and Autoimmunity: From Genetic Background to Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Bindoli, Sara; Dagan, Amir; Torres-Ruiz, José J; Perricone, Carlo; Bizjak, Mojca; Doria, Andrea; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystem disease with variable course resulting from the interaction between environmental factors and the immune system of individuals genetically predisposed. The evidence linking sarcoidosis with environmental triggers such as metals is increasing. We describe the case of a 44 year old female with a history. of smoking since age 30 and previous mercury dental filling who presented at physical examination with numerous subcutaneous nodules. Laboratory data showed accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high titer of anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein antibodies (U1 RNP). Skin biopsy and chest X-ray suggested the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In this report we illustrate the different causes involved in the onset of sarcoidosis. PMID:27228643

  8. Identifying Multimodal Intermediate Phenotypes Between Genetic Risk Factors and Disease Status in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yao, Xiaohui; Yan, Jingwen; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging genetics has attracted growing attention and interest, which is thought to be a powerful strategy to examine the influence of genetic variants (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) on structures or functions of human brain. In recent studies, univariate or multivariate regression analysis methods are typically used to capture the effective associations between genetic variants and quantitative traits (QTs) such as brain imaging phenotypes. The identified imaging QTs, although associated with certain genetic markers, may not be all disease specific. A useful, but underexplored, scenario could be to discover only those QTs associated with both genetic markers and disease status for revealing the chain from genotype to phenotype to symptom. In addition, multimodal brain imaging phenotypes are extracted from different perspectives and imaging markers consistently showing up in multimodalities may provide more insights for mechanistic understanding of diseases (i.e., Alzheimer's disease (AD)). In this work, we propose a general framework to exploit multi-modal brain imaging phenotypes as intermediate traits that bridge genetic risk factors and multi-class disease status. We applied our proposed method to explore the relation between the well-known AD risk SNP APOE rs429358 and three baseline brain imaging modalities (i.e., structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and F-18 florbetapir PET scans amyloid imaging (AV45)) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The empirical results demonstrate that our proposed method not only helps improve the performances of imaging genetic associations, but also discovers robust and consistent regions of interests (ROIs) across multi-modalities to guide the disease-induced interpretation. PMID:27277494

  9. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 377.22 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants? In addition to the criteria in § 377.21, the... strategies to increase client choice, in order to ensure that a variety of approaches are demonstrated...

  10. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Simon K G; Andreatta, Matthew E; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or "missing heritability". Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations.

  11. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  12. Genome-Enabled Estimates of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variances and Prediction of Apple Phenotypes Across Environments.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Molloy, Claire; Muñoz, Patricio; Daetwyler, Hans; Chagné, David; Volz, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The nonadditive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of phenotypes, so estimates of both the additive and nonadditive effects are desirable for breeding and selection purposes. Our main objectives were to: estimate additive, dominance and epistatic variances of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) phenotypes using relationship matrices constructed from genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; and compare the accuracy of genomic predictions using genomic best linear unbiased prediction models with or without including nonadditive genetic effects. A set of 247 clonally replicated individuals was assessed for six fruit quality traits at two sites, and also genotyped using an Illumina 8K SNP array. Across several fruit quality traits, the additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributed about 30%, 16%, and 19%, respectively, to the total phenotypic variance. Models ignoring nonadditive components yielded upwardly biased estimates of additive variance (heritability) for all traits in this study. The accuracy of genomic predicted genetic values (GEGV) varied from about 0.15 to 0.35 for various traits, and these were almost identical for models with or without including nonadditive effects. However, models including nonadditive genetic effects further reduced the bias of GEGV. Between-site genotypic correlations were high (>0.85) for all traits, and genotype-site interaction accounted for <10% of the phenotypic variability. The accuracy of prediction, when the validation set was present only at one site, was generally similar for both sites, and varied from about 0.50 to 0.85. The prediction accuracies were strongly influenced by trait heritability, and genetic relatedness between the training and validation families.

  13. Genome-Enabled Estimates of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variances and Prediction of Apple Phenotypes Across Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Molloy, Claire; Muñoz, Patricio; Daetwyler, Hans; Chagné, David; Volz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The nonadditive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of phenotypes, so estimates of both the additive and nonadditive effects are desirable for breeding and selection purposes. Our main objectives were to: estimate additive, dominance and epistatic variances of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) phenotypes using relationship matrices constructed from genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; and compare the accuracy of genomic predictions using genomic best linear unbiased prediction models with or without including nonadditive genetic effects. A set of 247 clonally replicated individuals was assessed for six fruit quality traits at two sites, and also genotyped using an Illumina 8K SNP array. Across several fruit quality traits, the additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributed about 30%, 16%, and 19%, respectively, to the total phenotypic variance. Models ignoring nonadditive components yielded upwardly biased estimates of additive variance (heritability) for all traits in this study. The accuracy of genomic predicted genetic values (GEGV) varied from about 0.15 to 0.35 for various traits, and these were almost identical for models with or without including nonadditive effects. However, models including nonadditive genetic effects further reduced the bias of GEGV. Between-site genotypic correlations were high (>0.85) for all traits, and genotype-site interaction accounted for <10% of the phenotypic variability. The accuracy of prediction, when the validation set was present only at one site, was generally similar for both sites, and varied from about 0.50 to 0.85. The prediction accuracies were strongly influenced by trait heritability, and genetic relatedness between the training and validation families. PMID:26497141

  14. Evidence for an intrinsic factor promoting landscape genetic divergence in Madagascan leaf-litter frogs

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C.

    2015-01-01

    The endemic Malagasy frog radiations are an ideal model system to study patterns and processes of speciation in amphibians. Large-scale diversity patterns of these frogs, together with other endemic animal radiations, led to the postulation of new and the application of known hypotheses of species diversification causing diversity patterns in this biodiversity hotspot. Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been studied in a comparative framework, with extrinsic factors usually being related to the physical environment (landscape, climate, river catchments, mountain chains), and intrinsic factors being clade-specific traits or constraints (reproduction, ecology, morphology, physiology). Despite some general patterns emerging from such large-scale comparative analyses, it became clear that the mechanism of diversification in Madagascar may vary among clades, and may be a multifactorial process. In this contribution, I test for intrinsic factors promoting population-level divergence within a clade of terrestrial, diurnal leaf-litter frogs (genus Gephyromantis) that has previously been shown to diversify according to extrinsic factors. Landscape genetic analyses of the microendemic species Gephyromantis enki and its widely distributed, larger sister species Gephyromantis boulengeri over a rugged landscape in the Ranomafana area shows that genetic variance of the smaller species cannot be explained by landscape resistance alone. Both topographic and riverine barriers are found to be important in generating this divergence. This case study yields additional evidence for the probable importance of body size in lineage diversification. PMID:26136766

  15. Factors affecting levels of genetic diversity in natural populations.

    PubMed Central

    Amos, W; Harwood, J

    1998-01-01

    Genetic variability is the clay of evolution, providing the base material on which adaptation and speciation depend. It is often assumed that most interspecific differences in variability are due primarily to population size effects, with bottlenecked populations carrying less variability than those of stable size. However, we show that population bottlenecks are unlikely to be the only factor, even in classic case studies such as the northern elephant seal and the cheetah, where genetic polymorphism is virtually absent. Instead, we suggest that the low levels of variability observed in endangered populations are more likely to result from a combination of publication biases, which tend to inflate the level of variability which is considered 'normal', and inbreeding effects, which may hasten loss of variability due to drift. To account for species with large population sizes but low variability we advance three hypotheses. First, it is known that certain metapopulation structures can result in effective population sizes far below the census size. Second, there is increasing evidence that heterozygous sites mutate more frequently than equivalent homozygous sites, plausibly because mismatch repair between homologous chromosomes during meiosis provides extra opportunities to mutate. Such a mechanism would undermine the simple relationship between heterozygosity and effective population size. Third, the fact that related species that differ greatly in variability implies that large amounts of variability can be gained or lost rapidly. We argue that such cases are best explained by rapid loss through a genome-wide selective sweep, and suggest a mechanism by which this could come about, based on forced changes to a control gene inducing coevolution in the genes it controls. Our model, based on meiotic drive in mammals, but easily extended to other systems, would tend to facilitate population isolation by generating molecular incompatabilities. Circumstances can even be

  16. Factors affecting levels of genetic diversity in natural populations.

    PubMed

    Amos, W; Harwood, J

    1998-02-28

    Genetic variability is the clay of evolution, providing the base material on which adaptation and speciation depend. It is often assumed that most interspecific differences in variability are due primarily to population size effects, with bottlenecked populations carrying less variability than those of stable size. However, we show that population bottlenecks are unlikely to be the only factor, even in classic case studies such as the northern elephant seal and the cheetah, where genetic polymorphism is virtually absent. Instead, we suggest that the low levels of variability observed in endangered populations are more likely to result from a combination of publication biases, which tend to inflate the level of variability which is considered 'normal', and inbreeding effects, which may hasten loss of variability due to drift. To account for species with large population sizes but low variability we advance three hypotheses. First, it is known that certain metapopulation structures can result in effective population sizes far below the census size. Second, there is increasing evidence that heterozygous sites mutate more frequently than equivalent homozygous sites, plausibly because mismatch repair between homologous chromosomes during meiosis provides extra opportunities to mutate. Such a mechanism would undermine the simple relationship between heterozygosity and effective population size. Third, the fact that related species that differ greatly in variability implies that large amounts of variability can be gained or lost rapidly. We argue that such cases are best explained by rapid loss through a genome-wide selective sweep, and suggest a mechanism by which this could come about, based on forced changes to a control gene inducing coevolution in the genes it controls. Our model, based on meiotic drive in mammals, but easily extended to other systems, would tend to facilitate population isolation by generating molecular incompatabilities. Circumstances can even be

  17. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  18. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  19. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  20. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  1. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  2. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  3. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  4. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  5. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  6. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  7. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  8. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  9. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  10. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  11. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  12. Lobular breast cancer: incidence and genetic and non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Dossus, Laure; Benusiglio, Patrick R

    2015-01-01

    While most invasive breast cancers consist of carcinomas of the ductal type, about 10% are invasive lobular carcinomas. Invasive lobular and ductal carcinomas differ with respect to risk factors. Invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with exposure to female hormones, and therefore its incidence is more subject to variation. This is illustrated by US figures during the 1987 to 2004 period: after 12 years of increases, breast cancer incidence declined steadily from 1999 to 2004, reflecting among other causes the decreasing use of menopausal hormone therapy, and these variations were stronger for invasive lobular than for invasive ductal carcinoma. Similarly, invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with early menarche, late menopause and late age at first birth. As for genetic risk factors, four high-penetrance genes are tested in clinical practice when genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is suspected, BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CDH1. Germline mutations in BRCA1 and TP53 are predominantly associated with invasive ductal carcinoma, while BRCA2 mutations are associated with both ductal and lobular cancers. CDH1, the gene coding for the E-cadherin adhesion protein, is of special interest as mutations are associated with invasive lobular carcinoma, but never with ductal carcinoma. It was initially known as the main susceptibility gene for gastric cancer of the diffuse type, but the excess of breast cancers of the lobular type in CDH1 families led researchers to identify it also as a susceptibility gene for invasive lobular carcinoma. The risk of invasive lobular carcinoma is high in female mutation carriers, as about 50% are expected to develop the disease. Carriers must therefore undergo intensive breast cancer screening, with, for example, yearly magnetic resonance imaging and mammogram starting at age 30 years. PMID:25848941

  13. Lobular breast cancer: incidence and genetic and non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Dossus, Laure; Benusiglio, Patrick R

    2015-01-01

    While most invasive breast cancers consist of carcinomas of the ductal type, about 10% are invasive lobular carcinomas. Invasive lobular and ductal carcinomas differ with respect to risk factors. Invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with exposure to female hormones, and therefore its incidence is more subject to variation. This is illustrated by US figures during the 1987 to 2004 period: after 12 years of increases, breast cancer incidence declined steadily from 1999 to 2004, reflecting among other causes the decreasing use of menopausal hormone therapy, and these variations were stronger for invasive lobular than for invasive ductal carcinoma. Similarly, invasive lobular carcinoma is more strongly associated with early menarche, late menopause and late age at first birth. As for genetic risk factors, four high-penetrance genes are tested in clinical practice when genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is suspected, BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CDH1. Germline mutations in BRCA1 and TP53 are predominantly associated with invasive ductal carcinoma, while BRCA2 mutations are associated with both ductal and lobular cancers. CDH1, the gene coding for the E-cadherin adhesion protein, is of special interest as mutations are associated with invasive lobular carcinoma, but never with ductal carcinoma. It was initially known as the main susceptibility gene for gastric cancer of the diffuse type, but the excess of breast cancers of the lobular type in CDH1 families led researchers to identify it also as a susceptibility gene for invasive lobular carcinoma. The risk of invasive lobular carcinoma is high in female mutation carriers, as about 50% are expected to develop the disease. Carriers must therefore undergo intensive breast cancer screening, with, for example, yearly magnetic resonance imaging and mammogram starting at age 30 years.

  14. Factors influencing stakeholders attitudes toward genetically modified aedes mosquito.

    PubMed

    Amin, Latifah; Hashim, Hasrizul

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever is a debilitating and infectious disease that could be life-threatening. It is caused by the dengue virus which affects millions of people in the tropical area. Currently, there is no cure for the disease as there is no vaccine available. Thus, prevention of the vector population using conventional methods is by far the main strategy but has been found ineffective. A genetically modified (GM) mosquito is among the favoured alternatives to curb dengue fever in Malaysia. Past studies have shown that development and diffusion of gene technology products depends heavily upon public acceptance. The purpose of this study is to identify the relevant factors influencing stakeholders' attitudes toward the GM Aedes mosquito and to analyse the relationships between all the factors using the structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 509 respondents from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Results of the survey have confirmed that public perception towards complex issues such as gene technology should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The perceived benefit-perceived risk balance is very important in determining the most predominant predictor of attitudes toward a GM mosquito. In this study the stakeholders perceived the benefit of the GM mosquito as outweighing its risk, translating perceived benefit as the most important direct predictor of attitudes toward the GM mosquito. Trust in key players has a direct influence on attitudes toward the GM mosquito while moral concern exhibited an indirect influence through perceived benefits. Other factors such as attitudes toward technology and nature were also indirect predictors of attitudes toward the GM mosquito while religiosity and engagement did not exhibited any significant roles. The research findings serve as a useful database to understand public acceptance and the social construct of public attitudes towards the GM mosquito to combat dengue. PMID:24906652

  15. No Additional Prognostic Value of Genetic Information in the Prediction of Vascular Events after Cerebral Ischemia of Arterial Origin: The PROMISe Study

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, Sefanja; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Traylor, Matthew; Algra, Ale

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients who have suffered from cerebral ischemia have a high risk of recurrent vascular events. Predictive models based on classical risk factors typically have limited prognostic value. Given that cerebral ischemia has a heritable component, genetic information might improve performance of these risk models. Our aim was to develop and compare two models: one containing traditional vascular risk factors, the other also including genetic information. Methods and Results We studied 1020 patients with cerebral ischemia and genotyped them with the Illumina Immunochip. Median follow-up time was 6.5 years; the annual incidence of new ischemic events (primary outcome, n=198) was 3.0%. The prognostic model based on classical vascular risk factors had an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC-ROC) of 0.65 (95% confidence interval 0.61-0.69). When we added a genetic risk score based on prioritized SNPs from a genome-wide association study of ischemic stroke (using summary statistics from the METASTROKE study which included 12389 cases and 62004 controls), the AUC-ROC remained the same. Similar results were found for the secondary outcome ischemic stroke. Conclusions We found no additional value of genetic information in a prognostic model for the risk of ischemic events in patients with cerebral ischemia of arterial origin. This is consistent with a complex, polygenic architecture, where many genes of weak effect likely act in concert to influence the heritable risk of an individual to develop (recurrent) vascular events. At present, genetic information cannot help clinicians to distinguish patients at high risk for recurrent vascular events. PMID:25906364

  16. Current understanding of genetic factors in preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Varner, Michael W; Esplin, M Sean

    2005-03-01

    Several lines of evidence support a genetic predisposition to spontaneous preterm labour and preterm birth. Firstly, a leading risk factor for spontaneous preterm labour and preterm birth is a personal or family history. If a woman previously delivered preterm, her subsequent babies are also more likely to be born preterm. Women who experienced an early preterm birth (<32 completed weeks) in their first pregnancy have the highest rate of recurrent preterm birth in subsequent pregnancies. Spontaneous preterm labour and preterm birth in subsequent pregnancies tend to recur at equivalent gestational ages. If a woman herself was born preterm, she is also at an increased risk of spontaneous preterm labour and preterm birth, with the risks being highest for those women who themselves were born most preterm. This predisposition does not apply to men who were born preterm. Racial predispositions to preterm birth have also been observed. Black women suffer twice the rate of preterm birth compared with Caucasians, even when confounding social and economic variables are controlled. It is well established that upper genital tract infection and/or inflammation is seen in association with spontaneous preterm labour and preterm birth. Previous investigations have focussed primarily on an infectious aetiology for this finding. However, an alternative hypothesis has emerged, which suggests that this finding may represent an abnormal inflammatory response. The frequent association of spontaneous preterm labour and preterm birth with histological infection/inflammation and elevated body fluid concentrations of inflammatory cytokines has focussed investigations on single gene polymorphisms of these cytokines in both mother and fetus. The polymorphisms tumour necrosis factor-alpha-308 (TNF-alpha-308), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) + 3953/3954 and IL-6-174 have been most consistently associated with spontaneous preterm labour and preterm birth. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important

  17. Are major behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors for mortality additive or multiplicative in their effects?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil; Preston, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    All individuals are subject to multiple risk factors for mortality. In this paper, we consider the nature of interactions between certain major sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors associated with all-cause mortality in the United States. We develop the formal logic pertaining to two forms of interaction between risk factors, additive and multiplicative relations. We then consider the general circumstances in which additive or multiplicative relations might be expected. We argue that expectations about interactions among socio-demographic variables, and their relation to behavioral variables, have been stated in terms of additivity. However, the statistical models typically used to estimate the relation between risk factors and mortality assume that risk factors act multiplicatively. We examine empirically the nature of interactions among five major risk factors associated with all-cause mortality: smoking, obesity, race, sex, and educational attainment. Data were drawn from the cross-sectional NHANES III (1988-1994) and NHANES 1999-2010 surveys, linked to death records through December 31, 2011. Our analytic sample comprised 35,604 respondents and 5369 deaths. We find that obesity is additive with each of the remaining four variables. We speculate that its additivity is a reflection of the fact that obese status is generally achieved later in life. For all pairings of socio-demographic variables, risks are multiplicative. For survival chances, it is much more dangerous to be poorly educated if you are black or if you are male. And it is much riskier to be a male if you are black. These traits, established at birth or during childhood, literally result in deadly combinations. We conclude that the identification of interactions among risk factors can cast valuable light on the nature of the process being studied. It also has public health implications by identifying especially vulnerable groups and by properly identifying the proportion of deaths

  18. Additive transgene expression and genetic introgression in multiple green-fluorescent protein transgenic crop x weed hybrid generations.

    PubMed

    Halfhill, M D; Millwood, R J; Weissinger, A K; Warwick, S I; Stewart, C N

    2003-11-01

    The level of transgene expression in crop x weed hybrids and the degree to which crop-specific genes are integrated into hybrid populations are important factors in assessing the potential ecological and agricultural risks of gene flow associated with genetic engineering. The average transgene zygosity and genetic structure of transgenic hybrid populations change with the progression of generations, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene is an ideal marker to quantify transgene expression in advancing populations. The homozygous T(1) single-locus insert GFP/ Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic canola ( Brassica napus, cv Westar) with two copies of the transgene fluoresced twice as much as hemizygous individuals with only one copy of the transgene. These data indicate that the expression of the GFP gene was additive, and fluorescence could be used to determine zygosity status. Several hybrid generations (BC(1)F(1), BC(2)F(1)) were produced by backcrossing various GFP/Bt transgenic canola ( B. napus, cv Westar) and birdseed rape ( Brassica rapa) hybrid generations onto B. rapa. Intercrossed generations (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) were generated by crossing BC(2)F(1) individuals in the presence of a pollinating insect ( Musca domestica L.). The ploidy of plants in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk hybrid generation was identical to the weedy parental species, B. rapa. AFLP analysis was used to quantify the degree of B. napus introgression into multiple backcross hybrid generations with B. rapa. The F(1) hybrid generations contained 95-97% of the B. napus-specific AFLP markers, and each successive backcross generation demonstrated a reduction of markers resulting in the 15-29% presence in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk population. Average fluorescence of each successive hybrid generation was analyzed, and homozygous canola lines and hybrid populations that contained individuals homozygous for GFP (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) demonstrated significantly higher fluorescence than hemizygous hybrid

  19. Additive transgene expression and genetic introgression in multiple green-fluorescent protein transgenic crop x weed hybrid generations.

    PubMed

    Halfhill, M D; Millwood, R J; Weissinger, A K; Warwick, S I; Stewart, C N

    2003-11-01

    The level of transgene expression in crop x weed hybrids and the degree to which crop-specific genes are integrated into hybrid populations are important factors in assessing the potential ecological and agricultural risks of gene flow associated with genetic engineering. The average transgene zygosity and genetic structure of transgenic hybrid populations change with the progression of generations, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene is an ideal marker to quantify transgene expression in advancing populations. The homozygous T(1) single-locus insert GFP/ Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic canola ( Brassica napus, cv Westar) with two copies of the transgene fluoresced twice as much as hemizygous individuals with only one copy of the transgene. These data indicate that the expression of the GFP gene was additive, and fluorescence could be used to determine zygosity status. Several hybrid generations (BC(1)F(1), BC(2)F(1)) were produced by backcrossing various GFP/Bt transgenic canola ( B. napus, cv Westar) and birdseed rape ( Brassica rapa) hybrid generations onto B. rapa. Intercrossed generations (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) were generated by crossing BC(2)F(1) individuals in the presence of a pollinating insect ( Musca domestica L.). The ploidy of plants in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk hybrid generation was identical to the weedy parental species, B. rapa. AFLP analysis was used to quantify the degree of B. napus introgression into multiple backcross hybrid generations with B. rapa. The F(1) hybrid generations contained 95-97% of the B. napus-specific AFLP markers, and each successive backcross generation demonstrated a reduction of markers resulting in the 15-29% presence in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk population. Average fluorescence of each successive hybrid generation was analyzed, and homozygous canola lines and hybrid populations that contained individuals homozygous for GFP (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) demonstrated significantly higher fluorescence than hemizygous hybrid

  20. Genetic factors in the presence, severity, and triggers of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Sarafino, E P; Goldfedder, J

    1995-01-01

    The role of heredity in the presence of asthma, severity of the condition, and impact of 12 specific triggers of attacks was investigated. Health surveys containing questions about children's asthma characteristics were completed by 325 families with twin children across the United States. Data for 39 monozygotic twin pairs and 55 same sex dizygotic twin pairs who were between 2 and 20 years of age and had asthma present in at least one member of each pair were received and analysed. Results revealed higher concordance for the presence of asthma among monozygotic (58.97%; n = 23) than dizygotic twins (23.64%; n = 13). Further analyses were restricted to data from the concordant monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. Asthma severity (the product of attack frequency and intensity ratings) was significantly correlated for monozygotic pairs but not for dizygotic pairs, and this difference in monozygotic and dizygotic severity correlations was significant. Also, monozygotic twins showed significantly higher correlations than dizygotic twins for the impacts of two asthma triggers: respiratory infection and physical activity. These results indicate a role of heredity in the presence of asthma and suggest that genetic factors may also affect the severity of children's asthma condition and the impact of respiratory infection and physical exertion as asthma triggers. PMID:7574852

  1. Heterogeneity of HLA genetic factors in IDDM susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; Marcadet, A; Moine, A; Boitard, C; Deschamps, I; Dausset, J; Bach, J F; Cohen, D

    1990-01-01

    The association of certain HLA-D alleles with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is well known. One hundred and sixty-one non-related diabetic individuals and 142 non-related healthy controls were typed for the HLA DR-DQw-Dw association, using a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing method that combines three probe/enzyme systems: DRB/Taq I, DQB/Taq I, and DQB/Bam HI. Comparison of frequencies in both diabetics and controls confirms previous results in terms of HLA class II and IDDM association. Moreover, we have found that DR3/3 heterozygous individuals are more susceptible to IDDM when they are also Dw25 (associated with B18) than when they are Dw24 (associated with B8). Using oligonucleotide dot-blot hybridizations we analyzed the HLA-DQB1 sequence of DR3,Dw24 and DR3,Dw25 homozygous individuals, and we found no difference at position 57 between these two DR3-carrying haplotypes. This observation points to the heterogeneity of HLA genetic factors in IDDM susceptibility. PMID:1970333

  2. Genetic Factors for Enhancement of Nicotine Levels in Cultivated Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingwu; Lewis, Ramsey S; Shi, Junli; Song, Zhongbang; Gao, Yulong; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Hongxia; Qu, Rongda

    2015-12-02

    Nicotine has practical applications relating to smoking cessation devices and alternative nicotine products. Genetic manipulation for increasing nicotine content in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) may be of value for industrial purposes, including the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of nicotine extraction. Biotechnological approaches have been evaluated in connection with this objective, but field-based results are few. Here, we report characterization of two genes encoding basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs), NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b from tobacco. Overexpression of NtMYC2a increased leaf nicotine levels in T1 transgenic lines approximately 2.3-fold in greenhouse-grown plants of tobacco cultivar 'NC 95'. Subsequent field testing of T2 and T3 generations of transgenic NtMYC2a overexpression lines showed nicotine concentrations were 76% and 58% higher than control lines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the increased nicotine trait was stably inherited to the T2 and T3 generations, indicating the important role that NtMYC2a plays in regulating nicotine accumulation in N. tabacum and the great potential of NtMYC2a overexpression in tobacco plants for industrial nicotine production. Collected data in this study also indicated a negative feedback inhibition of nicotine biosynthesis. Further enhancement of nicotine accumulation in tobacco leaf may require modification of the processes of nicotine transport and deposition.

  3. Genetic study of host factors in gastrocarcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Morino, K; Ohgaki, H; Matsukura, N; Kawachi, T; Sugimura, T

    1982-01-01

    The effects of genetic factors on gastrocarcinogenesis in rats were studied by giving 83 micrograms/ml of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in the drinking-water to ACI strain rats, Buffalo strain rats, and their F1 hybrid rats for eight months. Animals were sacrificed on the 505th experimental day and examined histologically. The incidences of gastric carcinoma were as follows (no. of carcinoma-bearing rats/no. of effective animals): ACI rats, 86% (12/14) of males and 53% (9/17) of females; Buffalo rats, 19% (3/16) of males and 0% (0/13) of females; F1 hybrids between ACI and Buffalo rats, 23% (7/30) of males and 3% (1/32) of females. The incidence of gastric carcinoma in F1 hybrids was significantly lower than that in ACI rats but not significantly different from that in Buffalo rats. These results suggest that resistance to gastrocarcinogenesis by MNNG is an autosomally dominant trait.

  4. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: genetic and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-11-28

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide.

  5. Alcoholism and liver disease in Mexico: Genetic and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sonia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Moreno-Luna, Laura Eugenia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism and cirrhosis, which are two of the most serious health problems worldwide, have a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes. Both diseases are influenced by genetic susceptibility and cultural traits that differ globally but are specific for each population. In contrast to other regions around the world, Mexicans present the highest drinking score and a high mortality rate for alcoholic liver disease with an intermediate category level of per capita alcohol consumption. Mexico has a unique history of alcohol consumption that is linked to profound anthropological and social aspects. The Mexican population has an admixture genome inherited from different races, Caucasian, Amerindian and African, with a heterogeneous distribution within the country. Thus, genes related to alcohol addiction, such as dopamine receptor D2 in the brain, or liver alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, such as alcohol dehydrogenase class I polypeptide B, cytochrome P450 2E1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 2, may vary from one individual to another. Furthermore, they may be inherited as risk or non-risk haplogroups that confer susceptibility or resistance either to alcohol addiction or abusive alcohol consumption and possibly liver disease. Thus, in this era of genomics, personalized medicine will benefit patients if it is directed according to individual or population-based data. Additional association studies will be required to establish novel strategies for the prevention, care and treatment of liver disease in Mexico and worldwide. PMID:24307790

  6. [Research progress in genetic abnormalities and etiological factors of congenital anorectal malformation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Ren, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anorectal malformation (ARM) is one of the most common gastrointestinal congenital diseases, accounting for 1/4 in digestive tract malformation, and is one of the congenital malformations in routine surveillance by the World Health Organization. Because of the variety of risk factors and the complexity of the pathological changes, etiology of ARM is still not clear. It is mostly considered that ARM is resulted from hereditary factors and environmental factors in the development of embryogenesis. Through animal experiments, scholars have found that Hox, Shh, Fgf, Wnt, Cdx and TCF4, Eph and ephrin play crucial role during the development of digestive tract. When the genes/signaling pathway dysfunction occurs, ARM may happen. In addition, ARM is related to the external factors in pregnancy. Because of the complexity of related factors in the development of human embryogenesis, the research progress of human ARM is very slow. This paper reviews relevant literatures in genetic factors and environmental factors, in order to provide the theoretical basis for the treatment and prevention of ARM. PMID:26797848

  7. Constructing the toolbox: Patient-specific genetic factors of altered fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Drissi, Hicham; Paglia, David N.; Alaee, Farhang; Yoshida, Ryu

    2014-01-01

    The multifaceted sequence of events that follow fracture repair can be further complicated when considering risk factors for impaired union, present in a large and growing percentage of the population. Risk factors such as diabetes, substance abuse, and poor nutrition affect both the young and old alike, and have been shown to dramatically impair the body’s natural healing processes. To this end, biotherapeudic interventions such as ultrasound, electrical simulation, growth factor treatment (BMP-2, BMP-7, PDGF-BB, FGF-2) have been evaluated in preclinical models and in some cases are used widely for patients with established non-union or risk/indication or impaired healing (ie. ultrasound, BMP-2, etc.). Despite the promise of these interventions, they have been shown to be reliant on patient compliance and can produce adverse side-effects such as heterotopic ossification. Gene and cell therapy approaches have attempted to apply controlled regimens of these factors and have produced promising results. However, there are safety and efficacy concerns that may limit the translation of these approaches. In addition, none of the above mentioned approaches consider genetic variation between individual patients. Several clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated a genetic component to fracture repair and that SNPs and genetic background variation play major roles in the determination of healing outcomes. Despite this, there is a need for preclinical data to dissect the mechanism underlying the influence of specific gene loci on the processes of fracture healing, which will be paramount in the future of patient-centered interventions for fracture repair. PMID:25558470

  8. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  9. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-11-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  10. 34 CFR 648.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 648.32 Section 648.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION GRADUATE ASSISTANCE IN AREAS OF NATIONAL...

  11. 34 CFR 491.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 491.22 Section 491.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE...

  12. 34 CFR 491.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 491.22 Section 491.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE...

  13. 34 CFR 491.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 491.22 Section 491.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE...

  14. 34 CFR 491.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 491.22 Section 491.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE...

  15. 34 CFR 491.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 491.22 Section 491.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE...

  16. 34 CFR 636.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 636.22 Section 636.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION URBAN COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM How Does...

  17. 34 CFR 636.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 636.22 Section 636.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION URBAN COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM How Does...

  18. 34 CFR 636.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 636.22 Section 636.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION URBAN COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM How Does...

  19. 34 CFR 636.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 636.22 Section 636.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION URBAN COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM How Does...

  20. 34 CFR 636.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 636.22 Section 636.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION URBAN COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM How Does...

  1. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional requirements for two-factor authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... criteria of FIPS 140-2 Security Level 1, as incorporated by reference in § 1311.08, for...

  2. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Additional requirements for two-factor authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... criteria of FIPS 140-2 Security Level 1, as incorporated by reference in § 1311.08, for...

  3. 34 CFR 425.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 425.22 Section 425.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR...

  4. 34 CFR 648.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... private institutions of higher education. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1135-1135c) ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 648.32 Section 648.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education...

  5. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  6. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  7. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  8. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  9. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  10. Metabolic and genetic factors contributing to alcohol induced effects and fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Simonetta; Vichi, Susanna; Testai, Emanuela

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol-related damages on newborns and infants include a wide variety of complications from facial anomalies to neurodevelopmental delay, known as fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). However, only less than 10% of women drinking alcohol during pregnancy have children with FAS. Understanding the risk factors increasing the probability for newborn exposed in utero to alcohol to develop FAS is therefore a key issue. The involvement of genetics as a one risk factor in FAS has been suggested by animal models and by molecular epidemiological studies on different populations, bearing allelic variants for those enzymes, such as ADH e CYP2E1, involved in ethanol metabolism. Indeed, one of the major factors determining the peak blood alcohol exposure to the fetus is the metabolic activity of the mother, in addition to placental and fetal metabolism, explaining, at least partially, the risk of FAS. The different rates of ethanol metabolism may be the result of genetic polymorphisms, the most relevant of which have been described in the paper.

  11. Multiple genetic factors in the heterogeneity of thyroid hormone resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.E.; Refetoff, S. ); Marcocci, C.; Bruno-Bossio, G. )

    1993-01-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH), a syndrome of inherited tissue hyposensitivity to thyroid hormone, is linked to thyroid hormone receptor (TR) mutations. A typical feature of GRTH is variable severity of organ involvement among families that, surprisingly, does not correlate with the degree of T[sub 3]-binding impairment of the corresponding in vitro synthesized mutant TRs. Furthermore, variations in the clinical severity among family members harboring identical TR[beta] mutations have been reported. The authors compared serum levels of thyroid hormones that maintained a normal TSH in members of a large family with GRTH divided in three groups: Group A, 8 affected subjects with a mutation replacing arginine-320 with a histidine in the T[sub 3]-binding domain of TR[beta]; Group B, 11 first degree relatives (sibs and children of affected subjects) with no TR[beta] mutation; Group C, 16 controls related by marriage. TSH values were not different among the three groups. As expected, total and free T[sub 4] and T[sub 3], and rT[sub 3] levels were significantly higher in Group A vs Groups B and C. However, with the exception of T[sub 3], the same tests were also significantly higher in Group B vs Group C. The latter differences are not due to thyroid hormone transport in serum since TBG concentrations were not different. It is postulated that genetic variability of factors that contribute to the action of thyroid hormone modulate the phenotype of GRTH associated with TR[beta] mutations. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Race influences warfarin dose changes associated with genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Limdi, Nita A; Brown, Todd M; Yan, Qi; Thigpen, Jonathan L; Shendre, Aditi; Liu, Nianjun; Hill, Charles E; Arnett, Donna K; Beasley, T Mark

    2015-07-23

    Warfarin dosing algorithms adjust for race, assigning a fixed effect size to each predictor, thereby attenuating the differential effect by race. Attenuation likely occurs in both race groups but may be more pronounced in the less-represented race group. Therefore, we evaluated whether the effect of clinical (age, body surface area [BSA], chronic kidney disease [CKD], and amiodarone use) and genetic factors (CYP2C9*2, *3, *5, *6, *11, rs12777823, VKORC1, and CYP4F2) on warfarin dose differs by race using regression analyses among 1357 patients enrolled in a prospective cohort study and compared predictive ability of race-combined vs race-stratified models. Differential effect of predictors by race was assessed using predictor-race interactions in race-combined analyses. Warfarin dose was influenced by age, BSA, CKD, amiodarone use, and CYP2C9*3 and VKORC1 variants in both races, by CYP2C9*2 and CYP4F2 variants in European Americans, and by rs12777823 in African Americans. CYP2C9*2 was associated with a lower dose only among European Americans (20.6% vs 3.0%, P < .001) and rs12777823 only among African Americans (12.3% vs 2.3%, P = .006). Although VKORC1 was associated with dose decrease in both races, the proportional decrease was higher among European Americans (28.9% vs 19.9%, P = .003) compared with African Americans. Race-stratified analysis improved dose prediction in both race groups compared with race-combined analysis. We demonstrate that the effect of predictors on warfarin dose differs by race, which may explain divergent findings reported by recent warfarin pharmacogenetic trials. We recommend that warfarin dosing algorithms should be stratified by race rather than adjusted for race.

  13. Dynamics of the Ovarian Reserve and Impact of Genetic and Epidemiological Factors on Age of Menopause1

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, Emanuele; Simonsick, Eleanor; Forabosco, Antonino; Garcia-Ortiz, Jose Elias; Schlessinger, David

    2015-01-01

    The narrow standard age range of menopause, ∼50 yr, belies the complex balance of forces that govern the underlying formation and progressive loss of ovarian follicles (the “ovarian reserve” whose size determines the age of menopause). We show here the first quantitative graph of follicle numbers, distinguished from oocyte counts, across the reproductive lifespan, and review the current state of information about genetic and epidemiological risk factors in relation to possible preservation of reproductive capacity. In addition to structural X-chromosome changes, several genes involved in the process of follicle formation and/or maintenance are implicated in Mendelian inherited primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), with menopause before age 40. Furthermore, variants in a largely distinct cohort of reported genes—notably involved in pathways relevant to atresia, including DNA repair and cell death—have shown smaller but additive effects on the variation in timing of menopause in the normal range, early menopause (age <45), and POI. Epidemiological factors show effect sizes comparable to those of genetic factors, with smoking accounting for about 5% of the risk of early menopause, equivalent to the summed effect of the top 17 genetic variants. The identified genetic and epidemiological factors underline the importance of early detection of reproductive problems to enhance possible interventions. PMID:25904009

  14. GWAS of human bitter taste perception identifies new loci and reveals additional complexity of bitter taste genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Mirko; Kutalik, Zoltán; Souza Destito, Maria C.; Souza, Milena M.; Cirillo, Cintia A.; Zamboni, Amabilene; Martin, Nathalie; Morya, Edgard; Sameshima, Koichi; Beckmann, Jacques S.; le Coutre, Johannes; Bergmann, Sven; Genick, Ulrich K.

    2014-01-01

    Human perception of bitterness displays pronounced interindividual variation. This phenotypic variation is mirrored by equally pronounced genetic variation in the family of bitter taste receptor genes. To better understand the effects of common genetic variations on human bitter taste perception, we conducted a genome-wide association study on a discovery panel of 504 subjects and a validation panel of 104 subjects from the general population of São Paulo in Brazil. Correction for general taste-sensitivity allowed us to identify a SNP in the cluster of bitter taste receptors on chr12 (10.88– 11.24 Mb, build 36.1) significantly associated (best SNP: rs2708377, P = 5.31 × 10−13, r2 = 8.9%, β = −0.12, s.e. = 0.016) with the perceived bitterness of caffeine. This association overlaps with—but is statistically distinct from—the previously identified SNP rs10772420 influencing the perception of quinine bitterness that falls in the same bitter taste cluster. We replicated this association to quinine perception (P = 4.97 × 10−37, r2 = 23.2%, β = 0.25, s.e. = 0.020) and additionally found the effect of this genetic locus to be concentration specific with a strong impact on the perception of low, but no impact on the perception of high concentrations of quinine. Our study, thus, furthers our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of bitter taste perception. PMID:23966204

  15. GWAS of human bitter taste perception identifies new loci and reveals additional complexity of bitter taste genetics.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Mirko; Kutalik, Zoltán; Souza Destito, Maria C; Souza, Milena M; Cirillo, Cintia A; Zamboni, Amabilene; Martin, Nathalie; Morya, Edgard; Sameshima, Koichi; Beckmann, Jacques S; le Coutre, Johannes; Bergmann, Sven; Genick, Ulrich K

    2014-01-01

    Human perception of bitterness displays pronounced interindividual variation. This phenotypic variation is mirrored by equally pronounced genetic variation in the family of bitter taste receptor genes. To better understand the effects of common genetic variations on human bitter taste perception, we conducted a genome-wide association study on a discovery panel of 504 subjects and a validation panel of 104 subjects from the general population of São Paulo in Brazil. Correction for general taste-sensitivity allowed us to identify a SNP in the cluster of bitter taste receptors on chr12 (10.88- 11.24 Mb, build 36.1) significantly associated (best SNP: rs2708377, P = 5.31 × 10(-13), r(2) = 8.9%, β = -0.12, s.e. = 0.016) with the perceived bitterness of caffeine. This association overlaps with-but is statistically distinct from-the previously identified SNP rs10772420 influencing the perception of quinine bitterness that falls in the same bitter taste cluster. We replicated this association to quinine perception (P = 4.97 × 10(-37), r(2) = 23.2%, β = 0.25, s.e. = 0.020) and additionally found the effect of this genetic locus to be concentration specific with a strong impact on the perception of low, but no impact on the perception of high concentrations of quinine. Our study, thus, furthers our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of bitter taste perception.

  16. Isolation of an additional member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, FGFR-3.

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, K; Johnson, D E; Williams, L T; Hayman, M J

    1991-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factors are a family of polypeptide growth factors involved in a variety of activities including mitogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have previously been identified in chicken, mouse, and human and have been shown to contain an extracellular domain with either two or three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. We have isolated a human cDNA for another tyrosine kinase receptor that is highly homologous to the previously described FGFR. Expression of this receptor cDNA in COS cells directs the expression of a 125-kDa glycoprotein. We demonstrate that this cDNA encodes a biologically active receptor by showing that human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors activate this receptor as measured by 45Ca2+ efflux assays. These data establish the existence of an additional member of the FGFR family that we have named FGFR-3. Images PMID:1847508

  17. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n = 62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24, genome OO), by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments) and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent. PMID:27148282

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n = 62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24, genome OO), by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments) and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent. PMID:27148282

  19. Non-genetic risk factors and their influence on the management of patients in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Teresa; Soto, Immaculada; Astermark, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The development of inhibitors is the most serious iatrogenic complication affecting patients with haemophilia. This complication is associated with impaired vital or functional prognosis, reduced quality of life and increased cost of treatment. The reasons why some patients develop antibodies to factor replacement and others do not remain unclear. It is however clear that inhibitor development results from a complex multifactorial interaction between genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Environmental influences implicated in increasing the risk of inhibitor formation can be viewed as modifiable risk factors. Therefore, identification of the non-genetic risk factors may offer the possibility of personalising haemophilia therapy by modifying treatment strategies in high-risk patients in the critical early phase of factor VIII exposure. In this article, we review the non-genetic factors reported as well as the potential impact of danger signals and the different scores for inhibitor development risk stratification.

  20. Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

    2009-10-01

    Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented. PMID:19582477

  1. Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

    2009-10-01

    Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented.

  2. Addition of restriction fragment length polymorphism markers to the genetic linkage map of Brassica rapa L. (syn. campestris).

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Jogeswar; Patnaik, Anjana; Kole, Phullara; Koleb, Chitta ranjan

    2009-01-01

    Genetic linkage analysis of 151 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) loci, that included eight new loci, detected by the six probes in the present study, and four trait loci including seed colour, leaf pubescence, resistance to white rust caused by Albugo candida race-2 (AC-2) and race-7 (AC-7) employing the MAPMAKER/EXP 3.0 programme led to the development of 10 linkage groups (LGs) spanning over 44.4 centiMorgan (cM) to 130.4 cM containing 9 to 22 loci and two short LGs with two or three marker loci in Brassica rapa. The enriched map covers 993.1 cM of B. rapa genome with an average marker interval of 6.41. Eight new RFLP loci occupied new map positions on five linkage groups, LG 2, 3, 6, 8 and 9. Addition of these RFLP loci led to appreciable changes in the corresponding linkage groups and resulted in an increase of the total map length by 102.8 cM and of the marker interval by 0.35 cM. Interval mapping by using the computer programme MAPMAKER/ QTL 1.1 for scanning the genetic map led to the detection of one major quantitative trait locus (QTL) in LG 4 and one minor QTL in LG 8 governing resistance to AC-7. Both QTLs contributed 7.89 to the interaction phenotype (IP) score with 96.3% genetic variation. The multi-locus model suggested additive gene action with 96.8% genetic variation.

  3. The relative importance of factors determining genetic drift: mating system, spatial genetic structure, habitat and census size in Arabidopsis lyrata.

    PubMed

    Willi, Yvonne; Määttänen, Kirsti

    2011-03-01

    • The mating system, dispersal and census size are predicted to determine the magnitude of genetic drift, but little is known about their relative importance in nature. • We estimated the contributions of several population-level features to genetic drift in 18 populations of Arabidopsis lyrata. The factors were outcrossing rate, within-population spatial genetic structure, census size and substrate type. The expected heterozygosity (H(E)) at 10 microsatellite loci was taken to reflect the effective population size (N(e)) and the strength of genetic drift. • The mating system explained most of the variation in H(E) (60%), followed by substrate (10%), genetic structure (9%) and census size (6%). The most outcrossing population had a +0.32 higher predicted H(E) than the most selfing population; the estimated N(e) of selfing populations was less than half that of outcrossing populations. Rocky outcrops supported populations with a +0.14 higher H(E) than did sandy substrates. The most structured population had a +0.24 higher H(E) than the least structured population, and the largest population had a +0.18 higher H(E) than the smallest population. • This study illustrates the importance of outcrossing, genetic structure and the physical environment--together with census size--in maintaining H(E), and suggests that multiple population-level characteristics influence N(e) and the action of genetic drift.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha genetic predisposing factors can influence clinical severity in nephropathia epidemica.

    PubMed

    Maes, Piet; Clement, Jan; Groeneveld, Paul H P; Colson, Paul; Huizinga, Tom W J; Van Ranst, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Severe human infection with Hantavirus is characterized by high fever, cold chills, thrombocytopenia, arterial hypotension, acute renal failure, and/or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like pulmonary involvement, but the clinical course varies greatly between individuals. We investigated whether genetically determined differences in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production can influence the severity of Hantavirus disease. We studied a TNF-alpha single-nucleotide promoter polymorphism (SNP) at position -238 (a guanine [G]-to-adenine [A] transition) and ex vivo TNF-alpha production in a recall study of 36 Belgian patients who had a serologically proven form of Puumala virus-induced Hantavirus infection with the kidney as main target organ. In our study, the highest creatinine levels were found in patients with the lowest ex vivo TNF-alpha production. Creatinine levels correlated inversely with TNF-alpha production (R = -0.35, p < 0.05). The number of thrombocytes was significantly lower in patients with the GA-238 genotype (low TNF-alpha producers) compared with patients with the GG-238 genotype. In our study, genetically determined low production of TNF-alpha was associated with some parameters indicating a more severe clinical course of Puumala Hantavirus infection in humans, possibly by impaired activation of TNF-alpha-dependent antiviral mechanisms, which could in turn result in decreased clearance of Hantavirus. PMID:16987073

  5. Genetic prerequisites for additive or synergistic actions of 5-fluorocytosine and fluconazole in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Paluszynski, John P; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2008-10-01

    During applications of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) and fluconazole (FLC), additive or synergistic action may even occur when primary resistance to 5FC is established. Here, we analysed conjoint drug action in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in genes known to be essential for 5FC or FLC function. Despite clear primary resistance, residual 5FC activity and additive 5FC+FLC action in cells lacking cytosine permease (Fcy2p) or uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (Fur1p) were detected. In contrast, Deltafcy1 mutants, lacking cytosine deaminase, became entirely resistant to 5FC, concomitantly losing 5FC+FLC additivity. Disruption of the orotate phosphoribosyltransferase gene (URA5) in the wild-type led to low-level 5FC tolerance, while an alternative orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by URA10, contributed to 5FC toxicity only in the Deltaura5 background. Remarkably, combination of Deltaura5 and Deltafur1 resulted in complete 5FC resistance. Thus, yeast orotate phosphoribosyltransferases are involved in 5FC metabolism. Similarly, disruption of the ergosterol Delta(5,6)-desaturase-encoding gene ERG3 resulted only in partial resistance to FLC, and concomitantly a synergistic effect with 5FC became evident. Full resistance to FLC occurred in Deltaerg3 Deltaerg11 double mutants and, simultaneously, synergism or even an additive effect with FLC and 5FC was no longer discernible. Since the majority of spontaneously occurring resistant yeast clones displayed residual sensitivity to either 5FC or FLC and those strains responded to combined drug treatment in a predictable manner, careful resistance profiling based on the findings reported here may help to address yeast infections by combined application of antimycotic compounds.

  6. A systematic review of factors that act as barriers to patient referral to genetic services

    PubMed Central

    Delikurt, Türem; Williamson, Graham R; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Skirton, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Patients who might benefit from genetic services may be denied access through failure to be referred. To investigate the evidence on barriers to referral to genetic services, we conducted a systematic review of empirical evidence on this topic. Nine studies were included in the review. Barriers related to non-genetic healthcare professionals were: lack of awareness of patient risk factors, failure to obtain adequate family history, lack of knowledge of genetics and genetic conditions, lack of awareness of genetic services, inadequate coordination of referral and lack of genetics workforce. Those related to individuals affected by or at risk of a genetic condition were: lack of awareness of personal risk, lack of knowledge and/or awareness of medical history of family members and lack of knowledge of genetic services. Research on access to genetic services is heterogeneous; stronger empirical evidence is needed on factors that are barriers, and further research is needed to develop ‘targeted interventions' for equitable access to genetic services in a range of populations. PMID:25205405

  7. A twin and molecular genetics study of sleep paralysis and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Denis, Dan; French, Christopher C; Rowe, Richard; Zavos, Helena M S; Nolan, Patrick M; Parsons, Michael J; Gregory, Alice M

    2015-08-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively common but under-researched phenomenon. In this paper we examine prevalence in a UK sample and associations with candidate risk factors. This is the first study to investigate the heritability of sleep paralysis in a twin sample and to explore genetic associations between sleep paralysis and a number of circadian expressed single nucleotide polymorphisms. Analyses are based on data from the Genesis1219 twin/sibling study, a community sample of twins/siblings from England and Wales. In total, data from 862 participants aged 22-32 years (34% male) were used in the study. This sample consisted of monozygotic and dizygotic twins and siblings. It was found that self-reports of general sleep quality, anxiety symptoms and exposure to threatening events were all associated independently with sleep paralysis. There was moderate genetic influence on sleep paralysis (53%). Polymorphisms in the PER2 gene were associated with sleep paralysis in additive and dominant models of inheritance-although significance was not reached once a Bonferroni correction was applied. It is concluded that factors associated with disrupted sleep cycles appear to be associated with sleep paralysis. In this sample of young adults, sleep paralysis was moderately heritable. Future work should examine specific polymorphisms associated with differences in circadian rhythms and sleep homeostasis further in association with sleep paralysis.

  8. Influence of genetic factors on the ephedrine alkaloid composition ratio of Ephedra plants.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masashi; Hirayama, Manabu; Ohtomi, Norihiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Nomura, Yukihiro; Iida, Osamu; Sugimura, Koji; Kawahara, Nobuo; Tsuchida, Takashi; Mikage, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ephedrine alkaloid [(-)-ephedrine and (+)-pseudoephedrine] composition ratio of a crude Chinese herbal drug described in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia 'Ephedra herb (Chinese name: Mahuang)'. There were marked changes in the alkaloid composition ratio of wild plants in areas where both male and female clusters coexisted. However, in genetically homogeneous areas with the growth of male or female clusters alone, all of the coefficients of the regression lines were positive, but each gradient varied. This suggests that the alkaloid composition ratio has a clear tendency in each individual. Based on this, we cultivated individuals for vegetative propagation, and evaluated the alkaloid content ratio. Those propagated by separating the roots showed a specific tendency regardless of the cultivation area (Wakayama, Tanegashima). Those propagated by separating the herbaceous stem showed a specific tendency regardless of the soil or harvest time. In addition, we surveyed the (-)-ephedrine content ratio of 3- to 6-year-old strains. There was a high positive correlation coefficient between the previous and subsequent years. These findings suggest that the ephedrine alkaloid composition ratio of Ephedra herb depends on genetic factors, but not on environmental factors or the growth period.

  9. A twin and molecular genetics study of sleep paralysis and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Denis, Dan; French, Christopher C; Rowe, Richard; Zavos, Helena M S; Nolan, Patrick M; Parsons, Michael J; Gregory, Alice M

    2015-08-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively common but under-researched phenomenon. In this paper we examine prevalence in a UK sample and associations with candidate risk factors. This is the first study to investigate the heritability of sleep paralysis in a twin sample and to explore genetic associations between sleep paralysis and a number of circadian expressed single nucleotide polymorphisms. Analyses are based on data from the Genesis1219 twin/sibling study, a community sample of twins/siblings from England and Wales. In total, data from 862 participants aged 22-32 years (34% male) were used in the study. This sample consisted of monozygotic and dizygotic twins and siblings. It was found that self-reports of general sleep quality, anxiety symptoms and exposure to threatening events were all associated independently with sleep paralysis. There was moderate genetic influence on sleep paralysis (53%). Polymorphisms in the PER2 gene were associated with sleep paralysis in additive and dominant models of inheritance-although significance was not reached once a Bonferroni correction was applied. It is concluded that factors associated with disrupted sleep cycles appear to be associated with sleep paralysis. In this sample of young adults, sleep paralysis was moderately heritable. Future work should examine specific polymorphisms associated with differences in circadian rhythms and sleep homeostasis further in association with sleep paralysis. PMID:25659590

  10. Plant Oils and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: The Role of Genetics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caren E

    2012-09-01

    More than 25 years have passed since Ancel Keys and others observed that high intake of monounsaturated fatty acids, especially as supplied by plants (eg, olive oil) was associated with lower cardiovascular and overall mortality. About 15 years later, advances in genotyping technologies began to facilitate widespread study of relationships between dietary fats and genetic variants, illuminating the role of genetic variation in modulating human responses to fatty acids. More recently, microarray technologies evaluate the ways in which minor, bioactive compounds in plant oils (including olive, thyme, lemongrass, clove, eucalyptus, and others) alter gene expression to mediate anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Results from a range of diverse technologies and approaches are coalescing to improve understanding of the role of the genome in shaping our responses to plant oils, and to clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective benefits we derive from a wide range of plant oil constituents. PMID:23001455

  11. Pathogenesis of malignant pleural mesothelioma and the role of environmental and genetic factors

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Shoshana J; Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek

    2008-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive tumor for which no effective therapy exists despite the discovery of many possible molecular and genetic targets. Many risk factors for MPM development have been recognized including environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, viral contamination, and radiation. However, the late stage of MPM diagnosis and the long latency that exists between some exposures and diagnosis have made it difficult to comprehensively evaluate the role of risk factors and their downstream molecular effects. In this review, we discuss the current molecular and genetic contributors in MPM pathogenesis and the risk factors associated with these carcinogenic processes. PMID:18662397

  12. Genetic Syndromes, Maternal Diseases and Antenatal Factors Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Ornoy, Asher; Weinstein- Fudim, Liza; Ergaz, Zivanit

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting about 1% of all children is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal etiologies. In addition, ASD is often an important clinical presentation of some well-known genetic syndromes in human. We discuss these syndromes as well as the role of the more important prenatal factors affecting the fetus throughout pregnancy which may also be associated with ASD. Among the genetic disorders we find Fragile X, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Timothy syndrome, Phelan–McDermid syndrome, Hamartoma tumor syndrome, Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, and a few others. Among the maternal diseases in pregnancy associated with ASD are diabetes mellitus (PGDM and/or GDM), some maternal autoimmune diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) with anti-β2GP1 IgG antibodies and thyroid disease with anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, preeclampsia and some other autoimmune diseases with IgG antibodies that might affect fetal brain development. Other related factors are maternal infections (rubella and CMV with fetal brain injuries, and possibly Influenza with fever), prolonged fever and maternal inflammation, especially with changes in a variety of inflammatory cytokines and antibodies that cross the placenta and affect the fetal brain. Among the drugs are valproic acid, thalidomide, misoprostol, and possibly SSRIs. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and paracetamol have also lately been associated with increased rate of ASD but the data is too preliminary and inconclusive. Associations were also described with ethanol, cocaine, and possibly heavy metals, heavy smoking, and folic acid deficiency. Recent studies show that heavy exposure to pesticides and air pollution, especially particulate matter < 2.5 and 10 μm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10) during pregnancy is also associated with ASD. Finally, we have to remember that many of the associations mentioned in this review are

  13. Genetic Syndromes, Maternal Diseases and Antenatal Factors Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Ornoy, Asher; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ergaz, Zivanit

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting about 1% of all children is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal etiologies. In addition, ASD is often an important clinical presentation of some well-known genetic syndromes in human. We discuss these syndromes as well as the role of the more important prenatal factors affecting the fetus throughout pregnancy which may also be associated with ASD. Among the genetic disorders we find Fragile X, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Timothy syndrome, Phelan-McDermid syndrome, Hamartoma tumor syndrome, Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, and a few others. Among the maternal diseases in pregnancy associated with ASD are diabetes mellitus (PGDM and/or GDM), some maternal autoimmune diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) with anti-β2GP1 IgG antibodies and thyroid disease with anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, preeclampsia and some other autoimmune diseases with IgG antibodies that might affect fetal brain development. Other related factors are maternal infections (rubella and CMV with fetal brain injuries, and possibly Influenza with fever), prolonged fever and maternal inflammation, especially with changes in a variety of inflammatory cytokines and antibodies that cross the placenta and affect the fetal brain. Among the drugs are valproic acid, thalidomide, misoprostol, and possibly SSRIs. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and paracetamol have also lately been associated with increased rate of ASD but the data is too preliminary and inconclusive. Associations were also described with ethanol, cocaine, and possibly heavy metals, heavy smoking, and folic acid deficiency. Recent studies show that heavy exposure to pesticides and air pollution, especially particulate matter < 2.5 and 10 μm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10) during pregnancy is also associated with ASD. Finally, we have to remember that many of the associations mentioned in this review are

  14. Genetic Syndromes, Maternal Diseases and Antenatal Factors Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Ornoy, Asher; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ergaz, Zivanit

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting about 1% of all children is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal etiologies. In addition, ASD is often an important clinical presentation of some well-known genetic syndromes in human. We discuss these syndromes as well as the role of the more important prenatal factors affecting the fetus throughout pregnancy which may also be associated with ASD. Among the genetic disorders we find Fragile X, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Timothy syndrome, Phelan-McDermid syndrome, Hamartoma tumor syndrome, Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, and a few others. Among the maternal diseases in pregnancy associated with ASD are diabetes mellitus (PGDM and/or GDM), some maternal autoimmune diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) with anti-β2GP1 IgG antibodies and thyroid disease with anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, preeclampsia and some other autoimmune diseases with IgG antibodies that might affect fetal brain development. Other related factors are maternal infections (rubella and CMV with fetal brain injuries, and possibly Influenza with fever), prolonged fever and maternal inflammation, especially with changes in a variety of inflammatory cytokines and antibodies that cross the placenta and affect the fetal brain. Among the drugs are valproic acid, thalidomide, misoprostol, and possibly SSRIs. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and paracetamol have also lately been associated with increased rate of ASD but the data is too preliminary and inconclusive. Associations were also described with ethanol, cocaine, and possibly heavy metals, heavy smoking, and folic acid deficiency. Recent studies show that heavy exposure to pesticides and air pollution, especially particulate matter < 2.5 and 10 μm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10) during pregnancy is also associated with ASD. Finally, we have to remember that many of the associations mentioned in this review are

  15. The structure of genetic and environmental risk factors for fears and phobias

    PubMed Central

    Loken, E. K.; Hettema, J.M.; Aggen, S.H.; Kendler, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although prior genetic studies of interview-assessed fears and phobias have shown that genetic factors predispose individuals to fears and phobias, they have been restricted to the DSM-III to DSM-IV aggregated subtypes of phobias rather than to individual fearful and phobic stimuli. Method We examined the lifetime history of fears and/or phobias in response to 21 individual phobic stimuli in 4067 personally interviewed twins from same-sex pairs from the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Disorders (VATSPSUD). We performed multivariate statistical analyses using Mx and Mplus. Results The best-fitting model for the 21 phobic stimuli included four genetic factors (agora-social-acrophobia, animal phobia, blood-injection-illness phobia and claustrophobia) and three environmental factors (agora-social-hospital phobia, animal phobia, and situational phobia). Conclusions This study provides the first view of the architecture of genetic and environmental risk factors for phobic disorders and their subtypes. The genetic factors of the phobias support the DSM-IV and DSM-5 constructs of animal and blood-injection-injury phobias but do not support the separation of agoraphobia from social phobia. The results also do not show a coherent genetic factor for the DSM-IV and DSM-5 situational phobia. Finally, the patterns of co-morbidity across individual fears and phobias produced by genetic and environmental influences differ appreciably. PMID:24384457

  16. Environmental factors influence both abundance and genetic diversity in a widespread bird species

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Webber, Simone; Bowgen, Katharine; Schmaltz, Lucie; Bradley, Katharine; Halvarsson, Peter; Abdelgadir, Mohanad; Griesser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity is one of the key evolutionary variables that correlate with population size, being of critical importance for population viability and the persistence of species. Genetic diversity can also have important ecological consequences within populations, and in turn, ecological factors may drive patterns of genetic diversity. However, the relationship between the genetic diversity of a population and how this interacts with ecological processes has so far only been investigated in a few studies. Here, we investigate the link between ecological factors, local population size, and allelic diversity, using a field study of a common bird species, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). We studied sparrows outside the breeding season in a confined small valley dominated by dispersed farms and small-scale agriculture in southern France. Population surveys at 36 locations revealed that sparrows were more abundant in locations with high food availability. We then captured and genotyped 891 house sparrows at 10 microsatellite loci from a subset of these locations (N = 12). Population genetic analyses revealed weak genetic structure, where each locality represented a distinct substructure within the study area. We found that food availability was the main factor among others tested to influence the genetic structure between locations. These results suggest that ecological factors can have strong impacts on both population size per se and intrapopulation genetic variation even at a small scale. On a more general level, our data indicate that a patchy environment and low dispersal rate can result in fine-scale patterns of genetic diversity. Given the importance of genetic diversity for population viability, combining ecological and genetic data can help to identify factors limiting population size and determine the conservation potential of populations. PMID:24363897

  17. Environmental factors influence both abundance and genetic diversity in a widespread bird species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Webber, Simone; Bowgen, Katharine; Schmaltz, Lucie; Bradley, Katharine; Halvarsson, Peter; Abdelgadir, Mohanad; Griesser, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Genetic diversity is one of the key evolutionary variables that correlate with population size, being of critical importance for population viability and the persistence of species. Genetic diversity can also have important ecological consequences within populations, and in turn, ecological factors may drive patterns of genetic diversity. However, the relationship between the genetic diversity of a population and how this interacts with ecological processes has so far only been investigated in a few studies. Here, we investigate the link between ecological factors, local population size, and allelic diversity, using a field study of a common bird species, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). We studied sparrows outside the breeding season in a confined small valley dominated by dispersed farms and small-scale agriculture in southern France. Population surveys at 36 locations revealed that sparrows were more abundant in locations with high food availability. We then captured and genotyped 891 house sparrows at 10 microsatellite loci from a subset of these locations (N = 12). Population genetic analyses revealed weak genetic structure, where each locality represented a distinct substructure within the study area. We found that food availability was the main factor among others tested to influence the genetic structure between locations. These results suggest that ecological factors can have strong impacts on both population size per se and intrapopulation genetic variation even at a small scale. On a more general level, our data indicate that a patchy environment and low dispersal rate can result in fine-scale patterns of genetic diversity. Given the importance of genetic diversity for population viability, combining ecological and genetic data can help to identify factors limiting population size and determine the conservation potential of populations.

  18. Identifying host genetic risk factors in the context of public health surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Lingappa, Jairam R; Dumitrescu, Logan; Zimmer, Shanta M; Lynfield, Ruth; McNicholl, Janet M; Messonnier, Nancy E; Whitney, Cynthia G; Crawford, Dana C

    2011-01-01

    Host genetic factors that modify risk of pneumococcal disease may help target future public health interventions to individuals at highest risk of disease. We linked data from population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with state-based newborn dried bloodspot repositories to identify biological samples from individuals who developed invasive pneumococcal disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from 366 case and 732 anonymous control samples. TagSNPs were selected in 34 candidate genes thought to be associated with host response to invasive pneumococcal disease, and a total of 326 variants were successfully genotyped. Among 543 European Americans (EA) (182 cases and 361 controls), and 166 African Americans (AA) (53 cases and 113 controls), common variants in surfactant protein D (SFTPD) are consistently underrepresented in IPD. SFTPD variants with the strongest association for IPD are intronic rs17886286 (allelic OR 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.25, 0.82], with p = 0.007) in EA and 5' flanking rs12219080 (allelic OR 0.32, 95%CI [0.13, 0.78], with p = 0.009) in AA. Variants in CD46 and IL1R1 are also associated with IPD in both EA and AA, but with effects in different directions; FAS, IL1B, IL4, IL10, IL12B, SFTPA1, SFTPB, and PTAFR variants are associated (p≤0.05) with IPD in EA or AA. We conclude that variants in SFTPD may protect against IPD in EA and AA and genetic variation in other host response pathways may also contribute to risk of IPD. While our associations are not corrected for multiple comparisons and therefore must be replicated in additional cohorts, this pilot study underscores the feasibility of integrating public health surveillance with existing, prospectively collected, newborn dried blood spot repositories to identify host genetic factors associated with infectious diseases.

  19. Broad bandwidth or high fidelity? Evidence from the structure of genetic and environmental effects on the facets of the five factor model.

    PubMed

    Briley, Daniel A; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2012-09-01

    The Five Factor Model of personality is well-established at the phenotypic level, but much less is known about the coherence of the genetic and environmental influences within each personality domain. Univariate behavioral genetic analyses have consistently found the influence of additive genes and nonshared environment on multiple personality facets, but the extent to which genetic and environmental influences on specific facets reflect more general influences on higher order factors is less clear. We applied a multivariate quantitative-genetic approach to scores on the CPI-Big Five facets for 490 monozygotic and 317 dizygotic twins who took part in the National Merit Twin Study. Our results revealed a complex genetic structure for facets composing all five factors, with both domain-general and facet-specific genetic and environmental influences. For three of the Big Five domains, models that required common genetic and environmental influences on each facet to occur by way of effects on a higher order trait did not fit as well as models allowing for common genetic and environmental effects to act directly on the facets. These results add to the growing body of literature indicating that important variation in personality occurs at the facet level which may be overshadowed by aggregating to the trait level. Research at the facet level, rather than the factor level, is likely to have pragmatic advantages in future research on the genetics of personality.

  20. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  1. The Contribution of Epigenetics to Understanding Genetic Factors in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Layla; Kelley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a grouping of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social communication and language, as well as by repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. While the environment is believed to play a role in the development of autism spectrum disorder, there is now strong evidence for a genetic link to autism.…

  2. Surprises From Genetic Analyses of Lipid Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Musunuru, Kiran; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-02-19

    Observational epidemiological studies have associated plasma lipid concentrations with risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), but these studies cannot distinguish cause from mere correlation. Human genetic studies, when considered with the results of randomized controlled trials of medications, can potentially shed light on whether lipid biomarkers are causal for diseases. Genetic analyses and randomized trials suggest that low-density lipoprotein is causal for CHD, whereas high-density lipoprotein is not. Surprisingly, human genetic evidence suggests that lipoprotein(a) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally contribute to CHD. Gene variants leading to higher levels of plasma apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins [low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, or lipoprotein(a)] consistently increase risk for CHD. For triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, the most compelling evidence revolves around lipoprotein lipase and its endogenous facilitator (APOA5 [apolipoprotein A-V]) and inhibitory proteins (APOC3 [apolipoprotein C-III], ANGPTL4 [angiopoietin like 4]). Combined, these genetic results anticipate that, beyond low-density lipoprotein, pharmacological lowering of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins or lipoprotein(a) will reduce risk for CHD, but this remains to be proven through randomized controlled trials.

  3. Identification of new genetic risk factors for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Guy, Michelle; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Jugurnauth, Sarah K; Mulholland, Shani; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Edwards, Stephen M; Morrison, Jonathan; Field, Helen I; Southey, Melissa C; Severi, Gianluca; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Dearnaley, David P; Muir, Kenneth R; Smith, Charmaine; Bagnato, Melisa; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Gehr-Swain, Beatrice N; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Cox, Angela; Lewis, Sarah; Brown, Paul M; Jhavar, Sameer G; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Bryant, Sarah L; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Fisher, Cyril; Jameson, Charles; Cooper, Colin S; English, Dallas R; Hopper, John L; Neal, David E; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that a substantial part of genetic predisposition to prostate cancer (PCa) may be due to lower penetrance genes which are found by genome-wide association studies. We have recently conducted such a study and seven new regions of the genome linked to PCa risk have been identified. Three of these loci contain candidate susceptibility genes: MSMB, LMTK2 and KLK2/3. The MSMB and KLK2/3 genes may be useful for PCa screening, and the LMTK2 gene might provide a potential therapeutic target. Together with results from other groups, there are now 23 germline genetic variants which have been reported. These results have the potential to be developed into a genetic test. However, we consider that marketing of tests to the public is premature, as PCa risk can not be evaluated fully at this stage and the appropriate screening protocols need to be developed. Follow-up validation studies, as well as studies to explore the psychological implications of genetic profile testing, will be vital prior to roll out into healthcare.

  4. Common Genetic and Nonshared Environmental Factors Contribute to the Association between Socioemotional Dispositions and the Externalizing Factor in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jeanette; Allan, Nicholas; Mikolajewski, Amy J.; Hart, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Childhood behavioral disorders including conduct disorder (CD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often co-occur. Prior twin research shows that common sets of genetic and environmental factors are associated with these various disorders and they form a latent factor called…

  5. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-20

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects.

  6. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  7. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  8. Additive genetic and heterosis effects in crosses among cattle breeds of British, European and Zebu origin.

    PubMed

    Peacock, F M; Koger, M; Olson, T A; Crockett, J R

    1981-05-01

    Breed and heterosis effects for maternal and calf components for weaning traits were measured in the progeny of Angus (A), Brahman (B) and Charolais (C) sires mated to A, B, C and reciprocal AB, AC and BC dams. Additive breed effects for the calf component for weaning weight were -3.0 +/- 3.2, -26.6 +/- 3.1 and 29.6 +/- 3.3 kg for A, B and C, respectively. Corresponding maternal breed effects were -1.7 +/- 2.4, 7.8 +/- 2.3 and -6.1 +/- 2.6 kilograms. Heterosis effects on weaning weight for the calf component were 21.2 +/- 3.6 for AB, 1.4 +/- 3.7 for AC and 16.5 +/- 3.4 for BC crosses, while heterosis levels for the maternal component were 28.9 +/- 2.7 for AB, 16.5 +/- 3.2 for AC and 18.7 +/- 2.9 kg for BC dams. The corresponding estimates for condition scores tended to parallel those for weaning weight. Approximate relative production efficiency rates were computed for the different mating groups as (calf weight divided by cow weight) x weaning rate. These values were .34 for purebred matings, .36 for purebred dams raising F1 calves, .40 for F1 cows raising backcross calves and .43 for F1 dams raising three breed crossbred calves.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  10. Biological detoxification of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol and its use in genetically engineered crops and feed additives.

    PubMed

    Karlovsky, Petr

    2011-08-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the major mycotoxin produced by Fusarium fungi in grains. Food and feed contaminated with DON pose a health risk to humans and livestock. The risk can be reduced by enzymatic detoxification. Complete mineralization of DON by microbial cultures has rarely been observed and the activities turned out to be unstable. The detoxification of DON by reactions targeting its epoxide group or hydroxyl on carbon 3 is more feasible. Microbial strains that de-epoxidize DON under anaerobic conditions have been isolated from animal digestive system. Feed additives claimed to de-epoxidize trichothecenes enzymatically are on the market but their efficacy has been disputed. A new detoxification pathway leading to 3-oxo-DON and 3-epi-DON was discovered in taxonomically unrelated soil bacteria from three continents; the enzymes involved remain to be identified. Arabidopsis, tobacco, wheat, barley, and rice were engineered to acetylate DON on carbon 3. In wheat expressing DON acetylation activity, the increase in resistance against Fusarium head blight was only moderate. The Tri101 gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides was used; Fusarium graminearum enzyme which possesses higher activity towards DON would presumably be a better choice. Glycosylation of trichothecenes occurs in plants, contributing to the resistance of wheat to F. graminearum infection. Marker-assisted selection based on the trichothecene-3-O-glucosyltransferase gene can be used in breeding for resistance. Fungal acetyltransferases and plant glucosyltransferases targeting carbon 3 of trichothecenes remain promising candidates for engineering resistance against Fusarium head blight. Bacterial enzymes catalyzing oxidation, epimerization, and less likely de-epoxidation of DON may extend this list in future.

  11. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  12. Genetic factors affecting patient responses to pancreatic cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fotopoulos, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is a malignancy with a high lethal rate. Surgical resection is the only possible curative mode of treatment. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is incurable with modest results from the current treatment options. New genomic information could prove treatment efficacy. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed up to March 2016, using combinations of terms such pancreatic exocrine cancer, chemotherapy, genomic profile, pancreatic cancer pharmacogenomics, genomics, molecular pancreatic pathogenesis, and targeted therapy. Recent genetic studies have identified new markers and therapeutic targets. Our current knowledge of pancreatic cancer genetics must be further advanced to elucidate the molecular basis and pathogenesis of the disease, improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and guide tailor-made therapies. PMID:27708512

  13. Genetic risk factors and Mendelian randomization in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Hingorani, Aroon D; Humphries, Steve E

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease encompasses several diverse pathological states that place a heavy burden on individual and population health. The aetiological basis of many cardiovascular disorders is not fully understood. Growing knowledge of the genetic architecture underlying coronary heart disease, stroke, cardiac arrhythmias and peripheral vascular disease has confirmed some suspected causal pathways in these conditions but also uncovered many previously unknown mechanisms. Here, we consider the contribution of genetics to the understanding of cardiovascular disease risk. We evaluate the utility and relevance of findings from genome-wide association studies and explore the role that Mendelian randomisation has to play in exploiting these. Mendelian randomisation permits robust causal inference in an area of research where this has been hampered by bias and confounding in observational studies. In doing so, it provides evidence for causal processes in cardiovascular disease that could represent novel targets for much-needed new drugs for disease prevention and treatment. PMID:25894797

  14. Nephrolithiasis and Nephrocalcinosis in Children - Metabolic and Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Velibor; Gucev, Zoran

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of pediatric nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis is a very complex and challenging task for every pediatrician. It is based on correct. disease history taking, which may guide to the mode of inheritance (dominant, recessive, x-linked). Ethnicity and consanguinity should also be investigated since they predispose to high prevalence of certain disorders. One should always begin with cheap and available screening tests. Herein we will review clinical, biochemical, metabolic and genetic characteristics of the inherited diseases which lead to nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis, such as: idiopathic hypercalciuria, renal hypophosphatemia, renal tubular acidosis, idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, hypocitraturia, cystinuria, primary hyperoxaluria and renal hypouricemia. Modern genetic techniques such as next generation sequencing enable nowadays diagnosis of rare disease using only a blood sample, trough massive parallel resequencing of many genes. This is very helpful for anuric patients or on dialysis where blood and urine biochemistry are not informative. Genetic testing also replaces invasive liver biopsy or unpleasant acidification tests and enables prenatal or early postnatal diagnosis. PMID:26540764

  15. VAV1 and BAFF, via NFκB pathway, are genetic risk factors for myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Nili; Le Panse, Rozen; Harbo, Hanne F; Bernasconi, Pia; Poulas, Konstantinos; Ginzburg, Elizabeta; Cavalcante, Paola; Colleoni, Lara; Baggi, Fulvio; Antozzi, Carlo; Truffault, Frédérique; Horn-Saban, Shirley; Pöschel, Simone; Zagoriti, Zoi; Maniaol, Angelina; Lie, Benedicte A; Bernard, Isabelle; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Illes, Zsolt; Casasnovas Pons, Carlos; Melms, Arthur; Tzartos, Socrates; Willcox, Nicholas; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Tallaksen, Chantal; Mantegazza, Renato; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Miller, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify novel genetic loci that predispose to early-onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG) applying a two-stage association study, exploration, and replication strategy. Methods Thirty-four loci and one confirmation loci, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRA, were selected as candidate genes by team members of groups involved in different research aspects of MG. In the exploration step, these candidate genes were genotyped in 384 EOMG and 384 matched controls and significant difference in allele frequency were found in eight genes. In the replication step, eight candidate genes and one confirmation loci were genotyped in 1177 EOMG patients and 814 controls, from nine European centres. Results Allele frequency differences were found in four novel loci: CD86, AKAP12, VAV1, B-cell activating factor (BAFF), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and these differences were consistent in all nine cohorts. Haplotype trend test supported the differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls. In addition, allele frequency difference in female versus male patients at HLA-DRA and TNF-α loci were observed. Interpretation The genetic associations to EOMG outside the HLA complex are novel and of interest as VAV1 is a key signal transducer essential for T- and B-cell activation, and BAFF is a cytokine that plays important roles in the proliferation and differentiation of B-cells. Moreover, we noted striking epistasis between the predisposing VAV1 and BAFF haplotypes; they conferred a greater risk in combination than alone. These, and CD86, share the same signaling pathway, namely nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB), thus implicating dysregulation of proinflammatory signaling in predisposition to EOMG. PMID:25356403

  16. Genetic and Environmental Factors in Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    PubMed

    Momi, Sukhleen K; Wolber, Lisa E; Fabiane, Stella Maris; MacGregor, Alex J; Williams, Frances M K

    2015-08-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is a common condition with complex etiology but a recognized genetic component. Heritability estimates for pure tone audiogram-determined hearing ability lie in the range 26-75%. The speech-in-noise (SIN) auditory test, however, may be better at encapsulating ARHI symptoms, particularly the diminished ability to segregate environmental sounds into comprehendible auditory streams. As heritability of SIN has not previously been reported, we explored the genetic and environmental contributions to ARHI determined by SIN in 2,076 twins (87.8% female) aged 18-87 (mean age 54.4). SIN was found to be significantly heritable (A, unadjusted for age=40%; 95% confidence intervals, CI=32%-47%). With age adjustment, heritability fell (A=25%; 95% CI=16-33%), and a relatively strong influence of environmental exposure unshared within twin siblings was identified (E=75%). To explore the environmental aspects further, we assessed the influence of diet (through the Food Frequency Questionnaire, FFQ), smoking (through self-report and cotinine metabolite levels) and alcohol intake (through the FFQ). A negative influence of high cholesterol diet was observed after adjustment (p=.037). A protective effect of raised serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels was observed after adjustment (p=.004). This study is the first assessment of the genetic and environmental influence on SIN perception. The findings suggest SIN is less heritable than pure tone audiogram (PTA) ability and highly influenced by the environment unique to each twin. Furthermore, a possible role of dietary fat in the etiology of ARHI is highlighted.

  17. Association of genetic and non-genetic risk factors with the development of prostate cancer in Malaysian men.

    PubMed

    Munretnam, Khamsigan; Alex, Livy; Ramzi, Nurul Hanis; Chahil, Jagdish Kaur; Kavitha, I S; Hashim, Nikman Adli Nor; Lye, Say Hean; Velapasamy, Sharmila; Ler, Lian Wee

    2014-01-01

    There is growing global interest to stratify men into different levels of risk to developing prostate cancer, thus it is important to identify common genetic variants that confer the risk. Although many studies have identified more than a dozen common genetic variants which are highly associated with prostate cancer, none have been done in Malaysian population. To determine the association of such variants in Malaysian men with prostate cancer, we evaluated a panel of 768 SNPs found previously associated with various cancers which also included the prostate specific SNPs in a population based case control study (51 case subjects with prostate cancer and 51 control subjects) in Malaysian men of Malay, Chinese and Indian ethnicity. We identified 21 SNPs significantly associated with prostate cancer. Among these, 12 SNPs were strongly associated with increased risk of prostate cancer while remaining nine SNPs were associated with reduced risk. However, data analysis based on ethnic stratification led to only five SNPs in Malays and 3 SNPs in Chinese which remained significant. This could be due to small sample size in each ethnic group. Significant non-genetic risk factors were also identified for their association with prostate cancer. Our study is the first to investigate the involvement of multiple variants towards susceptibility for PC in Malaysian men using genotyping approach. Identified SNPs and non-genetic risk factors have a significant association with prostate cancer.

  18. Possible modification of Alzheimer's disease by statins in midlife: interactions with genetic and non-genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Mitsuru; Sato, Naoyuki; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of statins, commonly prescribed for hypercholesterolemia, in treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not yet been fully established. A recent randomized clinical trial did not show any therapeutic effects of two statins on cognitive function in AD. Interestingly, however, the results of the Rotterdam study, one of the largest prospective cohort studies, showed reduced risk of AD in statin users. Based on the current understanding of statin actions and AD pathogenesis, it is still worth exploring whether statins can prevent AD when administered decades before the onset of AD or from midlife. This review discusses the possible beneficial effects of statins, drawn from previous clinical observations, pathogenic mechanisms, which include β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau metabolism, genetic and non-genetic risk factors (apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, sex, hypertension, and diabetes), and other clinical features (vascular dysfunction and oxidative and inflammatory stress) of AD. These findings suggest that administration of statins in midlife might prevent AD in late life by modifying genetic and non-genetic risk factors for AD. It should be clarified whether statins inhibit Aβ accumulation, tau pathological features, and brain atrophy in humans. To answer this question, a randomized controlled study using amyloid positron emission tomography (PET), tau-PET, and magnetic resonance imaging would be useful. This clinical evaluation could help us to overcome this devastating disease.

  19. Clinical genetic testing for male factor infertility: current applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, J; Carrell, D T

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis involves the aggregated action of up to 2300 genes, any of which, could, potentially, provide targets for diagnostic tests of male factor infertility. Contrary to the previously proposed common variant hypothesis for common diseases such as male infertility, genome-wide association studies and targeted gene sequencing in cohorts of infertile men have identified only a few gene polymorphisms that are associated with male infertility. Unfortunately, the search for genetic variants associated with male infertility is further hampered by the lack of viable animal models of human spermatogenesis, difficulty in robustly phenotyping infertile men and the complexity of pedigree studies in male factor infertility. In this review, we describe basic genetic principles involved in understanding the genetic basis of male infertility and examine the utility and proper clinical use of the proven genetic assays of male factor infertility, specifically Y chromosome microdeletions, chromosomal translocations, karyotype, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutation analysis and sperm genetic tests. Unfortunately, these tests are only able to diagnose the cause of about 20% of male factor infertility. The remainder of the review will be devoted to examining novel tests and diagnostic tools that have the potential to explain the other 80% of male factor infertility that is currently classified as idiopathic. Those tests include epigenetic analysis of the spermatozoa and the evaluation of rare genetic variants and copy number variations in patients. Success in advancing to the implementation of such areas is not only dependent on technological advances in the laboratory, but also improved phenotyping in the clinic.

  20. Dissection of genetic factors associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Claire S; Kaneb, Hannah M; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal late onset neurological disorder characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the primary motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. The majority of cases are sporadic (SALS) and only 5-10% have a family history (FALS). FALS cases show a high heritability and this has enabled the identification of several genetic triggers, of which mutations in SOD1, FUS, TARDBP and C9ORF72 are the most frequent. While such advances have contributed to our current understanding of the causes of most cases of FALS and their underlying pathophysiological consequences, they only explain a small fraction of SALS with the etiology of most SALS cases remaining unexplained. Here, we review past and current methods used for the identification of FALS and SALS associated genes and propose a risk-based classification for these. We also discuss how the growing number of whole exome/genome sequencing datasets prepared from SALS cases, and control individuals, may reveal novel insights into the genetic etiology of SALS; for instance through revealing increased mutation burden rates across genes or genomic regions that were not previously associated with ALS or through allowing the examination of a potential "oligogenic" mechanism of the disease. Finally we summarize the three most recently discovered 'high risk' genes in ALS.

  1. Contribution of genetic factors to neonatal transient hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Niu, D; Lin, C; Hwang, B; Jap, T; Liao, C; Wu, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: The causes of neonatal transient hypothyroidism (NTH) remain incompletely understood. Whether it is influenced by genetic background is rarely discussed and remains unproven. A defect in thyroid peroxidase is a common cause of dyshormonogenesis of the thyroid gland in Taiwanese, with a novel mutation (2268insT) present in nearly 90% of alleles studied. Objective: To determine if the presence of this common mutation is associated with NTH in Taiwan. Methods: A mismatched primer was designed and used for this specific 2268insT mutation to screen 1000 normal babies and 260 babies with confirmed NTH. Results: The carrier rate for 2268insT in normal babies (1/200) was significantly lower than in babies with NTH (1/13; p<0.0001). Conclusions: The results strongly suggest that the presence of this thyroid peroxidase mutation contributes to the development of NTH. Likely pathogenetic explanations include the effect of the stress of extrauterine adaptation during labour on an immature pituitary-thyroid axis in genetically predisposed individuals, combined with environmental triggers such as iodine deficiency, perinatal iodine exposure, and/or goitrogen contamination. PMID:15613581

  2. Evolution of the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E; Carter, Patrick A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-11-22

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix ( G: ). Yet knowledge of G: in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G: itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G: when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G: induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G: induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G: and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change.

  3. Evolution of the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E; Carter, Patrick A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-11-22

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix ( G: ). Yet knowledge of G: in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G: itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G: when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G: induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G: induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G: and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change. PMID:26582016

  4. Genome-wide linkage analysis of multiple metabolic factors: evidence of genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Lee, Kristine E; Duggal, Priya; Moore, Emily L; Wilson, Alexander F; Klein, Ronald; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Klein, Barbara E K

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a highly complex disease and has become one of the major public-health challenges worldwide. We sought to identify genetic loci with potential influence on multiple metabolic factors in a white population in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and to explore the possibility of genetic heterogeneity by family history of diabetes (FHD). Three metabolic factors were generated using principal-component factor analysis, and they represented: (i) glycemia, (ii) blood pressure, and (iii) combined (BMI, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and serum uric acid) factors. Multipoint model-free linkage analysis of these factors with 385 microsatellite markers was performed on 1,055 sib-pairs, using Haseman-Elston regression. Genome-wide suggestive evidence of linkage was found at 30 cM on chromosome 22q (empirical P (P(e)) = 0.0002) for the glycemia factor, at 188-191 cM on chromosome 1q (P(e) = 0.0007) for the blood pressure factor, and at 82 cM on chromosome 17q (P(e) = 0.0007) for the combined factor. Subset analyses of the families by FHD showed evidence of genetic heterogeneity, with divergent linkage signals in the subsets on at least four chromosomes. We found evidence of genetic heterogeneity by FHD for the three metabolic factors. The results also confirmed findings of previous studies that mapped components of the metabolic syndrome to a chromosome 1q region.

  5. The modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS as additional diagnostic tool for genetically distinct hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Rasenack, Maria; Athanasopoulou, Ioanna M; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Lipski, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Vittore, Debora; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the nerve ultrasound characteristics in genetically distinct inherited neuropathies, the value of the modified ultrasound pattern sum score (mUPSS) to differentiate between the subtypes and the correlation of ultrasound with nerve conduction studies (NCS), disease duration and severity. All patients underwent a standardized neurological examination, ultrasound, and NCS. In addition, genetic testing was performed. Consequently, mUPSS was applied, which is a sum-score of cross-sectional areas (CSA) at predefined anatomical points in different nerves. 31 patients were included (10xCharcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)1a, 3xCMT1b, 3xCMTX, 9xCMT2, 6xHNPP [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies]). Generalized, homogeneous nerve enlargement and significantly increased UPS scores emphasized the diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy, particularly CMT1a and CMT1b. The amount of enlargement did not depend on disease duration, symptom severity, height and weight. In CMTX the nerves were enlarged, as well, however, only in the roots and lower limbs, most prominent in men. In CMT2 no significant enlargement was detectable. In HNPP the CSA values were increased at entrapped sites, and not elsewhere. However, a distinction from CMT1, which also showed enlarged CSA values at entrapment sites, was only possible by calculating the entrapment ratios and entrapment score. The mUPSS allowed distinction between CMT1a (increased UPS scores, entrapment ratios <1.0) and HNPP (low UPS scores, entrapment ratios >1.4), while CMT1b and CMTX showed intermediate UPS types and entrapment ratios <1.0. Although based on few cases, ultrasound revealed consistent and homogeneous nerve alteration in certain inherited neuropathies. The modified UPSS is a quantitative tool, which may provide useful information for diagnosis, differentiation and follow-up evaluation in addition to NCS and molecular testing.

  6. Blood pressure and cerebral white matter share common genetic factors in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Kochunov, Peter; Glahn, David C; Lancaster, Jack; Winkler, Anderson; Karlsgodt, Kathrin; Olvera, Rene L; Curran, Joanna E; Carless, Melanie A; Dyer, Thomas D; Almasy, Laura; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T; Blangero, John

    2011-02-01

    Elevated arterial pulse pressure and blood pressure (BP) can lead to atrophy of cerebral white matter (WM), potentially attributable to shared genetic factors. We calculated the magnitude of shared genetic variance between BP and fractional anisotropy of water diffusion, a sensitive measurement of WM integrity in a well-characterized population of Mexican Americans. The patterns of whole-brain and regional genetic overlap between BP and fractional anisotropy were interpreted in the context the pulse-wave encephalopathy theory. We also tested whether regional pattern in genetic pleiotropy is modulated by the phylogeny of WM development. BP and high-resolution (1.7 × 1.7 × 3 mm; 55 directions) diffusion tensor imaging data were analyzed for 332 (202 females; mean age 47.9 ± 13.3 years) members of the San Antonio Family Heart Study. Bivariate genetic correlation analysis was used to calculate the genetic overlap between several BP measurements (pulse pressure, systolic BP, and diastolic BP) and fractional anisotropy (whole-brain and regional values). Intersubject variance in pulse pressure and systolic BP exhibited a significant genetic overlap with variance in whole-brain fractional anisotropy values, sharing 36% and 22% of genetic variance, respectively. Regionally, shared genetic variance was significantly influenced by rates of WM development (r=-0.75; P=0.01). The pattern of genetic overlap between BP and WM integrity was generally in agreement with the pulse-wave encephalopathy theory. Our study provides evidence that a set of pleiotropically acting genetic factors jointly influence phenotypic variation in BP and WM integrity. The magnitude of this overlap appears to be influenced by phylogeny of WM development, suggesting a possible role for genotype-by-age interactions.

  7. Genetic risk factors for sclerotic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Martin, Paul J; Flowers, Mary E D; Lee, Stephanie J; Carpenter, Paul A; Warren, Edus H; Geraghty, Daniel E; Lee, Ni; Boeckh, Michael J; Storer, Barry E; Levine, David M; Fan, Wenhong; Zhao, Lue-Ping; Hansen, John A

    2016-09-15

    Sclerotic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a distinctive phenotype of chronic GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, characterized by fibrosis of skin or fascia. Sclerotic GVHD has clinical and histopathological similarities with systemic sclerosis, an autoimmune disease whose risk is influenced by genetic polymorphisms. We examined 13 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have a well-documented association with systemic sclerosis to determine whether these SNPs are also associated with the risk of sclerotic GVHD. The study cohort included 847 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with chronic GVHD. Genotyping was performed using microarrays, followed by imputation of unobserved SNPs. The donor rs10516487 (BANK1: B-cell scaffold protein with ankyrin repeats 1) TT genotype was associated with lower risk of sclerotic GVHD (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-0.87; P = .02). Donor and recipient rs2056626 (CD247: T-cell receptor ζ subunit) GG or GT genotypes were associated with higher risk of sclerotic GVHD (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.13-2.18; P = .007 and HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.19-2.32; P = .003, respectively). Donor and recipient rs987870 (5'-flanking region of HLA-DPA1) CC genotypes were associated with higher risk of sclerotic GVHD (HR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.22-5.11; P = .01 and HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.00-4.54; P = .05, respectively). In further analyses, the recipient DPA1*01:03∼DPB1*04:01 haplotype and certain amino acid substitutions in the recipient P1 peptide-binding pocket of the HLA-DP heterodimer were associated with risk of sclerotic GVHD. Genetic components associated with systemic sclerosis are also associated with sclerotic GVHD. HLA-DP-mediated antigen presentation, T-cell response, and B-cell activation have important roles in the pathogenic mechanisms of both diseases. PMID:27313329

  8. Factors which Limit the Value of Additional Redundancy in Human Rated Launch Vehicle Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Joel M.; Stott, James E.; Ring, Robert W.; Hatfield, Spencer; Kaltz, Gregory M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has embarked on an ambitious program to return humans to the moon and beyond. As NASA moves forward in the development and design of new launch vehicles for future space exploration, it must fully consider the implications that rule-based requirements of redundancy or fault tolerance have on system reliability/risk. These considerations include common cause failure, increased system complexity, combined serial and parallel configurations, and the impact of design features implemented to control premature activation. These factors and others must be considered in trade studies to support design decisions that balance safety, reliability, performance and system complexity to achieve a relatively simple, operable system that provides the safest and most reliable system within the specified performance requirements. This paper describes conditions under which additional functional redundancy can impede improved system reliability. Examples from current NASA programs including the Ares I Upper Stage will be shown.

  9. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  10. Moderation of genetic factors by parental divorce in adolescents' evaluations of family functioning and subjective wellbeing.

    PubMed

    van der Aa, Niels; Boomsma, Dorret I; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Hudziak, James J; Bartels, Meike

    2010-04-01

    Adolescents' evaluations of family functioning may have a significant impact on their subjective well-being and adjustment. The aim of the study was to investigate the degree to which genetic and environmental influences affect variation in evaluations of general family functioning, family conflict, and quality of life and the overlap between them. We assessed whether genetic and environmental influences are moderated by parental divorce by analyzing self-report data from 6,773 adolescent twins and their non-twin siblings. Genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental influences accounted for variation in general family functioning and family conflict, with genetic influences being relatively more important in girls than boys in general family functioning. Genetic and nonshared environmental influences accounted for variation in quality of life, with genetic influences being relatively more important in girls. Evidence was found for interaction between genetic factors and parental divorce: genetic influence on general family functioning was larger in participants from divorced families. The overlap between general family functioning and quality of life, and family conflict and quality of life was accounted for the largest part by genetic effects, with nonshared environmental effects accounting for the remaining part. By examining the data from monozygotic twins, we found evidence for interaction between genotype and nonshared, non-measured, environmental influences on evaluations of general family functioning, family conflict, and quality of life.

  11. Evidence for genetic factors underlying the insulin resistance syndrome in american indians.

    PubMed

    North, Kari E; Williams, Ken; Williams, Jeff T; Best, Lyle G; Lee, Elisa T; Fabsitz, Richard R; Howard, Barbara V; Gray, R Stuart; MacCluer, Jean W

    2003-12-01

    Previous analyses of American Indians of the Strong Heart Study have demonstrated that various insulin-resistance variables cluster, although knowledge about the genetic determination of these clusters is unknown. In an effort to explore the influences on the aggregation of insulin-resistance phenotypes, we used principal component factor analysis to examine the clustering of these phenotypes in participants of the Strong Heart Family Study and evaluated the genetic and environmental contributions of such factors. Nine traits were chosen for principal component factor analysis: BMI, diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, natural log-transformed insulin, natural log-transformed triglycerides, percentage of body fat, systolic blood pressure, and waist-to-hip ratio. Analyses revealed three clusters: glucose/insulin/obesity, blood pressure, and dyslipidemia factors. Using a variance component approach and accounting for the effects of age, sex, center, and medication, we detected significant heritabilities (h2) for the three factors: h2 = 0.67, h2 = 0.33, and h2 = 0.61, respectively. In multivariate analysis, no significant genetic correlations among factors were found. These results suggest that heredity explains a substantial proportion of the variability of the factors that underlie the insulin resistance syndrome in American Indians and that these factors are genetically independent. PMID:14694207

  12. Condition-dependent, phenotype-dependent and genetic-dependent factors in the natal dispersal of a solitary rodent.

    PubMed

    Selonen, Vesa; Hanski, Ilpo K

    2010-09-01

    1. Dispersal can be condition- and phenotype-dependent and related to individual genetic differences. Few studies have addressed the relative importance of these factors on dispersal. We studied the factors behind philopatry and dispersal in juvenile Siberian flying squirrels, Pteromys volans L. 2. The dispersal distance and the distances explored before abandoning the natal nest were not related to any of the condition-dependent factors studied such as the area of high-quality habitat or the number of conspecifics near the natal area. In addition, the body mass (a phenotypic trait) of individuals was not related to philopatry and dispersal in flying squirrels. 3. Genetic variability, measured by microsatellite heterozygosity, was positively correlated with dispersal. The correlation was mainly driven by one locus related to the distances explored before abandoning the natal nest. 4. We conclude that condition- and phenotype-dependent factors did not have detectable effects on philopatry and dispersal, but individual heterozygosity was related to dispersal in flying squirrels. Our results suggest that genetic variability is important behind the dispersal of the species. PMID:20561101

  13. On the Genetic and Environmental Correlations between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Vocational Interest Factors.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Julie Aitken; Petrides, Konstantinos V; Vernon, Philip A

    2015-04-01

    The phenotypic (observed), genetic, and environmental correlations were examined in a sample of adult twins between the four factors and global score of the trait emotional intelligence questionnaire (TEIQue) and the seven vocational interest factors of the Jackson Career Explorer (JCE). Multiple significant correlations were found involving the work style vocational interest factor (consisting of job security, stamina, accountability, planfulness, and interpersonal confidence) and the social vocational interest factor (which included interests in the social sciences, personal services, teaching, social services, and elementary education), both of which correlated significantly with all of the TEIQue variables (well-being, self-control, emotionality, sociability, and global trait EI). Following bivariate genetic analyses, most of the significant phenotypic correlations were found to also have significant genetic correlations as well as significant non-shared (unique) environmental correlations.

  14. On the Genetic and Environmental Correlations between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Vocational Interest Factors.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Julie Aitken; Petrides, Konstantinos V; Vernon, Philip A

    2015-04-01

    The phenotypic (observed), genetic, and environmental correlations were examined in a sample of adult twins between the four factors and global score of the trait emotional intelligence questionnaire (TEIQue) and the seven vocational interest factors of the Jackson Career Explorer (JCE). Multiple significant correlations were found involving the work style vocational interest factor (consisting of job security, stamina, accountability, planfulness, and interpersonal confidence) and the social vocational interest factor (which included interests in the social sciences, personal services, teaching, social services, and elementary education), both of which correlated significantly with all of the TEIQue variables (well-being, self-control, emotionality, sociability, and global trait EI). Following bivariate genetic analyses, most of the significant phenotypic correlations were found to also have significant genetic correlations as well as significant non-shared (unique) environmental correlations. PMID:25743745

  15. Genetic Factors That Increase Male Facial Masculinity Decrease Facial Attractiveness of Female Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anthony J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework. PMID:24379153

  16. Genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity decrease facial attractiveness of female relatives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2014-02-01

    For women, choosing a facially masculine man as a mate is thought to confer genetic benefits to offspring. Crucial assumptions of this hypothesis have not been adequately tested. It has been assumed that variation in facial masculinity is due to genetic variation and that genetic factors that increase male facial masculinity do not increase facial masculinity in female relatives. We objectively quantified the facial masculinity in photos of identical (n = 411) and nonidentical (n = 782) twins and their siblings (n = 106). Using biometrical modeling, we found that much of the variation in male and female facial masculinity is genetic. However, we also found that masculinity of male faces is unrelated to their attractiveness and that facially masculine men tend to have facially masculine, less-attractive sisters. These findings challenge the idea that facially masculine men provide net genetic benefits to offspring and call into question this popular theoretical framework.

  17. Approximate Bayesian computation reveals the factors that influence genetic diversity and population structure of foxsnakes.

    PubMed

    Row, J R; Brooks, R J; MacKinnon, C A; Lawson, A; Crother, B I; White, M; Lougheed, S C

    2011-11-01

    Contemporary geographical range and patterns of genetic diversity within species reflect complex interactions between multiple factors acting across spatial and temporal scales, and it is notoriously difficult to disentangle causation. Here, we quantify patterns of genetic diversity and genetic population structure using mitochondrial DNA sequences (101 individuals, cytochrome b) and microsatellites (816 individuals, 12 loci) and use Approximate Bayesian computation methods to test competing models of the demographic history of eastern and western foxsnakes. Our analyses indicate that post-glacial colonization and past population declines, probably caused by the infilling of deciduous forest and cooler temperatures since the mid-Holocene, largely underpin large-scale genetic patterns for foxsnakes. At finer geographical scales, our results point to more recent anthropogenic habitat loss as having accentuated genetic population structure by causing further declines and fragmentation.

  18. Colorectal cancer survivors undergoing genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: motivational factors and psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Esplen, M J; Madlensky, L; Aronson, M; Rothenmund, H; Gallinger, S; Butler, K; Toner, B; Wong, J; Manno, M; McLaughlin, J

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) represents about 1-3% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC). The objectives of the study were to examine motivational factors, expectations and psychosocial functioning in a sample of CRC survivors undergoing genetic testing for HNPCC. A cross-sectional survey of 314 colorectal cancer patients recruited through a population-based colon cancer family registry was conducted. Motivations for genetic testing for hereditary cancer were similar to those of clinic-based samples of CRC patients and included learning of the increased risk to offspring and finding out if additional screening was needed. While age at diagnosis and sex were associated with psychological functioning, significant predictors of post-counseling distress were perceived lower satisfaction with social support, an escape-avoidant coping style and the anticipation of becoming depressed if a mutation was present. Most cancer survivors anticipated disclosing test results to relatives and physicians. Cancer survivors reported several motivations for genetic testing for HNPCC that varied by sex. A subgroup of survivors with lower satisfaction with social support and an escape-avoidant coping style were worried about the potential impact of genetic test results and demonstrated more distress following counseling. Findings have implications for future research and potential support needs during the genetic counseling and testing process. PMID:17892499

  19. Enhanced vascularization of cultured skin substitutes genetically modified to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Supp, D M; Supp, A P; Bell, S M; Boyce, S T

    2000-01-01

    Cultured skin substitutes have been used as adjunctive therapies in the treatment of burns and chronic wounds, but they are limited by lack of a vascular plexus. This deficiency leads to greater time for vascularization compared with native skin autografts and contributes to graft failure. Genetic modification of cultured skin substitutes to enhance vascularization could hypothetically lead to improved wound healing. To address this hypothesis, human keratinocytes were genetically modified by transduction with a replication incompetent retrovirus to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor, a specific and potent mitogen for endothelial cells. Cultured skin substitutes consisting of collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates inoculated with human fibroblasts and either vascular endothelial growth factor-modified or control keratinocytes were prepared, and were cultured in vitro for 21 d. Northern blot analysis demonstrated enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA in genetically modified keratinocytes and in cultured skin substitutes prepared with modified cells. Furthermore, the vascular endothelial growth factor-modified cultured skin substitutes secreted greatly elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor protein throughout the entire culture period. The bioactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor protein secreted by the genetically modified cultured skin substitutes was demonstrated using a microvascular endothelial cell growth assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified and control cultured skin substitutes were grafted to full-thickness wounds on athymic mice, and elevated vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression was detected in the modified grafts for at least 2 wk after surgery. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified grafts exhibited increased numbers of dermal blood vessels and decreased time to vascularization compared with controls. These results indicate that genetic modification of

  20. [Genetic factors in anti-D-antibody formation].

    PubMed

    Uhlig, R; Göhler, W

    1983-01-01

    The blood group specific artificial immunization for producing anti-D-antibodies in Rh-negative persons ("de-novo immunization") is scarcely successful at present and involves risks of health for test persons. With the justified suggestion that the antibody development is genetically influenced even in man, those serological features were being searched for which might reveal a good anti-D-formation, viz. AB0-blood group, HLA antigens and serum groups Hp, Gm and Km. 134 men de-novo immunized were examined. In those persons forming anti-D with a high titre ("high responders") blood group A will be encountered more frequently. Blood group B will frequently occur in "non-responders". In 78 test persons examined in the HLA system was no correlation between the features of the HLA system and the formation of anti-D. The serum features investigated in 71 test persons did not allow any correlation to anti-D formation to be recognized in the Hp, Gm and Km system. It seems reasonable to continue the investigation for relationships between antibody development and certain hereditary characteristics in the human blood, including HLA-DR gene place.

  1. Host factors and genetic susceptibility to infections due to intracellular bacteria and fastidious organisms.

    PubMed

    Asner, S A; Morré, S A; Bochud, P-Y; Greub, G

    2014-12-01

    While genetic polymorphisms play a paramount role in tuberculosis (TB), less is known about their contribution to the severity of diseases caused by other intracellular bacteria and fastidious microorganisms. We searched electronic databases for observational studies reporting on host factors and genetic predisposition to infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria published up to 30 May 2014. The contribution of genetic polymorphisms was documented for TB. This includes genetic defects in the mononuclear phagocyte/T helper cell type 1 (Th1) pathway contributing to disseminated TB disease in children and genome-wide linkage analysis (GWAS) in reactivated pulmonary TB in adults. Similarly, experimental studies supported the role of host genetic factors in the clinical presentation of illnesses resulting from other fastidious intracellular bacteria. These include IL-6 -174G/C or low mannose-binding (MBL) polymorphisms, which are incriminated in chronic pulmonary conditions triggered by C. pneumoniae, type 2-like cytokine secretion polymorphisms, which are correlated with various clinical patterns of M. pneumoniae infections, and genetic variation in the NOD2 gene, which is an indicator of tubal pathology resulting from Chamydia trachomatis infections. Monocyte/macrophage migration and T lymphocyte recruitment defects are corroborated to ineffective granuloma formation observed among patients with chronic Q fever. Similar genetic polymorphisms have also been suggested for infections caused by T. whipplei although not confirmed yet. In conclusion, this review supports the paramount role of genetic factors in clinical presentations and severity of infections caused by intracellular fastidious bacteria. Genetic predisposition should be further explored through such as exome sequencing.

  2. Genetic factors in evolution of sleep length--a longitudinal twin study in Finnish adults.

    PubMed

    Hublin, Christer; Partinen, Markku; Koskenvuo, Markku; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2013-10-01

    Genetic factors affect many aspects of sleep, such as sleep length. We investigated the contribution of genetic factors to stability and change of sleep length among adults over a 15-year period. In this representative follow-up study we used the Finnish Twin Cohort as the study population. Questionnaire surveys were performed in 1975 (response rate 89%, 11,041 twin pairs; age ≥18 years), 1981 (84%, 9323; ≥24 years) and 1990 (77%, 4507; 33-60 years). Sleep was categorized as short (<7 h), average or long (>8 h). Pairwise similarity in monozygotic and dizygotic pairs was examined at each survey by age group and sex. Quantitative genetic modelling was used to estimate cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects. The proportion of variance in sleep length at one point in time that was accounted for by genetic effects was very stable over the study period, being 0.31 in 1975, 0.32 in 1981 and 0.30 in 1990. Longitudinal genetic modelling indicated that the correlations of genetic effects between the three measurement points were high: 0.85 between 1975 and 1981; 0.93 between 1981 and 1990; and 0.76 between 1975 and 1990. Despite a high contribution of environmental effects, their correlations over time were modest: 0.31 between 1975 and 1981; 0.33 between 1981 and 1990; and 0.18 between 1975 and 1990. In conclusion, genetic factors have a modest but stable effect on the evolution of sleep length over a long time span in adults. Multiple measures are a more robust basis for genetic analyses than a single cross-sectional measure. PMID:23509990

  3. Identification of CSK as a systemic sclerosis genetic risk factor through Genome Wide Association Study follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Broen, Jasper C.; Carmona, F. David; Teruel, Maria; Simeon, Carmen P.; Vonk, Madelon C.; van ‘t Slot, Ruben; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Fonollosa, Vicente; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; González-Gay, Miguel A.; García-Hernández, Francisco J.; de la Peña, Paloma García; Carreira, Patricia; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; van Riel, Piet L.C.M.; Kreuter, Alexander; Witte, Torsten; Riemekasten, Gabriella; Airo, Paolo; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Beretta, Lorenzo; van Laar, Jacob; Chee, Meng May; Worthington, Jane; Herrick, Ariane; Denton, Christopher; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Assassi, Shervin; Fonseca, Carmen; Mayes, Maureen D.; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Martin, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is complex autoimmune disease affecting the connective tissue; influenced by genetic and environmental components. Recently, we performed the first successful genome-wide association study (GWAS) of SSc. Here, we perform a large replication study to better dissect the genetic component of SSc. We selected 768 polymorphisms from the previous GWAS and genotyped them in seven replication cohorts from Europe. Overall significance was calculated for replicated significant SNPs by meta-analysis of the replication cohorts and replication-GWAS cohorts (3237 cases and 6097 controls). Six SNPs in regions not previously associated with SSc were selected for validation in another five independent cohorts, up to a total of 5270 SSc patients and 8326 controls. We found evidence for replication and overall genome-wide significance for one novel SSc genetic risk locus: CSK [P-value = 5.04 × 10−12, odds ratio (OR) = 1.20]. Additionally, we found suggestive association in the loci PSD3 (P-value = 3.18 × 10−7, OR = 1.36) and NFKB1 (P-value = 1.03 × 10−6, OR = 1.14). Additionally, we strengthened the evidence for previously confirmed associations. This study significantly increases the number of known putative genetic risk factors for SSc, including the genes CSK, PSD3 and NFKB1, and further confirms six previously described ones. PMID:22407130

  4. Rapid Reprogramming of Primary Human Astrocytes into Potent Tumor-Initiating Cells with Defined Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Liu, Xinjian; Sampson, John H; Bigner, Darell D; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) are thought to drive brain cancer, but their cellular and molecular origins remain uncertain. Here, we report the successful generation of induced CSC (iCSC) from primary human astrocytes through the expression of defined genetic factors. Combined transduction of four factors, Myc, Oct-4, p53DD, and Ras, induced efficient transformation of primary human astrocytes into malignant cells with powerful tumor-initiating capabilities. Notably, transplantation of 100 transduced cells into nude mice was sufficient for tumor formation. The cells showed unlimited self-renewal ability with robust telomerase activities. In addition, they expressed typical glioma stem-like cell markers, such as CD133, CD15, and CD90. Moreover, these cells could form spheres in culture and differentiate into neuron-like, astrocyte-like, and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Finally, they also displayed resistance to the widely used brain cancer drug temozolomide. These iCSCs could provide important tools for studies of glioma biology and therapeutics development. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5143-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27364552

  5. Why the preeminent risk factor in sporadic Alzheimer's disease cannot be genetic.

    PubMed

    Foster, H D

    2002-07-01

    If genetic risk factors are preeminent in the etiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease, three corollaries follow: age-adjusted death rates from it should be fairly spatially uniform, should not vary significantly over time and should not alter markedly with migration. Globally, none of these corollaries hold true. The APO E(4) allele and other genetic aberrations that promote sporadic Alzheimer's disease do so most effectively in low alkalinity-high aluminum environments, especially if these are experiencing acid rain.

  6. Additive Factors Do Not Imply Discrete Processing Stages: A Worked Example Using Models of the Stroop Task

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Tom; Gurney, Kevin N.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown experimentally that the psychophysical law known as Piéron’s Law holds for color intensity and that the size of the effect is additive with that of Stroop condition (Stafford et al., 2011). According to the additive factors method (Donders, 1868–1869/1969; Sternberg, 1998), additivity is assumed to indicate independent and discrete processing stages. We present computational modeling work, using an existing Parallel Distributed Processing model of the Stroop task (Cohen et al., 1990) and a standard model of decision making (Ratcliff, 1978). This demonstrates that additive factors can be successfully accounted for by existing single stage models of the Stroop effect. Consequently, it is not valid to infer either discrete stages or separate loci of effects from additive factors. Further, our modeling work suggests that information binding may be a more important architectural property for producing additive factors than discrete stages. PMID:22102842

  7. Relationship between the genetic diversity of Artemisia halodendron and climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenda; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Yuqiang; Lian, Jie; Yun, Jianying

    2014-02-01

    Artemisia halodendron (Asteraceae) is a dominant sand-fixing semi-shrub species native to the Horqin Sandy Land of northeastern China. In this study, we evaluated levels of genetic variation within and among sampled A. halodendron populations from two different hydrothermal regions of the Horqin Sandy Land using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. We also investigated possible relationships between genetic diversity of this species and climatic factors. Our analysis revealed that A. halodendron is highly genetically diverse, with populations from a low hydrothermal level region having higher genetic diversity index values than those from a high hydrothermal level region. An analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA) revealed relatively high levels (>89.83%) of within-population genetic variation. Based on cluster analysis, the 13 studied A. halodendron populations can be clustered into two clades. Genetic diversities of all populations have been influenced by many climatic factors, and Nei's genetic diversity (h) is strongly correlated with annual temperature range (ART). These results have important implications for restoration and management of degraded ecosystems in arid and semi-arid areas.

  8. Shared Genetic Factors Influence Risk for Bipolar Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carmiol, Nasdia; Peralta, Juan M; Almasy, Laura; Contreras, Javier; Pacheco, Adriana; Escamilla, Michael A; Knowles, Emma E; Raventós, Henriette; Glahn, David C

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder and alcohol use disorder (AUD) have a high rate of comorbidity, more than 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder also receive a diagnosis of AUD in their lifetimes. Although both disorders are heritable, it is unclear if the same genetic factors mediate risk for bipolar disorder and AUD. We examined 733 Costa Rican individuals from 61 bipolar pedigrees. Based on a best-estimate process, 32% of the sample met criteria for bipolar disorder, 17% had a lifetime AUD diagnosis, 32% met criteria for lifetime nicotine dependence, and 21% had an anxiety disorder. AUD, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders were relatively more common among individuals with bipolar disorder than in their non-bipolar relatives. All illnesses were shown to be heritable and bipolar disorder was genetically correlated with AUD, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders. The genetic correlation between bipolar and AUD remained when controlling for anxiety, suggesting that unique genetic factors influence risk for comorbid bipolar and AUD independent of anxiety. Our findings provide evidence for shared genetic effects on bipolar disorder and AUD risk. Demonstrating that common genetic factors influence these independent diagnostic constructs could help to refine our diagnostic nosology. PMID:24321773

  9. Additive cytotoxicity of different monoclonal antibody-cobra venom factor conjugates for human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Juhl, H; Petrella, E C; Cheung, N K; Bredehorst, R; Vogel, C W

    1997-11-01

    Insufficient numbers of antigen molecules and heterogeneity of antigen expression on tumor cells are major factors limiting the immunotherapeutic potential of the few clinically useful monoclonal antibodies capable of mediating complement cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. To overcome this limitation, we converted two non-cytotoxic monoclonal anti-neuroblastoma antibodies, designated 3E7 (IgG2b) and 8H9 (IgG1), and the non-cytotoxic F(ab')2 fragment of the cytotoxic monoclonal anti-GD2 antibody 3F8 (IgG3) into cytotoxic antibody conjugates by covalent attachment of cobra venom factor (CVF), a structural and functional homologue of the activated third component of complement. Competitive binding experiments confirmed the different specificities of the three antibodies. In the presence of human complement, all three antibody-CVF conjugates mediated selective complement-dependent lysis of human neuroblastoma cells. Consistent with the kinetics of the alternative pathway of complement, approximately seven hours incubation were required to reach maximum cytotoxicity of up to 25% for the 3E7-CVF conjugate, up to 60% for the 8H9-CVF conjugate, and up to 95% for the 3F8 F(ab')2-CVF conjugate. The different extent of maximal cytotoxic activity of the three conjugates was reflected by corresponding differences in the extent of binding of both unconjugated antibodies and the respective conjugates. Any combination of the three antibody-CVF conjugates caused an additive effect in complement-mediated lysis. Using a cocktail of all three conjugates, the extent of complement-mediated killing could be increased up to 100%. These data demonstrate that by coupling of CVF the relative large number of non-cytotoxic monoclonal anti-tumor antibodies of interesting specificity can be used to design cocktails of cytotoxic conjugates and, thereby, to overcome the problem of insufficient and heterogeneous antigen expression on tumor cells for immunotherapy.

  10. Neuropathology and Animal Models of Autism: Genetic and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gadad, Bharathi S.; Young, Keith A.; German, Dwight C.

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a heterogeneous behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder. It is defined by the presence of marked social deficits, specific language abnormalities, and stereotyped repetitive patterns of behavior. Because of the variability in the behavioral phenotype of the disorder among patients, the term autism spectrum disorder has been established. In the first part of this review, we provide an overview of neuropathological findings from studies of autism postmortem brains and identify the cerebellum as one of the key brain regions that can play a role in the autism phenotype. We review research findings that indicate possible links between the environment and autism including the role of mercury and immune-related factors. Because both genes and environment can alter the structure of the developing brain in different ways, it is not surprising that there is heterogeneity in the behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of autism spectrum disorders. Finally, we describe animal models of autism that occur following insertion of different autism-related genes and exposure to environmental factors, highlighting those models which exhibit both autism-like behavior and neuropathology. PMID:24151553

  11. Clinical and Genetic Factors Associated With Thiazide-Induced Hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Chia-Min; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Lin, Liang-Yu; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, Chih-Yu; Li, Szu-yuan; Chen, Yen-Chia; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thiazide diuretics are associated with an increased risk of hyponatremia. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictors of thiazide-induced hyponatremia. A total of 48 patients admitted to the ward or to the emergency department due to severe thiazide-induced hyponatremia (Na < 125 mmol/L) were enrolled in our study as the case group. Another 211 hypertensive patients with normal sodium levels after treatment with thiazide diuretics were selected as the control group. Twelve tag single nucleotide polymorphism markers were selected from the Potassium Channel, Inwardly Rectifying Subfamily J, Member 1 (KCNJ1) gene: rs1231254, rs2238009, rs1148058, rs675482, rs673614, rs12795437, rs2855800, rs2509585, rs3016774, rs881333, rs4529890, and rs7116606. Clinical and genetic parameters between patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia and the control group were compared. Logistic regression was used to analyze data. The patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia were older (P < 0.001), predominantly female (P = 0.008), had a lower mean body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001), and more commonly used angiotensin II receptor antagonist (P < 0.001) and spironolactone (P = 0.007) compared with the control groups. Analysis with multivariate logistic regression revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–1.19, P < 0.001), female gender (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.54–13.11, P = 0.006), BMI (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69–0.93, P = 0.003), and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.25–26.45, P = 0.03) were independent predictors for thiazide-induced hyponatremia. Older female patients with lower BMIs and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms were more likely to develop thiazide-induced hyponatremia. PMID:26313793

  12. Clinical and Genetic Factors Associated With Thiazide-Induced Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Chia-Min; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Pan, Wen-Harn; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chiu, Chun-Chih; Lin, Liang-Yu; Lin, Chih-Ching; Yang, Chih-Yu; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Yen-Chia; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Thiazide diuretics are associated with an increased risk of hyponatremia. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictors of thiazide-induced hyponatremia.A total of 48 patients admitted to the ward or to the emergency department due to severe thiazide-induced hyponatremia (Na < 125 mmol/L) were enrolled in our study as the case group. Another 211 hypertensive patients with normal sodium levels after treatment with thiazide diuretics were selected as the control group. Twelve tag single nucleotide polymorphism markers were selected from the Potassium Channel, Inwardly Rectifying Subfamily J, Member 1 (KCNJ1) gene: rs1231254, rs2238009, rs1148058, rs675482, rs673614, rs12795437, rs2855800, rs2509585, rs3016774, rs881333, rs4529890, and rs7116606. Clinical and genetic parameters between patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia and the control group were compared. Logistic regression was used to analyze data.The patients with thiazide-induced hyponatremia were older (P < 0.001), predominantly female (P = 0.008), had a lower mean body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.001), and more commonly used angiotensin II receptor antagonist (P < 0.001) and spironolactone (P = 0.007) compared with the control groups. Analysis with multivariate logistic regression revealed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.19, P < 0.001), female gender (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.54-13.11, P = 0.006), BMI (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69-0.93, P = 0.003), and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.25-26.45, P = 0.03) were independent predictors for thiazide-induced hyponatremia.Older female patients with lower BMIs and KCNJ1 rs2509585 C/T or T/T polymorphisms were more likely to develop thiazide-induced hyponatremia. PMID:26313793

  13. Involvement of Genetic and Environmental Factors in the Onset of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2013-01-01

    First, this article provides a brief overview of the previous hypotheses regarding depression and then focuses on involvement of genetic and environmental factors in development of depression. According to epidemiological research, 30~40% of occurrences of bipolar disorder involve a genetic factor. Therefore, environmental factors play a more important role in development of depression. Resilience and resistance to stress are common; therefore, although a certain extent of stress might be received during the embryonic or perinatal period, having a genetic predisposition to mental disorders does not imply that a mental disorder will develop. However, having a genetic predisposition to disorders does weaken resistance to stresses received during puberty, and without the ability to recover, a mental disorder is triggered. The importance of epigenetics in maintaining normal development and biology is reflected by the observation that development of many diseases occurs when the wrong type of epigenetic marks are introduced or are added at the wrong time or in the wrong place. Involvement of genetic and environmental factors in the onset of depression was investigated in relation to epigenetics. When mice with the disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) abnormal gene received isolated rearing stress, depression-like abnormal behaviors and decreased gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the frontal cortex by epigenetical suppression via DNA methylation were observed. Decrease of dopamine in the frontal cortex triggers behavioral disorders. Administration of a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist resulted in full recovery from neurological and behavioral disorders. These results suggest a new therapeutic approach to depression. PMID:24465138

  14. Use of Factor V Leiden genetic testing in practice and impact on management

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, Anne-Marie; Psaty, Bruce M.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Burke, Wylie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the use of the genetic test for Factor V Leiden in clinical practice, physician adherence to national and local guidelines, and impacts of test results on patient management. Methods Chart review of all patients tested for Factor V Leiden during a 1-year period (2003) in a large nonprofit health care system (group health) (n = 272). Results The test for Factor V Leiden was most often used in nonacute outpatient settings by primary care practitioners, in combination with other tests for procoagulant disorders. Testing was performed more broadly than recommended: 61% of tests met American College of Medical Genetics guidelines, 46% of tests met CAP guidelines, and 37% of tests met group health internal guidelines. The most common rationale for testing was to explain a clinical event (58%). Patient management was modified more often in heterozygotes (54%) than in those with normal results (13%) (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The uptake of the test for Factor V Leiden has not followed existing recommendations. Genetic risk information was used to influence patient management in the absence of supporting evidence related to health outcomes. These results underscore the importance of further research concerning effective prevention and treatment strategies for patients with genetic risk to help translate genetic risk information into improved health outcomes. PMID:19668081

  15. Integrating products of Bessel functions with an additional exponential or rational factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deun, Joris; Cools, Ronald

    2008-04-01

    We provide two MATLAB programs to compute integrals of the form ex∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dxand 0∞xr+x∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dx with Jν_i(x) the Bessel function of the first kind and (real) order ν. The parameter m is a real number such that ∑ν+m>-1 (to assure integrability near zero), r is real and the numbers c and a are all strictly positive. The program can deliver accurate error estimates. Program summaryProgram title: BESSELINTR, BESSELINTC Catalogue identifier: AEAH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1601 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 161 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab (version ⩾6.5), Octave (version ⩾2.1.69) Computer: All supporting Matlab or Octave Operating system: All supporting Matlab or Octave RAM: For k Bessel functions our program needs approximately ( 500+140k) double precision variables Classification: 4.11 Nature of problem: The problem consists in integrating an arbitrary product of Bessel functions with an additional rational or exponential factor over a semi-infinite interval. Difficulties arise from the irregular oscillatory behaviour and the possible slow decay of the integrand, which prevents truncation at a finite point. Solution method: The interval of integration is split into a finite and infinite part. The integral over the finite part is computed using Gauss-Legendre quadrature. The integrand on the infinite part is approximated using asymptotic expansions and this approximation is integrated exactly with the aid of the upper incomplete gamma function. In the case where a rational factor is present, this factor is first expanded in a Taylor series around infinity. Restrictions: Some (and eventually all

  16. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  17. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OVERLAP BETWEEN GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS FOR INTENTIONAL WEIGHT LOSS AND OVEREATING

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Tracey D.; Treloar, Susan A.; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G

    2009-01-01

    Objective In order to further our understanding of how intentional weight loss (IWL) and overeating are related, we examined the shared genetic and environmental variance between lifetime IWL and overeating. Methods Interview data were available for 1976 female twins (both members of 439 and 264 pairs of monozygotic and dizygotic twins respectively), mean age=40.61, SD=4.72. We used lifetime diagnostic data for eating disorders obtained from a semi-structured psychiatric telephone interview, examined in a bivariate twin analysis. Both lifetime behaviours were measured on a 3-point scale, where absence of IWL or overeating formed one anchor on the scale and lifetime anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) formed the opposite anchors respectively. Results In line with previous findings, a higher body mass index was significantly associated with the lifetime presence of IWL and/or overeating (odds ratio=1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–1.19). The best fitting twin model contained additive genetic and non-shared environmental influence influencing both IWL and overeating, with correlations between these influences of 0.61 (95% CI: 0.35–0.92) and 0.24 (95% CI: 0.07–0.42) respectively. Conclusion About 37% of genetic risk factors were considered to overlap between IWL and overeating, and with only 6% of overlap between environmental risk factors. Thus considerable independence of risk factors was indicated. PMID:19235851

  18. A new recombinant factor VIII: from genetics to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Santagostino, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Advances in recombinant technology and knowledge about coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) are building a platform for new therapeutic options in patients with hemophilia A. The development of turoctocog alfa, a novel, high-purity, third-generation, B-domain truncated recombinant FVIII, has been produced and formulated without the use of animal-derived or human serum-derived components, in the wake of understanding of the new biochemical characteristics of FVIII, namely its protein structure, and glycosylation and sulfating patterns. Culture conditions and a five-step purification process have been developed to optimize the safety of turoctocog alfa. The results of two pilot clinical trials using turoctocog alfa confirmed high safety levels, with no patient developing inhibitors during the period of observation. The purpose of this review is to describe briefly the molecular and biological properties of turoctocog alfa, together with details of its clinical development, with emphasis on the needs of patients with hemophilia A. PMID:25548513

  19. Is there a genetic correlation between general factors of intelligence and personality?

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bratko, Denis; Martin, Nicholas G; Nichols, Robert C; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-06-01

    We tested a hypothesis that there is no genetic correlation between general factors of intelligence and personality, despite both having been selected for in human evolution. This was done using twin samples from Australia, the United States, the Netherlands, Great Britain, and Croatia, comprising altogether 1,748 monozygotic and 1,329 same-sex dizygotic twin pairs. Although parameters in the model-fitting differed among the twin samples, the genetic correlation between the two general factors could be set to zero, with a better fit if the U.S. sample was excepted.

  20. Genetic factors associated with small for gestational age birth and the use of human growth hormone in treating the disorder.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Paul; Reiter, Edward

    2012-05-15

    The term small for gestational age (SGA) refers to infants whose birth weights and/or lengths are at least two standard deviation (SD) units less than the mean for gestational age. This condition affects approximately 3%-10% of newborns. Causes for SGA birth include environmental factors, placental factors such as abnormal uteroplacental blood flow, and inherited genetic mutations. In the past two decades, an enhanced understanding of genetics has identified several potential causes for SGA. These include mutations that affect the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis, including mutations in the IGF-1 gene and acid-labile subunit (ALS) deficiency. In addition, select polymorphisms observed in patients with SGA include those involved in genes associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and deletion of exon 3 growth hormone receptor (d3-GHR) polymorphism. Uniparental disomy (UPD) and imprinting effects may also underlie some of the phenotypes observed in SGA individuals. The variety of genetic mutations associated with SGA births helps explain the diversity of phenotype characteristics, such as impaired motor or mental development, present in individuals with this disorder. Predicting the effectiveness of recombinant human GH (hGH) therapy for each type of mutation remains challenging. Factors affecting response to hGH therapy include the dose and method of hGH administration as well as the age of initiation of hGH therapy. This article reviews the results of these studies and summarizes the success of hGH therapy in treating this difficult and genetically heterogenous disorder.

  1. Genetic factors associated with small for gestational age birth and the use of human growth hormone in treating the disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The term small for gestational age (SGA) refers to infants whose birth weights and/or lengths are at least two standard deviation (SD) units less than the mean for gestational age. This condition affects approximately 3%–10% of newborns. Causes for SGA birth include environmental factors, placental factors such as abnormal uteroplacental blood flow, and inherited genetic mutations. In the past two decades, an enhanced understanding of genetics has identified several potential causes for SGA. These include mutations that affect the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 axis, including mutations in the IGF-1 gene and acid-labile subunit (ALS) deficiency. In addition, select polymorphisms observed in patients with SGA include those involved in genes associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and deletion of exon 3 growth hormone receptor (d3-GHR) polymorphism. Uniparental disomy (UPD) and imprinting effects may also underlie some of the phenotypes observed in SGA individuals. The variety of genetic mutations associated with SGA births helps explain the diversity of phenotype characteristics, such as impaired motor or mental development, present in individuals with this disorder. Predicting the effectiveness of recombinant human GH (hGH) therapy for each type of mutation remains challenging. Factors affecting response to hGH therapy include the dose and method of hGH administration as well as the age of initiation of hGH therapy. This article reviews the results of these studies and summarizes the success of hGH therapy in treating this difficult and genetically heterogenous disorder. PMID:22587301

  2. Regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factorgenetic variations

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANGZHOU; HAN, NING; LI, QINCHUAN; LI, ZENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genetic variations. The GSE5760 expression profile data, which was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, contained 30 wild-type (WT) and 28 mutation (MUT) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two types of samples were identified using the Student's t-test, and the corresponding microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using WebGestalt software. An integrated miRNA-DEG network was constructed using the Cytoscape software, based on the interactions between the DEGs, as identified using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and the correlation between miRNAs and their target genes. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and the KEGG Orthology Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 390 DEGS between the WT and MUT samples, along with 11 -associated miRNAs, were identified. The integrated miRNA-DEG network consisted of 38 DEGs and 11 miRNAs. Within this network, COPS2 was found to be associated with transcriptional functions, while FUS was found to be involved in mRNA metabolic processes. Other DEGs, including FBXW7 and CUL3, were enriched in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway. In addition, miR-15 was predicted to target COPS2 and CUL3. The results of the present study suggested that COPS2, FUS, FBXW7 and CUL3 may be associated with sepsis in patients with TNF-α genetic variations. In the progression of sepsis, FBXW7 and CUL3 may participate in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway, whereas COPS2 may regulate the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the FUS protein. Furthermore, COPS2 and CUL3 may be novel targets of miR-15. PMID:27347057

  3. Metabolic Profiles and Genetic Diversity of Denitrifying Communities in Activated Sludge after Addition of Methanol or Ethanol†

    PubMed Central

    Hallin, Sara; Throbäck, Ingela Noredal; Dicksved, Johan; Pell, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    External carbon sources can enhance denitrification rates and thus improve nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment plants. The effects of adding methanol and ethanol on the genetic and metabolic diversity of denitrifying communities in activated sludge were compared using a pilot-scale plant with two parallel lines. A full-scale plant receiving the same municipal wastewater, but without external carbon source addition, was the reference. Metabolic profiles obtained from potential denitrification rates with 10 electron donors showed that the denitrifying communities altered their preferences for certain compounds after supplementation with methanol or ethanol and that methanol had the greater impact. Clone libraries of nirK and nirS genes, encoding the two different nitrite reductases in denitrifiers, revealed that methanol also increased the diversity of denitrifiers of the nirS type, which indicates that denitrifiers favored by methanol were on the rise in the community. This suggests that there might be a niche differentiation between nirS and nirK genotypes during activated sludge processes. The composition of nirS genotypes also varied greatly among all samples, whereas the nirK communities were more stable. The latter was confirmed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of nirK communities on all sampling occasions. Our results support earlier hypotheses that the compositions of denitrifier communities change during predenitrification processes when external carbon sources are added, although no severe effect could be observed from an operational point of view. PMID:16885297

  4. Genetic factors in the predisposition to drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir

    2006-02-03

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions can occur with most drugs, although the frequency, severity, and clinical manifestations vary. Case reports have suggested that there may be familial clustering of drug hypersensitivity suggesting a genetic predisposition. As with most other forms of drug response, predisposition to drug hypersensitivity reactions is likely to be multifactorial and multigenic. Given the immune pathogenesis of these reactions, it is perhaps not surprising that the most significant genetic associations have been identified in the major histocompatibility complex for drugs such as abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol. For abacavir, it has been suggested that preprescription genotyping for HLA-B*5701 in whites may reduce the incidence of hypersensitivity. It is likely that as our knowledge of variation in the human genome improves, coupled with improvements in technology, many more significant genetic predisposing factors for drug hypersensitivity are likely to be identified in the next decade. However, as we search for these genetic factors, it is important that we do not forget environmental predisposition, and to bear in mind that a genetic marker for drug hypersensitivity in one population may not necessarily be relevant for another population. Notwithstanding the advances in genetic technologies, the ultimate determinant of success in this area of research will be the identification and careful phenotyping of patients with drug hypersensitivity reactions. As we progress to whole genome scanning, in order to satisfy the requirements for adequate statistical power, the identification of large numbers of carefully phenotyped patients will be feasible only through international collaborations.

  5. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 359.32 What additional factors does the Secretary...

  6. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 359.32 What additional factors does the Secretary...

  7. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 359.32 What additional factors does the Secretary...

  8. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 359.32 What additional factors does the Secretary...

  9. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS AND DEMONSTRATIONS FOR SPINAL CORD INJURIES How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 359.32 What additional factors does the Secretary...

  10. Genetic screening for Alzheimer's disease: what factors predict intentions to take a test?

    PubMed

    Frost, S; Myers, L B; Newman, S P

    2001-01-01

    The authors investigated factors that predict intention to take a genetic test for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The 449 men and women were surveyed in two groups: (a) those told that a positive result meant a 90% chance of developing AD (increased certainty) and (b) those told that a positive result meant a 50% chance of developing AD (decreased certainty). Participants completed measures of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), anticipated regret, risk perception, likelihood of taking a genetic test for cancer, and AD risk factors. Just over 50% of the variance in intentions was related to TPB variables, likelihood of taking a genetic test for cancer, number of people the participants knew who had AD, experimental condition, and anticipated regret. The subjective norm was the strongest predictor of intention in the increased certainty group, whereas positive belief was the strongest predictor in the decreased certainty group. PMID:11985183

  11. DIAGNOSIS-GUIDED METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING MULTI-MODALITY NEUROIMAGING BIOMARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH GENETIC RISK FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods.

  12. Additive genetic variation in resistance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae capsular type Ib: is genetic resistance correlated?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus (S.) iniae and S. agalactiae are both economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens affecting the globally farmed tilapia (Oreochromis spp.). Historically control of these bacteria in tilapia culture has included biosecurity, therapeutants and vaccination strategies. Genet...

  13. Racial and ethnic factors in the genetic pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Carethers, J M

    1999-01-01

    Colorectal cancer can develop by two distinct pathogenic mechanisms: one involving chromosomal breakage and aneuploidy (called chromosomal instability) and one involving mutations at DNA micro-satellite sequences (termed micro-satellite instability). Relatively few reports consider these mechanisms of colorectal cancer development across racial or ethnic groups. Available data indicate a moderate increase in colorectal cancer risk among Ashkenazi Jews who have a mutational polymorphism at codon 1307 in the APC gene. In American blacks, there is evidence for a higher prevalence of right-sided colonic tumors and an earlier age of onset of colorectal cancer. In addition, blacks have the highest colon cancer incidence in the United States among ethnic groups and have poorer 5-year survival rates compared with whites. While some differences may be attributed to health care access and socioeconomic differences, these do not completely explain all the variances. In the chromosomal instability pathway, there are polymorphisms within the P53 gene that are more prevalent in blacks, but the significance of these polymorphisms is not fully known. Blacks are more likely to demonstrate micro-satellite instability in their tumors; however, the mechanism for this phenomenon in blacks is unexplored. Differences in diet among racial and ethnic groups and polymorphic variations in drug metabolizing or acetylation genes have not been adequately cataloged. Identification of genetic and environmental factors among racial and ethnic groups should offer some insights into the observed epidemiologic data and advance opportunities to better understand the control and development of colorectal cancer. PMID:10826011

  14. PTPN22 R620W minor allele is a genetic risk factor for giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Susan; Hewitt, Alex W; Ruediger, Carlee D; Bradbury, Linda; De Smit, Elisabeth; Wiese, Michael D; Black, Rachel; Harrison, Andrew; Jones, Graeme; Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Merriman, Tony R; Shenstone, Bain; Smith, Malcolm D; Rischmueller, Maureen; Brown, Matthew A; Hill, Catherine L

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is one of the commonest forms of vasculitis in the elderly, and may result in blindness and stroke. The pathogenesis of GCA is not understood, although environmental, infectious and genetic risk factors are implicated. One gene of interest is PTPN22, encoding lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), expressed exclusively in immune cells, which is proposed to be an ‘archetypal non-HLA autoimmunity gene’. The minor allele of a functional PTPN22 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2476601, R620W), which disrupts an interaction motif in the protein, was originally reported to be associated with biopsy-proven GCA in Spanish patients, with supporting data from three replicate Northern European studies. Recently, this observation was extended with additional patients and controls, and studies encompassing European, Scandinavian, UK and American patients. The aim of our study was to determine the association between PTPN22 rs2476601 (R620W) and biopsy-proven GCA in an Australian case cohort. PMID:27110387

  15. Parenting Moderates a Genetic Vulnerability Factor in Longitudinal Increases in Youths' Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Beach, Steven R. H.; Philibert, Robert A.; Chen, Yi-fu; Lei, Man-Kit; Murry, Velma McBride; Brown, Anita C.

    2009-01-01

    The authors used a longitudinal, prospective design to investigate a moderation effect in the association between a genetic vulnerability factor, a variable nucleotide repeat polymorphism in the promoter region of "5HTT" (5-HTTLPR), and increases in youths' substance use. The primary study hypothesis predicted that involved-supportive parenting…

  16. Why Aren't Identical Twins Linguistically Identical? Genetic, Prenatal and Postnatal Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromswold, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Results of twin studies clearly demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the rate of language acquisition and linguistic proficiency attained by normal and impaired children and adults [see Stromswold, K. (2001). The heritability of language: A review and meta-analysis of twin, adoption and linkage studies. "Language," 77,…

  17. Pathways to Childhood Depressive Symptoms: The Role of Social, Cognitive, and Genetic Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Gregory, Alice M.; McGuffin, Peter; Eley, Thalia C.

    2007-01-01

    Childhood depressive conditions have been explored from multiple theoretical approaches but with few empirical attempts to address the interrelationships among these different domains and their combined effects. In the present study, the authors examined different pathways through which social, cognitive, and genetic risk factors may be expressed…

  18. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset: E2F2 as a New Potential Modifier Gene.

    PubMed

    Valcárcel-Ocete, Leire; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Iriondo, Mikel; Fullaondo, Asier; García-Barcina, María; Fernández-García, José Manuel; Lezcano-García, Elena; Losada-Domingo, José María; Ruiz-Ojeda, Javier; Álvarez de Arcaya, Amaia; Pérez-Ramos, José María; Roos, Raymund A C; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Saft, Carsten; Zubiaga, Ana M; Aguirre, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Age of onset (AO) of Huntington disease (HD) is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp) in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO), and the first motor symptoms age (motor AO or mAO). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample of 35 HD patients from Basque Country Hospitals. We found suggestive association signals between HD eAO and/or mAO and genetic variation within the E2F2, ATF7IP, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, LINC01559, HIP1 and GRIK2 genes. Among them, the most significant was the association between eAO and rs2742976, mapping to the promoter region of E2F2 transcription factor. Furthermore, rs2742976 T allele patient carriers exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte E2F2 gene expression, suggesting a possible implication of E2F2-dependent transcriptional activity in HD pathogenesis. Thus, E2F2 emerges as a new potential HD AO modifier factor.

  19. A pathway-based analysis provides additional support for an immune-related genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holmans, Peter; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Lesley; Sharma, Manu; Vedernikov, Alexey; Buchel, Finja; Saad, Mohamad; Sadd, Mohamad; Bras, Jose M; Bettella, Francesco; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Mittag, Florian; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nicholas W; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B; Nalls, Michael A; Hardy, John; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel M

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease affecting 1-2% in people >60 and 3-4% in people >80. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have now implicated significant evidence for association in at least 18 genomic regions. We have studied a large PD-meta analysis and identified a significant excess of SNPs (P < 1 × 10(-16)) that are associated with PD but fall short of the genome-wide significance threshold. This result was independent of variants at the 18 previously implicated regions and implies the presence of additional polygenic risk alleles. To understand how these loci increase risk of PD, we applied a pathway-based analysis, testing for biological functions that were significantly enriched for genes containing variants associated with PD. Analysing two independent GWA studies, we identified that both had a significant excess in the number of functional categories enriched for PD-associated genes (minimum P = 0.014 and P = 0.006, respectively). Moreover, 58 categories were significantly enriched for associated genes in both GWA studies (P < 0.001), implicating genes involved in the 'regulation of leucocyte/lymphocyte activity' and also 'cytokine-mediated signalling' as conferring an increased susceptibility to PD. These results were unaltered by the exclusion of all 178 genes that were present at the 18 genomic regions previously reported to be strongly associated with PD (including the HLA locus). Our findings, therefore, provide independent support to the strong association signal at the HLA locus and imply that the immune-related genetic susceptibility to PD is likely to be more widespread in the genome than previously appreciated.

  20. Relative Importance and Additive Effects of Maternal and Infant Risk Factors on Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; James, Kristina; Escobar, Gabriel; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Li, Sherian Xu; Carroll, Kecia N.; Walsh, Eileen; Mitchel, Edward; Das, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Yu, Chang; Dupont, William D.; Hartert, Tina V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures that occur in utero and during early life may contribute to the development of childhood asthma through alteration of the human microbiome. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cumulative effect and relative importance of environmental exposures on the risk of childhood asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based birth cohort study of mother-child dyads who were born between 1995 and 2003 and were continuously enrolled in the PRIMA (Prevention of RSV: Impact on Morbidity and Asthma) cohort. The individual and cumulative impact of maternal urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy, maternal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS), mode of delivery, infant antibiotic use, and older siblings at home, on the risk of childhood asthma were estimated using logistic regression. Dose-response effect on childhood asthma risk was assessed for continuous risk factors: number of maternal UTIs during pregnancy, courses of infant antibiotics, and number of older siblings at home. We further assessed and compared the relative importance of these exposures on the asthma risk. In a subgroup of children for whom maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy information was available, the effect of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of childhood asthma was estimated. Results Among 136,098 singleton birth infants, 13.29% developed asthma. In both univariate and adjusted analyses, maternal UTI during pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18, 1.25; adjusted OR [AOR] 1.04, 95%CI 1.02, 1.07 for every additional UTI) and infant antibiotic use (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.20, 1.22; AOR 1.16, 95%CI 1.15, 1.17 for every additional course) were associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, while having older siblings at home (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.91, 0.93; AOR 0.85, 95%CI 0.84, 0.87 for each additional sibling) was associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma, in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with vaginal

  1. [Influence of anthropogenous factors on the genetic variety of the sable (Martes zibellina L.)].

    PubMed

    Kashtanov, S N; Svishcheva, G R; Lazebny, O E; Kolobkov, D S; Pishchulina, I G; Meshchersky, S L; Rozhnov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The genetic variety of seven geographic populations of sable has been studied; its distribution area stretches from the Urals to the Far East. It was shown using the panel of eight nuclear microsatellite markers that the sable populations from different geographical regions retain their individual genetic characteristics, despite the influence of anthropogenous factors (overhunting and introduction). There is a significant genetic similarity between the three populations of Central Siberia (Reynolds distances are 0.170-0.200) due to the influence of natural migrations that weaken genetic differentiation, while genetic difference is maximum (0.361) between populations located at the edges of the sable' habitat. The population of the Kamchatka Peninsula is isolated and exists as an independent phylogenetic group. An analysis of the topology of the phylogenetic tree suggests that the populations of Kamchatka and the Sikhote-Alin are closest to the ancestral form. Despite the existence of interspecific hybrids of sable and marten, the level of interspecific genetic differentiation between them is maximal.

  2. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    PubMed

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B J; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  3. Demographic Histories, Isolation and Social Factors as Determinants of the Genetic Structure of Alpine Linguistic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of “local ethnicity” on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  4. Identifying genetic modulators of the connectivity between transcription factors and their transcriptional targets.

    PubMed

    Fazlollahi, Mina; Muroff, Ivor; Lee, Eunjee; Causton, Helen C; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2016-03-29

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is highly dependent on genetic background and interactions with cofactors. Identifying specific context factors is a major challenge that requires new approaches. Here we show that exploiting natural variation is a potent strategy for probing functional interactions within gene regulatory networks. We developed an algorithm to identify genetic polymorphisms that modulate the regulatory connectivity between specific transcription factors and their target genes in vivo. As a proof of principle, we mapped connectivity quantitative trait loci (cQTLs) using parallel genotype and gene expression data for segregants from a cross between two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We identified a nonsynonymous mutation in the DIG2 gene as a cQTL for the transcription factor Ste12p and confirmed this prediction empirically. We also identified three polymorphisms in TAF13 as putative modulators of regulation by Gcn4p. Our method has potential for revealing how genetic differences among individuals influence gene regulatory networks in any organism for which gene expression and genotype data are available along with information on binding preferences for transcription factors.

  5. Genetic and epigenetic factors affecting meiosis induction in eukaryotes revealed in paramecium research.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    This review presents studies of the induction of meiosis undertaken on the ciliate Paramecium, a unicellular model eukaryotic organism. Meiosis in Paramecium, preceding the process of fertilization, appears in starved cells after passing a defined number of divisions (cell generations), starting from the last fertilization. Investigations were performed on clones of cells entering autogamy, a self-fertilization process. Genetic as well as epigenetic factors, i.e. endo- and exogenous factors, affecting the induction ofmeiosis and changing the duration of the interautogamous interval (IAI), were analyzed. The results show that: (1) Meiosis induction is controlled genetically by the somatic macronucleus. However, besides the nuclear factors, the cytoplasmic protein immaturin also affects this process (Haga & Hiwatashi 1981); (2) Epigenetic factors, such as non-genetically disturbed cytoskeleton structures and changes in the cell architecture observed in doublet Paramecium cells, exert internal mechanical stress (Ingber 2003), which constitutes the endogenous impulse accelerating meiosis; (3) Mild osmotic stress, acting as an exogenous factor, can initiate the specific MAP kinases signaling pathway resulting in earlier meiosis induction, as in other unicellular eukaryotes (Seet & Pawson 2004).

  6. Genetic and epigenetic factors affecting meiosis induction in eukaryotes revealed in paramecium research.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    This review presents studies of the induction of meiosis undertaken on the ciliate Paramecium, a unicellular model eukaryotic organism. Meiosis in Paramecium, preceding the process of fertilization, appears in starved cells after passing a defined number of divisions (cell generations), starting from the last fertilization. Investigations were performed on clones of cells entering autogamy, a self-fertilization process. Genetic as well as epigenetic factors, i.e. endo- and exogenous factors, affecting the induction ofmeiosis and changing the duration of the interautogamous interval (IAI), were analyzed. The results show that: (1) Meiosis induction is controlled genetically by the somatic macronucleus. However, besides the nuclear factors, the cytoplasmic protein immaturin also affects this process (Haga & Hiwatashi 1981); (2) Epigenetic factors, such as non-genetically disturbed cytoskeleton structures and changes in the cell architecture observed in doublet Paramecium cells, exert internal mechanical stress (Ingber 2003), which constitutes the endogenous impulse accelerating meiosis; (3) Mild osmotic stress, acting as an exogenous factor, can initiate the specific MAP kinases signaling pathway resulting in earlier meiosis induction, as in other unicellular eukaryotes (Seet & Pawson 2004). PMID:19055018

  7. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Hjelmborg, Jacob v B; Skadhauge, Lars R; Steffensen, Ida; Backer, Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were enrolled in The Danish Twin Registry, a total of 11,515 twin pairs were identified in a nationwide questionnaire survey. Subjects were classified as atopic dermatitis cases when responding affirmatively to the question, "Do you have, or have you ever had, eczema in the folds of your elbows or knees?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared with a threefold increased risk among cotwins of an affected fraternal twin, relative to the general population. Genes accounted for 82% and nonshared environmental factors accounted for 18% of the individual susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis. The same genes contributed to the susceptibility to atopic dermatitis both in male and female patients (p = 0.98). The estimates were adjusted for age. The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis is attributable to mainly genetic differences between people. However, differences in environmental exposures also are of importance.

  8. Destructive effects of smoking on molecular and genetic factors of periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Many epidemiological evidences have proven the association between smoking and periodontal disease. The causality can be further established by linking findings of traditional epidemiological studies with the developments in molecular techniques that occurred in the last decade. The present article reviews recent studies that address the effect of smoking on molecular and genetic factors in periodontal disease. Most findings support the fact that tobacco smoking modulates destruction of the periodontium through different pathways: microcirculatory and host immune systems, connective tissue, and bone metabolism. Although smokers experience an increased burden of inflammatory responses to microbial challenges compared to non-smokers, understanding the association between smoking and periodontal diseases involves substantial problems with respect to accuracy of measurements, and particularly, sampling of many subjects. It remains unclear whether genetic susceptibility to periodontal disease is influenced by exposure to smoking or the effect of smoking on periodontal disease is influenced by genetic susceptibility. Employment of molecular techniques may play a key role in further elucidation of mechanisms linking smoking and periodontal destruction, the direct relationship as environmental factors and indirect relationship through genetic factors. PMID:20170537

  9. The role of genetic and environmental factors in cardiovascular disease in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R

    1999-03-01

    Considerable interest has been focused over the years on estimating the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors on differences in rates of cardiovascular disease in blacks and whites. However, recent advances in molecular science have helped to illuminate the underlying complexity of this problem. Attempts to impute the genetic component from "what was left over" after control for a limited set of environmental exposures is increasingly recognized as naive. The requirements for a model that could account for interactions between genetic and environmental factors far exceeds the precision of our measurements. Although it is obvious that blacks experience not only unique environmental exposures, such as white racism, but more intense exposure to common factors, such as obesity, current methods make it very difficult to summarize these effects. Simpler models, using data from large samples, could provide greater precision and might illuminate the exposure-outcome relationships common to all groups. Meanwhile, efforts to identify genetic underpinnings of complex disorders will have to reach a much higher level of development before useful conclusions can be reached about the magnitude and variation of effects between racial and ethnic groups.

  10. The role of genetic factors in autoimmune disease: implications for environmental research.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G S; Miller, F W; Pandey, J P

    1999-01-01

    Studies in both humans and in animal models of specific disorders suggest that polymorphisms of multiple genes are involved in conferring either a predisposition to or protection from autoimmune diseases. Genes encoding polymorphic proteins that regulate immune responses or the rates and extent of metabolism of certain chemical structures have been the focus of much of the research regarding genetic susceptibility. We examine the type and strength of evidence concerning genetic factors and disease etiology, drawing examples from a number of autoimmune diseases. Twin studies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type I diabetes, and multiple sclerosis (MS) indicate that disease concordance in monozygotic twins is 4 or more times higher than in dizygotic twins. Strong familial associations (odds ratio ranging from 5-10) are seen in studies of MS, type I diabetes, Graves disease, discoid lupus, and SLE. Familial association studies have also reported an increased risk of several systemic autoimmune diseases among relatives of patients with a systemic autoimmune disease. This association may reflect a common etiologic pathway with shared genetic or environmental influences among these diseases. Recent genomewide searches in RA, SLE, and MS provide evidence for multiple susceptibility genes involving major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci; there is also evidence that many autoimmune diseases share a common set of susceptibility genes. The multifactorial nature of the genetic risk factors and the low penetrance of disease underscore the potential influence of environmental factors and gene-environment interactions on the etiology of autoimmune diseases. PMID:10502533

  11. Genetic and immunological host factors associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Buchacz, K A; Wilkinson, D A; Krowka, J F; Koup, R A; Padian, N S

    1998-01-01

    The probability of HIV transmission depends on the interplay of many different factors related to infectiousness of the HIV-infected partner, susceptibility of the HIV-uninfected partner, and biological characteristics of HIV strains. Here, we review recent studies of host immunological and genetic factors which may affect susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. These factors are summarized in Table 1. We propose how to explore biological correlates of susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in epidemiological studies, discuss the strengths and limitations of this research, and address the implications for public health. PMID:9632989

  12. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., such as a password or response to a challenge question. (2) Something the practitioner is, biometric... modules or one-time-password devices. (c) If one factor is a biometric, the biometric subsystem...

  13. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as a password or response to a challenge question. (2) Something the practitioner is, biometric... modules or one-time-password devices. (c) If one factor is a biometric, the biometric subsystem...

  14. Genetic update on inflammatory factors in ulcerative colitis: Review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarlos, Patricia; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Magyari, Lili; Banfai, Zsolt; Szabo, Andras; Javorhazy, Andras; Melegh, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is one of the main types of inflammatory bowel disease, which is caused by dysregulated immune responses in genetically predisposed individuals. Several genetic factors, including interleukin and interleukin receptor gene polymorphisms and other inflammation-related genes play central role in mediating and modulating the inflammation in the human body, thereby these can be the main cause of development of the disease. It is clear these data are very important for understanding the base of the disease, especially in terms of clinical utility and validity, but summarized literature is exiguous for challenge health specialist that can used in the clinical practice nowadays. This review summarizes the current literature on inflammation-related genetic polymorphisms which are associated with UC. We performed an electronic search of Pubmed Database among publications of the last 10 years, using the following medical subject heading terms: UC, ulcerative colitis, inflammation, genes, polymorphisms, and susceptibility. PMID:25133031

  15. [Factors responsible for spatial population genetic Structure in white-spotted char Salvelinus leucomaensis (Pallas)].

    PubMed

    Salmenkova, E A; Omelchenko, V T

    2014-12-01

    Using personal data obtained earlier on the spatial population genetic structure of white-spotted char at ten microsatellite loci, an analysis of factors shaping the interpopulation divergence was performed. The primary role of genetic drift in population differentiation over the distribution range was demonstrated, compared to the practically absent role of stepwise mutation process. This result points to the common origin and relative connections between southern and northern population groups. In the majority of populations, no bottleneck effect was detected. Exclusion of the genetically peculiar Primorye population from the analysis resulted in the identification of the isolation by distance signatures among the examined populations. Such an association can be determined by the migratory exchange between the populations, or it could have formed during the historical post-Pleistocene colonization of the range.

  16. Genetic, environmental and stochastic factors in monozygotic twin discordance with a focus on epigenetic differences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genetic-epidemiological studies on monozygotic (MZ) twins have been used for decades to tease out the relative contributions of genes and the environment to a trait. Phenotypic discordance in MZ twins has traditionally been ascribed to non-shared environmental factors acting after birth, however recent data indicate that this explanation is far too simple. In this paper, we review other reasons for discordance, including differences in the in utero environment, genetic mosaicism, and stochastic factors, focusing particularly on epigenetic discordance. Epigenetic differences are gaining increasing recognition. Although it is clear that in specific cases epigenetic alterations provide a causal factor in disease etiology, the overall significance of epigenetics in twin discordance remains unclear. It is also challenging to determine the causality and relative contributions of environmental, genetic, and stochastic factors to epigenetic variability. Epigenomic profiling studies have recently shed more light on the dynamics of temporal methylation change and methylome heritability, yet have not given a definite answer regarding their relevance to disease, because of limitations in establishing causality. Here, we explore the subject of epigenetics as another component in human phenotypic variability and its links to disease focusing particularly on evidence from MZ twin studies. PMID:22898292

  17. Calcifying nanoparticles (nanobacteria): an additional potential factor for urolithiasis in space flight crews.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey A; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Schmid, Josef F; Barr, Yael R; Griffith, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced microgravity appears to be a risk factor for the development of urinary calculi, resulting in urolithiasis during and after spaceflight. Calcifying nanoparticles, or nanobacteria, multiply more rapidly in simulated microgravity and create external shells of calcium phosphate. The question arises whether calcifying nanoparticles are nidi for calculi and contribute to the development of clinically significant urolithiasis in those who are predisposed to the development of urinary calculi because of intrinsic or extrinsic factors. This case report describes a calculus recovered after flight from an astronaut that, on morphologic and immunochemical analysis (including specific monoclonal antibody staining), demonstrated characteristics of calcifying nanoparticles. PMID:18718644

  18. The association between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) +405G>C genetic polymorphism and endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lili; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important candidate genes for the development of endometriosis, and VEGF genetic polymorphisms might be potentially associated with endometriosis risk. However, the results still remain controversial. The objective of this study aimed to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis to explore a better understanding of the effects of VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism on the risk of endometriosis. A total of eleven eligible studies were eventually identified in this meta-analysis, including 2829 endometriosis cases and 2947 controls. In the overall analysis, no significant association between the VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism and the risk of endometriosis was detected in all genetic models (for homozygote comparison [CC versus vs. GG]: OR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.67–2.19, P = 0.537; for heterozygote comparison [CG vs. GG]: OR = 1.16, 95% CI 0.86–1.56, P = 0.348; for dominant comparison CC/CG vs. GG: OR = 1.10, 95% CI 0.93–1.30, P = 0.263; for recessive comparison [CC vs. CG/GG]: OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.73–1.47, P = 0.857; allele comparison [C vs. G]: OR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.70–1.40, P = 0.962). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicities, there was no significant association between VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism and endometriosis risk in Asians and/or Caucasians under all genetic models (all P-values >0.05). No publication bias was observed in this study. This meta-analysis supports that the VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism is not significant associated with the risk of endometriosis. PMID:25573961

  19. The association between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) +405G>C genetic polymorphism and endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Gong, Lili; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Ling

    2015-09-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important candidate genes for the development of endometriosis, and VEGF genetic polymorphisms might be potentially associated with endometriosis risk. However, the results still remain controversial. The objective of this study aimed to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis to explore a better understanding of the effects of VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism on the risk of endometriosis. A total of eleven eligible studies were eventually identified in this meta-analysis, including 2829 endometriosis cases and 2947 controls. In the overall analysis, no significant association between the VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism and the risk of endometriosis was detected in all genetic models (for homozygote comparison [CC versus vs. GG]: OR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.67-2.19, P = 0.537; for heterozygote comparison [CG vs. GG]: OR = 1.16, 95% CI 0.86-1.56, P = 0.348; for dominant comparison CC/CG vs. GG: OR = 1.10, 95% CI 0.93-1.30, P = 0.263; for recessive comparison [CC vs. CG/GG]: OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.73-1.47, P = 0.857; allele comparison [C vs. G]: OR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.70-1.40, P = 0.962). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicities, there was no significant association between VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism and endometriosis risk in Asians and/or Caucasians under all genetic models (all P-values >0.05). No publication bias was observed in this study. This meta-analysis supports that the VEGF +405G>C genetic polymorphism is not significant associated with the risk of endometriosis.

  20. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Wesley K.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Zuber, Verena; LeBlanc, Marissa; Bettella, Francesco; Mills, Ian G.; Desikan, Rahul S.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Gautvik, Kaare M.; Dale, Anders M.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR) method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD) associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD) at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity. PMID:26695485

  1. Identification of genetic factors that modify motor performance and body weight using Collaborative Cross mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian-Hua; Langley, Sasha A; Huang, Yurong; Hang, Michael; Bouchard, Kristofer E; Celniker, Susan E; Brown, James B; Jansson, Janet K; Karpen, Gary H; Snijders, Antoine M

    2015-11-09

    Evidence has emerged that suggests a link between motor deficits, obesity and many neurological disorders. However, the contributing genetic risk factors are poorly understood. Here we used the Collaborative Cross (CC), a large panel of newly inbred mice that captures 90% of the known variation among laboratory mice, to identify the genetic loci controlling rotarod performance and its relationship with body weight in a cohort of 365 mice across 16 CC strains. Body weight and rotarod performance varied widely across CC strains and were significantly negatively correlated. Genetic linkage analysis identified 14 loci that were associated with body weight. However, 45 loci affected rotarod performance, seven of which were also associated with body weight, suggesting a strong link at the genetic level. Lastly, we show that genes identified in this study overlap significantly with those related to neurological disorders and obesity found in human GWA studies. In conclusion, our results provide a genetic framework for studies of the connection between body weight, the central nervous system and behavior.

  2. Identification of genetic factors that modify motor performance and body weight using Collaborative Cross mice

    DOE PAGES

    Mao, Jian -Hua; Langley, Sasha A.; Huang, Yurong; Hang, Michael; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Karpen, Gary H.; Snijders, Antoine M.

    2015-11-09

    Evidence has emerged that suggests a link between motor deficits, obesity and many neurological disorders. However, the contributing genetic risk factors are poorly understood. Here we used the Collaborative Cross (CC), a large panel of newly inbred mice that captures 90% of the known variation among laboratory mice, to identify the genetic loci controlling rotarod performance and its relationship with body weight in a cohort of 365 mice across 16 CC strains. Body weight and rotarod performance varied widely across CC strains and were significantly negatively correlated. Genetic linkage analysis identified 14 loci that were associated with body weight. However,more » 45 loci affected rotarod performance, seven of which were also associated with body weight, suggesting a strong link at the genetic level. As a result, we show that genes identified in this study overlap significantly with those related to neurological disorders and obesity found in human GWA studies. In conclusion, our results provide a genetic framework for studies of the connection between body weight, the central nervous system and behavior.« less

  3. Identification of genetic factors that modify motor performance and body weight using Collaborative Cross mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jian -Hua; Langley, Sasha A.; Huang, Yurong; Hang, Michael; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Karpen, Gary H.; Snijders, Antoine M.

    2015-11-09

    Evidence has emerged that suggests a link between motor deficits, obesity and many neurological disorders. However, the contributing genetic risk factors are poorly understood. Here we used the Collaborative Cross (CC), a large panel of newly inbred mice that captures 90% of the known variation among laboratory mice, to identify the genetic loci controlling rotarod performance and its relationship with body weight in a cohort of 365 mice across 16 CC strains. Body weight and rotarod performance varied widely across CC strains and were significantly negatively correlated. Genetic linkage analysis identified 14 loci that were associated with body weight. However, 45 loci affected rotarod performance, seven of which were also associated with body weight, suggesting a strong link at the genetic level. As a result, we show that genes identified in this study overlap significantly with those related to neurological disorders and obesity found in human GWA studies. In conclusion, our results provide a genetic framework for studies of the connection between body weight, the central nervous system and behavior.

  4. Environmental factors shape the community of symbionts in the hoopoe uropygial gland more than genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Soler, Juan J; Martín-Vivaldi, Manuel; Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Méndez, María; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan M; Ananou, Samir; Valdivia, Eva; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Exploring processes of coevolution of microorganisms and their hosts is a new imperative for life sciences. If bacteria protect hosts against pathogens, mechanisms facilitating the intergenerational transmission of such bacteria will be strongly selected by evolution. By disentangling the diversity of bacterial strains from the uropygium of hoopoes (Upupa epops) due to genetic relatedness or to a common environment, we explored the importance of horizontal (from the environment) and vertical (from parents) acquisition of antimicrobial-producing symbionts in this species. For this purpose, we compared bacterial communities among individuals in nonmanipulated nests; we also performed a cross-fostering experiment using recently hatched nestlings before uropygial gland development and some nestlings that were reared outside hoopoe nests. The capacity of individuals to acquire microbial symbionts horizontally during their development was supported by our results, since cross-fostered nestlings share bacterial strains with foster siblings and nestlings that were not in contact with hoopoe adults or nests also developed the symbiosis. Moreover, nestlings could change some bacterial strains over the course of their stay in the nest, and adult females changed their bacterial community in different years. However, a low rate of vertical transmission was inferred, since genetic siblings reared in different nests shared more bacterial strains than they shared with unrelated nestlings raised in different nests. In conclusion, hoopoes are able to incorporate new symbionts from the environment during the development of the uropygium, which could be a selective advantage if strains with higher antimicrobial capacity are incorporated into the gland and could aid hosts in fighting against pathogenic and disease-causing microbes.

  5. Environmental factors shape the community of symbionts in the hoopoe uropygial gland more than genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Soler, Juan J; Martín-Vivaldi, Manuel; Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Méndez, María; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan M; Ananou, Samir; Valdivia, Eva; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Exploring processes of coevolution of microorganisms and their hosts is a new imperative for life sciences. If bacteria protect hosts against pathogens, mechanisms facilitating the intergenerational transmission of such bacteria will be strongly selected by evolution. By disentangling the diversity of bacterial strains from the uropygium of hoopoes (Upupa epops) due to genetic relatedness or to a common environment, we explored the importance of horizontal (from the environment) and vertical (from parents) acquisition of antimicrobial-producing symbionts in this species. For this purpose, we compared bacterial communities among individuals in nonmanipulated nests; we also performed a cross-fostering experiment using recently hatched nestlings before uropygial gland development and some nestlings that were reared outside hoopoe nests. The capacity of individuals to acquire microbial symbionts horizontally during their development was supported by our results, since cross-fostered nestlings share bacterial strains with foster siblings and nestlings that were not in contact with hoopoe adults or nests also developed the symbiosis. Moreover, nestlings could change some bacterial strains over the course of their stay in the nest, and adult females changed their bacterial community in different years. However, a low rate of vertical transmission was inferred, since genetic siblings reared in different nests shared more bacterial strains than they shared with unrelated nestlings raised in different nests. In conclusion, hoopoes are able to incorporate new symbionts from the environment during the development of the uropygium, which could be a selective advantage if strains with higher antimicrobial capacity are incorporated into the gland and could aid hosts in fighting against pathogenic and disease-causing microbes. PMID:25172851

  6. Belief and disbelief in the existence of genetic risk factors for suicide: cross-cultural comparisons.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin

    2007-12-01

    There is evidence for widespread disbelief in the genetics of suicide, despite recent research progress in this area and convergent evidence supporting a role for genetic factors. This study analyzed the beliefs held in 8 samples (total N = 1224) of various types (psychology, medical, and various undergraduates, psychology graduates, and the general population) from 6 countries located on 3 continents (Austria, Canada, Malaysia, Romania, United Kingdom, and the USA). Endorsement rates for the existence of genetic risk factors for suicide ranged from 26% and 30% (Austrian psychology undergraduates and general population) to around 50% (psychology undergraduates in the USA and United Kingdom). In the 8 samples, respondents' sex, age, religiosity, political orientation, and other demographic variables were, for the most part, unrelated, but overall knowledge about suicide throughout was related positively to endorsement rates. Consistent with previous research, across a considerable variety of sample types and cultural settings there was no evidence for a clear majority believing in genetic bases for suicide. PMID:18361135

  7. Factors Affecting the Incidence of Angel Wing in White Roman Geese: Stocking Density and Genetic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, M. J.; Chang, S. C.; Lin, T. Y.; Cheng, Y. S.; Lee, Y. P.; Fan, Y. K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated stocking density and genetic lines, factors that may alter the severity and incidence of angel wing (AW), in White Roman geese. Geese (n = 384) from two genetically selected lines (normal- winged line, NL, and angel-winged line, AL, respectively) and one commercial line (CL) were raised in four pens. Following common commercial practice, low-stocking-density (LD), medium-stocking-density, and high-stocking-density treatments were respectively administered to 24, 32, and 40 geese per pen at 0 to 3 weeks (1.92 m2/pen) and 4 to 6 weeks (13.2 m2/pen) of age and to 24, 30, and 36 geese at 7 to 14 weeks (20.0 m2/pen) of age. The results revealed that stocking density mainly affected body weight gain in geese younger than 4 weeks, and that geese subjected to LD had a high body weight at 2 weeks of age. However, the effect of stocking density on the severity score of AW (SSAW) and incidence of AW (IAW) did not differ significantly among the treatments. Differences were observed among the genetic stocks; that is, SSAW and IAW were significantly higher in AL than in NL and CL. Genetic selection generally aggravates AW, complicating its elimination. To effectively reduce IAW, stocking density, a suspected causal factor, should be lower than that presently applied commercially. PMID:26954185

  8. Factors Affecting the Incidence of Angel Wing in White Roman Geese: Stocking Density and Genetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Lin, M J; Chang, S C; Lin, T Y; Cheng, Y S; Lee, Y P; Fan, Y K

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigated stocking density and genetic lines, factors that may alter the severity and incidence of angel wing (AW), in White Roman geese. Geese (n = 384) from two genetically selected lines (normal- winged line, NL, and angel-winged line, AL, respectively) and one commercial line (CL) were raised in four pens. Following common commercial practice, low-stocking-density (LD), medium-stocking-density, and high-stocking-density treatments were respectively administered to 24, 32, and 40 geese per pen at 0 to 3 weeks (1.92 m(2)/pen) and 4 to 6 weeks (13.2 m(2)/pen) of age and to 24, 30, and 36 geese at 7 to 14 weeks (20.0 m(2)/pen) of age. The results revealed that stocking density mainly affected body weight gain in geese younger than 4 weeks, and that geese subjected to LD had a high body weight at 2 weeks of age. However, the effect of stocking density on the severity score of AW (SSAW) and incidence of AW (IAW) did not differ significantly among the treatments. Differences were observed among the genetic stocks; that is, SSAW and IAW were significantly higher in AL than in NL and CL. Genetic selection generally aggravates AW, complicating its elimination. To effectively reduce IAW, stocking density, a suspected causal factor, should be lower than that presently applied commercially.

  9. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) separate from the computer to which the practitioner is gaining access. (b) If one factor is a hard token, it must be separate from the computer to which it is gaining access and must meet at least the criteria of FIPS 140-2 Security Level 1, as incorporated by reference in § 1311.08, for...

  10. The Quality of Genetic Counseling and Connected Factors as Evaluated by Male BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kajula, Outi; Kääriäinen, Maria; Moilanen, Jukka S; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2016-06-01

    There is little written about the quality of genetic counseling for men with the BRCA1/2 mutation. The purpose of this study was to describe the quality of genetic counseling and connected factors according to Finnish male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers' (n = 35) perspectives and reasons for seeking genetic counseling. Data were collected from the Departments of Clinical Genetics at five Finnish university hospitals. The exploratory study design was conducted using a 51-item questionnaire based on a previously devised quality of counseling model and analyzed using non-parametric tests and principle content analysis. The satisfaction level with genetic counseling was high, especially with regard to the content of genetic counseling. The benefit of genetic counseling on the quality of life differed significantly (p < 0.001-0.009) from other factors. In particular, genetic counseling was in some cases associated to reduce the quality of life. Only 49 % of the male carriers felt they received sufficient counseling on social support. Attention to individual psychosocial support was proposed as an improvement to genetic counseling. Primary and secondary reasons for seeking genetic counseling and background information, such as education, affected the perceived quality of genetic counseling. The results of the study could be used to tailor genetic counseling for male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  11. The effect of nutritional additives on anti-infective factors in human milk.

    PubMed

    Quan, R; Yang, C; Rubinstein, S; Lewiston, N J; Stevenson, D K; Kerner, J A

    1994-06-01

    It has become a common practice to supplement human milk with a variety of additives to improve the nutritive content of the feeding for the premature infant. Twenty-two freshly frozen human milk samples were measured for lysozyme activity, total IgA, and specific IgA to Escherichia coli serotypes 01, 04, and 06. One mL aliquots were mixed with the following: 1 mL of Similac, Similac Special Care, Enfamil, Enfamil Premature Formula, and sterile water; 33 mL of Poly-Vi-Sol, 33 mg of Moducal, and 38 mg of breast-milk fortifier, and then reanalyzed. Significant decreases (41% to 74%) in lysozyme activity were seen with the addition of all formulas; breast-milk fortifier reduced activity by 19%, while no differences were seen with Moducal, sterile water, or Poly-Vi-Sol. No differences were seen in total IgA content, but some decreases were seen in specific IgA to E. coli serotypes 04 and 06. E. coli growth was determined after 3 1/2 hours of incubation at 37 degrees C after mixing. All cow-milk formulas enhanced E. coli growth; soy formulas and other additives preserved inhibition of bacterial growth. Nutritional additives can impair anti-infective properties of human milk, and such interplay should be considered in the decision on the feeding regimen of premature infants.

  12. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 377.22 What additional... strategies to increase client choice, in order to ensure that a variety of approaches are demonstrated...

  13. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 377.22 What additional... strategies to increase client choice, in order to ensure that a variety of approaches are demonstrated...

  14. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: comparing meta and mega analytical approaches for data pooling

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E.; Mandl, René C.; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T.; Hong, L. Elliot; Landman, Bennett A.; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna; Martin, Nicholas G.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Olvera, Rene L.; Peterson, Charles P.; Starr, John M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Wright, Susan N.; Bastin, Mark E.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, René S.; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Blangero, John; van ’t Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M.; Glahn, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9–85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large “mega-family”. We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  15. Complex molecular genetic abnormalities involving three or more genetic mutations are important prognostic factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wakita, S; Yamaguchi, H; Ueki, T; Usuki, K; Kurosawa, S; Kobayashi, Y; Kawata, E; Tajika, K; Gomi, S; Koizumi, M; Fujiwara, Y; Yui, S; Fukunaga, K; Ryotokuji, T; Hirakawa, T; Arai, K; Kitano, T; Kosaka, F; Tamai, H; Nakayama, K; Fukuda, T; Inokuchi, K

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of 28 recurrently mutated genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 271 patients with de novo AML. Co-mutations were frequently detected in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, at an average of 2.76 co-mutations per patient. When assessing the prognostic impact of these co-mutations in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, overall survival (OS) was found to be significantly shorter (P=0.0006) and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) significantly higher (P=0.0052) in patients with complex molecular genetic abnormalities (CMGAs) involving three or more mutations. This trend was marked even among patients aged ⩽65 years who were also FLT3-ITD (FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplications)-negative (OS: P=0.0010; CIR: P=0.1800). Moreover, the multivariate analysis revealed that CMGA positivity was an independent prognostic factor associated with OS (P=0.0007). In stratification based on FLT3-ITD and CEBPA status and 'simplified analysis of co-mutations' using seven genes that featured frequently in CMGAs, CMGA positivity retained its prognostic value in transplantation-aged patients of the intermediate cytogenetic risk group (OS: P=0.0002. CIR: P<0.0001). In conclusion, CMGAs in AML were found to be strong independent adverse prognostic factors and simplified co-mutation analysis to have clinical usefulness and applicability.

  16. Use of a twin dataset to identify AMD-related visual patterns controlled by genetic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quellec, Gwénolé; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Russell, Stephen R.

    2010-03-01

    The mapping of genotype to the phenotype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is expected to improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in a near future. In this study, we focused on the first step to discover this mapping: we identified visual patterns related to AMD which seem to be controlled by genetic factors, without explicitly relating them to the genes. For this purpose, we used a dataset of eye fundus photographs from 74 twin pairs, either monozygotic twins, who have the same genotype, or dizygotic twins, whose genes responsible for AMD are less likely to be identical. If we are able to differentiate monozygotic twins from dizygotic twins, based on a given visual pattern, then this pattern is likely to be controlled by genetic factors. The main visible consequence of AMD is the apparition of drusen between the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane. We developed two automated drusen detectors based on the wavelet transform: a shape-based detector for hard drusen, and a texture- and color- based detector for soft drusen. Forty visual features were evaluated at the location of the automatically detected drusen. These features characterize the texture, the shape, the color, the spatial distribution, or the amount of drusen. A distance measure between twin pairs was defined for each visual feature; a smaller distance should be measured between monozygotic twins for visual features controlled by genetic factors. The predictions of several visual features (75.7% accuracy) are comparable or better than the predictions of human experts.

  17. Interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Jacob, G.; Pohar, B.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (IOI) have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are not understood. If genetic predisposition were important in the pathogenesis of IOI, monozygotic twins of patients with IOI should have similar hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities. METHODS: We studied two patients with IOI and their identical twins. Both siblings in the first twin pair had orthostatic symptoms, significant orthostatic tachycardia, increased plasma norepinephrine levels with standing, and a greater than normal decrease in systolic blood pressure with trimethaphan infusion. RESULTS: Both siblings had a normal response of plasma renin activity to upright posture. In the second twin pair, only one sibling had symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, an orthostatic tachycardia, and raised plasma catecholamines with standing. The affected sibling had inappropriately low plasma renin activity with standing and was 8-fold more sensitive to the pressor effect of phenylephrine than the unaffected sibling. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in some patients, IOI seems to be strongly influenced by genetic factors. In others, however, IOI may be mainly caused by nongenetic factors. These findings suggest that IOI is heterogenous, and that both genetic and environmental factors contribute individually or collectively to create the IOI phenotype.

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plowman, G D; Whitney, G S; Neubauer, M G; Green, J M; McDonald, V L; Todaro, G J; Shoyab, M

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-alpha in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-beta. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-alpha on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that overexpress EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here we report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which we have named "HER3/ERRB3." The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. We have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth. Images PMID:2164210

  19. Nonchromosomal Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria: Genetic Transformation of Escherichia coli by R-Factor DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stanley N.; Chang, Annie C. Y.; Hsu, Leslie

    1972-01-01

    Transformation of E. coli cells treated with CaCl2 to multiple antibiotic resistance by purified R-factor DNA is reported. Drug resistance is expressed in a small fraction of the recipient bacterial population almost immediately after uptake of DNA, but full genetic expression of resistance requires subsequent incubation in drugfree medium before antibiotic challenge. Transformed bacteria acquire a closed circular, transferable DNA species having the resistance, fertility, and sedimentation characteristics of the parent R factor. Covalently-closed, catenated, and open (nicked) circular forms of R-factor DNA are all effective in transformation, but denaturation and sonication abolish the transforming ability of R-factor DNA in this system. PMID:4559594

  20. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael

    2011-06-23

    Plants utilize light as a source of information via families of photoreceptors such as the red/far-red absorbing phytochromes (PHY) and the blue/UVA absorbing cryptochromes (CRY). The main goal of the Neff lab is to use molecular-genetic mutant screens to elucidate signaling components downstream of these photoreceptors. Activation-tagging mutagenesis led to the identification of two putative transcription factors that may be involved in both photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling pathways. sob1-D (suppressor of phyB-dominant) mutant phenotypes are caused by the over-expression of a Dof transcription factor previously named OBP3. Our previous studies indicate that OBP3 is a negative regulator of light-mediated cotyledon expansion and may be involved in modulating responsiveness to the growth-regulating hormone auxin. The sob2-D mutant uncovers a role for LEP, a putative AP2/EREBP-like transcription factor, in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation and responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid. Based on photobiological and genetic analysis of OBP3-knockdown and LEP-null mutations, we hypothesize that these transcription factors are involved in both light-mediated seedling development and hormone signaling. To examine the role that these genes play in photomorphogenesis we will: 1) Further explore the genetic role of OBP3 in cotyledon/leaf expansion and other photomorphogenic processes as well as examine potential physical interactions between OBP3 and CRY1 or other signaling components that genetically interact with this transcription factor 2) Test the hypothesis that OBP3 is genetically involved in auxin signaling and root development as well as examine the affects of this hormone and light on OBP3 protein accumulation. 3) Test the hypothesis that LEP is involved in seed germination, seedling photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling. Together these experiments will lead to a greater understanding of the complexity of interactions between photoreceptors and DNA

  1. PGD for cystic fibrosis patients and couples at risk of an additional genetic disorder combined with 24-chromosome aneuploidy testing.

    PubMed

    Rechitsky, Svetlana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Kuliev, Anver

    2013-05-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for inherited disorders is presently applied for more than 300 different conditions. The most frequent PGD indication is cystic fibrosis (CF), the largest series of which is reviewed here, totalling 404 PGD cycles. This involved testing for 52 different CFTR mutations with almost half of the cases (195/404 cycles) performed for ΔF508 mutation, one-quarter (103/404 cycles) for six other frequent mutations and only a few for the remaining 45 CFTR mutations. There were 44 PGD cycles performed for 25 CF-affected homozygous or double-heterozygous CF patients (18 male and seven female partners), which involved testing simultaneously for three mutations, resulting in birth of 13 healthy CF-free children and no misdiagnosis. PGD was also performed for six couples at a combined risk of producing offspring with CF and another genetic disorder. Concomitant testing for CFTR and other mutations resulted in birth of six healthy children, free of both CF and another genetic disorder in all but one cycle. A total of 96 PGD cycles for CF were performed with simultaneous aneuploidy testing, including microarray-based 24-chromosome analysis, as a comprehensive PGD for two or more conditions in the same biopsy material.

  2. Regulation of migration in Mythimna separata (Walker) in China: a review integrating environmental, physiological, hormonal, genetic, and molecular factors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingfu; Luo, Lizhi; Zhang, Lei; Sappington, Thomas W; Hu, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Each year the Mythimna separate (Walker), undertakes a seasonal, long-distance, multigeneration roundtrip migration between southern and northern China. Despite its regularity, the decision to migrate is facultative, and is controlled by environmental, physiological, hormonal, genetic, and molecular factors. Migrants take off on days 1 or 2 after eclosion, although the preoviposition period lasts ≈7 d. The trade-offs among the competing physiological demands of migration and reproduction are coordinated in M. separata by the "oogenesis-flight syndrome." Larvae that experience temperatures above or below certain thresholds accompanied by appropriate humidity, short photoperiod, poor nutrition, and moderate density tend to develop into migrants. However, there is a short window of sensitivity within 24 h after adult eclosion when migrants can be induced to switch to reproductive residents if they encounter extreme environmental factors including starvation, low temperature and long photoperiod. Juvenile hormone (JH) titer is low before migration but high titers are associated with termination of migratory behavior and the switch to reproduction. Early release of JH by the corpora allata in environmentally stressed 1-d old adults, otherwise destined by larval conditions to be migrants, switches them to residents. Offspring inherit parental additive genetic effects governing migratory behavior. However, they also retain flexibility in expression of both flight and reproductive life history traits. The insect neuropeptide, allatotropin, which activates corpora allata to synthesize JH, controls adult flight and reproduction. Future research directions to better understand regulation of migration in this species are discussed.

  3. Genetic and nongenetic factors associated with warfarin dose requirements in Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Mohamed Hossam A.; Khalifa, Sherief I.; Gong, Yan; Hammad, Lamiaa N.; Sallam, Mohamed T.H.; Shafey, Mostafa El; Ali, Shawky S.; Mohamed, Mohamed-Eslam F.; Langaee, Taimour; Johnson, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective Warfarin is a commonly used oral anticoagulant with a narrow therapeutic index and various genetic and clinical factors that influence interpatient variability in dose requirements. This study investigated the impact of genetic and nongenetic factors on warfarin dose requirements in Egyptians. Methods DNA was extracted from 207 patients taking warfarin for more than 2 months and genotyped for VKORC1 (3673 G> A), CYP2C9 *2*3*4*5*8, CYP4F2 (V33M; rs2108622), APOE (rs429358, rs7412), and CALU (rs339097) gene polymorphisms. Linear regression modeling was conducted to identify the genetic and nongenetic factors that independently influence warfarin dose requirements. Results VKORC1 3673 AA or GA genotype (P < 0.0001), one or two variant alleles of CYP2C9 gene (P= 0.0004), APOE ε2 haplotype (P = 0.01), and increasing age (P < 0.0001) were all associated with lower warfarin dose, whereas smoking (P = 0.025) and pulmonary embolism (P = 0.0059) showed association with higher warfarin doses. These factors explained 31% of the warfarin dose variability. This is the first independent confirmation of the association of the CALU rs339097 variant with higher warfarin dose requirement, although inclusion of this single nucleotide polymorphism in the multiple regression model failed to achieve significance (P = 0.066). CYP4F2 (V33M) polymorphism was not significant (P = 0.314), despite its high frequency in the studied population (42%). Conclusion The study shows that VKORC1, CYP2C9 polymorphisms, APOE ε2 variant, and several clinical/ demographic variables are important determinants of warfarin dose requirements in Egyptian patients. The percentage of variability explained by these factors is lower than in those of European ancestry, but similar to the variability explained in Asians and African ancestry. PMID:21228733

  4. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs.

  5. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs. PMID:24879639

  6. Determinants of hierarchical genetic structure in Atlantic salmon populations: environmental factors vs. anthropogenic influences.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Charles; Guyomard, René; Bagliniere, Jean-Luc; Evanno, Guillaume

    2011-10-01

    Disentangling the effects of natural environmental features and anthropogenic factors on the genetic structure of endangered populations is an important challenge for conservation biology. Here, we investigated the combined influences of major environmental features and stocking with non-native fish on the genetic structure and local adaptation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations. We used 17 microsatellite loci to genotype 975 individuals originating from 34 French rivers. Bayesian analyses revealed a hierarchical genetic structure into five geographically distinct clusters. Coastal distance, geological substrate and river length were strong predictors of population structure. Gene flow was higher among rivers with similar geologies, suggesting local adaptation to geological substrate. The effect of river length was mainly owing to one highly differentiated population that has the farthest spawning grounds off the river mouth (up to 900km) and the largest fish, suggesting local adaptation to river length. We detected high levels of admixture in stocked populations but also in neighbouring ones, implying large-scale impacts of stocking through dispersal of non-native individuals. However, we found relatively few admixed individuals suggesting a lower fitness of stocked fish and/or some reproductive isolation between wild and stocked individuals. When excluding stocked populations, genetic structure increased as did its correlation with environmental factors. This study overall indicates that geological substrate and river length are major environmental factors influencing gene flow and potential local adaptation among Atlantic salmon populations but that stocking with non-native individuals may ultimately disrupt these natural patterns of gene flow among locally adapted populations.

  7. Genetic and environmental factors behind foliar chemistry of the mature mountain birch.

    PubMed

    Haviola, Sanna; Neuvonen, Seppo; Rantala, Markus J; Saikkonen, Kari; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Saloniemi, Irma; Yang, Shiyong; Ruuhola, Teija

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies of mountain birch (Betula pubescens spp. czerepanovii) repeatedly have found differences between individual trees in herbivory-related traits, but rarely have yielded estimates of the additive genetic variation of these traits or of their relationship to habitat. We used thirty-year-old birch half-sibs in a northern common garden to estimate the effect of genetics and local microhabitat on resistance-related traits. Genetic estimates of foliar chemistry have been studied only rarely with trees as old as these. Moth performance (Epirrita autumnata), rust (Melampsoridium betulinum) incidence levels, and the general level of natural herbivory damage to individual trees were used as direct measures of birch resistance. Chemical resistance-related traits in plant chemistry included 15 individual phenolics, 16 amino acids, and phenoloxidase activities in the foliage. We also followed birch phenology and growth. Our results show that the genotype of the birch was the most important determinant of phenolic composition and phenoloxidase activity, but that amino acid levels were best explained by the microhabitat of the birch. We also found that the phenology of the birch had a high heritability, although its variation was low. Our results reveal rich genetic variation in birch chemistry.

  8. Twins and virtual twins: Do genetic (as well as experiential) factors affect developmental risks?

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L; Tan, Tony Xing; Graham, Jamie L

    2015-08-01

    Factors underlying developmental delays and psychosocial risks are of interest to international adoption communities. The current study administered a Pre-Adoption Adversity (PAA) Questionnaire to mostly American parents raising (a) adopted Chinese twins or (b) same-age unrelated adopted siblings. A goal was to replicate earlier analyses of pre-adoption adversity/adjustment among adopted preschool-age Chinese girls. A second goal was to conduct genetic analyses of four content areas (Developmental Delays at Adoption, Initial Adaptation to Adoption, Crying/Clinging, and Refusal/Avoidance) derived from the PAA Questionnaire. A key finding was that age at adoption added less than other predictors to adoptees' externalizing and internalizing behaviors. Family factors (e.g., parental education) contributed significantly to behavioral outcomes among the adopted Chinese twins. Genetic effects were indicated for all four content areas, with shared environmental effects evident for Developmental Delays at Adoption and Crying/Clinging. Future investigators should consider incorporating genetically sensitive designs into developmental research programs.

  9. Coregulation of genetic programs by the transcription factors NFIB and STAT5.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gertraud W; Kang, Keunsoo; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Tang, Yong; Zhu, Bing-Mei; Yamaji, Daisuke; Colditz, Vera; Jang, Seung Jian; Gronostajski, Richard M; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Mammary-specific genetic programs are activated during pregnancy by the common transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5. More than one third of these genes carry nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) binding motifs that coincide with STAT5 in vivo binding, suggesting functional synergy between these two transcription factors. The role of NFIB in this governance was investigated in mice from which Nfib had been inactivated in mammary stem cells or in differentiating alveolar epithelium. Although NFIB was not required for alveolar expansion, the combined absence of NFIB and STAT5 prevented the formation of functional alveoli. NFIB controlled the expression of mammary-specific and STAT5-regulated genes and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing established STAT5 and NFIB binding at composite regulatory elements containing histone H3 lysine dimethylation enhancer marks and progesterone receptor binding. By integrating previously published chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing data sets, the presence of NFIB-STAT5 modules in other cell types was investigated. Notably, genomic sites bound by NFIB in hair follicle stem cells were also occupied by STAT5 in mammary epithelium and coincided with enhancer marks. Many of these genes were under NFIB control in both hair follicle stem cells and mammary alveolar epithelium. We propose that NFIB-STAT5 modules, possibly in conjunction with other transcription factors, control cell-specific genetic programs.

  10. [Methylmercury exposure in the general population; toxicokinetics; differences by gender, nutritional and genetic factors].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    Mercury is an environmental toxicant that causes numerous adverse effects on human health and natural ecosystems. The factors that determine the existance of adverse effects, as well as their severity are, among others: the chemical form of mercury (elemental, inorganic, organic), dosis, age, period of exposure, pathways of exposure and environmental, nutritional and genetic factors. In the aquatic cycle of mercury, once it has been deposited, it is transformed into methylmercury due to the action of certain sulphate-reducing bacteria, which bioaccumulates in the aquatic organisms and moves into the food chain. The methylmercury content of large, long-lived fish such as swordfish, shark, tuna or marlin, is higher. Methylmercury binds to protein in fish and is therefore not eliminated by cleaning or cooking the fish. Fetuses and small children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of methylmercury from the consumption of contaminated fish. Methylmercury is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and crosses the blood-brain barrier and the placenta. The intake of certain dietary components such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, selenium, fiber, thiol compounds, certain phytochemicals and other nutrients can modify methylmercury bioaccesibility and its toxicity. Apart from environmental factors, genetic factors can influence mercury toxicity and explain part of the individual vulnerability.

  11. [Methylmercury exposure in the general population; toxicokinetics; differences by gender, nutritional and genetic factors].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is an environmental toxicant that causes numerous adverse effects on human health and natural ecosystems. The factors that determine the existance of adverse effects, as well as their severity are, among others: the chemical form of mercury (elemental, inorganic, organic), dosis, age, period of exposure, pathways of exposure and environmental, nutritional and genetic factors. In the aquatic cycle of mercury, once it has been deposited, it is transformed into methylmercury due to the action of certain sulphate-reducing bacteria, which bioaccumulates in the aquatic organisms and moves into the food chain. The methylmercury content of large, long-lived fish such as swordfish, shark, tuna or marlin, is higher. Methylmercury binds to protein in fish and is therefore not eliminated by cleaning or cooking the fish. Fetuses and small children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of methylmercury from the consumption of contaminated fish. Methylmercury is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and crosses the blood-brain barrier and the placenta. The intake of certain dietary components such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, selenium, fiber, thiol compounds, certain phytochemicals and other nutrients can modify methylmercury bioaccesibility and its toxicity. Apart from environmental factors, genetic factors can influence mercury toxicity and explain part of the individual vulnerability. PMID:25365001

  12. Aitchbone hanging and ageing period are additive factors influencing pork eating quality.

    PubMed

    Channon, H A; Taverner, M R; D'Souza, D N; Warner, R D

    2014-01-01

    The effects of abattoir, carcase weight (60 or 80 kg HCW), hanging method (Achilles or aitchbone) and ageing period (2 or 7 day post-slaughter) on eating quality attributes of pork were investigated in this 3×2×2×2 factorial study. A total of 144 Large White×Landrace female pigs were slaughtered at one of three abattoirs and sides hung from either the Achilles tendon or the aitchbone. After 24 h chilling, loin (M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum) and topside (M. semimembranosus) muscles were individually vacuum packaged and aged for 2 or 7 days post-slaughter. Consumers (n=852) evaluated eating quality. Neither abattoir nor carcase weight influenced tenderness, flavour or overall liking of pork. Improvements in tenderness, flavour and overall liking were found due to aitchbone hanging (P<0.001) and ageing (P<0.001) for 7 days compared with Achilles-hung carcases and pork aged for 2 days, respectively. This study demonstrated that aitchbone hanging and 7 day ageing can improve eating quality, but these effects were additive as the interaction term was not significant. PMID:24013699

  13. Electrical inhibition of lens epithelial cell proliferation: an additional factor in secondary cataract?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Entong; Reid, Brian; Lois, Noemi; Forrester, John V.; McCaig, Colin D.; Zhao, Min

    2005-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of blindness but is at least curable by surgery. Unfortunately, many patients gradually develop the complication of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract. This arises from stimulated cell growth within the lens capsule and can greatly impair vision. It is not fully understood why residual lens epithelial cell growth occurs after surgery. We propose and show that cataract surgery might remove an important inhibitory factor for lens cell growth, namely electric fields. The lens generates a unique pattern of electric currents constantly flowing out from the equator and entering the anterior and posterior poles. We show here that cutting and removing part of the anterior capsule as in cataract surgery significantly decreases the equatorial outward electric currents. Application of electric fields in culture inhibits proliferation of human lens epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect is likely to be mediated through a cell cycle control mechanism that decreases entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase by decreasing the G1-specific cell cycle protein cyclin E and increasing the cyclin-Cdk complex inhibitor p27kip1. Capsulorrhexis in vivo, which reduced endogenous lens electric fields, significantly increased LEC growth. This, together with our previous findings that electric fields have significant effects on the direction of lens cell migration, points to a controlling mechanism for the aberrant cell growth in posterior capsule opacification. A novel approach to control growth of lens epithelial cells using electric fields combined with other controlling mechanisms may be more effective in the prevention and treatment of this common complication of cataract surgery. PMID:15764648

  14. Insulin resistance: an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tushar P; Rawal, Komal; Bagchi, Ashim K; Akolkar, Gauri; Bernardes, Nathalia; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Gupta, Sarita; Singal, Pawan K

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary life style and high calorie dietary habits are prominent leading cause of metabolic syndrome in modern world. Obesity plays a central role in occurrence of various diseases like hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, which lead to insulin resistance and metabolic derangements like cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mediated by oxidative stress. The mortality rate due to CVDs is on the rise in developing countries. Insulin resistance (IR) leads to micro or macro angiopathy, peripheral arterial dysfunction, hampered blood flow, hypertension, as well as the cardiomyocyte and the endothelial cell dysfunctions, thus increasing risk factors for coronary artery blockage, stroke and heart failure suggesting that there is a strong association between IR and CVDs. The plausible linkages between these two pathophysiological conditions are altered levels of insulin signaling proteins such as IR-β, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, Glut4 and PGC-1α that hamper insulin-mediated glucose uptake as well as other functions of insulin in the cardiomyocytes and the endothelial cells of the heart. Reduced AMPK, PFK-2 and elevated levels of NADP(H)-dependent oxidases produced by activated M1 macrophages of the adipose tissue and elevated levels of circulating angiotensin are also cause of CVD in diabetes mellitus condition. Insulin sensitizers, angiotensin blockers, superoxide scavengers are used as therapeutics in the amelioration of CVD. It evidently becomes important to unravel the mechanisms of the association between IR and CVDs in order to formulate novel efficient drugs to treat patients suffering from insulin resistance-mediated cardiovascular diseases. The possible associations between insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed here. PMID:26542377

  15. Evolution of pesticide resistance: interactions between generation time and genetic, ecological, and operational factors.

    PubMed

    Rosenheim, J; Tabashnik, B E

    1990-08-01

    We used computer simulation modeling to clarify the relationship between generation time and the rate of evolution of pesticide resistance. We examined the influence of generation time under various assumptions about genetics, population dynamics and selection pressures. The simplest model demonstrated that the time required for resistance to evolve can be independent of generation time. However, interactions of generation time with genetic, biological and operational factors resulted in positive, negative, and U-shaped relationships between the number of generations per year and the time required for resistance to evolve. These results preclude any generalizations concerning the influence of generation time on resistance evolution. Some ability to predict the influence of generation time may still exist on a case-by-case basis if the context of the resistance episode can be specified.

  16. Fmr-1 as an offspring genetic and a maternal environmental factor in neurodevelopmental disease.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Bojana; Toth, Miklos

    2012-01-01

    Since fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a typical X-linked mendelian disorder, the protein product associated with the disease (FMRP) is absent or reduced not only in the affected individuals but, in case of full mutation, also in their mothers. Here, by using the mouse model of the disease, we provide evidence that hyperactivity, a typical symptom of FXS, is not wholly induced by the lack of Fmrp in mice but also occurs as a result of its reduced expression in their mother. Genetically wild-type offspring of mutant mothers also had hyperactivity, albeit less pronounced than the mutant offspring. However, other features of FXS reproduced in the mouse model, such as sensory hyperreactivity and seizure susceptibility, were exclusively associated with the absence of Fmrp in the offspring. These data indicate that fmr-1, the gene encoding Fmrp, can be both an offspring genetic and a maternal environmental factor in producing a neurodevelopmental condition.

  17. [Past and present of streptococcus pyogenes: some pathogenic factors and their genetic determination].

    PubMed

    Totolian, A A

    2015-01-01

    In this review two aspects dealt with Streptococcus pyogenes--one of the leading agent responsible for infectious diseases and another related to their complications in humans worldwide--are given. In the first part of the review the comparative evaluation of laboratory diagnostic approaches and methods used in the second half of the twentieth century and molecular technologies developed during last twenty years are described. In the second part the role of the main microbial pathogenic factors as well as the data on intra- and interspecies genetic exchange with extrachromosomal genetic elements and their influence on biological properties of the pathogen are discussed. Essential for today possibilities for molecular epidemiology of streptococcal pathology approaches must be introduces in diagnostic laboratories within the country.

  18. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A; Roth, Frederick P; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2014-04-11

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases.

  19. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A.; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A.; Roth, Frederick P.; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E.; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M.

    2014-01-01

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases. PMID:24722188

  20. Transfer of R factors to and between genetically marked sublines of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, L D

    1979-05-01

    Plasmids R1822 and pRD1 of the P-1 incompatibility group, for which Rhizobium japonicum had not previously been shown to serve as host, were introduced into a strain of R. japonicum. Acquisition of R68 and R68.45 plasmids by this Rhizobium was equivocal. Transfer of R1822 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and of pRD1 from Escherichia coli to R. japonicum was unambiguous, because the exconjugants subsequently cotransferred the three R-factor resistance determinants (kanamycin, tetracycline, and penicillin) between genetically marked sublines of strain I-110. Under optimal conditions the transfer of R1822 and pRD1 occurred at frequencies of approximately 10(-3) in plate matings of strains bearing as many as five dissimilar genetic markers. In matings with R1822 on membrane filters, recombinants were formed at incidences as high as 4%. PMID:114109

  1. Navigating Transcriptional Coregulator Ensembles to Establish Genetic Networks: A GATA Factor Perspective.

    PubMed

    DeVilbiss, A W; Tanimura, N; McIver, S C; Katsumura, K R; Johnson, K D; Bresnick, E H

    2016-01-01

    Complex developmental programs require orchestration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals to control cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Master regulatory transcription factors are vital components of the machinery that transduce these stimuli into cellular responses. This is exemplified by the GATA family of transcription factors that establish cell type-specific genetic networks and control the development and homeostasis of systems including blood, vascular, adipose, and cardiac. Dysregulated GATA factor activity/expression underlies anemia, immunodeficiency, myelodysplastic syndrome, and leukemia. Parameters governing the capacity of a GATA factor expressed in multiple cell types to generate cell type-specific transcriptomes include selective coregulator usage and target gene-specific chromatin states. As knowledge of GATA-1 mechanisms in erythroid cells constitutes a solid foundation, we will focus predominantly on GATA-1, while highlighting principles that can be extrapolated to other master regulators. GATA-1 interacts with ubiquitous and lineage-restricted transcription factors, chromatin modifying/remodeling enzymes, and other coregulators to activate or repress transcription and to maintain preexisting transcriptional states. Major unresolved issues include: how does a GATA factor selectively utilize diverse coregulators; do distinct epigenetic landscapes and nuclear microenvironments of target genes dictate coregulator requirements; and do gene cohorts controlled by a common coregulator ensemble function in common pathways. This review will consider these issues in the context of GATA factor-regulated hematopoiesis and from a broader perspective.

  2. Characterizing the Role of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Genetic Variation in Alzheimer’s Disease Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Perea, Rodrigo D.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Goate, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that neurotrophins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), may impact aging and Alzheimer’s Disease. However, traditional genetic association studies have not found a clear relationship between BDNF and AD. Our goal was to test whether BDNF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) impact Alzheimer’s Disease-related brain imaging and cognitive markers of disease. We completed an imaging genetics study on 645 Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative participants (ND=175, MCI=316, AD=154) who had cognitive, brain imaging, and genetics data at baseline and a subset of those with brain imaging data at two years. Samples were genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad BeadChip. 13 SNPs in BDNF were identified in the dataset following quality control measures (rs6265(Val66Met), rs12273363, rs11030094, rs925946, rs1050187, rs2203877, rs11030104, rs11030108, rs10835211, rs7934165, rs908867, rs1491850, rs1157459). We analyzed a subgroup of 8 SNPs that were in low linkage disequilibrium with each other. Automated brain morphometric measures were available through ADNI investigators, and we analyzed baseline cognitive scores, hippocampal and whole brain volumes, and rates of hippocampal and whole brain atrophy and rates of change in the ADAS-Cog over one and two years. Three out of eight BDNF SNPs analyzed were significantly associated with measures of cognitive decline (rs1157659, rs11030094, rs11030108). No SNPs were significantly associated with baseline brain volume measures, however six SNPs were significantly associated with hippocampal and/or whole brain atrophy over two years (rs908867, rs11030094, rs6265, rs10501087, rs1157659, rs1491850). We also found an interaction between the BDNF Val66Met SNP and age with whole brain volume. Our imaging-genetics analysis in a large dataset suggests that while BDNF genetic variation is not specifically associated with a diagnosis of AD, it appears to play a role in AD-related brain

  3. Genetic factors that affect nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Tyler J; Besur, Siddesh; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of genetic polymorphisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) onset, severity, and outcome through systematic literature review. METHODS: The authors conducted both systematic and specific searches of PubMed through December 2015 with special emphasis on more recent data (from 2012 onward) while still drawing from more historical data for background. We identified several specific genetic polymorphisms that have been most researched and, at this time, appear to have the greatest clinical significance on NAFLD and similar hepatic diseases. These were further investigated to assess their specific effects on disease onset and progression and the mechanisms by which these effects occur. RESULTS: We focus particularly on genetic polymorphisms of the following genes: PNPLA3, particularly the p. I148M variant, TM6SF2, particularly the p. E167K variant, and on variants in FTO, LIPA, IFNλ4, and iron metabolism, specifically focusing on HFE, and HMOX-1. We discuss the effect of these genetic variations and their resultant protein variants on the onset of fatty liver disease and its severity, including the effect on likelihood of progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. While our principal focus is on NAFLD, we also discuss briefly effects of some of the variants on development and severity of other hepatic diseases, including hepatitis C and alcoholic liver disease. These results are briefly discussed in terms of clinical application and future potential for personalized medicine. CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms and genetic factors of several genes contribute to NAFLD and its end results. These genes hold keys to future improvements in diagnosis and management. PMID:27547017

  4. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  5. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  6. A key genetic factor for fucosyllactose utilization affects infant gut microbiota development

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Takahiro; Yahagi, Kana; Mori, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Hoshitaka; Hara, Taeko; Tajima, Saya; Ogawa, Eishin; Kodama, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Yamada, Takuji; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Kurokawa, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that gut microbiota development influences infants' health and subsequent host physiology. However, the factors shaping the development of the microbiota remain poorly understood, and the mechanisms through which these factors affect gut metabolite profiles have not been extensively investigated. Here we analyse gut microbiota development of 27 infants during the first month of life. We find three distinct clusters that transition towards Bifidobacteriaceae-dominant microbiota. We observe considerable differences in human milk oligosaccharide utilization among infant bifidobacteria. Colonization of fucosyllactose (FL)-utilizing bifidobacteria is associated with altered metabolite profiles and microbiota compositions, which have been previously shown to affect infant health. Genome analysis of infants' bifidobacteria reveals an ABC transporter as a key genetic factor for FL utilization. Thus, the ability of bifidobacteria to utilize FL and the presence of FL in breast milk may affect the development of the gut microbiota in infants, and might ultimately have therapeutic implications. PMID:27340092

  7. What Factors Impact upon a Woman’s Decision to Undertake Genetic Cancer Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Quinlivan, Julie A.; Battikhi, Zain; Petersen, Rodney W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The advent of human genome project has lead to genetic tests that identify high-risk states for certain cancers. Many are privately marketed on the Internet. Despite the availability of tests, limited data has evaluated factors that lead to test uptake. The aim of the present study was to explore the attitudes of a cohort of new mothers toward uptake of a genetic cancer test with a 50% predictive value of cancer. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken. The project targeted women who had recently given birth at an Australian tertiary referral hospital. Women were asked about a theoretical blood test that detected an increased risk for the development of cancer. Attitudes and knowledge questionnaires were completed. Results: Of 232 consecutive women approached, 32 declined, giving a response rate of 86.2%. Only 63 (31.5%) women stated they would have the test. Absence of religious belief, higher level of education, better knowledge of terms used in genetics, an absence of concern over emotional, employment, and insurance discrimination, and previous acceptance of Down syndrome screening in pregnancy were each associated with significantly higher rate of test uptake in univariate analysis (all p < 0.03). In multivariate analysis, a lack of concern over discrimination and a history of having accepted Down syndrome screening in the previous pregnancy remained significantly associated with test uptake (all p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Concern over discrimination and having made a prior decision to have genetic testing were the principal factors associated with decision-making. PMID:24432248

  8. Determination of Slope Safety Factor with Analytical Solution and Searching Critical Slip Surface with Genetic-Traversal Random Method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the current practice, to determine the safety factor of a slope with two-dimensional circular potential failure surface, one of the searching methods for the critical slip surface is Genetic Algorithm (GA), while the method to calculate the slope safety factor is Fellenius' slices method. However GA needs to be validated with more numeric tests, while Fellenius' slices method is just an approximate method like finite element method. This paper proposed a new method to determine the minimum slope safety factor which is the determination of slope safety factor with analytical solution and searching critical slip surface with Genetic-Traversal Random Method. The analytical solution is more accurate than Fellenius' slices method. The Genetic-Traversal Random Method uses random pick to utilize mutation. A computer automatic search program is developed for the Genetic-Traversal Random Method. After comparison with other methods like slope/w software, results indicate that the Genetic-Traversal Random Search Method can give very low safety factor which is about half of the other methods. However the obtained minimum safety factor with Genetic-Traversal Random Search Method is very close to the lower bound solutions of slope safety factor given by the Ansys software. PMID:24782679

  9. Genetic, Immune, and Vasoactive Factors in the Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajjadh M. J.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (PE) is a major complication of pregnancy that could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of PE are not completely understood, but recent research has begun to unravel some of the potential mechanisms. Areas covered Genetic polymorphisms and altered maternal immune response may cause impaired remodeling of the spiral arteries; a potential early defect in PE. Inadequate invasion of cytotrophoblasts into the decidua leads to reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia. Placental ischemia causes the release of biologically active factors such as anti-angiogenic factors, inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-inducible factors, and angiotensin II receptor autoantibodies. These vasoactive factors could cause systemic vascular endotheliosis and consequent increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure, glomerular endotheliosis causing proteinuria, cerebrovascular endotheliosis causing cerebral edema, seizures and visual disturbances, and hepatic endotheliosis which may contribute to the manifestations of HELLP syndrome. PE-associated vascular endotheliosis causes a decrease in vasodilator mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, an increase in vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1, angiotensin II and thromboxane A2, and enhanced mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction such as intracellular Ca2+, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Changes in matrix metalloproteinase activity and extracellular matrix cause vascular remodeling and further vasoconstriction. Expert opinion Some of the genetic, immune and vasoactive factors involved in vascular endotheliosis could be used as biomarkers for early detection, and as potential targets for prevention and treatment of PE. PMID:26294111

  10. Combinatorial genetic analysis of a network of actin disassembly‐promoting factors

    PubMed Central

    Ydenberg, Casey A.; Johnston, Adam; Weinstein, Jaclyn; Bellavance, Danielle; Jansen, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The patterning of actin cytoskeleton structures in vivo is a product of spatially and temporally regulated polymer assembly balanced by polymer disassembly. While in recent years our understanding of actin assembly mechanisms has grown immensely, our knowledge of actin disassembly machinery and mechanisms has remained comparatively sparse. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ideal system to tackle this problem, both because of its amenabilities to genetic manipulation and live‐cell imaging and because only a single gene encodes each of the core disassembly factors: cofilin (COF1), Srv2/CAP (SRV2), Aip1 (AIP1), GMF (GMF1/AIM7), coronin (CRN1), and twinfilin (TWF1). Among these six factors, only the functions of cofilin are essential and have been well defined. Here, we investigated the functions of the nonessential actin disassembly factors by performing genetic and live‐cell imaging analyses on a combinatorial set of isogenic single, double, triple, and quadruple mutants in S. cerevisiae. Our results show that each disassembly factor makes an important contribution to cell viability, actin organization, and endocytosis. Further, our data reveal new relationships among these factors, providing insights into how they work together to orchestrate actin turnover. Finally, we observe specific combinations of mutations that are lethal, e.g., srv2Δ aip1Δ and srv2Δ crn1Δ twf1Δ, demonstrating that while cofilin is essential, it is not sufficient in vivo, and that combinations of the other disassembly factors perform vital functions. © 2015 The Authors. Cytoskeleton Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26147656

  11. Genomics and Health: Behavior, Environment, and Genetic Factors All Have a Role in Causing People to be Overweight and ....

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Genomic Resources Behavior, environment, and genetic factors all have a role in causing people to be ... increased consumption of high-calorie foods. However, not all people living in such environments will become obese, ...

  12. Impact of the environment on the skeleton: is it modulated by genetic factors?

    PubMed

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Karasik, David

    2013-09-01

    The etiology of skeletal disease is driven by genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of osteoporotic phenotypes have identified novel candidate genes, but have only uncovered a small proportion of the trait variance explained. This "missing heritability" is caused by several factors, including the failure to consider gene-by-environmental (G*E) interactions. Some G*E interactions have been investigated, but new approaches to integrate environmental data into genomic studies are needed. Advances in genotyping and meta-analysis techniques now allow combining genotype data from multiple studies, but the measurement of key environmental factors in large human cohorts still lags behind, as do the statistical tools needed to incorporate these measures in genome-wide association meta-studies. This review focuses on discussing ways to enhance G*E interaction studies in humans and how the use of rodent models can inform genetic studies. Understanding G*E interactions will provide opportunities to effectively target intervention strategies for individualized therapy.

  13. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (p<0.05). XPG 1104His homozygotes appeared more vulnerable to DNA damage accumulation (p=0.001). Sex and individual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and α-carotene (p<0.05). We have determined genetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. PMID:24674629

  14. Genetically designed L3 photonic crystal nanocavities with measured quality factor exceeding one million

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Y.; Badolato, A.; Pirotta, S.; Urbinati, G.; Gerace, D.; Galli, M.; Minkov, M.; Savona, V.

    2014-06-16

    We report on the experimental realization of ultra-high quality factor (Q) designs of the L3-type photonic crystal nanocavity. Based on genetic optimization of the positions of few nearby holes, our design drastically improves the performance of the conventional L3 as experimentally confirmed by direct measurement of Q ≃ 2 × 10{sup 6} in a silicon-based photonic crystal membrane. Our devices rank among the highest Q/V ratios ever reported in photonic crystal cavities, holding great promise for the realization of integrated photonic platforms based on ultra-high-Q resonators.

  15. Plants with genetically modified events combined by conventional breeding: an assessment of the need for additional regulatory data.

    PubMed

    Pilacinski, W; Crawford, A; Downey, R; Harvey, B; Huber, S; Hunst, P; Lahman, L K; MacIntosh, S; Pohl, M; Rickard, C; Tagliani, L; Weber, N

    2011-01-01

    Crop varieties with multiple GM events combined by conventional breeding have become important in global agriculture. The regulatory requirements in different countries for such products vary considerably, placing an additional burden on regulatory agencies in countries where the submission of additional data is required and delaying the introduction of innovative products to meet agricultural needs. The process of conventional plant breeding has predictably provided safe food and feed products both historically and in the modern era of plant breeding. Thus, previously approved GM events that have been combined by conventional plant breeding and contain GM traits that are not likely to interact in a manner affecting safety should be considered to be as safe as their conventional counterparts. Such combined GM event crop varieties should require little, if any, additional regulatory data to meet regulatory requirements.

  16. Genetic Interactions between the Drosophila Tumor Suppressor Gene ept and the stat92E Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, M. Melissa; Beam, Carolyn K.; Robinson, Brian S.; Moberg, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101) promotes the endocytic degradation of transmembrane proteins and is implicated as a mutational target in cancer, yet the effect of TSG101 loss on cell proliferation in vertebrates is uncertain. By contrast, Drosophila epithelial tissues lacking the TSG101 ortholog erupted (ept) develop as enlarged undifferentiated tumors, indicating that the gene can have anti-growth properties in a simple metazoan. A full understanding of pathways deregulated by loss of Drosophila ept will aid in understanding potential links between mammalian TSG101 and growth control. Principal Findings We have taken a genetic approach to the identification of pathways required for excess growth of Drosophila eye-antennal imaginal discs lacking ept. We find that this phenotype is very sensitive to the genetic dose of stat92E, the transcriptional effector of the Jak-Stat signaling pathway, and that this pathway undergoes strong activation in ept mutant cells. Genetic evidence indicates that stat92E contributes to cell cycle deregulation and excess cell size phenotypes that are observed among ept mutant cells. In addition, autonomous Stat92E hyper-activation is associated with altered tissue architecture in ept tumors and an effect on expression of the apical polarity determinant crumbs. Conclusions These findings identify ept as a cell-autonomous inhibitor of the Jak-Stat pathway and suggest that excess Jak-Stat signaling makes a significant contribution to proliferative and tissue architectural phenotypes that occur in ept mutant tissues. PMID:19787055

  17. Left or right? Sources of political orientation: the roles of genetic factors, cultural transmission, assortative mating, and personality.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Christian; Bleidorn, Wiebke; Riemann, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we used an extended twin family design to investigate the influences of genetic and cultural transmission as well as different sources of nonrandom mating on 2 core aspects of political orientation: acceptance of inequality and rejecting system change. In addition, we studied the sources of phenotypic links between Big Five personality traits and political beliefs using self- and other reports. Data of 1,992 individuals (224 monozygotic and 166 dizygotic twin pairs, 92 unmatched twins, 530 spouses of twins, 268 fathers, and 322 mothers) were analyzed. Genetically informative analyses showed that political attitudes are genetically but not environmentally transmitted from parents to offspring and that a substantial proportion of this genetic variance can be accounted for by genetic variance in personality traits. Beyond genetic effects and genotypic assortative mating, generation-specific environmental sources act to increase twins' and spouses' resemblance in political beliefs. The results suggest multiple sources of political orientations in a modern democracy. PMID:21988277

  18. Left or right? Sources of political orientation: the roles of genetic factors, cultural transmission, assortative mating, and personality.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Christian; Bleidorn, Wiebke; Riemann, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we used an extended twin family design to investigate the influences of genetic and cultural transmission as well as different sources of nonrandom mating on 2 core aspects of political orientation: acceptance of inequality and rejecting system change. In addition, we studied the sources of phenotypic links between Big Five personality traits and political beliefs using self- and other reports. Data of 1,992 individuals (224 monozygotic and 166 dizygotic twin pairs, 92 unmatched twins, 530 spouses of twins, 268 fathers, and 322 mothers) were analyzed. Genetically informative analyses showed that political attitudes are genetically but not environmentally transmitted from parents to offspring and that a substantial proportion of this genetic variance can be accounted for by genetic variance in personality traits. Beyond genetic effects and genotypic assortative mating, generation-specific environmental sources act to increase twins' and spouses' resemblance in political beliefs. The results suggest multiple sources of political orientations in a modern democracy.

  19. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women under combined oral contraceptive. The PILl Genetic RIsk Monitoring (PILGRIM) Study.

    PubMed

    Suchon, Pierre; Al Frouh, Fadi; Henneuse, Agathe; Ibrahim, Manal; Brunet, Dominique; Barthet, Marie-Christine; Aillaud, Marie-Françoise; Venton, Geoffroy; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Identifying women at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major public health issue. The objective of this study was to identify environmental and genetic determinants of VTE risk in a large sample of women under combined oral contraceptives (COC). A total of 968 women who had had one event of VTE during COC use were compared to 874 women under COC but with no personal history of VTE. Clinical data were collected and a systematic thrombophilia screening was performed together with ABO blood group assessment. After adjusting for age, family history, and type and duration of COC use, main environmental determinants of VTE were smoking (odds ratio [OR] =1.65, 95% confidence interval [1.30-2.10]) and a body mass index higher than 35 kg.m⁻² (OR=3.46 [1.81-7.03]). In addition, severe inherited thrombophilia (OR=2.13 [1.32-3.51]) and non-O blood groups (OR=1.98 [1.57-2.49]) were strong genetic risk factors for VTE. Family history poorly predicted thrombophilia as its prevalence was similar in patients with or without first degree family history of VTE (29.3% vs 23.9%, p=0.09). In conclusion, this study confirms the influence of smoking and obesity and shows for the first time the impact of ABO blood group on the risk of VTE in women under COC. It also confirms the inaccuracy of the family history of VTE to detect inherited thrombophilia.

  20. The correlation between cognitive performance and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness is largely explained by genetic factors

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Odeh, Eneh; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Bloch, Edward; Williams, Katie M.; Steves, Claire J.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness has been associated with cognitive function but it is unclear whether RNFL thinning is secondary to cortical loss, or if the same disease process affects both. We explored whether there is phenotypic sharing between RNFL thickness and cognitive traits, and whether such sharing is due to genetic factors. Detailed eye and cognitive examination were performed on 1602 twins (mean age: 56.4 years; range: 18–89) from the TwinsUK cohort. Associations between RNFL thickness and ophthalmic, cognitive and other predictors were assessed using linear regression or analysis of variance models. Heritability analyses were performed using uni- and bivariate Cholesky decomposition models. RNFL was thinner with increase in myopia and with decrease in disc area (p < 0.001). A thicker RNFL was associated with better performance on mini mental state examination (MMSE, F(5,883) = 5.8, p < 0.001), and with faster reaction time (RT, β = −0.01; p = 0.01); independent of the effects of age, refractive error and disc area (p < 0.05). RNFL thickness was highly heritable (82%) but there was low phenotypic sharing between RNFL thickness and MMSE (5%, 95% CI: 0–10%) or RT (7%, 95% CI: 1–12%). This sharing, however, was mostly due to additive genetic effects (67% and 92% of the shared variance respectively). PMID:27677702

  1. Genetic Polymorphism of Human Y Chromosome and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases: A Study in WOBASZ Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kostrzewa, Grażyna; Broda, Grażyna; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Krajewki, Paweł; Płoski, Rafał

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variants of Y chromosome predispose to hypertension in rodents, whereas in humans the evidence is conflicting. Our purpose was to study the distribution of a panel of Y chromosome markers in a cohort from a cross-sectional population-based study on the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Poland (WOBASZ study). The HindIII, YAP Y chromosome variants, previously shown to influence blood pressure, lipid traits or height, as well as SNPs defining main Y chromosome haplogroups, were typed in 3026, 2783 and 2652 samples, respectively. In addition, 4 subgroups (N∼100 each) representing extremes of LDL concentration or blood pressure (BP) were typed for a panel of 17 STRs. The HindIII and YAP polymorphism were not associated with any of the studied traits. Analysis of the haplogroup distribution showed an association between higher HDL level and hg I-M170 (P = 0.02), higher LDL level and hg F*(xI-M170, J2-M172, K-M9) (P = 0.03) and lower BMI and hg N3-Tat (P = 0.04). Analysis of STRs did not show statistically significant differences. Since all these associations lost statistical significance after Bonferroni correction, we conclude that a major role of Y chromosome genetic variation (defined by HindIII, YAP or main Y chromosome haplogroups) in determining cardiovascular risk in Poles is unlikely. PMID:23935855

  2. Epidemiological support for genetic variability at hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and serotonergic system as risk factors for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Ching-López, Ana; Cervilla, Jorge; Rivera, Margarita; Molina, Esther; McKenney, Kathryn; Ruiz-Perez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Gutiérrez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious, and common psychiatric disorder worldwide. By the year 2020, MDD will be the second cause of disability in the world. The GranadΣp study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, epidemiological study of mental disorders carried out in Andalusia (South Spain), being one of its main objectives to identify genetic and environmental risk factors for MDD and other major psychiatric disorders. In this study, we focused on the possible association of 91 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with MDD. Methods A total of 711 community-based individuals participated in the GranadΣp study. All individuals were extensively assessed for clinical, psychological, sociodemographic, life style, and other environmental variables. A biological sample was also collected for subsequent genetic analyses in 91 candidate SNPs for MDD. DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD was used as the outcome variable. Logistic regression analysis assuming an additive genetic model was performed to test the association between MDD and the genetic data. The experiment-wide significance threshold adjusted with the SNP spectral decomposition method provided a maximum P-value (8×10−3) required to identify an association. Haplotype analyses were also performed. Results One SNP (rs623580) located in the tryptophan hydroxylase 1 gene (TPH1; chromosome 11), one intergenic variant (rs9526236) upstream of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A gene (HTR2A; chromosome 13), and five polymorphisms (rs17689966, rs173365, rs7209436, rs110402, and rs242924) located in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene (CRHR1; chromosome 17), all showed suggestive trends for association with MDD (P<0.05). Within CRHR1 gene, the TATGA haplotype combination was found to increase significantly the risk for MDD with an odds ratio =1.68 (95% CI: 1.16–2.42, P=0.006). Conclusion Although limited, perhaps due to insufficient sample size power, our results seem to

  3. Association of genetic and psychological factors with persistent pain after cosmetic thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, Violeta; Lötsch, Jörn; Hühne, Kathrin; Winterpacht, Andreas; Heesen, Michael; Parthum, Andreas; Weber, Peter G; Carbon, Roman; Griessinger, Norbert; Sittl, Reinhard; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The genetic control of pain has been repeatedly demonstrated in human association studies. In the present study, we assessed the relative contribution of 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms in pain-related genes, such as cathechol-O-methyl transferase gene (COMT), fatty acid amino hydrolase gene (FAAH), transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 gene (TRPV1), and δ-opioid receptor gene (OPRD1), for postsurgical pain chronification. Ninety preoperatively pain-free male patients were assigned to good or poor outcome groups according to their intensity or disability score assessed at 1 week, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after funnel chest correction. The genetic effects were compared with those of two psychological predictors, the attentional bias toward positive words (dot-probe task) and the self-reported pain vigilance (Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire [PVAQ]), which were already shown to be the best predictors for pain intensity and disability at 6 months after surgery in the same sample, respectively. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant effects of any of the genetic predictors up to the end point of survival time at 1 year after surgery. Adding the genetics to the prediction by the attentional bias to positive words for pain intensity and the PVAQ for pain disability, again no significant additional explanation could be gained by the genetic predictors. In contrast, the preoperative PVAQ score was also, in the present enlarged sample, a meaningful predictor for lasting pain disability after surgery. Effect size measures suggested some genetic variables, for example, the polymorphism rs1800587G>A in the interleukin 1 alpha gene (IL1A) and the COMT haplotype rs4646312T>C/rs165722T>C/rs6269A>G/rs4633T>C/rs4818C>G/rs4680A>G, as possible relevant modulators of long-term postsurgical pain outcome. A comparison between pathophysiologically different predictor groups appears to be helpful in identifying clinically relevant

  4. The role of genetic (PON1 polymorphism) and environmental factors, especially physical activity, in antioxidant function of paraoxonase.

    PubMed

    Otocka-Kmiecik, Aneta; Orłowska-Majdak, Monika

    2009-12-30

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a member of a three-gene family (PON1, PON2, and PON3). PON1 activity dominates in human plasma. It is secreted from hepatic cells and is found in the circulation bound to high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). For many years it has been known only for its ability to hydrolyze organophosphate derivatives. More recently, PON1's antioxidant activity draws attention as the enzyme was described to prevent oxidation of lipoproteins by reactive oxygen species formed during oxidative stress. PON1 was also shown to hydrolyze atherogenic products of oxidative lipid modification such as phospholipid peroxides and cholesterol ester hydroperoxides. Some studies indicate that the enzyme presents a lipolactonase activity and hydrolyzes homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL). There is growing evidence as to PON1's protective role in atherosclerosis. Genetic (PON1 polymorphism) and environmental factors and lifestyle may influence PON1 blood concentration and biological activity. Among the many recognized factors accounting for lifestyle, physical activity plays an important role. Various, often opposite, effects on PON1 status are observed in regular training and single physical activities. The results of different studies are often contradictory. It may depend on the time, intensity, and frequency of physical activity. Additionally, it seems that the effects of physical activity on PON1 blood concentration and activity are modified by environmental and lifestyle factors as well as PON1 polymorphism.

  5. Influence of Space Flight Factors on the Genetic Properties of Streptomyces Lividans 66 (PIJ702)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakov, V. Yu.; Voeikova, T. A.; Tairbekov, M. G.; Goins, T. L.; Martinson, V. G.; Pyle, B. H.

    2006-01-01

    Gram-positive Streptomyces bacteria display genetic instability in response to external factors. Strain S. lividans 66 harbors the multicopy plasmid pIJ702 with selective and differential marker genes for antibiotic thiostrepton resistance and melanin production. Culture plates of modified ISP agar medium with and without thiostrepton were flown on Foton-M2. Suboptimal flight temperatures, which were simulated for asynchronous ground controls, resulted in slow growth and failure to differentiate and sporulate. Flight samples and asynchronous controls showed a high frequency of failing to express plasmid markers compared to laboratory controls. This was associated with loss of plasmid DNA and likely resulted from suboptimal temperatures for flight cultures and controls. Neither restriction fragment length polymorphism, nor polymerase chain reaction amplification coupled with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, revealed differences between pIJ702 DNA from flight vs. control clones. Mutations of the plasmid marker genes resulting from specific spaceflight factors, e.g., microgravity and radiation, were not detected.

  6. Additive genetic variation in resistance traits of an exotic pine species: little evidence for constraints on evolution of resistance against native herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, X; Zas, R; Sampedro, L

    2013-01-01

    The apparent failure of invasions by alien pines in Europe has been explained by the co-occurrence of native pine congeners supporting herbivores that might easily recognize the new plants as hosts. Previous studies have reported that exotic pines show reduced tolerance and capacity to induce resistance to those native herbivores. We hypothesize that limited genetic variation in resistance to native herbivores and the existence of evolutionary trade-offs between growth and resistance could represent additional potential constraints on the evolution of invasiveness of exotic pines outside their natural range. In this paper, we examined genetic variation for constitutive and induced chemical defences (measured as non-volatile resin in the stem and total phenolics in the needles) and resistance to two major native generalist herbivores of pines in cafeteria bioassays (the phloem-feeder Hylobius abietis and the defoliator Thaumetopoea pityocampa) using half-sib families drawn from a sample of the population of Pinus radiata introduced to Spain in the mid-19th century. We found (i) significant genetic variation, with moderate-to-high narrow-sense heritabilities for both the production of constitutive non-volatile resin and induced total phenolics, and for constitutive resistance against T. pityocampa in bioassays, (ii) no evolutionary trade-offs between plant resistance and growth traits or between the production of different quantitative chemical defences and (iii) a positive genetic correlation between constitutive resistance to the two studied herbivores. Overall, results of our study indicate that the exotic pine P. radiata has limited genetic constraints on the evolution of resistance against herbivores in its introduced range, suggesting that, at least in terms of interactions with these enemies, this pine species has potential to become invasive in the future. PMID:23232833

  7. Genetic and environmental factors associated with dental caries in children: the Iowa Fluoride Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Willing, M C; Marazita, M L; Wendell, S; Warren, J J; Broffitt, B; Smith, B; Busch, T; Lidral, A C; Levy, S M

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries remains the most common chronic childhood disease. Despite strong evidence of genetic components, there have been few studies of candidate genes and caries. In this analysis we tried to assess genetic and environmental factors contributing to childhood caries in the Iowa Fluoride Study. Environmental factors (age, sex, race, tooth-brushing frequencies and water fluoride level) and three dental caries scores (d(2)fs-total, d(2)fs-pit/fissure, and d(2)fs-smooth surface) were assessed in 575 unrelated children (mean age 5.2 years). Regression analyses were applied to assess environmental correlates. The Family-Based Association Test was used to test genetic associations for 23 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in 7 caries candidate genes on 333 Caucasian parent-child trios. We evaluated the associations between caries status and the level of both single and multiple SNPs (haplotype) respectively. Permutation procedure was performed for correction of inflated type I errors due to multiple testing. Age, tooth-brushing frequency and water fluoride level were significantly correlated to at least one carious score. Caries on pit and fissure surfaces was substantially higher than on smooth surfaces (61 vs. 39%). SNPs in three genes (DSPP, KLK4 and AQP5) showed consistent associations with protection against caries. Of note, KLK4 and AQP5 were also highlighted by subsequent haplotype analysis. Our results support the concept that genes can modify the susceptibility of caries in children. Replication analysis in independent cohorts is highly needed in order to verify the validity of our findings. PMID:22508493

  8. Variation in salamander tail regeneration is associated with genetic factors that determine tail morphology.

    PubMed

    Voss, Gareth J; Kump, D Kevin; Walker, John A; Voss, S Randal

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni) was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander's tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66-68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (<4%) and correlated with tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site.

  9. Virulence factors and genetic variability of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from raw sheep's milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Spanu, Vincenzo; Spanu, Carlo; Virdis, Salvatore; Cossu, Francesca; Scarano, Christian; De Santis, Enrico Pietro Luigi

    2012-02-01

    Contamination of dairy products with Staphylococcus aureus can be of animal or human origin. The host pathogen relationship is an important factor determining genetic polymorphism of the strains and their potential virulence. The aim of the present study was to carry out an extensive characterization of virulence factors and to study the genetic variability of S. aureus strains isolated from raw ewe's milk cheese. A total of 100 S. aureus strains isolated from cheese samples produced in 10 artisan cheese factories were analyzed for the presence of enterotoxins (sea-see) and enterotoxins-like genes (seh, sek, sel, sem, seo, sep), leukocidins, exfoliatins, haemolysins, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) and the accessory gene regulator alleles (agr). Strains were also typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). AMOVA analysis carried out on PFGE and PCR data showed that the major component explaining genetic distance between strains was the dairy of origin. Of the total isolates 81% had a pathogenicity profile ascribable to "animal" biovar while 16% could be related to "human" biovar. The biovar allowed to estimate the most likely origin of the contamination. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nine antimicrobial agents and the presence of the corresponding genes coding for antibiotic resistance was also investigated. 18 strains carrying blaZ gene showed resistance to ampicillin and penicillin and 6 strains carrying tetM gene were resistant to tetracycline. The presence of mecA gene and methicillin resistance, typical of strains of human origin, was never detected. The results obtained in the present study confirm that S. aureus contamination in artisan cheese production is mainly of animal origin.

  10. Disease Risk Factors Identified through Shared Genetic Architecture and Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Ruau, David J.; Patel, Chirag J.; Weber, Susan C.; Chen, Rong; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Dudley, Joel T.; Butte, Atul J.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants for thousands of diseases and traits. In this study, we evaluated the relationships between specific risk factors (for example, blood cholesterol level) and diseases on the basis of their shared genetic architecture in a comprehensive human disease-SNP association database (VARIMED), analyzing the findings from 8,962 published association studies. Similarity between traits and diseases was statistically evaluated based on their association with shared gene variants. We identified 120 disease-trait pairs that were statistically similar, and of these we tested and validated five previously unknown disease-trait associations by searching electronic medical records (EMR) from 3 independent medical centers for evidence of the trait appearing in patients within one year of first diagnosis of the disease. We validated that mean corpuscular volume is elevated before diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia; both have associated variants in the gene IKZF1. Platelet count is decreased before diagnosis of alcohol dependence; both are associated with variants in the gene C12orf51. Alkaline phosphatase level is elevated in patients with venous thromboembolism; both share variants in ABO. Similarly, we found prostate specific antigen and serum magnesium levels were altered before the diagnosis of lung cancer and gastric cancer, respectively. Disease-trait associations identifies traits that can potentially serve a prognostic function clinically; validating disease-trait associations through EMR can whether these candidates are risk factors for complex diseases. PMID:24786325

  11. Genetic and Nongenetic Factors Affecting Clopidogrel Response in the Egyptian Population

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, BM; Shahin, MH; Solayman, MHM; Langaee, T; Schaalan, MF; Gong, Y; Hammad, LN; Al‐Mesallamy, HO; Hamdy, NM; El‐Hammady, WA

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin and clopidogrel are the mainstay oral antiplatelet regimens, yet a substantial number of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) still occur. Herein, we investigated genetic and nongenetic factors associated with clopidogrel response in Egyptians. In all, 190 Egyptians with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), treated with clopidogrel (75 mg/day) for at least a month, were genotyped for CYP2C19 *2, *3, *6, *8, *10, and *17, CES1 G143E and ABCB1*6 and *8. These variants along with nongenetic factors were tested for association with the risk of having MACE in clopidogrel‐treated patients. CYP2C19 loss‐of‐function (LOF) alleles carriers had increased risk of MACE vs. noncarriers (odds ratio 2.52; 95% confidence interval 1.23–5.15, P = 0.011). In a logistic regression, CYP2C19 LOF variants (P = 0.011), age (P = 0.032), and body mass index (BMI, P = 0.039) were significantly associated with the incidence of MACE in patients taking clopidogrel. CYP2C19 genetic variants, age, and BMI are potential predictors associated with variability to clopidogrel response in Egyptians. PMID:26757134

  12. Genetic and Nongenetic Factors Affecting Clopidogrel Response in the Egyptian Population.

    PubMed

    Khalil, B M; Shahin, M H; Solayman, M H M; Langaee, T; Schaalan, M F; Gong, Y; Hammad, L N; Al-Mesallamy, H O; Hamdy, N M; El-Hammady, W A; Johnson, J A

    2016-02-01

    Aspirin and clopidogrel are the mainstay oral antiplatelet regimens, yet a substantial number of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) still occur. Herein, we investigated genetic and nongenetic factors associated with clopidogrel response in Egyptians. In all, 190 Egyptians with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and/or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), treated with clopidogrel (75 mg/day) for at least a month, were genotyped for CYP2C19 *2, *3, *6, *8, *10, and *17, CES1 G143E and ABCB1*6 and *8. These variants along with nongenetic factors were tested for association with the risk of having MACE in clopidogrel-treated patients. CYP2C19 loss-of-function (LOF) alleles carriers had increased risk of MACE vs. noncarriers (odds ratio 2.52; 95% confidence interval 1.23-5.15, P = 0.011). In a logistic regression, CYP2C19 LOF variants (P = 0.011), age (P = 0.032), and body mass index (BMI, P = 0.039) were significantly associated with the incidence of MACE in patients taking clopidogrel. CYP2C19 genetic variants, age, and BMI are potential predictors associated with variability to clopidogrel response in Egyptians.

  13. Genetic risk factors for longitudinal changes in structural MRI in former organolead workers.

    PubMed

    James, Bryan D; Caffo, Brian; Stewart, Walter F; Yousem, David; Davatzikos, Christos; Schwartz, Brian S

    2011-01-01

    This study examined associations between polymorphisms in three genes, apolipoprotein E (APOE), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), and longitudinal change in brain volumes and white matter lesions (WML) as well as effect modification by cardiovascular factors and tibia lead concentrations. Two MRIs, an average of 5 years apart, were obtained for 317 former organolead workers and 45 population-based controls. Both regions-of-interest and voxel-wise analyses were conducted. APOE ε3/ε4 and ε4/ε4 genotypes were associated with less decline in white matter volumes. There was some evidence of interaction between genetic polymorphisms and cardiovascular risk factors (ACE and high-density lipoprotein; VDR and diabetes) on brain volume decline. The VDR FokI ff genotype was associated with an increase in WML (no association for APOE or ACE). This study expands our understanding of how genetic precursors of dementia and cardiovascular diseases are related to changes in brain structure.

  14. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia. PMID:24860163

  15. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-06-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia. PMID:24860163

  16. Identification of genetic loci underlying the phenotypic constructs of autism spectrum disorders Running head: Genetic loci for latent factors in ASD

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Qing; Georgiades, Stelios; Duku, Eric; Thompson, Ann; Devlin, Bernie; Cook, Edwin H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Szatmari, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the underlying phenotypic constructs in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and to identify genetic loci that are linked to these empirically derived factors. Method Exploratory factor analysis was applied to two datasets with 28 selected Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithm items. The first dataset was from the Autism Genome Project (AGP) phase I (1,236 ASD subjects from 618 families); the second was from the AGP phase II (804 unrelated ASD subjects). Variables derived from the factor analysis were then used as quantitative traits in genome-wide variance components linkage analyses. Results Six factors, joint attention, social interaction and communication, non-verbal communication, repetitive sensory-motor behaviour, peer interaction, and compulsion/restricted interests, were retained for both datasets. There was good agreement between the factor loading patterns from the two datasets. All factors showed familial aggregation. Suggestive evidence for linkage was obtained for the joint attention factor on 11q23. Genome-wide significant evidence for linkage was obtained for the repetitive sensory-motor behaviour factor on 19q13.3. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the underlying phenotypic constructs based on the ADI-R algorithm items are replicable in independent datasets; and the empirically derived factors are suitable and informative in genetic studies of ASD. PMID:21703496

  17. Factor analysis for genetic evaluation of linear type traits in dual-purpose autochthonous breeds.

    PubMed

    Mazza, S; Guzzo, N; Sartori, C; Mantovani, R

    2016-03-01

    Factor analysis was applied to individual type traits (TT) scored in primiparous cows belonging to two dual purpose Italian breeds, Rendena (REN; 20 individual type traits evaluated on 11 399 first parity cows), and Aosta Red Pied (ARP; 22 individual type traits evaluated on 36 168 primiparous cows). Six common latent factors (F1 to F6; eigenvalues ⩾1) which explained 63% (REN) and 58% (ARP) of the total variance were obtained. F1 included TT mainly related to muscularity, and F2 to body size. The F3 and F4 accounted for udder size and conformation, respectively. F5 included rear legs and feet. Biological significance for F6 was not readily obtained. Moderate to low heritability were estimated through REML single-trait analysis from factor scores (from 0.22 to 0.52 in REN, and from 0.08 to 0.37 in ARP). The greatest heritability values were estimated for body size and muscularity (0.52 and 0.37 for body size; and 0.40 and 0.32 for muscularity in REN and ARP, respectively). As expected, rank correlations, obtained considering estimated breeding values derived from best linear unbiased prediction analysis on the individual TT and factor score, showed similar coefficients to those observed in the factor analysis following loading of TT within each latent factor. These results suggest the possibility to implement the factor analysis in the morphological evaluation, simplifying the information given by the type traits into new variables useful for the genetic improvement of dual purpose cattle.

  18. Quantification of the Relative Contribution of Environmental and Genetic Factors to Variation in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Collaco, J. Michael; Blackman, Scott M.; McGready, John; Naughton, Kathleen M.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the relative contributions of environmental and genetic factors to variation in cystic fibrosis (CF) pulmonary disease. Study design Genetic and environmental contributions were quantified using intra-pair correlations and differences in CF-specific FEV1 measures from 134 monozygous twins and 272 dizygous twins and siblings while in different living environments (i.e. living with parents vs. living alone) as well as using intra-individual differences in lung function from a separate group of 80 siblings. Results Lung function among monozygous twins was more similar than among dizygous twin and sibling pairs, regardless of living environment, affirming the role of genetic modifiers in CF lung function. Regression modeling revealed that genetic factors account for 50% of lung function variation, unique environmental and stochastic factors 36%, and shared environmental factors, 14% (Model p: <0.0001). The intra-individual analysis produced similar estimates for the contributions of the unique and shared environment. The shared environment effects appeared primarily due to living with a sibling with CF (p: 0.003), rather than factors within the parental household (p: 0.310). Conclusions Genetic and environmental factors contribute equally to lung function variation in CF. Environmental effects are dominated by unique and stochastic effects rather than common exposures. PMID:20580019

  19. FACTOR V LEIDEN AND ISCHEMIC STROKE RISK: THE GENETICS OF EARLY ONSET STROKE (GEOS) STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Hamedani, Ali G.; Cole, John W.; Cheng, Yuching; Sparks, Mary J.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stine, Oscar C.; Wozniak, Marcella A.; Stern, Barney J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Factor V Leiden (FVL) has been associated with ischemic stroke in children, but not in adults. Although the FVL mutation is associated with increased risk for venous thrombosis, its association with ischemic stroke in young adults remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined the association between FVL and ischemic stroke in participants of the Genetics of Early Onset Stroke (GEOS) Study. Methods A population-based case-control study identified 354 women and 476 men aged 15–49 years with first-ever ischemic stroke, and 907 controls. Participant-specific data included vascular risk factors, FVL genotype and, for cases, the ischemic stroke subtype by modified TOAST criteria. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for the entire population and for subgroups stratified by risk factors and ischemic stroke subtype. Results The frequency of the FVL mutation was similar between ischemic stroke patients (3.6%, 95% CI: 2.5%–5.1%) and non-stroke controls (3.8%, 95% CI: 2.7%–5.2%). This frequency did not change significantly when cases were restricted to patients with stroke of undetermined etiology (4.1%, 95% CI: 2.6%–6.4%). Conclusions Among young adults, we found no evidence for an association between Factor V Leiden and either all ischemic stroke or the subgroup with stroke of undetermined etiology. PMID:22100829

  20. Additive effects of LPL, APOA5 and APOE variant combinations on triglyceride levels and hypertriglyceridemia: results of the ICARIA genetic sub-study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well-established independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the influence of several genetic variants in genes related with triglyceride (TG) metabolism has been described, including LPL, APOA5 and APOE. The combined analysis of these polymorphisms could produce clinically meaningful complementary information. Methods A subgroup of the ICARIA study comprising 1825 Spanish subjects (80% men, mean age 36 years) was genotyped for the LPL-HindIII (rs320), S447X (rs328), D9N (rs1801177) and N291S (rs268) polymorphisms, the APOA5-S19W (rs3135506) and -1131T/C (rs662799) variants, and the APOE polymorphism (rs429358; rs7412) using PCR and restriction analysis and TaqMan assays. We used regression analyses to examine their combined effects on TG levels (with the log-transformed variable) and the association of variant combinations with TG levels and hypertriglyceridemia (TG ≥ 1.69 mmol/L), including the covariates: gender, age, waist circumference, blood glucose, blood pressure, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results We found a significant lowering effect of the LPL-HindIII and S447X polymorphisms (p < 0.0001). In addition, the D9N, N291S, S19W and -1131T/C variants and the APOE-ε4 allele were significantly associated with an independent additive TG-raising effect (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Grouping individuals according to the presence of TG-lowering or TG-raising polymorphisms showed significant differences in TG levels (p < 0.0001), with the lowest levels exhibited by carriers of two lowering variants (10.2% reduction in TG geometric mean with respect to individuals who were homozygous for the frequent alleles of all the variants), and the highest levels in carriers of raising combinations (25.1% mean TG increase). Thus, carrying two lowering variants was protective against HTG (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.98; p = 0.042) and having one single raising polymorphism (OR

  1. Genetic Factors of Individual Differences in Decision Making in Economic Behavior: A Japanese Twin Study using the Allais Problem.

    PubMed

    Shikishima, Chizuru; Hiraishi, Kai; Yamagata, Shinji; Ando, Juko; Okada, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Why does decision making differ among individuals? People sometimes make seemingly inconsistent decisions with lower expected (monetary) utility even when objective information of probabilities and reward are provided. It is noteworthy, however, that a certain proportion of people do not provide anomalous responses, choosing the alternatives with higher expected utility, thus appearing to be more "rational." We investigated the genetic and environmental influences on these types of individual differences in decision making using a classical Allais problem task. Participants were 1,199 Japanese adult twins aged 20-47. Univariate genetic analysis revealed that approximately a third of the Allais problem response variance was explained by genetic factors and the rest by environmental factors unique to individuals and measurement error. The environmental factor shared between families did not contribute to the variance. Subsequent multivariate genetic analysis clarified that decision making using the expected utility theory was associated with general intelligence and that the association was largely mediated by the same genetic factor. We approach the mechanism underlying two types of "rational" decision making from the perspective of genetic correlations with cognitive abilities.

  2. Genetic Factors of Individual Differences in Decision Making in Economic Behavior: A Japanese Twin Study using the Allais Problem.

    PubMed

    Shikishima, Chizuru; Hiraishi, Kai; Yamagata, Shinji; Ando, Juko; Okada, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Why does decision making differ among individuals? People sometimes make seemingly inconsistent decisions with lower expected (monetary) utility even when objective information of probabilities and reward are provided. It is noteworthy, however, that a certain proportion of people do not provide anomalous responses, choosing the alternatives with higher expected utility, thus appearing to be more "rational." We investigated the genetic and environmental influences on these types of individual differences in decision making using a classical Allais problem task. Participants were 1,199 Japanese adult twins aged 20-47. Univariate genetic analysis revealed that approximately a third of the Allais problem response variance was explained by genetic factors and the rest by environmental factors unique to individuals and measurement error. The environmental factor shared between families did not contribute to the variance. Subsequent multivariate genetic analysis clarified that decision making using the expected utility theory was associated with general intelligence and that the association was largely mediated by the same genetic factor. We approach the mechanism underlying two types of "rational" decision making from the perspective of genetic correlations with cognitive abilities. PMID:26617546

  3. Genetic Factors of Individual Differences in Decision Making in Economic Behavior: A Japanese Twin Study using the Allais Problem

    PubMed Central

    Shikishima, Chizuru; Hiraishi, Kai; Yamagata, Shinji; Ando, Juko; Okada, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Why does decision making differ among individuals? People sometimes make seemingly inconsistent decisions with lower expected (monetary) utility even when objective information of probabilities and reward are provided. It is noteworthy, however, that a certain proportion of people do not provide anomalous responses, choosing the alternatives with higher expected utility, thus appearing to be more “rational.” We investigated the genetic and environmental influences on these types of individual differences in decision making using a classical Allais problem task. Participants were 1,199 Japanese adult twins aged 20–47. Univariate genetic analysis revealed that approximately a third of the Allais problem response variance was explained by genetic factors and the rest by environmental factors unique to individuals and measurement error. The environmental factor shared between families did not contribute to the variance. Subsequent multivariate genetic analysis clarified that decision making using the expected utility theory was associated with general intelligence and that the association was largely mediated by the same genetic factor. We approach the mechanism underlying two types of “rational” decision making from the perspective of genetic correlations with cognitive abilities. PMID:26617546

  4. Breast cancer subtypes and previously established genetic risk factors: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Poole, Charles; Herring, Amy H.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses indicate that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with at least 5 immunohistologic subtypes. Despite growing evidence that these subtypes are etiologically and prognostically distinct, few studies have investigated whether they have divergent genetic risk factors. To help fill in this gap in our understanding, we examined associations between breast cancer subtypes and previously established susceptibility loci among white and African-American women in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Methods We used Bayesian polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% posterior intervals (PIs) for the association between each of 78 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 breast cancer subtypes. Subtypes were defined using 5 immunohistochemical markers: estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (HER1/2) and cytokeratin (CK) 5/6. Results Several SNPs in TNRC9/TOX3 were associated with luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2−) or basal-like breast cancer (ER−, PR−, HER2−, HER1 or CK 5/6+), and one SNP (rs3104746) was associated with both. SNPs in FGFR2 were associated with luminal A, luminal B (ER/PR+, HER2+), or HER2+/ER− disease, but none were associated with basal-like disease. We also observed subtype differences in the effects of SNPs in 2q35, 4p, TLR1, MAP3K1, ESR1, CDKN2A/B, ANKRD16, and ZM1Z1. Conclusion and Impact We found evidence that genetic risk factors for breast cancer vary by subtype and further clarified the role of several key susceptibility genes. PMID:24177593

  5. Shared Genetic Aetiology between Cognitive Ability and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: Generation Scotland's Scottish Family Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luciano, Michelle; Batty, G. David; McGilchrist, Mark; Linksted, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Bridie; Jackson, Cathy; Pattie, Alison; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Smith, Blair H.; Porteous, David; Deary, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    People with higher general cognitive ability in early life have more favourable levels of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in adulthood and CVD itself. The mechanism of these associations is not known. Here we examine whether general cognitive ability and CVD risk factors share genetic and/or environmental aetiology. In this large,…

  6. Genetic determinants of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in a population from rural Brazil.

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Parra, Flavia C; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the heritability of and pleiotropic relationships among triglycerides and cholesterol lipoproteins that have long been considered traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Quantitative lipid and lipoprotein phenotypes were determined for a cross-sectional sample of a community in Jequitinhonha valley in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The sample consisted primarily of subsistence farmers. Two hundred sixty-nine individuals (128 males and 141 females), ages 18-88 years, were sampled. Eighty-eight percent (n = 252) of the individuals belonged to a single pedigree, which was highly informative for genetic analysis. Data on anthropometrics, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, and triglycerides were available for each study participant. Extended pedigrees were constructed using the pedigree-based data management software PedSys. Univariate and bivariate variance-components analyses, adjusted by sex and age, were performed using the SOLAR software package. Heritability estimates of lipids and lipoproteins ranged from 29% to 45% (p < 0.008). The highest heritability estimated was for HDL-C (h2 = 44.8%, p < 0.0001), and this was the only trait that exhibited a significant household effect (c2 = 25%). Strong positive genetic correlations were found between triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) (rhog = 0.998) and between total cholesterol and LDL-C (rhog = 0.948). Significant genetic correlations were also found between triglycerides and LDL-C, between total cholesterol and VLDL, and between total cholesterol and LDL-C and VLDL, and finally between LDL and VLDL. There was a significant negative environmental correlation between triglycerides and HDL-C (rhoe = -0.406). PMID:18027813

  7. Genetic determinants of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in a population from rural Brazil.

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Parra, Flavia C; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the heritability of and pleiotropic relationships among triglycerides and cholesterol lipoproteins that have long been considered traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Quantitative lipid and lipoprotein phenotypes were determined for a cross-sectional sample of a community in Jequitinhonha valley in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The sample consisted primarily of subsistence farmers. Two hundred sixty-nine individuals (128 males and 141 females), ages 18-88 years, were sampled. Eighty-eight percent (n = 252) of the individuals belonged to a single pedigree, which was highly informative for genetic analysis. Data on anthropometrics, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, and triglycerides were available for each study participant. Extended pedigrees were constructed using the pedigree-based data management software PedSys. Univariate and bivariate variance-components analyses, adjusted by sex and age, were performed using the SOLAR software package. Heritability estimates of lipids and lipoproteins ranged from 29% to 45% (p < 0.008). The highest heritability estimated was for HDL-C (h2 = 44.8%, p < 0.0001), and this was the only trait that exhibited a significant household effect (c2 = 25%). Strong positive genetic correlations were found between triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) (rhog = 0.998) and between total cholesterol and LDL-C (rhog = 0.948). Significant genetic correlations were also found between triglycerides and LDL-C, between total cholesterol and VLDL, and between total cholesterol and LDL-C and VLDL, and finally between LDL and VLDL. There was a significant negative environmental correlation between triglycerides and HDL-C (rhoe = -0.406).

  8. Identification and validation of genetic variants that influence transcription factor and cell signaling protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ronald J; Stark, Amy L; Antao, Nirav N; Gorsic, Lidija K; Chung, Sophie H; Brown, Christopher D; Wong, Shan S; Gill, Daniel F; Myers, Jamie L; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P; Dolan, M Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-08-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression.

  9. Genetic diversity shaped by historical and recent factors in the live-bearing twoline skiffia Neotoca bilineata.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-García, C P; Alda, F; Díaz-Pardo, E; Gutiérrez-Hernández, A; Doadrio, I

    2012-11-01

    The endangered twoline skiffia Neotoca bilineata, a viviparous fish of the subfamily Goodeinae, endemic to central Mexico (inhabiting two basins, Cuitzeo and Lerma-Santiago) was evaluated using genetic and habitat information. The genetic variation of all remaining populations of the species was analysed using both mitochondrial and microsatellite markers and their habitat conditions were assessed using a water quality index (I(WQ)). An 80% local extinction was found across the distribution of N. bilineata. The species was found in three of the 16 historical localities plus one previously unreported site. Most areas inhabited by the remaining populations had I(WQ) scores unsuitable for the conservation of freshwater biodiversity. Populations showed low but significant genetic differentiation with both markers (mtDNA φ(ST) = 0.076, P < 0.001; microsatellite F(ST) = 0.314, P < 0.001). Borbollon, in the Cuitzeo Basin, showed the highest level of differentiation and was identified as a single genetic unit by Bayesian assignment methods. Rio Grande de Morelia and Salamanca populations showed the highest genetic diversity and also a high migration rate facilitated by an artificial channel that connected the two basins. Overall, high genetic diversity values were observed compared with other freshwater fishes (average N(a) = 16 alleles and loci and mean ±S.D. H(o) = 0.63 ± 0.10 and nucleotide diversity π = 0.006). This suggests that the observed genetic diversity has not diminished as rapidly as the species' habitat destruction. No evidence of correlation between habitat conditions and genetic diversity was found. The current pattern of genetic diversity may be the result of both historical factors and recent modifications of the hydrological system. The main threat to the species may be the rapid habitat deterioration and associated demographic stochasticity rather than genetic factors.

  10. Genetic variations in the transforming growth factor beta pathway as predictors of bladder cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua; Kamat, Ashish M; Aldousari, Saad; Ye, Yuanqing; Huang, Maosheng; Dinney, Colin P; Wu, Xifeng

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, and identifying genetic markers that may predict susceptibility in high-risk population is always needed. The purpose of our study is to determine whether genetic variations in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway are associated with bladder cancer risk. We identified 356 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 key genes from this pathway and evaluated their association with cancer risk in 801 cases and 801 controls. Forty-one SNPs were significantly associated with cancer risk, and after adjusting for multiple comparisons, 9 remained significant (Q-value ≤0.1). Haplotype analysis further revealed three haplotypes within VEGFC and two haplotypes in EGFR were significantly associated with increased bladder cancer risk compared to the most common haplotype. Classification and regression tree analysis further revealed potential high-order gene-gene interactions, with VEGFC: rs3775194 being the initial split, which suggests that this variant is responsible for the most variation in risk. Individuals carrying the common genotype for VEGFC: rs3775194 and EGFR: rs7799627 and the variant genotype for VEGFR: rs4557213 had a 4.22-fold increase in risk, a much larger effect magnitude than that conferred by common genotype for VEGFR: rs4557213. Our study provides the first epidemiological evidence supporting a connection between TGF-β pathway variants and bladder cancer risk.

  11. Modifiable Factors and Genetic Predisposition Associated with Gallbladder Cancer. A Concise Review.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Roman; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Krawczyk, Marek; Bonfrate, Leonilde; Portincasa, Piero; Krawczyk, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GbCa) is the most frequent malignancy of the biliary tract. It is also the 6th most common gastrointestinal tumor. It is associated with very high lethality, mainly due to the lack of symptoms up to a very late and thus incurable state. As many as 80% of patients are diagnosed at very late stages of disease, which allow only palliative therapy. As a result, most of the patients with GbCa will die within 6 months of the diagnosis, hence the average 5-year survival does not exceed 5%. Currently, surgical resection represents the only curative option in GbCa, but this approach is feasible only at an early stage of the disease. Other oncologic therapies are of limited use. The incidence of GbCa is remarkably increased in certain populations such as Native North Americans, South Indian females and, in Europe, in the Polish population. It is not clear to date if these enhanced risk populations are the result of common environmental exposure or of shared genetic risk factors. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-art in GbCa research with the focus on the current knowledge concerning genetic and environmental triggers of this tumor. PMID:26405706

  12. Gut Microbiome and Infant Health: Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Host Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Romisher, Rachael; Poveda, Samantha; Forte, Shaina; Starkweather, Angela; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the neonatal gut microbiome is influenced by multiple factors, such as delivery mode, feeding, medication use, hospital environment, early life stress, and genetics. The dysbiosis of gut microbiota persists during infancy, especially in high-risk preterm infants who experience lengthy stays in the Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant microbiome evolutionary trajectory is essentially parallel with the host (infant) neurodevelopmental process and growth. The role of the gut microbiome, the brain-gut signaling system, and its interaction with the host genetics have been shown to be related to both short and long term infant health and bio-behavioral development. The investigation of potential dysbiosis patterns in early childhood is still lacking and few studies have addressed this host-microbiome co-developmental process. Further research spanning a variety of fields of study is needed to focus on the mechanisms of brain-gut-microbiota signaling system and the dynamic host-microbial interaction in the regulation of health, stress and development in human newborns. PMID:27698614

  13. Endemic malignant mesothelioma: exposure to erionite is more important than genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Metintas, Muzaffer; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Metintas, Selma; Dumortier, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The village of Karain, Turkey, has the world's highest prevalence rate of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Environmental exposure to erionite is thought to cause the disease. However, it has also been suggested that the disease is mainly genetic. Residents in Karain village were traced from 1990 to 2006. Mineral samples were obtained from stones used in construction of their houses and any fibers present were identified. All women who had moved to the village as brides were traced and their cause of death determined. MM was the cause of death in 52 of 322 villagers, representing 50.5% of all deaths. Only 2 of 8 types of stones used in construction contained erionite, and these stones had been used almost exclusively in the mid-sections of the village, where MM was common. In houses not containing erionite, no cases of MM were observed. Sixty-four women came as brides to Karain from villages where erionite or asbestos is not found. Of the 16 women who have died, 11 (69%) died from MM. The extreme risk of MM in Karain is due to indoor exposure to erionite. The effect of genetic factors on mesothelioma development cannot be evaluated in this study, but is likely to be minor.

  14. Gut Microbiome and Infant Health: Brain-Gut-Microbiota Axis and Host Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Xiaomei; Xu, Wanli; Romisher, Rachael; Poveda, Samantha; Forte, Shaina; Starkweather, Angela; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the neonatal gut microbiome is influenced by multiple factors, such as delivery mode, feeding, medication use, hospital environment, early life stress, and genetics. The dysbiosis of gut microbiota persists during infancy, especially in high-risk preterm infants who experience lengthy stays in the Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Infant microbiome evolutionary trajectory is essentially parallel with the host (infant) neurodevelopmental process and growth. The role of the gut microbiome, the brain-gut signaling system, and its interaction with the host genetics have been shown to be related to both short and long term infant health and bio-behavioral development. The investigation of potential dysbiosis patterns in early childhood is still lacking and few studies have addressed this host-microbiome co-developmental process. Further research spanning a variety of fields of study is needed to focus on the mechanisms of brain-gut-microbiota signaling system and the dynamic host-microbial interaction in the regulation of health, stress and development in human newborns.

  15. Genetic Risk Factors in Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism: A Multilocus, Population-Based, Prospective Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Robert YL; Bubes, Vadim; Shrivastava, Sanjay; Ridker, Paul M; Glynn, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Background Recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, complex disorder; however, genetic factors have been suggested to play a role in the disease development. We therefore conducted a multi-locus genetic study examining the potential associations of candidate gene variants in inflammation, thrombosis, coagulation, and lipid metabolism pathways, individually or interactively, with risk of recurrent VTE. Methods Using DNA samples collected at baseline in the Prevention of Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism trial (PREVENT), we genotyped 86 candidate genes polymorphisms among 43 individuals who subsequently developed recurrent VTE and among 396 individuals who remained free of recurrent event over a mean follow-up period of 2.1 years to prospectively determine whether these gene polymorphisms contribute to the risk of recurrent VTE. Results Using a single-marker ‘uncorrected’ analysis, CCR5 A(-2459)G [rs1799864], MMP3 5A(-1171)6A [rs3025058] and PON1 gln192arg [rs662] gene variants were associated with increased risk, and CETP C(-629)A [rs1800775] gene variant with reduced risk of recurrent VTE, respectively. Furthermore, potentially important gene-gene-interactions were detected by the Monte Carlo Markov chain Logic Regression method. Conclusions Although the present findings are hypothesis-generating and require confirmation in an independent investigation, our study provides a practical example of detecting epistasis in common, complex diseases. PMID:19263529

  16. Elucidation of Genetic Interactions in the Yeast GATA-Factor Network Using Bayesian Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Gerosa, Luca; Falter, Laura; Sauer, Uwe; Lygeros, John

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of complex gene regulatory networks using classical genetic assays is an error-prone procedure that frequently generates ambiguous outcomes. Even some of the best-characterized gene networks contain interactions whose validity is not conclusively proven. Founded on dynamic experimental data, mechanistic mathematical models are able to offer detailed insights that would otherwise require prohibitively large numbers of genetic experiments. Here we attempt mechanistic modeling of the transcriptional network formed by the four GATA-factor proteins, a well-studied system of central importance for nitrogen-source regulation of transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To resolve ambiguities in the network organization, we encoded a set of five interactions hypothesized in the literature into a set of 32 mathematical models, and employed Bayesian model selection to identify the most plausible set of interactions based on dynamic gene expression data. The top-ranking model was validated on newly generated GFP reporter dynamic data and was subsequently used to gain a better understanding of how yeast cells organize their transcriptional response to dynamic changes of nitrogen sources. Our work constitutes a necessary and important step towards obtaining a holistic view of the yeast nitrogen regulation mechanisms; on the computational side, it provides a demonstration of how powerful Monte Carlo techniques can be creatively combined and used to address the great challenges of large-scale dynamical system inference. PMID:26967983

  17. Performance of genetic risk factors in prediction of trichloroethylene induced hypersensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yufei; Chen, Ying; Huang, Hanlin; Zhou, Wei; Niu, Yong; Zhang, Mingrong; Bin, Ping; Dong, Haiyan; Jia, Qiang; Huang, Jianxun; Yi, Juan; Liao, Qijun; Li, Haishan; Teng, Yanxia; Zang, Dan; Zhai, Qingfeng; Duan, Huawei; Shen, Juan; He, Jiaxi; Meng, Tao; Sha, Yan; Shen, Meili; Ye, Meng; Jia, Xiaowei; Xiang, Yingping; Huang, Huiping; Wu, Qifeng; Shi, Mingming; Huang, Xianqing; Yang, Huanming; Luo, Longhai; Li, Sai; Li, Lin; Zhao, Jinyang; Li, Laiyu; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene induced hypersensitivity syndrome is dose-independent and potentially life threatening disease, which has become one of the serious occupational health issues and requires intensive treatment. To discover the genetic risk factors and evaluate the performance of risk prediction model for the disease, we conducted genomewide association study and replication study with total of 174 cases and 1761 trichloroethylene-tolerant controls. Fifty seven SNPs that exceeded the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) were screened to relate with the disease, among which two independent SNPs were identified, that is rs2857281 at MICA (odds ratio, 11.92; Pmeta = 1.33 × 10−37) and rs2523557 between HLA-B and MICA (odds ratio, 7.33; Pmeta = 8.79 × 10−35). The genetic risk score with these two SNPs explains at least 20.9% of the disease variance and up to 32.5-fold variation in inter-individual risk. Combining of two SNPs as predictors for the disease would have accuracy of 80.73%, the area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) scores was 0.82 with sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 85%, which was considered to have excellent discrimination for the disease, and could be considered for translational application for screening employees before exposure. PMID:26190474

  18. Genetic, environmental, and epigenetic factors in the development of personality disturbance.

    PubMed

    Depue, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    A dimensional model of personality disturbance is presented that is defined by extreme values on interacting subsets of seven major personality traits. Being at the extreme has marked effects on the threshold for eliciting those traits under stimulus conditions: that is, the extent to which the environment affects the neurobiological functioning underlying the traits. To explore the nature of development of extreme values on these traits, each trait is discussed in terms of three major issues: (a) the neurobiological variables associated with the trait, (b) individual variation in this neurobiology as a function of genetic polymorphisms, and (c) the effects of environmental adversity on these neurobiological variables through the action of epigenetic processes. It is noted that gene-environment interaction appears to be dependent on two main factors: (a) both genetic and environmental variables appear to have the most profound and enduring effects when they exert their effects during early postnatal periods, times when the forebrain is undergoing exuberant experience-expectant dendritic and axonal growth; and (b) environmental effects on neurobiology are strongly modified by individual differences in "traitlike" functioning of neurobiological variables. A model of the nature of the interaction between environmental and neurobiological variables in the development of personality disturbance is presented.

  19. Genetic programs of epithelial cell plasticity directed by transforming growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Zavadil, Jiri; Bitzer, Markus; Liang, Dan; Yang, Yaw-Ching; Massimi, Aldo; Kneitz, Susanne; Piek, Ester; Böttinger, Erwin P.

    2001-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) are an essential manifestation of epithelial cell plasticity during morphogenesis, wound healing, and tumor progression. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) modulates epithelial plasticity in these physiological contexts by inducing EMT. Here we report a transcriptome screen of genetic programs of TGF-β-induced EMT in human keratinocytes and propose functional roles for extracellular response kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in cell motility and disruption of adherens junctions. We used DNA arrays of 16,580 human cDNAs to identify 728 known genes regulated by TGF-β within 4 hours after treatment. TGF-β-stimulated ERK signaling mediated regulation of 80 target genes not previously associated with this pathway. This subset is enriched for genes with defined roles in cell–matrix interactions, cell motility, and endocytosis. ERK-independent genetic programs underlying the onset of EMT involve key pathways and regulators of epithelial dedifferentiation, undifferentiated transitional and mesenchymal progenitor phenotypes, and mediators of cytoskeletal reorganization. The gene expression profiling approach delineates complex context-dependent signaling pathways and transcriptional events that determine epithelial cell plasticity controlled by TGF-β. Investigation of the identified pathways and genes will advance the understanding of molecular mechanisms that underlie tumor invasiveness and metastasis. PMID:11390996

  20. Modifiable Factors and Genetic Predisposition Associated with Gallbladder Cancer. A Concise Review.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Roman; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Krawczyk, Marek; Bonfrate, Leonilde; Portincasa, Piero; Krawczyk, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GbCa) is the most frequent malignancy of the biliary tract. It is also the 6th most common gastrointestinal tumor. It is associated with very high lethality, mainly due to the lack of symptoms up to a very late and thus incurable state. As many as 80% of patients are diagnosed at very late stages of disease, which allow only palliative therapy. As a result, most of the patients with GbCa will die within 6 months of the diagnosis, hence the average 5-year survival does not exceed 5%. Currently, surgical resection represents the only curative option in GbCa, but this approach is feasible only at an early stage of the disease. Other oncologic therapies are of limited use. The incidence of GbCa is remarkably increased in certain populations such as Native North Americans, South Indian females and, in Europe, in the Polish population. It is not clear to date if these enhanced risk populations are the result of common environmental exposure or of shared genetic risk factors. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-art in GbCa research with the focus on the current knowledge concerning genetic and environmental triggers of this tumor.

  1. P-TEFb regulation of transcription termination factor Xrn2 revealed by a chemical genetic screen for Cdk9 substrates.

    PubMed

    Sansó, Miriam; Levin, Rebecca S; Lipp, Jesse J; Wang, Vivien Ya-Fan; Greifenberg, Ann Katrin; Quezada, Elizabeth M; Ali, Akbar; Ghosh, Animesh; Larochelle, Stéphane; Rana, Tariq M; Geyer, Matthias; Tong, Liang; Shokat, Kevan M; Fisher, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The transcription cycle of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is regulated at discrete transition points by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), a complex of Cdk9 and cyclin T1, promotes release of paused Pol II into elongation, but the precise mechanisms and targets of Cdk9 action remain largely unknown. Here, by a chemical genetic strategy, we identified ∼ 100 putative substrates of human P-TEFb, which were enriched for proteins implicated in transcription and RNA catabolism. Among the RNA processing factors phosphorylated by Cdk9 was the 5'-to-3' "torpedo" exoribonuclease Xrn2, required in transcription termination by Pol II, which we validated as a bona fide P-TEFb substrate in vivo and in vitro. Phosphorylation by Cdk9 or phosphomimetic substitution of its target residue, Thr439, enhanced enzymatic activity of Xrn2 on synthetic substrates in vitro. Conversely, inhibition or depletion of Cdk9 or mutation of Xrn2-Thr439 to a nonphosphorylatable Ala residue caused phenotypes consistent with inefficient termination in human cells: impaired Xrn2 chromatin localization and increased readthrough transcription of endogenous genes. Therefore, in addition to its role in elongation, P-TEFb regulates termination by promoting chromatin recruitment and activation of a cotranscriptional RNA processing enzyme, Xrn2.

  2. The role of host genetic factors in respiratory tract infectious diseases: systematic review, meta-analyses and field synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Patarčić, Inga; Gelemanović, Andrea; Kirin, Mirna; Kolčić, Ivana; Theodoratou, Evropi; Baillie, Kenneth J.; de Jong, Menno D.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Polašek, Ozren

    2015-01-01

    Host genetic factors have frequently been implicated in respiratory infectious diseases, often with inconsistent results in replication studies. We identified 386 studies from the total of 24,823 studies identified in a systematic search of four bibliographic databases. We performed meta-analyses of studies on tuberculosis, influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, SARS-Coronavirus and pneumonia. One single-nucleotide polymorphism from IL4 gene was significant for pooled respiratory infections (rs2070874; 1.66 [1.29–2.14]). We also detected an association of TLR2 gene with tuberculosis (rs5743708; 3.19 [2.03–5.02]). Subset analyses identified CCL2 as an additional risk factor for tuberculosis (rs1024611; OR = 0.79 [0.72–0.88]). The IL4-TLR2-CCL2 axis could be a highly interesting target for translation towards clinical use. However, this conclusion is based on low credibility of evidence - almost 95% of all identified studies had strong risk of bias or confounding. Future studies must build upon larger-scale collaborations, but also strictly adhere to the highest evidence-based principles in study design, in order to reduce research waste and provide clinically translatable evidence. PMID:26524966

  3. P-TEFb regulation of transcription termination factor Xrn2 revealed by a chemical genetic screen for Cdk9 substrates

    PubMed Central

    Sansó, Miriam; Levin, Rebecca S.; Lipp, Jesse J.; Wang, Vivien Ya-Fan; Greifenberg, Ann Katrin; Quezada, Elizabeth M.; Ali, Akbar; Ghosh, Animesh; Larochelle, Stéphane; Rana, Tariq M.; Geyer, Matthias; Tong, Liang; Shokat, Kevan M.; Fisher, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription cycle of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is regulated at discrete transition points by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), a complex of Cdk9 and cyclin T1, promotes release of paused Pol II into elongation, but the precise mechanisms and targets of Cdk9 action remain largely unknown. Here, by a chemical genetic strategy, we identified ∼100 putative substrates of human P-TEFb, which were enriched for proteins implicated in transcription and RNA catabolism. Among the RNA processing factors phosphorylated by Cdk9 was the 5′-to-3′ “torpedo” exoribonuclease Xrn2, required in transcription termination by Pol II, which we validated as a bona fide P-TEFb substrate in vivo and in vitro. Phosphorylation by Cdk9 or phosphomimetic substitution of its target residue, Thr439, enhanced enzymatic activity of Xrn2 on synthetic substrates in vitro. Conversely, inhibition or depletion of Cdk9 or mutation of Xrn2-Thr439 to a nonphosphorylatable Ala residue caused phenotypes consistent with inefficient termination in human cells: impaired Xrn2 chromatin localization and increased readthrough transcription of endogenous genes. Therefore, in addition to its role in elongation, P-TEFb regulates termination by promoting chromatin recruitment and activation of a cotranscriptional RNA processing enzyme, Xrn2. PMID:26728557

  4. P-TEFb regulation of transcription termination factor Xrn2 revealed by a chemical genetic screen for Cdk9 substrates.

    PubMed

    Sansó, Miriam; Levin, Rebecca S; Lipp, Jesse J; Wang, Vivien Ya-Fan; Greifenberg, Ann Katrin; Quezada, Elizabeth M; Ali, Akbar; Ghosh, Animesh; Larochelle, Stéphane; Rana, Tariq M; Geyer, Matthias; Tong, Liang; Shokat, Kevan M; Fisher, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The transcription cycle of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is regulated at discrete transition points by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), a complex of Cdk9 and cyclin T1, promotes release of paused Pol II into elongation, but the precise mechanisms and targets of Cdk9 action remain largely unknown. Here, by a chemical genetic strategy, we identified ∼ 100 putative substrates of human P-TEFb, which were enriched for proteins implicated in transcription and RNA catabolism. Among the RNA processing factors phosphorylated by Cdk9 was the 5'-to-3' "torpedo" exoribonuclease Xrn2, required in transcription termination by Pol II, which we validated as a bona fide P-TEFb substrate in vivo and in vitro. Phosphorylation by Cdk9 or phosphomimetic substitution of its target residue, Thr439, enhanced enzymatic activity of Xrn2 on synthetic substrates in vitro. Conversely, inhibition or depletion of Cdk9 or mutation of Xrn2-Thr439 to a nonphosphorylatable Ala residue caused phenotypes consistent with inefficient termination in human cells: impaired Xrn2 chromatin localization and increased readthrough transcription of endogenous genes. Therefore, in addition to its role in elongation, P-TEFb regulates termination by promoting chromatin recruitment and activation of a cotranscriptional RNA processing enzyme, Xrn2. PMID:26728557

  5. Replication of a gene-environment interaction Via Multimodel inference: additive-genetic variance in adolescents' general cognitive ability increases with family-of-origin socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2015-03-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES-an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research. PMID:25539975

  6. Replication of a Gene-Environment Interaction via Multimodel Inference: Additive-Genetic Variance in Adolescents’ General Cognitive Ability Increases with Family-of-Origin Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES—an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research. PMID:25539975

  7. Replication of a gene-environment interaction Via Multimodel inference: additive-genetic variance in adolescents' general cognitive ability increases with family-of-origin socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2015-03-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES-an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research.

  8. A microfluidic-based genetic screen to identify microbial virulence factors that inhibit dendritic cell migration.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Laura M; Xu, Hui; Carden, Sarah E; Fisher, Samantha; Reyes, Monique; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Monack, Denise M

    2014-04-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host cells and evade the immune system by multiple mechanisms. For example, Salmonella injects effector proteins into host cells and evades the host immune system in part by inhibiting dendritic cell (DC) migration. The identification of microbial factors that modulate normal host functions should lead to the development of new classes of therapeutics that target these pathways. Current screening methods to identify either host or pathogen genes involved in modulating migration towards a chemical signal are limited because they do not employ stable, precisely controlled chemical gradients. Here, we develop a positive selection microfluidic-based genetic screen that allows us to identify Salmonella virulence factors that manipulate DC migration within stable, linear chemokine gradients. Our screen identified 7 Salmonella effectors (SseF, SifA, SspH2, SlrP, PipB2, SpiC and SseI) that inhibit DC chemotaxis toward CCL19. This method is widely applicable for identifying novel microbial factors that influence normal host cell chemotaxis as well as revealing new mammalian genes involved in directed cell migration.

  9. Genetic factors associated with the development of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sergejeva, Olga; Botov, Roman; Liutkevičienė, Rasa; Kriaučiūnienė, Loresa

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects the macula and is the leading cause of significant and irreversible central visual loss. It is the most common cause of visual loss in people aged more than 60 years. This disease affects 2.5 million individuals in Europe. AMD is caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Numerous risk factors have been reported, but the pathogenesis of AMD is complex and fairly understood. Age, female gender, obesity, race, education status, family history, hyperopia, iris color, cigarette smoking, previous cataract surgery, history of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, sunlight exposure and many other factors have been shown to be associated with AMD development. Scientific evidence shows that genes may play a role in the development of nearly 3 out of 4 cases of this devastating eye disease. The genes that have been shown to be associated with AMD are genes encoding complement system components such as CFH, C2, C3, CFB, and other. PMID:27170480

  10. Complete effect-profile assessment in association studies with multiple genetic and multiple environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Maity, Arnab; Luo, Yiwen; Neely, Megan L; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Studying complex diseases in the post genome-wide association studies (GWAS) era has led to developing methods that consider factor-sets rather than individual genetic/environmental factors (i.e., Multi-G-Multi-E studies), and mining for potential gene-environment (G×E) interactions has proven to be an invaluable aid in both discovery and deciphering underlying biological mechanisms. Current approaches for examining effect profiles in Multi-G-Multi-E analyses are either underpowered due to large degrees of freedom, ill-suited for detecting G×E interactions due to imprecise modeling of the G and E effects, or lack of capacity for modeling interactions between two factor-sets (e.g., existing methods focus primarily on a single E factor). In this work, we illustrate the issues encountered in constructing kernels for investigating interactions between two factor-sets, and propose a simple yet intuitive solution to construct the G×E kernel that retains the ease-of-interpretation of classic regression. We also construct a series of kernel machine (KM) score tests to evaluate the complete effect profile (i.e., the G, E, and G×E effects individually or in combination). We show, via simulations and a data application, that the proposed KM methods outperform the classic and PC regressions across a range of scenarios, including varying effect size, effect structure, and interaction complexity. The largest power gain was observed when the underlying effect structure involved complex G×E interactions; however, the proposed methods have consistent, powerful performance when the effect profile is simple or complex, suggesting that the proposed method could be a useful tool for exploratory or confirmatory G×E analysis.

  11. Complete Effect-Profile Assessment in Association Studies with Multiple Genetic and Multiple Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Maity, Arnab; Luo, Yiwen; Neely, Megan L.; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Studying complex diseases in the post GWAS era has led to developing methods that consider factor-sets rather than individual genetic/environmental factors (i.e., Multi-G-Multi-E studies), and mining for potential gene-environment (GxE) interactions has proven to be an invaluable aid in both discovery and deciphering underlying biological mechanisms. Current approaches for examining effect profiles in Multi-G-Multi-E analyses are either underpowered due to large degrees of freedom, ill-suited for detecting GxE interactions due to imprecise modeling of the G and E effects, or lack of capacity for modeling interactions between two factor sets (e.g., existing methods focus primarily on a single E factor). In this work, we illustrate the issues encountered in constructing kernels for investigating interactions between two factor-sets, and propose a simple yet intuitive solution to construct the GxE kernel that retains the ease-of-interpretation of classic regression. We also construct a series of KM score tests to evaluate the complete effect profile (i.e., the G, E, and GxE effects individually or in combination). We show, via simulations and a data application, that the proposed KM methods outperform the classic and PC regressions across a range of scenarios, including varying effect size, effect structure, and interaction complexity. The largest power gain was observed when the underlying effect structure involved complex GxE interactions; however, the proposed methods have consistent, powerful performance when the effect profile is simple or complex, suggesting that the proposed method could be a useful tool for exploratory or confirmatory GxE analysis. PMID:25538034

  12. Low edge safety factor operation and passive disruption avoidance in current carrying plasmas by the addition of stellarator rotational transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, M. D.; ArchMiller, M. C.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Ennis, D. A.; Hanson, J. D.; Hartwell, G. J.; Hebert, J. D.; Herfindal, J. L.; Knowlton, S. F.; Ma, X.; Massidda, S.; Maurer, D. A.; Roberds, N. A.; Traverso, P. J.

    2015-11-01

    Low edge safety factor operation at a value less than two ( q (a )=1 /ι̷tot(a )<2 ) is routine on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid device with the addition of sufficient external rotational transform. Presently, the operational space of this current carrying stellarator extends down to q (a )=1.2 without significant n = 1 kink mode activity after the initial plasma current rise phase of the discharge. The disruption dynamics of these low edge safety factor plasmas depend upon the fraction of helical field rotational transform from external stellarator coils to that generated by the plasma current. We observe that with approximately 10% of the total rotational transform supplied by the stellarator coils, low edge q disruptions are passively suppressed and avoided even though q(a) < 2. When the plasma does disrupt, the instability precursors measured and implicated as the cause are internal tearing modes with poloidal, m, and toroidal, n, helical mode numbers of m /n =3 /2 and 4/3 observed on external magnetic sensors and m /n =1 /1 activity observed on core soft x-ray emissivity measurements. Even though the edge safety factor passes through and becomes much less than q(a) < 2, external n = 1 kink mode activity does not appear to play a significant role in the disruption phenomenology observed.

  13. Association mapping of genetic risk factors for chronic wasting disease in wild deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomomi Matsumoto,; Samuel, Michael D.; Trent Bollinger,; Margo Pybus,; David W. Coltman,

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. We assessed the feasibility of association mapping CWD genetic risk factors in wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) using a panel of bovine microsatellite markers from three homologous deer linkage groups predicted to contain candidate genes. These markers had a low cross-species amplification rate (27.9%) and showed weak linkage disequilibrium (<1 cM). Markers near the prion protein and the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) genes were suggestively associated with CWD status in white-tailed deer (P = 0.006) and mule deer (P = 0.02), respectively. This is the first time an association between the NF1 region and CWD has been reported.

  14. Extensive genetic polymorphism in the human tumor necrosis factor region and relation to extended HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Jongeneel, C V; Briant, L; Udalova, I A; Sevin, A; Nedospasov, S A; Cambon-Thomsen, A

    1991-01-01

    We have identified three polymorphic microsatellites (which we call TNFa, TNFb, and TNFc) within a 12-kilobase region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that includes the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) locus. TNFc is located within the first intron of the TNF-beta gene and has only 2 alleles. TNFa and TNFb are 3.5 kilobases upstream (telomeric) of the TNF-beta gene and have at least 13 and 7 alleles, respectively. TNFa, -b, and -c alleles are in linkage disequilibrium with alleles at other loci within the MHC, including class I, class II, and class III. TNFa, -b, and -c alleles are also associated with extended HLA haplotypes. These TNF polymorphisms will allow a thorough genetic analysis of the involvement of TNF in MHC-linked pathologies. Images PMID:1946393

  15. Association mapping of genetic risk factors for chronic wasting disease in wild deer.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomomi; Samuel, Michael D; Bollinger, Trent; Pybus, Margo; Coltman, David W

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. We assessed the feasibility of association mapping CWD genetic risk factors in wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) using a panel of bovine microsatellite markers from three homologous deer linkage groups predicted to contain candidate genes. These markers had a low cross-species amplification rate (27.9%) and showed weak linkage disequilibrium (<1 cM). Markers near the prion protein and the neurofibromin 1 (NF1) genes were suggestively associated with CWD status in white-tailed deer (P = 0.006) and mule deer (P = 0.02), respectively. This is the first time an association between the NF1 region and CWD has been reported.

  16. Expressed sequence tags reveal genetic diversity and putative virulence factors of the pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum.

    PubMed

    Krajaejun, Theerapong; Khositnithikul, Rommanee; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Lowhnoo, Tassanee; Rujirawat, Thidarat; Petchthong, Thanom; Yingyong, Wanta; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Smittipat, Nat; Juthayothin, Tada; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Sullivan, Thomas D

    2011-07-01

    Oomycetes are unique eukaryotic microorganisms that share a mycelial morphology with fungi. Many oomycetes are pathogenic to plants, and a more limited number are pathogenic to animals. Pythium insidiosum is the only oomycete that is capable of infecting both humans and animals, and causes a life-threatening infectious disease, called "pythiosis". In the majority of pythiosis patients life-long handicaps result from the inevitable radical excision of infected organs, and many die from advanced infection. Better understanding P. insidiosum pathogenesis at molecular levels could lead to new forms of treatment. Genetic and genomic information is lacking for P. insidiosum, so we have undertaken an expressed sequence tag (EST) study, and report on the first dataset of 486 ESTs, assembled into 217 unigenes. Of these, 144 had significant sequence similarity with known genes, including 47 with ribosomal protein homology. Potential virulence factors included genes involved in antioxidation, thermal adaptation, immunomodulation, and iron and sterol binding. Effectors resembling pathogenicity factors of plant-pathogenic oomycetes were also discovered, such as, a CBEL-like protein (possible involvement in host cell adhesion and hemagglutination), a putative RXLR effector (possibly involved in host cell modulation) and elicitin-like (ELL) proteins. Phylogenetic analysis mapped P. insidiosum ELLs to several novel clades of oomycete elicitins (ELIs), and homology modeling predicted that P. insidiosum ELLs should bind sterols. Most of the P. insidiosum ESTs showed homology to sequences in the genome or EST databases of other oomycetes, but one putative gene, with unknown function, was found to be unique to P. insidiosum. The EST dataset reported here represents the first steps in identifying genes of P. insidiosum and beginning transcriptome analysis. This genetic information will facilitate understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of this devastating pathogen. PMID:21724174

  17. Disorder-specific genetic factors in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A comprehensive meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Much remains to be learned about the etiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Twin studies suggest that it arises from both disorder-specific and non-specific genetic factors. To understand the etiology of OCD per se, it is necessary to identify disorder-specific factors. Previous research shows that OCD is associated with serotonin-related polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR coded as triallelic and HTR2A rs6311/rs6313) and, in males, a polymorphism involved in catecholamine modulation; COMT (rs4680). The present study is the first comprehensive meta-analysis to investigate whether these polymorphisms are specific to OCD. A meta-analysis was conducted for genetic association studies of OCD or any other psychiatric disorder, published in any language, in any country. A total of 551 studies were examined, of which 290 were included, consisting of 47,358 cases and 68,942 controls from case control studies, and 2,443 trios from family based studies. The main meta-analysis was limited to those disorders in which there were at least five datasets (studies or sub-studies) per disorder. Results confirmed that OCD is associated with polymorphisms of 5-HTTLPR, HTR2A, and, in males only, COMT. These polymorphisms were not associated with almost all other forms of psychopathology, including unipolar mood disorders, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, schizophrenia, and alcohol dependence. OCD, compared to most other disorders, had a significantly stronger association with particular alleles of each of the polymorphisms. Results did not differ across ancestral groups (Asian vs. Caucasian), designs (case control vs. family based), or diagnostic systems. Results suggest that the polymorphisms investigated in this study are relatively specific to OCD.

  18. Geographical, genetic and functional diversity of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kono, Ken; Nomaguchi, Masako; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Akio; Shioda, Tatsuo; Akari, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Emi E

    2012-03-01

    The antiretroviral factor tripartite motif protein 5 (TRIM5) gene-derived isoform (TRIMCyp) has been found in at least three species of Old World monkey: rhesus (Macaca mulatta), pig-tailed (Macaca nemestrina) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Although the frequency of TRIMCyp has been well studied in rhesus and pig-tailed macaques, the frequency and prevalence of TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques remain to be definitively elucidated. Here, the geographical and genetic diversity of TRIM5α/TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques was studied in comparison with their anti-lentiviral activity. It was found that the frequency of TRIMCyp in a population in the Philippines was significantly higher than those in Indonesian and Malaysian populations. Major and minor haplotypes of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclophilin A domain were also found. The functional significance of the polymorphism in TRIMCyp was examined, and it was demonstrated that the major haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but not HIV-2, whilst the minor haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed HIV-2 but not HIV-1. The major haplotype of TRIMCyp did not restrict a monkey-tropic HIV-1 clone, NL-DT5R, which contains a capsid with the simian immunodeficiency virus-derived loop between α-helices 4 and 5 and the entire vif gene. These results indicate that polymorphisms of TRIMCyp affect its anti-lentiviral activity. Overall, the results of this study will help our understanding of the genetic background of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp, as well as the host factors composing species barriers of primate lentiviruses.

  19. The gut microbiota composition in dichorionic triplet sets suggests a role for host genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kiera; O' Shea, Carol Anne; Ryan, C Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene M; O' Toole, Paul W; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2015-01-01

    Monozygotic and dizygotic twin studies investigating the relative roles of host genetics and environmental factors in shaping gut microbiota composition have produced conflicting results. In this study, we investigated the gut microbiota composition of a healthy dichorionic triplet set. The dichorionic triplet set contained a pair of monozygotic twins and a fraternal sibling, with similar pre- and post-natal environmental conditions including feeding regime. V4 16S rRNA and rpoB amplicon pyrosequencing was employed to investigate microbiota composition, and the species and strain diversity of the culturable bifidobacterial population was also examined. At month 1, the monozygotic pair shared a similar microbiota distinct to the fraternal sibling. By month 12 however, the profile was more uniform between the three infants. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) of the microbiota composition revealed strong clustering of the monozygotic pair at month 1 and a separation of the fraternal infant. At months 2 and 3 the phylogenetic distance between the monozygotic pair and the fraternal sibling has greatly reduced and by month 12 the monozygotic pair no longer clustered separately from the fraternal infant. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the bifidobacterial population revealed a lack of strain diversity, with identical strains identified in all three infants at month 1 and 12. The microbiota of two antibiotic-treated dichorionic triplet sets was also investigated. Not surprisingly, in both triplet sets early life antibiotic administration appeared to be a major determinant of microbiota composition at month 1, irrespective of zygosity. By month 12, early antibiotic administration appeared to no longer exert such a strong influence on gut microbiota composition. We hypothesize that initially host genetics play a significant role in the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, unless an antibiotic intervention is given, but by month 12 environmental

  20. The Gut Microbiota Composition in Dichorionic Triplet Sets Suggests a Role for Host Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kiera; O’ Shea, Carol Anne; Ryan, C. Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene M.; O' Toole, Paul W.; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Monozygotic and dizygotic twin studies investigating the relative roles of host genetics and environmental factors in shaping gut microbiota composition have produced conflicting results. In this study, we investigated the gut microbiota composition of a healthy dichorionic triplet set. The dichorionic triplet set contained a pair of monozygotic twins and a fraternal sibling, with similar pre- and post-natal environmental conditions including feeding regime. V4 16S rRNA and rpoB amplicon pyrosequencing was employed to investigate microbiota composition, and the species and strain diversity of the culturable bifidobacterial population was also examined. At month 1, the monozygotic pair shared a similar microbiota distinct to the fraternal sibling. By month 12 however, the profile was more uniform between the three infants. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) of the microbiota composition revealed strong clustering of the monozygotic pair at month 1 and a separation of the fraternal infant. At months 2 and 3 the phylogenetic distance between the monozygotic pair and the fraternal sibling has greatly reduced and by month 12 the monozygotic pair no longer clustered separately from the fraternal infant. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the bifidobacterial population revealed a lack of strain diversity, with identical strains identified in all three infants at month 1 and 12. The microbiota of two antibiotic-treated dichorionic triplet sets was also investigated. Not surprisingly, in both triplet sets early life antibiotic administration appeared to be a major determinant of microbiota composition at month 1, irrespective of zygosity. By month 12, early antibiotic administration appeared to no longer exert such a strong influence on gut microbiota composition. We hypothesize that initially host genetics play a significant role in the composition of an individual’s gut microbiota, unless an antibiotic intervention is given, but by month 12

  1. High Resolution Mapping of Genetic Factors Affecting Abdominal Bristle Number in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. D.; Mullaney, S. L.; Reid, L. A.; Fry, J. D.; Langley, C. H.; Mackay, TFC.

    1995-01-01

    Factors responsible for selection response for abdominal bristle number and correlated responses in sternopleural bristle number were mapped to the X and third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Lines divergent for high and low abdominal bristle number were created by 25 generations of artificial selection from a large base population, with an intensity of 25 individuals of each sex selected from 100 individuals of each sex scored per generation. Isogenic chromosome substitution lines in which the high (H) X or third chromosome were placed in an isogenic low (L) background were derived from the selection lines and from the 93 recombinant isogenic (RI) HL X and 67 RI chromosome 3 lines constructed from them. Highly polymorphic neutral r00 transposable elements were hybridized in situ to the polytene chromosomes of the RI lines to create a set of cytogenetic markers. These techniques yielded a dense map with an average spacing of 4 cM between informative markers. Factors affecting bristle number, and relative viability of the chromosome 3 RI lines, were mapped using a multiple regression interval mapping approach, conditioning on all markers >/=10 cM from the tested interval. Two factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were mapped on the X chromosome and five factors on the third chromosome. One factor with a large effect on sternopleural bristle number was mapped to the X and two were mapped to the third chromosome; all factors with sternopleural effects corresponded to those with effects on abdominal bristle number. Two of the chromosome 3 factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were also associated with reduced viability. Significant sex-specific effects and epistatic interactions between mapped factors of the same order of magnitude as the additive effects were observed. All factors mapped to the approximate positions of likely candidate loci (ASC, bb, emc, h, mab, Dl and E(spl)), previously characterized by mutations with large

  2. Genetic and environmental factors associated with incidence of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis in preweaned beef calves.

    PubMed

    Snowder, G D; Van Vleck, L D; Cundiff, L V; Bennett, G L

    2005-03-01

    Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) is one of the most economically important diseases in preweaned calves. This study examined the health records of 45,497 calves over a 20-yr period to determine environmental and genetic factors influencing the incidence of IBK. Three data sets were analyzed with an animal model. The first data set (n = 41,986) evaluated environmental factors and genetic differences among nine purebred (Angus, Braunvieh, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Limousin, Pinzgauer, Red Poll, and Simmental) and three composite breeds (MARC I, MARC II, and MARC III). Weaning weights of calves diagnosed with IBK were 8.9 kg lighter (P < 0.05) than weights of healthy calves. Incidence of IBK was related to age of the calf and the seasonal life cycle of the face fly (Musca autumnalis). Incidence of IBK increased in the spring (June), peaked during the summer months (July to September), and then decreased in the fall. Herefords were the most susceptible breed (P < 0.05) compared with all other purebreds and composites. Estimates of direct heritability for the incidence of IBK were generally low and ranged from 0.00 to 0.28 by breed. The maternal permanent environmental and genetic effects of the dam on the incidence of IBK were not significant for most breeds. The second data set (n = 9,606) was used to estimate heterosis for the incidence of IBK from a Hereford and Angus diallel design. The heterosis effect for the incidence of IBK in reciprocal Hereford/Angus crossbred calves was slightly negative (P = 0.12) but not large. The higher incidence of IBK in Angus x Hereford calves compared with Hereford x Angus calves (13.3 vs. 8.9%) suggests a maternal effect related to the incidence of IBK. Incidence of IBK in crossbred calves sired by tropically adapted breeds (Brahma, Boran, Tuli) compared with purebred and crossbred Bos taurus types was investigated in the third data set (n = 2,622). Crossbred calves sired by tropically adapted breeds had a lower

  3. Study of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors for Aspirin-induced Gastric Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun; Hu, Ying; You, Peng; Chi, Yu-Jing; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Yu-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current knowledge about clinical and genetic risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury is not sufficient to prevent these gastric mucosal lesions. Methods: We recruited aspirin takers as the exposed group and healthy volunteers as the control group. The exposed group was categorized into two subgroups such as subgroup A as gastric mucosal injury diagnosed by gastroscopy, including erosion, ulcer or bleeding of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum; subgroup B as no injury of the gastric mucosa was detected by gastroscopy. Clinical information was collected, and 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated. Results: Among 385 participants, 234 were in the aspirin-exposed group. According to gastroscopy, 82 belonged to subgroup A, 91 belonged to subgroup B, and gastroscopic results of 61 participants were not available. Using the Chi-square test and logistic regression, we found that peptic ulcer history (odds ratio [OR] = 5.924, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 2.115–16.592), dual anti-platelet medication (OR = 3.443, 95% CI: 1.154–10.271), current Helicobacter pylori infection (OR = 2.242, 95% CI: 1.032–4.870), male gender (OR = 2.211, 95% CI: 1.027–4.760), GG genotype of rs2243086 (OR = 4.516, 95% CI: 1.180–17.278), and AA genotype of rs1330344 (OR = 2.178, 95% CI: 1.016–4.669) were more frequent in subgroup A than subgroup B. In aspirin users who suffered from upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the frequency of the TT genotype of rs2238631 and TT genotype of rs2243100 was higher than in those without upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Conclusions: Peptic ulcer history, dual anti-platelet medication, H. pylori current infection, and male gender were possible clinical risk factors for aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury. GG genotype of rs2243086 and AA genotype of rs1330344 were possible genetic risk factors. TT genotype of rs2238631 and TT genotype of rs2243100 may be risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in aspirin

  4. Evolution of eukaryotic translation elongation and termination factors: variations of evolutionary rate and genetic code deviations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, David; Kervestin, Stéphanie; Jean-Jean, Olivier; Philippe, Hervé

    2002-02-01

    Translation is carried out by the ribosome and several associated protein factors through three consecutive steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. Termination remains the least understood of them, partly because of the nonuniversality of the factors involved. To get some insights on the evolution of eukaryotic translation termination, we have compared the phylogeny of the release factors eRF1 and eRF3 to that of the elongation factors EF-1alpha and EF-2, with special focus on ciliates. Our results show that these four translation proteins have experienced different modes of evolution. This is especially evident for the EF-1alpha, EF-2, and eRF1 ciliate sequences. Ciliates appear as monophyletic in the EF-2 phylogenetic tree but not in the EF-1alpha and eRF1 phylogenetic trees. This seems to be mainly because of phylogeny reconstruction artifacts (the long-branch attraction) produced by the acceleration of evolutionary rate of ciliate EF-1alpha and eRF1 sequences. Interaction with the highly divergent actin found in ciliates, or on the contrary, loss of interaction, could explain the acceleration of the evolutionary rate of the EF-1alpha sequences. In the case of ciliate eRF1 sequences, their unusually high evolutionary rate may be related to the deviations in the genetic code usage found in diverse ciliates. These deviations involve a relaxation (or even abolition) of the recognition of one or two stop codons by eRF1. To achieve this, structural changes in eRF1 are needed, and this may affect its evolutionary rate. Eukaryotic translation seems to have followed a mosaic evolution, with its different elements governed by different selective pressures. However, a correlation analysis shows that, beneath the disagreement shown by the different translation proteins, their concerted evolution can still be made apparent when they are compared with other proteins that are not involved in translation.

  5. IL6 and IL10 are genetic susceptibility factors of periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Scapoli, Luca; Girardi, Ambra; Palmieri, Annalisa; Carinci, Francesco; Testori, Tiziano; Zuffetti, Francesco; Monguzzi, Riccardo; Lauritano, Dorina

    2012-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is a disease mainly caused by a chronic infection of tissues that support the teeth. Several factors, such as diabetes, smoking and oral care, as well as genetic susceptibility can influence both the risk to develop periodontitis and its progression. The aim of the investigation was to test whether alleles of candidate genes were associated with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A case control study was performed with a cohort of 184 patients with chronic periodontitis and 231 healthy controls from the Italian population. A total of six single nucleotide polymorphisms from five candidate genes, i.e., IL1A, IL1B, IL6, IL10 and vitamin D receptor, were investigated. Results: Evidence of association were obtained for rs1800795 mapping in IL6 (P value = 0.01) as well as for the rs1800872 mapping in IL10 (P = 0.04). The rarer variant allele lowered the risk to develop periodontitis at IL6 (Odds Ratio [OR] = 0.69 [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.51-0.93]) and increased the risk at IL10 (OR = 1.38 [95% CI 1.01-1.86]). Conclusions: The present investigation indicated that polymorphisms of IL6 and IL10 constitute risk factors for chronic periodontitis, while there was no evidence implicating a specific IL1A or IL1B genotype. PMID:23814583

  6. Diet, Lifestyle, Biomarkers, Genetic Factors, and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the Nurses’ Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Edward; Rimm, Eric; Qi, Lu; Rexrode, Kathryn; Albert, Christine M.; Sun, Qi; Willett, Walter C.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contributions of the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHSs) to the understanding of cardiovascular disease etiology in women. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Results. Diets low in trans fat, saturated fat, refined carbohydrates, and sugar-sweetened beverages and rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and sources of unsaturated fats are associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Healthy lifestyle choices include smoking avoidance, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body mass index, and moderate alcohol consumption. Adherence to a combination of these healthy diet and lifestyle behaviors may prevent most vascular events. Studies also covered oral contraceptive use, postmenopausal hormone therapy, shift work, sleep duration, psychosocial factors, and various biomarkers and genetic factors. Findings, such as the association of trans fat with cardiovascular disease, have helped shaped medical guidelines and government policies. Conclusions. The NHS has provided compelling evidence that the majority of vascular events may be prevented by avoiding smoking, participating in regular physical activity, maintaining normal body mass index, and eating a healthy diet. PMID:27459449

  7. Heme dynamics and trafficking factors revealed by genetically encoded fluorescent heme sensors.

    PubMed

    Hanna, David A; Harvey, Raven M; Martinez-Guzman, Osiris; Yuan, Xiaojing; Chandrasekharan, Bindu; Raju, Gheevarghese; Outten, F Wayne; Hamza, Iqbal; Reddi, Amit R

    2016-07-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor and signaling molecule. Heme acquisition by proteins and heme signaling are ultimately reliant on the ability to mobilize labile heme (LH). However, the properties of LH pools, including concentration, oxidation state, distribution, speciation, and dynamics, are poorly understood. Herein, we elucidate the nature and dynamics of LH using genetically encoded ratiometric fluorescent heme sensors in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae We find that the subcellular distribution of LH is heterogeneous; the cytosol maintains LH at ∼20-40 nM, whereas the mitochondria and nucleus maintain it at concentrations below 2.5 nM. Further, we find that the signaling molecule nitric oxide can initiate the rapid mobilization of heme in the cytosol and nucleus from certain thiol-containing factors. We also find that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase constitutes a major cellular heme buffer, and is responsible for maintaining the activity of the heme-dependent nuclear transcription factor heme activator protein (Hap1p). Altogether, we demonstrate that the heme sensors can be used to reveal fundamental aspects of heme trafficking and dynamics and can be used across multiple organisms, including Escherichia coli, yeast, and human cell lines. PMID:27247412

  8. Affective changes during the postpartum period: Influences of genetic and experiential factors.

    PubMed

    Agrati, Daniella; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". The postpartum period involves some truly transformational changes in females' socioemotional behaviors. For most female laboratory rodents and women, these changes include an improvement in their affective state, which has positive consequences for their ability to sensitively care for their offspring. There is heterogeneity among females in the likelihood of this positive affective change, though, and some women experience elevated anxiety or depression (or in rodents anxiety- or depression-related behaviors) after giving birth. We aim to contribute to the understanding of this heterogeneity in maternal affectivity by reviewing selected components of the scientific literatures on laboratory rodents and humans examining how mothers' physical contact with her infants, genetics, history of anxiety and depression and early-life and recent-life experiences contribute to individual differences in postpartum affective states. These studies together indicate that multiple biological and environmental factors beyond female maternal state shape affective responses during the postpartum period, and probably do so in an interactive manner. Furthermore, the similar capacity of some of these factors to modulate anxiety and depression in human and rodent mothers suggests cross-species conservation of mechanisms regulating postpartum affectivity.

  9. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  10. Genetic factors associated with population size may increase extinction risks and decrease colonization potential in a keystone tropical pine

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Rafael F; Trujillo-Argueta, Sonia; Sánchez-Vargas, Nahúm; Newton, Adrian C

    2011-01-01

    Pioneer species are essential for forest regeneration and ecosystem resilience. Pinus chiapensis is an endangered pioneer key species for tropical montane cloud forest regeneration in Mesoamerica. Human activities have severely reduced some P. chiapensis populations, which exhibited a small or null colonization potential suggesting the involvement of genetic factors associated with small populations. We explored the relationships between (i) population genetic diversity (allozymes) and population size, including sampling size effects, (ii) fitness estimates associated with colonization potential (seed viability and seedling performance) in a common environment and population size, and (iii) fitness estimates and observed heterozygosity in populations with sizes spanning five orders of magnitude. All the estimates of genetic diversity and fitness increased significantly with population size. Low fitness was detected in progenies of small populations of disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Progenies with the lowest observed heterozygosity displayed the lowest fitness estimates, which, in turn, increased with heterozygosity, but seed viability peaked at intermediate heterozygosity values suggesting inbreeding and outbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression appears to be the most immediate genetic factor in population decline. Conservation efforts should try to maintain large and genetically diverse populations, enhance gene flow by restoring connectivity between adjacent populations, and avoid genetically distant individuals. PMID:25568006

  11. A genome-wide genetic screen for host factors required for hepatitis C virus propagation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qisheng; Brass, Abraham L.; Ng, Aylwin; Hu, Zongyi; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Liang, T. Jake; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of end-stage liver disease and a leading indication for liver transplantation. Current therapy fails in many instances and is associated with significant side effects. HCV encodes only a few proteins and depends heavily on host factors for propagation. Each of these host dependencies is a potential therapeutic target. To find host factors required by HCV, we completed a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen using an infectious HCV cell culture system. We applied a two-part screening protocol to allow identification of host factors involved in the complete viral lifecycle. The candidate genes found included known or previously identified factors, and also implicate many additional host cell proteins in HCV infection. To create a more comprehensive view of HCV and host cell interactions, we performed a bioinformatic meta-analysis that integrates our data with those of previous functional and proteomic studies. The identification of host factors participating in the complete HCV lifecycle will both advance our understanding of HCV pathogenesis and illuminate therapeutic targets. PMID:19717417

  12. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  13. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  14. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  15. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  16. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  17. ABO Blood Groups and Genetic Risk Factors for Thrombosis in Croatian Population

    PubMed Central

    Jukić, Irena; Bingulac-Popović, Jasna; Đogić, Vesna; Babić, Ivana; Culej, Jelena; Tomičić, Maja; Vuk, Tomislav; Šarlija, Dorotea; Balija, Melita

    2009-01-01

    Aim To assess the association between ABO blood group genotypes and genetic risk factors for thrombosis (FV Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutations) in the Croatian population and to determine whether genetic predisposition to thrombotic risk is higher in non-OO blood group genotypes than in OO blood group genotypes. Methods The study included 154 patients with thrombosis and 200 asymptomatic blood donors as a control group. Genotyping to 5 common alleles of ABO blood groups was performed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP). FV Leiden was determined by PCR-SSP, while prothrombin and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase were determined by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Results There was an association between non-OO blood group genotypes and the risk of thrombosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-3.27). The strongest association with thrombotic risk was recorded for A1B/A2B blood group genotypes (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.10-6.74), followed by BB/O1B/O2B (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.25-4.21) and O1A1/O2A1 (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.15-3.31). FV Leiden increased the risk of thrombosis 31-fold in the group of OO carriers and fourfold in the group of non-OO carriers. There was no significant difference in the risk of thrombosis between OO and non-OO blood groups associated with prothrombin mutation. Non-OO carriers positive for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase had a 5.7 times greater risk of thrombosis than that recorded in OO carriers negative for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Conclusion Study results confirmed the association of non-OO blood group genotypes with an increased risk of thrombosis in Croatia. PMID:20017223

  18. MTHFR Genetic Polymorphism As a Risk Factor in Egyptian Mothers with Down Syndrome Children

    PubMed Central

    Meguid, Nagwa A.; Dardir, Ahmed A.; Khass, Mohamed; Hossieny, Lamia El; Ezzat, Afaf; Awady, Mostafa K. El

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports linking Down syndrome (DS) to maternal polymorphisms at the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene locus have generated great interest among investigators in the field. The present study aimed at evaluation of MTHFR 677C/T and 1298A/C polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene as maternal risk factors for DS. Forty two mothers of proven DS outcomes and forty eight control mothers with normal offspring were included. Complete medical and nutritional histories for all mothers were taken with special emphasis on folate intake. Folic acid intake from food or vitamin supplements was significantly low (below the Recommended Daily Allowance) in the group of case mothers compared to control mothers. Frequencies of MTHFR 677T and MTHFR 1298C alleles were significantly higher among case mothers (32.1% and 57.1%, respectively) compared to control mothers (18.7% and 32.3%, respectively). Heterozygous and homozygous genotype frequencies of MTHFR at position 677 (CT and TT) were higher among case mothers than controls (40.5% versus 25% and 11.9% versus 6.2%, respectively) with an odds ratio of 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93–5.89) and 2.75 (95% CI 0.95–12.77), respectively. Interestingly, the homozygous genotype frequency (CC) at position 1298 was significantly higher in case mothers than in controls (33.3% versus 2.1% respectively) with an odds ratio of 31.5 (95% CI 3.51 to 282.33) indicating that this polymorphism may have more genetic impact than 677 polymorphism. Heterozygous genotype (AC) did not show significant difference between the two groups. We here report on the first pilot study of the possible genetic association between DS and MTHFR 1298A/C genotypes among Egyptians. Further extended studies are recommended to confirm the present work. PMID:18057532

  19. MTHFR genetic polymorphism as a risk factor in Egyptian mothers with Down syndrome children.

    PubMed

    Meguid, Nagwa A; Dardir, Ahmed A; Khass, Mohamed; Hossieny, Lamia El; Ezzat, Afaf; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports linking Down syndrome (DS) to maternal polymorphisms at the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene locus have generated great interest among investigators in the field. The present study aimed at evaluation of MTHFR 677C/T and 1298A/C polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene as maternal risk factors for DS. Forty two mothers of proven DS outcomes and forty eight control mothers with normal offspring were included. Complete medical and nutritional histories for all mothers were taken with special emphasis on folate intake. Folic acid intake from food or vitamin supplements was significantly low (below the Recommended Daily Allowance) in the group of case mothers compared to control mothers. Frequencies of MTHFR 677T and MTHFR 1298C alleles were significantly higher among case mothers (32.1% and 57.1%, respectively) compared to control mothers (18.7% and 32.3%, respectively). Heterozygous and homozygous genotype frequencies of MTHFR at position 677 (CT and TT) were higher among case mothers than controls (40.5% versus 25% and 11.9% versus 6.2%, respectively) with an odds ratio of 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.93-5.89) and 2.75 (95% CI 0.95-12.77), respectively. Interestingly, the homozygous genotype frequency (CC) at position 1298 was significantly higher in case mothers than in controls (33.3% versus 2.1% respectively) with an odds ratio of 31.5 (95% CI 3.51 to 282.33) indicating that this polymorphism may have more genetic impact than 677 polymorphism. Heterozygous genotype (AC) did not show significant difference between the two groups. We here report on the first pilot study of the possible genetic association between DS and MTHFR 1298A/C genotypes among Egyptians. Further extended studies are recommended to confirm the present work.

  20. Correlation between genetic variability and virulence factors in clinical strains of Malassezia pachydermatis of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Buommino, Elisabetta; Nocera, Francesca Paola; Parisi, Annamaria; Rizzo, Antonietta; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Mallardo, Karina; Fiorito, Filomena; Baroni, Adone; De Martino, Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a yeast belonging to the microbiota of the skin and mucous membranes of dog and cat, but it can also act as pathogen, causing dermatitis. The aim of this work was to evaluate the genetic variability of M. pachydermatis strains isolated from symptomatic dogs and cats and determine a correlation between genotype and phenotype. For this purpose eleven strains of M. pachydermatis were molecularly classified by nested-polymerase chain reaction (nested-PCR) based on ITS-1 and ITS-2 regions, specific for fungal rRNA genes. Furthermore, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was applied for genetic typing of M. pachydermatis isolates identifying four different genotypes. Strains belonging to genotype 1 produced the highest amount of biofilm and phospholipase activity. The inflammatory response induced by M. pachydermatis strains in immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCat cells) was significantly different when we compared the results obtained from each strain. In particular, HaCat cells infected with the strains belonging to genotypes 1 and 2 triggered the highest levels of increase in TLR-2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, COX-2 and MMP-9 expression. By contrast, cells infected with the strains of genotype 3 and those of genotype 4 did not significantly induce TLR-2 and cytokines. The results obtained might suggest a possible association between genotype and virulence factors expressed by M. pachydermatis strains. This highlights the need for a more accurate identification of the yeast to improve the therapeutic approach and to monitor the onset of human infections caused by this emergent zoonotic pathogen. PMID:27602421

  1. Genetic and environmental factors affecting self-esteem from age 14 to 17: a longitudinal study of Finnish twins

    PubMed Central

    Raevuori, Anu; Dick, Danielle M.; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Pulkkinen, Lea; Rose, Richard J.; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko; Viken, Richard J.; Silventoinen, Karri

    2007-01-01

    Background We analysed genetic and environmental influences on self-esteem and its stability across adolescence. Methods Finnish twins born in 1983–1987 were assessed by questionnaire at ages 14y (N= 4132 twin individuals) and 17y (N=3841 twin individuals). Self esteem was measured using the Rosenberg global self-esteem scale and analyzed using quantitative genetic methods for twin data in the Mx statistical package. Results The heritability of self-esteem was 0.62 (95% CI 0.56–0.68) in 14-y-old boys and 0.40 (95% CI 0.26–0.54) in 14-y-old girls, while the corresponding estimates at age 17y were 0.48 (95% CI 0.39–0.56) and 0.29 (95% CI 0.11–0.45). Rosenberg self-esteem scores at age 14 y and 17 y were modestly correlated (r=0.44 in boys, r=0.46 in girls). In boys, the correlation was mainly (82%) due to genetic factors, with residual co-variation due to unique environment. In girls, genetic (31%) and common environmental (61%) factors largely explained the correlation. Conclusions In adolescence, self-esteem seems to be differently regulated in boys versus girls. A key challenge for future research is to identify environmental influences contributing to self-esteem during adolescence and how these factors interact with genetic influences. PMID:17537282

  2. Yeast Genetic Analysis Reveals the Involvement of Chromatin Reassembly Factors in Repressing HIV-1 Basal Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Respaldiza, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Gil, Alfonso; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Jordan, Albert; Chávez, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5′ end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5′HIV-TR), which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5′HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5′HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5′HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency. PMID:19148280

  3. Additive-dominance genetic model analyses for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in a bread wheat factorial crossing population.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Ibrahim, Amir M H

    2015-12-01

    Elevated level of late maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) can result in low falling number scores, reduced grain quality, and downgrade of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) class. A mating population was developed by crossing parents with different levels of LMAA. The F2 and F3 hybrids and their parents were evaluated for LMAA, and data were analyzed using the R software package 'qgtools' integrated with an additive-dominance genetic model and a mixed linear model approach. Simulated results showed high testing powers for additive and additive × environment variances, and comparatively low powers for dominance and dominance × environment variances. All variance components and their proportions to the phenotypic variance for the parents and hybrids were significant except for the dominance × environment variance. The estimated narrow-sense heritability and broad-sense heritability for LMAA were 14 and 54%, respectively. High significant negative additive effects for parents suggest that spring wheat cultivars 'Lancer' and 'Chester' can serve as good general combiners, and that 'Kinsman' and 'Seri-82' had negative specific combining ability in some hybrids despite of their own significant positive additive effects, suggesting they can be used as parents to reduce LMAA levels. Seri-82 showed very good general combining ability effect when used as a male parent, indicating the importance of reciprocal effects. High significant negative dominance effects and high-parent heterosis for hybrids demonstrated that the specific hybrid combinations; Chester × Kinsman, 'Lerma52' × Lancer, Lerma52 × 'LoSprout' and 'Janz' × Seri-82 could be generated to produce cultivars with significantly reduced LMAA level.

  4. Experimental separation of genetic and demographic factors on extinction risk in wild populations.

    PubMed

    Wootton, J Timothy; Pfister, Catherine A

    2013-10-01

    When populations reach small size, an extinction risk vortex may arise from genetic (inbreeding depression, genetic drift) and ecological (demographic stochasticity, Allee effects, environmental fluctuation) processes. The relative contribution of these processes to extinction in wild populations is unknown, but important for conserving endangered species. In experimental field populations of a harvested kelp (Postelsia palmaeformis), in which we independently varied initial genetic diversity (completely inbred, control, outbred) and population size, ecological processes dominated the risk of extinction, whereas the contribution of genetic diversity was slight. Our results match theoretical predictions that demographic processes will generally doom small populations to extinction before genetic effects act strongly, prioritize detailed ecological