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Sample records for additional genetic mutations

  1. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  2. An Overview of Mutation Detection Methods in Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Rabbani, Bahareh

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders are traditionally categorized into three main groups: single-gene, chromosomal, and multifactorial disorders. Single gene or Mendelian disorders result from errors in DNA sequence of a gene and include autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR), X-linked dominant and Y-linked (holandric) disorders. Chromosomal disorders are due to chromosomal aberrations including numerical and structural damages. Molecular and cytogenetic techniques have been applied to identify genetic mutations leading to diseases. Accurate diagnosis of diseases is essential for appropriate treatment of patients, genetic counseling and prevention strategies. Characteristic features of patterns of inheritance are briefly reviewed and a short description of chromosomal disorders is also presented. In addition, applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and different types of mutations are discussed for genetic diagnosis of the pediatric genetic diseases. The purpose is to make pediatricians familiar with the applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and tools used for genetic diagnosis. PMID:24427490

  3. De novo mutations in human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Joris A; Brunner, Han G

    2012-08-01

    New mutations have long been known to cause genetic disease, but their true contribution to the disease burden can only now be determined using family-based whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing approaches. In this Review we discuss recent findings suggesting that de novo mutations play a prominent part in rare and common forms of neurodevelopmental diseases, including intellectual disability, autism and schizophrenia. De novo mutations provide a mechanism by which early-onset reproductively lethal diseases remain frequent in the population. These mutations, although individually rare, may capture a significant part of the heritability for complex genetic diseases that is not detectable by genome-wide association studies. PMID:22805709

  4. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  5. Addition of molecular methods to mutation studies with Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.R. )

    1989-01-01

    For 80 years, Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a major tool in analyzing Mendelian genetics. By using chromosome inversions that suppress crossing over, geneticists have developed a large number of stocks for mutation analysis. These stocks permit numerous tests for specific locus mutations, lethals at multiple loci on any chromosome, chromosome exchanges, insertions, and deletions. The entire genome can be manipulated for a degree of genetic control not found in other germ-line systems. Recombinant DNA techniques now permit analysis of mutations to the nucleotide level. By combining classical genetic analysis with recombinant DNA techniques, it is possible to analyze mutations that range from chromosome aberrations and multilocus deficiencies to single nucleotide transitions.

  6. Equine diseases caused by known genetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Finno, Carrie J; Spier, Sharon J; Valberg, Stephanie J

    2009-03-01

    The recent development of equine genome maps by the equine genome community and the complete sequencing of the horse genome performed at the Broad Institute have accelerated the pace of genetic discovery. This review focuses on genetic diseases in the horse for which a mutation is currently known, including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, severe combined immunodeficiency, overo lethal white syndrome, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, malignant hyperthermia, hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia, and polysaccharide storage myopathy. Emphasis is placed on the prevalence, clinical signs, etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for each disease.

  7. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management. PMID:24339558

  8. Polygenic mutation in Droosophila melanogaster: Genetic analysis of selection lines

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, J.D.; deRonde, K.A.; Mackay, T.F.C.

    1995-03-01

    The authors have conducted genetic analyses of 12 long-term selection lines of Drosophila melanogaster derived from a highly inbred base population, containing new mutations affecting abdominal and sternopleural bristle number. Biometric analysis of the number of effective factors differentiating the selected lines from the base inbred indicated that with the exception of the three lines selected for increased number of abdominal bristles, three or more mutations contributed to the responses of the selection lines. Analysis of the chromosomal distribution of effects revealed that mutations affecting abdominal bristle number occurred on all three major chromosomes. In addition, Y-linked mutations with effects ranging from one to three bristles occurred in all three lines selected for decreased number of abdominal bristles, as well as in one line selected for increased abdominal bristle number. Mutations affecting sternopleural bristle number were mainly on the X and third chromosomes. One abdominal and one sternopleural selection line showed evidence of a segregating lethal with large effects on bristle number. As an indirect test for allelism of mutations occurring in different selection lines, the three lines selected in the same direction for the same trait were crossed in all possible combinations, and selection continued from the F{sub 2} hybrides. Responses of the hybrid lines usually did not exceed those of the most extreme parental lines, indicating that the responses of the parental lines may have been partly due to mutations at the same loci, although other interpretations are possible.

  9. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  10. Genetic analysis of transcription-associated mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Morey, N J; Greene, C N; Jinks-Robertson, S

    2000-01-01

    High levels of transcription are associated with elevated mutation rates in yeast, a phenomenon referred to as transcription-associated mutation (TAM). The transcription-associated increase in mutation rates was previously shown to be partially dependent on the Rev3p translesion bypass pathway, thus implicating DNA damage in TAM. In this study, we use reversion of a pGAL-driven lys2DeltaBgl allele to further examine the genetic requirements of TAM. We find that TAM is increased by disruption of the nucleotide excision repair or recombination pathways. In contrast, elimination of base excision repair components has only modest effects on TAM. In addition to the genetic studies, the lys2DeltaBgl reversion spectra of repair-proficient low and high transcription strains were obtained. In the low transcription spectrum, most of the frameshift events correspond to deletions of AT base pairs whereas in the high transcription strain, deletions of GC base pairs predominate. These results are discussed in terms of transcription and its role in DNA damage and repair. PMID:10628973

  11. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  12. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon. PMID:25940384

  13. Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and one wild-type Escherichia coli to doubling concentrations of the antibiotic cefotaxime. All strains carried TEM-1, a β-lactamase enzyme well known by its low availability of mutational pathways. Crucially, one of the mutators does not elevate any of the relevant first-step mutations known to improve cefatoximase activity. Despite this, both mutators displayed a similar ability to evolve more than 1000-fold resistance. Initial adaptation proceeded in parallel through general multi-drug resistance mechanisms. High-level resistance, in contrast, was achieved through divergent paths; with the a priori inferior mutator exploiting alternative mutational pathways in PBP3, the target of the antibiotic. These results have implications for mutator management in clinical infections and, more generally, illustrate that limits to natural selection in real organisms are alleviated by the existence of multiple loci contributing to fitness. PMID:25716795

  14. Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and one wild-type Escherichia coli to doubling concentrations of the antibiotic cefotaxime. All strains carried TEM-1, a β-lactamase enzyme well known by its low availability of mutational pathways. Crucially, one of the mutators does not elevate any of the relevant first-step mutations known to improve cefatoximase activity. Despite this, both mutators displayed a similar ability to evolve more than 1000-fold resistance. Initial adaptation proceeded in parallel through general multi-drug resistance mechanisms. High-level resistance, in contrast, was achieved through divergent paths; with the a priori inferior mutator exploiting alternative mutational pathways in PBP3, the target of the antibiotic. These results have implications for mutator management in clinical infections and, more generally, illustrate that limits to natural selection in real organisms are alleviated by the existence of multiple loci contributing to fitness.

  15. Hirschsprung's disease: genetic mutations in mice and men

    PubMed Central

    ROBERTSON, K; MASON, I; HALL, S

    1997-01-01

    MRC Brain Development Programme,Department of Developmental Neurobiology,UMDS Guy's Hospital,London SE1 9RT, UK S HALL Hirschsprung's disease is a neuronal dysplasia of the hindgut, characterised by a loss of neurones, which affects about 1in 5000 live births.1 Genetic factors have been implicated in the aetiology of this disease in about 20% of cases and a dominant pattern of inheritance has been revealed in several families. The pathogenesis of the aganglionosis is often attributed to a failure of migration of neural crest cells, although this has not been proven. 
Recently, mutations in a developmentally regulated receptor tyrosine kinase gene, ret, and mutations in the endothelin receptor-B gene (ENDR-B) have both been linked to familial Hirschsprung's disease in humans.4-6 Moreover, certain mutant mouse strains—namely piebald lethal and lethal spotted—exhibit striking similarities to the human condition. The mutation which gives rise to piebald lethal has now been found to be in the ENDR-B gene,7 and the mutation associated with lethal spotted occurs in the gene for endothelin-3 (ET-3), a ligand for ENDR-B.8 
Two transgenic mouse lines have been developed which also reflect the human disease: ret-k , which has a loss of function mutation of the ret gene,9 and ENDR-B null.10 In addition, the introduction of a Lac-Z reporter gene into neural crest cells of aganglionic mice has made it possible to study directly the fate of enteric neuroblasts which are affected by "Hirschsprung's-like" mutations.11 Here, we review the possible roles of RET and endothelin in the normal development of the enteric nervous system, and the significance of their mutated forms in the pathogenesis of familial aganglionosis. 
This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of the lesions which have been implicated in congenital forms of Hirschsprung's disease. Disruption of these genes in the mouse, either by transgenic "knockout" approaches or

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... N. A family harboring a germ-line N-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation and development of acute myeloid leukemia with an additional somatic C-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar; ...

  17. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-03-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health.

  18. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  19. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-03-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  20. Genetic Screens for Mutations Affecting Development of Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matthew D; Stemple, Derek L; Zimmerman, Lyle B

    2006-01-01

    We present here the results of forward and reverse genetic screens for chemically-induced mutations in Xenopus tropicalis. In our forward genetic screen, we have uncovered 77 candidate phenotypes in diverse organogenesis and differentiation processes. Using a gynogenetic screen design, which minimizes time and husbandry space expenditures, we find that if a phenotype is detected in the gynogenetic F2 of a given F1 female twice, it is highly likely to be a heritable abnormality (29/29 cases). We have also demonstrated the feasibility of reverse genetic approaches for obtaining carriers of mutations in specific genes, and have directly determined an induced mutation rate by sequencing specific exons from a mutagenized population. The Xenopus system, with its well-understood embryology, fate map, and gain-of-function approaches, can now be coupled with efficient loss-of-function genetic strategies for vertebrate functional genomics and developmental genetics. PMID:16789825

  1. Deleterious mutations and the genetic variance of male fitness components in Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John K

    2003-01-01

    Deleterious mutations are relevant to a broad range of questions in genetics and evolutionary biology. I present an application of the "biometric method" for estimating mutational parameters for male fitness characters of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus. The biometric method rests on two critical assumptions. The first is that experimental inbreeding changes genotype frequencies without changing allele frequencies; i.e., there is no genetic purging during the experiment. I satisfy this condition by employing a breeding design in which the parents are randomly extracted, fully homozygous inbred lines. The second is that all genetic variation is attributable to deleterious mutations maintained in mutation-selection balance. I explicitly test this hypothesis using likelihood ratios. Of the three deleterious mutation models tested, the first two are rejected for all characters. The failure of these models is due to an excess of additive genetic variation relative to the expectation under mutation-selection balance. The third model is not rejected for either of two log-transformed male fitness traits. However, this model imposes only "weak conditions" and is not sufficiently detailed to provide estimates for mutational parameters. The implication is that, if biometric methods are going to yield useful parameter estimates, they will need to consider mutational models more complicated than those typically employed in experimental studies. PMID:12871916

  2. Influence of dominance, leptokurtosis and pleiotropy of deleterious mutations on quantitative genetic variation at mutation-selection balance.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Jinliang; Hill, William G

    2004-01-01

    In models of maintenance of genetic variance (V (G)) it has often been assumed that mutant alleles act additively. However, experimental data show that the dominance coefficient varies among mutant alleles and those of large effect tend to be recessive. On the basis of empirical knowledge of mutations, a joint-effect model of pleiotropic and real stabilizing selection that includes dominance is constructed and analyzed. It is shown that dominance can dramatically alter the prediction of equilibrium V (G). Analysis indicates that for the situations where mutations are more recessive for fitness than for a quantitative trait, as supported by the available data, the joint-effect model predicts a significantly higher V (G) than does an additive model. Importantly, for what seem to be realistic distributions of mutational effects (i.e., many mutants may not affect the quantitative trait substantially but are likely to affect fitness), the observed high levels of genetic variation in the quantitative trait under strong apparent stabilizing selection can be generated. This investigation supports the hypothesis that most V (G) comes from the alleles nearly neutral for fitness in heterozygotes while apparent stabilizing selection is contributed mainly by the alleles of large effect on the quantitative trait. Thus considerations of dominance coefficients of mutations lend further support to our previous conclusion that mutation-selection balance is a plausible mechanism of the maintenance of the genetic variance in natural populations. PMID:15020447

  3. Mosaic mutations in early-onset genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Matt; Petrovski, Slavé; Shellhaas, Renée; Tang, Yingying; Crandall, Laura; Goldstein, David; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An emerging approach in medical genetics is to identify de novo mutations in patients with severe early-onset genetic disease that are absent in population controls and in the patient’s parents. This approach, however, frequently misses post-zygotic “mosaic” mutations that are present in only a portion of the healthy parents’ cells and are transmitted to offspring. Methods We constructed a mosaic transmission screen for variants that have an ~50% alternative allele ratio in the proband but are significantly less than 50% in the transmitting parent. We applied it to two family-based genetic disease cohorts consisting of 9 cases of sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC) and 338 previously published cases of epileptic encephalopathy. Results The screen identified six parental-mosaic transmissions across the two cohorts. The resultant rate of ~0.02 identified transmissions per trio is far lower than that of de novo mutations. Among these transmissions were two likely disease-causing mutations: an SCN1A mutation transmitted to an SUDC proband and her sibling with Dravet syndrome, as well as an SLC6A1 mutation in a proband with epileptic encephalopathy. Conclusion These results highlight explicit screening for mosaic mutations as an important complement to the established approach of screening for de novo mutations. PMID:26716362

  4. FLG mutations in ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic eczema: spectrum of mutations and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M

    2010-03-01

    Filaggrin is a key protein involved in skin barrier function. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and have been shown to be major predisposing factors for atopic eczema (AE), initially in European populations. Subsequently, FLG mutations were identified in Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese and Korean populations. It was demonstrated that FLG mutations are closely associated with AE in the Japanese population. Notably, the same FLG mutations identified in the European population were rarely found in Asians. These results exemplify differences in filaggrin population genetics between Europe and Asia. For mutation screening, background information needs to be obtained on prevalent FLG mutations for each geographical population. It is therefore important to establish the global population genetics maps for FLG mutations. Mutations at any site within FLG, even mutations in C-terminal imperfect filaggrin repeats, cause significant reductions in amounts of profilaggrin/filaggrin peptide in patient epidermis as the C-terminal region is essential for proper processing of profilaggrin into filaggrin. Thus, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed in patients with FLG mutations. A restoration of the barrier function seems a feasible and promising strategy for treatment and prevention in individuals with filaggrin deficiency.

  5. The population genetics of mutations: good, bad and indifferent.

    PubMed

    Loewe, Laurence; Hill, William G

    2010-04-27

    Population genetics is fundamental to our understanding of evolution, and mutations are essential raw materials for evolution. In this introduction to more detailed papers that follow, we aim to provide an oversight of the field. We review current knowledge on mutation rates and their harmful and beneficial effects on fitness and then consider theories that predict the fate of individual mutations or the consequences of mutation accumulation for quantitative traits. Many advances in the past built on models that treat the evolution of mutations at each DNA site independently, neglecting linkage of sites on chromosomes and interactions of effects between sites (epistasis). We review work that addresses these limitations, to predict how mutations interfere with each other. An understanding of the population genetics of mutations of individual loci and of traits affected by many loci helps in addressing many fundamental and applied questions: for example, how do organisms adapt to changing environments, how did sex evolve, which DNA sequences are medically important, why do we age, which genetic processes can generate new species or drive endangered species to extinction, and how should policy on levels of potentially harmful mutagens introduced into the environment by humans be determined?

  6. Clinical and Genetic Characterization of Manifesting Carriers of DMD Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J.; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Sampson, Jacinda B.; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M.; Florence, Julaine M.; Finkel, Richard S.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Wong, Brenda L.; Sussman, Michael D.; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M.; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E.; Howard, Michael T.; Weiss, Robert B.; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in fifteen manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward nonrandom in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. PMID:20630757

  7. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats. PMID:20484848

  8. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats.

  9. De Novo Synonymous Mutations in Regulatory Elements Contribute to the Genetic Etiology of Autism and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Takata, Atsushi; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Gogos, Joseph A; Xu, Bin; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2016-03-01

    We analyze de novo synonymous mutations identified in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia (SCZ) with potential impact on regulatory elements using data from whole-exome sequencing (WESs) studies. Focusing on five types of genetic regulatory functions, we found that de novo near-splice site synonymous mutations changing exonic splicing regulators and those within frontal cortex-derived DNase I hypersensitivity sites are significantly enriched in ASD and SCZ, respectively. These results remained significant, albeit less so, after incorporating two additional ASD datasets. Among the genes identified, several are hit by multiple functional de novo mutations, with RAB2A and SETD1A showing the highest statistical significance in ASD and SCZ, respectively. The estimated contribution of these synonymous mutations to disease liability is comparable to de novo protein-truncating mutations. These findings expand the repertoire of functional de novo mutations to include "functional" synonymous ones and strengthen the role of rare variants in neuropsychiatric disease risk. PMID:26938441

  10. Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, David G.; Politi, Katerina; Bhutkar, Arjun; Chen, Frances K.; Song, Xiaoling; Pirun, Mono; Santiago, Philip M.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Platt, James T.; Lee, Emily; Hodges, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Jacks, Tyler; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity. PMID:27702896

  11. Explaining additional genetic variation in complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew R.; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of complex traits, discovering >6000 variants associated with >500 quantitative traits and common complex diseases in humans. The associations identified so far represent only a fraction of those which influence phenotype, as there are likely to be very many variants across the entire frequency spectrum, each of which influences multiple traits, with only a small average contribution to the phenotypic variance. This presents a considerable challenge to further dissection of the remaining unexplained genetic variance within populations, which limits our ability to predict disease risk, identify new drug targets, improve and maintain food sources, and understand natural diversity. This challenge will be met within the current framework through larger sample size, better phenotyping including recording of non-genetic risk factors, focused study designs, and an integration of multiple sources of phenotypic and genetic information. The current evidence supports the application of quantitative genetic approaches, and we argue that one should retain simpler theories until simplicity can be traded for greater explanatory power. PMID:24629526

  12. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  13. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  14. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Low incidence of SCN1A genetic mutation in patients with hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Byung Chan; Kim, Ki Joong; Chae, Jong Hee; Lee, Ran; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-10-01

    Genetic mutations in SCN1A account for more than two-thirds of patients with classic Dravet syndrome. A role for SCN1A genetic mutations in the development of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy (HHE) syndrome was recently suggested based on the observation that HHE syndrome and classic Dravet syndrome share many clinical features. We previously identified a 2 bp-deletion mutation in SCN1A in a Dravet patient, and we found out the patient also had HHE syndrome upon clinical re-evaluation. We subsequently screened 10 additional HHE patients for SCN1A. Among the 11 patients who were diagnosed with HHE syndrome, six patients had no other etiology with the exception of prolonged febrile illness, therefore classified as idiopathic HHE syndrome, whereas five patients were classified as symptomatic HHE syndrome. Direct sequencing of all coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the SCN1A gene was performed, but we failed to identify additional mutations in 10 patients. The patient with SCN1A mutation had the earliest onset of febrile convulsion and hemiparesis. Our study suggests that SCN1A genetic mutation is only a rare predisposing cause of HHE syndrome.

  17. Novel genetic mutation in the background of Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Halászlaki, Csaba; Takács, István; Butz, Henriett; Patócs, Attila; Lakatos, Péter

    2012-04-01

    Carney complex is a rare disease inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. It is mostly caused by inactivating mutations of the subunit of protein kinase A. Carney complex is associated with atrial myxoma, nevi or myxomas of the skin, breast tumor and endocrine overactivity. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is the specific endocrine manifestation. The authors present the history of a 53-year-old female patient who had undergone surgery for atrial myxomas, thyroid tumor and breast cancer. She was also operated for an adrenal adenoma causing Cushing’s syndrome. Genetic study revealed a novel mutation in the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (ivs2-1G>A splice mutation in intron 2). Her heterozygous twins were also genetically screened and one of them carried the same mutation. The authors emphasize that despite the absence of specific treatment for patients with Carney complex, confirmation of the diagnosis by genetic studies is important for the close follow-up of the patient and early identification of novel manifestations. PMID:22297707

  18. Genetic Mutations Associated With Cigarette Smoking in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Kensler, Thomas W.; Wolfgang, Christopher; Jones, Siân; Zhang, Xiaosong; Parsons, D. Willams; Lin, Jimmy Cheng-Ho; Leary, Rebecca J.; Eshleman, James R.; Goggins, Michael; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Maitra, Anirban; Klein, Alison; Cameron, John L.; Olino, Kelly; Schulick, Richard; Winter, Jordan; Vogelstein, Bert; Velculescu, Victor E.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking doubles the risk of pancreatic cancer and smoking accounts for 20 to 25% of pancreatic cancers. The recent sequencing of the pancreatic cancer genome provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify mutational patterns associated with smoking. Design We previously sequenced over 750 million base pairs of DNA from 23,219 transcripts in 24 adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (“Discovery Screen”). In this previous study the 39 genes that were mutated more than once in the Discovery Screen were sequenced in an additional 90 adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (“Validation Screen”). Here we compared the somatic mutations in the cancers obtained from individuals who ever smoked cigarettes (n=64) to the somatic mutations in the cancers obtained from individuals who never smoked cigarettes (n=50). Results When adjusted for age and gender, analyses of the Discovery Screen revealed significantly more non-synonymous mutations in the carcinomas obtained from ever smokers (mean 53.1 mutations per tumor, SD 27.9) than in the carcinomas obtained from never smokers (mean 38.5, SD 11.1, p=0.04). The difference between smokers and non-smokers was not driven by mutations in known driver genes in pancreatic cancer (KRAS, TP53, p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4), but instead was predominantly observed in genes mutated at lower frequency. No differences were observed in mutations in carcinomas from the head vs. tail of the gland. Conclusion Pancreatic carcinomas from cigarette smokers harbor more mutations than do carcinomas from never smokers. The types and patterns of these mutations provide insight into the mechanisms by which cigarette smoking causes pancreatic cancer. PMID:19351817

  19. Mutation and Human Exceptionalism: Our Future Genetic Load

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Although the human germline mutation rate is higher than that in any other well-studied species, the rate is not exceptional once the effective genome size and effective population size are taken into consideration. Human somatic mutation rates are substantially elevated above those in the germline, but this is also seen in other species. What is exceptional about humans is the recent detachment from the challenges of the natural environment and the ability to modify phenotypic traits in ways that mitigate the fitness effects of mutations, e.g., precision and personalized medicine. This results in a relaxation of selection against mildly deleterious mutations, including those magnifying the mutation rate itself. The long-term consequence of such effects is an expected genetic deterioration in the baseline human condition, potentially measurable on the timescale of a few generations in westernized societies, and because the brain is a particularly large mutational target, this is of particular concern. Ultimately, the price will have to be covered by further investment in various forms of medical intervention. Resolving the uncertainties of the magnitude and timescale of these effects will require the establishment of stable, standardized, multigenerational measurement procedures for various human traits. PMID:26953265

  20. Genetic heterogeneity of pseudoxanthoma elasticum: the Chinese signature profile of ABCC6 and ENPP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Jiang, Qiujie; Wu, Zhengsheng; Shao, Changxia; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Luting; Uitto, Jouni; Wang, Gang

    2015-05-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ectopic mineralization, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. We examined clinically 29 Chinese PXE patients from unrelated families, so far the largest cohort of Asian PXE patients. In a subset of 22 patients, we sequenced ABCC6 and another candidate gene, ENPP1, and conducted pathogenicity analyses for each variant. We identified a total of 17 distinct mutations in ABCC6, 15 of them being, to our knowledge, previously unreported, including 5 frameshift and 10 missense variants. In addition, a missense mutation in combination with a recurrent nonsense mutation in ENPP1 was discovered in a pediatric PXE case. No cases with p.R1141X or del23-29 mutations, common in Caucasian patient populations, were identified. The 10 missense mutations in ABCC6 were expressed in the mouse liver via hydrodynamic tail-vein injections. One mutant protein showed cytoplasmic accumulation indicating abnormal subcellular trafficking, while the other nine mutants showed correct plasma membrane location. These nine mutations were further investigated for their pathogenicity using a recently developed zebrafish mRNA rescue assay. Minimal rescue of the morpholino-induced phenotype was achieved with eight of the nine mutant human ABCC6 mRNAs tested, implying pathogenicity. This study demonstrates that the Chinese PXE population harbors unique ABCC6 mutations. These genetic data have implications for allele-specific therapy currently being developed for PXE. PMID:25615550

  1. Hepatitis B virus genetic mutations and evolution in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Yan, Xin-Min

    2014-05-14

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) belongs to the genus Orthohepadnavirus of the Hepadnaviridae family and is approximately 3.2 kb in length. Owing to a lack of proofreading capacity during reverse transcription and a high replication rate, HBV exhibits as quasispecies. To detect the genetic mutations of HBV, many methods with different sensitivities and throughputs were developed. According to documentary records, HBV mutation and evolution were important vial parameters in predicting disease progression and therapeutic outcome. In this review, we separately discussed the correlation between HBV genomic mutations in four open reading frames and liver disease progression. Since some of the results were controversial from different laboratories, it remains to be seen whether functional analyses will confirm their role in modifying the course of infection.

  2. Genetic regulatory network motifs constrain adaptation through curvature in the landscape of mutational (co)variance.

    PubMed

    Hether, Tyler D; Hohenlohe, Paul A

    2014-04-01

    Systems biology is accumulating a wealth of understanding about the structure of genetic regulatory networks, leading to a more complete picture of the complex genotype-phenotype relationship. However, models of multivariate phenotypic evolution based on quantitative genetics have largely not incorporated a network-based view of genetic variation. Here we model a set of two-node, two-phenotype genetic network motifs, covering a full range of regulatory interactions. We find that network interactions result in different patterns of mutational (co)variance at the phenotypic level (the M-matrix), not only across network motifs but also across phenotypic space within single motifs. This effect is due almost entirely to mutational input of additive genetic (co)variance. Variation in M has the effect of stretching and bending phenotypic space with respect to evolvability, analogous to the curvature of space-time under general relativity, and similar mathematical tools may apply in each case. We explored the consequences of curvature in mutational variation by simulating adaptation under divergent selection with gene flow. Both standing genetic variation (the G-matrix) and rate of adaptation are constrained by M, so that G and adaptive trajectories are curved across phenotypic space. Under weak selection the phenotypic mean at migration-selection balance also depends on M. PMID:24219635

  3. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  4. Mutation analysis and molecular genetics of epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, L; Uitto, J

    1999-02-01

    Cutaneous basement membrane zone (BMZ) consists of a number of attachment structures that are critical for stable association of the epidermis to the underlying dermis. These include hemidesmosomes, anchoring filaments and anchoring fibrils which form an interconnecting network extending from the intracellular milieu of basal keratinocytes across the dermal-epidermal basement membrane to the underlying dermis. Aberrations in this network structure, e.g. due to genetic lesions in the corresponding genes, can result in fragility of the skin at the level of the cutaneous BMZ. The prototype of such diseases is epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by fragility and blistering of the skin, often associated with extracutaneous manifestations, and inherited either in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. Based on constellations of the phenotypic manifestations, severity of the disease, and the level of tissue separation within the cutaneous BMZ, EB has been divided into clinically distinct subcategories, including the simplex, hemidesmosomal, junctional and dystrophic variants. Elucidation of BMZ gene/protein systems and development of mutation detection strategies have allowed identification of mutations in 10 different BMZ genes which can explain the clinical heterogeneity of EB. These include mutations in the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in the dystrophic (severely scarring) forms of EB; mutations in the laminin 5 genes (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) in a lethal (Herlitz) variant of junctional EB; aberrations in the type XVII collagen gene (COL17A1) in non-lethal forms of junctional EB; mutations in the alpha6 and beta4 integrin genes in a distinct hemidesmosomal variant of EB with congenital pyloric atresia; and mutations in the plectin gene (PLEC1) in a form of EB associated with late-onset muscular dystrophy. Identification of mutations in these gene/protein systems attests to their critical importance in the

  5. Skeleton Genetics: a comprehensive database for genes and mutations related to genetic skeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Xu, Chenyang; Liu, Xinting; Hu, Lin; Xiang, Yanbao; Chen, Qingshuang; Chen, Denghui; Li, Huanzheng; Xu, Xueqin; Tang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic skeletal disorders (GSD) involving the skeletal system arises through disturbances in the complex processes of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis and remain a diagnostic challenge because of their clinical heterogeneity and genetic variety. Over the past decades, tremendous effort platforms have been made to explore the complex heterogeneity, and massive new genes and mutations have been identified in different GSD, but the information supplied by literature is still limited and it is hard to meet the further needs of scientists and clinicians. In this study, combined with Nosology and Classification of genetic skeletal disorders, we developed the first comprehensive and annotated genetic skeletal disorders database, named 'SkeletonGenetics', which contains information about all GSD-related knowledge including 8225 mutations in 357 genes, with detailed information associated with 481 clinical diseases (2260 clinical phenotype) classified in 42 groups defined by molecular, biochemical and/or radiographic criteria from 1698 publications. Further annotations were performed to each entry including Gene Ontology, pathways analysis, protein-protein interaction, mutation annotations, disease-disease clustering and gene-disease networking. Furthermore, using concise search methods, intuitive graphical displays, convenient browsing functions and constantly updatable features, 'SkeletonGenetics' could serve as a central and integrative database for unveiling the genetic and pathways pre-dispositions of GSD.Database URL: http://101.200.211.232/skeletongenetics/. PMID:27580923

  6. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il. PMID:20186514

  7. Lipoprotein lipase gene mutations and the genetic susceptibility of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Williamson, R A; Chen, K; Smith, J L; Murray, J C; Merrill, D C

    2001-11-01

    In the pathogenesis of preeclampsia, endothelial cell activation or dysfunction is a central theme, and marked dyslipidemia may contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between preeclampsia and mutations within the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene. DNA was extracted from whole blood or cheek swabs of 250 preeclamptic patients, 265 control subjects, and 106 offspring of preeclamptic patients (all white). Control subjects were women who had undergone >/=2 term pregnancies unaffected by preeclampsia. All samples were genotyped for 3 LPL polymorphisms with the use of polymerase chain reaction of known allelic variants. The 3 mutations studied were the following: (1) Asp9Asn substitution in exon 2, (2) T-to-G substitution at position -93 of the proximal promotor region (-93T/G), and (3) Asn291Ser substitution in exon 6. Results were analyzed with an chi(2) contingency table. The prevalences of the Asp9Asn mutation, -93T/G promotor mutation, and Asn291Ser mutation were not significantly different among the preeclamptic patients and control subjects (Asp9Asn: patients, 2.8%; control subjects, 4.0%; -93T/G: patients, 4.5%; control subjects, 5.5%; Asn291Ser: patients, 4.0%; control subject, 3.0%). In addition, there was no difference in the frequency of any of the mutations in the offspring of preeclamptic women compared with that observed in the control population. Between a small group of patients with nulliparous HELLP syndrome (a variant of severe preeclampsia: hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme, low platelets) patients (n=12) and control subjects, there was a significant difference in the prevalence of the Asn291Ser mutation (16.7% versus 3.0%, P=0.01). In this large white population, the Asp9Asn mutation, -93T/G promotor mutation, and Asn291Ser mutation were not associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia. In a small subgroup of patients, the Asn291Ser mutation was associated with an increased risk for

  8. Genetic profile of GNAQ-mutated blue melanocytic neoplasms reveals mutations in genes linked to genomic instability and the PI3K pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Vivancos, Ana; Caratú, Ginevra; Matito, Judit; Ferrer, Berta; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Cortés, Javier; Muñoz, Eva; Garcia-Patos, Vicente; Recio, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanomas arising in association with a common or cellular blue nevus (MABN) comprise a relatively rare and heterogeneous group of lethal melanomas. Although GNAQ is known to be frequently mutated in common blue nevus, cellular blue nevus (CBN) and MABN and these malignant lesions present gross chromosome alterations harboring BAP1 mutations, little is known about other mutations that contribute to the development and progression of these neoplasms. Thus, the genetic profile of these tumors is important to increase the number of intervention and treatment modalities. Here, we characterized and genetically profiled two different sections of a rare MABN and two CBNs from three different patients. All of the samples harbored a GNAQ mutation, exhibited RAS pathway activation, and harbored additional mutations in genes associated with genomic instability and epigenetic regulation (KMT2C, FANCD2, ATR, ATRX, NBN, ERCC2, SETD2, and WHSC1). In addition, all neoplasms harbored mutations that directly or indirectly affected either the regulation or activation of the PI3K pathway (PIK3CA, NF1, INPP5B and GSK3B). Our results not only help understand the genetic complexity of these blue melanocytic lesions but provide a rationale to use the combination of PI3K/MTOR and MEK1/2 inhibitors against these types of tumors. PMID:27057633

  9. Physiology of SLC12 transporters: lessons from inherited human genetic mutations and genetically engineered mouse knockouts.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Kenneth B; Delpire, Eric

    2013-04-15

    Among the over 300 members of the solute carrier (SLC) group of integral plasma membrane transport proteins are the nine electroneutral cation-chloride cotransporters belonging to the SLC12 gene family. Seven of these transporters have been functionally described as coupling the electrically silent movement of chloride with sodium and/or potassium. Although in silico analysis has identified two additional SLC12 family members, no physiological role has been ascribed to the proteins encoded by either the SLC12A8 or the SLC12A9 genes. Evolutionary conservation of this gene family from protists to humans confirms their importance. A wealth of physiological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical studies have revealed a great deal of information regarding the importance of this gene family to human health and disease. The sequencing of the human genome has provided investigators with the capability to link several human diseases with mutations in the genes encoding these plasma membrane proteins. The availability of bacterial artificial chromosomes, recombination engineering techniques, and the mouse genome sequence has simplified the creation of targeting constructs to manipulate the expression/function of these cation-chloride cotransporters in the mouse in an attempt to recapitulate some of these human pathologies. This review will summarize the three human disorders that have been linked to the mutation/dysfunction of the Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl, and K-Cl cotransporters (i.e., Bartter's, Gitleman's, and Andermann's syndromes), examine some additional pathologies arising from genetically modified mouse models of these cotransporters including deafness, blood pressure, hyperexcitability, and epithelial transport deficit phenotypes.

  10. Multiple Genetic Mutations Associated with Polymyxin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tze Peng; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Hon, Pei-Yun; Hawkey, Jane; Holt, Kathryn E.; Koh, Tse Hsien; Leong, Micky Lo-Ngah; Teo, Jocelyn Qi-Min; Tan, Thean Yen; Ng, Mary Mah-Lee

    2015-01-01

    We studied polymyxin B resistance in 10 pairs of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates, two of which had developed polymyxin B resistance in vivo. All polymyxin B-resistant isolates had lower growth rates than and substitution mutations in the lpx or pmrB gene compared to their parent isolates. There were significant differences in terms of antibiotic susceptibility and genetic determinants of resistance in A. baumannii isolates that had developed polymyxin B resistance in vivo compared to isolates that had developed polymyxin B resistance in vitro. PMID:26438500

  11. Frequent HRAS Mutations in Malignant Ectomesenchymoma: Overlapping Genetic Abnormalities With Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Alaggio, Rita; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Zhang, Lei; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Wexler, Leonard H; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-07-01

    Malignant ectomesenchymoma (MEM) is an exceedingly rare pediatric sarcoma with a predilection for infants and young children and is composed of dual malignant mesenchymal and neuroectodermal components. Microscopically, MEM displays areas of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) with intermixed neuronal/neuroblastic foci. The molecular alterations associated with MEM and its relationship with embryonal RMS (ERMS) and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) have not yet been elucidated. In this study we used whole-transcriptome sequencing in 2 MEM index cases with available frozen tissue, followed by screening of the identified genetic abnormalities in 5 additional cases. No candidate fusion genes were detected by FusionSeq analysis; however, the mutation detection algorithms revealed HRAS and PTPRD hotspot mutations in both index cases, with 1 case harboring an additional FBXW7 mutation. As these mutation profiles have been previously described in ERMS we have tested their incidence in a control group of 7 age-matched ERMS. In addition, the gene signature of MEM was compared with that of RMS, MPNST, and neuronal lineage. All 7 MEM patients were male, with a mean age of 7.5 months (range, 0.6 to 17 mo). All except 1 occurred in the pelvic/urogenital region. Most cases showed ERMS elements, with occasional spindle or undifferentiated/round cell areas. The intermixed neuroectodermal components were mostly scattered ganglion cells, ganglioneuroma, or ganglioneuroblastoma. By Sanger sequencing, 6 of 7 (86%) MEMs had HRAS mutations, with no additional case harboring PTPRD or FBXW7 mutations. The only case lacking HRAS mutation showed neuroblastic micronodules without ganglion cells. The trimethylation at lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) expression, typically lost in MPNST, was retained in all cases. In the control ERMS group, 5 of 7 (71%) showed RAS mutations, equally distributed among NRAS, KRAS, and HRAS genes. The expression profiling of MEM showed upregulation of skeletal

  12. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  13. Characterization of New Punch Mutations: Identification of Two Additional Mutant Classes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E. R.; O'Donnell, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Punch locus of Drosophila melanogaster which encodes the pteridine biosynthetic enzyme, GTP cyclohydrolase, is genetically complex. Lethal alleles of the locus resolve into an array of interallelic complementation groups, and at least one class of mutations is developmentally specific, affecting GTP cyclohydrolase activity only in the heads of adults. All previously isolated Punch alleles were identified on the basis of a mutant eye color phenotype. By screening mutagenized chromosomes over Punch region deficiencies, we have now isolated new alleles on the basis of lethal and visible phenotypes. Most of these alleles fall into previously identified genetic classes, but two new classes of mutations were also found. One class contains two alleles that behave as dominant lethal mutations in some genetic backgrounds. The other class represents a second developmentally specific set of alleles that affect the function of the Punch locus only during embryogenesis. PMID:3136053

  14. Skeleton Genetics: a comprehensive database for genes and mutations related to genetic skeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Xu, Chenyang; Liu, Xinting; Hu, Lin; Xiang, Yanbao; Chen, Qingshuang; Chen, Denghui; Li, Huanzheng; Xu, Xueqin; Tang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic skeletal disorders (GSD) involving the skeletal system arises through disturbances in the complex processes of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis and remain a diagnostic challenge because of their clinical heterogeneity and genetic variety. Over the past decades, tremendous effort platforms have been made to explore the complex heterogeneity, and massive new genes and mutations have been identified in different GSD, but the information supplied by literature is still limited and it is hard to meet the further needs of scientists and clinicians. In this study, combined with Nosology and Classification of genetic skeletal disorders, we developed the first comprehensive and annotated genetic skeletal disorders database, named ‘SkeletonGenetics’, which contains information about all GSD-related knowledge including 8225 mutations in 357 genes, with detailed information associated with 481 clinical diseases (2260 clinical phenotype) classified in 42 groups defined by molecular, biochemical and/or radiographic criteria from 1698 publications. Further annotations were performed to each entry including Gene Ontology, pathways analysis, protein–protein interaction, mutation annotations, disease–disease clustering and gene–disease networking. Furthermore, using concise search methods, intuitive graphical displays, convenient browsing functions and constantly updatable features, ‘SkeletonGenetics’ could serve as a central and integrative database for unveiling the genetic and pathways pre-dispositions of GSD. Database URL: http://101.200.211.232/skeletongenetics/ PMID:27580923

  15. Homozygous null mutations in ZMPSTE24 in restrictive dermopathy: evidence of genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Z; Phadke, S R; Arch, E; Glass, J; Agarwal, A K; Garg, A

    2012-02-01

    Restrictive dermopathy (RD) results in stillbirth or early neonatal death. RD is characterized by prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, fixed facial expression, micrognathia, mouth in the 'o' position, rigid and tense skin with erosions and denudations and multiple joint contractures. Nearly all 25 previously reported neonates with RD had homozygous or compound heterozygous null mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene. Here, we report three new cases of RD; all died within 3 weeks of birth. One of them had a previously reported homozygous c.1085dupT (p.Leu362PhefsX19) mutation, the second case had a novel homozygous c.1020G>A (p.Trp340X) null mutation in ZMPSTE24, but the third case, a stillborn with features of RD except for the presence of tapering rather than rounded, bulbous digits, harbored no disease-causing mutations in LMNA or ZMPSTE24. In the newborn with a novel ZMPSTE24 mutation, unique features included butterfly-shaped thoracic 5 vertebra and the bulbous appearance of the distal clavicles. Skin biopsies from both the stillborn fetus and the newborn with c.1020G>A ZMPSTE24 mutation showed absence of elastic fibers throughout the dermis. This report provides evidence of genetic heterogeneity among RD and concludes that there may be an additional locus for RD which remains to be identified.

  16. Performance impact of mutation operators of a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm for multi-robot task allocation problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Kroll, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation determines the task sequence and distribution for a group of robots in multi-robot systems, which is one of constrained combinatorial optimization problems and more complex in case of cooperative tasks because they introduce additional spatial and temporal constraints. To solve multi-robot task allocation problems with cooperative tasks efficiently, a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm, a crossover-free genetic algorithm employing mutation operators and elitism selection in each subpopulation, is developed in this paper. Moreover, the impact of mutation operators (swap, insertion, inversion, displacement, and their various combinations) is analyzed when solving several industrial plant inspection problems. The experimental results show that: (1) the proposed genetic algorithm can obtain better solutions than the tested binary tournament genetic algorithm with partially mapped crossover; (2) inversion mutation performs better than other tested mutation operators when solving problems without cooperative tasks, and the swap-inversion combination performs better than other tested mutation operators/combinations when solving problems with cooperative tasks. As it is difficult to produce all desired effects with a single mutation operator, using multiple mutation operators (including both inversion and swap) is suggested when solving similar combinatorial optimization problems.

  17. Performance impact of mutation operators of a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm for multi-robot task allocation problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Kroll, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation determines the task sequence and distribution for a group of robots in multi-robot systems, which is one of constrained combinatorial optimization problems and more complex in case of cooperative tasks because they introduce additional spatial and temporal constraints. To solve multi-robot task allocation problems with cooperative tasks efficiently, a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm, a crossover-free genetic algorithm employing mutation operators and elitism selection in each subpopulation, is developed in this paper. Moreover, the impact of mutation operators (swap, insertion, inversion, displacement, and their various combinations) is analyzed when solving several industrial plant inspection problems. The experimental results show that: (1) the proposed genetic algorithm can obtain better solutions than the tested binary tournament genetic algorithm with partially mapped crossover; (2) inversion mutation performs better than other tested mutation operators when solving problems without cooperative tasks, and the swap-inversion combination performs better than other tested mutation operators/combinations when solving problems with cooperative tasks. As it is difficult to produce all desired effects with a single mutation operator, using multiple mutation operators (including both inversion and swap) is suggested when solving similar combinatorial optimization problems. PMID:27588254

  18. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  19. Brain somatic mutations: the dark matter of psychiatric genetics?

    PubMed

    Insel, T R

    2014-02-01

    Although inherited DNA sequences have a well-demonstrated role in psychiatric disease risk, for even the most heritable mental disorders, monozygotic twins are discordant at a significant rate. The genetic variation associated with mental disorders has heretofore been based on the search for rare or common variation in blood cells. This search is based on the premise that every somatic cell shares an identical DNA sequence, so that variation found in lymphocytes should reflect variation present in brain cells. Evidence from the study of cancer cells, stem cells and now neurons demonstrate that this premise is false. Somatic mutation is common in human cells and has been implicated in a range of diseases beyond cancer. The exuberant proliferation of cortical precursors during fetal development provides a likely environment for somatic mutation in neuronal and glial lineages. Studies of rare neurodevelopmental disorders, such as hemimegencephaly, demonstrate somatic mutations in affected cortical cells that cannot be detected in unaffected parts of the brain or in peripheral cells. This perspective argues for the need to investigate somatic variation in the brain as an explanation of the discordance in monozygotic twins, a proximate cause of mental disorders in individuals with inherited risk, and a potential guide to novel treatment targets. PMID:24342990

  20. The role of mutation in genetic copy number variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. K.; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean number of genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  1. [Osteochondrodysplasia determined genetically by a collagen type II gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Czarny-Ratajczak, M; Rogala, P; Wolnik-Brzozowska, D; Latos-Bieleńska, A

    2001-01-01

    Chondrodysplasias are a heterogenous group of skeletal dysplasias, affecting the growing cartilage. The main part of chondrodysplasias is caused by mutations in various types of collagen genes. The current classification within this group of disorder relies on clinical, histological and radiographic features. Type II collagenopathies comprise part of chondrodysplasias, consisting of hereditary disorders caused by defects in the type II collagen. Collagen type II is coded by a large gene--COL2A1. The chromosomal location for the human COL2A1 gene is 12q13.11-q13.12. Defects in collagen type II are caused by point mutations in the COL2A1 gene. Type II collagenopathies form a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, through severe forms like spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia congenita, Marshall syndrome, to the mild forms--Stickler syndrome and early osteoarthritis. The pathological changes in the patients are observed in the growth plate, nucleus pulposus and vitreous body, where the abnormal collagen type II is distributed. This article presents the genetic background of collagenopathies type II and the results of current molecular studies of the patients. Both the molecular and the clinical studies may promise a better understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype. We present the patients, who were diagnosed at the Department of Medical Genetics and in the Orthopaedic Department in Poznań. PMID:11481990

  2. An exploration of the communication preferences regarding genetic testing in individuals from families with identified breast/ovarian cancer mutations.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Paboda; Wakefield, Claire E; Meiser, Bettina; Suthers, Graeme; Price, Melanie A; Duffy, Jessica; Tucker, Kathy

    2011-03-01

    The responsibility for informing at-risk relatives of the availability of genetic testing for breast/ovarian cancer gene (BRCA1 or BRCA2) mutations currently falls on the probands. This study explored the support needs of individuals from families with identified BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations when communicating about genetic risk and genetic testing with at-risk family members. Thirty-nine semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with individuals from families with identified BRCA mutations. Interview responses were cross-tabulated by sample characteristics using the qualitative research analysis software NVivo8. The development of educational materials, which individuals could use when communicating the risks of carrying a BRCA gene mutation with their relatives, was identified as a specific need. Many participants expressed a preference for a staged approach, where relatives are notified of their increased risk and the availability of genetic testing risk either face-to-face or via a letter, with additional educational sources, including brief written information or access to a website, made available for those wishing to access more in-depth information. This research identified a need for the development of educational/informational resources to support individuals with identified breast/ovarian cancer mutations to communicate with their at-risk relatives about genetic risk and genetic testing availability.

  3. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L; Remmers, Elaine F; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina I; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  4. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J.; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D.; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L.; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  5. Novel genetic mutations in a sporadic port-wine stain.

    PubMed

    Lian, Christine Guo; Sholl, Lynette M; Zakka, Labib R; O, Teresa M; Liu, Cynthia; Xu, Shuyun; Stanek, Ewelina; Garcia, Elizabeth; Jia, Yonghui; MacConaill, Laura E; Murphy, George F; Waner, Milton; Mihm, Martin C

    2014-12-01

    IMPORTANCE Port-wine stains (PWSs) are common congenital cutaneous capillary malformations. A somatic GNAQ mutation was recently identified in patients with sporadic PWSs and Sturge-Weber syndrome. However, subsequent studies to confirm or extend this observation are lacking.OBSERVATIONS We report a long-standing, unilateral facial PWS of a man in his early 70s confirmed by histopathological analysis. Staged surgical excision of the vascular malformation was performed, and genomic DNA was extracted from the vascular malformation specimen and normal skin. Targeted next-generation sequencing of the coding sequence of 275 known cancer genes including GNAQ was performed in both specimens. A single-nucleotide variant(c.548G>A, p.Arg183Gln) in GNAQ was identified in the PWS-affected tissue but not in the normal skin sample. In addition, this sequencing approach uncovered several additional novel somatic mutations in the genes SMARCA4, EPHA3, MYB, PDGFR-β, and PIK3CA.CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings confirm the presence of somatic mutations inGNAQ in the affected skin of a patient with congenital PWS, as well as alterations in several other novel genes of possible importance in the pathogenesis of PWS that may also offer substantial therapeutic targets.

  6. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1−/− GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  7. Additive and nonadditive genetic variation in avian personality traits.

    PubMed

    van Oers, K; Drent, P J; de Jong, G; van Noordwijk, A J

    2004-11-01

    Individuals of all vertebrate species differ consistently in their reactions to mildly stressful challenges. These typical reactions, described as personalities or coping strategies, have a clear genetic basis, but the structure of their inheritance in natural populations is almost unknown. We carried out a quantitative genetic analysis of two personality traits (exploration and boldness) and the combination of these two traits (early exploratory behaviour). This study was carried out on the lines resulting from a two-directional artificial selection experiment on early exploratory behaviour (EEB) of great tits (Parus major) originating from a wild population. In analyses using the original lines, reciprocal F(1) and reciprocal first backcross generations, additive, dominance, maternal effects ands sex-dependent expression of exploration, boldness and EEB were estimated. Both additive and dominant genetic effects were important determinants of phenotypic variation in exploratory behaviour and boldness. However, no sex-dependent expression was observed in either of these personality traits. These results are discussed with respect to the maintenance of genetic variation in personality traits, and the expected genetic structure of other behavioural and life history traits in general.

  8. [Diagnosis of MDS: morphology, chromosome abnormalities and genetic mutations].

    PubMed

    Hata, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of hematological neoplasms associated with ineffective hematopoiesis and that can transform into acute leukemia. The clinical classification of MDS which is defined by cytopenia, the rate of blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, dysplasia, and chromosomal abnormalities, has undergone continuous revision. To increase the accuracy of dysplastic evaluation, IWGM-MDS and the Research Committee for Idiopathic Hematopoietic Disorders, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan have proposed a quantitative and qualitative definition of dysplasia. Recently, refining the definition of dysgranulopoiesis was proposed by IWGM-MDS. Neutrophils with abnormal clumping of chromatin, and harboring more than 4 nuclear projections, were recognized as dysplastic features. At present, karyotypic abnormalities are detected in approximately 50% of de novo MDS and these remain the most critical prognostic factor. In the new cytogenetic scoring system, cytogenetic abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups. This new classification was adopted by the revised IPSS. Approximately 80% to 90% of MDS patients have detectable mutations by whole-exon sequencing or whole genome sequencing. Many genetic mutations had biological and prognostic significance. It is important to further understand the utility of this factor in determining prognosis and in selecting among therapeutic options. PMID:26458436

  9. Impact of genetic profiles on the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer with KRAS mutation.

    PubMed

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Masaki, Tadahiko; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Furuse, Jyunji; Sugiyama, Masanori; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Reports indicate that, even in KRAS-mutated colon cancer, there are subsets of patients who benefit from anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) treatment. The aim of the present study was to identify genetic profiles that contribute to the responsiveness of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to anti-EGFR MoAb. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of anti-EGFR MoAb in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations according to KRAS mutational subtypes, BRAF and PIK3CA mutational status and PTEN and MET expression. Among 21 patients with KRAS-mutant tumors, 8 (38%) harbored p.G13D, 7 (33%) harbored p.G12V, 5 (24%) harbored p.G12D, and 1 (5%) harbored p.G12C mutation. Patients with the p.G13D mutation exhibited a significantly higher disease control rate than patients with other KRAS mutations (P=0.042), and tended to show a longer progression-free survival (PFS) than patients with other KRAS mutations with marginal significance (P=0.074). Patients with loss of PTEN had significantly shorter PFS than those with normal PTEN expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.044). MET overexpression was significantly associated with shorter PFS compared to normal MET expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.016). Our data demonstrated the potential utility of alterations in PTEN and MET expression as predictive markers for response to anti-EGFR MoAbs in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations. In addition, we confirmed the predictive value of the KRAS p.G13D mutation for better response to anti-EGFR therapies in comparison with other KRAS mutations. PMID:24839940

  10. EAST syndrome: Clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic aspects of mutations in KCNJ10

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Daniela; Stanescu, Horia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT EAST syndrome is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder secondary to mutations in KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a gene encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, eye, ear and kidney. This condition is characterized by 4 cardinal features; Epilepsy, Ataxia, Sensorineural deafness, and (a renal salt-wasting) Tubulopathy, hence the acronym EAST syndrome. Here we review reported clinical manifestations, in particular the neurological signs and symptoms which typically have the most impact on the quality of life of patients. In addition we review the pathophysiology and genetic aspects of the disease. So far 14 different KCNJ10 mutations have been published which either directly affect channel function or may lead to mislocalisation. Investigations of the pathophysiology may provide clues to potential treatments. PMID:27500072

  11. EAST syndrome: Clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic aspects of mutations in KCNJ10.

    PubMed

    Abdelhadi, Ola; Iancu, Daniela; Stanescu, Horia; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    EAST syndrome is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder secondary to mutations in KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a gene encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, eye, ear and kidney. This condition is characterized by 4 cardinal features; Epilepsy, Ataxia, Sensorineural deafness, and (a renal salt-wasting) Tubulopathy, hence the acronym EAST syndrome. Here we review reported clinical manifestations, in particular the neurological signs and symptoms which typically have the most impact on the quality of life of patients. In addition we review the pathophysiology and genetic aspects of the disease. So far 14 different KCNJ10 mutations have been published which either directly affect channel function or may lead to mislocalisation. Investigations of the pathophysiology may provide clues to potential treatments. PMID:27500072

  12. Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD): Taking Advantage from Founder Mutations in Genetics Diagnosis, Genetic Diversity and Migration History of the Mediterranean Population.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Bakhchane, Amina; Benrahma, Houda; Romdhane, Lilia; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Abdelhak, Sonia; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean basin has been the theater of migration crossroads followed by settlement of several societies and cultures in prehistoric and historical times, with important consequences on genetic and genomic determinisms. Here, we present the Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD), established to offer web-based access to founder mutation information in the Mediterranean population. Mutation data were collected from the literature and other online resources and systematically reviewed and assembled into this database. The information provided for each founder mutation includes DNA change, amino-acid change, mutation type and mutation effect, as well as mutation frequency and coalescence time when available. Currently, the database contains 383 founder mutations found in 210 genes related to 219 diseases. We believe that MFMD will help scientists and physicians to design more rapid and less expensive genetic diagnostic tests. Moreover, the coalescence time of founder mutations gives an overview about the migration history of the Mediterranean population. MFMD can be publicly accessed from http://mfmd.pasteur.ma.

  13. Identification of Genetic Mutations in Human Lung Cancer by Targeted Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hongxiang; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Tang, Chuanning; Ye, Hua; Jones, Lindsey; Lou, Feng; Zhang, Dandan; Jiang, Shouwen; Sun, Hong; Dong, Haichao; Zhang, Guangchun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; Yan, He; Yan, Chaowei; Wang, Lu; Su, Ziyi; Li, Yangyang; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Liu, Deruo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most prevalent malignancy and the primary cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Unique mutations patterns can be found in lung cancer subtypes, in individual cancers, or within a single tumor, and drugs that target these genetic mutations and signal transduction pathways are often beneficial to patients. In this study, we used the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Panel to sequence 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes and oncogenes to identify genetic mutations in 48 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human lung cancer samples from Chinese patients. We found frequent mutations in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and TP53 genes. Moreover, we observed that a portion of the lung cancer samples harbored two or more mutations in these key genes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the Ion Torrent sequencing to efficiently identify genetic mutations in individual tumors for targeted lung cancer therapy. PMID:26244006

  14. Stickler syndrome: further mutations in COL11A1 and evidence for additional locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Richards, A J; Yates, J R; Scott, J D; Pope, M; Snead, M P

    1999-01-01

    Stickler syndrome (hereditary arthro-ophthalmopathy) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder with ocular, oro-facial, auditory and skeletal manifestations. It is genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous with the majority of families having mutations in the gene encoding type II collagen (COL2A1) and exhibiting a characteristic 'membranous' or type 1 vitreous phenotype. More recently a novel mutation in the gene encoding the alpha1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was reported in a Stickler syndrome pedigree with a different 'beaded' or type 2 vitreous phenotype. In the present study five more families with the type 2 vitreous phenotype were examined for linkage to four candidate genes: COL2A1, COL5A2, COL11A1 and COL11A2. Two families were linked to COL11A1 and sequencing identified mutations resulting in shortened alphal(XI) collagen chains, one via exon skipping and the other via a multiexon deletion. One of the families showed weak linkage to COL5A2 but sequencing the open reading frame failed to identify a mutation. In the remaining two families all four loci were excluded by linkage analysis. These data confirm that mutations in COL11A1 cause Stickler syndrome with the type2 vitreous phenotype and also reveal further locus heterogeneity.

  15. An Individual with Blepharophimosis-Ptosis-Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES) and Additional Features Expands the Phenotype Associated with Mutations in KAT6B

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Chun; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Medne, Livija; Zackai, Elaine H.; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2015-01-01

    Blepharophimosis-Ptosis-Epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in FOXL2. We identified an individual with BPES and additional phenotypic features who did not have a FOXL2 mutation. We used whole exome sequencing to identify a de novo mutation in KAT6B (lysine acetyltransferase 6B) in this individual. The mutation was a 2 bp insertion leading to a frameshift which resulted in a premature stop codon. The resulting truncated protein does not have the C-terminal serine/methionine transcription activation domain necessary for interaction with other transcriptional and epigenetic regulators. This mutation likely has a dominant-negative or gain-of-function effect, similar to those observed in other genetic disorders resulting from KAT6B mutations, including Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson (SBBYSS) and Genitopatellar syndrome (GTPTS). Thus, our subject’s phenotype broadens the spectrum of clinical findings associated with mutations in KAT6B. Furthermore, our results suggest that individuals with BPES without a FOXL2 mutation should be tested for KAT6B mutations. The transcriptional and epigenetic regulation mediated by KAT6B appears crucial to early developmental processes, which when perturbed can lead to a wide spectrum of phenotypic outcomes. PMID:24458743

  16. Efficient Improvement of Silage Additives by Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Zoe S.; Gilbert, Richard J.; Merry, Roger J.; Kell, Douglas B.; Theodorou, Michael K.; Griffith, Gareth W.

    2000-01-01

    The enormous variety of substances which may be added to forage in order to manipulate and improve the ensilage process presents an empirical, combinatorial optimization problem of great complexity. To investigate the utility of genetic algorithms for designing effective silage additive combinations, a series of small-scale proof of principle silage experiments were performed with fresh ryegrass. Having established that significant biochemical changes occur over an ensilage period as short as 2 days, we performed a series of experiments in which we used 50 silage additive combinations (prepared by using eight bacterial and other additives, each of which was added at six different levels, including zero [i.e., no additive]). The decrease in pH, the increase in lactate concentration, and the free amino acid concentration were measured after 2 days and used to calculate a “fitness” value that indicated the quality of the silage (compared to a control silage made without additives). This analysis also included a “cost” element to account for different total additive levels. In the initial experiment additive levels were selected randomly, but subsequently a genetic algorithm program was used to suggest new additive combinations based on the fitness values determined in the preceding experiments. The result was very efficient selection for silages in which large decreases in pH and high levels of lactate occurred along with low levels of free amino acids. During the series of five experiments, each of which comprised 50 treatments, there was a steady increase in the amount of lactate that accumulated; the best treatment combination was that used in the last experiment, which produced 4.6 times more lactate than the untreated silage. The additive combinations that were found to yield the highest fitness values in the final (fifth) experiment were assessed to determine a range of biochemical and microbiological quality parameters during full-term silage

  17. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  18. Incidence and mutation rates of Huntington's disease in Spain: experience of 9 years of direct genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Arroyo, M; Moreno, S; Valiente, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prior to the discovery of the Huntington's disease (HD) mutation, the prevalence, incidence, and new mutation rates for this disease were based on the presence of progressive choreic movements and a positive family history. Objective: To evaluate the uptake of the HD genetic analysis in Spain, and to provide additional information on the epidemiology of this disease from the experience of 9 years of direct genetic testing. Methods: From 1994 to 2002, CAG repeat length was determined in 317 patients with symptoms compatible with HD. In all cases, demographic, clinical, and family data were carefully reviewed. Results: HD diagnosis (CAG repeat length ⩾36) was confirmed in 166 (52%) symptomatic cases. Of these, 76 (45.8%) reported a positive family history and in 21 cases (12.7%) family history was negative. New mutation events were genetically proven in three families and highly suspected in another, estimating that the minimum new mutation rate for HD in our population is >4%, with a potential mutation rate of 8%. More than 16% of all HD cases had late onset (>59 years) of symptoms, and in three quarters of these the family history was negative. The incidence rate for the autonomous communities of Navarra and the Basque country, based on the number of newly diagnosed cases by genetic testing, was 4.7 per million per year. Conclusions: Direct HD genetic testing shows that the incidence and mutation rates of the disease are 2–3 times higher than previously reported. We also demonstrated the relevance of CAG repeat length assessment in diagnosing patients with late onset of symptoms and negative family history for HD. PMID:15716522

  19. Fly-TILL: reverse genetics using a living point mutation resource.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer L; Till, Bradley J; Henikoff, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Mutagenesis with ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) has been the standard for traditional genetic screens, and in recent years has been applied to reverse genetics. However, reverse-genetic strategies require maintaining a viable germline library so that mutations that are discovered can subsequently be recovered. In applying our TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) method to establish a Drosophila reverse-genetic service (Fly-TILL), we chose to screen the Zuker lines, a large collection of EMS-mutagenized second- and third-chromosome balanced lines that had been established for forward-genetic screening. For the past four years, our Fly-TILL service has screened this collection to provide approximately 150 allelic series of point mutations for the fly community. Our analysis of >2000 point mutations and indels have provided a glimpse into the population dynamics of this valuable genetic resource. We found evidence for selection and differential recovery of mutations, depending on distance from balancer breakpoints. Although this process led to variable mutational densities, we have nevertheless been able to deliver potentially valuable mutations in genes selected by Fly-TILL users. We anticipate that our findings will help guide the future implementation of point-mutation resources for the Drosophila community.

  20. Non-additive and Additive Genetic Effects on Extraversion in 3314 Dutch Adolescent Twins and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Hudziak, James J.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of non-additive genetic influences on personality traits has been increasingly reported in adult populations. Less is known, however, with respect to younger samples. In this study, we examine additive and non-additive genetic contributions to the personality trait of extraversion in 1,689 Dutch twin pairs, 1,505 mothers and 1,637 fathers of the twins. The twins were on average 15.5 years (range 12–18 years). To increase statistical power to detect non-additive genetic influences, data on extraversion were also collected in parents and simultaneously analyzed. Genetic modeling procedures incorporating age as a potential modifier of heritability showed significant influences of additive (20–23%) and non-additive genetic factors (31–33%) in addition to unshared environment (46–48%) for adolescents and for their parents. The additive genetic component was slightly and positively related to age. No significant sex differences were found for either extraversion means or for the magnitude of the genetic and environmental influences. There was no evidence of non-random mating for extraversion in the parental generation. Results show that in addition to additive genetic influences, extraversion in adolescents is influenced by non-additive genetic factors. PMID:18240014

  1. Spontaneous mutations and the origin and maintenance of quantitative genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Lyman, Richard F; Lyman, Rachel A; Carbone, Mary Anna; Harbison, Susan T; Magwire, Michael M; Mackay, Trudy FC

    2016-01-01

    Mutation and natural selection shape the genetic variation in natural populations. Here, we directly estimated the spontaneous mutation rate by sequencing new Drosophila mutation accumulation lines maintained with minimal natural selection. We inferred strong stabilizing natural selection on quantitative traits because genetic variation among wild-derived inbred lines was much lower than predicted from a neutral model and the mutational effects were much larger than allelic effects of standing polymorphisms. Stabilizing selection could act directly on the traits, or indirectly from pleiotropic effects on fitness. However, our data are not consistent with simple models of mutation-stabilizing selection balance; therefore, further empirical work is needed to assess the balance of evolutionary forces responsible for quantitative genetic variation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14625.001 PMID:27213517

  2. Genetic characterization of T-PLL reveals two major biologic subgroups and JAK3 mutations as prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Anna; Kern, Wolfgang; Zenger, Melanie; Perglerová, Karolína; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare post-thymic T-cell neoplasm with aggressive clinical course and short overall survival. So far, due to the rareness of this disease, genetic data are available only from individual cases or small cohorts. In our study, we aimed at performing a comprehensive cytogenetic and molecular genetic characterization of T-PLL comprising the largest cohort of patients with T-PLL analyzed so far, including correlations between the respective markers and their impact on prognosis. Genetic abnormalities were found in all 51 cases with T-PLL, most frequently involving the TCRA/D locus (86%). Deletions were detected for ATM (69%) and TP53 (31%), whereas i(8)(q10) was observed in 61% of cases. Mutations in ATM, TP53, JAK1, and JAK3 were detected in 73, 14, 6, and 21% of patients, respectively. Additionally, BCOR mutations were observed for the first time in a lymphoid malignancy (8%). Two distinct genetic subgroups of T-PLL were identified: A large subset (86% of patients) showed abnormalities involving the TCRA/D locus activating the proto-oncogenes TCL1 or MTCP1, while the second group was characterized by a high frequency of TP53 mutations (4/7 cases). Further, analyses of overall survival identified JAK3 mutations as important prognostic marker, showing a significant negative impact.

  3. Genetic characterization of T-PLL reveals two major biologic subgroups and JAK3 mutations as prognostic marker.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Anna; Kern, Wolfgang; Zenger, Melanie; Perglerová, Karolína; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare post-thymic T-cell neoplasm with aggressive clinical course and short overall survival. So far, due to the rareness of this disease, genetic data are available only from individual cases or small cohorts. In our study, we aimed at performing a comprehensive cytogenetic and molecular genetic characterization of T-PLL comprising the largest cohort of patients with T-PLL analyzed so far, including correlations between the respective markers and their impact on prognosis. Genetic abnormalities were found in all 51 cases with T-PLL, most frequently involving the TCRA/D locus (86%). Deletions were detected for ATM (69%) and TP53 (31%), whereas i(8)(q10) was observed in 61% of cases. Mutations in ATM, TP53, JAK1, and JAK3 were detected in 73, 14, 6, and 21% of patients, respectively. Additionally, BCOR mutations were observed for the first time in a lymphoid malignancy (8%). Two distinct genetic subgroups of T-PLL were identified: A large subset (86% of patients) showed abnormalities involving the TCRA/D locus activating the proto-oncogenes TCL1 or MTCP1, while the second group was characterized by a high frequency of TP53 mutations (4/7 cases). Further, analyses of overall survival identified JAK3 mutations as important prognostic marker, showing a significant negative impact. PMID:26493028

  4. MELAS: a new disease associated mitochondrial DNA mutation and evidence for further genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, M; Nelson, I; Morgan-Hughes, J; Wood, N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To define the molecular genetic basis of the MELAS phenotype in five patients without any known mutation of mitochondrial DNA.
METHODS—Systematic automated mitochondrial DNA sequencing of all mitochondrial transfer RNA and cytochrome c oxidase genes was undertaken in five patients who had the MELAS phenotype.
RESULTS— A novel heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutation was identified in the transfer RNA gene for phenylalanine in one case (patient 3). This mutation was not detected in the patient's blood or in her mother's blood. No pathogenic mutations were identified in the other four patients.
CONCLUSIONS—This is the first point mutation in the transfer RNA gene for phenylalanine to be associated with MELAS. The absence of mutations in the remaining four patients suggests that there is further genetic heterogeneity associated with this mitochondrial phenotype.

 PMID:9771776

  5. Genetic code evolution reveals the neutral emergence of mutational robustness, and information as an evolutionary constraint.

    PubMed

    Massey, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of "neutral emergence". The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these "pseudaptations", and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an "unfreezing" of the codon - amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick's Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content between organisms, a

  6. Genetic Code Evolution Reveals the Neutral Emergence of Mutational Robustness, and Information as an Evolutionary Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of “neutral emergence”. The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these “pseudaptations”, and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an “unfreezing” of the codon – amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick’s Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content

  7. Applications in genetic risk estimation of data on the induction of dominant skeletal mutations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the induction of dominant skeleton mutations and of dominant cataract mutations provide means of estimating genetic hazard to humans from radiation. The breeding-test method of studying the induction of dominant skeletal mutations is slow and cumbersome. In an attempt to devise a more rapid method, three non-breeding-test methods have been developed which are likely to have wider application in mutagenicity testing. (ACR)

  8. Estimating Additive and Non-Additive Genetic Variances and Predicting Genetic Merits Using Genome-Wide Dense Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Guosheng; Christensen, Ole F.; Ostersen, Tage; Henryon, Mark; Lund, Mogens S.

    2012-01-01

    Non-additive genetic variation is usually ignored when genome-wide markers are used to study the genetic architecture and genomic prediction of complex traits in human, wild life, model organisms or farm animals. However, non-additive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of complex traits. This study presented a genomic BLUP model including additive and non-additive genetic effects, in which additive and non-additive genetic relation matrices were constructed from information of genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. In addition, this study for the first time proposed a method to construct dominance relationship matrix using SNP markers and demonstrated it in detail. The proposed model was implemented to investigate the amounts of additive genetic, dominance and epistatic variations, and assessed the accuracy and unbiasedness of genomic predictions for daily gain in pigs. In the analysis of daily gain, four linear models were used: 1) a simple additive genetic model (MA), 2) a model including both additive and additive by additive epistatic genetic effects (MAE), 3) a model including both additive and dominance genetic effects (MAD), and 4) a full model including all three genetic components (MAED). Estimates of narrow-sense heritability were 0.397, 0.373, 0.379 and 0.357 for models MA, MAE, MAD and MAED, respectively. Estimated dominance variance and additive by additive epistatic variance accounted for 5.6% and 9.5% of the total phenotypic variance, respectively. Based on model MAED, the estimate of broad-sense heritability was 0.506. Reliabilities of genomic predicted breeding values for the animals without performance records were 28.5%, 28.8%, 29.2% and 29.5% for models MA, MAE, MAD and MAED, respectively. In addition, models including non-additive genetic effects improved unbiasedness of genomic predictions. PMID:23028912

  9. Aceruloplasminemia in an asymptomatic patient with a new mutation. Diagnosis and family genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Fernando; Burguera, Juan A; Benlloch, Salvador; Berenguer, Marina; Rayón, Jose M

    2005-06-01

    A 39-year-old asymptomatic man showed elevated serum ferritin levels, mild hypertransaminasemia and serum ceruloplasmin almost undetectable. There was histological iron accumulation within the hepatocytes and also in the central nervous system (MRI). A genetic analysis revealed a new missense mutation in the ceruloplasmin gene. Two of the other four siblings were also affected by this mutation.

  10. Estimation of the incidence of a rare genetic disease through a two-tier mutation survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Srinivasan, M.R. ); Raskin, S. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba )

    1993-06-01

    Recent attempts to detect mutations involving single base changes or small deletions that are specific to genetic diseases provide an opportunity to develop a two-tier mutation-screening program through which incidence of rare genetic disorders and gene carriers may be precisely estimated. A two-tier survey consists of mutation screening in a sample of patients with specific genetic disorders and in a second sample of newborns from the same population in which mutation frequency is evaluated. The authors provide the statistical basis for evaluating the incidence of affected and gene carriers in such two-tier mutation-screening surveys, from which the precision of the estimates is derived. Sample-size requirements of such two-tier mutation-screening surveys are evaluated. Considering examples of cystic fibrosis (CF) and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD), the two most frequent autosomal recessive diseases in Caucasian populations and the two most frequent mutations ([Delta]F508 and G985) that occur on these disease allele-bearing chromosomes, the authors show that, with 50--100 patients and a 20-fold larger sample of newborns screened for these mutations, the incidence of such diseases and their gene carriers in a population may be quite reliably estimated. The theory developed here is also applicable to rare autosomal dominant diseases for which disease-specific mutations are found. 21 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. mStruct: Inference of Population Structure in Light of Both Genetic Admixing and Allele Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash; Xing, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional methods for analyzing population structure, such as the Structure program, ignore the influence of the effect of allele mutations between the ancestral and current alleles of genetic markers, which can dramatically influence the accuracy of the structural estimation of current populations. Studying these effects can also reveal additional information about population evolution such as the divergence time and migration history of admixed populations. We propose mStruct, an admixture of population-specific mixtures of inheritance models that addresses the task of structure inference and mutation estimation jointly through a hierarchical Bayesian framework, and a variational algorithm for inference. We validated our method on synthetic data and used it to analyze the Human Genome Diversity Project–Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (HGDP–CEPH) cell line panel of microsatellites and HGDP single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. A comparison of the structural maps of world populations estimated by mStruct and Structure is presented, and we also report potentially interesting mutation patterns in world populations estimated by mStruct. PMID:19363128

  12. Breast Cancer, BRCA Mutations, and Attitudes Regarding Pregnancy and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Ashley H.; Muse, Kimberly I.; Lin, Heather; Jackson, Michelle; Mattair, Danielle N.; Schover, Leslie; Woodard, Terri; McKenzie, Laurie; Theriault, Richard L.; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N.; Arun, Banu; Peterson, Susan K.; Profato, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background. Women with premenopausal breast cancer may face treatment-related infertility and have a higher likelihood of a BRCA mutation, which may affect their attitudes toward future childbearing. Methods. Premenopausal women were invited to participate in a questionnaire study administered before and after BRCA genetic testing. We used the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to evaluate the pre- and post-testing impact of cancer or carrying a BRCA mutation on attitudes toward future childbearing. The likelihood of pursuing prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was also assessed in this setting. Univariate analyses determined factors contributing to attitudes toward future childbearing and likelihood of PND or PGD. Results. One hundred forty-eight pretesting and 114 post-testing questionnaires were completed. Women with a personal history of breast cancer had less change in IES than those with no history of breast cancer (p = .003). The 18 BRCA-positive women had a greater change in IES than the BRCA-negative women (p = .005). After testing, 31% and 24% of women would use PND and PGD, respectively. BRCA results did not significantly affect attitudes toward PND/PGD. Conclusion. BRCA results and history of breast cancer affect the psychological impact on future childbearing. Intentions to undergo PND or PGD do not appear to change after disclosure of BRCA results. Additional counseling for patients who have undergone BRCA testing may be warranted to educate patients about available fertility preservation options. PMID:24951607

  13. GENETIC LINKAGE OF MUTATIONAL SITES AFFECTING SIMILAR CHARACTERS IN PNEUMOCOCCUS AND STREPTOCOCCUS.

    PubMed

    RAVIN, A W; DESA, J H

    1964-01-01

    Ravin, Arnold W. (University of Rochester, Rochester, N.Y.), and Joscelyn D. H. De Sa. Genetic linkage of mutational sites affecting similar characters in pneumococcus and streptococcus. J. Bacteriol. 87:86-96. 1964.-By interspecific transformation, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) determinants conferring resistance to high levels of streptomycin in pneumococcus were found to be allelic with DNA determinants conferring low levels of streptomycin resistance in the Challis and NBSI strains of streptococcus. The reciprocal transformation (low resistance pneumococcus x high resistance streptococcus) led to the same conclusion. In addition, determinants controlling resistance to erythromycin in pneumococcus and the Challis strain of streptococcus were found to become closely linked after interspecific transformation. Modifier genes influencing the phenotype conferred by mutations at the streptomycin-resistance locus differentiate species to a certain extent. The results demonstrate that transformations between pneumococcus and streptococcus are not due to episomes, but involve recombinational events in which genetic material of the host species is replaced by homologous material that performed a similar function in the donor species.

  14. Genetic mosaicism of a frameshift mutation in the RET gene in a family with Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Charlotte M; Haase, Michael G; Kemnitz, Ivonne; Fitze, Guido

    2014-05-10

    Mutations and polymorphisms in the RET gene are a major cause of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Theoretically, all true heterozygous patients with a new manifestation of a genetically determined disease must have parents with a genetic mosaicism of some extent. However, no genetic mosaicism has been described for the RET gene in HSCR yet. Therefore, we analyzed families with mutations in the RET gene for genetic mosaicism in the parents of the patients. Blood samples were taken from patients with HSCR and their families/parents to sequence the RET coding region. Among 125 families with HSCR, 33 families with RET mutations were analyzed. In one family, we detected a frameshift mutation due to a loss of one in a row of four cytosines in codon 117/118 of the RET gene (c.352delC) leading to a frameshift mutation in the protein (p.Leu118Cysfs*105) that affected two siblings. In the blood sample of the asymptomatic father we found a genetic mosaicism of this mutation which was confirmed in two independent samples of saliva and hair roots. Quantification of peak-heights and comparison with different mixtures of normal and mutated plasmid DNA suggested that the mutation occurred in the early morula stadium of the founder, between the 4- and 8-cell stages. We conclude that the presence of a RET mutation leading to loss of one functional allele in 20 to 25% of the cells is not sufficient to cause HSCR. The possibility of a mosaicism has to be kept in mind during genetic counseling for inherited diseases.

  15. Evolution of Escherichia coli to 42 °C and subsequent genetic engineering reveals adaptive mechanisms and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Troy E; Pedersen, Margit; LaCroix, Ryan A; Ebrahim, Ali; Bonde, Mads; Herrgard, Markus J; Palsson, Bernhard O; Sommer, Morten; Feist, Adam M

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) has emerged as a valuable method by which to investigate microbial adaptation to a desired environment. Here, we performed ALE to 42 °C of ten parallel populations of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 grown in glucose minimal media. Tightly controlled experimental conditions allowed selection based on exponential-phase growth rate, yielding strains that uniformly converged toward a similar phenotype along distinct genetic paths. Adapted strains possessed as few as 6 and as many as 55 mutations, and of the 144 genes that mutated in total, 14 arose independently across two or more strains. This mutational recurrence pointed to the key genetic targets underlying the evolved fitness increase. Genome engineering was used to introduce the novel ALE-acquired alleles in random combinations into the ancestral strain, and competition between these engineered strains reaffirmed the impact of the key mutations on the growth rate at 42 °C. Interestingly, most of the identified key gene targets differed significantly from those found in similar temperature adaptation studies, highlighting the sensitivity of genetic evolution to experimental conditions and ancestral genotype. Additionally, transcriptomic analysis of the ancestral and evolved strains revealed a general trend for restoration of the global expression state back toward preheat stressed levels. This restorative effect was previously documented following evolution to metabolic perturbations, and thus may represent a general feature of ALE experiments. The widespread evolved expression shifts were enabled by a comparatively scant number of regulatory mutations, providing a net fitness benefit but causing suboptimal expression levels for certain genes, such as those governing flagellar formation, which then became targets for additional ameliorating mutations. Overall, the results of this study provide insight into the adaptation process and yield lessons important for the future

  16. Structural and functional characterization of pathogenic non- synonymous genetic mutations of human insulin-degrading enzyme by in silico methods.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Noor A; Kaleemuddin, Mohammed; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Khan, Fazal; Shaik, Nazia S; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a key protease involved in degrading insulin and amyloid peptides in human body. Several non-synonymous genetic mutations of IDE gene have been recently associated with susceptibility to both diabetes and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the consequence of these mutations on the structure of IDE protein and its substrate binding characteristics is not well elucidated. The computational investigation of genetic mutation consequences on structural level of protein is recently found to be an effective alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. Hence, by using a combination of empirical rule and support vector machine based in silico algorithms, this study was able to identify that the pathogenic nonsynonymous genetic mutations corresponding to p.I54F, p.P122T, p.T533R, p.P581A and p.Y609A have more potential role in structural and functional deviations of IDE activity. Moreover, molecular modeling and secondary structure analysis have also confirmed their impact on the stability and secondary properties of IDE protein. The molecular docking analysis of IDE with combinational substrates has revealed that peptide inhibitors compared to small non-peptide inhibitor molecules possess good inhibitory activity towards mutant IDE. This finding may pave a way to design novel potential small peptide inhibitors for mutant IDE. Additionally by un-translated region (UTR) scanning analysis, two regulatory pathogenic genetic mutations i.e., rs5786997 (3' UTR) and rs4646954 (5' UTR), which can influence the translation pattern of IDE gene through sequence alteration of upstream-Open Reading Frame and Internal Ribosome Entry Site elements were identified. Our findings are expected to help in narrowing down the number of IDE genetic variants to be screened for disease association studies and also to select better competitive inhibitors for IDE related diseases.

  17. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation-selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. "Animal model" analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population.

  18. Expanded Genetic Codes Create New Mutational Routes to Rifampicin Resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hammerling, Michael J; Gollihar, Jimmy; Mortensen, Catherine; Alnahhas, Razan N; Ellington, Andrew D; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, evolutionary questions surrounding the nature of the genetic code have been mostly limited to the realm of conjecture, modeling, and simulation due to the difficulty of altering this fundamental property of living organisms. Concerted genome and protein engineering efforts now make it possible to experimentally study the impact of alternative genetic codes on the evolution of biological systems. We explored how Escherichia coli strains that incorporate a 21st nonstandard amino acid (nsAA) at the recoded amber (TAG) stop codon evolve resistance to the antibiotic rifampicin. Resistance to rifampicin arises from chromosomal mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (RpoB). We found that a variety of mutations that lead to substitutions of nsAAs in the essential RpoB protein confer robust rifampicin resistance. We interpret these results in a framework in which an expanded code can increase evolvability in two distinct ways: by adding a new letter with unique chemical properties to the protein alphabet and by altering the mutational connectivity of amber-adjacent codons by converting a lethal nonsense mutation into a missense mutation. Finally, we consider the implications of these results for the evolution of alternative genetic codes. In our experiments, reliance on a mutation to a reassigned codon for a vital trait is not required for the long-term maintenance of an expanded genetic code and may even destabilize incorporation of an nsAA, a result that is consistent with the codon capture model of genetic code evolution. PMID:27189550

  19. Genetic mutations in the K1 and K10 genes of patients with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Correlation between location and disease severity.

    PubMed Central

    Syder, A J; Yu, Q C; Paller, A S; Giudice, G; Pearson, R; Fuchs, E

    1994-01-01

    Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (EH) is a skin disease caused by mutations in the genes encoding K1 and K10, the differentiation-specific keratins of epidermis. To explore the heterogeneity of mutations and to assess whether a correlation exists between disease severity and the extent to which a mutation interferes with keratin network formation, we determined the genetic bases of four severe incidences of EH and one unusually mild case. Two severe cases have the same mutation, K10-R156:C, at a conserved arginine that we previously showed was mutated to a histidine in two unrelated EH families. An additional severe case has a mutation six residues away, still within the amino end of the alpha-helical rod domain of K10. The other severe case has a mutation in the conserved carboxy end of the K1 rod. In contrast, affected members of the atypically mild family have a mutation just proximal to the conserved carboxy end of the K10 rod. By genetic engineering and gene transfection, we demonstrate that each mutation is functionally responsible for the keratin filament aberrations that are typical of keratinocytes cultured from these patients. Moreover, we show that the mild EH mutation less severely affects filament network formation. Taken together, our studies strengthen the link between filament perturbations, cell fragility, and degeneration. Images PMID:7512983

  20. An Unusual BRCA Mutation Distribution in a High Risk Cancer Genetics Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-Moseke, Anna C.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Cui, Haiyan; Roe, Denise J.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    The Database of Individuals at High Risk for Breast, Ovarian, or Other Hereditary Cancers at the Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, Arizona, assesses cancer risk factors and outcomes in patients with a family history of cancer or a known genetic mutation. We analyzed the subset of clinic probands who carry deleterious BRCA gene mutations to identify factors that could explain why mutations in BRCA2 out number those in BRCA1. Medical, family, social, ethnic and genetic mutation histories were collected from consenting patients’ electronic medical records. Differences between BRCA1 and BRCA2 probands from this database were analyzed for statistical significance and compared to published analyses.. A significantly higher proportion of our clinic probands carry mutations in BRCA2 than BRCA1, compared with previous reports of mutation prevalence. This also holds true for the Hispanic sub-group. Probands with BRCA2 mutations were significantly more likely than their BRCA1 counterparts to present to the high risk clinic without adiagnosis of cancer. Other differences between the groups were not significant. Six previously unreported BRCA2 mutations appear in our clinic population. The increased proportion of probands carrying deleterious BRCA2 mutations is likely multifactorial, but may reflect aspects of Southern Arizona’s unique ethnic heritage. PMID:23179792

  1. Beyond Mutations: Additional Mechanisms and Implications of SWI/SNF Complex Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Stefanie B.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Lu, Li; Reisman, David

    2015-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a major regulator of gene expression. Its role is to facilitate the shifting and exposure of DNA segments within the promoter and other key domains to transcription factors and other essential cellular proteins. This complex interacts with a wide range of proteins and does not function within a single, specific pathway; thus, it is involved in a multitude of cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation, development, cell adhesion, and growth control. Given SWI/SNF’s prominent role in these processes, many of which are important for blocking cancer development, it is not surprising that the SWI/SNF complex is targeted during cancer initiation and progression both by mutations and by non-mutational mechanisms. Currently, the understanding of the types of alterations, their frequency, and their impact on the SWI/SNF subunits is an area of intense research that has been bolstered by a recent cadre of NextGen sequencing studies. These studies have revealed mutations in SWI/SNF subunits, indicating that this complex is thus important for cancer development. The purpose of this review is to put into perspective the role of mutations versus other mechanisms in the silencing of SWI/SNF subunits, in particular, BRG1 and BRM. In addition, this review explores the recent development of synthetic lethality and how it applies to this complex, as well as how BRM polymorphisms are becoming recognized as potential clinical biomarkers for cancer risk. Significance: Recent reviews have detailed the occurrence of mutations in nearly all SWI/SNF subunits, which indicates that this complex is an important target for cancer. However, when the frequency of mutations in a given tumor type is compared to the frequency of subunit loss, it becomes clear that other non-mutational mechanisms must play a role in the inactivation of SWI/SNF subunits. Such data indicate that epigenetic mechanisms that are known to regulate BRM may also be involved in the loss of

  2. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  3. Population Genetics Study of Isoniazid Resistance Mutations and Evolution of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M. Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-01-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  4. Population genetics study of isoniazid resistance mutations and evolution of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-08-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  5. Clinical and genetic analyses reveal novel pathogenic ABCA4 mutations in Stargardt disease families

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bing; Cai, Xue-Bi; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a juvenile macular degeneration predominantly inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, characterized by decreased central vision in the first 2 decades of life. The condition has a genetic basis due to mutation in the ABCA4 gene, and arises from the deposition of lipofuscin-like substance in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) with secondary photoreceptor cell death. In this study, we describe the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from four unrelated Chinese cohorts. The targeted exome sequencing (TES) was carried out in four clinically confirmed patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 164 known causative inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) genes. Genetic analysis revealed eight ABCA4 mutations in all of the four pedigrees, including six mutations in coding exons and two mutations in adjacent intronic areas. All the affected individuals showed typical manifestations consistent with the disease phenotype. We disclose two novel ABCA4 mutations in Chinese patients with STGD disease, which will expand the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and will further aid in the future mutation screening and genetic counseling, as well as in the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. PMID:27739528

  6. Rapid growth of a hepatocellular carcinoma and the driving mutations revealed by cell-population genetic analysis of whole-genome data.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yong; Ruan, Jue; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Lu, Xuemei; Wang, Yu; Zhai, Weiwei; Cai, Jun; Ling, Shaoping; Gong, Qiang; Chong, Zecheng; Qu, Zhengzhong; Li, Qianqian; Liu, Jiang; Yang, Jin; Zheng, Caihong; Zeng, Changqing; Wang, Hurng-Yi; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Sheng-Han; Hao, Lingtong; Dong, Lili; Li, Wenjie; Sun, Min; Zou, Wei; Yu, Caixia; Li, Chaohua; Liu, Guojing; Jiang, Lan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Li, Chunyan; Mi, Shuangli; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Baoxian; Zhao, Wenming; Hu, Songnian; Zhuang, Shi-Mei; Shen, Yang; Shi, Suhua; Brown, Christopher; White, Kevin P; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Chen, Pei-Jer; Wu, Chung-I

    2011-07-19

    We present the analysis of the evolution of tumors in a case of hepatocellular carcinoma. This case is particularly informative about cancer growth dynamics and the underlying driving mutations. We sampled nine different sections from three tumors and seven more sections from the adjacent nontumor tissues. Selected sections were subjected to exon as well as whole-genome sequencing. Putative somatic mutations were then individually validated across all 9 tumor and 7 nontumor sections. Among the mutations validated, 24 were amino acid changes; in addition, 22 large indels/copy number variants (>1 Mb) were detected. These somatic mutations define four evolutionary lineages among tumor cells. Separate evolution and expansion of these lineages were recent and rapid, each apparently having only one lineage-specific protein-coding mutation. Hence, by using a cell-population genetic definition, this approach identified three coding changes (CCNG1, P62, and an indel/fusion gene) as tumor driver mutations. These three mutations, affecting cell cycle control and apoptosis, are functionally distinct from mutations that accumulated earlier, many of which are involved in inflammation/immunity or cell anchoring. These distinct functions of mutations at different stages may reflect the genetic interactions underlying tumor growth.

  7. [Genetic Mutation Accumulation and Clinical Outcome of Immune Checkpoint Blockade Therapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy has recently attracted great attention in the area of oncology. In Japan, since 2014, an anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab and anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab have been available for the treatment of patients with malignant melanoma, and nivolumab has been available for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials using these drugs and other immune checkpoint inhibitors are currently in progress worldwide. The immune checkpoint blockade therapy is a promising new cancer therapy; however, not all patients with cancer can benefit from this therapy. Recent evidence shows that markers reflecting the extent of genetic mutation accumulation, including mutation burden, non-synonymous mutation that produces neoantigen, and microsatellite instability, possibly serve as promising marker to predict who can benefit from the immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Here, I introduce the recent evidence and discuss the correlation between genetic mutation accumulation and clinical outcome of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27306805

  8. A novel pseudoderivative-based mutation operator for real-coded adaptive genetic algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Maxinder S; Ramesh, Avinash S; Huang, Lauren A

    2013-01-01

    Recent development of large databases, especially those in genetics and proteomics, is pushing the development of novel computational algorithms that implement rapid and accurate search strategies. One successful approach has been to use artificial intelligence and methods, including pattern recognition (e.g. neural networks) and optimization techniques (e.g. genetic algorithms). The focus of this paper is on optimizing the design of genetic algorithms by using an adaptive mutation rate that is derived from comparing the fitness values of successive generations. We propose a novel pseudoderivative-based mutation rate operator designed to allow a genetic algorithm to escape local optima and successfully continue to the global optimum. Once proven successful, this algorithm can be implemented to solve real problems in neurology and bioinformatics. As a first step towards this goal, we tested our algorithm on two 3-dimensional surfaces with multiple local optima, but only one global optimum, as well as on the N-queens problem, an applied problem in which the function that maps the curve is implicit. For all tests, the adaptive mutation rate allowed the genetic algorithm to find the global optimal solution, performing significantly better than other search methods, including genetic algorithms that implement fixed mutation rates. PMID:24627784

  9. ATRX mutations and glioblastoma: Impaired DNA damage repair, alternative lengthening of telomeres, and genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-05-01

    Alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) is mutated in nearly a third of pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) patients. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM. Using this model combined with analysis of multiple human glioma genome-wide datasets, we determined that ATRX mutation leads to genetic instability, impaired non-homologous end joining, and alternate lengthening of telomeres (ALT). PMID:27314101

  10. (Genetics and molecular biology of Robertson's Mutator: A workshop series): Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, B.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the Workshop Series on the Genetics and Molecular Biology of Robertson's Mutator were to assess and consolidate interpretations of current Mutator research and to recognize and honor the outstanding contributions of Donald S. Robertson. To this end, a program of lectures, workshops, posters and opportunities for informal interaction was planned and carried out as indicated in the enclosed registration booklet. Within the context of the workshops, several topics were discussed. These discussions are summarized in abstract form.

  11. Expansion load: recessive mutations and the role of standing genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Peischl, Stephan; Excoffier, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    Expanding populations incur a mutation burden - the so-called expansion load. Previous studies of expansion load have focused on codominant mutations. An important consequence of this assumption is that expansion load stems exclusively from the accumulation of new mutations occurring in individuals living at the wave front. Using individual-based simulations, we study here the dynamics of standing genetic variation at the front of expansions, and its consequences on mean fitness if mutations are recessive. We find that deleterious genetic diversity is quickly lost at the front of the expansion, but the loss of deleterious mutations at some loci is compensated by an increase of their frequencies at other loci. The frequency of deleterious homozygotes therefore increases along the expansion axis, whereas the average number of deleterious mutations per individual remains nearly constant across the species range. This reveals two important differences to codominant models: (i) mean fitness at the front of the expansion drops much faster if mutations are recessive, and (ii) mutation load can increase during the expansion even if the total number of deleterious mutations per individual remains constant. We use our model to make predictions about the shape of the site frequency spectrum at the front of range expansion, and about correlations between heterozygosity and fitness in different parts of the species range. Importantly, these predictions provide opportunities to empirically validate our theoretical results. We discuss our findings in the light of recent results on the distribution of deleterious genetic variation across human populations and link them to empirical results on the correlation of heterozygosity and fitness found in many natural range expansions.

  12. Genetic screening and functional characterization of PDGFRB mutations associated with Basal Ganglia Calcification of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Baker, Matthew C.; Finch, NiCole A.; Nicholson, Alexandra; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Three causal genes for Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) have been identified. Most recently, mutations in PDGFRB, encoding a member of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor family type β, and PDGFB, encoding PDGF-B, the specific ligand of PDGFRβ, were found implicating the PDGF-B/PDGFRβ pathway in abnormal brain calcification. In this study we aimed to identify and study mutations in PDGFRB and PDGFB in a series of 26 patients from the Mayo Clinic Florida Brain Bank with moderate to severe basal ganglia calcification (BCG) of unknown etiology. No mutations in PDGFB were found. However, we identified one mutation in PDGFRB, p.R695C located in the tyrosine kinase domain, in one BGC patient. We further studied the function of p.R695C mutant PDGFRβ and two previously reported mutants, p.L658P and p.R987W PDGFRβ in cell culture. We show that, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation, the p.L658P mutation completely suppresses PDGFRβ autophosphorylation whereas the p.R695C mutation results in partial loss of autophosphorylation. For the p.R987W mutation, our data suggest a different mechanism involving reduced protein levels. These genetic and functional studies provide the first insight into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with PDGFRB mutations and provide further support for a pathogenic role of PDGFRB mutations in BGC. PMID:24796542

  13. Complex molecular genetic abnormalities involving three or more genetic mutations are important prognostic factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wakita, S; Yamaguchi, H; Ueki, T; Usuki, K; Kurosawa, S; Kobayashi, Y; Kawata, E; Tajika, K; Gomi, S; Koizumi, M; Fujiwara, Y; Yui, S; Fukunaga, K; Ryotokuji, T; Hirakawa, T; Arai, K; Kitano, T; Kosaka, F; Tamai, H; Nakayama, K; Fukuda, T; Inokuchi, K

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of 28 recurrently mutated genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 271 patients with de novo AML. Co-mutations were frequently detected in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, at an average of 2.76 co-mutations per patient. When assessing the prognostic impact of these co-mutations in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group, overall survival (OS) was found to be significantly shorter (P=0.0006) and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) significantly higher (P=0.0052) in patients with complex molecular genetic abnormalities (CMGAs) involving three or more mutations. This trend was marked even among patients aged ⩽65 years who were also FLT3-ITD (FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplications)-negative (OS: P=0.0010; CIR: P=0.1800). Moreover, the multivariate analysis revealed that CMGA positivity was an independent prognostic factor associated with OS (P=0.0007). In stratification based on FLT3-ITD and CEBPA status and 'simplified analysis of co-mutations' using seven genes that featured frequently in CMGAs, CMGA positivity retained its prognostic value in transplantation-aged patients of the intermediate cytogenetic risk group (OS: P=0.0002. CIR: P<0.0001). In conclusion, CMGAs in AML were found to be strong independent adverse prognostic factors and simplified co-mutation analysis to have clinical usefulness and applicability.

  14. Expanding the spectrum of genetic mutations in antenatal Bartter syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Fretzayas, Andreas; Gole, Evangelia; Attilakos, Achilleas; Daskalaki, Anna; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni; Papadopoulou, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia and elevated renin and aldosterone plasma concentrations. BS type II is caused by mutations in the KCNJ1 gene and usually presents with transient hyperkalemia. We report here a novel KCNJ1 mutation in a male neonate, prematurely born after a pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios. The infant presented with typical clinical and laboratory findings of BS type II, such as hyponatremia, hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, severe weight loss, elevated renin and aldosterone levels and transient hyperkalemia in the early postnatal period, which were later normalized. Molecular analysis revealed a compound heterozygous mutation in the KCNJ1 gene, consisting of a novel K76E and an already described V315G mutation, both affecting functional domains of the channel protein. Typical manifestations of antenatal BS in combination with hyperkalemia should prompt the clinician to search for mutations in the KCNJ1 gene first. PMID:23782368

  15. Similar relative mutation rates in the three genetic compartments of Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jimeng; Smith, David Roy; Borza, Tudor; Lee, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Levels of nucleotide substitution at silent sites in organelle versus nuclear DNAs have been used to estimate relative mutation rates among these compartments and explain lineage-specific features of genome evolution. Synonymous substitution divergence values in animals suggest that the rate of mutation in the mitochondrial DNA is 10-50 times higher than that of the nuclear DNA, whereas overall data for most seed plants support relative mutation rates in mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear DNAs of 1:3:10. Little is known about relative mutation rates in green algae, as substitution rate data is limited to only the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas. Here, we measure silent-site substitution rates in the plastid DNA of Chlamydomonas and the three genetic compartments of the streptophyte green alga Mesostigma. In contrast to the situation in animals and land plants, our results support similar relative mutation rates among the three genetic compartments of both Chlamydomonas and Mesostigma. These data are discussed in relation to published intra-species genetic diversity data for the three genetic compartments of Chlamydomonas and are ultimately used to address contemporary hypotheses on the organelle genome evolution. To guide future work, we describe evolutionary divergence data of all publically available Mesostigma viride strains and identify, for the first time, three distinct lineages of Mesostigma.

  16. Genetic mutations in sporadic pituitary adenomas--what to screen for?

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Kamenický, Peter; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that can result in morbidity owing to local invasion and/or excessive or deficient hormone production. The prevalence of symptomatic pituitary adenomas is approximately 1:1,000 in the general population. The vast majority of these tumours occur sporadically and are not part of syndromic disorders. However, germline mutations in genes known to predispose individuals to familial pituitary adenomas are found in a few patients with sporadic pituitary adenomas. Mutations in AIP (encoding aryl-hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein) are the most frequently observed germline mutations. The prevalence of these mutations in patients with sporadic pituitary adenomas is ∼4%, but can increase to 8-20% in young adults with macroadenomas or gigantism, and also in children. Germline mutations in MEN1 (encoding menin) result in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and are found in very young patients with isolated sporadic pituitary adenomas, which highlights the importance of the chromosome 11q13 locus in pituitary tumorigenesis. In this Review, we describe the clinical features of patients with sporadic pituitary adenomas that are associated with AIP or MEN1 mutations, and discuss the molecular mechanisms that might be involved in pituitary adenoma tumorigenesis. We also discuss genetic screening of patients with sporadic pituitary adenomas and investigations of relatives of these patients who also have the same genetic mutations. PMID:25350067

  17. Genetic Counseling for DAPK1 Mutation in a Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Family

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Ferrara, Kelly; Weisenburger, Dennis; Sanger, Warren; Lynch, Jane F.; Thomé, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Genetic counseling has become the clinical bedrock of hereditary cancer. Countless advances in molecular genetics contributing to the identification of cancer-causing germline mutations have increased its importance. We report perhaps the world’s first genetic counseling experience involving a family with hereditary chronic lymphocytic leukemia and the cancer-causing mutation in the death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) gene. This hereditary disorder currently lacks any preventive or curative interventions for mutation carriers. This family has been under our investigation for a decade, during which time genealogy, cancer of all anatomic sites, medical and pathology records, and, whenever possible, slides and tissue blocks were reviewed. Family attendance at three Family Information Services provided intensive education about this disease. Blood and skin fibroblasts were obtained for molecular genetic studies of DNA leading to the discovery of the DAPK1 mutation in the family. Their intellectual and emotional reaction to its presence or absence in them was assessed. This family serves as a model for genetic counseling in disorders where life-saving intervention is not yet possible. PMID:18940472

  18. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation. PMID:26597662

  19. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation.

  20. Genetic evolution of nevus of Ota reveals clonal heterogeneity acquiring BAP1 and TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, Ana; Caratú, Ginevra; Matito, Judit; Muñoz, Eva; Ferrer, Berta; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Bodet, Domingo; Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Cortés, Javier; Garcia-Patos, Vicente; Recio, Juan A

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma presents molecular alterations based on its anatomical location and exposure to environmental factors. Due to its intrinsic genetic heterogeneity, a simple snapshot of a tumor's genetic alterations does not reflect the tumor clonal complexity or specific gene-gene cooperation. Here, we studied the genetic alterations and clonal evolution of a unique patient with a Nevus of Ota that developed into a recurring uveal-like dermal melanoma. The Nevus of Ota and ulterior lesions contained GNAQ mutations were c-KIT positive, and tumors showed an increased RAS pathway activity during progression. Whole-exome sequencing of these lesions revealed the acquisition of BAP1 and TP53 mutations during tumor evolution, thereby unmasking clonal heterogeneity and allowing the identification of cooperating genes within the same tumor. Our results highlight the importance of studying tumor genetic evolution to identify cooperating mechanisms and delineate effective therapies. PMID:26701415

  1. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  2. Genetic mapping of the mouse neuromuscular mutation kyphoscoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Skynner, M.J.; Coulton, G.R.; Mason, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    The ky mouse mutant, kyphoscoliosis, exhibits a degenerative muscle disease resulting in chronic deformation of the spinal column. Using an interspecific backcross segregating the ky mutation, we have mapped the ky locus to a small region of mouse chromosome 9. ky is nonrecombinant with the microsatellites D9Mit24 and D9Mit169 and lies in a conserved linkage group that encompasses human chromosome 3. s-Laminin (LAMS) and the gene for dystrophin-associated glycoprotein 1 (DAG1), which map to human chromosome 3, are both recombinant with ky, ruling them out as candidates. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  4. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  5. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  6. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  7. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations. B is 33 years... reimbursement. Following an established policy, the plan asks B for evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for...

  8. Genetics of unstable alleles of the X chromosome genes isolated from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster during the outburst of mutation yellow in 1982 to 1991 in Uman`

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, I.K.; Skibitskii, E.E.

    1995-08-01

    In 1982, a local increase of frequency of mutation yellow-2, which lasted for a decade, occurred in a population of Drosophila melanogaster from Uman` (Ukraine). Genetic properties (phenotypic difference, mutability, and pecularities of complementation) of alleles yellow-2, isolated from the population during the mutation outburst, and of their revertants, were studied. Allelic diversity, which reflected molecular differences in allele structure, was shown to appear. In addition to mutation yellow, isolated in 1990 from the Uman` population, mutational properties of other sex-linked genes (dusky, miniature, rudimentary, singed, and vermilion) isolated from natural populations in 1986 to 1990, were analyzed. Based on these data, the conclusion was drawn that the presence of unstable alleles in populations is not a sufficient condition for mutation outbursts. Comparative analysis of properties of yellow alleles obtained in different periods of the outburst continues. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in sporadic breast/ovarian cancer patients and identification of a novel de novo BRCA1 mutation in a patient diagnosed with late onset breast and ovarian cancer: implications for genetic testing.

    PubMed

    De Leeneer, Kim; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Simkens, Justine; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Bols, Alain; Stragier, Barbara; Vanhoutte, Ilse; De Paepe, Anne; Poppe, Bruce; Claes, Kathleen

    2012-02-01

    In order to adequately evaluate the clinical relevance of genetic testing in sporadic breast and ovarian cancer patients, we offered comprehensive BRCA1/2 mutation analysis in patients without a family history for the disease. We evaluated the complete coding and splice site regions of BRCA1/2 in 193 sporadic patients. In addition, a de novo mutation was further investigated with ultra deep sequencing and microsatellite marker analysis. In 17 patients (8.8%), a deleterious germline BRCA1/2 mutation was identified. The highest mutation detection ratio (3/7 = 42.9%) was obtained in sporadic patients diagnosed with breast and ovarian cancer after the age of 40. In 21 bilateral breast cancer patients, two mutations were identified (9.5%). Furthermore, 140 sporadic patients with unilateral breast cancer were investigated. Mutations were only identified in patients diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 (12/128 = 9.4% vs. 0/12 with Dx > 40). No mutations were detected in 17 sporadic male breast cancer and 6 ovarian cancer patients. BRCA1 c.3494_3495delTT was identified in a patient diagnosed with breast and ovarian cancer at the age of 52 and 53, respectively, and was proven to have occurred de novo at the paternal allele. Our study shows that the mutation detection probability in specific patient subsets can be significant, therefore mutation analysis should be considered in sporadic patients. As a consequence, a family history for the disease and an early age of onset should not be used as the only criteria for mutation analysis of BRCA1/2. The relatively high mutation detection ratio suggests that the prevalence of BRCA1/2 may be underestimated, especially in sporadic patients who developed breast and ovarian cancer. In addition, although rare, the possibility of a de novo occurrence in a sporadic patient should be considered.

  10. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials. PMID:26306257

  11. Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis: Report of two cases and a novel genetic mutation in an Indian patient

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bhupender K; Singh, Anand; Anand, Kuljeet S; Garg, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis (CTX) is an autosomal recessive disorder of bile acid metabolism manifesting typically with the triad of neurological dysfunction, tendon xanthoma, and early onset cataract. The diagnosis is often missed and delayed as the patients do not manifest all the classical features. Early recognition and initiation of chenodeoxycholic acid therapy with Hydoxymethylglutaryl Coenzyme-A (HMG-Co-A) inhibitors is critical to prevent irreversible neurological damage and permanently disabled existence. We report about two patients, both of whom remained undiagnosed for more than 20 years. Genetic analysis in one of the patients revealed a novel genetic mutation in one of the homologous genes. The patient was found to have heterozygous mutation of CTX gene with a novel mutation in exon 1 of CYP27A1 gene. PMID:24174808

  12. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials.

  13. A quantum genetic algorithm with quantum crossover and mutation operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SaiToh, Akira; Rahimi, Robabeh; Nakahara, Mikio

    2013-11-01

    In the context of evolutionary quantum computing in the literal meaning, a quantum crossover operation has not been introduced so far. Here, we introduce a novel quantum genetic algorithm that has a quantum crossover procedure performing crossovers among all chromosomes in parallel for each generation. A complexity analysis shows that a quadratic speedup is achieved over its classical counterpart in the dominant factor of the run time to handle each generation.

  14. Mobile genetic elements and cancer. From mutations to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozeretska, I A; Demydov, S V; Ostapchenko, L I

    2011-12-01

    In the present review, an association between cancer and the activity of the non-LTR retroelements L1, Alu, and SVA, as well as endogenous retroviruses, in the human genome, is analyzed. Data suggesting that transposons have been involved in embryogenesis and malignization processes, are presented. Events that lead to the activation of mobile elements in mammalian somatic cells, as well as the use of mobile elements in genetic screening and cancer gene therapy, are reviewed.

  15. Developing regional genetic counseling for southern Chinese with nonsyndromic hearing impairment: a unique mutational spectrum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Racial and regional factors are important for the clinical diagnosis of non-syndromic hearing impairment. Comprehensive genetic analysis of deaf patients in different regions of China must be performed to provide effective genetic counseling. To evaluate the mutational spectrum of south Chinese families, we performed genetic analysis for non-syndromic hearing impairment in this population. Methods Complete clinical evaluations were performed on 701 unrelated patients with non-syndromic hearing impairment from six provinces in south China. Each subject was screened for common mutations, including SLC26A4 c.IVS7-2A > G, c.2168A > G; mitochondrial DNA m.1555A > G, m.1494C > T, m.7444G > A, m.7445A > G; GJB3 c.538C > T, c.547G > A; and WFS1 c.1901A > C, using pyrosequencing. GJB2 and SLC26A4 coding region mutation detection were performed using Sanger sequencing. Results Genetic analysis revealed that among the etiology of non-syndromic hearing impairment, GJB2, SLC26A4, and mitochondrial m.1555A > G mutations accounted for 18.0%, 13.1%, and 0.9%, respectively. Common mutations included GJB2 c.235delC, c.109G > A, SLC26A4 c.IVS7-2A > G, c.1229 T > C, and mitochondrial m.1555A > G. The total mutation rate was 45.1% in all patients examined in south China. Overall, the clear contribution of GJB2, SLC26A4, and mitochondrial m.1555A > G to the etiology of the non-syndromic deafness population in south China was 32.0%. Conclusions Our study is the first genetic analysis of non-syndromic hearing impairment in south China, and revealed that a clear genetic etiology accounted for 32.0% of non-syndromic hearing cases in patients from these regions. The mutational spectrum of non-syndromic hearing impairment in the south Chinese population provides useful and targeted information to aid in genetic counseling. PMID:24612839

  16. Combinatorial reshaping of a lipase structure for thermostability: additive role of surface stabilizing single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Ranvir; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2014-05-16

    Thermostable lipases are of high priority for industrial applications. In the present study, targeted improvement of the thermostability of a lipase from metagenomic origin was examined by using a combinatorial protein engineering approach exploring additive effects of single amino acid substitutions. A variant (LipR5) was generated after combination of two thermostabilizing mutations (R214C & N355K). Thermostability of the variant enzyme was analyzed by half-life measurement and circular dichroism (CD). To assess whether catalytic properties were affected by mutation, the optimal reaction conditions were determined. The protein LipR5, displayed optimum activity at 50°C and pH 8.0. It showed two fold enhancement in thermostability (at 60°C) as compared to LipR3 (R214C) and nearly 168 fold enhancement as compared to parent enzyme (LipR1). Circular dichroism and fluorescence study suggest that the protein structure had become more rigid and stable to denaturation. Study of 3D model suggested that Lys355 was involved in formation of a Hydrogen bond with OE1 of Glu284. Lys355 was also making salt bridge with OE2 of Glu284. PMID:24751523

  17. Comprehensive genetic and epigenetic analysis of sporadic meningioma for macro-mutations on 22q and micro-mutations within the NF2 locus

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Caisa M; Buckley, Patrick G; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Hellström, Anders R; Mantripragada, Kiran; Jarbo, Caroline; Mathiesen, Tiit; Dumanski, Jan P

    2007-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most common intracranial neoplasias, representing a clinically and histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumors. The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor is the only gene known to be frequently involved in early development of meningiomas. The objective of this study was to identify genetic and/or epigenetic factors contributing to the development of these tumors. A large set of sporadic meningiomas were analyzed for presence of 22q macro-mutations using array-CGH in order to identify tumors carrying gene dosage aberrations not encompassing NF2. The NF2 locus was also comprehensively studied for point mutations within coding and conserved non-coding sequences. Furthermore, CpG methylation within the NF2 promoter region was thoroughly analyzed. Results Monosomy 22 was the predominant finding, detected in 47% of meningiomas. Thirteen percent of the tumors contained interstitial/terminal deletions and gains, present singly or in combinations. We defined at least two minimal overlapping regions outside the NF2 locus that are small enough (~550 kb and ~250 kb) to allow analysis of a limited number of candidate genes. Bialleinactivationo the NF2 gne was detected in 36% of meningiomas. Among the monosomy 22 cases, no additional NF2 mutations could be identified in 35% (17 out of 49) of tumors. Furthermore, the majority of tumors (9 out of 12) with interstitial/terminal deletions did not have any detectable NF2 mutations. Methylation within the NF2 promoter region was only identified at a single CpG site in one tumor sample. Conclusion We confirmed previous findings of pronounced differences in mutation frequency between different histopathological subtypes. There is a higher frequency of biallelic NF2 inactivation in fibroblastic (52%) compared to meningothelial (18%) tumors. The presence of macro-mutations on 22q also shows marked differences between fibroblastic (86%) and meningothelial (39%) subtypes. Thus, inactivation of

  18. Mutations in PSMB8 Cause CANDLE Syndrome with Evidence of Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Ramot, Yuval; Torrelo, Antonio; Paller, Amy S.; Si, Nuo; Babay, Sofia; Kim, Peter W.; Sheikh, Afzal; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Chen, Yongqing; Vera, Angel; Zhang, Xue; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Zlotogorski, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome is an autoinflammatory syndrome recently described in children. We investigated the clinical phenotype, genetic cause and the immune dysregulation in nine CANDLE patients. Methods Genomic DNA from all patients was screened for PSMB8 (Proteasome subunit beta type-8) mutations. Serum cytokine levels were measured from four patients. Skin biopsies were evaluated immunohistochemically and blood microarray profile (n=4) and stat-1 phosphorylation (n=3) were assessed. Results One patient was homozygous for a novel nonsense mutation in PSMB8 (c.405C>A) suggesting a protein truncation, four patients were homozygous and two were heterozygous for a previously reported missense mutation (c.224C>T), and one patient showed no mutation. None of these sequence changes was observed in chromosomes from 750 healthy controls. Of the four patients with the same mutation, only two share the same haplotype indicating a mutational hot spot. PSMB8 mutation-positive and -negative patients expressed high IP-10 (Interferon gamma-induced protein 10) levels. Levels of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1Ra were moderately elevated. Microarray profiles and monocyte stat-1 activation suggested a unique interferon (IFN) signaling signature, unlike in other autoinflammatory disorders. Conclusion CANDLE is caused by mutations in PSMB8, a gene recently reported to cause JMP syndrome (joint contractures, muscle atrophy and panniculitis induced lipodystrophy) in adults. We extend the clinical and pathogenic description of this novel autoinflammatory syndrome, thereby expanding the clinical and genetic disease spectrum of PSMB8-associated disorders. IFN may be a key mediator of the inflammatory response and may present a therapeutic target. PMID:21953331

  19. A novel missense mutation in Van der Woude syndrome: usefulness of fingernail DNA for genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, N; Shimozato, K; Natsume, N; Niikawa, N; Yoshiura, K

    2006-12-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal-dominant oral facial disorder. To find a gene mutation in a Japanese family using fingernail DNA samples, we performed this study. We hypothesized that a gene mutation in IRF6 might be involved in VWS, and that fingernail DNA samples may be valuable for detecting such mutations. Linkage and haplotype analyses of the family mapped the disease locus to the 1q32-q41 region. Mutation analysis with an improved extraction method for fingernail DNA detected a novel missense mutation (1046A>T, E349V) in exon 7 of IRF6 in all the affected members of the family. Since the E349V change may disturb the hydrophobic core and affect regulatory activity of IRF6, it is most likely that the mutation is causative for VWS in this family. Fingernail DNA is thus useful for linkage and mutation analyses, since the fingernail can be easily obtained non-invasively, sent through the mail, and stored for a long period. We emphasize here the usefulness of fingernail DNA for the genetic analysis of a disease. PMID:17122170

  20. Genetic and molecular analysis of chlorambucil-induced germ-line mutations in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Rinchik, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Russell, L.B. ); Kwon, B.S. ); Jackson, I.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Eighteen variants recovered from specific locus mutation rate experiments involving the mutagen chlorambucil were subjected to several genetic and molecular analyses. Most mutations were found to be homozygous lethal. Because lethality is often presumptive evidence for multilocus-deletion events, 10 mutations were analyzed by Southern blot analysis with probes at, or closely linked to, several of the specific locus test markers, namely, albino (c), brown (b), and dilute (d). All eight mutations (two c; three b; two d; and one dilute-short ear (Df(d se))) that arose in post-spermatogonial germ cells were deleted for DNA sequences. No evidence for deletion of two d-se region probes was obtained for the remaining two d mutations that arose in stem-cell spermatogonia. Six of the primary mutants also produced low litter sizes (semisterility). Karyotypic analysis has, to date, confirmed the presence of reciprocal translocations in four of the six. The high frequency of deletions and translocations among the mutations induced in post-spermatogonial stages by chlorambucil, combined with its overall high efficiency in inducing mutations in these stages, should make chlorambucil mutagenesis useful for generating experimentally valuable germ-line deletions throughout the mouse genome.

  1. Genetic Mutations Associated with Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Marva; Catanzaro, Donald; Catanzaro, Antonino; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) incidence and mortality are declining worldwide; however, poor detection of drug-resistant disease threatens to reverse current progress toward global TB control. Multiple, rapid molecular diagnostic tests have recently been developed to detect genetic mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genes known to confer first-line drug resistance. Their utility, though, depends on the frequency and distribution of the resistance associated mutations in the pathogen population. Mutations associated with rifampicin resistance, one of the two first-line drugs, are well understood and appear to occur in a single gene region in >95% of phenotypically resistant isolates. Mutations associated with isoniazid, the other first-line drug, are more complex and occur in multiple Mtb genes. Objectives/Methodology A systematic review of all published studies from January 2000 through August 2013 was conducted to quantify the frequency of the most common mutations associated with isoniazid resistance, to describe the frequency at which these mutations co-occur, and to identify the regional differences in the distribution of these mutations. Mutation data from 118 publications were extracted and analyzed for 11,411 Mtb isolates from 49 countries. Principal Findings/Conclusions Globally, 64% of all observed phenotypic isoniazid resistance was associated with the katG315 mutation. The second most frequently observed mutation, inhA-15, was reported among 19% of phenotypically resistant isolates. These two mutations, katG315 and inhA-15, combined with ten of the most commonly occurring mutations in the inhA promoter and the ahpC-oxyR intergenic region explain 84% of global phenotypic isoniazid resistance. Regional variation in the frequency of individual mutations may limit the sensitivity of molecular diagnostic tests. Well-designed systematic surveys and whole genome sequencing are needed to identify mutation frequencies in geographic regions where rapid

  2. [Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and genetic mutations including progranulin gene].

    PubMed

    Arai, Tetsuaki; Hasegawa, Masato; Nishihara, Masugi; Nonaka, Takashi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Hashizume, Yoshio; Beach, Thomas G; Morita, Mitsuya; Nakano, Imaharu; Oda, Tatsuro; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2008-11-01

    Research on familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has led to the discovery of disease-causing genes: microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (PGRN) and valosin-containing protein (VCP). TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as a major component of tau-negative ubiquitin-positive inclusions in familial and sporadic FTLD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which are now referred to as TDP-43 proteinopathy. Recent findings of mutations in TDP-43 gene in familial and sporadic ALS cases confirm the pathogenetic role for TDP-43 in neurodegeneration. TDP-43 proteinopathies have been classified into 4 pathological subtypes. Type 1 is characterized by numerous dystrophic neurites (DNs), Type 2 has numerous neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), Type 3 has NCIs and DNs and Type 4 has neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs) and DNs. There is a close relationship between such pathological subtypes of TDP-43 proteinopathy and the immunoblot pattern of C-terminal fragments of accumulated TDP-43. These results parallel our earlier findings of differing C-terminal tau fragments in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, despite identical composition of tau isoforms. Taken together, these results suggest that elucidating the mechanism of C-terminal fragment origination may shed light on the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders involving TDP-43 proteinopathy and tauopathy. PMID:19198141

  3. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  4. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks. VIII. The concept of mutation component and its use in risk estimation for multifactorial diseases.

    PubMed

    Denniston, C; Chakraborty, R; Sankaranarayanan, K

    1998-08-31

    Multifactorial diseases, which include the common congenital abnormalities (incidence: 6%) and chronic diseases with onset predominantly in adults (population prevalence: 65%), contribute substantially to human morbidity and mortality. Their transmission patterns do not conform to Mendelian expectations. The model most frequently used to explain their inheritance and to estimate risks to relatives is a Multifactorial Threshold Model (MTM) of disease liability. The MTM assumes that: (i) the disease is due to the joint action of a large number of genetic and environmental factors, each of which contributing a small amount of liability, (ii) the distribution of liability in the population is Gaussian and (iii) individuals whose liability exceeds a certain threshold value are affected by the disease. For most of these diseases, the number of genes involved or the environmental factors are not fully known. In the context of radiation exposures of the population, the question of the extent to which induced mutations will cause an increase in the frequencies of these diseases has remained unanswered. In this paper, we address this problem by using a modified version of MTM which incorporates mutation and selection as two additional parameters. The model assumes a finite number of gene loci and threshold of liability (hence, the designation, Finite-Locus Threshold Model or FLTM). The FLTM permits one to examine the relationship between broad-sense heritability of disease liability and mutation component (MC), the responsiveness of the disease to a change in mutation rate. Through the use of a computer program (in which mutation rate, selection, threshold, recombination rate and environmental variance are input parameters and MC and heritability of liability are output estimates), we studied the MC-heritability relationship for (i) a permanent increase in mutation rate (e.g., when the population sustains radiation exposure in every generation) and (ii) a one-time increase

  5. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-11-09

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility.

  6. E-cadherin germline mutation carriers: clinical management and genetic implications.

    PubMed

    Corso, Giovanni; Figueiredo, Joana; Biffi, Roberto; Trentin, Chiara; Bonanni, Bernardo; Feroce, Irene; Serrano, Davide; Cassano, Enrico; Annibale, Bruno; Melo, Soraia; Seruca, Raquel; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Ferrara, Francesco; Piagnerelli, Riccardo; Roviello, Franco; Galimberti, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomic dominant syndrome associated with E-cadherin protein (CDH1) gene germline mutations. Clinical criteria for genetic screening were revised in 2010 by the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium at the Cambridge meeting. About 40 % of families fulfilling clinical criteria for this inherited disease present deleterious CDH1 germline mutations. Lobular breast cancer is a neoplastic condition associated with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer syndrome. E-cadherin constitutional mutations have been described in both settings, in gastric and breast cancers. The management of CDH1 asymptomatic mutation carriers requires a multidisciplinary approach; the only life-saving procedure is the prophylactic total gastrectomy after thorough genetic counselling. Several prophylactic gastrectomies have been performed to date; conversely, no prophylactic mastectomies have been described in CDH1 mutant carriers. However, the recent discovery of novel germline alterations in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast cancer opens up a new debate in the management of these individuals. In this critical review, we describe the clinical management of CDH1 germline mutant carriers providing specific recommendations for genetic counselling, clinical criteria, surveillance and/ or prophylactic surgery.

  7. Additive effect of mutations in LDLR and PCSK9 genes on the phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Priore Oliva, Claudio; Cefalù, Angelo Baldassare; Noto, Davide; Bellocchio, Antonella; Fresa, Raffaele; Cantafora, Alfredo; Patel, Dilip; Averna, Maurizio; Tarugi, Patrizia; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2006-06-01

    Patients homozygous or compound heterozygous for LDLR mutations or double heterozygous for LDLR and apo B R3500Q mutation have higher LDL-C levels, more extensive xanthomatosis and more severe premature coronary disease (pCAD) than simple heterozygotes for mutations in either these genes or for missense mutations in PCSK9 gene. It is not known whether combined mutations in LDLR and PKCS9 are associated with such a severe phenotype. We sequenced Apo B and PCSK9 genes in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of homozygous FH who were heterozygous for LDLR gene mutations. Proband Z.P. (LDL-C 13.39 mmol/L and pCAD) was heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.E228K) inherited from her father (LDL-C 8.07 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.R496W) from her mother (LDL-C 5.58 mmol/L). Proband L.R. and her sister (LDL-C 11.51 and 10.47 mmol/L, xanthomatosis and carotid atherosclerosis) were heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.Y419X) inherited from their mother (LDL-C 6.54 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.N425S) probably from their deceased father. The LDL-C levels in double heterozygotes of these two families were 56 and 44% higher than those found in simple heterozygotes for the two LDLR mutations, respectively. The two PCSK9 mutations are novel and were not found in 110 controls and 80 patients with co-dominant hypercholesterolemia. These observations indicate that rare missense mutations of PCSK9 may worsen the clinical phenotype of patients carrying LDLR mutations. PMID:16183066

  8. Temperature-sensitive respiratory-deficient mitochondrial mutations: isolation and genetic mapping.

    PubMed

    Bolotin-Fukuhara, M; Fay, G; Fukuhara, H

    1977-04-29

    In order to find new genetic loci and functions on the yeast mitochondrial DNA, especially mutations affecting the mitochondrial protein synthesis apparatus, temperature sensitive mutants have been isolated after MnCl2 mutagenesis and mitochondrial and nuclear mutants classified according to their pattern of recombination with three rho- tester strains. Eighteen cold- and heat-sensitive respiratory deficient mitochondrial mutants have been isolated and localized on the mitochondrial genome by deletion mapping using 113 rho- strains. Eight of them appear to represent new loci, among which some are probably mutations of the tRNA and rRNA genes.

  9. A general population genetic framework for antagonistic selection that accounts for demography and recurrent mutation.

    PubMed

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G

    2012-04-01

    Antagonistic selection--where alleles at a locus have opposing effects on male and female fitness ("sexual antagonism") or between components of fitness ("antagonistic pleiotropy")--might play an important role in maintaining population genetic variation and in driving phylogenetic and genomic patterns of sexual dimorphism and life-history evolution. While prior theory has thoroughly characterized the conditions necessary for antagonistic balancing selection to operate, we currently know little about the evolutionary interactions between antagonistic selection, recurrent mutation, and genetic drift, which should collectively shape empirical patterns of genetic variation. To fill this void, we developed and analyzed a series of population genetic models that simultaneously incorporate these processes. Our models identify two general properties of antagonistically selected loci. First, antagonistic selection inflates heterozygosity and fitness variance across a broad parameter range--a result that applies to alleles maintained by balancing selection and by recurrent mutation. Second, effective population size and genetic drift profoundly affect the statistical frequency distributions of antagonistically selected alleles. The "efficacy" of antagonistic selection (i.e., its tendency to dominate over genetic drift) is extremely weak relative to classical models, such as directional selection and overdominance. Alleles meeting traditional criteria for strong selection (N(e)s > 1, where N(e) is the effective population size, and s is a selection coefficient for a given sex or fitness component) may nevertheless evolve as if neutral. The effects of mutation and demography may generate population differences in overall levels of antagonistic fitness variation, as well as molecular population genetic signatures of balancing selection. PMID:22298707

  10. [CHEK2-mutation in Dutch breast cancer families: expanding genetic testing for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Adank, Muriel A; Hes, Frederik J; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; van den Tol, M Petrousjka; Seynaeve, Caroline; Oosterwijk, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    In the majority of breast cancer families, DNA testing does not show BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and the genetic cause of breast cancer remains unexplained. Routine testing for the CHEK2*1100delC mutation has recently been introduced in breast cancer families in the Netherlands. The 1100delC mutation in the CHEK2-gene may explain the occurrence of breast cancer in about 5% of non-BRCA1/2 families in the Netherlands. In the general population the CHEK2*1100delC mutation confers a slightly increased breast cancer risk, but in a familial breast cancer setting this risk is between 35-55% for first degree female carriers. Female breast cancer patients with the CHEK2*1100delC mutation are at increased risk of contralateral breast cancer and may have a less favourable prognosis. Female heterozygous CHEK2*1100delC mutation carriers are offered annual mammography and specialist breast surveillance between the ages of 35-60 years. Prospective research in CHEK2-positive families is essential in order to develop more specific treatment and screening strategies.

  11. The distinct genetic pattern of ALS in Turkey and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Özoğuz, Aslıhan; Uyan, Özgün; Birdal, Güneş; Iskender, Ceren; Kartal, Ece; Lahut, Suna; Ömür, Özgür; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Eken, Aslı Gündoğdu; Sen, Nesli Ece; Kavak, Pınar; Saygı, Ceren; Sapp, Peter C; Keagle, Pamela; Parman, Yeşim; Tan, Ersin; Koç, Filiz; Deymeer, Feza; Oflazer, Piraye; Hanağası, Haşmet; Gürvit, Hakan; Bilgiç, Başar; Durmuş, Hacer; Ertaş, Mustafa; Kotan, Dilcan; Akalın, Mehmet Ali; Güllüoğlu, Halil; Zarifoğlu, Mehmet; Aysal, Fikret; Döşoğlu, Nilgün; Bilguvar, Kaya; Günel, Murat; Keskin, Özlem; Akgün, Tahsin; Özçelik, Hilmi; Landers, John E; Brown, Robert H; Başak, A Nazlı

    2015-04-01

    The frequency of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mutations has been extensively investigated in several populations; however, a systematic analysis in Turkish cases has not been reported so far. In this study, we screened 477 ALS patients for mutations, including 116 familial ALS patients from 82 families and 361 sporadic ALS (sALS) cases. Patients were genotyped for C9orf72 (18.3%), SOD1 (12.2%), FUS (5%), TARDBP (3.7%), and UBQLN2 (2.4%) gene mutations, which together account for approximately 40% of familial ALS in Turkey. No SOD1 mutations were detected in sALS patients; however, C9orf72 (3.1%) and UBQLN2 (0.6%) explained 3.7% of sALS in the population. Exome sequencing revealed mutations in OPTN, SPG11, DJ1, PLEKHG5, SYNE1, TRPM7, and SQSTM1 genes, many of them novel. The spectrum of mutations reflect both the distinct genetic background and the heterogeneous nature of the Turkish ALS population. PMID:25681989

  12. Genetic analysis and SOD1 mutation screening in Iranian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afagh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Rohani, Mohammad; Zamani, Babak; Sedighi, Behnaz; Shamshiri, Hosein; Fan, Jian-Bing; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2013-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease, and the most common in European populations. Results of genetic analysis and mutation screening of SOD1 in a cohort of 60 Iranian ALS patients are here reported. Initially, linkage analysis in 4 families identified a disease-linked locus that included the known ALS gene, SOD1. Screening of SOD1 identified homozygous p.Asp90Ala causing mutations in all the linked families. Haplotype analysis suggests that the p.Asp90Ala alleles in the Iranian patients might share a common founder with the renowned Scandinavian recessive p.Asp90Ala allele. Subsequent screening in all the patients resulted in identification of 3 other mutations in SOD1, including p.Leu84Phe in the homozygous state. Phenotypic features of the mutation-bearing patients are presented. SOD1 mutations were found in 11.7% of the cohort, 38.5% of the familial ALS probands, and 4.25% of the sporadic ALS cases. SOD1 mutations contribute significantly to ALS among Iranians.

  13. POLE and POLD1 mutations in 529 kindred with familial colorectal cancer and/or polyposis: review of reported cases and recommendations for genetic testing and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Fernando; Pineda, Marta; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Matilde; Puente, Diana A.; Pons, Tirso; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Darder, Esther; Piñol, Virginia; Soto, José Luís; Valencia, Alfonso; Blanco, Ignacio; Urioste, Miguel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Germ-line mutations in the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 have been recently associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the phenotypic characteristics of this syndrome to establish specific criteria for POLE and POLD1 mutation screening and to help define the clinical management of mutation carriers. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Methods: The exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 were studied in 529 kindred, 441 with familial nonpolyposis CRC and 88 with polyposis, by using pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Results: Seven novel or rare genetic variants were identified. In addition to the POLE p.L424V recurrent mutation in a patient with polyposis, CRC and oligodendroglioma, six novel or rare POLD1 variants (four of them, p.D316H, p.D316G, p.R409W, and p.L474P, with strong evidence for pathogenicity) were identified in nonpolyposis CRC families. Phenotypic data from these and previously reported POLE/POLD1 carriers point to an associated phenotype characterized by attenuated or oligo-adenomatous colorectal polyposis, CRC, and probably brain tumors. In addition, POLD1 mutations predispose to endometrial and breast tumors. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Conclusion: Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of the POLE/POLD1-associated syndrome and identify novel pathogenic variants. We propose guidelines for genetic testing and surveillance recommendations. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. PMID:26133394

  14. K-ras genetic mutation and influencing factor analysis for Han and Uygur nationality colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Eli, Mayinur; Mollayup, Ablikim; Muattar; Liu, Chao; Zheng, Chao; Bao, Yong-Xing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the K-ras genetic mutation status in colorectal cancer patients, compare the difference of K-ras genetic mutation rate in Han and Uygur nationality and analyze the influencing factor. 91 cases (52 cases of Han nationality and 39 cases of Uygur nationality) of colorectal biopsy or surgical ablation pathology specimen from the first affiliated hospital of Xinjiang Medical University during January, 2010 to March, 2013 were collected to detect the 12th and 13th code mutation status of K-ras gene exon 2 with pyrosequencing method and compare the difference of K-ras gene mutation rate between Han and Uygur nationality patients. Single factor analysis and multiple factor logistic regression analysis were utilized to analyze the influencing factor for K-ras genetic mutation. 33 cases of patients with K-ras genetic mutation were found from the 91 cases colorectal cancer patients and the total mutation rate was 36.3%. Among them, 24 cases (72.7%) were found with mutation only in the 12th code, 9 cases (27.3%) were found with mutation only in the 13th code and no one case was found with mutation in both the two codes. Mutation rate of the 12th code in the Uygur nationality was significantly higher than that in the Han nationality (P<0.05), but there were no significant difference in the comparison of the total mutation rate and the 13th code mutation rate between the two groups (P>0.05). There were no associativity (P>0.05) between the K-ras genetic mutation and sex, age, smoking history, drinking history, tumor location, macropathology type, differentiation level, staging, invasive depth, lymph nodes transferring and metastasis in colorectal cancer patients (P>0.05). K-ras genetic mutation rate is high in colorectal cancer patients. The mutation rate of 12th code in Uygur nationality is higher than that in Han nationality. There is no significant associativity between K-ras genetic mutation rate and patients' clinical pathology characteristic.

  15. Exome sequencing of lymphomas from three dog breeds reveals somatic mutation patterns reflecting genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Elvers, Ingegerd; Turner-Maier, Jason; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Johnson, Jeremy; Stewart, Chip; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Rosenberg, Mara; Thomas, Rachael; Mauceli, Evan; Getz, Gad; Palma, Federica Di; Modiano, Jaime F.; Breen, Matthew; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Alföldi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy in developed countries. Outcome is strongly determined by molecular subtype, reflecting a need for new and improved treatment options. Dogs spontaneously develop lymphoma, and the predisposition of certain breeds indicates genetic risk factors. Using the dog breed structure, we selected three lymphoma predisposed breeds developing primarily T-cell (boxer), primarily B-cell (cocker spaniel), and with equal distribution of B- and T-cell lymphoma (golden retriever), respectively. We investigated the somatic mutations in B- and T-cell lymphomas from these breeds by exome sequencing of tumor and normal pairs. Strong similarities were evident between B-cell lymphomas from golden retrievers and cocker spaniels, with recurrent mutations in TRAF3-MAP3K14 (28% of all cases), FBXW7 (25%), and POT1 (17%). The FBXW7 mutations recurrently occur in a specific codon; the corresponding codon is recurrently mutated in human cancer. In contrast, T-cell lymphomas from the predisposed breeds, boxers and golden retrievers, show little overlap in their mutation pattern, sharing only one of their 15 most recurrently mutated genes. Boxers, which develop aggressive T-cell lymphomas, are typically mutated in the PTEN-mTOR pathway. T-cell lymphomas in golden retrievers are often less aggressive, and their tumors typically showed mutations in genes involved in cellular metabolism. We identify genes with known involvement in human lymphoma and leukemia, genes implicated in other human cancers, as well as novel genes that could allow new therapeutic options. PMID:26377837

  16. Using standard nomenclature to adequately name transgenes, knockout gene alleles and any mutation associated to a genetically modified mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Lluís; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2011-04-01

    Mice provide an unlimited source of animal models to study mammalian gene function and human diseases. The powerful genetic modification toolbox existing for the mouse genome enables the creation of, literally, thousands of genetically modified mouse strains, carrying spontaneous or induced mutations, transgenes or knock-out/knock-in alleles which, in addition, can exist in hundreds of different genetic backgrounds. Such an immense diversity of individuals needs to be adequately annotated, to ensure that the most relevant information is kept associated with the name of each mouse line, and hence, the scientific community can correctly interpret and benefit from the reported animal model. Therefore, rules and guidelines for correctly naming genes, alleles and mouse strains are required. The Mouse Genome Informatics Database is the authoritative source of official names for mouse genes, alleles, and strains. Nomenclature follows the rules and guidelines established by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. Herewith, both from the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) and from the scientific journal Transgenic Research, we would like to encourage all our colleagues to adhere and follow adequately the standard nomenclature rules when describing mouse models. The entire scientific community using genetically modified mice in experiments will benefit.

  17. Genetic analysis of new 16S rRNA mutations conferring aminoglycoside resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Nessar, Rachid; Reyrat, Jean Marc; Murray, Alan; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We studied the development and fitness cost of 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside resistance of Mycobacterium abscessus. Methods Spontaneous 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside-resistant mutants were selected and the frequency of their appearance was determined. The 3′ part of the rrs gene was sequenced to characterize mutations. Additionally, we determined the MICs of aminoglycoside drugs for the different mutants obtained. The dominance/recessivity traits of the different mutations were examined and we explored the potential cost conferred by the mutations selected in vitro on the fitness of these isolates compared with the wild-type strain. Results The in vitro mutation rate for 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside resistance was ∼10−7 mutations/cell division. In addition to the known rrs A→G substitution at position 1408 (Escherichia coli numbering), which confers kanamycin resistance (KanR), three new substitutions in rrs were identified in M. abscessus KanR mutants, i.e. T→A at 1406, C→T at 1409 and G→T at 1491. Heterodiploids carrying genomic mutations T→A at 1406 and A→G at 1408 with the wild-type rrs gene carried by the pNBV1 vector showed a resistant phenotype. In contrast, heterodiploids carrying genomic mutations C→T at 1409 and G→T at 1491 with the wild-type rrs gene carried by the pNBV1 vector had a susceptible phenotype. No burden on fitness was observed for the different mutations. Conclusion Mutations in the rrs gene that confer high-level 2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside resistance on M. abscessus differ in their dominance/recessivity traits and have no biological cost under our experimental conditions. PMID:21652621

  18. Mutations in Soviet public health science: post-Lysenko medical genetics, 1969-1991.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This paper traces the integration of human genetics with Soviet public health science after the Lysenko era. For nearly three decades, USSR biology pursued its own version of anti-bourgeois, Soviet 'creative Darwinism', departing from western, post-WWII scientific developments. After Lysenko was suspended, research niches of immunology, biophysics and mutation research formed the basis of new departments at the Institute of Medical Genetics, which was founded in 1969 as part of the Soviet Academy of Medical Sciences. Focussing on early research activities and collaborations at the institute, I show how the concept of mutagenesis, a pivotal issue during the Cold War, became mobilized from Drosophila genetics to human heredity and to society as a whole. This mode of scaling up and down through population studies shaped not only Soviet human biology and genetics; it also brought about changes in clinical practice and public health as well as in the monitoring and regulation of mutagenic agents in the environment.

  19. Mutations in Soviet public health science: post-Lysenko medical genetics, 1969-1991.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This paper traces the integration of human genetics with Soviet public health science after the Lysenko era. For nearly three decades, USSR biology pursued its own version of anti-bourgeois, Soviet 'creative Darwinism', departing from western, post-WWII scientific developments. After Lysenko was suspended, research niches of immunology, biophysics and mutation research formed the basis of new departments at the Institute of Medical Genetics, which was founded in 1969 as part of the Soviet Academy of Medical Sciences. Focussing on early research activities and collaborations at the institute, I show how the concept of mutagenesis, a pivotal issue during the Cold War, became mobilized from Drosophila genetics to human heredity and to society as a whole. This mode of scaling up and down through population studies shaped not only Soviet human biology and genetics; it also brought about changes in clinical practice and public health as well as in the monitoring and regulation of mutagenic agents in the environment. PMID:24947269

  20. Limited family structure and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype as predictors of BRCA mutations in a genetic counseling cohort of early-onset sporadic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Manzano, Arancha; Blanco, Ignacio; Vega, Ana; Custodio, Ana; Teulé, Alex; Fachal, Laura; Martínez, Beatriz; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Cruz-Hernández, Juan Jesús; Chirivella, Isabel; Garcés, Vicente; Garre, Pilar; Romero, Atocha; Caldés, Trinidad; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset diagnosis is an eligibility criterion for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) testing in sporadic breast cancer patients. Limited family structure has been proposed as a predictor of BRCA mutation status in this group of patients. An overwhelming amount of data supports a strong association between BRCA1 mutations and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, we analyze the feasibility of using limited family structure and TNBC as predictors of BRCA mutation status in early-onset breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. We have conducted the study in a cohort of sporadic early-onset (≤35 years) breast cancer patients (N = 341) previously selected for BRCA genetic testing in Academic Hereditary Cancer Clinics from Spain. A retrospective review of medical records available at the time of risk assessment allowed us classifying patients according to family structure and TNBC. In addition, BRCAPRO score was calculated for all patients. Association between categorical variables was investigated using the Fisher's exact test. Binary Logistic Regression Analysis was used for multivariate analysis. Limited family structure (OR 3.61, p = 0.013) and TNBC (OR 3.14, p = 0.013) were independent predictors of BRCA mutation status. Mutation prevalence in the subgroup of patients with at least one positive predictor was 14%, whereas it dropped to 3% in non-TNBCs with adequate family history (OR 5.31, 95% CI 1.38-23.89, p = 0.006). BRCAPRO correctly discerned between limited and adequate family structures. Limited family structure and TNBC are feasible predictors of BRCA mutation status in sporadic early-onset (≤35 years) breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. The low prevalence of mutations observed in non-TNBCs with adequate family structure suggests that this subgroup of patients might be excluded from genetic testing.

  1. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: clinical course, genetic mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-08-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients.

  2. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Clinical Course, Genetic Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients. PMID:25337067

  3. Rapid sensitive analysis of IDH1 mutation in lower-grade gliomas by automated genetic typing involving a quenching probe.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Michihiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Aoki, Kosuke; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kondo, Goro; Motomura, Kazuya; Iijima, Kentaro; Yamamichi, Akane; Ranjit, Melissa; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Kimura, Shinya; Natsume, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The authors recently found that 80% of lower-grade gliomas (LGGs) harbored a mutation in IDH1. Intraoperative detection of the mutated IDH1 helps not only differentiate LGGs from other type of brain tumors, but determine the resection border. In the current study, the authors have applied an automated genetic typing involving a quenching probe to detect the mutated IDH1. If tumor cells with the mutated IDH1 contained 10% or more in the mixture of normal and tumor cells, the device could detect it sensitively. The intraoperative assessment of IDH1 mutation is useful in brain tumor surgeries.

  4. The effect of genetic background on behavioral manifestation of Grid2(Lc) mutation.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan; Tuma, Jan; Korelusova, Ivana; Vozeh, Frantisek

    2014-09-01

    Mutant mice are commonly used models of hereditary diseases. Nevertheless, these mice have phenotypic traits of the original strain, which could interfere with the manifestation of the mutation of interest. Lurcher mice represent a model of olivocerebellar degeneration, which is caused by the Grid2(Lc) mutation. Lurchers show ataxia and various cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. The most commonly used strains of Lurcher mice are B6CBA and C3H, but there is no information about the role of genetic background on the Grid2(Lc) manifestation. The aim of this work was to compare spatial navigation in the Morris water maze, spontaneous activity in the open field and motor skills on the horizontal wire, slanted ladder and rotarod in B6CBA and C3H Lurcher mutant and wild type mice. The study showed impaired motor skills and water maze performance in both strains of Lurcher mice. Both C3H Lurcher and C3H wild type mice had poorer performances in the water maze task than their B6CBA counterparts. In the open field test, C3H mice showed higher activity and lower thigmotaxis. The study showed that genetic backgrounds can modify manifestations of the Lurcher mutation. In this case, B6CBA Lurcher mice models probably have more validity when studying the behavioral aspects of cerebellar degeneration than C3H Lurcher mice, since they do not combine abnormalities related to the Grid2(Lc) mutation with strain-specific problems.

  5. [Retrotransposon MDG4 and its role in genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Liubomirskaia, N V; Kim, A I; Il'in, Iu V

    2003-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a ten-year study of genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster caused by transposition of the gypsy retrotransposon. The results of other authors working with an analogous system are analyzed. Possible mechanisms are suggested for the interaction of gypsy with the cell gene flamenco that participates in transposition control of this mobile element. PMID:12669411

  6. Early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease: prevalence, genetic heterogeneity, and mutation spectrum.

    PubMed Central

    Campion, D; Dumanchin, C; Hannequin, D; Dubois, B; Belliard, S; Puel, M; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Martin, C; Charbonnier, F; Raux, G; Camuzat, A; Penet, C; Mesnage, V; Martinez, M; Clerget-Darpoux, F; Brice, A; Frebourg, T

    1999-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) and of autosomal dominant forms of EOAD (ADEOAD), we performed a population-based study in the city of Rouen (426,710 residents). EOAD was defined as onset of disease at age <61 years, and ADEOAD was defined as the occurrence of at least three EOAD cases in three generations. Using these stringent criteria, we calculated that the EOAD and ADEOAD prevalences per 100,000 persons at risk were 41.2 and 5.3, respectively. We then performed a mutational analysis of the genes for amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) in 34 families with ADEOAD ascertained in France. In 19 (56%) of these families, we identified 16 distinct PSEN1 missense mutations, including 4 (Thr147Ile, Trp165Cys, Leu173Trp, and Ser390Ile) not reported elsewhere. APP mutations, including a novel mutation located at codon 715, were identified in 5 (15%) of the families. In the 10 remaining ADEOAD families and in 9 additional autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease families that did not fulfill the strict criteria for ADEOAD, no PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP mutation was identified. These results show that (1) PSEN1 and APP mutations account for 71% of ADEOAD families and (2) nonpenetrance at age <61 years is probably infrequent for PSEN1 or APP mutations. PMID:10441572

  7. Genetic evidence for the spread of a benzimidazole resistance mutation across southern India from a single origin in the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Umer; Redman, Elizabeth M; Raman, Muthusamy; Gilleard, John S

    2015-09-01

    It is important to understand how anthelmintic drug resistance mutations arise and spread in order to determine appropriate mitigation strategies. We hypothesised that a molecular genetic study of Haemonchus contortus in southern India, a region where resistance may be less advanced than in western Europe and North America, might provide some important insights into the origin and spread of anthelmintic resistance. The F200Y (TAC) isotype-1 β-tubulin benzimidazole resistance mutation is common in H. contortus throughout the world and the F167Y (TAC) and E198A (GCA) mutations, although less common, have been reported in a number of different countries. We have investigated the haplotypic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of isotype-1 β-tubulin benzimidazole resistance alleles for 23 H. contortus populations from small ruminants across southern India. The F200Y (TAC) mutation was most common, being detected in 18/23 populations at frequencies between 9% and 84% and the E198A (GCA) mutation was also detected in 8/23 populations at frequencies between 8% and 18%. The F167Y (TAC) mutation was not detected in any of the 23 populations. Phylogenetic haplotype network analysis suggested that the F200Y (TAC) mutation has arisen multiple independent times in the region with at least three independent origins of resistance alleles across the populations surveyed. In contrast, the E198A (GCA) mutation was present on a single haplotype which, given the high level of haplotypic diversity of the susceptible alleles in the region, suggests this particular mutation has spread from a single origin, likely by anthropogenic animal movement. Population genetic analysis of 12 of the H. contortus populations, using a panel of eight microsatellite markers, revealed extremely low genetic differentiation between populations, consistent with the hypothesis of high gene flow among sites. Additionally, there was no significant genetic differentiation between H. contortus taken from

  8. The 5q deletion size in myeloid malignancies is correlated to additional chromosomal aberrations and to TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Anna; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the long arm of chromosome 5 (del(5q)) are recurrent abnormalities in myeloid malignancies. We analyzed del(5q) and accompanying molecular mutations in MDS, MPN and MDS/MPN cases. A high del(5q) frequency was revealed in MDS (1869/11398 cases; 16%), followed by MDS/MPN (37/1107; 3%) and MPN (97/6373; 2%). To investigate potential associations of the del(5q) size with the respective phenotypes, we applied array CGH analyses in selected cohorts of 61 MDS, 22 MDS/MPN and 23 MPN cases. The size varied between 16 and 119 Mb with no differences between the entities. However, MPN and MDS/MPN cases with del(5q) sole showed a significantly smaller del(5q) than cases with additional aberrations. Sequence analysis of 27 genes revealed ≥1 mutation in 91% of patients. The highest mutation frequencies in the total cohort were observed for TP53 (31%), JAK2 (23%) and DNMT3A (18%). The molecular mutation patterns in the del(5q) cohorts were different between the entities but resembled known patterns of cohorts not selected for del(5q). Further, TP53 mutations were significantly more frequent in cases with a larger deletion size (P = 0.003). The results suggest a correlation of large del(5q) with TP53 mutations and with additional chromosomal aberrations possibly contributing to more severe courses of these cases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218649

  9. A Novel WRN Frameshift Mutation Identified by Multiplex Genetic Testing in a Family with Multiple Cases of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Guosheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Ye, Song; Shen, Peng; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology allows simultaneous analysis of multiple susceptibility genes for clinical cancer genetics. In this study, multiplex genetic testing was conducted in a Chinese family with multiple cases of cancer to determine the variations in cancer predisposition genes. The family comprises a mother and her five daughters, of whom the mother and the eldest daughter have cancer and the secondary daughter died of cancer. We conducted multiplex genetic testing of 90 cancer susceptibility genes using the peripheral blood DNA of the mother and all five daughters. WRN frameshift mutation is considered a potential pathogenic variation according to the guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics. A novel WRN frameshift mutation (p.N1370Tfs*23) was identified in the three cancer patients and in the youngest unaffected daughter. Other rare non-synonymous germline mutations were also detected in DICER and ELAC2. Functional mutations in WRN cause Werner syndrome, a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging and associated with genetic instability and increased cancer risk. Our results suggest that the WRN frameshift mutation is important in the surveillance of other members of this family, especially the youngest daughter, but the pathogenicity of the novel WRN frameshift mutation needs to be investigated further. Given its extensive use in clinical genetic screening, multiplex genetic testing is a promising tool in clinical cancer surveillance.

  10. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality. PMID:27450674

  11. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality.

  12. ‘My funky genetics’: BRCA1/2 mutation carriers’ understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new repro-genetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid transmitting a BRCA1/2 mutation to a child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child’s inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. METHOD 39 female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and post-test assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. FINDINGS Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically-related children, yet stated their genetically ‘well’ partner’s lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically ‘well’ partners’ participation in family planning and risk management decisions. DISCUSSION Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to they ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision making. PMID:22709328

  13. Laboratory and Genetic Investigation of Mutations Accounting for Congenital Fibrinogen Disorders.

    PubMed

    Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; de Moerloose, Philippe; Casini, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Congenital fibrinogen disorders are classified into two types of plasma fibrinogen defects: type I (quantitative fibrinogen deficiencies), that is, hypofibrinogenemia or afibrinogenemia, in which there are low or absent plasma fibrinogen antigen levels, respectively, and type II (qualitative fibrinogen deficiencies), that is, dysfibrinogenemia or hypodysfibrinogenemia, in which there are normal or reduced antigen levels associated with disproportionately low functional activity. These disorders are caused by mutations in the three fibrinogen-encoding genes FGA, FGB, and FGG. Afibrinogenemia is associated with mild to severe bleeding, whereas hypofibrinogenemia is often asymptomatic. For these quantitative disorders, the majority of mutations prevent protein production. However, in some cases, missense or late-truncating nonsense mutations allow synthesis of the mutant fibrinogen chain, but intracellular fibrinogen assembly and/or secretion are impaired. Qualitative fibrinogen disorders are associated with bleeding, thrombosis, or both thrombosis and bleeding, but many dysfibrinogenemias are asymptomatic. The majority of cases are caused by heterozygous missense mutations. Here, we review the laboratory and genetic diagnosis of fibrinogen gene anomalies with an updated discussion of causative mutations identified.

  14. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, Sam F; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Louis, Ard A

    2016-03-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps-a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure-to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  15. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Louis, Ard A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps—a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure—to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  16. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (embryo screening) for enlarged vestibular aqueduct due to SLC26A4 mutation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Shin-Yu; Su, Yi-Nin; Fang, Mei-Ya; Chen, Shee-Uan; Hsu, Chuan-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is used to analyze embryos genetically before their transfer into the uterus. For families with genetic diseases, PGD offers a chance to have an unaffected child, without facing termination of pregnancy. Although PGD has been performed for many monogenic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis and beta-thalassemia, the application of PGD to hereditary hearing impairment has not been explored. In the present study, we reported the development and application of PGD protocols to address enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA), which is a common type of hereditary hearing impairment associated with mutations in the SLC26A4 gene. The family requesting PGD had a history of EVA, segregating the SLC26A4 c.919-2A-->G mutation. In short, the PGD process was composed of two steps: the development of a single-cell testing protocol and clinical PGD cycles (i.e., selection and implantation of unaffected embryos using the single-cell testing protocol). First, protocols for genetic testing in a single cell were established for the c.919-2A-->G mutation using GenomiPhi technology and primer extension mini-sequencing. These protocols were validated on single lymphocytes collected from both parents and their affected child. Two clinical PGD cycles were then performed for the parents, with the second cycle successfully leading to a singleton pregnancy. The baby was homozygous for the wild-type SLC26A4 allele and revealed a normal audiological phenotype after birth. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature describing successful PGD in families with genetic hearing impairment. In our opinion, the application of PGD in the field of hereditary hearing impairment involves fewer ethical controversies than other novel applications of PGD and traditional indications for PGD for other monogenic diseases. Therefore, the approach demonstrated in the present study can also be used in a large number of families with other types of hereditary

  17. Identification of genetic mutations in Japanese patients with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Kikawa, Y; Inuzuka, M; Jin, B Y; Kaji, S; Koga, J; Yamamoto, Y; Fujisawa, K; Hata, I; Nakai, A; Shigematsu, Y; Mizunuma, H; Taketo, A; Mayumi, M; Sudo, M

    1997-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) deficiency is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder and may cause sudden unexpected infant death. We reported the first case of molecular diagnosis of FBPase deficiency, using cultured monocytes as a source for FBPase mRNA. In the present study, we confirmed the presence of the same genetic mutation in this patient by amplifying genomic DNA. Molecular analysis was also performed to diagnose another 12 Japanese patients with FBPase deficiency. Four mutations responsible for FBPase deficiency were identified in 10 patients from 8 unrelated families among a total of 13 patients from 11 unrelated families; no mutation was found in the remaining 3 patients from 3 unrelated families. The identified mutations included the mutation reported earlier, with an insertion of one G residue at base 961 in exon 7 (960/961insG) (10 alleles, including 2 alleles in the Japanese family from our previous report [46% of the 22 mutant alleles]), and three novel mutations--a G-->A transition at base 490 in exon 4 (G164S) (3 alleles [14%]), a C-->A transversion at base 530 in exon 4 (A177D) (1 allele [4%]), and a G-->T transversion at base 88 in exon 1 (E30X) (2 alleles [9%]). FBPase proteins with G164S or A177D mutations were enzymatically inactive when purified from E. coli. Another new mutation, a T-->C transition at base 974 in exon 7 (V325A), was found in the same allele with the G164S mutation in one family (one allele) but was not responsible for FBPase deficiency. Our results indicate that the insertion of one G residue at base 961 was associated with a preferential disease-causing alternation in 13 Japanese patients. Our results also indicate accurate carrier detection in eight families (73%) of 11 Japanese patients with FBPase deficiency, in whom mutations in both alleles were identified. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9382095

  18. Mutation-Based Learning to Improve Student Autonomy and Scientific Inquiry Skills in a Large Genetics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jinlu

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory education can play a vital role in developing a learner's autonomy and scientific inquiry skills. In an innovative, mutation-based learning (MBL) approach, students were instructed to redesign a teacher-designed standard experimental protocol by a "mutation" method in a molecular genetics laboratory course. Students could…

  19. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  20. Mutational analysis of the human mitochondrial genome branches into the realm of bacterial genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, N.

    1996-10-01

    This is shaping up as a vintage year for studies of the genetics and evolution of the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). In a theoretical and experimental tour de force, Shenkar et al. (1996), on pages 772-780 of this issue, derive the mutation rate of the 4,977-bp (or {open_quotes}common{close_quotes}) deletion in the human mtDNA through refinement and extension of fluctuation analysis, a technique that was first used >50 years ago. Shenkar et al., in essence, have solved or bypassed many of the difficulties that are inherent in the application of fluctuation analysis to human mitochondrial gene mutations. Their study is important for two principal reasons. In the first place, high levels of this deletion cause a variety of pathological disorders, including Kearns-Sayre syndrome and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Their current report, therefore, is a major step in the elucidation of the molecular genetic pathogenesis of this group of mitochondrial disorders. For example, it now may be feasible to analyze the effects of selection on transmission and segregation of this deletion and, perhaps, other mtDNA mutations as well. Second, and at a broader level, the approach of Shenkar et al. should find widespread applicability to the study of other mtDNA mutations. It has been recognized for several years that mammalian mtDNA mutates much more rapidly than nuclear DNA, a phenomenon with potentially profound evolutionary implications. It is exciting and useful, both experimentally and theoretically, that this {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} approach can be used for {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} applications. 56 refs.

  1. Mild CFTR mutations and genetic predisposition to lactase persistence in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mądry, Edyta; Fidler, Ewa; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Krzyżanowska, Patrycja; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Minarowski, Łukasz; Oralewska, Beata; Mojs, Ewa; Sapiejka, Ewa; Marciniak, Ryszard; Sands, Dorota; Korzon-Burakowska, Anna; Kwiecień, Jarosław; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2011-07-01

    Taking into account the reported incidence of hypolactasia in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the possible impact of milk products on nutritional status we aimed to assess the genetic predisposition to adult-type hypolactasia (ATH) and its incidence in CF. Single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) was assessed in 289 CF patients. In subject with -13910C/C genotype (C/C) predisposing to ATH, hydrogen-methane breath test (BT) with lactose loading was conducted and clinical symptoms typical for lactose malabsorption were assessed. The percentage of CF patients with C/C was similar to that observed in healthy subjects (HS) (31.5 vs 32.5% ). Eleven out of 52 (24.5%) CF C/C patients had abnormal BT results. The recalculated frequency of lactose malabsorption was similar for the entire CF and HS populations (6.9 vs 7.2%). Similarly as in the control group, few CF patients have identified and linked to lactose consumption clinical symptoms. The frequency of LCT polymorphic variants in CF patients having and not having severe mutations of CFTR gene showed significant differences. The C allele was more frequent in homozygotes of the severe mutations than in patients carrying at least one mild/unknown mutation (P<0.0028) and in patients with at least one mild mutation (P < 0.0377). In conclusion, CF patients carrying mild CFTR mutations seem to have lower genetic predisposition to ATH. Lactose malabsorption due to ATH in CF is not more frequent than in the general population. Symptomatic assessment of lactose malabsorption in CF is not reliable.

  2. The Quality of Genetic Counseling and Connected Factors as Evaluated by Male BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kajula, Outi; Kääriäinen, Maria; Moilanen, Jukka S; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2016-06-01

    There is little written about the quality of genetic counseling for men with the BRCA1/2 mutation. The purpose of this study was to describe the quality of genetic counseling and connected factors according to Finnish male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers' (n = 35) perspectives and reasons for seeking genetic counseling. Data were collected from the Departments of Clinical Genetics at five Finnish university hospitals. The exploratory study design was conducted using a 51-item questionnaire based on a previously devised quality of counseling model and analyzed using non-parametric tests and principle content analysis. The satisfaction level with genetic counseling was high, especially with regard to the content of genetic counseling. The benefit of genetic counseling on the quality of life differed significantly (p < 0.001-0.009) from other factors. In particular, genetic counseling was in some cases associated to reduce the quality of life. Only 49 % of the male carriers felt they received sufficient counseling on social support. Attention to individual psychosocial support was proposed as an improvement to genetic counseling. Primary and secondary reasons for seeking genetic counseling and background information, such as education, affected the perceived quality of genetic counseling. The results of the study could be used to tailor genetic counseling for male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  3. The Evolution of Human Intelligence and the Coefficient of Additive Genetic Variance in Human Brain Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geoffrey F.; Penke, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Most theories of human mental evolution assume that selection favored higher intelligence and larger brains, which should have reduced genetic variance in both. However, adult human intelligence remains highly heritable, and is genetically correlated with brain size. This conflict might be resolved by estimating the coefficient of additive genetic…

  4. Mutation Is a Sufficient and Robust Predictor of Genetic Variation for Mitotic Spindle Traits in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Farhadifar, Reza; Ponciano, José Miguel; Andersen, Erik C; Needleman, Daniel J; Baer, Charles F

    2016-08-01

    Different types of phenotypic traits consistently exhibit different levels of genetic variation in natural populations. There are two potential explanations: Either mutation produces genetic variation at different rates or natural selection removes or promotes genetic variation at different rates. Whether mutation or selection is of greater general importance is a longstanding unresolved question in evolutionary genetics. We report mutational variances (VM) for 19 traits related to the first mitotic cell division in Caenorhabditis elegans and compare them to the standing genetic variances (VG) for the same suite of traits in a worldwide collection C. elegans Two robust conclusions emerge. First, the mutational process is highly repeatable: The correlation between VM in two independent sets of mutation accumulation lines is ∼0.9. Second, VM for a trait is a good predictor of VG for that trait: The correlation between VM and VG is ∼0.9. This result is predicted for a population at mutation-selection balance; it is not predicted if balancing selection plays a primary role in maintaining genetic variation. PMID:27334268

  5. Comprehensive genetic analysis and structural characterization of CYP21A2 mutations in CAH patients.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, B; Pereira, M; Marques, C J; Carvalho, D; Leão, M; Oliveira, J P; Barros, A; Carvalho, F

    2012-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). Complete DNA sequencing of CYP21A2 was performed in 5 patients, 3 non-classic and 2 classic forms of the disease, that were previously screened for the 10 most common mutations, in order to detect additional mutations that could justify the phenotype of the patients. 5 mutations were identified with the whole gene extended analysis. The mutations, p.Pro432Leu and p.Ala434Glu, the first previously reported by our group and the second a novel one were structurally analyzed with ICM-Pro software regarding biochemical properties such as protein stability, accessibility to surface and hydrophobicity, in order to elucidate their effects on the CYP21A2 protein. The 2 affected residues, Pro432 and Ala434, were also studied for conservation purposes in order to predict the severity of both mutations with PolyPhen-2 software and were considered as "probably damaging". Prediction of clinical severity, based on molecular modelling and sequence conservation, was in accordance with the patient's clinical diagnosis.

  6. Application of a New Genetic Deafness Microarray for Detecting Mutations in the Deaf in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Feng, Yong; Jiang, Lu; Pan, Qian; Liu, Yalan; Liu, Chang; He, Chufeng; Chen, Hongsheng; Liu, Xueming; Hu, Chang; Hu, Yiqiao; Mei, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the GoldenGate microarray as a diagnostic tool and to elucidate the contribution of the genes on this array to the development of both nonsyndromic and syndromic sensorineural hearing loss in China. Methods We developed a microarray to detect 240 mutations underlying syndromic and nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. The microarray was then used for analysis of 382 patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (including 15 patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome), 21 patients with Waardenburg syndrome, and 60 unrelated controls. Subsequently, we analyzed the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of this new approach after Sanger sequencing-based verification, and also determined the contribution of the genes on this array to the development of distinct hearing disorders. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the microarray chip were 98.73% and 98.34%, respectively. Genetic defects were identified in 61.26% of the patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss, and 9 causative genes were identified. The molecular etiology was confirmed in 19.05% and 46.67% of the patients with Waardenburg syndrome and enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, respectively. Conclusion Our new mutation-based microarray comprises an accurate and comprehensive genetic tool for the detection of sensorineural hearing loss. This microarray-based detection method could serve as a first-pass screening (before next-generation-sequencing screening) for deafness-causing mutations in China. PMID:27018795

  7. The million mutation project: A new approach to genetics in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Owen; Edgley, Mark; Strasbourger, Pnina; Flibotte, Stephane; Ewing, Brent; Adair, Ryan; Au, Vinci; Chaudhry, Iasha; Fernando, Lisa; Hutter, Harald; Kieffer, Armelle; Lau, Joanne; Lee, Norris; Miller, Angela; Raymant, Greta; Shen, Bin; Shendure, Jay; Taylor, Jon; Turner, Emily H.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Moerman, Donald G.; Waterston, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    We have created a library of 2007 mutagenized Caenorhabditis elegans strains, each sequenced to a target depth of 15-fold coverage, to provide the research community with mutant alleles for each of the worm's more than 20,000 genes. The library contains over 800,000 unique single nucleotide variants (SNVs) with an average of eight nonsynonymous changes per gene and more than 16,000 insertion/deletion (indel) and copy number changes, providing an unprecedented genetic resource for this multicellular organism. To supplement this collection, we also sequenced 40 wild isolates, identifying more than 630,000 unique SNVs and 220,000 indels. Comparison of the two sets demonstrates that the mutant collection has a much richer array of both nonsense and missense mutations than the wild isolate set. We also find a wide range of rDNA and telomere repeat copy number in both sets. Scanning the mutant collection for molecular phenotypes reveals a nonsense suppressor as well as strains with higher levels of indels that harbor mutations in DNA repair genes and strains with abundant males associated with him mutations. All the strains are available through the Caenorhabditis Genetics Center and all the sequence changes have been deposited in WormBase and are available through an interactive website. PMID:23800452

  8. Predictive genetic testing of first degree relatives of mutation carriers is a cost-effective strategy in preventing hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vivian Wei; Koh, Poh Koon; Chow, Wai Leng; Lim, Jeremy Fung Yen

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer in Singapore. We sought to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of targeted genetic testing and surveillance programs in individuals at high risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), as compared to an unselective clinical surveillance program alone in Singapore. A Markov model analysis from the healthcare service provider's perspective was developed to follow over a lifetime a cohort of cancer-free 21-year-old individuals, who were first-degree relatives of HNPCC patients with a known mutation. Genetic testing strategy provided a lifetime saving of Singapore dollars (SGD) 13,588 per person and gained additional life years of 0.01, as compared to clinical surveillance alone, by sparing non-mutation carriers from unnecessary and invasive intensive clinical surveillance (assuming 100% compliance with recommended surveillance programs in both strategies). Sensitivity analyses showed that as long as the compliance rate in mutation carriers was not lower than that for individuals without genetic testing, pursuing a genetic testing strategy would either be a more favorable option with discounted incremental cost-effectiveness ratios ranging from SGD 6,961 to 17,289 per life year gained or a dominant status achieved (more life year gained and less costly). Genetic testing for individuals at high risk of HNPCC allows targeted clinical surveillance to be directed at mutation carriers, ensuring efficient use of healthcare resources and reduces CRC-related mortality. It can be regarded as a cost-effective strategy in Singapore, if an improved compliance with recommended surveillance protocol is achieved in proven mutation carriers.

  9. Epistasis Is a Major Determinant of the Additive Genetic Variance in Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of genetic interactions (epistasis) on the genetic variance of quantitative traits is a major unresolved problem relevant to medical, agricultural, and evolutionary genetics. The additive genetic component is typically a high proportion of the total genetic variance in quantitative traits, despite that underlying genes must interact to determine phenotype. This study estimates direct and interaction effects for 11 pairs of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) affecting floral traits within a single population of Mimulus guttatus. With estimates of all 9 genotypes for each QTL pair, we are able to map from QTL effects to variance components as a function of population allele frequencies, and thus predict changes in variance components as allele frequencies change. This mapping requires an analytical framework that properly accounts for bias introduced by estimation errors. We find that even with abundant interactions between QTLs, most of the genetic variance is likely to be additive. However, the strong dependency of allelic average effects on genetic background implies that epistasis is a major determinant of the additive genetic variance, and thus, the population’s ability to respond to selection. PMID:25946702

  10. Genetic studies to characterize the origin of the mutation in placental aromatase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Hisamitsu; Yamada, Kazuyo ); Shozu, Makio )

    1992-09-01

    Placental aromatase deficiency has recently been shown to be due to expression of RNA transcripts encoding abnormal aromatase molecules with 29 extra amino acids. To establish whether this aromatase deficiency is a hereditary or sporadic disease, the authors examined the genetic defect of the aromatase gene in the family of a patient. Direct sequencing of fragments of the aromatase gene prepared by PCR revealed that the splicing donor sequence (GT) of intron 6 in controls was mutated to GC in the patient, whereas the parents showed signals of both GT and GC. Subcloning of PCR products of the parents gave two different types of clones with GT and GC sequences in this site. Futhermore, for diagnosis of this deficiency, competitive-oligonucleotide-priming PCR of genomic DNA was performed in the presence of both normal and mutational oligonucleotide primers labeled with two kinds of fluorescent dyes, and the products were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and were detected fluorometrically in the gel. Genomic DNA of the patient gave a PCR product primed only by the mutational primer, whereas that of controls gave a product primed only by the normal primer. The PCR products of the parents were primed by both primers. The results obtained by this fluorometric method were also confirmed by differential hybridizations with specific oligonucleotide probes. Thus these findings indicate that this deficiency is an autosomal hereditary disease and that the patient is a homozygote, while the parents are heterozygotes, for this mutation. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  11. On the Probability of Random Genetic Mutations for Various Types of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we consider the problem of estimating the probability for a specific random genetic mutation to be present in a tumor of a given size. Previous mathematical models have been based on stochastic methods where the tumor was assumed to be homogeneous and, on average, growing exponentially. In contrast, we are able to obtain analytical results for cases where the exponential growth of cancer has been replaced by other, arguably more realistic types of growth of a heterogeneous tumor cell population. Our main result is that the probability that a given random mutation will be present by the time a tumor reaches a certain size, is independent of the type of curve assumed for the average growth of the tumor, at least for a general class of growth curves. The same is true for the related estimate of the expected number of mutants present in a tumor of a given size, if mutants are indeed present. PMID:22311065

  12. Neutral mutation as the source of genetic variation in life history traits.

    PubMed

    Brcić-Kostić, Krunoslav

    2005-08-01

    The mechanism underlying the maintenance of adaptive genetic variation is a long-standing question in evolutionary genetics. There are two concepts (mutation-selection balance and balancing selection) which are based on the phenotypic differences between alleles. Mutation - selection balance and balancing selection cannot properly explain the process of gene substitution, i.e. the molecular evolution of quantitative trait loci affecting fitness. I assume that such loci have non-essential functions (small effects on fitness), and that they have the potential to evolve into new functions and acquire new adaptations. Here I show that a high amount of neutral polymorphism at these loci can exist in real populations. Consistent with this, I propose a hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variation in life history traits which can be efficient for the fixation of alleles with very small selective advantage. The hypothesis is based on neutral polymorphism at quantitative trait loci and both neutral and adaptive gene substitutions. The model of neutral - adaptive conversion (NAC) assumes that neutral alleles are not neutral indefinitely, and that in specific and very rare situations phenotypic (relative fitness) differences between them can appear. In this paper I focus on NAC due to phenotypic plasticity of neutral alleles. The important evolutionary consequence of NAC could be the increased adaptive potential of a population. Loci responsible for adaptation should be fast evolving genes with minimally discernible phenotypic effects, and the recent discovery of genes with such characteristics implicates them as suitable candidates for loci involved in adaptation.

  13. A genetic screen for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis.

    PubMed Central

    Pultz, M A; Zimmerman, K K; Alto, N M; Kaeberlein, M; Lange, S K; Pitt, J N; Reeves, N L; Zehrung, D L

    2000-01-01

    We have screened for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera; Chalcidoidea). Our broad goal was to investigate the use of Nasonia for genetically surveying conservation and change in regulatory gene systems, as a means to understand the diversity of developmental strategies that have arisen during the course of evolution. Specifically, we aim to compare anteroposterior patterning gene functions in two long germ band insects, Nasonia and Drosophila. In Nasonia, unfertilized eggs develop as haploid males while fertilized eggs develop as diploid females, so the entire genome can be screened for recessive zygotic mutations by examining the progeny of F1 females. We describe 74 of >100 lines with embryonic cuticular mutant phenotypes, including representatives of coordinate, gap, pair-rule, segment polarity, homeotic, and Polycomb group functions, as well as mutants with novel phenotypes not directly comparable to those of known Drosophila genes. We conclude that Nasonia is a tractable experimental organism for comparative developmental genetic study. The mutants isolated here have begun to outline the extent of conservation and change in the genetic programs controlling embryonic patterning in Nasonia and Drosophila. PMID:10866651

  14. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies. PMID:27157324

  15. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies.

  16. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  17. Suppressors of a genetic regulatory mutation affecting isoleucine-valine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, J E; Calhoun, D H

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutant PS187 carries a mutation, ilvA538, in the structural gene for the biosynthetic L-threonine deaminase that leads to a leucine-sensitive growth phenotype, an isoleucine- and leucine-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and pleiotropic effects resulting in abnormally low and invariant expression of some of the isoleucine-valine biosynthetic enzymes. Fifty-eight derivatives of strain PS187 were isolated as resistant to growth inhibition by leucine, by valine, or by valine plus glycly-valine and were biochemically, genetically, and physiologically characterized. All of these derivatives produced the feedback-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and thus presumably possess the ilvA538 allele of the parent strain. Elevated synthesis of L-threonine deaminase was observed in 41 of the 58 isolates. Among 18 strains analyzed genetically, only those with mutations linked to the ilv gene clusters at 83 min produced elevated levels of L-threonine deaminase. One of the strains, MSR91, isolated as resistant to valine plus glycyl-valine, was chosen for more detailed study. The locus in strain MSR91 conferring resistance was located in four factor crosses between ilvE and rbs, and is in or near the ilvO gene postulated to be a site controlling the expression of the ilvEDA genes. Synthesis of the ilvEDA gene products in strain MSR91 is constitutive and derepressed approximately 200-fold relative to the parent strain, indicating that the genetic regulatory effects of the ilvA538 allele have been suppressed. Strain MSR91 should be suitable for use in purification of the ilvA538 gene product, since enzyme synthesis is fully derepressed and the suppressor mutation is clearly not located within the ilvA gene. PMID:361682

  18. Parametric and Nonparametric Statistical Methods for Genomic Selection of Traits with Additive and Epistatic Genetic Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Réka; Carriquiry, Alicia L.; Beavis, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Parametric and nonparametric methods have been developed for purposes of predicting phenotypes. These methods are based on retrospective analyses of empirical data consisting of genotypic and phenotypic scores. Recent reports have indicated that parametric methods are unable to predict phenotypes of traits with known epistatic genetic architectures. Herein, we review parametric methods including least squares regression, ridge regression, Bayesian ridge regression, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), Bayesian LASSO, best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP), Bayes A, Bayes B, Bayes C, and Bayes Cπ. We also review nonparametric methods including Nadaraya-Watson estimator, reproducing kernel Hilbert space, support vector machine regression, and neural networks. We assess the relative merits of these 14 methods in terms of accuracy and mean squared error (MSE) using simulated genetic architectures consisting of completely additive or two-way epistatic interactions in an F2 population derived from crosses of inbred lines. Each simulated genetic architecture explained either 30% or 70% of the phenotypic variability. The greatest impact on estimates of accuracy and MSE was due to genetic architecture. Parametric methods were unable to predict phenotypic values when the underlying genetic architecture was based entirely on epistasis. Parametric methods were slightly better than nonparametric methods for additive genetic architectures. Distinctions among parametric methods for additive genetic architectures were incremental. Heritability, i.e., proportion of phenotypic variability, had the second greatest impact on estimates of accuracy and MSE. PMID:24727289

  19. De novo mutations in schizophrenia implicate chromatin remodeling and support a genetic overlap with autism and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, S E; Gillis, J; Kramer, M; Lihm, J; Yoon, S; Berstein, Y; Mistry, M; Pavlidis, P; Solomon, R; Ghiban, E; Antoniou, E; Kelleher, E; O'Brien, C; Donohoe, G; Gill, M; Morris, D W; McCombie, W R; Corvin, A

    2014-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric disorder with a broadly undiscovered genetic etiology. Recent studies of de novo mutations (DNMs) in schizophrenia and autism have reinforced the hypothesis that rare genetic variation contributes to risk. We carried out exome sequencing on 57 trios with sporadic or familial schizophrenia. In sporadic trios, we observed a ~3.5-fold increase in the proportion of nonsense DNMs (0.101 vs 0.031, empirical P=0.01, Benjamini-Hochberg-corrected P=0.044). These mutations were significantly more likely to occur in genes with highly ranked probabilities of haploinsufficiency (P=0.0029, corrected P=0.006). DNMs of potential functional consequence were also found to occur in genes predicted to be less tolerant to rare variation (P=2.01 × 10(-)(5), corrected P=2.1 × 10(-)(3)). Genes with DNMs overlapped with genes implicated in autism (for example, AUTS2, CHD8 and MECP2) and intellectual disability (for example, HUWE1 and TRAPPC9), supporting a shared genetic etiology between these disorders. Functionally CHD8, MECP2 and HUWE1 converge on epigenetic regulation of transcription suggesting that this may be an important risk mechanism. Our results were consistent in an analysis of additional exome-based sequencing studies of other neurodevelopmental disorders. These findings suggest that perturbations in genes, which function in the epigenetic regulation of brain development and cognition, could have a central role in the susceptibility to, pathogenesis and treatment of mental disorders. PMID:24776741

  20. 3D resistivity inversion using an improved Genetic Algorithm based on control method of mutation direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Li, S. C.; Nie, L. C.; Wang, J.; L, X.; Zhang, Q. S.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional inversion method is the most commonly used procedure for three-dimensional (3D) resistivity inversion, which usually takes the linearization of the problem and accomplish it by iterations. However, its accuracy is often dependent on the initial model, which can make the inversion trapped in local optima, even cause a bad result. Non-linear method is a feasible way to eliminate the dependence on the initial model. However, for large problems such as 3D resistivity inversion with inversion parameters exceeding a thousand, main challenges of non-linear method are premature and quite low search efficiency. To deal with these problems, we present an improved Genetic Algorithm (GA) method. In the improved GA method, smooth constraint and inequality constraint are both applied on the object function, by which the degree of non-uniqueness and ill-conditioning is decreased. Some measures are adopted from others by reference to maintain the diversity and stability of GA, e.g. real-coded method, and the adaptive adjustment of crossover and mutation probabilities. Then a generation method of approximately uniform initial population is proposed in this paper, with which uniformly distributed initial generation can be produced and the dependence on initial model can be eliminated. Further, a mutation direction control method is presented based on the joint algorithm, in which the linearization method is embedded in GA. The update vector produced by linearization method is used as mutation increment to maintain a better search direction compared with the traditional GA with non-controlled mutation operation. By this method, the mutation direction is optimized and the search efficiency is improved greatly. The performance of improved GA is evaluated by comparing with traditional inversion results in synthetic example or with drilling columnar sections in practical example. The synthetic and practical examples illustrate that with the improved GA method we can eliminate

  1. Dew inspired breathing-based detection of genetic point mutation visualized by naked eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liping; Wang, Tongzhou; Huang, Tianqi; Hou, Wei; Huang, Guoliang; Du, Yanan

    2014-09-01

    A novel label-free method based on breathing-induced vapor condensation was developed for detection of genetic point mutation. The dew-inspired detection was realized by integration of target-induced DNA ligation with rolling circle amplification (RCA). The vapor condensation induced by breathing transduced the RCA-amplified variances in DNA contents into visible contrast. The image could be recorded by a cell phone for further or even remote analysis. This green assay offers a naked-eye-reading method potentially applied for point-of-care liver cancer diagnosis in resource-limited regions.

  2. Estimation of Additive, Dominance, and Imprinting Genetic Variance Using Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marcos S.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Janss, Luc; Knol, Egbert F.; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, exploration of genetic variance in humans, plants, and livestock species has been limited mostly to the use of additive effects estimated using pedigree data. However, with the development of dense panels of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the exploration of genetic variation of complex traits is moving from quantifying the resemblance between family members to the dissection of genetic variation at individual loci. With SNPs, we were able to quantify the contribution of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance to the total genetic variance by using a SNP regression method. The method was validated in simulated data and applied to three traits (number of teats, backfat, and lifetime daily gain) in three purebred pig populations. In simulated data, the estimates of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance were very close to the simulated values. In real data, dominance effects account for a substantial proportion of the total genetic variance (up to 44%) for these traits in these populations. The contribution of imprinting to the total phenotypic variance of the evaluated traits was relatively small (1–3%). Our results indicate a strong relationship between additive variance explained per chromosome and chromosome length, which has been described previously for other traits in other species. We also show that a similar linear relationship exists for dominance and imprinting variance. These novel results improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of the evaluated traits and shows promise to apply the SNP regression method to other traits and species, including human diseases. PMID:26438289

  3. The contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation: heritability of personality.

    PubMed

    Dochtermann, Ned A; Schwab, Tori; Sih, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Individual animals frequently exhibit repeatable differences from other members of their population, differences now commonly referred to as 'animal personality'. Personality differences can arise, for example, from differences in permanent environmental effects--including parental and epigenetic contributors--and the effect of additive genetic variation. Although several studies have evaluated the heritability of behaviour, less is known about general patterns of heritability and additive genetic variation in animal personality. As overall variation in behaviour includes both the among-individual differences that reflect different personalities and temporary environmental effects, it is possible for personality to be largely genetically influenced even when heritability of behaviour per se is quite low. The relative contribution of additive genetic variation to personality variation can be estimated whenever both repeatability and heritability are estimated for the same data. Using published estimates to address this issue, we found that approximately 52% of animal personality variation was attributable to additive genetic variation. Thus, while the heritability of behaviour is often moderate or low, the heritability of personality is much higher. Our results therefore (i) demonstrate that genetic differences are likely to be a major contributor to variation in animal personality and (ii) support the phenotypic gambit: that evolutionary inferences drawn from repeatability estimates may often be justified.

  4. Expression of Drosophila mushroom body mutations in alternative genetic backgrounds: a case study of the mushroom body miniature gene (mbm).

    PubMed Central

    de Belle, J S; Heisenberg, M

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in 12 genes regulating Drosophila melanogaster mushroom body (MB) development were each studied in two genetic backgrounds. In all cases, brain structure was qualitatively or quantitatively different after replacement of the "original" genetic background with that of the Canton Special wild-type strain. The mushroom body miniature gene (mbm) was investigated in detail. mbm supports the maintenance of MB Kenyon cell fibers in third instar larvae and their regrowth during metamorphosis. Adult mbm1 mutant females are lacking many or most Kenyon cell fibers and are impaired in MB-mediated associative odor learning. We show here that structural defects in mbm1 are apparent only in combination with an X-linked, dosage-dependent modifier (or modifiers). In the Canton Special genetic background, the mbm1 anatomical phenotype is suppressed, and MBs develop to a normal size. However, the olfactory learning phenotype is not fully restored, suggesting that submicroscopic defects persist in the MBs. Mutant mbm1 flies with full-sized MBs have normal retention but show a specific acquisition deficit that cannot be attributed to reductions in odor avoidance, shock reactivity, or locomotor behavior. We propose that polymorphic gene interactions (in addition to ontogenetic factors) determine MB size and, concomitantly, the ability to recognize and learn odors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8790424

  5. Schema theory for genetic programming with one-point crossover and point mutation.

    PubMed

    Poli, R; Langdon, W B

    1998-01-01

    We review the main results obtained in the theory of schemata in genetic programming (GP), emphasizing their strengths and weaknesses. Then we propose a new, simpler definition of the concept of schema for GP, which is closer to the original concept of schema in genetic algorithms (GAs). Along with a new form of crossover, one-point crossover, and point mutation, this concept of schema has been used to derive an improved schema theorem for GP that describes the propagation of schemata from one generation to the next. We discuss this result and show that our schema theorem is the natural counterpart for GP of the schema theorem for GAs, to which it asymptotically converges.

  6. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  7. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  8. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  9. Additive and nonadditive genetic variances for milk yield, fertility, and lifetime performance traits of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, C; Sölkner, J

    1994-04-01

    Additive and nonadditive genetic variances were estimated for yield traits and fertility for three subsequent lactations and for lifetime performance traits of purebred and crossbred dairy cattle populations. Traits were milk yield, energy-corrected milk yield, fat percentage, protein percentage, calving interval, length of productive life, and lifetime FCM of purebred Simmental, Simmental including crossbreds, and Braunvieh crossed with Brown Swiss. Data files ranged from 66,740 to 375,093 records. An approach based on pedigree information for sire and maternal grandsire was used and included additive, dominance, and additive by additive genetic effects. Variances were estimated using the tildehat approximation to REML. Heritability estimated without nonadditive effects in the model was overestimated, particularly in presence of additive by additive variance. Dominance variance was important for most traits; for the lifetime performance traits, dominance was clearly higher than additive variance. Additive by additive variance was very high for milk yield and energy-corrected milk yield, especially for data including crossbreds. Effect of inbreeding was low in most cases. Inclusion of nonadditive effects in genetic evaluation models might improve estimation of additive effects and may require consideration for dairy cattle breeding programs.

  10. Mutation analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: evidence for hotspots of genetic change.

    PubMed

    Kurath, G; Dodds, J A

    1995-07-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations. PMID:7489510

  11. Mutation analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: evidence for hotspots of genetic change.

    PubMed

    Kurath, G; Dodds, J A

    1995-07-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations.

  12. Identification of the promoter region and genetic mutations of the porcine GALP gene.

    PubMed

    Su, Lina; Mei, Shuqi; Tao, Hu; Peng, Xianwen; Sun, Xiaojie; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Xuying; Qiao, Mu; Li, Fenge

    2013-04-01

    Galanin-like peptide (GALP) gene, encoding a member of the galanin family of neuropeptides involved in reproduction, was differentially expressed in PMSG-hCG stimulated pre-ovulatory ovarian follicles of Chinese Taihu and Large White sows in our previous study. In the present study, promoter region and genetic mutations of the porcine GALP gene were determined. A 1,322 bp contig in 5'-flanking region was predicted to contain 5 potential transcription promoters by Neural Network Promoter Prediction version 2.2. 5'-deletion expression in both CHO and hela cells showed that there were a negative regulatory element at -852 to -803 bp and a positive regulatory element at -1,318 to -1,269 bp. Comparative sequence analyses of Chinese Taihu and Large White GALP gene sequence revealed the c.*27C>G mutation in the 3'-UTR and the c.88-1225C>G mutation in intron 1, which can be detected by HhaI and AluI PCR-RFLP, respectively. The association analysis with litter size traits showed that at both loci CC and GG genotypes were different for NBA for all parities in DIV pigs (P < 0.05). However, two SNPs were not in significant linkage disequilibrium analyzed using SHEsis online software, and could be used in pig breeding individually.

  13. Clinical implications of genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Austria.

    PubMed

    Singer, C F; Muhr, D; Rappaport, C; Tea, M-K; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D; Fink-Retter, A; Pfeiler, G; Berger, A; Sun, P; Narod, S A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the experience of genetic testing in Austrian women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in terms of preventive measures taken and incident cancers diagnosed. We collected clinical information on 246 Austrian women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation tested between 1995 and 2012 and followed 182 of them for an average of 6.5 years. Of the 90 women who were cancer-free at baseline, 21.4% underwent preventive bilateral mastectomy, 46.1% had preventive bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and 1 took tamoxifen; 58.8% of the at-risk women underwent at least one screening breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Of the 85 women with breast cancer, 69.4% had a unilateral mastectomy or lumpectomy and 30.6% had a contralateral mastectomy. In the follow-up period, 14 new invasive breast cancers (6 first primary and 8 contralateral), 1 ductal carcinoma in situ case, 2 incident ovarian cancer cases, and 1 peritoneal cancer were diagnosed. In Austria, the majority of healthy women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation opt for preventive oophorectomy and MRI screening to manage their breast cancer risk; few have preventive mastectomy or take tamoxifen.

  14. Genetics and Epigenetics of Glioblastoma: Applications and Overall Incidence of IDH1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aizhen; Hou, Chunfeng; Chen, Hongfang; Zong, Xuan; Zong, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most fatal brain cancer found in humans. Patients suffering from glioblastoma have a dismal prognosis, with a median survival of 15 months. The tumor may develop rapidly de novo in older patients or through progression from anaplastic astrocytomas in younger patients if glioblastoma is primary or secondary, respectively. During the past decade, significant advances have been made in the understanding of processes leading to glioblastoma, and several important genetic defects that appear to be important for the development and progression of this tumor have been identified. Particularly, the discovery of recurrent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene has shed new light on the molecular landscape in glioblastoma. Indeed, emerging research on the consequences of mutant IDH1 protein expression suggests that its neomorphic enzymatic activity catalyzing the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate influences a range of cellular programs that affect the epigenome and contribute to glioblastoma development. One of the exciting observations is the presence of IDH1 mutation in the vast majority of secondary glioblastoma, while it is almost absent in primary glioblastoma. Growing data indicate that this particular mutation has clinical and prognostic importance and will become a critical early distinction in diagnosis of glioblastoma. PMID:26858939

  15. Life insurance and genetic test results: a mutation carrier's fight to achieve full cover.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Louise A; Otlowski, Margaret F A

    2013-09-01

    Currently, there is debate about life insurance companies' use of genetic information for assessing applicants. In his early 20s, James (pseudonym) was denied full life insurance cover because he revealed that he had discussed genetic testing with a genetic counsellor. He was later tested and found to carry a mutation in the MSH6 gene; after disclosing this, he was denied cover for cancer by two other life insurance companies. Unsatisfied with the insurance companies' risk assessments, and based on his understanding that regular colonoscopy significantly reduced his risk of cancer, James made a complaint to the Australian Human Rights Commission. After informing the third insurance company that he had done so, he was offered full coverage, which suggests that the company did not have actuarial data to justify its decision. This case provides evidence of the high level of initiative and proactivity required for a consumer to achieve a fair result. Few Australians would be in a position to pursue the level of research and advocacy undertaken by James (a professional with scientific training). We call on a collaborative approach between industry, government and researchers to address the issues that James's case raises about genetic testing and life insurance.

  16. Arab genetic disease database (AGDDB): a population-specific clinical and mutation database.

    PubMed

    Teebi, Ahmad S; Teebi, Saeed A; Porter, Christopher J; Cuticchia, A Jamie

    2002-06-01

    Here we present the Arab Genetic Disease Database (AGDDB), a curated catalog of genetic disorders found in Arab populations. The first release of the database is populated primarily with information from the textbook Genetic Disorders Among Arab Populations [Teebi and Farag, 1997]. AGDDB is composed of data elements revolving around disorder reports. Other reports cover clinical, genomic, reference, and population frequency elements and their important attributes. The Arab Genetic Disease Consortium (30 investigators, 18 countries) is responsible for editing and reviewing AGDDB data. After initial indexing, AGDDB contains over 1,000 unique disorder entries. Entries are linked to their counterparts in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database; similar associations with relevant locus-specific and central mutation databases are planned. The database can be queried by keyword across all its fields, with more focused searches allowed. The database is freely available and may be accessed at www.agddb.org. The database serves as a robust prototype for cataloging variation and disorder information within a specific population. PMID:12007218

  17. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations and genetic background shape the fitness effect of resistance across species of Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Kojadinovic, M.; MacLean, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance often evolves by mutations at conserved sites in essential genes, resulting in parallel molecular evolution between divergent bacterial strains and species. Whether these resistance mutations are having parallel effects on fitness across bacterial taxa, however, is unclear. This is an important point to address, because the fitness effects of resistance mutations play a key role in the spread and maintenance of resistance in pathogen populations. We address this idea by measuring the fitness effect of a collection of rifampicin resistance mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) across eight strains that span the diversity of the genus Pseudomonas. We find that almost 50% of rpoB mutations have background-dependent fitness costs, demonstrating that epistatic interactions between rpoB and the rest of the genome are common. Moreover, epistasis is typically strong, and it is the dominant genetic determinant of the cost of resistance mutations. To investigate the functional basis of epistasis, and because rpoB plays a central role in transcription, we measured the effects of common rpoB mutations on transcriptional efficiency across three strains of Pseudomonas. Transcriptional efficiency correlates strongly to fitness across strains, and epistasis arises because individual rpoB mutations have differential effects on transcriptional efficiency in different genetic backgrounds. PMID:27170722

  18. The impact of reactive oxygen species and genetic mitochondrial mutations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li; Motherwell, Michael S

    2013-12-10

    The exact pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is still unknown and proper mechanisms that correspond to the disease remain unidentified. It is understood that PD is age-related; as age increases, the chance of onset responds accordingly. Although there are no current means of curing PD, the understanding of reactive oxygen species (ROS) provides significant insight to possible treatments. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neural apoptosis generation in PD. Dopaminergic neurons are severely damaged as a result of the deficiency. Symptoms such as inhibited cognitive ability and loss of smooth motor function are the results of such impairment. The genetic mutations of Parkinson's related proteins such as PINK1 and LRRK2 contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction which precedes ROS formation. Various pathways are inhibited by these mutations, and inevitably causing neural cell damage. Antioxidants are known to negate the damaging effects of free radical overexpression. This paper expands on the specific impact of mitochondrial genetic change and production of free radicals as well as its correlation to the neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease.

  19. Mutation extraction tools can be combined for robust recognition of genetic variants in the literature.

    PubMed

    Jimeno Yepes, Antonio; Verspoor, Karin

    2014-01-01

    As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the amount of data being collected and studied for the purpose of understanding the genetic basis of disease is increasing dramatically. Much of the source information relevant to such efforts is available only from unstructured sources such as the scientific literature, and significant resources are expended in manually curating and structuring the information in the literature. As such, there have been a number of systems developed to target automatic extraction of mutations and other genetic variation from the literature using text mining tools. We have performed a broad survey of the existing publicly available tools for extraction of genetic variants from the scientific literature. We consider not just one tool but a number of different tools, individually and in combination, and apply the tools in two scenarios. First, they are compared in an intrinsic evaluation context, where the tools are tested for their ability to identify specific mentions of genetic variants in a corpus of manually annotated papers, the Variome corpus. Second, they are compared in an extrinsic evaluation context based on our previous study of text mining support for curation of the COSMIC and InSiGHT databases. Our results demonstrate that no single tool covers the full range of genetic variants mentioned in the literature. Rather, several tools have complementary coverage and can be used together effectively. In the intrinsic evaluation on the Variome corpus, the combined performance is above 0.95 in F-measure, while in the extrinsic evaluation the combined recall performance is above 0.71 for COSMIC and above 0.62 for InSiGHT, a substantial improvement over the performance of any individual tool. Based on the analysis of these results, we suggest several directions for the improvement of text mining tools for genetic variant extraction from the literature. PMID:25285203

  20. Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH): clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Saqib; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad J

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH) is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7) for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL) identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1) orientation of mitotic spindles, 2) chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3) DNA damage-response signaling, 4) transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5) certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder. PMID:21668957

  1. Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia due to Mutations in an Armadillo Repeat Containing 5 (ARMC5) Gene: A Clinical and Genetic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lodish, Maya B.; Szarek, Eva; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Sinaii, Ninet; Berthon, Annabel; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Context: Inactivating germline mutations of the probable tumor suppressor gene, armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5), have recently been identified as a genetic cause of macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (MAH). Objective: We searched for ARMC5 mutations in a large cohort of patients with MAH. The clinical phenotype of patients with and without ARMC5 mutations was compared. Methods: Blood DNA from 34 MAH patients was genotyped using Sanger sequencing. Diurnal serum cortisol measurements, plasma ACTH levels, urinary steroids, 6-day Liddle's test, adrenal computed tomography, and weight of adrenal glands at adrenalectomy were assessed. Results: Germline ARMC5 mutations were found in 15 of 34 patients (44.1%). In silico analysis of the mutations indicated that seven (20.6%) predicted major implications for gene function. Late-night cortisol levels were higher in patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations compared with those without and/or with nonpathogenic mutations (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 6.7 ± 4.3, P < .001). All patients carrying a pathogenic ARMC5 mutation had clinical Cushing's syndrome (seven of seven, 100%) compared with 14 of 27 (52%) of those without or with mutations that were predicted to be benign (P = .029). Repeated-measures analysis showed overall higher urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroids and free cortisol values in the patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations during the 6-day Liddle's test (P = .0002). Conclusions: ARMC5 mutations are implicated in clinically severe Cushing's syndrome associated with MAH. Knowledge of a patient's ARMC5 status has important clinical implications for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome and genetic counseling of patients and their families. PMID:24601692

  2. Age-specific Parkinson disease risk in GBA mutation carriers: information for genetic counseling

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Huma Q.; Balwani, Manisha; Bier, Louise; Alcalay, Roy N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We sought to estimate age-specific risk of Parkinson disease in relatives of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligate carriers of GBA mutations and who were not ascertained by family history of Parkinson disease. Methods A validated family history of Parkinson disease questionnaire was administered to 119 patients with Gaucher disease who were evaluated at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine from 2009 to 2012; the ages of their parents, siblings, and children, history of Parkinson disease, age at onset of Parkinson disease, and ethnic background were obtained. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to estimate age-specific Parkinson disease penetrance among parents of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligatory GBA mutation carriers. Results Two participants with Gaucher disease were affected by Parkinson disease (5.4% of those who were 60 years or older). Of the 224 informative parents of patients with Gaucher disease, 11 had Parkinson disease (4.9%). Among the parents (obligatory carriers), cumulative risk of Parkinson disease by ages 65 and 85 was estimated to be 2.2% ±2.1% and 10.9% ±7.2%, respectively. Conclusion We provide useful age-specific estimates of Parkinson disease penetrance in patients with Gaucher disease and GBA heterozygous carriers for genetic counseling. Although GBA mutations may increase the risk for PD, the vast majority of patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygotes may not develop the disease. Further studies are needed to identify what modifies the risk of Parkinson disease in GBA mutation carriers. PMID:22935721

  3. Sensitivity of the distribution of mutational fitness effects to environment, genetic background, and adaptedness: a case study with Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alethea D; Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2014-03-01

    Heterogeneity in the fitness effects of individual mutations has been found across different environmental and genetic contexts. Going beyond effects on individual mutations, how is the distribution of selective effects, f(s), altered by changes in genetic and environmental context? In this study, we examined changes in the major features of f(s) by estimating viability selection on 36 individual mutations in Drosophila melanogaster across two different environments in two different genetic backgrounds that were either adapted or nonadapted to the two test environments. Both environment and genetic background affected selection on individual mutations. However, the overall distribution f(s) appeared robust to changes in genetic background but both the mean, E(s), and the variance, V(s) were dependent on the environment. Between these two properties, V(s) was more sensitive to environmental change. Contrary to predictions of fitness landscape theory, the match between genetic background and assay environment (i.e., adaptedness) had little effect on f(s).

  4. Genetic analysis of suppressors of the PF10 mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, S.K.; Gibbons, W.; Inwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    A mutation at the PF10 locus of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to abnormal cell motility. The asymmetric form of the ciliary beat stroke characteristic of wild-type flagella is modified by this mutation to a nearly symmetric beat. We report here that this abnormal motility is a conditional phenotype that depends on light intensity. In the absence of light or under low light intensities, the motility is more severely impaired than at higher light intensities. By UV mutagenesis we obtained 11 intragenic and 70 extragenic strains that show reversion of the pf10 motility phenotype observed in low light. The intragenic events reverted the motility phenotype of the pf10 mutation completely. The extragenic events define at least seven suppressor loci; these map to linkage groups IV, VII, IX, XI, XII and XVII. Suppressor mutations at two of the seven loci (LIS1 and LIS2) require light for their suppressor activity. Forty-eight of the 70 extragenic suppressors were examined in heterozygous diploid cells; 47 of these mutants were recessive to the wild-type allele and one mutant (bop5-1) was dominant to the wild-type allele. Complementation analysis of the 47 recessive mutants showed unusual patterns. Most mutants within a recombinationally defined group failed to complement one another, although there were pairs that showed intra-allelic complementation. Additionally, some of the mutants at each recombinationally defined locus failed to complement mutants at other loci. They define dominant enhancers of one another.

  5. Prevalence and Type of BRCA Mutations in Hispanics Undergoing Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment in the Southwestern United States: A Report From the Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Clague, Jessica; Martir-Negron, Arelis; Ogaz, Raquel; Herzog, Josef; Ricker, Charité; Jungbluth, Chelsy; Cina, Cheryl; Duncan, Paul; Unzeitig, Gary; Saldivar, J. Salvador; Beattie, Mary; Feldman, Nancy; Sand, Sharon; Port, Danielle; Barragan, Deborah I.; John, Esther M.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Larson, Garrett P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and type of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations among Hispanics in the Southwestern United States and their potential impact on genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). Patients and Methods Hispanics (n = 746) with a personal or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were enrolled in an institutional review board–approved registry and received GCRA and BRCA testing within a consortium of 14 clinics. Population-based Hispanic breast cancer cases (n = 492) enrolled in the Northern California Breast Cancer Family Registry, negative by sequencing for BRCA mutations, were analyzed for the presence of the BRCA1 ex9-12del large rearrangement. Results Deleterious BRCA mutations were detected in 189 (25%) of 746 familial clinic patients (124 BRCA1, 65 BRCA2); 21 (11%) of 189 were large rearrangement mutations, of which 62% (13 of 21) were BRCA1 ex9-12del. Nine recurrent mutations accounted for 53% of the total. Among these, BRCA1 ex9-12del seems to be a Mexican founder mutation and represents 10% to 12% of all BRCA1 mutations in clinic- and population-based cohorts in the United States. Conclusion BRCA mutations were prevalent in the largest study of Hispanic breast and/or ovarian cancer families in the United States to date, and a significant proportion were large rearrangement mutations. The high frequency of large rearrangement mutations warrants screening in every case. We document the first Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del), which, along with other recurrent mutations, suggests the potential for a cost-effective panel approach to ancestry-informed GCRA. PMID:23233716

  6. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  7. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  8. Genetic analysis and functional characterization of novel mutations in a series of patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Szarvas, Nóra; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Csuka, Dorottya; Takács, Beáta; Rusai, Krisztina; Müller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Réti, Marienn; Haris, Ágnes; Wagner, László; Török, Szilárd; Kelen, Kata; Szabó, Attila J; Reusz, György S; Morgan, B Paul; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2016-03-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disorder caused by dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway, and associated with mutations in genes of complement components and regulators. In the recent years several studies have been published describing these mutations, however, no data is available from the Central and Eastern European region. In this study we present a detailed genetic analysis of our 30 patients, hospitalized with the diagnosis of aHUS in the past 7 years. We analyzed the genetic variants of genes CFH, CFI, CD46, THBD, CFB and C3; furthermore the possible effect of mutations that may alter the function or level of factor H protein was also investigated. We identified 27 (12 novel and 15 previously described) potentially disease-causing mutations in the candidate genes in 23 patients. Genetic analysis of family members revealed that in most cases the disease develops in individuals with multiple genetic risk factors, which may explain the low penetrance of the mutations. Here we showed that two novel mutations (p.W198R, p.P1161T) and a previously reported one (p.R1215Q) in CFH caused impaired regulation as indicated by increased lysis in hemolytic test, while four CFH mutations (p.V609D, p.S722X, p.T1216del and p.C448Y) were associated with decreased factor H protein level in serum as determined by allele-specific immunoassay. These results further point to the necessity of complete genetic workup of patients with aHUS and to the importance of functional characterization of novel variations. PMID:26826462

  9. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  10. PGD for cystic fibrosis patients and couples at risk of an additional genetic disorder combined with 24-chromosome aneuploidy testing.

    PubMed

    Rechitsky, Svetlana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Kuliev, Anver

    2013-05-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for inherited disorders is presently applied for more than 300 different conditions. The most frequent PGD indication is cystic fibrosis (CF), the largest series of which is reviewed here, totalling 404 PGD cycles. This involved testing for 52 different CFTR mutations with almost half of the cases (195/404 cycles) performed for ΔF508 mutation, one-quarter (103/404 cycles) for six other frequent mutations and only a few for the remaining 45 CFTR mutations. There were 44 PGD cycles performed for 25 CF-affected homozygous or double-heterozygous CF patients (18 male and seven female partners), which involved testing simultaneously for three mutations, resulting in birth of 13 healthy CF-free children and no misdiagnosis. PGD was also performed for six couples at a combined risk of producing offspring with CF and another genetic disorder. Concomitant testing for CFTR and other mutations resulted in birth of six healthy children, free of both CF and another genetic disorder in all but one cycle. A total of 96 PGD cycles for CF were performed with simultaneous aneuploidy testing, including microarray-based 24-chromosome analysis, as a comprehensive PGD for two or more conditions in the same biopsy material.

  11. A specific superoxide dismutase mutation is on the same genetic background in sporadic and familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, C.; Brock, D.J.H.; Swingler, R.J.

    1996-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disease of motor neurons, causing progressive muscular atrophy, weakness, and death from respiratory failure, often within 2-3 years. Although most cases are sporadic, some 5%-10% are inherited as autosomal dominants with age-dependent penetrance. An ALS locus has been mapped to chromosome 21q, and causative mutations identified in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. A majority of SOD1 mutations have been found in cases with a clear family history of ALS. However, we and others have also described SOD1 mutations in patients where the disease appears to be sporadic. This is especially true for the missense mutation in codon 113 of the SOD1 gene, which substitutes threonine for isoleucine (I113T). One explanation for this finding is that this codon is a mutational hot spot with sporadic cases representing new mutations. Another is that the inherited nature of the cases is disguised by the reduced penetrance of this specific mutation. We have now shown that each of six unrelated cases of I113T mutation that we have collected in the Scottish population occurs on the same genetic background. Association analysis of multiple flanking loci on chromosome 21q supports the conclusion of a founder effect, with the original mutational event occurring {ge}10 generations ago. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Evidence of intermetastatic heterogeneity for pathological response and genetic mutations within colorectal liver metastases following preoperative chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sebagh, Mylène; Allard, Marc-Antoine; Bosselut, Nelly; Dao, Myriam; Vibert, Eric; Lewin, Maïté; Lemoine, Antoinette; Cherqui, Daniel; Adam, René; Cunha, Antonio Sa

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy, colorectal liver metastases (CLM) are expected to demonstrate a similar behaviour because of similar organ microenvironment and tumour cell chemosensitivity. We focused on the occurrence of pathological and genetic heterogeneity within CLM. Methods Patients resected for multiple CLM between 2004 and 2011 after > three cycles of chemotherapy were included. Pathological heterogeneity was arbitrarily defined as a > 50% difference in the percentage of remaining tumour cells between individual CLM. In patients with pathological heterogeneity, the mutational genotyping (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA) was determined from the most heterogeneous CLM. Results Pathological heterogeneity was observed in 31 of 157 patients with multiple CLM (median = 4, range, 2–32) (19.7%). In 72.4% of them, we found a concordance of the mutation status between the paired CLM: both wild-type in 55%, and both mutated in 17.2%. We observed a discordance of the mutation status of 27.6% between CLM: one mutated and the other wild-type. The mutated CLM was the less florid one in 75% of patients with genetic heterogeneity. Conclusions Pathological heterogeneity is present in 19.7% of patients with multiple CLM. Genetic heterogeneity is present in 27.6% of patients with pathological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity could refine guide management for tissue sampling. PMID:26943031

  14. Genetic diversity and mutation of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (Newcastle disease virus) in wild birds and evidence for intercontinental spread.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Andrew M; Reeves, Andrew B; Ogawa, Haruko; Ip, Hon S; Imai, Kunitoshi; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Yamaguchi, Emi; Silko, Nikita Y; Afonso, Claudio L

    2013-12-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), or Newcastle disease virus, is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, one of the most economically important diseases for poultry production worldwide and a cause of periodic epizootics in wild birds in North America. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity of APMV-1 isolated from migratory birds sampled in Alaska, Japan, and Russia and assessed the evidence for intercontinental virus spread using phylogenetic methods. Additionally, we predicted viral virulence using deduced amino acid residues for the fusion protein cleavage site and estimated mutation rates for the fusion gene of class I and class II migratory bird isolates. All 73 isolates sequenced as part of this study were most closely related to virus genotypes previously reported for wild birds; however, five class II genotype I isolates formed a monophyletic clade exhibiting previously unreported genetic diversity, which met criteria for the designation of a new sub-genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of wild-bird isolates provided evidence for intercontinental virus spread, specifically viral lineages of APMV-1 class II genotype I sub-genotypes Ib and Ic. This result supports migratory bird movement as a possible mechanism for the redistribution of APMV-1. None of the predicted deduced amino acid motifs for the fusion protein cleavage site of APMV-1 strains isolated from migratory birds in Alaska, Japan, and Russia were consistent with those of previously identified virulent viruses. These data therefore provide no support for these strains contributing to the emergence of avian pathogens. The estimated mutation rates for fusion genes of class I and class II wild-bird isolates were faster than those reported previously for non-virulent APMV-1 strains. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into the diversity, spread, and evolution of APMV-1 in wild birds.

  15. Genetic diversity and mutation of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (Newcastle disease virus) in wild birds and evidence for intercontinental spread

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Ogawa, Haruko; Ip, Hon S.; Imai, Kunitoshi; Bui, V. N.; Yamaguchi, Emi; Silko, N. Y.; Afonso, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), or Newcastle disease virus, is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, one of the most economically important diseases for poultry production worldwide and a cause of periodic epizootics in wild birds in North America. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity of APMV-1 isolated from migratory birds sampled in Alaska, Japan, and Russia and assessed the evidence for intercontinental virus spread using phylogenetic methods. Additionally, we predicted viral virulence using deduced amino acid residues for the fusion protein cleavage site and estimated mutation rates for the fusion gene of class I and class II migratory bird isolates. All 73 isolates sequenced as part of this study were most closely related to virus genotypes previously reported for wild birds; however, five class II genotype I isolates formed a monophyletic clade exhibiting previously unreported genetic diversity, which met criteria for the designation of a new sub-genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of wild-bird isolates provided evidence for intercontinental virus spread, specifically viral lineages of APMV-1 class II genotype I sub-genotypes Ib and Ic. This result supports migratory bird movement as a possible mechanism for the redistribution of APMV-1. None of the predicted deduced amino acid motifs for the fusion protein cleavage site of APMV-1 strains isolated from migratory birds in Alaska, Japan, and Russia were consistent with those of previously identified virulent viruses. These data therefore provide no support for these strains contributing to the emergence of avian pathogens. The estimated mutation rates for fusion genes of class I and class II wild-bird isolates were faster than those reported previously for non-virulent APMV-1 strains. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into the diversity, spread, and evolution of APMV-1 in wild birds.

  16. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination – including the optic disc – might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  17. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination - including the optic disc - might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of some mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in Moldova: Characterization of molecular markers and their linkage to various mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Gimbovskaya, S.D.; Kalinin, V.N.; Ivashchenko, T.E.; Baranov, V.S.

    1994-12-01

    Sixty-one patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Moldova were tested for mutations {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Frequencies of various alleles of the repeated GATT sequence in intron 6B of the GFTR gene, their linkage to other polymorphic markers, and various mutations were determined. The frequency of occurrence of mutation {Delta}F508 was only 25%. An absolute majority of CF patients (80%) had pancreatic insufficiency. Mutations G551D and R553X were not found in our sample. Each of 31 chromosomes with mutation {Delta}F508 carry the 6-GATT allele. Most {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} (78%) and normal (80%) chromosomes were marked by the 7-GATT allele. Twenty-seven {Delta}F508 chromosomes (96.4%) belong to haplotype B6, and only one to D6. Most chromosomes with {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} mutations are associated with haplotypes D7 (26.3%) and C7 (21%). In addition, a significant portion of chromosomes from this subgroup were associated with haplotypes A7 (23.7%), A6 (10.5%), and C6 (2.7%), which are not yet described for mutant chromosomes. The results obtained demonstrate that CF in Moldova is mainly associated with mutations other than {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Severe forms of the disease, with pancreatic insufficiency, are more frequently caused by these mutations; moreover, our data provides strong evidence for the presence of at least seven additional CF mutations in Moldova, apart from {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Some of these are probably not described.

  19. Clinical, immunologic, and genetic characteristics of RAG mutations in 15 Chinese patients with SCID and Omenn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoming; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Chaohong; Zhang, Yongjie; Tang, Wenjing; Dai, Rongxin; Wu, Junfeng; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Yu; Ding, Yuan; Jiang, Liping; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in Recombination Activating Genes (RAG1 and RAG2) are common genetic causes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Omenn syndrome (OS). The clinical, immunologic, and genetic characteristics of RAG mutations in Chinese patients with SCID or OS have not been studied in detail. In this research, 22 RAG mutations were identified in 15 Chinese patients, including 10 novel mutations in RAG1 (R108X, M630T, E510X, S666P, E669K, C730Y, A857V, K847E, L922PfsX7, and L1025FfsX39) and 4 in RAG2 (R73C, I427GfsX12, P432L, and 311insL). L1025FfsX39 is a potential RAG1 hot-spot mutation in the Chinese population. The distribution of RAG1 mutations rather than mutation type seemed to differ between SCID and OS patients. The thymic output of T lymphocytes, TCR rearrangement, and T cell proliferation were severely impaired in RAG mutant patients. These findings will contribute to the early diagnosis and treatment of SCID and OS to a certain extent.

  20. Hereditary nephrotic syndrome: a systematic approach for genetic testing and a review of associated podocyte gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Several genes have been implicated in genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome occurring in children. It is now known that the phenotypes associated with mutations in these genes display significant variability, rendering genetic testing and counselling a more complex task. This review will focus on the recent clinical findings associated with those genes known to be involved in isolated steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in children and, thereby, propose an approach for appropriate mutational screening. The recurrence of proteinuria after transplantation in patients with hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome will also be discussed. PMID:20333530

  1. A general model for likelihood computations of genetic marker data accounting for linkage, linkage disequilibrium, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Egeland, Thore; Mostad, Petter

    2015-09-01

    Several applications necessitate an unbiased determination of relatedness, be it in linkage or association studies or in a forensic setting. An appropriate model to compute the joint probability of some genetic data for a set of persons given some hypothesis about the pedigree structure is then required. The increasing number of markers available through high-density SNP microarray typing and NGS technologies intensifies the demand, where using a large number of markers may lead to biased results due to strong dependencies between closely located loci, both within pedigrees (linkage) and in the population (allelic association or linkage disequilibrium (LD)). We present a new general model, based on a Markov chain for inheritance patterns and another Markov chain for founder allele patterns, the latter allowing us to account for LD. We also demonstrate a specific implementation for X chromosomal markers that allows for computation of likelihoods based on hypotheses of alleged relationships and genetic marker data. The algorithm can simultaneously account for linkage, LD, and mutations. We demonstrate its feasibility using simulated examples. The algorithm is implemented in the software FamLinkX, providing a user-friendly GUI for Windows systems (FamLinkX, as well as further usage instructions, is freely available at www.famlink.se ). Our software provides the necessary means to solve cases where no previous implementation exists. In addition, the software has the possibility to perform simulations in order to further study the impact of linkage and LD on computed likelihoods for an arbitrary set of markers.

  2. Clinical hallmarks and genetic polymorphisms in the CFTR gene contribute to the disclosure of the A1006E mutation.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Anna Cristina; Alghisi, Federico; Petrocchi, Stefano; Surace, Cecilia; Roberti, Maria Cristina; Bella, Sergio; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Angioni, Adriano

    2010-08-01

    Since the identification of the Cystic Fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene in 1989, many genetic mutations have been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Dysfunctions of the CFTR gene are responsible for the highly variable clinical presentation ranging from severe CF, disseminated bronchiectasis, idiopathic chronic pancreatitis and congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD). Linkage disequilibrium studies have shown that some mutations are stringently coupled with polymorphisms in a genetic complex called haplotype. From a familial study of a patient with CBAVD, carrier of the A1006E mutation, we have observed its strict association with the polymorphism 5T-TG11. In order to speed up the genetic diagnosis and to correlate the clinical setting to this genetic feature, we have directly investigated the exon 17a, where the A1006E mutation is located, of five cystic fibrosis patients belonging to two unrelated families. All patients had the 5T-TG11 tract, F508del and one unknown mutation. One more family with two affected individuals carrying the Q220X/A1006E mutations was investigated for the poly-T polymorphism. All the members were found to have the A1006E mutation and the 5T-TG11 in the same DNA strand, demonstrating that this strategy is a reliable and inexpensive method for genotyping the CFTR gene. A detailed description of the clinical presentation and follow-up are provided in order to highlight common phenotypic features useful to improve the management of cystic fibrosis patients.

  3. Establishment and application of a multiplex genetic mutation-detection method of lung cancer based on MassARRAY platform

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jian-Guang; Chen, Shi-Liang; Guo, Wei-Bang; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to establish a method for highly parallel multiplexed detection of genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer samples through Agena iPLEX chemistry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis on MassARRAY mass spectrometry platform. Methods: We reviewed the related literature and data on lung cancer treatments. We also identified 99 mutation hot spots in 13 target genes closely related to the pathogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 297 primers, composed of 99 paired forward and reverse amplification primers and 99 matched extension primers, were designed using Assay Design software. The detection method was established by analyzing eight cell lines and six lung cancer specimens. The proposed method was then validated through comparisons by using a LungCartaTM kit. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were evaluated by directly sequencing EGFR and KRAS genes in 100 lung cancer cases. Results: The proposed method was able to detect multiplex genetic mutations in lung cancer cell lines. This finding was consistent with the observations on previously reported mutations. The proposed method can also detect such mutations in clinical lung cancer specimens. This result was consistent with the observations with LungCartaTM kit. However, an FGFR2 mutation was detected only through the proposed method. The measured sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 96.3%, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed MassARRAY technology-based multiplex method can detect genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to detect mutations in other cancer tissues. PMID:27144063

  4. Suppression of nonsense mutations as a therapeutic approach to treat genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Kim M; Bedwell, David M

    2011-01-01

    Suppression therapy is a treatment strategy for genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. This therapeutic approach utilizes pharmacological agents that suppress translation termination at in-frame premature termination codons (PTCs) to restore translation of a full-length, functional polypeptide. The efficiency of various classes of compounds to suppress PTCs in mammalian cells is discussed along with the current limitations of this therapy. We also elaborate on approaches to improve the efficiency of suppression that include methods to enhance the effectiveness of current suppression drugs and the design or discovery of new, more effective suppression agents. Finally, we discuss the role of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in limiting the effectiveness of suppression therapy, and describe tactics that may allow the efficiency of NMD to be modulated in order to enhance suppression therapy.

  5. Suppression of Nonsense Mutations As A Therapeutic Approach To Treat Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Kim M.; Bedwell, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Suppression therapy is a treatment strategy for genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. This therapeutic approach utilizes pharmacological agents that suppress translation termination at in-frame premature termination codons (PTCs) to restore translation of a full-length, functional polypeptide. The efficiency of various classes of compounds to suppress PTCs in mammalian cells is discussed along with the current limitations of this therapy. We also elaborate on approaches to improve the efficiency of suppression that include methods to enhance the effectiveness of current suppression drugs, and the design or discovery of new, more effective suppression agents. Finally, we discuss the role of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in limiting the effectiveness of suppression therapy, and describe tactics that may allow the efficiency of NMD to be modulated in order to enhance suppression therapy. PMID:21976286

  6. Fulminant Wilson's disease requiring liver transplantation in one monozygotic twin despite identical genetic mutation.

    PubMed

    Kegley, K M; Sellers, M A; Ferber, M J; Johnson, M W; Joelson, D W; Shrestha, R

    2010-05-01

    Acute decompensated Wilson's disease (WD) that presents as fulminant hepatic failure carries significant mortality without hepatic replacement. The abnormal gene implicated in WD, ATP7B, has been mapped to chromosome 13, and leads to decreased passage of copper from hepatocytes to bile. Excess copper accumulation exceeds hepatocyte storage capacity resulting in intracellular necrosis, apoptosis and cell death in various organs of the body. The hepatic injury induced by the abnormal accumulation of copper in WD has variable presentation such as acute hepatitis, rapid hepatic deterioration resembling fulminant hepatic failure, or as progressive chronic liver disease in the form of chronic active hepatitis or cirrhosis. There are reports in the literature describing monozygotic (identical) twins with similar hepatic progression requiring liver transplantation, however, with different neurological outcome after transplant. We report a case of one monozygotic twin presenting with acute liver failure requiring emergent liver transplantation while the other twin presented with mild liver disease, when both shared an identical genetic mutation.

  7. Penetrance of biallelic SMARCAL1 mutations is associated with environmental and genetic disturbances of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Cho, Kyoung Sang; Tolhuis, Bas; Sanyal, Mrinmoy; Morozova, Olena; Morimoto, Marie; Elizondo, Leah I; Bridgewater, Darren; Lubieniecka, Joanna; Beirnes, Kimberly; Myung, Clara; Leung, Danny; Fam, Hok Khim; Choi, Kunho; Huang, Yan; Dionis, Kira Y; Zonana, Jonathan; Keller, Kory; Stenzel, Peter; Mayfield, Christy; Lücke, Thomas; Bokenkamp, Arend; Marra, Marco A; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Lewis, David B; Shaw, Chad; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2012-06-01

    Biallelic mutations of the DNA annealing helicase SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1) cause Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD, MIM 242900), an incompletely penetrant autosomal recessive disorder. Using human, Drosophila and mouse models, we show that the proteins encoded by SMARCAL1 orthologs localize to transcriptionally active chromatin and modulate gene expression. We also show that, as found in SIOD patients, deficiency of the SMARCAL1 orthologs alone is insufficient to cause disease in fruit flies and mice, although such deficiency causes modest diffuse alterations in gene expression. Rather, disease manifests when SMARCAL1 deficiency interacts with genetic and environmental factors that further alter gene expression. We conclude that the SMARCAL1 annealing helicase buffers fluctuations in gene expression and that alterations in gene expression contribute to the penetrance of SIOD.

  8. MEGA-MD: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis software with mutational diagnosis of amino acid variation.

    PubMed

    Stecher, Glen; Liu, Li; Sanderford, Maxwell; Peterson, Daniel; Tamura, Koichiro; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-05-01

    Computational diagnosis of amino acid variants in the human exome is the first step in assessing the disruptive impacts of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) on human health and disease. The Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis software with mutational diagnosis (MEGA-MD) is a suite of tools developed to forecast the deleteriousness of nsSNVs using multiple methods and to explore nsSNVs in the context of the variability permitted in the long-term evolution of the affected position. In its graphical interface for use on desktops, it enables interactive computational diagnosis and evolutionary exploration of nsSNVs. As a web service, MEGA-MD is suitable for diagnosing variants on an exome scale. The MEGA-MD suite intends to serve the needs for conducting low- and high-throughput analysis of nsSNVs in diverse applications.

  9. PIK3CA mutations are an early genetic alteration associated with FGFR3 mutations in superficial papillary bladder tumors.

    PubMed

    López-Knowles, Elena; Hernández, Silvia; Malats, Núria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Lloreta, Josep; Carrato, Alfredo; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Real, Francisco X

    2006-08-01

    Bladder tumors constitute a very heterogeneous disease. Superficial tumors are characterized by a high prevalence of FGFR3 mutations and chromosome 9 alterations. High-grade and muscle-invasive tumors are characterized by Tp53 mutations and aneuploidy. We have analyzed the sequence of exons 9 and 20 of PIK3CA in a panel of bladder tumors covering the whole spectrum of the disease. DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sections was amplified by PCR and products were sequenced. In an unselected panel of tumors representative of the disease, the PIK3CA mutation prevalence was 13% (11 of 87). Mutations occurred mainly at the previously identified hotspots (codons 542, 545, 1007, and 1047). The distribution according to stage was as follows: papillary urothelial neoplasms of uncertain malignant potential (PUNLMP; 11 of 43, 25.6%), T(a) (9 of 57, 16%), T(1) (2 of 10, 20%), and muscle-invasive tumors (0 of 20, 0%; P = 0.019). Mutations were associated with low-grade tumors: grade 1 (6 of 27, 22.2%), grade 2 (3 of 23, 13%), and grade 3 (2 of 37, 5.4%; P = 0.047). Overall, PIK3CA mutations were strongly associated with FGFR3 mutations: 18 of 69 (26%) FGFR3(mut) tumors were PIK3CA(mut), versus 4 of 58 (6.9%) FGFR3(wt) tumors (P = 0.005). Our findings indicate that PIK3CA mutations are a common event that can occur early in bladder carcinogenesis and support the notion that papillary and muscle-invasive tumors arise through different molecular pathways. PIK3CA may constitute a novel diagnostic and prognostic tool, as well as a therapeutic target, in bladder cancer.

  10. HFE C282Y mutation as a genetic modifier influencing disease susceptibility for chronic myeloproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Meggyesi, Nora; Szilvasi, Aniko; Tamaska, Julia; Halm, Gabriella; Lueff, Sandor; Nahajevszky, Sarolta; Egyed, Miklos; Varkonyi, Judit; Mikala, Gabor; Sipos, Andrea; Kalasz, Laszlo; Masszi, Tamas; Tordai, Attila

    2009-03-01

    Iron metabolism has been implicated in carcinogenesis and several studies assessed the potential role of genetic variants of proteins involved in iron metabolism (HFE C282Y, TFR S142G) in different malignancies. Few reports addressed this issue with relation to chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD). The aims of our study were (a) to examine the potential associations of CMPD development with genetic modifiers of iron metabolism in a large cohort of CMPD patients; (b) to examine associations of genetic variants of proteins involved in iron metabolism; and acquired JAK2 V617F mutation with clinical characteristics of CMPD. HFE C282Y was genotyped in 328 CMPD patients and 996 blood donors as controls, HFE H63D, and TFR S142G were tested in CMPD patients and 171 first time blood donors. JAK2 V617F mutation was tested in CMPD patients and in 122 repeated blood donors. Decreased C282Y allele frequency (allele frequency+/-95% confidence interval) was found in the CMPD group (1.8%+/-1.0%) compared with controls (3.4%+/-0.8%; P=0.048). TFR S142G allele frequency was reduced among V617F-negative CMPD patients (34.8%+/-7.6%) compared with controls (47.8%+/-5.4%; P=0.02). The frequency of JAK2 V617F was 75.9% (249 of 328) in the CMPD group. At presentation, elevated hemoglobin levels were found in V617F-positive patients compared with V617F-negative counterparts (P<0.000). Vascular complications (26.6% versus 15.2%; P=0.039) as well as female gender (57.4% versus 41.8%; P=0.019) were more common in V617F-positive patients. We found that HFE C282Y might be associated with a protective role against CMPD. Because chronic iron deficiency or latent anemia may trigger disease susceptibility for CMPD, HFE C282Y positivity may be a genetic factor influencing this effect.

  11. Mutations in 2 distinct genetic pathways result in cerebral cavernous malformations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Aubrey C.; Drakos, Stavros G.; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Smith, Alexandra C.H.; Gibson, Christopher C.; Ling, Jing; Passi, Samuel F.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Revelo, M. Patricia; Grossmann, Allie H.; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Davis, George E.; Metzstein, Mark M.; Whitehead, Kevin J.; Li, Dean Y.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are a common type of vascular malformation in the brain that are a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke. This condition has been independently linked to 3 separate genes: Krev1 interaction trapped (KRIT1), Cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2), and Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). Despite the commonality in disease pathology caused by mutations in these 3 genes, we found that the loss of Pdcd10 results in significantly different developmental, cell biological, and signaling phenotypes from those seen in the absence of Ccm2 and Krit1. PDCD10 bound to germinal center kinase III (GCKIII) family members, a subset of serine-threonine kinases, and facilitated lumen formation by endothelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that CCM may be a common tissue manifestation of distinct mechanistic pathways. Nevertheless, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for either Pdcd10 or Ccm2 resulted in CCMs in mice. The murine phenotype induced by loss of either protein reproduced all of the key clinical features observed in human patients with CCM, as determined by direct comparison with genotype-specific human surgical specimens. These results suggest that CCM may be more effectively treated by directing therapies based on the underlying genetic mutation rather than treating the condition as a single clinical entity. PMID:21490399

  12. Correlation of the feline PKD1 genetic mutation with cases of PKD diagnosed by pathological examination.

    PubMed

    Helps, Chris; Tasker, Séverine; Harley, Ross

    2007-10-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) is the most prevalent inherited genetic disease of cats, particularly affecting Persians. Using archived tissue samples from 44 cats a genotype was successfully obtained by real-time PCR for 43 cats. Twenty-five cats (18 Persians, 4 domestic longhair cats and 3 domestic shorthair (DSH) cats) were found to carry the AD-PKD mutation and all of these cats had macroscopic and/or microscopic evidence of renal cysts consistent with PKD. Eighteen cats were found to be wild-type. Twelve of these (all Persians) had no pathological evidence of PKD, but the remaining 6 cats had evidence of renal cystic lesions. On pathological review the cystic lesions in 4 (2 Persians and 2 DSH) of these 6 cats were considered not to be consistent with a primary diagnosis of PKD. Histological evidence of polycystic kidneys was, however, confirmed in the remaining 2 cats (1 DSH and 1 Bengal) and may indicate that other PKD-causing mutations exist in the feline population. PMID:17553488

  13. Mitochondrial Genetics of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii: Resistance Mutations Marking the Cytochrome B Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bennoun, P.; Delosme, M.; Kuck, U.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the genetic and molecular analysis of the first non-Mendelian mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resistant to myxothiazol, an inhibitor of the respiratory cytochrome bc1 complex. Using a set of seven oligonucleotide probes, restriction fragments containing the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene from C. reinhardtii were isolated from a mitochondrial DNA library. This gene is located adjacent to the gene for subunit 4 of the mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase (ND4), near one end of the 15.8-kb linear mitochondrial genome of C. reinhardtii. The algal cytochrome b apoprotein contains 381 amino-acid residues and exhibits a sequence similarity of about 59% with other plant cytochrome b proteins. The cyt b gene from four myxothiazol resistant mutants of C. reinhardtii was amplified for DNA sequence analysis. In comparison to the wild-type strain, all mutants contain an identical point mutation in the cyt b gene, leading to a change of a phenylalanine codon to a leucine codon at amino acid position 129 of the cytochrome b protein. Segregation analysis in tetrads from reciprocal crosses of mutants with wild type shows a strict uniparental inheritance of this mutation from the mating type minus parent (UP(-)). However, mitochondrial markers from both parents are recovered in vegetative diploids in variable proportions from one experiment to the next for a given cross. On the average, a strong bias is seen for markers inherited from the mating type minus parent. PMID:2004707

  14. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  15. Genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus and mutations associated to hepatocellular carcinoma in patients from Venezuela, with different stages of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Puche, Mary L; Kay-Valero, Sharon; Michelli, Pedro; Oropeza, Maria D; Loureiro, Carmen L; Devesa, Marisol; Dagher, Lucy; Puol, Flor H

    2016-03-01

    Globally, about 50% of liver cancer originates as a result of long term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), and some genotypes and mutations have been associated with an increased severity of infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of HBV in patients from Venezuela, with chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to compare the occurrence of mutations in all patient groups. Samples from patients with different pathologies of the liver, associated with HBV infection, were collected. The HBV S region was analyzed for genotype determination and, when available, the whole genome sequence was examined for mutations analysis. Genotype F was the most common genotype (87%). While the HBV subgenotype F3 was the most frequent genotype in the whole group of samples (44%), the subgenotype F2 predominated in HCC patients (56%). Mutations were more common in HCC and cirrhosis cases (p=0.01). The A1762T mutation was significantly associated with the advanced stage of liver disease (p=0.008). Additionally, mutations were more common in early stages of liver disease in HBV subgenotype F2-infected patients, and a significant association between this subgenotype and the emergence of T 1753C, A1762T, A1762T/G1764A (p=0.04) and C1773T (p=0.001) mutations in chronic patients was found, when compared to the HBV subgenotype F3. By comparing F2 with all other HBV subgenotypes, a positive association for the three basal core promoter (BCP) mutants (A1762T, A1762T/G1764A p=0.01, G1764A p=0.04) was found. These results suggest that the HBV subgenotype F2 might be associated to more severe forms of liver disease in comparison with the HBV subgenotype F3. PMID:27382800

  16. Identification of Novel Mutations in ABCA4 Gene: Clinical and Genetic Analysis of Indian Patients with Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Verma, Anshuman; Hariharan, Ramesh; Krishna, Shuba; Kiran, Ravi; Jacob, Jemima; Ganapathy, Aparna; Ramprasad, Vedam L.; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) is the leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration associated with progressive central vision loss, photophobia, and colour vision abnormalities. In this study, we have described the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from an Indian cohort. The next generation sequencing was carried out in five clinically confirmed unrelated patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 184 retinal specific genes. Sequencing results were analyzed by read mapping and variant calling in genes of interest, followed by their verification and interpretation. Genetic analysis revealed ABCA4 mutations in all of the five unrelated patients. Among these, four patients were found with compound heterozygous mutations and another one had homozygous mutation. All the affected individuals showed signs and symptoms consistent with the disease phenotype. We report two novel ABCA4 mutations in Indian patients with STGD disease, which expands the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. Screening for causative mutations in patients with STGD using panel of targeted gene sequencing by NGS would be a cost effective tool, might be helpful in confirming the precise diagnosis, and contributes towards the genetic counselling of asymptomatic carriers and isolated patients. PMID:25922843

  17. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  18. A genetic analysis of the 63E-64A genomic region of Drosophila melanogaster: Identification of mutations in a replication factor C subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.D.; Solomon, N.; Rubin, G.M.

    1995-04-01

    We have performed an F{sub 2} genetic screen to identify lethal mutations within the 63E-64A genomic region. We have isolated 122 mutations in 20 different complementation groups. Of these groups, 16 are represented by multiple alleles. We have also established that the Rop and Ras2 genes are located within the 63E-64A genomic domain at 64A10,11. We have sequenced 10.2 kb of DNA surrounding this gene pair and find that in addition to Rop and Ras2 there is another gene located within this DNA sequence. The gene product, which we have named Rfc40, shows 68% identity to the 40-kDa subunit of replication factor C. We find that the members of one complementation group (13 alleles) derived from our screen correspond to mutations in the Rop gene, whereas the members of another (five alleles) correspond to mutations in the Rfc40 gene. In addition we have isolated 11 new mutant alleles of the disembodied gene. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Mosaicism: The embryo as a target for induction of mutations leading to cancer and genetic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.; Zingg, B.

    1995-12-31

    Mosaicismhas been observed in both germinal and somatic tissues of several species, including humans. Mutational events occurring during early embryogenesis can give rise to an organism with a significant number of cells with the mutant genotype in one or more tissues. In the F{sub 1} generation, this event will usually be perceived as a de novo germinal mutation rather than a transmitted variant allele, unless significant effort is directed toward detecting the mosaicism. Similarly, mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in proliferating somatic cells can generate populations of cells that are at increased risk of transforming into tumor cells. The number of potential preneoplastic cells is larger when the mutagenic event occurs in early development than if it occurs in the mature adult. Experimental data confirm that treatment of the developing embryo or fetus with carcinogenic and mutagenic agents increases the cancer incidence in these animals and the frequency of mutations in the offspring of the animals that were exposed in utero. The available data are conclusive that the developing organism is at risk from exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. However, the data are insufficient to estimate the level of risk associated with similar exposures to the adult organism. The potential risk from exposure of the developing embryo is increased relative to the risk from adult exposure if the sensitivity of the individual cells to damage in the adult and the embryo are equivalent. It seems apparent that the potential risks of cancer and heritable disease following in utero exposure are sufficient to warrant additional attention. It is important to obtain data for estimating the relative contribution of in utero exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents to the total health burden and for the subsequent development of appropriate regulations. 60 refs., 2 figs.

  20. The genetic difference between Western and Chinese urothelial cell carcinomas: infrequent FGFR3 mutation in Han Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Liu, Tiantian; Ge, Nan; Kong, Feng; Yang, Liu; Björkholm, Magnus; Fan, Yidong; Zhao, Shengtian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) includes urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC), renal pelvic carcinoma (RPC) and ureter carcinoma (UC), and its incidence varies dependent on geographical areas and tumor locations, which indicates different oncogenic mechanisms and/or different genetic susceptibility/environment exposure. The activating mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter are the most frequent genetic events in UCCs. These mutations have clinical utilities in UCC initial diagnostics, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and management. However, the vast majority of the results are obtained from studies of UCC patients in Western countries, and little has been known about these in Han Chinese patients. In the present study, we screened the FGFR3 gene and TERT promoter for mutations in 116 UBC, 91 RPC and 115 UC tumors from Han Chinese patients by using Sanger Sequencing. TERT promoter mutations occurred at a high frequency in these UCC patients, comparable with that seen in Western patients, however, the FGFR3 mutation was surprisingly lower, only 9.4% for UBCs, 8.8% for RPCs and 2.6% for UCs, respectively. Taken together, the FGFR3 gene is an infrequent target in the pathogenesis of Han Chinese UCCs, and its mutation detection and targeted therapy have limited clinical utility in these patients. Our results underscore the need for extensive characterization of cancer genomes from diverse patient populations, thereby contributing to precision medicine for cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:27029078

  1. The genetic difference between Western and Chinese urothelial cell carcinomas: infrequent FGFR3 mutation in Han Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaotian; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Kun; Liu, Li; Liu, Tiantian; Ge, Nan; Kong, Feng; Yang, Liu; Björkholm, Magnus; Fan, Yidong; Zhao, Shengtian; Xu, Dawei

    2016-05-01

    Urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) includes urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC), renal pelvic carcinoma (RPC) and ureter carcinoma (UC), and its incidence varies dependent on geographical areas and tumor locations, which indicates different oncogenic mechanisms and/or different genetic susceptibility/environment exposure. The activating mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter are the most frequent genetic events in UCCs. These mutations have clinical utilities in UCC initial diagnostics, prognosis, recurrence monitoring and management. However, the vast majority of the results are obtained from studies of UCC patients in Western countries, and little has been known about these in Han Chinese patients. In the present study, we screened the FGFR3 gene and TERT promoter for mutations in 116 UBC, 91 RPC and 115 UC tumors from Han Chinese patients by using Sanger Sequencing. TERT promoter mutations occurred at a high frequency in these UCC patients, comparable with that seen in Western patients, however, the FGFR3 mutation was surprisingly lower, only 9.4% for UBCs, 8.8% for RPCs and 2.6% for UCs, respectively. Taken together, the FGFR3 gene is an infrequent target in the pathogenesis of Han Chinese UCCs, and its mutation detection and targeted therapy have limited clinical utility in these patients. Our results underscore the need for extensive characterization of cancer genomes from diverse patient populations, thereby contributing to precision medicine for cancer treatment and prevention.

  2. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-06-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. However, it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but are instead due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the underexplored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the 'wild type' genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs.

  3. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. Yet it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but rather are due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the under-explored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the “wild-type” genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs. PMID:23453263

  4. "Sickle Cell Anemia: Tracking down a Mutation": An Interactive Learning Laboratory That Communicates Basic Principles of Genetics and Cellular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients…

  5. Multidisciplinary investigation links backward-speech trait and working memory through genetic mutation.

    PubMed

    Prekovic, Stefan; Đurđević, Dušica Filipović; Csifcsák, Gábor; Šveljo, Olivera; Stojković, Oliver; Janković, Milica; Koprivšek, Katarina; Covill, Laura E; Lučić, Milos; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Helsen, Christine; Ceroni, Fabiola; Claessens, Frank; Newbury, Dianne F

    2016-02-03

    Case studies of unusual traits can provide unique snapshots of the effects of modified systems. In this study, we report on an individual from a Serbian family with the ability to rapidly, accurately and voluntarily speak backwards. We consider psychological, neural and genetic correlates of this trait to identify specific relevant neural mechanisms and new molecular pathways for working memory and speech-related tasks. EEG data suggest that the effect of word reversal precedes semantic integration of visually presented backward-words, and that event-related potentials above the frontal lobe are affected by both word reversal and the maintenance of backward-words in working memory. fMRI revealed that the left fusiform gyrus may facilitate the production of backward-speech. Exome sequencing identified three novel coding variants of potential significance in the RIC3, RIPK1 and ZBED5 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that, in this individual, the ability to speak backwards is afforded by an extraordinary working memory capacity. We hypothesise that this is served by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain to the frontal cortex and supported by visual semantic loops within the left fusiform gyrus and that these neural processes may be mediated by a genetic mutation in RIC3; a chaperone for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  6. NGS-Based Assay for the Identification of Individuals Carrying Recessive Genetic Mutations in Reproductive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Abulí, Anna; Boada, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Coroleu, Buenaventura; Veiga, Anna; Armengol, Lluís; Barri, Pedro N; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity of carrier screening in gamete donation (GD) programs. We have developed and validated an NGS carrier-screening test (qCarrier test) that includes 200 genes associated with 368 disorders (277 autosomal recessive and 37 X-linked). Carrier screening is performed on oocyte donation candidates and the male partner of oocyte recipient. Carriers of X-linked conditions are excluded from the GD program, whereas donors are chosen who do not carry mutations for the same gene/disease as the recipients. The validation phase showed a high sensitivity (>99% sensitivity) detecting all single-nucleotide variants, 13 indels, and 25 copy-number variants included in the validation set. A total of 1,301 individuals were analysed with the qCarrier test, including 483 candidate oocyte donors and 635 receptor couples, 105 females receiving sperm donation, and 39 couples seeking pregnancy. We identified 56% of individuals who are carriers for at least one genetic condition and 1.7% of female donors who were excluded from the program due to a carrier state of X-linked conditions. Globally, 3% of a priori assigned donations had a high reproductive risk that could be minimized after testing. Genetic counselling at different stages is essential for helping to facilitate a successful and healthy pregnancy.

  7. Multidisciplinary investigation links backward-speech trait and working memory through genetic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Prekovic, Stefan; Đurđević, Dušica Filipović; Csifcsák, Gábor; Šveljo, Olivera; Stojković, Oliver; Janković, Milica; Koprivšek, Katarina; Covill, Laura E; Lučić, Milos; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Helsen, Christine; Ceroni, Fabiola; Claessens, Frank; Newbury, Dianne F

    2016-01-01

    Case studies of unusual traits can provide unique snapshots of the effects of modified systems. In this study, we report on an individual from a Serbian family with the ability to rapidly, accurately and voluntarily speak backwards. We consider psychological, neural and genetic correlates of this trait to identify specific relevant neural mechanisms and new molecular pathways for working memory and speech-related tasks. EEG data suggest that the effect of word reversal precedes semantic integration of visually presented backward-words, and that event-related potentials above the frontal lobe are affected by both word reversal and the maintenance of backward-words in working memory. fMRI revealed that the left fusiform gyrus may facilitate the production of backward-speech. Exome sequencing identified three novel coding variants of potential significance in the RIC3, RIPK1 and ZBED5 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that, in this individual, the ability to speak backwards is afforded by an extraordinary working memory capacity. We hypothesise that this is served by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain to the frontal cortex and supported by visual semantic loops within the left fusiform gyrus and that these neural processes may be mediated by a genetic mutation in RIC3; a chaperone for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:26838027

  8. NGS-Based Assay for the Identification of Individuals Carrying Recessive Genetic Mutations in Reproductive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Abulí, Anna; Boada, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Coroleu, Buenaventura; Veiga, Anna; Armengol, Lluís; Barri, Pedro N; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity of carrier screening in gamete donation (GD) programs. We have developed and validated an NGS carrier-screening test (qCarrier test) that includes 200 genes associated with 368 disorders (277 autosomal recessive and 37 X-linked). Carrier screening is performed on oocyte donation candidates and the male partner of oocyte recipient. Carriers of X-linked conditions are excluded from the GD program, whereas donors are chosen who do not carry mutations for the same gene/disease as the recipients. The validation phase showed a high sensitivity (>99% sensitivity) detecting all single-nucleotide variants, 13 indels, and 25 copy-number variants included in the validation set. A total of 1,301 individuals were analysed with the qCarrier test, including 483 candidate oocyte donors and 635 receptor couples, 105 females receiving sperm donation, and 39 couples seeking pregnancy. We identified 56% of individuals who are carriers for at least one genetic condition and 1.7% of female donors who were excluded from the program due to a carrier state of X-linked conditions. Globally, 3% of a priori assigned donations had a high reproductive risk that could be minimized after testing. Genetic counselling at different stages is essential for helping to facilitate a successful and healthy pregnancy. PMID:26990548

  9. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Sie, Aisha S; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Brunner, Han G; Prins, Judith B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2014-06-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with telephone, written and digital information sent home, and face-to-face contact following BRCA-mutation testing (DNA-direct). From August 2011 to February 2012, 161 of 233 eligible BC patients referred to our Human Genetics department chose between DNA-direct (intervention) or DNA-intake (control). Exclusion criteria were psychological problems (n = 33), difficulty with Dutch text (n = 5), known BRCA-family (n = 3), non-BRCA-referral (n = 1). 30 declined genetic counseling or study participation. Participants received questionnaires including satisfaction and psychological distress. 59 % chose DNA-direct (p = 0.03), of whom 90 % were satisfied and would choose DNA-direct again (including 6/8 BRCA-mutation carriers); although 27 % hesitated to recommend DNA-direct to other patients. General distress (GHQ-12, p = 0.001) and heredity-specific distress (IES, p = 0.02) scored lower in DNA-direct than DNA-intake, both at baseline and follow-up 2 weeks after BRCA-result disclosure; all scores remained below clinical relevance. DNA-direct participants reported higher website use (53 vs. 32 %, p = 0.01), more referrer information about personal consequences (41 vs. 20 %, p = 0.004) and lower decisional conflict (median 20 [0-88] vs. 25 [0-50], p = 0.01). Processing time in DNA-direct was reduced by 1 month. Mutation detection rate was 8 % in both groups. All BRCA-mutation carriers fulfilled current testing criteria. In conclusion, more BC patients preferred DNA-direct over intake consultation prior to BRCA-mutation testing, the majority being strongly to moderately satisfied with the procedure followed, without increased distress.

  10. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Methods We genotyped rs3814113 in 10 029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10-9) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10-4). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:21169536

  11. Mutational breeding and genetic engineering in the development of high grain protein content.

    PubMed

    Wenefrida, Ida; Utomo, Herry S; Linscombe, Steve D

    2013-12-01

    Cereals are the most important crops in the world for both human consumption and animal feed. Improving their nutritional values, such as high protein content, will have significant implications, from establishing healthy lifestyles to helping remediate malnutrition problems worldwide. Besides providing a source of carbohydrate, grain is also a natural source of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, specific oils, and other disease-fighting phytocompounds. Even though cereal grains contain relatively little protein compared to legume seeds, they provide protein for the nutrition of humans and livestock that is about 3 times that of legumes. Most cereal seeds lack a few essential amino acids; therefore, they have imbalanced amino acid profiles. Lysine (Lys), threonine (Thr), methionine (Met), and tryptophan (Trp) are among the most critical and are a limiting factor in many grain crops for human nutrition. Tremendous research has been put into the efforts to improve these essential amino acids. Development of high protein content can be outlined in four different approaches through manipulating seed protein bodies, modulating certain biosynthetic pathways to overproduce essential and limiting amino acids, increasing nitrogen relocation to the grain through the introduction of transgenes, and exploiting new genetic variance. Various technologies have been employed to improve protein content including conventional and mutational breeding, genetic engineering, marker-assisted selection, and genomic analysis. Each approach involves a combination of these technologies. Advancements in nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics continue to improve public knowledge at a rapid pace on the importance of specific aspects of food nutrition for optimum fitness and health. An understanding of the molecular basis for human health and genetic predisposition to certain diseases through human genomes enables individuals to personalize their nutritional requirements. It is critically important

  12. Mutational breeding and genetic engineering in the development of high grain protein content.

    PubMed

    Wenefrida, Ida; Utomo, Herry S; Linscombe, Steve D

    2013-12-01

    Cereals are the most important crops in the world for both human consumption and animal feed. Improving their nutritional values, such as high protein content, will have significant implications, from establishing healthy lifestyles to helping remediate malnutrition problems worldwide. Besides providing a source of carbohydrate, grain is also a natural source of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, specific oils, and other disease-fighting phytocompounds. Even though cereal grains contain relatively little protein compared to legume seeds, they provide protein for the nutrition of humans and livestock that is about 3 times that of legumes. Most cereal seeds lack a few essential amino acids; therefore, they have imbalanced amino acid profiles. Lysine (Lys), threonine (Thr), methionine (Met), and tryptophan (Trp) are among the most critical and are a limiting factor in many grain crops for human nutrition. Tremendous research has been put into the efforts to improve these essential amino acids. Development of high protein content can be outlined in four different approaches through manipulating seed protein bodies, modulating certain biosynthetic pathways to overproduce essential and limiting amino acids, increasing nitrogen relocation to the grain through the introduction of transgenes, and exploiting new genetic variance. Various technologies have been employed to improve protein content including conventional and mutational breeding, genetic engineering, marker-assisted selection, and genomic analysis. Each approach involves a combination of these technologies. Advancements in nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics continue to improve public knowledge at a rapid pace on the importance of specific aspects of food nutrition for optimum fitness and health. An understanding of the molecular basis for human health and genetic predisposition to certain diseases through human genomes enables individuals to personalize their nutritional requirements. It is critically important

  13. Treatment-influenced associations of PML-RARα mutations, FLT3 mutations, and additional chromosome abnormalities in relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Barry K.; Racevskis, Janis; Poiré, Xavier; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Roulston, Diane; Schachter-Tokarz, Esther; Zhou, Da-cheng; Chen, I-Ming L.; Harvey, Richard; Koval, Greg; Sher, Dorie A.; Feusner, James H.; Tallman, Martin S.; Larson, Richard A.; Powell, Bayard L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Willman, Cheryl L.; Stock, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)–targeted ligand binding domain of PML-RARα (PRα/LBD+) have been implicated in the passive selection of ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia clones leading to disease relapse. Among 45 relapse patients from the ATRA/chemotherapy arm of intergroup protocol C9710, 18 patients harbored PRα/LBD+ (40%), 7 of whom (39%) relapsed Off-ATRA selection pressure, suggesting a possible active role of PRα/LBD+. Of 41 relapse patients coanalyzed, 15 (37%) had FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication mutations (FLT3-ITD+), which were differentially associated with PRα/LBD+ depending on ATRA treatment status at relapse: positively, On-ATRA; negatively, Off-ATRA. Thirteen of 21 patients (62%) had additional chromosome abnormalities (ACAs); all coanalyzed PRα/LBD mutant patients who relapsed off-ATRA (n = 5) had associated ACA. After relapse Off-ATRA, ACA and FLT3-ITD+ were negatively associated and were oppositely associated with presenting white blood count and PML-RARα type: ACA, low, L-isoform; FLT3-ITD+, high, S-isoform. These exploratory results suggest that differing PRα/LBD+ activities may interact with FLT3-ITD+ or ACA, that FLT3-ITD+ and ACA are associated with different intrinsic disease progression pathways manifest at relapse Off-ATRA, and that these different pathways may be short-circuited by ATRA-selectable defects at relapse On-ATRA. ACA and certain PRα/LBD+ were also associated with reduced postrelapse survival. PMID:22734072

  14. The genetic basis of "Scarsdale Gourmet Diet" variegate porphyria: a missense mutation in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Frank, J; Poh-Fitzpatrick, M B; King, L E; Christiano, A M

    1998-08-01

    The porphyrias are disorders of porphyrin or porphyrin-precursor metabolism that result from inherited or acquired aberrations in the control of the porphyrin-heme biosynthetic pathway. Variegate porphyria (VP), one of the acute hepatic porphyrias, is characterized by a partial reduction in the activity of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO), and recently, mutations in the PPO gene on chromosome 1q22-23 have been described. Our purpose was to identify the underlying genetic lesion in a severely affected patient with VP and to detect the silent mutation carriers in her family. The disease in this patient was precipitated by carbohydrate restriction as outlined in the "Scarsdale Gourmet Diet". Our mutation detection and confirmation strategy included PCR, automated sequencing, and restriction enzyme digestion. We identified a missense mutation in the patient and five family members. The mutation consisted of a previously unreported C-to-T transition in exon 5 of the PPO gene, resulting in the substitution of arginine by cysteine, designated R152C. This arginine residue is evolutionarily highly conserved in humans, mice, bacteria, yeast, and plants, indicating the importance of this residue in PPO. Our study established that a missense mutation in the PPO gene was the underlying mutation in this patient with VP and explained the occurrence of the phenotype in this family.

  15. Additive Genetic Risk from Five Serotonin System Polymorphisms Interacts with Interpersonal Stress to Predict Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E.; Adam, Emma K.; Redei, Eva E.; Hammen, Constance; Craske, Michelle G.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral genetic research supports polygenic models of depression in which many genetic variations each contribute a small amount of risk, and prevailing diathesis-stress models suggest gene-environment interactions (GxE). Multilocus profile scores of additive risk offer an approach that is consistent with polygenic models of depression risk. In a first demonstration of this approach in a GxE predicting depression, we created an additive multilocus profile score from five serotonin system polymorphisms (one each in the genes HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR2C, and two in TPH2). Analyses focused on two forms of interpersonal stress as environmental risk factors. Using five years of longitudinal diagnostic and life stress interviews from 387 emerging young adults in the Youth Emotion Project, survival analyses show that this multilocus profile score interacts with major interpersonal stressful life events to predict major depressive episode onsets (HR = 1.815, p = .007). Simultaneously, there was a significant protective effect of the profile score without a recent event (HR = 0.83, p = .030). The GxE effect with interpersonal chronic stress was not significant (HR = 1.15, p = .165). Finally, effect sizes for genetic factors examined ignoring stress suggested such an approach could lead to overlooking or misinterpreting genetic effects. Both the GxE effect and the protective simple main effect were replicated in a sample of early adolescent girls (N = 105). We discuss potential benefits of the multilocus genetic profile score approach and caveats for future research. PMID:26595467

  16. Genetic and structure-function studies of missense mutations in human endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hamid; Tempczyk-Russell, Anna; Haubold, Kurt; Santorico, Stephanie A; Shokati, Touraj; Christians, Uwe; Churchill, Mair E A

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) plays a pivotal role in HDL metabolism. We sought to characterize EL and its interaction with HDL as well as its natural variants genetically, functionally and structurally. We screened our biethnic population sample (n = 802) for selected missense mutations (n = 5) and identified T111I as the only common variant. Multiple linear regression analyses in Hispanic subjects revealed an unexpected association between T111I and elevated LDL-C (p-value = 0.012) and total cholesterol (p-value = 0.004). We examined lipase activity of selected missense mutants (n = 10) and found different impacts on EL function, ranging from normal to complete loss of activity. EL-HDL lipidomic analyses indicated that EL has a defined remodeling of HDL without exhaustion of the substrate and a distinct and preference for several fatty acids that are lipid mediators and known for their potent pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Structural studies using homology modeling revealed a novel α/β motif in the C-domain, unique to EL. The EL dimer was found to have the flexibility to expand and to bind various sizes of HDL particles. The likely impact of the all known missense mutations (n = 18) on the structure of EL was examined using molecular modeling and the impact they may have on EL lipase activity using a novel structure-function slope based on their structural free energy differences. The results of this multidisciplinary approach delineated the impact of EL and its variants on HDL. Moreover, the results suggested EL to have the capacity to modulate vascular health through its role in fatty acid-based signaling pathways. PMID:23536757

  17. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  18. Genetic risk factors for deep vein thrombosis among Japanese: importance of protein S K196E mutation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Rina; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Sakata, Toshiyuki

    2006-04-01

    There is mounting evidence that mutations associated with a given disease arise with different frequencies among ethnic groups, thus ethnicity-specific studies are needed to identify causative mutations and properly assess risk. In particular, ethnic differences in the genetic background of thrombophilia have been reported. We recently conducted a large-scale analysis of the plasma activities of proteins C, S, antithrombin, and plasminogen within the Japanese general population. We found age- and sex-related differences and estimated the prevalence of deficiencies of protein C (0.13%), antithrombin (0.15%), protein S (1.12%), and plasminogen (4.29%). We also evaluated the genetic contribution to deep vein thrombosis and found that protein S mutation K196E is a genetic risk factor in the Japanese population. We estimated allele frequency to be 0.009, suggesting that 1 of 12,000 Japanese may be homozygous for the E allele, thus possibly as many as 10,000 individuals. Accordingly, a substantial proportion of the Japanese population carries the protein S E allele and is at risk of developing deep vein thrombosis. Given the frequency of this mutation and its strong correlation with deep vein thrombosis, it may be valuable to conduct a large-scale screening for this allele and advise concerned persons to avoid environmental risk factors known to be associated with deep vein thrombosis.

  19. A Catecholamine-Secreting Skull Base Sinonasal Paraganglioma Presenting with Labile Hypertension in a Patient with Previously Undiagnosed Genetic Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Samuel; Palmer, James N.; Adappa, Nithin D.

    2012-01-01

    Sinonasal paragangliomas are very uncommon neuroendocrine tumors that can present as skull base lesions. Functional paragangliomas are exceedingly rare. They can be associated with genetic mutations that have been associated with increased risk of head and neck paragangliomas. We present a case of a rare functioning sinonasal paraganglioma of the skull base in a patient with distant history of prior abdominal paragangliomas. The patient underwent subtotal endoscopic resection of the skull base lesion limited by carotid encasement of the tumor. They were treated with postoperative adjuvant radiation and therapeutic metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy. Genetic testing revealed succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) mutation. Skull base paragangliomas are rare tumors that may preclude complete surgical resection. 131Iodine-MIBG can be used as adjuvant therapy in postoperative external beam radiation and in MIBG avid tumors. Long-term follow-up is needed given locally aggressive nature of these tumors, especially for patients with history of genetic mutations such as SDHB mutations as recurrent paragangliomas may develop. PMID:23946921

  20. Genetic basis for increased intestinal permeability in families with Crohn's disease: role of CARD15 3020insC mutation?

    PubMed Central

    Buhner, S; Buning, C; Genschel, J; Kling, K; Herrmann, D; Dignass, A; Kuechler, I; Krueger, S; Schmidt, H H‐J; Lochs, H

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim A genetically impaired intestinal barrier function has long been suspected to be a predisposing factor for Crohn's disease (CD). Recently, mutations of the capsase recruitment domain family, member 15 (CARD15) gene have been identified and associated with CD. We hypothesise that a CARD15 mutation may be associated with an impaired intestinal barrier. Methods We studied 128 patients with quiescent CD, 129 first degree relatives (CD‐R), 66 non‐related household members (CD‐NR), and 96 healthy controls. The three most common CARD15 polymorphisms (R702W, G908R, and 3020insC) were analysed and intestinal permeability was determined by the lactulose/mannitol ratio. Results Intestinal permeability was significantly increased in CD and CD‐R groups compared with CD‐NR and controls. Values above the normal range were seen in 44% of CD and 26% of CD‐R but only in 6% of CD‐NR, and in none of the controls. A household community with CD patients, representing a common environment, was not associated with increased intestinal permeability in family members. However, 40% of CD first degree relatives carrying a CARD15 3020insC mutation and 75% (3/4) of those CD‐R with combined 3020insC and R702W mutations had increased intestinal permeability compared with only 15% of wild‐types, indicating a genetic influence on barrier function. R702W and G908R mutations were not associated with high permeability. Conclusions In healthy first degree relatives, high mucosal permeability is associated with the presence of a CARD15 3020insC mutation. This indicates that genetic factors may be involved in impairment of intestinal barrier function in families with IBD. PMID:16000642

  1. Environmental risk factors for autism: do they help cause de novo genetic mutations that contribute to the disorder?

    PubMed

    Kinney, Dennis K; Barch, Daniel H; Chayka, Bogdan; Napoleon, Siena; Munir, Kerim M

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has discovered that a number of genetic risk factors for autism are de novo mutations. Advanced parental age at the time of conception is associated with increased risk for both autism and de novo mutations. We investigated the hypothesis that other environmental factors associated with increased risk for autism might also be mutagenic and contribute to autism by causing de novo mutations. A survey of the research literature identified 9 environmental factors for which increased pre-conceptual exposure appears to be associated with increased risk for autism. Five of these factors--mercury, cadmium, nickel, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride--are established mutagens. Another four--including residence in regions that are urbanized, located at higher latitudes, or experience high levels of precipitation--are associated with decreased sun exposure and increased risk for vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D plays important roles in repairing DNA damage and protecting against oxidative stress--a key cause of DNA damage. Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency will thus contribute to higher mutation rates and impaired repair of DNA. We note how de novo mutations may also help explain why the concordance rate for autism is so markedly higher in monozygotic than dizygotic twins. De novo mutations may also explain in part why the prevalence of autism is so remarkably high, given the evidence for a strong role of genetic factors and the low fertility of individuals with autism--and resultant selection pressure against autism susceptibility genes. These several lines of evidence provide support for the hypothesis, and warrant new research approaches--which we suggest--to address limitations in existing studies. The hypothesis has implications for understanding possible etiologic roles of de novo mutations in autism, and it suggests possible approaches to primary prevention of the disorder, such as addressing widespread vitamin D deficiency and exposure to

  2. Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma: Review of perioperative management of blood pressure and update on genetic mutations associated with pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Lauren; Orlowski, Robert; Cohen, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are rare tumors with high morbidity, due to excessive catecholamine secretion, even though the majority of tumors are benign. The use of perioperative blockade regimens, together with improved surgical techniques, has greatly impacted the perioperative morbidity associated with these tumors. The old dogma of the “tumor of tens” no longer holds true. For example, at least one-third of all pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are hereditary with mutations in one of ten well characterized susceptibility genes, and one-quarter of all tumors are malignant. This review will focus on the perioperative management of pheochromocytoma and paragangliomas and the clinical implications of the associated genetic mutations. PMID:23730992

  3. Molecular genetic analysis in mild hyperhomocysteinemia: A common mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is a genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Stevens, E.M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genetic aberrations in the cystathionine P-synthase (CBS) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genes may account for reduced enzyme activities and elevated plasma homocysteine levels. In 15 unrelated Dutch patients with homozygous CBS deficiency, we observed the 833T{yields}C (1278T) mutation in 50% of the alleles. Very recently, we identified a common mutation (677C{yields}T; A{yields}V) in the MTHFR gene, which, in homozygous state, is responsible for the thermolabile phenotype and which is associated with decreased specific MTHFR activity and elevated homocysteine levels. We screened 60 cardiovascular patients and 111 controls for these two mutations, to determine whether these mutations are risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease. Heterozygosity for the 833T{yields}C mutation in the CBS gene was observed in one individual of the control group but was absent in patients with premature cardiovascular disease. Homozygosity for the 677C-{yields}T mutation in the MTHFR gene was found in 9 (15%) of 60 cardiovascular patients and in only 6 ({approximately}5%) of 111 control individuals (odds ratio 3.1 [95% confidence interval 1.0-9.21]). Because of both the high prevalence of the 833T-{yields}C mutation among homozygotes for CBS deficiency and its absence in 60 cardiovascular patients, we may conclude that heterozygosity for CBS deficiency does not appear to be involved in premature cardiovascular disease. However, a frequent homozygous mutation in the MTHFR gene is associated with a threefold increase in risk for premature cardiovascular disease. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Genetic linkage analysis to identify a gene required for the addition of phosphoethanolamine to meningococcal lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christoph M; Stroud, Dave; Mackinnon, Fiona; Makepeace, Katherine; Plested, Joyce; Moxon, E Richard; Chalmers, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is important for the virulence of Neisseria meningitidis, and is the target of immune responses. We took advantage of a monoclonal antibody (Mab B5) that recognises phosphoethanolamine (PEtn) attached to the inner core of meningococcal LPS to identify genes required for the addition of PEtn to LPS. Insertional mutants that lost Mab B5 reactivity were isolated and characterised, but failed to yield genes directly responsible for PEtn substitution. Subsequent genetic linkage analysis was used to define a region of DNA containing a single intact open reading frame which is sufficient to confer B5 reactivity to a B5 negative meningococcal isolate. The results provide an initial characterisation of the genetic basis of a key, immunodominant epitope of meningococcal LPS.

  5. RET and EDNRB mutation screening in patients with Hirschsprung disease: Functional studies and its implications for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Widowati, Titis; Melhem, Shamiram; Patria, Suryono Y; de Graaf, Bianca M; Sinke, Richard J; Viel, Martijn; Dijkhuis, Jos; Sadewa, Ahmad H; Purwohardjono, Rochadi; Soenarto, Yati; Hofstra, Robert Mw; Sribudiani, Yunia

    2016-06-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a major cause of chronic constipation in children. HSCR can be caused by germline mutations in RET and EDNRB. Defining causality of the mutations identified is difficult and almost exclusively based on in silico predictions. Therefore, the reported frequency of pathogenic mutations might be overestimated. We combined mutation analysis with functional assays to determine the frequencies of proven pathogenic RET and EDNRB mutations in HSCR. We sequenced RET and EDNRB in 57 HSCR patients. The identified RET-coding variants were introduced into RET constructs and these were transfected into HEK293 cells to determine RET phosphorylation and activation via ERK. An exon trap experiment was performed to check a possible splice-site mutation. We identified eight rare RET-coding variants, one possible splice-site variant, but no rare EDNRB variants. Western blotting showed that three coding variants p.(Pr270Leu), p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys) resulted in lower activation of RET. Moreover, only two RET variants (p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys)) resulted in reduced ERK activation. Splice-site assays on c.1880-11A>G could not confirm its pathogenicity. Our data suggest that indeed almost half of the identified rare variants are proven pathogenic and that, hence, functional studies are essential for proper genetic counseling.

  6. A rapid automatic processing platform for bead label-assisted microarray analysis: application for genetic hearing-loss mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Song, Xiumei; Xiang, Guangxin; Feng, Zhengde; Guo, Hongju; Mei, Danyang; Zhang, Guohao; Wang, Dong; Mitchelson, Keith; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Molecular diagnostics using microarrays are increasingly being used in clinical diagnosis because of their high throughput, sensitivity, and accuracy. However, standard microarray processing takes several hours and involves manual steps during hybridization, slide clean up, and imaging. Here we describe the development of an integrated platform that automates these individual steps as well as significantly shortens the processing time and improves reproducibility. The platform integrates such key elements as a microfluidic chip, flow control system, temperature control system, imaging system, and automated analysis of clinical results. Bead labeling of microarray signals required a simple imaging system and allowed continuous monitoring of the microarray processing. To demonstrate utility, the automated platform was used to genotype hereditary hearing-loss gene mutations. Compared with conventional microarray processing procedures, the platform increases the efficiency and reproducibility of hybridization, speeding microarray processing through to result analysis. The platform also continuously monitors the microarray signals, which can be used to facilitate optimization of microarray processing conditions. In addition, the modular design of the platform lends itself to development of simultaneous processing of multiple microfluidic chips. We believe the novel features of the platform will benefit its use in clinical settings in which fast, low-complexity molecular genetic testing is required.

  7. Effect of multiplicative and additive noise on genetic transcriptional regulatory mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Mei; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Liu, Liang-Gang; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2009-02-01

    A multiplicative noise and an additive noise are introduced in the kinetic model of Smolen-Baxter-Byrne [P. Smolen, D.A. Baxter, J.H. Byrne, Amer. J. Physiol. Cell. Physiol. 274 (1998) 531], in which the expression of gene is controlled by protein concentration of transcriptional activator. The Fokker-Planck equation is solved and the steady-state probability distribution is obtained numerically. It is found that the multiplicative noise converts the bistability to monostability that can be regarded as a noise-induced transition. The additive noise reduces the transcription efficiency. The correlation between the multiplicative noise and the additive noise works as a genetic switch and regulates the gene transcription effectively.

  8. Genetic Panel Screening of Nearly 100 Mutations Reveals New Insights into the Breed Distribution of Risk Variants for Canine Hereditary Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Jonas; Möller, Fredrik; Kyöstilä, Kaisa; Sankari, Satu; Hytönen, Marjo; Giger, Urs; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Background The growing number of identified genetic disease risk variants across dog breeds challenges the current state-of-the-art of population screening, veterinary molecular diagnostics, and genetic counseling. Multiplex screening of such variants is now technologically feasible, but its practical potential as a supportive tool for canine breeding, disease diagnostics, pet care, and genetics research is still unexplored. Results To demonstrate the utility of comprehensive genetic panel screening, we tested nearly 7000 dogs representing around 230 breeds for 93 disease-associated variants using a custom-designed genotyping microarray (the MyDogDNA® panel test). In addition to known breed disease-associated mutations, we discovered 15 risk variants in a total of 34 breeds in which their presence was previously undocumented. We followed up on seven of these genetic findings to demonstrate their clinical relevance. We report additional breeds harboring variants causing factor VII deficiency, hyperuricosuria, lens luxation, von Willebrand’s disease, multifocal retinopathy, multidrug resistance, and rod-cone dysplasia. Moreover, we provide plausible molecular explanations for chondrodysplasia in the Chinook, cerebellar ataxia in the Norrbottenspitz, and familiar nephropathy in the Welsh Springer Spaniel. Conclusions These practical examples illustrate how genetic panel screening represents a comprehensive, efficient and powerful diagnostic and research discovery tool with a range of applications in veterinary care, disease research, and breeding. We conclude that several known disease alleles are more widespread across different breeds than previously recognized. However, careful follow up studies of any unexpected discoveries are essential to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, as is readiness to provide genetic counseling on their implications for the dog and its breed. PMID:27525650

  9. The Witschi Hypothesis revisited after 35 years: genetic proof from SP-C BRICHOS domain mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hang

    2013-01-01

    Over 35 years ago, Wanda Haschek and Hanspeter Witschi published a theory for the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis that dared to challenge the longstanding view of lung fibrosis as an “inflammatory disease.” On the basis of considerable experimental evidence, they proposed that lung fibrosis was initiated and propagated by microfoci of epithelial damage that, if unrepaired, upset the normal epithelial-fibroblast balance to create profibrotic microenvironments, without any obligatory contribution of “inflammatory” cells. Unfortunately, this theory was largely overlooked for many years. In the meantime, the repeated failure of attempts to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with anti-inflammatory regimens has led some investigators to revive the theory referred to, in decades past, as “The Witschi Hypothesis.” This manuscript briefly reviews more recent evidence in support of the “Severity of Epithelial Injury” Hypothesis proposed by Haschek and Witschi. More important, it offers the updated viewpoint that mutations in the BRICHOS domain of surfactant protein C, which cause interstitial lung disease and induce cell death specifically in lung epithelial cells, in effect provide genetic proof that the Witschi Hypothesis is indeed the correct theory to explain the pathogenesis of fibrosis in the lungs. PMID:24142519

  10. Characterization and genetic mapping of a mutation affecting apurinic endonuclease activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J E; Pattee, P A

    1986-01-01

    Protoplast fusion between the Rec- mutant RN981 (L. Wyman, R. V. Goering, and R. P. Novick, Genetics 76:681-702, 1974) of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 and a Rec+ NCTC 8325 derivative yielded Rec+ recombinants that exhibited the increased sensitivity to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine characteristic of RN981. Transformation analyses identified a specific mutation, designated ngr-374, that was responsible not only for N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine sensitivity, but also sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrous acid, and UV irradiation. However, ngr-374-carrying recombinants showed no significant increase in their sensitivity to mitomycin C or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide and were unaffected in recombination proficiency. In vitro assays showed that ngr-374-carrying strains had lower apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities than the wild type. The chromosomal locus occupied by ngr-374 was shown to exist in the gene order omega(Chr::Tn551)40-ngr-374-thrB106. PMID:2430940

  11. Genetics of mutations affecting the development of a barley floral bract.

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, C; Faccioli, P; Terzi, V; Stanca, A M; Cerioli, S; Castiglioni, P; Fink, R; Capone, R; Müller, K J; Bossinger, G; Rohde, W; Salamini, F

    2000-01-01

    Two groups of mutants that affect the morphology of the lemma, a floral bract of barley, are described. The first comprises phenotypes associated with mutant alleles of calcaroides loci. On the lemma of these mutants, a well-organized neomorphic structure is formed, termed the sac. We provide a morphological description of wild-type (WT) and mutant lemmas, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing that both consist of similar tissues, but that the mutant is characterized by reversed growth polarity. The sac is a unique structure among grasses, and it is remarkable that recessive mutations at five different genetic loci lead to the same organ. The second group of mutants carry recessive alleles of two leafy lemma genes, both of which are necessary to cause the transformation of the lemma into a structure having all characteristics of a vegetative leaf, as shown by SEM analysis. The presence of sheath, blade, and ligule in the mutant lemma suggests that wild-type lemma development is interrupted at a leaf-like stage. The genes cal a, b, C, d, 23, lel1, and lel2 have now been mapped at precise positions on linkage groups 2, 7, 7, 3, 7, 5, and 7, respectively. The mutants considered in this article are unaffected in other floral organs. A model for lemma development is suggested. PMID:10757774

  12. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Carvalho, Livia S; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Cowing, Jill A; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J; Munro, Peter M G; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype-genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1(rd8/rd8)/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling-features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1(rd8/rd8) line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers.

  13. FEMALE AND MALE GENETIC EFFECTS ON OFFSPRING PATERNITY: ADDITIVE GENETIC (CO)VARIANCES IN FEMALE EXTRA-PAIR REPRODUCTION AND MALE PATERNITY SUCCESS IN SONG SPARROWS (MELOSPIZA MELODIA)

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically. PMID:24724612

  14. Female and male genetic effects on offspring paternity: additive genetic (co)variances in female extra-pair reproduction and male paternity success in song sparrows (Melospiza melodia).

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-08-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically.

  15. [Mutational Analysis of Hemophilia B in Russia: Molecular-Genetic Study].

    PubMed

    Surin, V L; Demidova, E Yu; Selivanova, D S; Luchinina, Yu A; Salomashkina, V V; Pshenichnikova, O S; Likhacheva, E A

    2016-04-01

    Hemophilia B is a hereditary X-linked coagulation disorder. This pathology is caused by various defects in the factor IX gene, which is, being about 34 kb long and consisting of eight exons, localized in the Xq27 locus of the. X-chromosome long arm. Mutations were revealed in 56 unrelated patients with hemophilia B in this study by using direct sequencing of factor IX gene functionally important fragments. Forty-six mutations were found with prevailing missense mutations (n = 30). The rest of the mutations were nonsense (n = 4) and splicing (n = 4) mutations, large deletions (n = 3), microdeletions (n = 2), microinsertions (n = 2), and promoter mutations (n = 1). Eleven of 46 mutations were previously unknown for human populations.

  16. "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation": an interactive learning laboratory that communicates basic principles of genetics and cellular biology.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J Michael

    2016-03-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients have the sickle cell genotype/phenotype using DNA and blood samples from wild-type and transgenic mice that carry a sickle cell mutation. The inquiry-based, problem-solving approach facilitates the students' understanding of the basic concepts of genetics and cellular and molecular biology and provides experience with contemporary tools of biotechnology. It also leads to students' appreciation of the causes and consequences of this genetic disease, which is relatively common in individuals of African descent, and increases their understanding of the first principles of genetics. This protocol provides optimal learning when led by well-trained facilitators (including the classroom teacher) and carried out in small groups (6:1 student-to-teacher ratio). This high-quality experience can be offered to a large number of students at a relatively low cost, and it is especially effective in collaboration with a local science museum and/or university. Over the past 15 yr, >12,000 students have completed this inquiry-based learning experience and demonstrated a consistent, substantial increase in their understanding of the disease and genetics in general.

  17. Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Huchard, E; Charmantier, A; English, S; Bateman, A; Nielsen, J F; Clutton-Brock, T

    2014-09-01

    Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a cooperative mongoose. Our results indicate that (i) the correlation between early growth (prior to nutritional independence) and adult mass is positive but weak, and there are frequent changes (compensatory growth) in post-independence growth trajectories; (ii) among parameters describing growth trajectories, those describing growth rate (prior to and at nutritional independence) show undetectable heritability while associated size parameters (mass at nutritional independence and asymptotic mass) are moderately heritable (0.09 ≤ h(2) < 0.3); and (iii) additive genetic effects, rather than early environmental effects, mediate the covariance between early growth and adult mass. These results reveal that meerkat growth trajectories remain plastic throughout development, rather than showing early and irreversible divergence, and that the weak effects of early growth on adult mass, an important determinant of breeding success, are partly genetic. In contrast to most cooperative invertebrates, the acquisition of breeding status is often determined after sexual maturity and strongly impacted by chance in many cooperative vertebrates, who may therefore retain the ability to adjust their morphology to environmental changes and social opportunities arising throughout their development, rather than specializing early.

  18. Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Huchard, E; Charmantier, A; English, S; Bateman, A; Nielsen, J F; Clutton-Brock, T

    2014-09-01

    Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a cooperative mongoose. Our results indicate that (i) the correlation between early growth (prior to nutritional independence) and adult mass is positive but weak, and there are frequent changes (compensatory growth) in post-independence growth trajectories; (ii) among parameters describing growth trajectories, those describing growth rate (prior to and at nutritional independence) show undetectable heritability while associated size parameters (mass at nutritional independence and asymptotic mass) are moderately heritable (0.09 ≤ h(2) < 0.3); and (iii) additive genetic effects, rather than early environmental effects, mediate the covariance between early growth and adult mass. These results reveal that meerkat growth trajectories remain plastic throughout development, rather than showing early and irreversible divergence, and that the weak effects of early growth on adult mass, an important determinant of breeding success, are partly genetic. In contrast to most cooperative invertebrates, the acquisition of breeding status is often determined after sexual maturity and strongly impacted by chance in many cooperative vertebrates, who may therefore retain the ability to adjust their morphology to environmental changes and social opportunities arising throughout their development, rather than specializing early. PMID:24962704

  19. Genetic Background Strongly Modifies the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease, but Not Hearing Loss in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Ruihua; Torigoe, Daisuke; Suzuki, Sari; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Moritoh, Kanako; Sasaki, Nobuya; Agui, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is thought to result as a consequence of multiple gene interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate the developing gut. However, it remains unknown whether the single complete deletion of important HSCR-associated genes is sufficient to result in HSCR disease. In this study, we found that the null mutation of the Ednrb gene, thought indispensable for enteric neuron development, is insufficient to result in HSCR disease when bred onto a different genetic background in rats carrying Ednrbsl mutations. Moreover, we found that this mutation results in serious congenital sensorineural deafness, and these strains may be used as ideal models of Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 (WS4). Furthermore, we evaluated how the same changed genetic background modifies three features of WS4 syndrome, aganglionosis, hearing loss, and pigment disorder in these congenic strains. We found that the same genetic background markedly changed the aganglionosis, but resulted in only slight changes to hearing loss and pigment disorder. This provided the important evidence, in support of previous studies, that different lineages of neural crest-derived cells migrating along with various pathways are regulated by different signal molecules. This study will help us to better understand complicated diseases such as HSCR and WS4 syndrome. PMID:21915282

  20. An F1 genetic screen for maternal-effect mutations affecting embryonic pattern formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Luschnig, Stefan; Moussian, Bernard; Krauss, Jana; Desjeux, Isabelle; Perkovic, Josip; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale screens for female-sterile mutations have revealed genes required maternally for establishment of the body axes in the Drosophila embryo. Although it is likely that the majority of components involved in axis formation have been identified by this approach, certain genes have escaped detection. This may be due to (1) incomplete saturation of the screens for female-sterile mutations and (2) genes with essential functions in zygotic development that mutate to lethality, precluding their identification as female-sterile mutations. To overcome these limitations, we performed a genetic mosaic screen aimed at identifying new maternal genes required for early embryonic patterning, including zygotically required ones. Using the Flp-FRT technique and a visible germline clone marker, we developed a system that allows efficient screening for maternal-effect phenotypes after only one generation of breeding, rather than after the three generations required for classic female-sterile screens. We identified 232 mutants showing various defects in embryonic pattern or morphogenesis. The mutants were ordered into 10 different phenotypic classes. A total of 174 mutants were assigned to 86 complementation groups with two alleles on average. Mutations in 45 complementation groups represent most previously known maternal genes, while 41 complementation groups represent new loci, including several involved in dorsoventral, anterior-posterior, and terminal patterning. PMID:15166158

  1. A genome-editing strategy to treat β-hemoglobinopathies that recapitulates a mutation associated with a benign genetic condition.

    PubMed

    Traxler, Elizabeth A; Yao, Yu; Wang, Yong-Dong; Woodard, Kaitly J; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hughes, Jim R; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A; Li, Chunliang; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2016-09-01

    Disorders resulting from mutations in the hemoglobin subunit beta gene (HBB; which encodes β-globin), mainly sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia, become symptomatic postnatally as fetal γ-globin expression from two paralogous genes, hemoglobin subunit gamma 1 (HBG1) and HBG2, decreases and adult β-globin expression increases, thereby shifting red blood cell (RBC) hemoglobin from the fetal (referred to as HbF or α2γ2) to adult (referred to as HbA or α2β2) form. These disorders are alleviated when postnatal expression of fetal γ-globin is maintained. For example, in hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), a benign genetic condition, mutations attenuate γ-globin-to-β-globin switching, causing high-level HbF expression throughout life. Co-inheritance of HPFH with β-thalassemia- or SCD-associated gene mutations alleviates their clinical manifestations. Here we performed CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing of human blood progenitors to mutate a 13-nt sequence that is present in the promoters of the HBG1 and HBG2 genes, thereby recapitulating a naturally occurring HPFH-associated mutation. Edited progenitors produced RBCs with increased HbF levels that were sufficient to inhibit the pathological hypoxia-induced RBC morphology found in SCD. Our findings identify a potential DNA target for genome-editing-mediated therapy of β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:27525524

  2. Genetic and biochemical characterization of mutations affecting the ability of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to metabolize D-xylose

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.P.; Zahab, D.M.; Mahmourides, G.; Maleszka, R.; Schneider, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Induced mutants, selected for their defective growth on D-xylose while retaining the ability to grow normally on D-glucose, were studied in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast capable of converting D-xylose to ethanol. Fourteen of the mutations were found to occur at nine distinct loci, and data indicated that many more loci remain to be detected. Most of the mutations were pleiotropic in character, and the expression of some of them was much affected by nutritional conditions and by genetic background. Mutations at several loci resulted in poor growth on at least one compound that was either an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, succinate or {alpha}-ketoglutarate, or on compounds metabolizable via this cycle, ethanol or glycerol. An initial biochemical characterization of the mutants was undertaken. Analysis for xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulose kinase activity showed that one or more of these activities was affected in 12 of 13 mutants. However, drastic reduction in activity of a single enzyme was confined to that of xylitol dehydrogenase by mutations at three different loci and to that of D-xylose reductase by mutation at another locus. Growth of these latter four mutants was normal on all carbon sources tested that were not five-carbon sugars.

  3. Role of genetic polymorphisms and mutations in colorectal cancer therapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Marco; Vella, Nadia; Cannavò, Calogero; Scalisi, Aurora; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Buonadonna, Angela; Libra, Massimo; Stivala, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Gene polymorphisms and mutations in various types of cancer may predict clinical response to chemotherapy and related toxicity, since they may affect the metabolism of the drugs commonly used in combination chemotherapy treatments. However, conflicting data have been generated on this subject. To elucidate this issue, this review discusses the clinical applications of several genetic polymorphisms in colorectal cancer patients treated with the most common agents alone or in combination. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 is a conjugating biotransformation enzyme that plays a role in maintaining the levels of endogenous compounds (e.g., bilirubin) and in handling exogenous compounds, including carcinogens. It has been demonstrated that the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism plays a predictive role in patients administered an irinotecan-containing regimen. Polymorphisms in XPD (Lys751Gln), a member of the nucleotide excision repair pathway, negatively affect response to therapy, with oxaliplatin/5FU reducing the survival of the patient. A similar reaction has also been observed in patients with the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism, while patients with the GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism have an improved response to oxaliplatin/5FU therapy. Treatment with biological compounds such as cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody, has been shown to be effective only in colon cancer patients with wild-type K-Ras. Fc polymorphisms are associated with progression-free survival in patients treated with cetuximab. Another monoclonal antibody useful in the treatment of colon cancer is bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); however, in some cases bevacizumab may cause deep vein thrombosis (DVP). In a related vein, our recent unpublished data show that the VEGF C936T polymorphism may increase the risk of DVP in cancer patients. In conclusion, this review indicates that certain polymorphisms increase the effectiveness of

  4. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  5. Genetic Control of Phosphate-Metabolizing Enzymes in NEUROSPORA CRASSA: Relationships among Regulatory Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Barbara S.; Chia, William; Metzenberg, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the phosphate-metabolizing enzymes are made during phosphate starvation, but not under phosphate sufficiency. The synthesis of these enzymes is controlled by three regulatory genes: pcon-nuc-2, preg and nuc-1. pcon-nuc-2 and preg are closely linked. A model of the hierarchical relationships among these regulatory genes is presented. Studies of double mutants and revertants confirm several predictions of the model. It has been found that nuc-2 (null) and pconc (constitutive) mutations reside in the same cistron. pregc (constitutive) mutations are epistatic to nuc-2 mutations. nuc-1 (null) mutations are epistatic to all others. PMID:123873

  6. Genetic rearrangements of six wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P addition lines revealed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Han, Haiming; Bai, Li; Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat-A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  7. Single-cell codetection of metabolic activity, intracellular functional proteins, and genetic mutations from rare circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yin; Sun, Shuai; Wang, Zhihua; Wu, Wenjun; Zhao, Xiaodong; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Yan; Tian, Jianhui; Xu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Deng, Yuliang; Shi, Qihui

    2015-10-01

    The high glucose uptake and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells has long made these features, together with the mutational spectrum, prime diagnostic targets of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Further, an ability to characterize these properties at a single cell resolution is widely believed to be essential, as the known extensive heterogeneity in CTCs can obscure important correlations in data obtained from cell population-based methods. However, to date, it has not been possible to quantitatively measure metabolic, proteomic, and genetic data from a single CTC. Here we report a microchip-based approach that allows for the codetection of glucose uptake, intracellular functional proteins, and genetic mutations at the single-cell level from rare tumor cells. The microchip contains thousands of nanoliter grooves (nanowells) that isolate individual CTCs and allow for the assessment of their glucose uptake via imaging of a fluorescent glucose analog, quantification of a panel of intracellular signaling proteins using a miniaturized antibody barcode microarray, and retrieval of the individual cell nuclei for subsequent off-chip genome amplification and sequencing. This approach integrates molecular-scale information on the metabolic, proteomic, and genetic status of single cells and permits the inference of associations between genetic signatures, energy consumption, and phosphoproteins oncogenic signaling activities in CTCs isolated from blood samples of patients. Importantly, this microchip chip-based approach achieves this multidimensional molecular analysis with minimal cell loss (<20%), which is the bottleneck of the rare cell analysis. PMID:26378744

  8. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  9. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of Suppressors of Sir4 Mutations in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, R.; D'Ari, L.; Foss, M.; Goodman, D.; Rine, J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to learn more about other proteins that may be involved in repression of HML and HMR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, extragenic suppressor mutations were identified that could restore repression in cells defective in SIR4, a gene required for function of the silencer elements flanking HML and HMR. These suppressor mutations, which define at least three new genes, SAN1, SAN2 and SAN3, arose at the frequency expected for loss-of-function mutations following mutagenesis. All san mutations were recessive. Suppression by san1 was allele-nonspecific, since san1 could suppress two very different alleles of SIR4, and was locus-specific since san1 was unable to suppress a SIR3 mutation or a variety of mutations conferring auxotrophies. The SAN1 gene was cloned, sequenced, and used to construct a null allele. The null allele had the same phenotype as the EMS-induced mutations and exhibited no pleiotropies of its own. Thus, the SAN1 gene was not essential. SAN1-mediated suppression was neither due to compensatory mutations in interacting proteins, nor to translational missense suppression. SAN1 may act posttranslationally to control the stability or activity of the SIR4 protein. PMID:2471670

  10. Computational Simulation and Analysis of Mutations: Nucleotide Fixation, Allelic Age and Rare Genetic Variations in Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Shuhao

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the complexity of mutations, a computational approach named Genome Evolution by Matrix Algorithms ("GEMA") has been implemented. GEMA models genomic changes, taking into account hundreds of mutations within each individual in a population. By modeling of entire human chromosomes, GEMA precisely mimics real…

  11. Unusual Splice-Site Mutations in the RSK2 Gene and Suggestion of Genetic Heterogeneity in Coffin-Lowry Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zeniou, Maria; Pannetier, Solange; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Hanauer, André

    2002-01-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a syndromic form of X-linked mental retardation that is characterized, in male patients, by psychomotor and growth retardation and various skeletal anomalies. Typical facial changes and specific clinical and radiological hand aspects exhibited by patients are essential clues for the diagnosis. CLS is caused by mutations in a gene that is located in Xp22.2 and that encodes RSK2, a growth-factor–regulated protein kinase. RSK2 mutations are extremely heterogeneous and lead to premature termination of translation and/or loss of phosphotransferase activity. Surprisingly, among a series of 250 patients screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, in whom a clinical diagnosis of CLS was made, no mutations were detected in 66% (165) of the patients. To determine what proportion of these latter patients have a RSK2 mutation that has not been detected and what proportion have different disorders that are phenotypically similar to CLS, we have, in the present article, investigated, by western blot analysis and in vitro kinase assay, cell lines from 26 patients in whom no mutation was previously identified by SSCP analysis. This approach allowed us to identify seven novel RSK2 mutations: two changes in the coding sequence of RSK2, one intragenic deletion, and four unusual intronic nucleotide substitutions that do not affect the consensus GT or AG splice sites. We have also determined the nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the RSK2 gene, and we have screened it for mutations. No disease-causing nucleotide change was identified, suggesting that mutations affecting the promoter region are unlikely to account for a large number of patients with CLS. Finally, our results provide evidence that some patients have a disease that is phenotypically very similar to CLS, which is not caused by RSK2 defects. This suggests that there are defects in either additional genes or combinations of genes that may result in a CLS

  12. Large family with both parents affected by distinct BRCA1 mutations: implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Voskresenskiy, Dmitry A; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Bit-Sava, Elena M; Gutkina, Nadezhda I; Anisimenko, Maxim S; Yu Sherina, Nathalia; Mitiushkina, Nathalia V; Ulibina, Yulia M; Yatsuk, Olga S; Zaitseva, Olga A; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Togo, Alexandr V; Pospelov, Valery A; Kovalenko, Sergey P; Semiglazov, Vladimir F; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2009-01-01

    Although the probability of both parents being affected by BRCA1 mutations is not negligible, such families have not been systematically described in the literature. Here we present a large breast-ovarian cancer family, where 3 sisters and 1 half-sister inherited maternal BRCA1 5382insC mutation while the remaining 2 sisters carried paternal BRCA1 1629delC allele. No BRCA1 homozygous mutations has been detected, that is consistent with the data on lethality of BRCA1 knockout mice. This report exemplifies that the identification of a single cancer-predisposing mutation within the index patient may not be sufficient in some circumstances. Ideally, all family members affected by breast or ovarian tumor disease have to be subjected to the DNA testing, and failure to detect the mutation in any of them calls for the search of the second cancer-associated allele. PMID:19338681

  13. Heritability of heterozygosity offers a new way of understanding why dominant gene action contributes to additive genetic variance.

    PubMed

    Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2015-07-01

    Whenever allele frequencies are unequal, nonadditive gene action contributes to additive genetic variance and therefore the resemblance between parents and offspring. The reason for this has not been easy to understand. Here, we present a new single-locus decomposition of additive genetic variance that may give greater intuition about this important result. We show that the contribution of dominant gene action to parent-offspring resemblance only depends on the degree to which the heterozygosity of parents and offspring covary. Thus, dominant gene action only contributes to additive genetic variance when heterozygosity is heritable. Under most circumstances this is the case because individuals with rare alleles are more likely to be heterozygous, and because they pass rare alleles to their offspring they also tend to have heterozygous offspring. When segregating alleles are at equal frequency there are no rare alleles, the heterozygosities of parents and offspring are uncorrelated and dominant gene action does not contribute to additive genetic variance. PMID:26100570

  14. Genetic mutation analysis in Japanese patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroko; Nakaji, Mai; Kitano, Masataka; Kim, Ki-Sung; Sagawa, Koichi; Ishikawa, Shiro; Satokata, Ichiro; Mitani, Yoshihide; Kato, Hitoshi; Hamaoka, Kenji; Echigo, Shigeyuki; Shiraishi, Isao; Morisaki, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect occurring in humans and some transcriptional factors have been identified as causative. However, additional mutation analysis of these genes is necessary to develop effective diagnostic and medical treatment methods. We conducted sequence analysis of the coding regions of NKX2.5, GATA4, TBX1, TBX5, TBX20, CFC1 and ZIC3 in 111 Japanese patients with non-syndromic CHD and 9 of their relatives. All patient samples were also analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification using probes involved in chromosome deletion related to CHD. Five novel variations of TBX5, GATA4 and TBX20 were detected in 6 of the patients, whereas none were found in 200 controls. The TBX5 variation p.Pro108Thr, located in the T-box domain, was identified in a patient with tricuspid atresia, an exon-intron boundary variation of GATA4 (IVS4+5G>A) was detected in a Tetralogy of Fallot patient and an 8p23 microdeletion was detected in one patient with atrioventricular septal defect and psychomotor delay. A total of seven non-synonymous polymorphisms were found in the patients and controls. Accumulation of novel variations of genes involving the cardiac development may be required for better understanding of CHD. PMID:26490186

  15. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  16. Characterization of a New DGKE Intronic Mutation in Genetically Unsolved Cases of Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mele, Caterina; Lemaire, Mathieu; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Piras, Rossella; Bresin, Elena; Bettoni, Serena; Bick, David; Helbling, Daniel; Veith, Regan; Valoti, Elisabetta; Donadelli, Roberta; Murer, Luisa; Neunhäuserer, Maria; Breno, Matteo; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Lifton, Richard; Noris, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Genetic and acquired abnormalities causing dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, nonimmune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. However, in a substantial proportion of patients the disease-associated alterations are still unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing were performed in two unrelated families with infantile recessive aHUS. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals was used to test for the presence of aberrant mRNA species. Expression of mutant diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKE) protein was evaluated with western blotting. Results Whole-exome sequencing analysis with conventional variant filtering parameters did not reveal any obvious candidate mutation in the first family. The report of aHUS-associated mutations in DGKE, encoding DGKE, led to re-examination of the noncoding DGKE variants obtained from next-generation sequencing, allowing identification of a novel intronic DGKE mutation (c.888+40A>G) that segregated with disease. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals revealed aberrant forms of DGKE mRNA predicted to cause profound abnormalities in the protein catalytic site. By whole-genome sequencing, the same mutation was found in compound heterozygosity with a second nonsense DGKE mutation in all affected siblings of another unrelated family. Homozygous and compound heterozygous patients presented similar clinical features, including aHUS presentation in the first year of life, multiple relapsing episodes, and proteinuria, which are prototypical of DGKE-associated aHUS. Conclusions This is the first report of a mutation located beyond the exon-intron boundaries in aHUS. Intronic mutations such as these are underreported because conventional filtering parameters used to process next-generation sequencing data routinely

  17. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness.

  18. Genetic heterogeneity in Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome: delineation of the phenotype of the first patients carrying mutations in EP300

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdi, Deborah; Roelfsema, Jeroen H; Papadia, Francesco; Breuning, Martijn H; Niedrist, Dunja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Schinzel, Albert; Peters, Dorien J M

    2007-01-01

    Background Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a congenital disorder characterised by growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms, skeletal abnormalities and mental retardation. Broad thumbs and halluces are the hallmarks of the syndrome. RSTS is associated with chromosomal rearrangements and mutations in the CREB‐binding protein gene (CREBBP), also termed CBP, encoding the CREB‐binding protein. Recently, it was shown that mutations in EP300, coding for the p300 protein, also cause RSTS. CBP and EP300 are highly homologous genes, which play important roles as global transcriptional coactivators. Objective To report the phenotype of the presently known patients with RSTS (n = 4) carrying germline mutations of EP300. Results The patients with EP300 mutations displayed the typical facial gestalt and malformation pattern compatible with the diagnosis of RSTS. However, three patients exhibited much milder skeletal findings on the hands and feet than typically observed in patients with RSTS. Conclusions Part of the clinical variability in RSTS is explained by genetic heterogeneity. The diagnosis of RSTS must be expanded to include patients without broad thumbs or halluces. PMID:17220215

  19. From molecular genetics to phylodynamics: evolutionary relevance of mutation rates across viruses.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Although evolution is a multifactorial process, theory posits that the speed of molecular evolution should be directly determined by the rate at which spontaneous mutations appear. To what extent these two biochemical and population-scale processes are related in nature, however, is largely unknown. Viruses are an ideal system for addressing this question because their evolution is fast enough to be observed in real time, and experimentally-determined mutation rates are abundant. This article provides statistically supported evidence that the mutation rate determines molecular evolution across all types of viruses. Properties of the viral genome such as its size and chemical composition are identified as major determinants of these rates. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis reveals that, as expected, evolution rates increase linearly with mutation rates for slowly mutating viruses. However, this relationship plateaus for fast mutating viruses. A model is proposed in which deleterious mutations impose an evolutionary speed limit and set an extinction threshold in nature. The model is consistent with data from replication kinetics, selection strength and chemical mutagenesis studies.

  20. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of nucleic acid-based devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and the genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance. Final order.

    PubMed

    2014-10-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB-complex) and the genetic mutations associated with MTB-complex antibiotic resistance in respiratory specimens devices into class II (special controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) because special controls, in addition to general controls, will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  1. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    PubMed

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes.

  2. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    PubMed

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes. PMID:26801640

  3. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  4. Incipient allochronic speciation due to non-selective assortative mating by flowering time, mutation and genetic drift

    PubMed Central

    Devaux, Céline; Lande, Russell

    2008-01-01

    We model the evolution of flowering time using a multilocus quantitative genetic model with non-selective assortative mating and mutation to investigate incipient allochronic speciation in a finite population. For quantitative characters with evolutionary parameters satisfying empirical observations and two approximate inequalities that we derived, disjunct clusters in the population flowering phenology originated within a few thousand generations in the absence of disruptive natural or sexual selection. Our simulations and the conditions we derived showed that cluster formation was promoted by limited population size, high mutational variance of flowering time, short individual flowering phenology and a long flowering season. By contrast, cluster formation was hindered by inbreeding depression, stabilizing selection and pollinator limitation. Our results suggest that incipient allochronic speciation in populations of limited size (satisfying two inequalities) could be a common phenomenon. PMID:18700202

  5. The genetic epidemiology of the form of microcephaly ascribed to mutation at the WDR62 locus.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan Edmund

    2016-08-01

    The disorder associated with mutation in the WDR62 gene MCPH2 is taken as the prototype of a condition which has a recessive mode of inheritance. The mutant homozygote has relatively lower fitness defined by the selection coefficient. Formulae which relate the incidence of the disorder to the mutation rate and the gene frequency in equilibrium when some degree of inbreeding occurs in the population are given. PMID:27570775

  6. The genetic epidemiology of the form of microcephaly ascribed to mutation at the WDR62 locus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The disorder associated with mutation in the WDR62 gene MCPH2 is taken as the prototype of a condition which has a recessive mode of inheritance. The mutant homozygote has relatively lower fitness defined by the selection coefficient. Formulae which relate the incidence of the disorder to the mutation rate and the gene frequency in equilibrium when some degree of inbreeding occurs in the population are given. PMID:27570775

  7. A molecular model for the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the mouse lethal yellow (A{sup y}) mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E.J.; Klebig, M.L.; Stubbs, L.J.; Russell, L.B.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Vugt, M.J. van |

    1994-03-29

    Lethal yellow (A{sup y}) is a mutation at the mouse agouti locus in chromosome 2 that causes a number of dominant pleiotropic effects, including a completely yellow coat color, obesity, an insulin-resistant type II diabetic condition, and an increased propensity to develop a variety of spontaneous and induced tumors. Additionally, homozygosity for A{sup y} results in preimplantation lethality, which terminates development by the blastocyst stage. The A{sup y} mutation is the result of a 170-kb deletion that removes all but the promoter and noncoding first exon of another gene called Raly, which lies in the same transcriptional orientation as agouti and maps 280 kb proximal to the 3{prime} end of the agouti gene. The authors present a model for the structure of the A{sub y} allele that can explain the dominant pleiotropic effects associated with this mutation, as well as the recessive lethality, which is unrelated to the agouti gene.

  8. INS-gene mutations: From genetics and beta cell biology to clinical disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Sun, Jinhong; Cui, Jinqiu; Chen, Wei; Guo, Huan; Barbetti, Fabrizio; Arvan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A growing list of insulin gene mutations causing a new form of monogenic diabetes has drawn increasing attention over the past seven years. The mutations have been identified in the untranslated regions of the insulin gene as well as the coding sequence of preproinsulin including within the signal peptide, insulin B-chain, C-peptide, insulin A-chain, and the proteolytic cleavage sites both for signal peptidase and the prohormone convertases. These mutations affect a variety of different steps of insulin biosynthesis in pancreatic beta cells. Importantly, although many of these mutations cause proinsulin misfolding with early onset autosomal dominant diabetes, some of the mutant alleles appear to engage different cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie beta cell failure and diabetes. In this article, we review the most recent advances in the field and discuss challenges as well as potential strategies to prevent/delay the development and progression of autosomal dominant diabetes caused by INS-gene mutations. It is worth noting that although diabetes caused by INS gene mutations is rare, increasing evidence suggests that defects in the pathway of insulin biosynthesis may also be involved in the progression of more common types of diabetes. Collectively, the (pre)proinsulin mutants provide insightful molecular models to better understand the pathogenesis of all forms of diabetes in which preproinsulin processing defects, proinsulin misfolding, and ER stress are involved. PMID:25542748

  9. Spatio-temporal genetic heterogeneity of CTNNB1 mutations in sporadic desmoid type fibromatosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Jérôme; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Hostein, Isabelle; Karanian-Philippe, Marie; Chevreau, Christine; Breibach, Florence; Coutts, Michael; Dadone, Bérengère; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Gugenheim, Jean; Duffaud, Florence; Pedeutour, Florence

    2016-03-01

    Desmoid type fibromatosis (DT) is a rare lesion of unclear pathogenesis that most often presents a mutation of the (β-catenin) gene. The natural history and clinical evolution are highly variable between patients and to date there is no consensus on optimal therapy. We report two cases of a patient with multiple DT lesions. Molecular investigations performed in both patients on multiple tumors at different anatomical sites revealed non-identical CTNNB1 mutations. The first patient was a 39-year-old man with a history of recurrent DT. In two of the DT lesions, three different mutations were found in codons 41 and 45, respectively. The lesions showed marked inflammatory features, characterized by IgG4 positive lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and a foreign body reaction, which increased in intensity over time. The patient was eventually treated with a COX-2 inhibitor and the remaining mass was stabilized. In the two DT lesions of the second patient, CTNNB1 mutations S45P and T41A were found. The presence of different mutations in multiple focally recurrent sporadic DT lesions indicates that they do not have a clonal relationship. Our data suggest that a CTNNB1 mutation is a necessary event probably by providing a selective growth advantage. An IgG4 host antigen response is discussed as a potential predisposing factor for one of the patients. PMID:26666421

  10. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10-15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  11. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A.; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10–15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  12. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer.

  13. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer. PMID:20934514

  14. Patients with genetically heterogeneous synchronous colorectal cancer carry rare damaging germline mutations in immune-related genes.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Matteo; Gambardella, Gennaro; Benedetti, Lorena; Iannelli, Fabio; Patel, Dominic; Basso, Gianluca; Guerra, Rosalinda F; Mourikis, Thanos P; Puccio, Ignazio; Sinha, Shruti; Laghi, Luigi; Spencer, Jo; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (syCRCs) are physically separated tumours that develop simultaneously. To understand how the genetic and environmental background influences the development of multiple tumours, here we conduct a comparative analysis of 20 syCRCs from 10 patients. We show that syCRCs have independent genetic origins, acquire dissimilar somatic alterations, and have different clone composition. This inter- and intratumour heterogeneity must be considered in the selection of therapy and in the monitoring of resistance. SyCRC patients show a higher occurrence of inherited damaging mutations in immune-related genes compared to patients with solitary colorectal cancer and to healthy individuals from the 1,000 Genomes Project. Moreover, they have a different composition of immune cell populations in tumour and normal mucosa, and transcriptional differences in immune-related biological processes. This suggests an environmental field effect that promotes multiple tumours likely in the background of inflammation. PMID:27377421

  15. Patients with genetically heterogeneous synchronous colorectal cancer carry rare damaging germline mutations in immune-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Matteo; Gambardella, Gennaro; Benedetti, Lorena; Iannelli, Fabio; Patel, Dominic; Basso, Gianluca; Guerra, Rosalinda F.; Mourikis, Thanos P.; Puccio, Ignazio; Sinha, Shruti; Laghi, Luigi; Spencer, Jo; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Ciccarelli, Francesca D.

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (syCRCs) are physically separated tumours that develop simultaneously. To understand how the genetic and environmental background influences the development of multiple tumours, here we conduct a comparative analysis of 20 syCRCs from 10 patients. We show that syCRCs have independent genetic origins, acquire dissimilar somatic alterations, and have different clone composition. This inter- and intratumour heterogeneity must be considered in the selection of therapy and in the monitoring of resistance. SyCRC patients show a higher occurrence of inherited damaging mutations in immune-related genes compared to patients with solitary colorectal cancer and to healthy individuals from the 1,000 Genomes Project. Moreover, they have a different composition of immune cell populations in tumour and normal mucosa, and transcriptional differences in immune-related biological processes. This suggests an environmental field effect that promotes multiple tumours likely in the background of inflammation. PMID:27377421

  16. Toxicological safety assessment of genetically modified Bacillus thuringiensis with additional N-acyl homoserine lactonase gene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Donghai; Zhou, Chenfei; Chen, Shouwen; Ruan, Lifang; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the toxicology safety to mammals of a genetically modified (GM) Bacillus thuringiensis with an additional N-acyl homoserine lactones gene (aiiA), which possesses insecticidal activity together with restraint of bacterial pathogenicity and is intended for use as a multifunctional biopesticide. Safety assessments included an acute oral toxicity test and 28-d animal feeding study in Wistar rats, primary eye and dermal irritation in Zealand White rabbits, and delayed contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. Tests were conducted using spray-dried powder preparation. This GM product showed toxicity neither in oral acute toxicity test nor in 28-d animal feeding test at a dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. During the animal feeding test, there were no significant differences in growth, food and water consumption, hematology, blood biochemical indices, organ weights, and histopathology finding between rats in controls and tested groups. Tested animals in primary eye and dermal irritation and delayed contact hypersensitivity test were also devoid of any toxicity compared to controls. All the above results demonstrated that the GM based multifunctional B. thuringiensis has low toxicity and low eye and dermal irritation and would not cause hypersensitivity to laboratory mammals and therefore could be regarded as safe for use as a pesticide.

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  18. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  19. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Clinical characteristics and molecular genetic analysis of 22 patients with neonatal diabetes from the South-Eastern region of Turkey: predominance of non-KATP channel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Demirbilek, Huseyin; Arya, Ved Bhushan; Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Houghton, Jayne A L; Baran, Riza Taner; Akar, Melek; Tekes, Selahattin; Tuzun, Heybet; Mackay, Deborah J; Flanagan, Sarah E; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian; Hussain, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare form of monogenic diabetes and usually presents in the first 6 months of life. We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and molecular genetics of a large Turkish cohort of NDM patients from a single centre and estimate an annual incidence rate of NDM in South-Eastern Anatolian region of Turkey. Design and methods NDM patients presenting to Diyarbakir Children State Hospital between 2010 and 2013, and patients under follow-up with presumed type 1 diabetes mellitus, with onset before 6 months of age were recruited. Molecular genetic analysis was performed. Results Twenty-two patients (59% males) were diagnosed with NDM (TNDM-5; PNDM-17). Molecular genetic analysis identified a mutation in 20 (95%) patients who had undergone a mutation analysis. In transient neonatal diabetes (TNDM) patients, the genetic cause included chromosome 6q24 abnormalities (n=3), ABCC8 (n=1) and homozygous INS (n=1). In permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM) patients, homozygous GCK (n=6), EIF2AK3 (n=3), PTF1A (n=3), and INS (n=1) and heterozygous KCNJ11 (n=2) mutations were identified. Pancreatic exocrine dysfunction was observed in patients with mutations in the distal PTF1A enhancer. Both patients with a KCNJ11 mutation responded to oral sulphonylurea. A variable phenotype was associated with the homozygous c.-331C>A INS mutation, which was identified in both a PNDM and TNDM patient. The annual incidence of PNDM in South-East Anatolian region of Turkey was one in 48 000 live births. Conclusions Homozygous mutations in GCK, EIF2AK3 and the distal enhancer region of PTF1A were the commonest causes of NDM in our cohort. The high rate of detection of a mutation likely reflects the contribution of new genetic techniques (targeted next-generation sequencing) and increased consanguinity within our cohort. PMID:25755231

  1. De novo gene mutations highlight patterns of genetic and neural complexity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Roos, J Louw; Boone, Braden; Woodrick, Scarlet; Sun, Yan; Levy, Shawn; Gogos, Joseph A; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate evidence for de novo etiologies in schizophrenia, we sequenced at high coverage the exomes of families recruited from two populations with distinct demographic structures and history. We sequenced a total of 795 exomes from 231 parent-proband trios enriched for sporadic schizophrenia cases, as well as 34 unaffected trios. We observed in cases an excess of de novo nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants as well as a higher prevalence of gene-disruptive de novo mutations relative to controls. We found four genes (LAMA2, DPYD, TRRAP and VPS39) affected by recurrent de novo events within or across the two populations, which is unlikely to have occurred by chance. We show that de novo mutations affect genes with diverse functions and developmental profiles, but we also find a substantial contribution of mutations in genes with higher expression in early fetal life. Our results help define the genomic and neural architecture of schizophrenia. PMID:23042115

  2. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  3. [Questions safety and tendency of using genetically modified microorganisms in food, food additives and food derived].

    PubMed

    Khovaev, A A

    2008-01-01

    In this article analysis questions of using genetically modified microorganisms in manufacture food production, present new GMM used in manufacture -food ferments; results of medical biological appraisal/ microbiological and genetic expert examination/ of food, getting by use microorganisms or there producents with indication modern of control methods.

  4. Horka, a dominant mutation of Drosophila, induces nondisjunction and, through paternal effect, chromosome loss and genetic mosaics

    SciTech Connect

    Szabad, J.; Mathe, E.; Puro, J.

    1995-04-01

    Fs(3) Horka (Horka) was described as a dominant female-sterile mutation of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic and cytological data show that Horka induces mostly equational nondisjunction during spermatogenesis but not chromosome loss and possesses a predominant paternal effect: the X, second, third and the fourth chromosomes, but not the Y, are rendered unstable while undergoing spermatogenesis and may be lost in the descending zygotes. The frequency of Horka-induced chromosome loss is usually 2-4% but varies with the genetic background and can be over 20%. The X chromosome loss occurs during the gonomeric and the initial cleavage divisions. Loss of the X and fourth chromosomes shows no correlation. We propose, based on similarities in the mutant phenotypes with the chromosome destabilizing mutations nonclaret disjunctional and paternal loss, that the normal Horka{sup +} product is required for function of the centromeres and/or nearby regions. Horka is a convenient tool for the generation of gynandromorphs, autosome mosaics and for the study of gene expression in mosaics. 55 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Disentangling the Influence of Mutation and Migration in Clonal Seagrasses Using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum for Microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Moalic, Yann; Hernández-García, Emilio; Eguiluz, Victor M; Alberto, Filipe; Serrão, Ester A; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-03-19

    The recurrent lack of isolation by distance reported at regional scale in seagrass species was recently suggested to stem from stochastic events of large-scale dispersal. We explored the usefulness of phylogenetic information contained in microsatellite loci to test this hypothesis by using the Genetic Diversity Spectrum (GDS) on databases containing, respectively, 7 and 9 microsatellites genotypes for 1541 sampling units of Posidonia oceanica and 1647 of Cymodocea nodosa. The simultaneous increase of microsatellite and geographic distances that emerges reveals a coherent pattern of isolation by distance in contrast to the chaotic pattern previously described using allele frequencies, in particular, for the long-lived P. oceanica. These results suggest that the lack of isolation by distance, rather than the resulting from rare events of large-scale dispersal, reflects at least for some species a stronger influence of mutation over migration at the scale of the distribution range. The global distribution of genetic polymorphism may, therefore, result predominantly from ancient events of step-by-step (re)colonization followed by local recruitment and clonal growth, rather than contemporary gene flow. The analysis of GDS appears useful to unravel the evolutionary forces influencing the dynamics and evolution at distinct temporal and spatial scales by accounting for phylogenetic information borne by microsatellites, under an appropriate mutation model. This finding adds nuance to the generalization of the influence of large-scale dispersal on the dynamics of seagrasses.

  6. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  7. Genetic mosaic analysis of a deleterious mitochondrial DNA mutation in Drosophila reveals novel aspects of mitochondrial regulation and function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Qi, Yun; French, Stephanie; Zhang, Guofeng; Garcia, Raúl Covian; Balaban, Robert; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Various human diseases are associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, but heteroplasmy—the coexistence of mutant and wild-type mtDNA—complicates their study. We previously isolated a temperature-lethal mtDNA mutation in Drosophila, mt:CoIT300I, which affects the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (CoI) locus. In the present study, we found that the decrease in cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was ascribable to a temperature-dependent destabilization of cytochrome a heme. Consistently, the viability of homoplasmic flies at 29°C was fully restored by expressing an alternative oxidase, which specifically bypasses the cytochrome chains. Heteroplasmic flies are fully viable and were used to explore the age-related and tissue-specific phenotypes of mt:CoIT300I. The proportion of mt:CoIT300I genome remained constant in somatic tissues along the aging process, suggesting a lack of quality control mechanism to remove defective mitochondria containing a deleterious mtDNA mutation. Using a genetic scheme that expresses a mitochondrially targeted restriction enzyme to induce tissue-specific homoplasmy in heteroplasmic flies, we found that mt:CoIT300I homoplasmy in the eye caused severe neurodegeneration at 29°C. Degeneration was suppressed by improving mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, suggesting that Ca2+ mishandling contributed to mt:CoIT300I pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate a novel approach for Drosophila mtDNA genetics and its application in modeling mtDNA diseases. PMID:25501370

  8. Genetics and Molecular Modeling of New Mutations of Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis in a Single Italian Center

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Callea, Francesco; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Torre, Giuliano; De Ville De Goyet, Jean; Francalanci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestases (FICs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. Three distinct forms are described: FIC1 and FIC2, associated with low/normal GGT level in serum, which are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and defects in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump protein, respectively; FIC3, linked to high GGT level, involves impaired biliary phospholipid secretion due to defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein. Different mutations in these genes may cause either a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) or a benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC). For the purposes of the present study we genotyped 27 children with intrahepatic cholestasis, diagnosed on either a clinical or histological basis. Two BRIC, 23 PFIC and 2 BRIC/PFIC were identified. Thirty-four different mutations were found of which 11 were novel. One was a 2Mb deletion (5’UTR- exon 18) in ATP8B1. In another case microsatellite analysis of chromosome 2, including ABCB11, showed uniparental disomy. Two cases were compound heterozygous for BRIC/PFIC2 mutations. Our results highlight the importance of the pathogenic role of novel mutations in the three genes and unusual modes of their transmission. PMID:26678486

  9. Genetics and Molecular Modeling of New Mutations of Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis in a Single Italian Center.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Callea, Francesco; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Torre, Giuliano; De Ville De Goyet, Jean; Francalanci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestases (FICs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. Three distinct forms are described: FIC1 and FIC2, associated with low/normal GGT level in serum, which are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and defects in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump protein, respectively; FIC3, linked to high GGT level, involves impaired biliary phospholipid secretion due to defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein. Different mutations in these genes may cause either a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) or a benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC). For the purposes of the present study we genotyped 27 children with intrahepatic cholestasis, diagnosed on either a clinical or histological basis. Two BRIC, 23 PFIC and 2 BRIC/PFIC were identified. Thirty-four different mutations were found of which 11 were novel. One was a 2Mb deletion (5'UTR- exon 18) in ATP8B1. In another case microsatellite analysis of chromosome 2, including ABCB11, showed uniparental disomy. Two cases were compound heterozygous for BRIC/PFIC2 mutations. Our results highlight the importance of the pathogenic role of novel mutations in the three genes and unusual modes of their transmission. PMID:26678486

  10. "I do not want my baby to suffer as I did"; prenatal and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for BRCA1/2 mutations: a case report and genetic counseling considerations.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Efrat; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Kurolap, Alina; Goldberg, Yael; Fried, Georgeta

    2014-07-01

    This article presents the complexity of prenatal genetic diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. These issues are discussed using a case report to highlight the genetic counseling process, together with decision-making considerations, in light of the clinical, psychological, and ethical perspectives, of both the mutation carriers and health professionals; and the health policy regarding these procedures in Israel compared to several European countries.

  11. Planning additional drilling campaign using two-space genetic algorithm: A game theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Ozer, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Grade and tonnage are the most important technical uncertainties in mining ventures because of the use of estimations/simulations, which are mostly generated from drill data. Open pit mines are planned and designed on the basis of the blocks representing the entire orebody. Each block has different estimation/simulation variance reflecting uncertainty to some extent. The estimation/simulation realizations are submitted to mine production scheduling process. However, the use of a block model with varying estimation/simulation variances will lead to serious risk in the scheduling. In the medium of multiple simulations, the dispersion variances of blocks can be thought to regard technical uncertainties. However, the dispersion variance cannot handle uncertainty associated with varying estimation/simulation variances of blocks. This paper proposes an approach that generates the configuration of the best additional drilling campaign to generate more homogenous estimation/simulation variances of blocks. In other words, the objective is to find the best drilling configuration in such a way as to minimize grade uncertainty under budget constraint. Uncertainty measure of the optimization process in this paper is interpolation variance, which considers data locations and grades. The problem is expressed as a minmax problem, which focuses on finding the best worst-case performance i.e., minimizing interpolation variance of the block generating maximum interpolation variance. Since the optimization model requires computing the interpolation variances of blocks being simulated/estimated in each iteration, the problem cannot be solved by standard optimization tools. This motivates to use two-space genetic algorithm (GA) approach to solve the problem. The technique has two spaces: feasible drill hole configuration with minimization of interpolation variance and drill hole simulations with maximization of interpolation variance. Two-space interacts to find a minmax solution

  12. Imprints from genetic drift and mutation imply relative divergence times across marine transition zones in a pan-European small pelagic fish (Sprattus sprattus).

    PubMed

    Limborg, M T; Hanel, R; Debes, P V; Ring, A K; André, C; Tsigenopoulos, C S; Bekkevold, D

    2012-08-01

    Geographic distributions of most temperate marine fishes are affected by postglacial recolonisation events, which have left complex genetic imprints on populations of marine species. This study investigated population structure and demographic history of European sprat (Sprattus sprattus L.) by combining inference from both mtDNA and microsatellite genetic markers throughout the species' distribution. We compared effects from genetic drift and mutation for both genetic markers in shaping genetic differentiation across four transition zones. Microsatellite markers revealed significant isolation by distance and a complex population structure across the species' distribution (overall θ(ST)=0.038, P<0.01). Across transition zones markers indicated larger effects of genetic drift over mutations in the northern distribution of sprat contrasting a stronger relative impact of mutation in the species' southern distribution in the Mediterranean region. These results were interpreted to reflect more recent divergence times between northern populations in accordance with previous findings. This study demonstrates the usefulness of comparing inference from different markers and estimators of divergence for phylogeographic and population genetic studies in species with weak genetic structure, as is the case in many marine species.

  13. Growth behavior of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2013-01-01

    The probability of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele for growing to a size NC for a range of population sizes N, sequence lengths L, selective advantages s, and measuring parameters C was calculated for a haploid, asexual population in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive selective advantage of the reversal allele over the optimal allele. The growing probability in the stochastic region was inversely proportional to the measuring parameter when C < 1 /Ns, bent when C ≈ 1/ Ns and saturated when C > 1/ Ns. The crossing time and the time dependence of the increase in relative density of the reversal allele in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was approximated using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model with the same selective advantage and corresponding effective mutation rate. The growth behavior of additional offspring with the reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was controlled by the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared to the optimal allele and could be described by using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model, in spite of there being many other alleles with lower fitness, and in spite of there being two alleles, the optimal and reversal allele, separated by a low-fitness valley with a tunable depth and width.

  14. Evolvability of individual traits in a multivariate context: partitioning the additive genetic variance into common and specific components.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Blows, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Genetic covariation among multiple traits will bias the direction of evolution. Although a trait's phenotypic context is crucial for understanding evolutionary constraints, the evolutionary potential of one (focal) trait, rather than the whole phenotype, is often of interest. The extent to which a focal trait can evolve independently depends on how much of the genetic variance in that trait is unique. Here, we present a hypothesis-testing framework for estimating the genetic variance in a focal trait that is independent of variance in other traits. We illustrate our analytical approach using two Drosophila bunnanda trait sets: a contact pheromone system comprised of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), and wing shape, characterized by relative warps of vein position coordinates. Only 9% of the additive genetic variation in CHCs was trait specific, suggesting individual traits are unlikely to evolve independently. In contrast, most (72%) of the additive genetic variance in wing shape was trait specific, suggesting relative warp representations of wing shape could evolve independently. The identification of genetic variance in focal traits that is independent of other traits provides a way of studying the evolvability of individual traits within the broader context of the multivariate phenotype.

  15. Mutation, radiation, and species survival: The genetics studies of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Lindee, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    This is an analysis of the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, an American agency which studied the effects of radiation on survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, 1947-1975. Funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and directed by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, the ABCC was the largest and longest medical study of the estimated 300,000 survivors. The morphological genetics study dominated the ABCCs first decade. James Neel and his principal collaborator William J. Schull tracked more than 76,000 pregnancies. Their results (1956) suggested the bombs radiation had no detectable impact on the offspring of survivors. Though geneticists knew that radiation caused heritable mutations in experimental organisms such as Drosophila, and believed it caused mutations in humans, the Neel-Schull findings were not a surprise. The practical difficulties of the study, and the relatively small increase in abnormal births to be expected, made a finding of significant effects unlikely. The Neel-Schull approach reflected the scientific debate over genetic load, and the Muller-Dobzhansky classical-balance controversy. Yet the findings also reflected the post-war debate over atomic energy and weapons testing. Many extra-scientific forces militated against a finding of positive effects at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Negative findings were consistent with the needs of the Atomic Energy Commission, the State Department and the U.S. military. This dissertation explores how both the scientific debate about genetic load, and the political debate about atmospheric weapons testing, shaped this complex epidemiological study.

  16. Genetic variation and prediction of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits in an Angus-Brahman multibreed herd.

    PubMed

    Elzo, M A; West, R L; Johnson, D D; Wakeman, D L

    1998-07-01

    Estimates of covariances and sire expected progeny differences of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits were obtained using records from 486 straightbred and crossbred steers from 121 sires born between 1989 and 1995 in the Angus-Brahman multibreed herd of the University of Florida. Steers were slaughtered at a similar carcass composition end point. Covariances were estimated by REML procedures, using a generalized expectation-maximization algorithm applied to multibreed populations. Straightbred and crossbred estimates of heritabilities and additive genetic correlations were within ranges found in the literature for steers slaughtered on an age- or weight-constant basis for hot carcass weight, longissimus muscle area, and shear force but equal to or less than the lower bound of these ranges for fat-related traits. Maximum values of interactibilities (i.e., ratios of nonadditive variances to phenotypic variances in the F1) and nonadditive genetic correlations were smaller than heritabilities and additive genetic correlations in straightbreds and crossbred groups. Sire additive and total direct genetic predictions for longissimus muscle area, marbling, and shear force tended to decrease with the fraction of Brahman alleles, whereas those for hot carcass weight and fat thickness over the longissimus were higher, and those for kidney fat were lower in straightbreds and F1 than in other crossbred groups. Nonadditive genetic predictions were similar across sire groups of all Angus and Brahman fractions. These results suggest that slaughtering steers on a similar carcass composition basis reduces variability of fat-related traits while retaining variability for non-fat-related traits comparable to slaughtering steers on a similar age or weight basis. Selection for carcass traits within desirable (narrow) ranges and slaughter of steers at similar compositional end point seems to be a good combination to help produce meat products of consistent

  17. Genetic variation and prediction of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits in an Angus-Brahman multibreed herd.

    PubMed

    Elzo, M A; West, R L; Johnson, D D; Wakeman, D L

    1998-07-01

    Estimates of covariances and sire expected progeny differences of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits were obtained using records from 486 straightbred and crossbred steers from 121 sires born between 1989 and 1995 in the Angus-Brahman multibreed herd of the University of Florida. Steers were slaughtered at a similar carcass composition end point. Covariances were estimated by REML procedures, using a generalized expectation-maximization algorithm applied to multibreed populations. Straightbred and crossbred estimates of heritabilities and additive genetic correlations were within ranges found in the literature for steers slaughtered on an age- or weight-constant basis for hot carcass weight, longissimus muscle area, and shear force but equal to or less than the lower bound of these ranges for fat-related traits. Maximum values of interactibilities (i.e., ratios of nonadditive variances to phenotypic variances in the F1) and nonadditive genetic correlations were smaller than heritabilities and additive genetic correlations in straightbreds and crossbred groups. Sire additive and total direct genetic predictions for longissimus muscle area, marbling, and shear force tended to decrease with the fraction of Brahman alleles, whereas those for hot carcass weight and fat thickness over the longissimus were higher, and those for kidney fat were lower in straightbreds and F1 than in other crossbred groups. Nonadditive genetic predictions were similar across sire groups of all Angus and Brahman fractions. These results suggest that slaughtering steers on a similar carcass composition basis reduces variability of fat-related traits while retaining variability for non-fat-related traits comparable to slaughtering steers on a similar age or weight basis. Selection for carcass traits within desirable (narrow) ranges and slaughter of steers at similar compositional end point seems to be a good combination to help produce meat products of consistent

  18. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  19. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  20. Distinctive genetic and clinical features of CMT4J: a severe neuropathy caused by mutations in the PI(3,5)P2 phosphatase FIG4

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Garth; Lenk, Guy M.; Reddel, Stephen W.; Grant, Adrienne E.; Towne, Charles F.; Ferguson, Cole J.; Simpson, Ericka; Scheuerle, Angela; Yasick, Michelle; Hoffman, Stuart; Blouin, Randall; Brandt, Carla; Coppola, Giovanni; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Batish, Sat D.

    2011-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease is a genetically heterogeneous group of motor and sensory neuropathies associated with mutations in more than 30 genes. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4J (OMIM 611228) is a recessive, potentially severe form of the disease caused by mutations of the lipid phosphatase FIG4. We provide a more complete view of the features of this disorder by describing 11 previously unreported patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4J. Three patients were identified from a small cohort selected for screening because of their early onset disease and progressive proximal as well as distal weakness. Eight patients were identified by large-scale exon sequencing of an unselected group of 4000 patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. In addition, 34 new FIG4 variants were detected. Ten of the new CMT4J cases have the compound heterozygous genotype FIG4I41T/null described in the original four families, while one has the novel genotype FIG4L17P/null. The population frequency of the I41T allele was found to be 0.001 by genotyping 5769 Northern European controls. Thirty four new variants of FIG4 were identified. The severity of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4J ranges from mild clinical signs to severe disability requiring the use of a wheelchair. Both mild and severe forms have been seen in patients with the same genotype. The results demonstrate that Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4J is characterized by highly variable onset and severity, proximal as well as distal and asymmetric muscle weakness, electromyography demonstrating denervation in proximal and distal muscles, and frequent progression to severe amyotrophy. FIG4 mutations should be considered in Charcot–Marie–Tooth patients with these characteristics, especially if found in combination with sporadic or recessive inheritance, childhood onset and a phase of rapid progression. PMID:21705420

  1. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  2. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  3. Genetic analysis of in vivo-selected viral variants causing chronic infection: importance of mutation in the L RNA segment of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, R; Simon, R S; Matloubian, M; Kolhekar, S R; Southern, P J; Freedman, D M

    1988-01-01

    Viral variants with different biological properties are present in the central nervous systems (CNS) and lymphoid tissues of mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Viral isolates from the CNS are similar to the original Armstrong LCMV strain and induce potent virus-specific T-cell responses in adult mice, and the infection is rapidly cleared. In contrast, LCMV isolates derived from spleens of carrier mice cause persistent infections in adult mice. This chronic infection is associated with low levels of antiviral T-cell responses. In this study, we genetically characterized two independently derived spleen variants by making recombinants (reassortants) between the spleen isolates and wild-type (wt) LCMV and showed that the ability to persist in adult mice and the associated suppression of T-cell responses segregates with the large (L) RNA segment. In addition, we analyzed a revertant (isolated from the CNS) derived from one of the spleen variants. By comparing the biological properties of three reassortants that contained the same S segment but had the L segment of either the original wt Armstrong LCMV, the spleen variant derived from it, or the CNS revertant derived from the spleen variant, we were able to show unequivocally that biologically relevant mutations occurred in the L segment not only during generation of the spleen variant from wt LCMV but also in reversion of the spleen variant to the wt phenotype. Thus, our results showed that (i) genetic alterations in the L genomic segment were involved in organ-specific selection of viral variants, and (ii) these mutations profoundly affected the ability of LCMV to cause chronic infections in adult mice. Images PMID:3261347

  4. Divergent Metabolic Phenotype between Two Sisters with Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy Due to Double AGPAT2 Homozygous Mutations. A Clinical, Genetic and In Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Víctor A.; Smalley, Susan V.; Goldenberg, Denisse; Lagos, Carlos F.; Hodgson, María I.; Santos, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extreme reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. CGL type 1 is the most frequent form and is caused by mutations in AGPAT2. Genetic and clinical studies were performed in two affected sisters of a Chilean family. These patients have notoriously dissimilar metabolic abnormalities that correlate with differential levels of circulating leptin and soluble leptin receptor fraction. Sequencing of AGPAT2 exons and exon-intron boundaries revealed two homozygous mutations in both sisters. Missense mutation c.299G>A changes a conserved serine in the acyltransferase NHX4D motif of AGPAT2 (p.Ser100Asn). Intronic c.493-1G>C mutation destroy a conserved splicing site that likely leads to exon 4 skipping and deletion of whole AGPAT2 substrate binding domain. In silico protein modeling provided insights of the mechanisms of lack of catalytic activity owing to both mutations. PMID:24498038

  5. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) aggregate in Alzheimer’s disease due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently identified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) tangle-like aggregates and RNA splicing abnormalities in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However little is known about snRNP biology in early onset AD due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations or trisomy 21 in Down syndrome. Therefore we investigated snRNP biochemical and pathologic features in these disorders. Findings We performed quantitative proteomics and immunohistochemistry in postmortem brain from genetic AD cases. Electron microscopy was used to characterize ultrastructural features of pathologic aggregates. U1-70k and other snRNPs were biochemically enriched in the insoluble fraction of human brain from subjects with presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations. Aggregates of U1 snRNP-immunoreactivity formed cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in cortex of AD subjects with PS1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations as well as trisomy 21. Ultrastructural analysis with electron microscopy in an APP mutation case demonstrated snRNP immunogold labeling of paired helical filaments (PHF). Conclusions These studies identify U1 snRNP pathologic changes in brain of early onset genetic forms of AD. Since dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21 result in dysfunctional amyloid processing, the findings suggest that aberrant β-amyloid processing may influence U1 snRNP aggregate formation. PMID:24773620

  6. Genome-scale genetic screen of lead ion-sensitive gene deletion mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Cao, C; Jiang, L

    2015-06-01

    Pb (lead) is one of the most widespread and toxic heavy metal contaminants and imposes potential harm to human health. Pb ions cause cellular damage and induce loss of cell viability. However, mechanisms regulating Pb toxicity remain poorly understood. Through a genome-scale screen, we have identified 30 yeast single-gene deletion mutants that are sensitive to lead ions. These genes are involved in the metabolism, transcription, protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, protein folding, modification, destination, as well as cellular transport process. Comparative analyses to cadmium-sensitive mutations identified from previous studies indicate that overlapping genes of lead- and cadmium-sensitive mutations are involved in both the metabolism and the cellular transport process. Furthermore, eleven lead-sensitive mutants show elevated levels of lead contents in response to lead stress. Our findings provide a basis to understand molecular mechanisms underlying the detoxification of lead ions by yeast cells.

  7. Immunological and genetic characterization of 2-deoxygalactose-resistant, galactokinase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster cells: evidence for structural mutations at the galK locus.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, B; de Souza, C A; Banville, D; Thirion, J P

    1984-01-01

    Ten independent mutants resistant to 2-deoxygalactose and without any detectable galactokinase activity (null-galactokinase mutations) were isolated from mutagenized Chinese hamster somatic cells. They were analyzed for the presence of serologically cross-reacting material (CRM) with antiserum generated against highly purified Chinese hamster galactokinase. All 10 mutants contain cross-reacting material (i.e., were CRM+), indicating that all the mutations affect the correct expression of a product of the galactokinase structural gene. Complementation analysis among them shows that the 10 mutations fall in one functional genetic unit. PMID:6513922

  8. A functional genetic study identifies HAND1 mutations in septation defects of the human heart.

    PubMed

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Ciribilli, Yari; Traverso, Ilaria; Kuhls, Beate; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Juergen

    2009-10-01

    Heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (HAND1) is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor essential for mammalian heart development. Absence of Hand1 in mice results in embryonal lethality, as well as in a wide spectrum of cardiac abnormalities including failed cardiac looping, defective chamber septation and impaired ventricular development. Therefore, Hand1 is a strong candidate for the many cardiac malformations observed in human congenital heart disease (CHD). Recently, we identified a loss-of-function frameshift mutation (p.A126fs) in the bHLH domain of HAND1 frequent in hypoplastic hearts. This finding prompted us to continue our search for HAND1 gene mutations in a different cohort of malformed hearts affected primarily by septation defects. Indeed, in tissue samples of septal defects, we detected 32 sequence alterations leading to amino acid change, of which 12 are in the bHLH domain of HAND1. Interestingly, 10 sequence alterations, such as p.L28H and p.L138P, had been identified earlier in hypoplastic hearts, but the frequent p.A126fs mutation was absent except in one aborted case with ventricular septal defect and outflow tract abnormalities. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells enabled translation of sequence alterations to HAND1 transcriptional activity, which was reduced or abolished by certain mutations, notably p.L138P. Our results suggest that HAND1 may also be affected in septation defects of the human hearts, and thus has a broader role in human heart development and CHD.

  9. Genetic testing for oculocutaneous albinism type 1 and 2 and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1 and 3 mutations in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Santiago Borrero, Pedro J; Rodríguez-Pérez, Yolanda; Renta, Jessicca Y; Izquierdo, Natalio J; Del Fierro, Laura; Muñoz, Daniel; Molina, Norma López; Ramírez, Sonia; Pagán-Mercado, Glorivee; Ortíz, Idith; Rivera-Caragol, Enid; Spritz, Richard A; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2006-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) (MIM #203300) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), bleeding tendency, and lysosomal dysfunction. HPS is very common in Puerto Rico (PR), particularly in the northwest part of the island, with a frequency of approximately 1:1,800. Two HPS genes and mutations have been identified in PR, a 16-base pair (bp) duplication in HPS1 and a 3,904-bp deletion in HPS3. In Puerto Ricans with more typical OCA, the most common mutation of the tyrosinase (TYR) (human tyrosinase (OCA1) gene) gene was G47D. We describe screening 229 Puerto Rican OCA patients for these mutations, and for mutations in the OCA2 gene. We found the HPS1 mutation in 42.8% of cases, the HPS3 deletion in 17%, the TYR G47D mutation in 3.0%, and a 2.4-kb deletion of the OCA2 gene in 1.3%. Among Puerto Rican newborns, the frequency of the HPS1 mutation is highest in northwest PR (1:21; 4.8%) and lower in central PR (1:64; 1.6%). The HPS3 gene deletion is most frequent in central PR (1:32; 3.1%). Our findings provide insights into the genetics of albinism and HPS in PR, and provide the basis for genetic screening for these disorders in this minority population.

  10. Genetic Testing for Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 1 and 2 and Hermansky–Pudlak Syndrome Type 1 and 3 Mutations in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Santiago Borrero, Pedro J.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Yolanda; Renta, Jessicca Y.; Izquierdo, Natalio J.; del Fierro, Laura; Muñoz, Daniel; Molina, Norma López; Ramírez, Sonia; Pagán-Mercado, Glorivee; Ortíz, Idith; Rivera-Caragol, Enid; Spritz, Richard A.; Cadilla, Carmen L.

    2013-01-01

    Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome (HPS) (MIM #203300) is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), bleeding tendency, and lysosomal dysfunction. HPS is very common in Puerto Rico (PR), particularly in the northwest part of the island, with a frequency of ~1:1,800. Two HPS genes and mutations have been identified in PR, a 16-base pair (bp) duplication in HPS1 and a 3,904-bp deletion in HPS3. In Puerto Ricans with more typical OCA, the most common mutation of the tyrosinase (TYR) (human tyrosinase (OCA1) gene) gene was G47D. We describe screening 229 Puerto Rican OCA patients for these mutations, and for mutations in the OCA2 gene. We found the HPS1 mutation in 42.8% of cases, the HPS3 deletion in 17%, the TYR G47D mutation in 3.0%, and a 2.4-kb deletion of the OCA2 gene in 1.3%. Among Puerto Rican newborns, the frequency of the HPS1 mutation is highest in northwest PR (1:21; 4.8%) and lower in central PR (1:64; 1.6%). The HPS3 gene deletion is most frequent in central PR (1:32; 3.1%). Our findings provide insights into the genetics of albinism and HPS in PR, and provide the basis for genetic screening for these disorders in this minority population. PMID:16417222

  11. Genetic Studies on the Loss of Mu Mutator Activity in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Donald S.

    1986-01-01

    Mutator activity of the Mu mutator system of maize can be lost by either outcrossing or inbreeding Mu stocks. The nature of these two kinds of Mu-loss phenomena was analyzed by testing the results of crossing Mu-loss stocks by active Mu lines. Outcross- Mu-loss stocks are capable of supporting Mu activity if crossed by an active mutator line. Inbred-Mu-loss stocks, however, inactivate the active Mu system contributed by a Mu line. Also, inbred- Mu-loss lines do not regain Mu activity after at least three generations of outcrossing to non-Mu stocks. These results suggest that, once the Mu system is inactivated by inbreeding, it remains inactivated for at least three generations of outcrossing. Further, once the system responsible for inactivation is established, it will, in turn, inactivate an active Mu system contributed by crossing with Mu plants. The outcross-Mu-loss does not seem to involve such an inactivation system. These results are interpreted in the light of recent evidence that Mu inactivation results from the modification of Mu 1 transposable elements involved in the Mu phenotype. PMID:17246337

  12. [Genetic diagnosis of thalassemia mutations with free fetal DNA in pregnant plasma].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-Rong; You, Liu-Xia; Chen, Yong

    2013-10-01

    This research was aimed to develop a simple, rapid, accurate and non-invasive method by means of flow-through hybridization technology, which can be used for molecular screening and early prenatal diagnosis for detecting common β-thalassemias mutational genotypes. By using PCR technology combined with flow-through hybridization of low-density gene chip technology, the 6 sets of PCR primer single tube multiplex PCR system and 29 types of DNA probes were designed, then the mutational thalassemias in foetus DNA was rapidly detected in total of 60 anaemia pregnant women plasma. The results showed that 4 cases with deletional α-thalassemias, 3 cases with β-thalassemias, 1 case with mixed type of α & β-thalassemias were detected in foetus DNA of 60 pregnant women plasmas. It is concluded that the method presented in this study is easy to handle, rapid, reliable and cost-effective for detecting 3 common deletional α-thalassemias and 17 common mutational β-thalassemia.

  13. [The mutation spectrum of the GJB2 gene in Belarussian patients with hearing loss. Results of pilot genetic screening of hearing impairment in newborns].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Marcul', D N; Khorov, O G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-02-01

    A total of 111 unrelated probands and their 8 sibs from Grodno oblast (Belarus) with bilateral isolated sensorineural hearing impairment were studied for the presence of mutations in the connexin 26--GJB2gene. Mutations were detected in 51 probands (46% of the sample). A significantly higher frequency of the GJB2gene mutations was observed in familial cases of the disease with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance (in 78% of families). Detected peculiarities of the GJB2 gene mutation spectrum demonstrated that use of the algorithm, which was developed for Russian patients, is optimal for the molecular study of patients from Be- larus. In the sample of patients with hearing loss, the highest (among other similar samples studied in the world) allele frequency of c.313_326de114 mutation (7% out of all pathological GJB2 alleles) was registered; Polish origin of this deletion was suggested. It was demonstrated that detection of the GJB2 gene mutation on only one patient's chromosome is insufficient to confirm a molecular genetic diagnosis of hearing loss of the DFNB1 genetic type (autosomal recessive hearing loss caused by the GJB2 gene mutations). Pilot screening in the presence of GJB2 gene mutations in newborns from Grodno oblast was conducted. The material from 235 children was studied during the screening; nine heterozygous carriers of the mutation were found. The c.35delG mutation was detected in a homozygous state in a single newborn (hearing loss of moderate severity was subsequently audiologically confirmed in this child). PMID:25711030

  14. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Simon K G; Andreatta, Matthew E; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or "missing heritability". Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations.

  15. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  16. Genome-Enabled Estimates of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variances and Prediction of Apple Phenotypes Across Environments.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Molloy, Claire; Muñoz, Patricio; Daetwyler, Hans; Chagné, David; Volz, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The nonadditive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of phenotypes, so estimates of both the additive and nonadditive effects are desirable for breeding and selection purposes. Our main objectives were to: estimate additive, dominance and epistatic variances of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) phenotypes using relationship matrices constructed from genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; and compare the accuracy of genomic predictions using genomic best linear unbiased prediction models with or without including nonadditive genetic effects. A set of 247 clonally replicated individuals was assessed for six fruit quality traits at two sites, and also genotyped using an Illumina 8K SNP array. Across several fruit quality traits, the additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributed about 30%, 16%, and 19%, respectively, to the total phenotypic variance. Models ignoring nonadditive components yielded upwardly biased estimates of additive variance (heritability) for all traits in this study. The accuracy of genomic predicted genetic values (GEGV) varied from about 0.15 to 0.35 for various traits, and these were almost identical for models with or without including nonadditive effects. However, models including nonadditive genetic effects further reduced the bias of GEGV. Between-site genotypic correlations were high (>0.85) for all traits, and genotype-site interaction accounted for <10% of the phenotypic variability. The accuracy of prediction, when the validation set was present only at one site, was generally similar for both sites, and varied from about 0.50 to 0.85. The prediction accuracies were strongly influenced by trait heritability, and genetic relatedness between the training and validation families.

  17. Genome-Enabled Estimates of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variances and Prediction of Apple Phenotypes Across Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Molloy, Claire; Muñoz, Patricio; Daetwyler, Hans; Chagné, David; Volz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The nonadditive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of phenotypes, so estimates of both the additive and nonadditive effects are desirable for breeding and selection purposes. Our main objectives were to: estimate additive, dominance and epistatic variances of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) phenotypes using relationship matrices constructed from genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; and compare the accuracy of genomic predictions using genomic best linear unbiased prediction models with or without including nonadditive genetic effects. A set of 247 clonally replicated individuals was assessed for six fruit quality traits at two sites, and also genotyped using an Illumina 8K SNP array. Across several fruit quality traits, the additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributed about 30%, 16%, and 19%, respectively, to the total phenotypic variance. Models ignoring nonadditive components yielded upwardly biased estimates of additive variance (heritability) for all traits in this study. The accuracy of genomic predicted genetic values (GEGV) varied from about 0.15 to 0.35 for various traits, and these were almost identical for models with or without including nonadditive effects. However, models including nonadditive genetic effects further reduced the bias of GEGV. Between-site genotypic correlations were high (>0.85) for all traits, and genotype-site interaction accounted for <10% of the phenotypic variability. The accuracy of prediction, when the validation set was present only at one site, was generally similar for both sites, and varied from about 0.50 to 0.85. The prediction accuracies were strongly influenced by trait heritability, and genetic relatedness between the training and validation families. PMID:26497141

  18. Do mutator mutations fuel tumorigenesis?

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward J; Prindle, Marc J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2013-12-01

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis proposes that the mutation rate of normal cells is insufficient to account for the large number of mutations found in human cancers. Consequently, human tumors exhibit an elevated mutation rate that increases the likelihood of a tumor acquiring advantageous mutations. The hypothesis predicts that tumors are composed of cells harboring hundreds of thousands of mutations, as opposed to a small number of specific driver mutations, and that malignant cells within a tumor therefore constitute a highly heterogeneous population. As a result, drugs targeting specific mutated driver genes or even pathways of mutated driver genes will have only limited anticancer potential. In addition, because the tumor is composed of such a diverse cell population, tumor cells harboring drug-resistant mutations will exist prior to the administration of any chemotherapeutic agent. We present recent evidence in support of the mutator phenotype hypothesis, major arguments against this concept, and discuss the clinical consequences of tumor evolution fueled by an elevated mutation rate. We also consider the therapeutic possibility of altering the rate of mutation accumulation. Most significantly, we contend that there is a need to fundamentally reconsider current approaches to personalized cancer therapy. We propose that targeting cellular pathways that alter the rate of mutation accumulation in tumors will ultimately prove more effective than attempting to identify and target mutant driver genes or driver pathways.

  19. Genetic and proteomic characterization of rpoB mutations and their effect on nematicidal activity in Photorhabdus luminescens LN2.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuehong; Yan, Xun; Liu, Mingxing; Han, Richou

    2012-01-01

    Rifampin resistant (Rif(R)) mutants of the insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens LN2 from entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LN2 were genetically and proteomically characterized. The Rif(R) mutants showed typical phase one characters of Photorhabdus bacteria, and insecticidal activity against Galleria mellonella larvae, but surprisingly influenced their nematicidal activity against axenic infective juveniles (IJs) of H. bacteriophora H06, an incompatible nematode host. 13 out of 34 Rif(R) mutants lost their nematicidal activity against H06 IJs but supported the reproduction of H06 nematodes. 7 nematicidal-producing and 7 non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R) mutants were respectively selected for rpoB sequence analysis. rpoB mutations were found in all 14 Rif(R) mutants. The rpoB (P564L) mutation was found in all 7 mutants which produced nematicidal activity against H06 nematodes, but not in the mutants which supported H06 nematode production. Allelic exchange assays confirmed that the Rif-resistance and the impact on nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria were conferred by rpoB mutation(s). The non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R) mutant was unable to colonize in the intestines of H06 IJs, but able to colonize in the intestines of its indigenous LN2 IJs. Proteomic analysis revealed different protein expression between wild-type strain and Rif(R) mutants, or between nematicidal-producing and non nematicidal-producing mutants. At least 7 putative proteins including DsbA, HlpA, RhlE, RplC, NamB (a protein from T3SS), and 2 hypothetical proteins (similar to unknown protein YgdH and YggE of Escherichia coli respectively) were probably involved in the nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria against H06 nematodes. This hypothesis was further confirmed by creating insertion-deletion mutants of three selected corresponding genes (the downregulated rhlE and namB, and upregulated dsbA). These results indicate that the rpoB mutations greatly influence the

  20. Genetic and Proteomic Characterization of rpoB Mutations and Their Effect on Nematicidal Activity in Photorhabdus luminescens LN2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuehong; Yan, Xun; Liu, Mingxing; Han, Richou

    2012-01-01

    Rifampin resistant (RifR) mutants of the insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens LN2 from entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LN2 were genetically and proteomically characterized. The RifR mutants showed typical phase one characters of Photorhabdus bacteria, and insecticidal activity against Galleria mellonella larvae, but surprisingly influenced their nematicidal activity against axenic infective juveniles (IJs) of H. bacteriophora H06, an incompatible nematode host. 13 out of 34 RifR mutants lost their nematicidal activity against H06 IJs but supported the reproduction of H06 nematodes. 7 nematicidal-producing and 7 non-nematicidal-producing RifR mutants were respectively selected for rpoB sequence analysis. rpoB mutations were found in all 14 RifR mutants. The rpoB (P564L) mutation was found in all 7 mutants which produced nematicidal activity against H06 nematodes, but not in the mutants which supported H06 nematode production. Allelic exchange assays confirmed that the Rif-resistance and the impact on nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria were conferred by rpoB mutation(s). The non-nematicidal-producing RifR mutant was unable to colonize in the intestines of H06 IJs, but able to colonize in the intestines of its indigenous LN2 IJs. Proteomic analysis revealed different protein expression between wild-type strain and RifR mutants, or between nematicidal-producing and non nematicidal-producing mutants. At least 7 putative proteins including DsbA, HlpA, RhlE, RplC, NamB (a protein from T3SS), and 2 hypothetical proteins (similar to unknown protein YgdH and YggE of Escherichia coli respectively) were probably involved in the nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria against H06 nematodes. This hypothesis was further confirmed by creating insertion-deletion mutants of three selected corresponding genes (the downregulated rhlE and namB, and upregualted dsbA). These results indicate that the rpoB mutations greatly influence the symbiotic

  1. Method for Optimal Sensor Deployment on 3D Terrains Utilizing a Steady State Genetic Algorithm with a Guided Walk Mutation Operator Based on the Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Unaldi, Numan; Temel, Samil; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical issues of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is the deployment of a limited number of sensors in order to achieve maximum coverage on a terrain. The optimal sensor deployment which enables one to minimize the consumed energy, communication time and manpower for the maintenance of the network has attracted interest with the increased number of studies conducted on the subject in the last decade. Most of the studies in the literature today are proposed for two dimensional (2D) surfaces; however, real world sensor deployments often arise on three dimensional (3D) environments. In this paper, a guided wavelet transform (WT) based deployment strategy (WTDS) for 3D terrains, in which the sensor movements are carried out within the mutation phase of the genetic algorithms (GAs) is proposed. The proposed algorithm aims to maximize the Quality of Coverage (QoC) of a WSN via deploying a limited number of sensors on a 3D surface by utilizing a probabilistic sensing model and the Bresenham's line of sight (LOS) algorithm. In addition, the method followed in this paper is novel to the literature and the performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the Delaunay Triangulation (DT) method as well as a standard genetic algorithm based method and the results reveal that the proposed method is a more powerful and more successful method for sensor deployment on 3D terrains. PMID:22666078

  2. Genetic modulation of homocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Rozen, R

    2000-01-01

    With the identification of hyperhomocysteinemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, an understanding of the genetic determinants of plasma homocysteine is important for prevention and treatment. It has been known for some time that homocystinuria, a rare inborn error of metabolism, can be due to genetic mutations that severely disrupt homocysteine metabolism. A more recent development is the finding that milder, but more common, genetic mutations in the same enzymes might also contribute to an elevation in plasma homocysteine. The best example of this concept is a missense mutation (alanine to valine) at base pair (bp) 677 of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), the enzyme that provides the folate derivative for conversion of homocysteine to methionine. This mutation results in mild hyperhomocysteinemia, primarily when folate levels are low, providing a rationale (folate supplementation) for overcoming the genetic deficiency. Additional genetic variants in MTHFR and in other enzymes of homocysteine metabolism are being identified as the cDNAs/genes become isolated. These variants include a glutamate to alanine mutation (bp 1298) in MTHFR, an aspartate to glycine mutation (bp 2756) in methionine synthase, and an isoleucine to methionine mutation (bp 66) in methionine synthase reductase. These variants have been identified relatively recently; therefore additional investigations are required to determine their clinical significance with respect to mild hyperhomocysteinemia and vascular disease.

  3. Genetic characterization of the vaccinia virus DNA polymerase: cytosine arabinoside resistance requires a variable lesion conferring phosphonoacetate resistance in conjunction with an invariant mutation localized to the 3'-5' exonuclease domain.

    PubMed

    Taddie, J A; Traktman, P

    1993-07-01

    In this report, we describe the isolation, molecular genetic mapping, and phenotypic characterization of vaccinia virus mutants resistant to cytosine arabinoside (araC) and phosphonoacetic acid (PAA). At 37 degrees C, 8 microM araC was found to prevent macroscopic plaque formation by wild-type virus and to cause a 10(4)-fold reduction in viral yield. Mutants resistant to 8 microM araC were selected by serial passage of a chemically mutagenized viral stock in the presence of drug. Because recovery of mutants required that initial passages be performed under less stringent selective conditions, and because plaque-purified isolates were found to be cross-resistant to 200 micrograms of PAA per ml, it seemed likely that resistance to araC required more than one genetic lesion. This hypothesis was confirmed by genetic and physical mapping of the responsible mutations. PAAr was accorded by the acquisition of one of three G-A transitions in the DNA polymerase gene which individually alter cysteine 356 to tyrosine, glycine 372 to aspartic acid, or glycine 380 to serine. AraCr was found to require one of these substitutions plus an additional T-C transition within codon 171 of the DNA polymerase gene, a change which replaces the wild-type phenylalanine with serine. Congenic viral stocks carrying one of the three PAAr lesions, either alone or in conjunction with the upstream araCr lesion, in an otherwise wild-type background were generated. The PAAr mutations conferred nearly complete resistance to PAA, a slight degree of resistance to araC, hypersensitivity to aphidicolin, and decreased spontaneous mutation frequency. Addition of the mutation at codon 171 significantly augmented araC resistance and aphidicolin hypersensitivity but caused no further change in mutation frequency. Several lines of evidence suggest that the PAAr mutations primarily affect the deoxynucleoside triphosphate-binding site, whereas the codon 171 mutation, lying within a conserved motif associated with

  4. Social contract theory and just decision making: lessons from genetic testing for the BRCA mutations.

    PubMed

    Williams-Jones, Bryn; Burgess, Michael M

    2004-06-01

    Decisions about funding health services are crucial to controlling costs in health care insurance plans, yet they encounter serious challenges from intellectual property protection--e.g., patents--of health care services. Using Myriad Genetics' commercial genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer (BRCA testing) in the context of the Canadian health insurance system as a case study, this paper applies concepts from social contract theory to help develop more just and rational approaches to health care decision making. Specifically, Daniel's and Sabin's "accountability for reasonableness" is compared to broader notions of public consultation, demonstrating that expert assessments in specific decisions must be transparent and accountable and supplemented by public consultation.

  5. A multi-case report of the pathways to and through genetic testing and cancer risk management for BRCA mutation-positive women aged 18–25

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Lin, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Much of the extant literature addressing the psychosocial aspects of BRCA1/2 mutation testing and risk management aggregates mutation carriers of all ages in study recruitment, data analysis, and interpretation. This analytic strategy does not adequately address the needs of the youngest genetic testing consumers, i.e., women aged 18–25. Despite low absolute cancer risk estimates before age 30, BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women aged 18–25 feel vulnerable to a cancer diagnosis but find themselves in a management quandary because the clinical utility of screening and prevention options are not yet well defined for such young carriers. We present three cases, selected from a larger study of 32 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women who completed or considered genetic testing before age 25, to demonstrate the unique developmental, relational and temporal influences, as well as the challenges, experienced by very young BRCA mutation-positive women as they complete genetic testing and initiate cancer risk management. The first case describes the maturation of a young woman whose family participated in a national cancer registry. The second addresses the experiences and expectations of a young woman who completed genetic testing after learning that her unaffected father was a mutation carrier. The third case highlights the experiences of a young woman parentally bereaved in childhood, who presented for genetic counseling and testing due to intense family pressure. Together, these cases suggest that BRCA1/2-positive women aged 18–25 are challenged to reconcile their burgeoning independence from their families with risk-related support needs. Loved ones acting in ways meant to care for these young women may inadvertently apply pressure, convoluting family support dynamics and autonomous decision-making. Ongoing support from competent healthcare professionals will enable these young women to remain informed and receive objective counsel about their risk-management decisions

  6. Predicting extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypes with genetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, Timothy C; Valafar, Faramarz; Douglas, James; Qian, Lishi; Garfein, Richard S; Chawla, Ashu; Torres, Jessica; Zadorozhny, Victoria; Kim, Min Soo; Hoshide, Matt; Catanzaro, Donald; Jackson, Lynn; Lin, Grace; Desmond, Edward; Rodrigues, Camilla; Eisenach, Kathy; Victor, Thomas C; Ismail, Nazir; Crudu, Valeru; Gler, Maria Tarcela; Catanzaro, Antonino

    2014-03-01

    Molecular diagnostic methods based on the detection of mutations conferring drug resistance are promising technologies for rapidly detecting multidrug-/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR TB), but large studies of mutations as markers of resistance are rare. The Global Consortium for Drug-Resistant TB Diagnostics analyzed 417 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from multinational sites with a high prevalence of drug resistance to determine the sensitivities and specificities of mutations associated with M/XDR TB to inform the development of rapid diagnostic methods. We collected M/XDR TB isolates from regions of high TB burden in India, Moldova, the Philippines, and South Africa. The isolates underwent standardized phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) to isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), moxifloxacin (MOX), ofloxacin (OFX), amikacin (AMK), kanamycin (KAN), and capreomycin (CAP) using MGIT 960 and WHO-recommended critical concentrations. Eight genes (katG, inhA, rpoB, gyrA, gyrB, rrs, eis, and tlyA) were sequenced using Sanger sequencing. Three hundred seventy isolates were INHr, 356 were RIFr, 292 were MOXr/OFXr, 230 were AMKr, 219 were CAPr, and 286 were KANr. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in katG/inhA had a combined sensitivity of 96% and specificities of 97 to 100% for the detection of INHr. Eleven SNPs in rpoB had a combined sensitivity of 98% for RIFr. Eight SNPs in gyrA codons 88 to 94 had sensitivities of 90% for MOXr/OFXr. The rrs 1401/1484 SNPs had 89 to 90% sensitivity for detecting AMKr/CAPr but 71% sensitivity for KANr. Adding eis promoter SNPs increased the sensitivity to 93% for detecting AMKr and to 91% for detecting KANr. Approximately 30 SNPs in six genes predicted clinically relevant XDR-TB phenotypes with 90 to 98% sensitivity and almost 100% specificity.

  7. The chemical production of mutations. The effect of chemical mutagens on cells and their genetic material is discussed.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, C

    1967-12-01

    Since the discovery of the first potent mutagens over 20 years ago, progress in mutation research has been rapid. Many new mutagens, belonging to a variety of chemical classes, have been discovered, and for some of them the reaction with DNA in vitro has been established. It seems that the findings of these chemical investigations usually also apply to viruses which are treated outside the cell. This has made chemical mutagens into an important tool for the analysis of the genetic code. When DNA is treated inside the cell, its reactions would not be expected to be always identical with those observed in vitro; in one case they have, indeed, been found to be different.

  8. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  9. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  10. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  11. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  12. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  13. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  14. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  15. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  16. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  17. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 40, or at age 30 for those with increased risk for breast cancer, including individuals with BRCA1 or... evidence of increased risk of breast cancer, such as the results of a genetic test or a family history of breast cancer, before the claim for the mammogram is paid. This policy is applied uniformly to...

  18. [A diagnostic analysis of a genetic mutation associated with a deficiency of leukocyte adhesion in cattle].

    PubMed

    Kostetskiĭ, I E; Kirilenko, S M; Glazko, V I; Sozinov, A A

    1996-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion (BLAD) is a recessive autosomal disease in Holstein-Friesian cattle caused by point mutation in CD18 gene encoding neutrophil-surface glycoprotein. To determine BLAD carriers, the convenient primers were chosen to amplify the mutant region of gene with the following restriction analysis. A screening program for BLAD has been initiated. Among 190 animals from different Ukrainian farms 6 were heterozygous according to the tested trait, i.e., BLAD deficient. No homozygous BLAD carriers were detected. PMID:9281202

  19. Mupirocin-induced mutations in ileS in various genetic backgrounds of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andie S; Gizard, Yann; Empel, Joanna; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Harbarth, Stephan; François, Patrice

    2014-10-01

    Topical mupirocin is widely used for the decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers. We evaluated the capacity of various MRSA clonotypes to develop mutations in the ileS gene associated with low-level mupirocin resistance. Twenty-four mupirocin-sensitive MRSA isolates from a variety of genotypes (determined by a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat assay) were selected. Mupirocin MICs were determined by Etest. The isolates were then incubated in subinhibitory concentrations of mupirocin for 7 to 14 days. Repeat MIC determinations and sequencing of the ileS gene were then performed. Doubling times of isolates exposed to mupirocin and of unexposed isolates were compared. We found that exposure to mupirocin led to rapid induction of low-level resistance (MICs of 8 to 24 μg/ml) in 11 of 24 (46%) MRSA isolates. This phenomenon was observed in strains with diverse genetic backgrounds. Various mutations were detected in 18 of 24 (75%) MRSA isolates. Acquisition of mutations appeared to be a stepwise process during prolonged incubation with the drug. Among the five isolates exhibiting low-level resistance and the highest MICs, four tested sensitive after incubation in the absence of mupirocin but there was no reversion to the susceptible wild-type primary sequence. Resistance was not associated with significant fitness cost, suggesting that MRSA strains with low-level mupirocin resistance may have a selective advantage in facilities where mupirocin is commonly used. Our findings emphasize the importance of the judicious use of this topical agent and the need to closely monitor for the emergence of resistance.

  20. Degenerate In Vitro Genetic Selection Reveals Mutations That Diminish Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA Replication without Affecting Coat Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-01-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3′-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5′ hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3′-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3′ RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3′ hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  1. Clinical impact of c-MET expression and genetic mutational status in colorectal cancer patients after liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nagashima, Kengo; Okita, Natsuko; Takashima, Atsuo; Honma, Yoshitaka; Iwasa, Satoru; Kato, Ken; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    c-MET is implicated in the pathogenesis and growth of a wide variety of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between c-MET expression and tumor recurrence in CRC patients after curative liver resection, and to evaluate concordance in c-MET expression and various mutations of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA between primary CRC and paired liver metastases. A cohort of patients was tested for c-MET immunoreactivity (i.e. immunohistochemistry [IHC]) and KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. Analyses were performed both on primary tumors and paired liver metastases, and the association between IHC and mutations results were assessed. A total of 108 patients were eligible. A total of 53% of patients underwent simultaneous resection of primary tumors and metastases, and the others underwent metachronous resection. Levels of concordance between primary tumors and metastases were 65.7%, 87.7%, 100% and 95.2% for c-MET, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA, respectively. High levels of c-MET expression (c-MET-high) in the primary tumors were observed in 52% of patients. Relapse-free survival was significantly shorter for patients with c-MET-high primary tumors (9.7 months) than for those with c-MET-low primary tumors (21.1 months) (P = 0.013). These results suggest that a high level of genetic concordance in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA between primary tumors and liver metastases, and c-MET-high in the primary tumors were associated with shorter relapse-free survival after hepatic metastasectomy. PMID:24863535

  2. Mutation-Based Learning to Improve Student Autonomy and Scientific Inquiry Skills in a Large Genetics Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinlu

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory education can play a vital role in developing a learner's autonomy and scientific inquiry skills. In an innovative, mutation-based learning (MBL) approach, students were instructed to redesign a teacher-designed standard experimental protocol by a “mutation” method in a molecular genetics laboratory course. Students could choose to delete, add, reverse, or replace certain steps of the standard protocol to explore questions of interest to them in a given experimental scenario. They wrote experimental proposals to address their rationales and hypotheses for the “mutations”; conducted experiments in parallel, according to both standard and mutated protocols; and then compared and analyzed results to write individual lab reports. Various autonomy-supportive measures were provided in the entire experimental process. Analyses of student work and feedback suggest that students using the MBL approach 1) spend more time discussing experiments, 2) use more scientific inquiry skills, and 3) find the increased autonomy afforded by MBL more enjoyable than do students following regimented instructions in a conventional “cookbook”-style laboratory. Furthermore, the MBL approach does not incur an obvious increase in labor and financial costs, which makes it feasible for easy adaptation and implementation in a large class. PMID:24006394

  3. Genetic basis of human complement C4A deficiency. Detection of a point mutation leading to nonexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Barba, G; Rittner, C; Schneider, P M

    1993-01-01

    The fourth component of the human complement system (C4) is coded for by two genes, C4A and C4B, located within the MHC. Null alleles of C4 (C4Q0) are defined by the absence of C4 protein in plasma. These null alleles are due either to large gene deletions or to nonexpression of the respective genes. In a previous study, evidence was obtained for nonexpressed defective genes at the C4A locus, and for gene conversion at the C4B locus. To further characterize the molecular basis of these non-expressed C4A genes, we selected nine pairs of PCR primers from flanking genomic intron sequences to amplify all 41 exons from individuals with a defective C4A gene. The amplified products were subjected to single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis to detect possible mutations. PCR products exhibiting a variation in the SSCP pattern were sequenced directly. In 10 of 12 individuals studied, we detected a 2-bp insertion in exon 29 leading to nonexpression due to the creation of a termination codon, which was observed in linkage to the haplotype HLA-B60-DR6 in seven cases. In one of the other two individuals without this mutation, evidence was obtained for gene conversion to the C4B isotype. The genetic basis of C4A nonexpression in the second individual is not yet known and will be subject to further analysis. Images PMID:8473511

  4. Genetic Analysis of a Novel Tubulin Mutation That Redirects Synaptic Vesicle Targeting and Causes Neurite Degeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Chih; McDonald, Kent L.; Gurling, Mark; Lee, Albert; Garriga, Gian; Pan, Chun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal cargos are differentially targeted to either axons or dendrites, and this polarized cargo targeting critically depends on the interaction between microtubules and molecular motors. From a forward mutagenesis screen, we identified a gain-of-function mutation in the C. elegans α-tubulin gene mec-12 that triggered synaptic vesicle mistargeting, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration in the touch receptor neurons. This missense mutation replaced an absolutely conserved glycine in the H12 helix with glutamic acid, resulting in increased negative charges at the C-terminus of α-tubulin. Synaptic vesicle mistargeting in the mutant neurons was suppressed by reducing dynein function, suggesting that aberrantly high dynein activity mistargeted synaptic vesicles. We demonstrated that dynein showed preference towards binding mutant microtubules over wild-type in microtubule sedimentation assay. By contrast, neurite swelling and neurodegeneration were independent of dynein and could be ameliorated by genetic paralysis of the animal. This suggests that mutant microtubules render the neurons susceptible to recurrent mechanical stress induced by muscle activity, which is consistent with the observation that microtubule network was disorganized under electron microscopy. Our work provides insights into how microtubule-dynein interaction instructs synaptic vesicle targeting and the importance of microtubule in the maintenance of neuronal structures against constant mechanical stress. PMID:25392990

  5. Mutation and the evolution of ageing: from biometrics to system genetics

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    A notable success for evolutionary genetics during the past century was to generate a coherent, quantitative explanation for an apparent evolutionary paradox: the tendency for multicellular organisms to show declining fitness with age (senescence, often referred to simply as ‘ageing’). This general theory is now widely accepted and explains most of the features of senescence that are observed in natural and laboratory populations, but specific instantiations of that theory have been more controversial. To date, most of the empirical tests of these models have relied on data generated from biometric experiments. Modern population genetics and genomics provide new, and probably more powerful, ways to test ideas that are still controversial more than half a century after the original theory was developed. System-genetic experiments have the potential to address both evolutionary and mechanistic questions about ageing by identifying causal loci and the genetic networks with which they interact. Both the biometrical approaches and the newer approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on the challenges and limitations that each method faces. PMID:20308103

  6. Mutation and the evolution of ageing: from biometrics to system genetics.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Kimberly A

    2010-04-27

    A notable success for evolutionary genetics during the past century was to generate a coherent, quantitative explanation for an apparent evolutionary paradox: the tendency for multicellular organisms to show declining fitness with age (senescence, often referred to simply as 'ageing'). This general theory is now widely accepted and explains most of the features of senescence that are observed in natural and laboratory populations, but specific instantiations of that theory have been more controversial. To date, most of the empirical tests of these models have relied on data generated from biometric experiments. Modern population genetics and genomics provide new, and probably more powerful, ways to test ideas that are still controversial more than half a century after the original theory was developed. System-genetic experiments have the potential to address both evolutionary and mechanistic questions about ageing by identifying causal loci and the genetic networks with which they interact. Both the biometrical approaches and the newer approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on the challenges and limitations that each method faces.

  7. Blue Genes: An Integrative Laboratory to Differentiate Genetic Transformation from Gene Mutation for Underclassmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Militello, Kevin T.; Chang, Ming-Mei; Simon, Robert D.; Lazatin, Justine C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of students to understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype, and the mechanisms by which genotypes and phenotypes can change is essential for students studying genetics. To this end, we have developed a four-week laboratory called Blue Genes, which is designed to help novice students discriminate between two mechanisms by…

  8. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovine lentiviruses cause incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative diseases that affect millions of sheep worldwide. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been recently associated with lentivirus infections in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the two most common TMEM1...

  9. The structure and regulation of genes and consequences of their genetic mutations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fundamental genetic unit of heredity, the gene, is a nucleic acid sequence characterized by three main parts: a promoter region where gene expression levels are controlled by transcription factors and other accessory proteins, the coding region (often interrupted by intervening sequences or intr...

  10. Genetic and epigenetic mutations of tumor suppressive genes in sporadic pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhang, Xun; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Human pituitary adenomas are the most common intracranial neoplasms. Approximately 5% of them are familial adenomas. Patients with familial tumors carry germline mutations in predisposition genes, including AIP, MEN1 and PRKAR1A. These mutations are extremely rare in sporadic pituitary adenomas, which therefore are caused by different mechanisms. Multiple tumor suppressive genes linked to sporadic tumors have been identified. Their inactivation is caused by epigenetic mechanisms, mainly promoter hypermethylation, and can be placed into two groups based on their functional interaction with tumor suppressors RB or p53. The RB group includes CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, RB1, BMP4, CDH1, CDH13, GADD45B and GADD45G; AIP and MEN1 genes also belong to this group. The p53 group includes MEG3, MGMT, PLAGL1, RASSF1, RASSF3 and SOCS1. We propose that the tumor suppression function of these genes is mainly mediated by the RB and p53 pathways. We also discuss possible tumor suppression mechanisms for individual genes. PMID:24035864

  11. Genetic prion disease with codon 196 PRNP mutation: clinical and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Schelzke, Gabi; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Romero, Carlos; Varges, Daniela; Breithaupt, Maren; Taratuto, Ana L; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Zerr, Inga

    2011-04-01

    Ten percent to 15% of all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy are characterized by a mutation in prion protein gene (PRNP). They are distinct with respect to clinical signs, disease onset, disease duration, and diagnostic findings. During our surveillance activities in Germany, we identified 7 patients with the rare mutation E196K in PRNP gene, thereof 4 patients belonging to 2 families. The clinical syndromes were characterized by nonspecific and psychiatric symptoms at disease onset and progressed to predominant motor signs. These patients showed a late median disease onset of 71 years and short disease duration of 6.5 months. In absence of family history, they mimicked sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In clinical tests they were 100% positive for 14-3-3 protein detection in cerebrospinal fluid and less sensitive for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities. As a secondary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormality, we have seen conspicuous common involvement of the subcortical white matter in 57%. Four patients underwent autopsy-pathological lesions revealed striking similarity to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but also involvement of the white matter. PMID:21232818

  12. Genetic and epigenetic mutations of tumor suppressive genes in sporadic pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhang, Xun; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Human pituitary adenomas are the most common intracranial neoplasms. Approximately 5% of them are familial adenomas. Patients with familial tumors carry germline mutations in predisposition genes, including AIP, MEN1 and PRKAR1A. These mutations are extremely rare in sporadic pituitary adenomas, which therefore are caused by different mechanisms. Multiple tumor suppressive genes linked to sporadic tumors have been identified. Their inactivation is caused by epigenetic mechanisms, mainly promoter hypermethylation, and can be placed into two groups based on their functional interaction with tumor suppressors RB or p53. The RB group includes CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, RB1, BMP4, CDH1, CDH13, GADD45B and GADD45G; AIP and MEN1 genes also belong to this group. The p53 group includes MEG3, MGMT, PLAGL1, RASSF1, RASSF3 and SOCS1. We propose that the tumor suppression function of these genes is mainly mediated by the RB and p53 pathways. We also discuss possible tumor suppression mechanisms for individual genes. PMID:24035864

  13. A novel P106L mutation in EPSPS and an unknown mechanism(s) act additively to confer resistance to glyphosate in a South African Lolium rigidum population.

    PubMed

    Kaundun, Shiv S; Dale, Richard P; Zelaya, Ian A; Dinelli, Giovanni; Marotti, Ilaria; McIndoe, Eddie; Cairns, Andrew

    2011-04-13

    Glyphosate resistance evolution in weeds is a growing problem in world agriculture. Here, we have investigated the mechanism(s) of glyphosate resistance in a Lolium rigidum population (DAG1) from South Africa. Nucleotide sequencing revealed the existence of at least three EPSPS homologues in the L. rigidum genome and identified a novel proline 106 to leucine substitution (P106L) in 52% DAG1 individuals. This mutation conferred a 1.7-fold resistance increase to glyphosate at the whole plant level. Additionally, a 3.1-fold resistance increase, not linked to metabolism or translocation, was estimated between wild-type P106-DAG1 and P106-STDS sensitive plants. Point accepted mutation analysis suggested that other amino acid substitutions at EPSPS position 106 are likely to be found in nature besides the P106/S/A/T/L point mutations reported to date. This study highlights the importance of minor mechanisms acting additively to confer significant levels of resistance to commercial field rates of glyphosate in weed populations subjected to high selection pressure.

  14. Computer simulation for the growing probability of additional offspring with an advantageous reversal allele in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2016-01-01

    This study calculated the growing probability of additional offspring with the advantageous reversal allele in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape using the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The growing probability was calculated for various population sizes, N, sequence lengths, L, selective advantages, s, fitness parameters, k and measuring parameters, C. The saturated growing probability in the stochastic region was approximately the effective selective advantage, s*, when C≫1/Ns* and s*≪1. The present study suggests that the growing probability in the stochastic region in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model can be described using the theoretical formula for the growing probability in the Moran two-allele model. The selective advantage ratio, which represents the ratio of the effective selective advantage to the selective advantage, does not depend on the population size, selective advantage, measuring parameter and fitness parameter; instead the selective advantage ratio decreases with the increasing sequence length.

  15. Genetic and biochemical characterization of mutations in the ATPase and helicase regions of the Upf1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Y; Czaplinski, K; Peltz, S W

    1996-01-01

    mRNA degradation is an important control point in the regulation of gene expression and has been linked to the process of translation. One clear example of this linkage is the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, in which nonsense mutations in a gene can reduce the abundance of the mRNA transcribed from that gene. For the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Upf1 protein (Upf1p), which contains a cysteine- and histidine-rich region and nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis and helicase motifs, was shown to be a trans-acting factor in this decay pathway. Biochemical analysis of the wild-type Upf1p demonstrates that it has RNA-dependent ATPase, RNA helicase, and RNA binding activities. A UPF1 gene disruption results in stabilization of nonsense-containing mRNAs, leading to the production of enough functional product to overcome an auxotrophy resulting from a nonsense mutation. A genetic and biochemical study of the UPF1 gene was undertaken in order to understand the mechanism of Upf1p function in the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Our analysis suggests that Upf1p is a multifunctional protein with separable activities that can affect mRNA turnover and nonsense suppression. Mutations in the conserved helicase motifs of Upf1p that inactivate its mRNA decay function while not allowing suppression of leu2-2 and tyr7-1 nonsense alleles have been identified. In particular, one mutation located in the ATP binding and hydrolysis motif of Upf1p that changed the aspartic and glutamic acid residues to alanine residues (DE572AA) lacked ATPase and helicase activities, and the mutant formed a Upf1p:RNA complex in the absence of ATP; surprisingly, however, the Upf1p:RNA complex dissociated as a consequence of ATP binding. This result suggests that ATP binding, independent of its hydrolysis, can modulate Upf1p:RNA complex formation for this mutant protein. The role of the RNA binding activity of Upf1p in modulating nonsense suppression is discussed. PMID:8816461

  16. Will we be taught ethics by our clones? The mutations of the living, from endocrine disruptors to genetics.

    PubMed

    Vandelac, L; Bacon, M H

    1999-12-01

    Considering the worldwide threat to health and reproduction related to endocrine disruptors (by-products of the chemical industry); considering the untrammelled development of the industrialization and engineering of the living, ethics and gynaecology/obstetrics itself is at a crossroads. Endocrine disruptors (derived from organochlorines and persistent organic pollutants such as PCBs, dioxins and furans, and pesticides such as aldrin, chlordane and DDT), are prime suspects in the deterioration of fertility and intellectual faculties and possibly a key factor in endometriosis, breast cancer and prostate cancer. The long-term and pernicious impacts of endocrine disruptors show our poor understanding of the complexities of life's mechanisms. Paradoxically, with our short-term perspectives and predilection for a technological fix, the problem posed by endocrine disruptors may accelerate the use of reproductive technologies such as ICSI and even cloning, as well as the dissemination of genetically modified organisms. The cure could be worse than the disease. Given the gravity of the challenge to humanity related to the chemical erosion of human health, the mutation of human conception introduced by reproductive technologies and by the drive to genetically modify nature and even human nature, we must urgently re-evaluate the direction in which our societies are headed and the reliance on profit-oriented technology to save us from ourselves. In these circumstances, the collective exercise of wisdom, prudence and responsibility towards the essence and integrity of humanity has become, more than ever, an ethical, and perhaps even a survival, imperative. PMID:10718712

  17. Somatic Mutations and Genetic Variants of NOTCH1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Occurrence and Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Fan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chung, Chia-Min; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Lin, You-Zhe; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ka-Wo; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Hua, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Yuan-Chien; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic variants have been associated with cancer occurrence, however it may be the acquired somatic mutations (SMs) that drive cancer development. This study investigates the potential SMs and related genetic variants associated with the occurrence and development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We identified several SMs in NOTCH1 from whole-exome sequencing and validated them in a 13-year cohort of 128 HNSCC patients using a high-resolution melting analysis and resequencing. Patients who have NOTCH1 SMs show higher 5-year relapse-free recurrence (P = 0.0013) and lower survival proportion (P = 0.0447) when the risk-associated SMs were analysed by Cox proportional hazard models. Interestingly, the NOTCH1 gene rs139994842 that shares linkage with SMs is associated with HNSCC risk (OR = 3.46), increasing when SMs in NOTCH1 are involved (OR = 7.74), and furthermore when there are SMs in conjunction to betel quid chewing (OR = 32.11), which is a related independent environmental risk factor after adjusting for substances use (alcohol, betel quid, cigarettes) and age. The findings indicate that betel quid chewing is highly associated with NOTCH1 SMs (especially with changes in EGF-like domains), and that rs139994842 may potentially serve as an early predictive and prognostic biomarker for the occurrence and development of HNSCC. PMID:27035284

  18. Genetics and phenomics of hypothyroidism and goiter due to iodotyrosine deiodinase (DEHAL1) gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José C; Visser, Theo J

    2010-06-30

    Iodotyrosine deiodinase is a thyroidal enzyme that deiodinates mono- and di-iodotyrosines (MIT, DIT) and recycles iodine, a scarce element in the environment, for the efficient synthesis of thyroid hormone. Failure of this enzyme leads to hypothyroidism, goiter and mental retardation, a clinical phenotype yet described in the 1950s, whose diagnostic hallmark is the elevation of iodotyrosines in serum and urine. DEHAL1, the gene responsible for this activity, was recently isolated and the molecular basis for the iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency (ITDD) unraveled. The current clinical picture of mutations in DEHAL1 mostly recapitulates the "classical" phenotype of ITDD, including the psychomotor deficits. This is probably due to the lack of expression of the disease at the beginning of life, which causes ITDD being undetected in current screening programs for congenital hypothyroidism. This worrying feature calls for efforts to improve the preclinical detection of iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency in the neonatal time. PMID:20298747

  19. Mutation-free baby born from a mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like syndrome carrier after blastocyst trophectoderm preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Heindryckx, Björn; Neupane, Jitesh; Vandewoestyne, Mado; Christodoulou, Christodoulos; Jackers, Yens; Gerris, Jan; Van den Abbeel, Etienne; Van Coster, Rudy; Deforce, Dieter; De Sutter, Petra

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the applicability of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we used trophectoderm (TE) biopsy to determine the mutation load in a 35-year-old female with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS). Transfer of a mutation-free blastocyst gave birth to a healthy boy with undetectable mutation in any of the analyzed tissues. We found strong correlation among TE cells (r=0.90) within blastocysts and also between cytoplasmic fragments and TE (r=0.95). This is the first case of mutation-free baby born from a MELAS patient after TE biopsy and supports the applicability of blastocyst PGD for patients with mtDNA disorders to establish healthy offspring.

  20. Mutation Scanning in a Single and a Stacked Genetically Modified (GM) Event by Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G.; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017 × MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  1. Mutation scanning in a single and a stacked genetically modified (GM) event by real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017×MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  2. Mutation scanning in a single and a stacked genetically modified (GM) event by real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G; Brandes, Christian

    2014-10-31

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017×MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found.

  3. Genetic Inhibition Of The Ubiquitin Ligase Rnf5 Attenuates Phenotypes Associated To F508del Cystic Fibrosis Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tomati, Valeria; Sondo, Elvira; Armirotti, Andrea; Caci, Emanuela; Pesce, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Gianotti, Ambra; Ju Jeon, Young; Cilli, Michele; Pistorio, Angela; Mastracci, Luca; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Scholte, Bob; Ronai, Ze’ev; Galietta, Luis J. V.; Pedemonte, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CFTR chloride channel. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 (F508del), the most frequent CF mutation, impairs CFTR trafficking and gating. F508del-CFTR mistrafficking may be corrected by acting directly on mutant CFTR itself or by modulating expression/activity of CFTR-interacting proteins, that may thus represent potential drug targets. To evaluate possible candidates for F508del-CFTR rescue, we screened a siRNA library targeting known CFTR interactors. Our analysis identified RNF5 as a protein whose inhibition promoted significant F508del-CFTR rescue and displayed an additive effect with the investigational drug VX-809. Significantly, RNF5 loss in F508del-CFTR transgenic animals ameliorated intestinal malabsorption and concomitantly led to an increase in CFTR activity in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, we found that RNF5 is differentially expressed in human bronchial epithelia from CF vs. control patients. Our results identify RNF5 as a target for therapeutic modalities to antagonize mutant CFTR proteins. PMID:26183966

  4. [Recommended Extension of Indication Criteria for Genetic Testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Foretová, L; Macháčková, E; Palácová, M; Navrátilová, M; Svoboda, M; Petráková, K

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is indicated by a genetic counselor on the basis of personal and family history evaluation, with regards to consensual criteria, reflecting the current knowledge. The latest recommendation accepted by Czech Oncology Society and Society of Medical Genetics was published in the supplement 22 to the Journal of Clinical Oncology in 2009. Since the availability of PARP inhibitors for treatment of ovarian cancer in BRCA1/ 2 mutation carriers, an update of these guidelines is urgently needed. Another reason is a higher incidence of other malignancies in high-risk families, such as prostate or pancreatic cancer. The goal is to refine the detection of mutations in selected families, to improve preventive care and collect data necessary for targeted cancer treatment.

  5. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  6. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-11-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  7. ReCAP: Economic Evaluation Alongside a Clinical Trial of Telephone Versus In-Person Genetic Counseling for BRCA1/2 Mutations in Geographically Underserved Areas

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yaojen; Near, Aimee M.; Butler, Karin M.; Hoeffken, Amanda; Edwards, Sandra L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Kohlmann, Wendy; Gammon, Amanda; Buys, Saundra S.; Schwartz, Marc D.; Peshkin, Beth N.; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2016-01-01

    QUESTION ASKED: Many individuals at risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations do not have access to trained genetic counselors. This study conducted an economic evaluation alongside a clinical trial of approaches to extending the reach of genetic testing services to geographically underserved populations. SUMMARY ANSWER: Telephone genetic counseling was less expensive than in-person services delivered in the community per individual counseled, individual tested, or mutation detected. For example, it cost an average of $120 (range, $80 to $200) per person counseled in the telephone counseling arm compared with $270 (range, $180 to $400) for in-person counseling. One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the average cost per participant remained consistently lower in the telephone counseling arm than in the in-person counseling arm across the range values for each cost parameter and for each study outcome. METHODS: Microcosting was used to enumerate resources for counseling delivered at 14 primary care clinics (nine geographically remote, five urban) in Utah. Staff time and travel, space, overhead, patient time costs, and test costs were calculated on the basis of actual intervention use and valued using national data for wage rates, space, and overhead. We calculated the costs per arm for pretest counseling, uptake of BRCA1/BRCA2 testing, per mutation detected, and per completion of post-test genetic counseling at 6 months afterrandomization. Costs and effects were not discounted. BIAS, CONFOUNDING FACTOR(S), DRAWBACKS: The findings may not be generalizable to women in other geographically underserved regions in terms of socio-demographic characteristics and mutation risk. Next, we included only costs related to genetic counseling and testing. Counseling and testing may affect other costs, such as those related to increased or decreased short-term use of medical care or long-term health behaviors. REAL-LIFE IMPLICATIONS: Telephone counseling is a cost-efficient method to

  8. [Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease associated with periaxin mutations (CMT4F): Clinical, electrophysiological and genetic analysis of 24 patients].

    PubMed

    Renouil, M; Stojkovic, T; Jacquemont, M L; Lauret, K; Boué, P; Fourmaintraux, A; Randrianaivo, H; Tallot, M; Mignard, D; Roelens, P; Tabailloux, D; Bernard, R; Cartault, F; Chane-Thien, E; Dubourg, O; Ferrer, X; Sole, G; Fournier, E; Latour, P; Lacour, A; Mignard, C

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (AR-CMT) is often characterized by onset in early childhood and severe phenotype compared to the dominant forms. CMT disease associated with periaxin gene (PRX) is rare and characterized by demyelination limited to the major peripheral nerves. Following the discovery of a high frequency of a specific periaxin gene mutation (E1085fsX4 homozygote) in the Reunion Island, we examined all French patients known as carriers of the periaxin gene mutation. There were 24 patients. Eighteen were from the Reunion Island (6 families and 10 sporadic cases). The six remaining patients were in two families, each with two affected individuals, and two sporadic cases. The series included 17 female and seven male patients. Walking was acquired late, on average at 3.4±1.6 years. One patient never learned to walk. The Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy Score (CMTNS) averaged 24.5±8.1. Seven patients had been wheelchair-bound since the age of 24±22. Other symptoms were: scoliosis most often observed after the age of 12 years and sometimes complicated by a restrictive respiratory syndrome; foot deformity in 24 patients; strabismus; glaucoma; myopia. When conduction recordings are available, median nerve motor conduction was slow (<10m/s), associated with a major lengthening of distal latencies. Study of the periaxin gene should be considered in patients with severe demyelinating neuropathy associated with early infantile scoliosis. This disease leads to major disability (29% of patients in this series were wheelchair-bound) and to respiratory insufficiency. Genetic counselling is highly recommended for consanguineous families.

  9. Spectrum of genetic changes in patients with non-syndromic hearing impairment and extremely high carrier frequency of 35delG GJB2 mutation in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Danilenko, Nina; Merkulava, Elena; Siniauskaya, Marina; Olejnik, Olga; Levaya-Smaliak, Anastasia; Kushniarevich, Alena; Shymkevich, Andrey; Davydenko, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The genetic nature of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) has so far been studied for many ethnic groups in various parts of the world. The single-nucleotide guanine deletion (35delG) of the GJB2 gene coding for connexin 26 was shown to be the main genetic cause of autosomal recessive deafness among Europeans. Here we present the results of the first study of GJB2 and three mitochondrial mutations among two groups of Belarusian inhabitants: native people with normal hearing (757 persons) and 391 young patients with non-syndromic SNHL. We have found an extremely high carrier frequency of 35delG GJB2 mutation in Belarus -5.7%. This point deletion has also been detected in 53% of the patients with SNHL. The 312del14 GJB2 was the second most common mutation in the Belarus patient cohort. Mitochondrial A1555G mt-RNR1 substitution was found in two SNHL patients (0.55%) but none were found in the population cohort. No individuals carried the A7445G mutation of mitochondrial mt-TS1. G7444A as well as T961G substitutions were detected in mitochondrial mt-RNR1 at a rate of about 1% both in the patient and population cohorts. A possible reason for Belarusians having the highest mutation carrier frequency in Europe 35delG is discussed.

  10. GWAS of human bitter taste perception identifies new loci and reveals additional complexity of bitter taste genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Mirko; Kutalik, Zoltán; Souza Destito, Maria C.; Souza, Milena M.; Cirillo, Cintia A.; Zamboni, Amabilene; Martin, Nathalie; Morya, Edgard; Sameshima, Koichi; Beckmann, Jacques S.; le Coutre, Johannes; Bergmann, Sven; Genick, Ulrich K.

    2014-01-01

    Human perception of bitterness displays pronounced interindividual variation. This phenotypic variation is mirrored by equally pronounced genetic variation in the family of bitter taste receptor genes. To better understand the effects of common genetic variations on human bitter taste perception, we conducted a genome-wide association study on a discovery panel of 504 subjects and a validation panel of 104 subjects from the general population of São Paulo in Brazil. Correction for general taste-sensitivity allowed us to identify a SNP in the cluster of bitter taste receptors on chr12 (10.88– 11.24 Mb, build 36.1) significantly associated (best SNP: rs2708377, P = 5.31 × 10−13, r2 = 8.9%, β = −0.12, s.e. = 0.016) with the perceived bitterness of caffeine. This association overlaps with—but is statistically distinct from—the previously identified SNP rs10772420 influencing the perception of quinine bitterness that falls in the same bitter taste cluster. We replicated this association to quinine perception (P = 4.97 × 10−37, r2 = 23.2%, β = 0.25, s.e. = 0.020) and additionally found the effect of this genetic locus to be concentration specific with a strong impact on the perception of low, but no impact on the perception of high concentrations of quinine. Our study, thus, furthers our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of bitter taste perception. PMID:23966204

  11. GWAS of human bitter taste perception identifies new loci and reveals additional complexity of bitter taste genetics.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Mirko; Kutalik, Zoltán; Souza Destito, Maria C; Souza, Milena M; Cirillo, Cintia A; Zamboni, Amabilene; Martin, Nathalie; Morya, Edgard; Sameshima, Koichi; Beckmann, Jacques S; le Coutre, Johannes; Bergmann, Sven; Genick, Ulrich K

    2014-01-01

    Human perception of bitterness displays pronounced interindividual variation. This phenotypic variation is mirrored by equally pronounced genetic variation in the family of bitter taste receptor genes. To better understand the effects of common genetic variations on human bitter taste perception, we conducted a genome-wide association study on a discovery panel of 504 subjects and a validation panel of 104 subjects from the general population of São Paulo in Brazil. Correction for general taste-sensitivity allowed us to identify a SNP in the cluster of bitter taste receptors on chr12 (10.88- 11.24 Mb, build 36.1) significantly associated (best SNP: rs2708377, P = 5.31 × 10(-13), r(2) = 8.9%, β = -0.12, s.e. = 0.016) with the perceived bitterness of caffeine. This association overlaps with-but is statistically distinct from-the previously identified SNP rs10772420 influencing the perception of quinine bitterness that falls in the same bitter taste cluster. We replicated this association to quinine perception (P = 4.97 × 10(-37), r(2) = 23.2%, β = 0.25, s.e. = 0.020) and additionally found the effect of this genetic locus to be concentration specific with a strong impact on the perception of low, but no impact on the perception of high concentrations of quinine. Our study, thus, furthers our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of bitter taste perception.

  12. Antioxidant vitamins intake, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) genetic polymorphisms, and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ah; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Seung-Joon; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue Kyung; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee

    2010-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) cells exist under a constant state of oxidative stress with high levels of reactive oxygen species, which are removed by cellular antioxidant vitamins. We investigated the independent and combined effect of antioxidant vitamins intake and the ATM genotype or diplotype on the breast cancer risk. Analyses included 323 cases and age-matched controls who participated in the Korean Breast Cancer Study during 2001-2003 with complete dietary information. The vitamin A (P < 0.01) and α-tocopherol (P < 0.01) were associated with lower breast cancer risk as well as some water-soluble vitamins including vitamin B(2) (P = 0.01), vitamin C (P < 0.01), and folic acid (P = 0.02) intake. No five single nucleotide polymorphisms (ATM-5144A > T (rs228589), IVS21 + 1049T > C (rs664677), IVS33-55T > C (rs664982), IVS34+60G > A (rs664143), and 3393T > G (rs4585)) studied showed significant differences in their allele frequencies between the cases and controls. On the other hand, compared with the diploid of ATTGT/ATTGT, as the number of ATTGT haplotype decreased, the risk of breast cancer increased (P = 0.04). The association between ATM diplotype and the breast cancer risk was predominantly among women with low intake of antioxidant vitamins including vitamin A, vitamin C, and folic acid. This study suggested that some antioxidant vitamins intake may modify the effect of ATM diplotype on the breast cancer risk among Korean women.

  13. Two distinct origins of a common BRCA1 mutation in breast-ovarian cancer families: a genetic study of 15 185delAG-mutation kindreds.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, D. B.; Wagner-Costalas, J.; Schultz, D. C.; Lynch, H. T.; Daly, M.; Godwin, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    We screened 163 women from breast-ovarian cancer-prone families, as well as 178 individuals affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer but unselected for family history, for germ-line mutations in exon 2 of BRCA1, by SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. A total of 25 mutations were detected. Thirteen of 64 Jewish Ashkenazi women and 2 non-Jewish individuals were found to possess the 185delAG mutation. Haplotype data for all 15 individuals, with markers intragenic to BRCA1, suggest that the Jewish Ashkenazi individuals share a common ancestry that is distinct from the lineage shared by the other two women. These data provide the first evidence of two distinct lines of transmission for the 185delAG mutation, only one of which has its origins in the Jewish Ashkenazi population. Our screening also uncovered 10 affected individuals with an 11-bp deletion at nucleotide 188 of BRCA1 (188del11), 4 of whom are Ashkenazi Jews. This is only the third reported mutation detected within the Jewish Ashkenazi population and may represent the second most common alteration in BRCA1 found in Ashkenazi Jews in the United States. The observed overrepresentation of specific mutations within a subgroup of the general population may eventually contribute to the development of inexpensive and routine tests for BRCA1 mutations, as well as to the elucidation of other contributory factors (e.g., diet, environment, and chemical exposures) that may play a key role in cancer initiation and development. The implications of the mutational data, as well as the role that founder effect, demographic history, and penetrance play in the resulting observed phenomena, are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8651293

  14. Two distinct origins of a common BRCA1 mutation in breast-ovarian cancer families: A genetic study of 15 185delAG-mutation kindreds

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D.B.; Schultz, D.C.; Godwin, A.K.

    1996-06-01

    We screened 163 women from breast-ovarian cancer-prone families, as well as 178 individuals affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer but unselected for family history, for germ-line mutations in exon 2 of BRCA1, by SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. A total of 25 mutations were detected. Thirteen of 64 Jewish Ashkenazi women and 2 non-Jewish individuals were found to possess the 185delAG mutation. Haplotype data for all 15 individuals, with markers intragenic to BRCA1, suggest that the Jewish Ashkenazi individuals share a common ancestry that is distinct from the lineage shared by the other two women. These data provide the first evidence of two distinct lines of transmission for the 185delAG mutation, only one of which has its origins in the Jewish Ashkenazi population. Our screening also uncovered 10 affected individuals with an 11-bp deletion at nucleotide 188 of BRCA1 (188del11), 4 of whom are Ashkenazi Jews. This is only the third reported mutation detected within the Jewish Ashkenazi population and may represent the second most common alteration in BRCA1 found in Ashkenazi Jews in the United States. The observed overrepresentation of specific mutations within a subgroup of the general population may eventually contribute to the development of inexpensive and routine tests for BRCA1 mutations, as well as to the elucidation of other contributory factors (e.g., diet, environment, and chemical exposures) that may play a key role in cancer initiation and development. The implications of the mutational data, as well as the role that founder effect, demographic history, and penetrance play in the resulting observed phenomena, are discussed. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple.

  16. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple. PMID:25606403

  17. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n = 62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24, genome OO), by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments) and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent. PMID:27148282

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n = 62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24, genome OO), by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments) and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent. PMID:27148282

  19. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs.

  20. Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

    2009-10-01

    Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented. PMID:19582477

  1. Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

    2009-10-01

    Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented.

  2. The unstable 'clone': evidence from monitoring AFLP-based mutations for short-term clonal genetic variation in two asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.).

    PubMed

    Loxdale, H D; Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2013-02-01

    Clones have been in the forefront of biological interest for many years. Even so, open discussions continue to surround the concept of clonality, which has been recently much debated in the scientific literature, both in terms of philosophical meaning as well as empirical determination. Philosophically, the clone is the horizontally produced lineage from a single fertlized egg (e.g. mammals by division of the fertilized egg and representing a single generation) or vertically produced offspring (e.g. aphids representing different successive generations) from a single asexual stem mother (originally for a particular lineage, following hatching of the overwintering sexual egg in the spring); empirically, the aspect of genetic fidelity is also considered important, so-called clones being assumed to have an identical genome among clone mates. In reality of course, such members of a clonal lineage must differ at various regions of the genome, since mutation is a fundamental property of the DNA itself. Yet few studies have so far set out to show this empirically in eukaryotic organisms, which indulge in periods of asexual reproduction, sometimes, as in aphids, over many generations. In the present study, we have investigated asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.), a global pest of cereals, over five successive generations employing AFLP-PCR molecular techniques. Our main interest was to see how much variation was present in the early generations and if this variation was transmitted through the asexual lineages. By monitoring AFLP-based polymorphisms, we show that, in this aphid species, of a total of 110 individuals from two lineages tested (termed SA and SB), random mutations (band deletions, more rarely additions) were apparent from the third generation onwards, and although some mutations were found to be transmitted transgenerationally, others were rarely transmitted through the particular lineages they were detected in. Using Arlequin v. 2

  3. The unstable 'clone': evidence from monitoring AFLP-based mutations for short-term clonal genetic variation in two asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.).

    PubMed

    Loxdale, H D; Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2013-02-01

    Clones have been in the forefront of biological interest for many years. Even so, open discussions continue to surround the concept of clonality, which has been recently much debated in the scientific literature, both in terms of philosophical meaning as well as empirical determination. Philosophically, the clone is the horizontally produced lineage from a single fertlized egg (e.g. mammals by division of the fertilized egg and representing a single generation) or vertically produced offspring (e.g. aphids representing different successive generations) from a single asexual stem mother (originally for a particular lineage, following hatching of the overwintering sexual egg in the spring); empirically, the aspect of genetic fidelity is also considered important, so-called clones being assumed to have an identical genome among clone mates. In reality of course, such members of a clonal lineage must differ at various regions of the genome, since mutation is a fundamental property of the DNA itself. Yet few studies have so far set out to show this empirically in eukaryotic organisms, which indulge in periods of asexual reproduction, sometimes, as in aphids, over many generations. In the present study, we have investigated asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.), a global pest of cereals, over five successive generations employing AFLP-PCR molecular techniques. Our main interest was to see how much variation was present in the early generations and if this variation was transmitted through the asexual lineages. By monitoring AFLP-based polymorphisms, we show that, in this aphid species, of a total of 110 individuals from two lineages tested (termed SA and SB), random mutations (band deletions, more rarely additions) were apparent from the third generation onwards, and although some mutations were found to be transmitted transgenerationally, others were rarely transmitted through the particular lineages they were detected in. Using Arlequin v. 2

  4. Isolation of Mutations in the Drosophila Homologues of the Human Neurofibromatosis 2 and Yeast Cdc42 Genes Using a Simple and Efficient Reverse-Genetic Method

    PubMed Central

    Fehon, R. G.; Oren, T.; LaJeunesse, D. R.; Melby, T. E.; McCartney, B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reverse genetic analysis in Drosophila has been greatly aided by a growing collection of lethal P transposable element insertions that provide molecular tags for the identification of essential genetic loci. However, because the screens performed to date primarily have generated autosomal P-element insertions, this collection has not been as useful for performing reverse genetic analysis of X-linked genes. We have designed a reverse genetic screen that takes advantage of the hemizygosity of the X chromosome in males together with a cosmid-based transgene that serves as an autosomally linked duplication of a small region of the X chromosome. The efficacy and efficiency of this method is demonstrated by the isolation of mutations in Drosophila homologues of two well-studied genes, the human Neurofibromatosis 2 tumor suppressor and the yeast CDC42 gene. The method we describe should be of general utility for the isolation of mutations in other X-linked genes, and should also provide an efficient method for the isolation of new alleles of existing X-linked or autosomal mutations in Drosophila. PMID:9136014

  5. Germline MLH1 and MSH2 mutational spectrum including frequent large genomic aberrations in Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families: Implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta E; Olah, Edith

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of germline MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutations and evaluate the clinical characteristics of Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. METHODS: Thirty-six kindreds were tested for mutations using conformation sensitive gel electrophoreses, direct sequencing and also screening for genomic rearrangements applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). RESULTS: Eighteen germline mutations (50%) were identified, 9 in MLH1 and 9 in MSH2. Sixteen of these sequence alterations were considered pathogenic, the remaining two were non-conservative missense alterations occurring at highly conserved functional motifs. The majority of the definite pathogenic mutations (81%, 13/16) were found in families fulfilling the stringent Amsterdam I/II criteria, including three rearrangements revealed by MLPA (two in MSH2 and one in MLH1). However, in three out of sixteen HNPCC-suspected families (19%), a disease-causing alteration could be revealed. Furthermore, nine mutations described here are novel, and none of the sequence changes were found in more than one family. CONCLUSION: Our study describes for the first time the prevalence and spectrum of germline mismatch repair gene mutations in Hungarian HNPCC and suspected-HNPCC families. The results presented here suggest that clinical selection criteria should be relaxed and detection of genomic rearrangements should be included in genetic screening in this population. PMID:17569143

  6. Detection of modifications in the glucose metabolism induced by genetic mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by 13C- and H-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herve, M; Buffin-Meyer, B; Bouet, F; Son, T D

    2000-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy may offer a suitable technique to characterize the glucose metabolism in response to genetic mutations in cells. The effects of various genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast were investigated using 13C- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy associated with biochemical techniques. Cells were incubated with [1-13C]glucose in order to study glucose consumption and the formation of various end-products (ethanol, trehalose, glycerol, glutamate and amino acids) as a function of time. Two types of genetic modifications were studied in S. cerevisiae. A genetic modification deleted the N-terminal part of the TFC7 protein which is the smallest subunit (tau55) of the TFIIIC transcription factor. One secondary effect of this mutation was a large deletion of mitochondrial DNA giving the rho-phenotype. The other genetic modification corresponded to the disruption of the HUF gene; the mutated cells were rho+ like the reference strain. Both mutations increase the glycolysis rate and glycerol synthesis and decrease trehalose production. The most modified cells, which contain both TFC7 deletion and HUF gene disruption, utilize glucose in the most extreme manner as in these cells the largest production of the two glycolytic products (ethanol and glycerol) and the smallest trehalose formation occur. The HUF gene disruption serves as a positive modulator of glycolysis and respiration. However, the TFC7 deletion, associated with the phenotype rho-, induces the most damage in the cellular function, dramatically altering the behaviour of the Krebs cycle. The cycle becomes blocked at the level of 2-oxoglutarate, detected by a characteristic pattern of the 13C-NMR glutamate spectra. These NMR spectra corroborate the phenotypic data, the rho-phenotype corresponding to deletions of mitochondria DNA which block all mitochondria protein synthesis and render the cells unable to derive energy from respiration. Moreover, as a consequence of the Krebs cycle blocking, alanine

  7. Addition of restriction fragment length polymorphism markers to the genetic linkage map of Brassica rapa L. (syn. campestris).

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Jogeswar; Patnaik, Anjana; Kole, Phullara; Koleb, Chitta ranjan

    2009-01-01

    Genetic linkage analysis of 151 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) loci, that included eight new loci, detected by the six probes in the present study, and four trait loci including seed colour, leaf pubescence, resistance to white rust caused by Albugo candida race-2 (AC-2) and race-7 (AC-7) employing the MAPMAKER/EXP 3.0 programme led to the development of 10 linkage groups (LGs) spanning over 44.4 centiMorgan (cM) to 130.4 cM containing 9 to 22 loci and two short LGs with two or three marker loci in Brassica rapa. The enriched map covers 993.1 cM of B. rapa genome with an average marker interval of 6.41. Eight new RFLP loci occupied new map positions on five linkage groups, LG 2, 3, 6, 8 and 9. Addition of these RFLP loci led to appreciable changes in the corresponding linkage groups and resulted in an increase of the total map length by 102.8 cM and of the marker interval by 0.35 cM. Interval mapping by using the computer programme MAPMAKER/ QTL 1.1 for scanning the genetic map led to the detection of one major quantitative trait locus (QTL) in LG 4 and one minor QTL in LG 8 governing resistance to AC-7. Both QTLs contributed 7.89 to the interaction phenotype (IP) score with 96.3% genetic variation. The multi-locus model suggested additive gene action with 96.8% genetic variation.

  8. Genetic prerequisites for additive or synergistic actions of 5-fluorocytosine and fluconazole in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Paluszynski, John P; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2008-10-01

    During applications of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) and fluconazole (FLC), additive or synergistic action may even occur when primary resistance to 5FC is established. Here, we analysed conjoint drug action in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in genes known to be essential for 5FC or FLC function. Despite clear primary resistance, residual 5FC activity and additive 5FC+FLC action in cells lacking cytosine permease (Fcy2p) or uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (Fur1p) were detected. In contrast, Deltafcy1 mutants, lacking cytosine deaminase, became entirely resistant to 5FC, concomitantly losing 5FC+FLC additivity. Disruption of the orotate phosphoribosyltransferase gene (URA5) in the wild-type led to low-level 5FC tolerance, while an alternative orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by URA10, contributed to 5FC toxicity only in the Deltaura5 background. Remarkably, combination of Deltaura5 and Deltafur1 resulted in complete 5FC resistance. Thus, yeast orotate phosphoribosyltransferases are involved in 5FC metabolism. Similarly, disruption of the ergosterol Delta(5,6)-desaturase-encoding gene ERG3 resulted only in partial resistance to FLC, and concomitantly a synergistic effect with 5FC became evident. Full resistance to FLC occurred in Deltaerg3 Deltaerg11 double mutants and, simultaneously, synergism or even an additive effect with FLC and 5FC was no longer discernible. Since the majority of spontaneously occurring resistant yeast clones displayed residual sensitivity to either 5FC or FLC and those strains responded to combined drug treatment in a predictable manner, careful resistance profiling based on the findings reported here may help to address yeast infections by combined application of antimycotic compounds.

  9. ABO blood group but not haemostasis genetic polymorphisms significantly influence thrombotic risk: a study of 180 homozygotes for the Factor V Leiden mutation.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Limited data exist on the impact of additional genetic risk factors on the clinical manifestations of factor (F) V Leiden homozygotes. A retrospective multi-centre cohort study was performed to assess the role of the FII G20210A gene mutation, the protein C (PC) promoter CG haplotype, the combination of two PC polymorphisms (A-1641G, C-1654T), the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism, two thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor polymorphisms (Thr325Ile, Ala147Thr), two plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 polymorphisms (-675 4G/5G, A-844G), the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism and the ABO blood group on the thrombotic phenotype in FV Leiden homozygotes. 127 subjects with venous thrombosis and 53 asymptomatic subjects were analysed. The T allele of MTHFR C677T was more frequent in symptomatic subjects than in asymptomatic ones (68% vs. 45%, P = 0.02; odds ratio (OR) 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-5.8, after adjustment for potential confounders). For the other polymorphisms, no difference was observed between symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. The non-O blood group was more frequent among symptomatic carriers (84% vs. 57%, P = 0.0002; OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.7-9.7). In conclusion, except for the ABO blood group, none of the polymorphisms studied contribute strongly to the thrombotic risk in FV Leiden homozygotes.

  10. Phenotypic, metabolic, and molecular genetic characterization of six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by novel mutations in the CYP11B1 gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Eiden-Plach, Antje; Hannemann, Frank; Malunowicz, Ewa M; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of steroidogenesis. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene is the second most common form of CAH. In this study, 6 patients suffering from CAH were diagnosed with 11β-OHD using urinary GC-MS steroid metabolomics analysis. The molecular basis of the disorder was investigated by molecular genetic analysis of the CYP11B1 gene, functional characterization of splicing and missense mutations, and analysis of the missense mutations in a computer model of CYP11B1. All patients presented with abnormal clinical signs of hyperandrogenism. Their urinary steroid metabolomes were characterized by excessive excretion rates of metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol as well as metabolites of 11-deoxycorticosterone, and allowed definite diagnosis. Patient 1 carries compound heterozygous mutations consisting of a novel nonsense mutation p.Q102X (c.304C>T) in exon 2 and the known missense mutation p.T318R (c.953C>G) in exon 5. Two siblings (patient 2 and 3) were compound heterozygous carriers of a known splicing mutation c.1200+1G>A in intron 7 and a known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. Minigene experiments demonstrated that the c.1200+1G>A mutation caused abnormal pre-mRNA splicing (intron retention). Two further siblings (patient 4 and 5) were compound heterozygous carriers of a novel missense mutation p.R332G (c.994C>G) in exon 6 and the known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. A CYP11B1 activity study in COS-1 cells showed that only 11% of the enzyme activity remained in the variant p.R332G. Patient 6 carried a so far not described homozygous deletion g.2470_5320del of 2850 bp corresponding to a loss of the CYP11B1 exons 3-8. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical 6 base pair repeats (GCTTCT) upstream and downstream of the gene. Experiments analyzing the influence of mutations on splicing and on enzyme

  11. A Genetic Screen for Olfactory Habituation Mutations in Drosophila: Analysis of Novel Foraging Alleles and an Underlying Neural Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Eddison, Mark; Belay, Amsale T.; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Habituation is a form of non-associative learning that enables animals to reduce their reaction to repeated harmless stimuli. When exposed to ethanol vapor, Drosophila show an olfactory-mediated startle response characterized by a transient increase in locomotor activity. Upon repeated exposures, this olfactory startle attenuates with the characteristics of habituation. Here we describe the results of a genetic screen to identify olfactory startle habituation (OSH) mutants. One mutation is a transcript specific allele of foraging (for) encoding a cGMP-dependent kinase. We show this allele of for reduces expression of a for-T1 isoform expressed in the head and functions normally to inhibit OSH. We localize for-T1 function to a limited set of neurons that include olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and the mushroom body (MB). Overexpression of for-T1 in ORNs inhibits OSH, an effect also seen upon synaptic silencing of the ORNs; for-T1 may therefore function in ORNs to decrease synaptic release upon repeated exposure to ethanol vapor. Overall, this work contributes to our understanding of the genes and neurons underlying olfactory habituation in Drosophila. PMID:23284741

  12. Mutational trends in V3 loop protein sequences observed in different genetic lineages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Korber, B T; MacInnes, K; Smith, R F; Myers, G

    1994-01-01

    Highly variable international human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope sequences can be assigned to six major clades, or phylogenetically defined subtypes, designated A through F. These subtypes are approximately equidistant in terms of evolutionary distance measured by nucleotide sequences. This radiation from a common ancestral sequence may have been in step with the spread of the pandemic. In this study, V3 loop protein sequence relationships within these major clades are analyzed to determine how the different lineages might be evolving with respect to this biologically important domain. The V3 loop has been shown to influence viral phenotype and to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. To identify patterns in V3 loop amino acid evolution, we cluster the sequences by a phenetic principle which evaluates protein similarities on the basis of amino acid identities and similarities irrespective of evolutionary relationships. When phenetic clustering patterns are superimposed upon phylogenetic subtype classifications, two interesting mutational trends are revealed. First, a set of identical, or highly similar, V3 loop protein sequences can be identified within two otherwise dissimilar genetic subtypes, A and C. Second, the D subtype sequences are found to possess the most radically divergent set of V3 loop sequences. These and other patterns characteristic of the V3 loop reflect the acquisition of specific biological properties during the apparently recent evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 lineages. PMID:8084005

  13. Crossover versus Mutation: A Comparative Analysis of the Evolutionary Strategy of Genetic Algorithms Applied to Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    PubMed Central

    Osaba, E.; Carballedo, R.; Diaz, F.; Onieva, E.; de la Iglesia, I.; Perallos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Since their first formulation, genetic algorithms (GAs) have been one of the most widely used techniques to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The basic structure of the GAs is known by the scientific community, and t