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Sample records for additional genetic mutations

  1. Simultaneous Estimation of Additive and Mutational Genetic Variance in an Outbred Population of Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Aguirre, J David; Blows, Mark W

    2015-11-01

    How new mutations contribute to genetic variation is a key question in biology. Although the evolutionary fate of an allele is largely determined by its heterozygous effect, most estimates of mutational variance and mutational effects derive from highly inbred lines, where new mutations are present in homozygous form. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, middle-class neighborhood (MCN) experiments have been used to assess the fitness effect of new mutations in heterozygous form. However, because MCN populations harbor substantial standing genetic variance, estimates of mutational variance have not typically been available from such experiments. Here we employ a modification of the animal model to analyze data from 22 generations of Drosophila serrata bred in an MCN design. Mutational heritability, measured for eight cuticular hydrocarbons, 10 wing-shape traits, and wing size in this outbred genetic background, ranged from 0.0006 to 0.006 (with one exception), a similar range to that reported from studies employing inbred lines. Simultaneously partitioning the additive and mutational variance in the same outbred population allowed us to quantitatively test the ability of mutation-selection balance models to explain the observed levels of additive and mutational genetic variance. The Gaussian allelic approximation and house-of-cards models, which assume real stabilizing selection on single traits, both overestimated the genetic variance maintained at equilibrium, but the house-of-cards model was a closer fit to the data. This analytical approach has the potential to be broadly applied, expanding our understanding of the dynamics of genetic variance in natural populations. PMID:26384357

  2. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  3. An Overview of Mutation Detection Methods in Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Rabbani, Bahareh

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders are traditionally categorized into three main groups: single-gene, chromosomal, and multifactorial disorders. Single gene or Mendelian disorders result from errors in DNA sequence of a gene and include autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR), X-linked dominant and Y-linked (holandric) disorders. Chromosomal disorders are due to chromosomal aberrations including numerical and structural damages. Molecular and cytogenetic techniques have been applied to identify genetic mutations leading to diseases. Accurate diagnosis of diseases is essential for appropriate treatment of patients, genetic counseling and prevention strategies. Characteristic features of patterns of inheritance are briefly reviewed and a short description of chromosomal disorders is also presented. In addition, applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and different types of mutations are discussed for genetic diagnosis of the pediatric genetic diseases. The purpose is to make pediatricians familiar with the applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and tools used for genetic diagnosis. PMID:24427490

  4. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  5. Addition of molecular methods to mutation studies with Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.R. )

    1989-01-01

    For 80 years, Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a major tool in analyzing Mendelian genetics. By using chromosome inversions that suppress crossing over, geneticists have developed a large number of stocks for mutation analysis. These stocks permit numerous tests for specific locus mutations, lethals at multiple loci on any chromosome, chromosome exchanges, insertions, and deletions. The entire genome can be manipulated for a degree of genetic control not found in other germ-line systems. Recombinant DNA techniques now permit analysis of mutations to the nucleotide level. By combining classical genetic analysis with recombinant DNA techniques, it is possible to analyze mutations that range from chromosome aberrations and multilocus deficiencies to single nucleotide transitions.

  6. Volatile fingerprints of cancer specific genetic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Nir; Barash, Orna; Tisch, Ulrike; Ionescu, Radu; Broza, Yoav Y.; Ilouze, Maya; Mattei, Jane; Bunn, Paul A.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Haick, Hossam

    2014-01-01

    We report on a new concept for profiling genetic mutations of (lung) cancer cells, based on the detection of patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from cell membranes, using an array of nanomaterial-based sensors. In this in-vitro pilot study we have derived a volatile fingerprint assay for representative genetic mutations in cancer cells that are known to be associated with targeted cancer therapy. Five VOCs were associated with the studied oncogenes, using complementary chemical analysis, and were discussed in terms of possible metabolic pathways. The reported approach could lead to the development of novel methods for guiding treatments, so that patients could benefit from safer, more timely and effective interventions that improve survival and quality of life while avoiding unnecessary invasive procedures. Studying clinical samples (tissue/blood/breath) will be required as next step in order to determine whether this cell-line study can be translated into a clinically useful tool. PMID:23428987

  7. Genetic Analysis of 63 Mutations Affecting Maize Kernel Development Isolated from Mutator Stocks

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, M. J.; Stinard, P. S.; James, M. G.; Myers, A. M.; Robertson, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three mutations affecting development of the maize kernel were isolated from active Robertson's Mutator (Mu) stocks. At least 14 previously undescribed maize gene loci were defined by mutations in this collection. Genetic mapping located 53 of these defective kernel (dek) mutations to particular chromosome arms, and more precise map determinations were made for 21 of the mutations. Genetic analyses identified 20 instances of allelism between one of the novel mutations and a previously described dek mutation, or between new dek mutations identified in this study; phenotypic variability was observed in three of the allelic series. Viability testing of homozygous mutant kernels identified numerous dek mutations with various pleiotropic effects on seedling and plant development. The mutations described here presumably arose by insertion of a Mu transposon within a dek gene; thus, many of the affected loci are expected to be accessible to molecular cloning via transposon-tagging. PMID:8138165

  8. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    PubMed

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members. PMID:19068258

  9. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K; Keshari, Amit K; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  10. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  11. Clinical Grade “SNaPshot” Genetic Mutation Profiling in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Elizabeth; Mahindra, Anuj; Yee, Andrew J.; Nardi, Valentina; Birrer, Nicole; Horick, Nora; Borger, Darrell; Finkelstein, Dianne; Iafrate, John A.; Raje, Noopur

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing studies have identified several oncogenic mutations in multiple myeloma (MM). As MM progresses, it evolves genetically underscoring the need to have tools for rapid detection of targetable mutations to optimize individualized treatment. Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has developed a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved, high-throughput, genotyping platform to determine the mutation status of a panel of known oncogenes. Sequence analysis using SNaPshot on DNA extracted from bone marrow and extramedullary plasmacytomas is feasible and leads to the detection of potentially druggable mutations. Screening MM patients for somatic mutations in oncogenes may provide novel targets leading to additional therapies for this patient population. PMID:26137536

  12. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon. PMID:25940384

  13. Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and one wild-type Escherichia coli to doubling concentrations of the antibiotic cefotaxime. All strains carried TEM-1, a β-lactamase enzyme well known by its low availability of mutational pathways. Crucially, one of the mutators does not elevate any of the relevant first-step mutations known to improve cefatoximase activity. Despite this, both mutators displayed a similar ability to evolve more than 1000-fold resistance. Initial adaptation proceeded in parallel through general multi-drug resistance mechanisms. High-level resistance, in contrast, was achieved through divergent paths; with the a priori inferior mutator exploiting alternative mutational pathways in PBP3, the target of the antibiotic. These results have implications for mutator management in clinical infections and, more generally, illustrate that limits to natural selection in real organisms are alleviated by the existence of multiple loci contributing to fitness. PMID:25716795

  14. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-03-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  15. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... N. A family harboring a germ-line N-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation and development of acute myeloid leukemia with an additional somatic C-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar; ...

  17. Deleterious mutations and the genetic variance of male fitness components in Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John K

    2003-01-01

    Deleterious mutations are relevant to a broad range of questions in genetics and evolutionary biology. I present an application of the "biometric method" for estimating mutational parameters for male fitness characters of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus. The biometric method rests on two critical assumptions. The first is that experimental inbreeding changes genotype frequencies without changing allele frequencies; i.e., there is no genetic purging during the experiment. I satisfy this condition by employing a breeding design in which the parents are randomly extracted, fully homozygous inbred lines. The second is that all genetic variation is attributable to deleterious mutations maintained in mutation-selection balance. I explicitly test this hypothesis using likelihood ratios. Of the three deleterious mutation models tested, the first two are rejected for all characters. The failure of these models is due to an excess of additive genetic variation relative to the expectation under mutation-selection balance. The third model is not rejected for either of two log-transformed male fitness traits. However, this model imposes only "weak conditions" and is not sufficiently detailed to provide estimates for mutational parameters. The implication is that, if biometric methods are going to yield useful parameter estimates, they will need to consider mutational models more complicated than those typically employed in experimental studies. PMID:12871916

  18. Mutations Affecting Sexual Conjugation and Related Processes in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. II. Genetic Analysis of Nonmating Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Vivian; Manney, Thomas R.

    1974-01-01

    Rare diploids formed by sterile mutants have been studied by tetrad analysis. Sixteen classes of mutants representing at least five distinct genetic loci have been defined. One group of mutations, isolated only in α, maps at the mating-type locus, while none of the others shows any linkage to mating type. Some of the mutations are nonspecific for mating type, while others act only on a or α. In addition, mutations were found that prevent sporulation when heterozygous in diploids. These appear to be mutations of the mating-type alleles. PMID:4595644

  19. Influence of dominance, leptokurtosis and pleiotropy of deleterious mutations on quantitative genetic variation at mutation-selection balance.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Jinliang; Hill, William G

    2004-01-01

    In models of maintenance of genetic variance (V (G)) it has often been assumed that mutant alleles act additively. However, experimental data show that the dominance coefficient varies among mutant alleles and those of large effect tend to be recessive. On the basis of empirical knowledge of mutations, a joint-effect model of pleiotropic and real stabilizing selection that includes dominance is constructed and analyzed. It is shown that dominance can dramatically alter the prediction of equilibrium V (G). Analysis indicates that for the situations where mutations are more recessive for fitness than for a quantitative trait, as supported by the available data, the joint-effect model predicts a significantly higher V (G) than does an additive model. Importantly, for what seem to be realistic distributions of mutational effects (i.e., many mutants may not affect the quantitative trait substantially but are likely to affect fitness), the observed high levels of genetic variation in the quantitative trait under strong apparent stabilizing selection can be generated. This investigation supports the hypothesis that most V (G) comes from the alleles nearly neutral for fitness in heterozygotes while apparent stabilizing selection is contributed mainly by the alleles of large effect on the quantitative trait. Thus considerations of dominance coefficients of mutations lend further support to our previous conclusion that mutation-selection balance is a plausible mechanism of the maintenance of the genetic variance in natural populations. PMID:15020447

  20. Population genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: founder mutations to genomes.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, William D; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The current standard model for identifying carriers of high-risk mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes (CSGs) generally involves a process that is not amenable to population-based testing: access to genetic tests is typically regulated by health-care providers on the basis of a labour-intensive assessment of an individual's personal and family history of cancer, with face-to-face genetic counselling performed before mutation testing. Several studies have shown that application of these selection criteria results in a substantial proportion of mutation carriers being missed. Population-based genetic testing has been proposed as an alternative approach to determining cancer susceptibility, and aims for a more-comprehensive detection of mutation carriers. Herein, we review the existing data on population-based genetic testing, and consider some of the barriers, pitfalls, and challenges related to the possible expansion of this approach. We consider mechanisms by which population-based genetic testing for cancer susceptibility could be delivered, and suggest how such genetic testing might be integrated into existing and emerging health-care structures. The existing models of genetic testing (including issues relating to informed consent) will very likely require considerable alteration if the potential benefits of population-based genetic testing are to be fully realized. PMID:26483301

  1. Near East University Genetic Mutation Database (NEU-GD): The first mutation database of Northern Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Pirzada, Rameez Hassan; Arici, Mustafa; Serakinci, Nedime

    2015-10-15

    The health care system is negatively affected by the genetic disorders that lead to an increasing rate of morbidity and neonatal deaths and affect adults as well. These create a substantial government's psychosocial and economic burden on clinicians, patients and their families with the advancement in the field of genetics. There has been a tremendous increase in the rate in which diseases associated with variant DNA sequences are being sought and identified. The goal behind the creation of Near East University Genetic Mutation Database (NEU-GD) is to map and apprehend the patterns of common genetic diversity in the human genetic makeup in order to accelerate the search for the genetic causes of human disease. NEU-GD will allow scientists to generate extraordinarily useful information such as allelic variations among population, and description of the genetic blueprint of mutations occurring in human beings. In this communication we report the construction of the first genetic mutation database for the people belonging to different ethnic groups living in North Cyprus (http://genetics-db.neu.edu.tr/). Therefore NEU-GD can serve as an important tool available online for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorder and persuade for further investigation of novel genetic disorders in North Cyprus population. PMID:26183225

  2. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats. PMID:20484848

  3. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  4. Functional modules, mutational load and human genetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Norann A.; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The ability to generate a massive amount of sequencing and genotyping data is transforming the study of human genetic disorders. Driven by such innovation, it is likely that whole exome and whole-genome resequencing will replace regionally focused approaches for gene discovery and clinical testing in the next few years. However, this opportunity brings a significant interpretative challenge to assigning function and phenotypic variance to common and rare alleles. Understanding the effect of individual mutations in the context of the remaining genomic variation represents a major challenge to our interpretation of disease. Here, we discuss the challenges of assigning mutation functionality and, drawing from the examples of ciliopathies as well as cohesinopathies and channelopathies, discuss possibilities for the functional modularization of the human genome. Functional modularization in addition to the development of physiologically-relevant assays to test allele functionality will accelerate our understanding of disease architecture and enable the use of genome-wide sequence data for disease diagnosis and phenotypic prediction in individuals. PMID:20226561

  5. Explaining additional genetic variation in complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew R.; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of complex traits, discovering >6000 variants associated with >500 quantitative traits and common complex diseases in humans. The associations identified so far represent only a fraction of those which influence phenotype, as there are likely to be very many variants across the entire frequency spectrum, each of which influences multiple traits, with only a small average contribution to the phenotypic variance. This presents a considerable challenge to further dissection of the remaining unexplained genetic variance within populations, which limits our ability to predict disease risk, identify new drug targets, improve and maintain food sources, and understand natural diversity. This challenge will be met within the current framework through larger sample size, better phenotyping including recording of non-genetic risk factors, focused study designs, and an integration of multiple sources of phenotypic and genetic information. The current evidence supports the application of quantitative genetic approaches, and we argue that one should retain simpler theories until simplicity can be traded for greater explanatory power. PMID:24629526

  6. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  7. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  8. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Malignant bladder pheochromocytoma with SDHB genetic mutation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Funahashi, Y; Katoh, M; Fujita, T; Tsuruta, K; Gotoh, M

    2013-09-01

    A 30-year-old man presented with micturition pain and was diagnosed with a submucosal tumor in the right wall of the bladder with metastasis to the right obturator lymph node. Transurethral resection led to a diagnosis of invasive malignant pheochromocytoma. Radical cystectomy, neobladder reconstruction and bilateral iliac lymph node dissection were performed. Genetic analysis revealed succinate dehydrogenase B-associated hereditary pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma syndrome. 10 months after the operation, he had no evidence of recurrence. PMID:23807799

  11. Additive genetic variation and evolvability of a multivariate trait can be increased by epistatic gene action.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Cortland K

    2015-12-21

    Epistatic gene action occurs when mutations or alleles interact to produce a phenotype. Theoretically and empirically it is of interest to know whether gene interactions can facilitate the evolution of diversity. In this paper, we explore how epistatic gene action affects the additive genetic component or heritable component of multivariate trait variation, as well as how epistatic gene action affects the evolvability of multivariate traits. The analysis involves a sexually reproducing and recombining population. Our results indicate that under stabilizing selection conditions a population with a mixed additive and epistatic genetic architecture can have greater multivariate additive genetic variation and evolvability than a population with a purely additive genetic architecture. That greater multivariate additive genetic variation can occur with epistasis is in contrast to previous theory that indicated univariate additive genetic variation is decreased with epistasis under stabilizing selection conditions. In a multivariate setting, epistasis leads to less relative covariance among individuals in their genotypic, as well as their breeding values, which facilitates the maintenance of additive genetic variation and increases a population׳s evolvability. Our analysis involves linking the combinatorial nature of epistatic genetic effects to the ancestral graph structure of a population to provide insight into the consequences of epistasis on multivariate trait variation and evolution. PMID:26431770

  12. Novel genetic mutation in the background of Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Halászlaki, Csaba; Takács, István; Butz, Henriett; Patócs, Attila; Lakatos, Péter

    2012-04-01

    Carney complex is a rare disease inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. It is mostly caused by inactivating mutations of the subunit of protein kinase A. Carney complex is associated with atrial myxoma, nevi or myxomas of the skin, breast tumor and endocrine overactivity. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is the specific endocrine manifestation. The authors present the history of a 53-year-old female patient who had undergone surgery for atrial myxomas, thyroid tumor and breast cancer. She was also operated for an adrenal adenoma causing Cushing’s syndrome. Genetic study revealed a novel mutation in the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (ivs2-1G>A splice mutation in intron 2). Her heterozygous twins were also genetically screened and one of them carried the same mutation. The authors emphasize that despite the absence of specific treatment for patients with Carney complex, confirmation of the diagnosis by genetic studies is important for the close follow-up of the patient and early identification of novel manifestations. PMID:22297707

  13. [Characterization of genetic alterations in primary human melanomas carrying BRAF or NRAS mutation].

    PubMed

    Lázár, Viktória

    2013-06-01

    Human malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer with an exceptionally bad prognosis. Melanoma often displays constitutively activated MAPK pathway through BRAF or NRAS mutations. It is also known that these mutations are almost never simultaneously present and that they appear at early stages and preserved throughout tumor progression, although it is proved that these alterations alone are insufficient to cause tumor progression. Therefore the first aim of our study was to evaluate those distinct genetic alterations which can properly differentiate the three important molecular subtypes of primary melanomas with a) BRAF, b) NRAS mutation and c) WT (wild type for both loci). High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) was used to assess genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number alterations. Primary melanomas with BRAF mutation more frequently exhibited losses on 10q23-10q26 and gains on chromosome 7 and 1q23-1q25 compared to melanomas with NRAS mutation. Loss on the 11q23-11q25 sequence was found mainly in conjunction with NRAS mutation. Based on these results, we proved the existence of marked differences in the genetic pattern of the BRAF and NRAS mutated melanoma subgroups, which might suggest that these mutations contribute to the development of malignant melanoma in conjunction with distinct cooperating oncogenic events. In general, it is an interesting phenomenon suggesting that these mutations provide probably the "guiding force" for these tumors and it also suggests that there are alternative genetic pathways to melanoma. These additional oncogenic events which are associated with BRAF or NRAS mutations can provide rational additional targets for a combination therapy with kinase inhibitors. In this study we also investigated the specific dynamic activities among different signalling pathways highlighting the frequent alterations of genes involved in the signalling interactions between the MAPK-JAK pathways

  14. Mutations in GABAA receptor subunits associated with genetic epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Robert L; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Gallagher, Martin J

    2010-06-01

    Mutations in inhibitory GABAA receptor subunit genes (GABRA1, GABRB3, GABRG2 and GABRD) have been associated with genetic epilepsy syndromes including childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), pure febrile seizures (FS), generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), and Dravet syndrome (DS)/severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI). These mutations are found in both translated and untranslated gene regions and have been shown to affect the GABAA receptors by altering receptor function and/or by impairing receptor biogenesis by multiple mechanisms including reducing subunit mRNA transcription or stability, impairing subunit folding, stability, or oligomerization and by inhibiting receptor trafficking. PMID:20308251

  15. Mutation and Human Exceptionalism: Our Future Genetic Load.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Although the human germline mutation rate is higher than that in any other well-studied species, the rate is not exceptional once the effective genome size and effective population size are taken into consideration. Human somatic mutation rates are substantially elevated above those in the germline, but this is also seen in other species. What is exceptional about humans is the recent detachment from the challenges of the natural environment and the ability to modify phenotypic traits in ways that mitigate the fitness effects of mutations, e.g., precision and personalized medicine. This results in a relaxation of selection against mildly deleterious mutations, including those magnifying the mutation rate itself. The long-term consequence of such effects is an expected genetic deterioration in the baseline human condition, potentially measurable on the timescale of a few generations in westernized societies, and because the brain is a particularly large mutational target, this is of particular concern. Ultimately, the price will have to be covered by further investment in various forms of medical intervention. Resolving the uncertainties of the magnitude and timescale of these effects will require the establishment of stable, standardized, multigenerational measurement procedures for various human traits. PMID:26953265

  16. Mutation and Human Exceptionalism: Our Future Genetic Load

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Although the human germline mutation rate is higher than that in any other well-studied species, the rate is not exceptional once the effective genome size and effective population size are taken into consideration. Human somatic mutation rates are substantially elevated above those in the germline, but this is also seen in other species. What is exceptional about humans is the recent detachment from the challenges of the natural environment and the ability to modify phenotypic traits in ways that mitigate the fitness effects of mutations, e.g., precision and personalized medicine. This results in a relaxation of selection against mildly deleterious mutations, including those magnifying the mutation rate itself. The long-term consequence of such effects is an expected genetic deterioration in the baseline human condition, potentially measurable on the timescale of a few generations in westernized societies, and because the brain is a particularly large mutational target, this is of particular concern. Ultimately, the price will have to be covered by further investment in various forms of medical intervention. Resolving the uncertainties of the magnitude and timescale of these effects will require the establishment of stable, standardized, multigenerational measurement procedures for various human traits. PMID:26953265

  17. Genetic regulatory network motifs constrain adaptation through curvature in the landscape of mutational (co)variance.

    PubMed

    Hether, Tyler D; Hohenlohe, Paul A

    2014-04-01

    Systems biology is accumulating a wealth of understanding about the structure of genetic regulatory networks, leading to a more complete picture of the complex genotype-phenotype relationship. However, models of multivariate phenotypic evolution based on quantitative genetics have largely not incorporated a network-based view of genetic variation. Here we model a set of two-node, two-phenotype genetic network motifs, covering a full range of regulatory interactions. We find that network interactions result in different patterns of mutational (co)variance at the phenotypic level (the M-matrix), not only across network motifs but also across phenotypic space within single motifs. This effect is due almost entirely to mutational input of additive genetic (co)variance. Variation in M has the effect of stretching and bending phenotypic space with respect to evolvability, analogous to the curvature of space-time under general relativity, and similar mathematical tools may apply in each case. We explored the consequences of curvature in mutational variation by simulating adaptation under divergent selection with gene flow. Both standing genetic variation (the G-matrix) and rate of adaptation are constrained by M, so that G and adaptive trajectories are curved across phenotypic space. Under weak selection the phenotypic mean at migration-selection balance also depends on M. PMID:24219635

  18. The genetic basis of familial hypercholesterolemia: inheritance, linkage, and mutations

    PubMed Central

    De Castro-Orós, Isabel; Pocoví, Miguel; Civeira, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder of lipoprotein metabolism characterized by high plasma concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), tendon xanthomas, and increased risk of premature coronary heart disease. FH is one of the most common inherited disorders; there are 10,000,000 people with FH worldwide, mainly heterozygotes. The most common FH cause is mutations along the entire gene that encode for LDL receptor (LDLR) protein, but it has been also described that mutations in apolipoprotein B (APOB) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 genes produce this phenotype. About 17%–33% of patients with a clinical diagnosis of monogenic hypercholesterolemia do not harbor any genetic cause in the known loci. Because FH has been considered as a public health problem, it is very important for an early diagnosis and treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated the influence of the LDLR mutation type in the FH phenotype, associating a more severe clinical phenotype and worse advanced carotid artherosclerosis in patients with null than those with receptor-defective mutations. Since 2004, a molecular FH diagnosis based on a genetic diagnostic platform (Lipochip®; Progenika-Biopharma, Derio, Spain) has been developed. This analysis completes the adequate clinical diagnosis made by physicians. Our group has recently proposed new FH guidelines with the intention to facilitate the FH diagnosis. The treatment for this disease is based on the benefit of lowering LDLc and a healthy lifestyle. Actually, drug therapy is focused on using statins and combined therapy with ezetimibe and statins. This review highlights the recent progress made in genetics, diagnosis, and treatment for FH. PMID:23776352

  19. Genetic Studies of the Mouse Mutations Mahogany and Mahoganoid

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K. A.; Gunn, T. M.; Carrasquillo, M. M.; Lamoreux, M. L.; Galbraith, D. B.; Barsh, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The mouse mutations mahogany (mg) and mahoganoid (md) are negative modifiers of the Agouti coat color gene, which encodes a paracrine signaling molecule that induces a switch in melanin synthesis from eumelanin to pheomelanin. Animals mutant for md or mg synthesize very little or no pheomelanin depending on Agouti gene background. The Agouti protein is normally expressed in the skin and acts as an antagonist of the melanocyte receptor for α-MSH (Mc1r); however, ectopic expression of Agouti causes obesity, possibly by antagonizing melanocortin receptors expressed in the brain. To investigate where md and mg lie in a genetic pathway with regard to Agouti and Mc1r signaling, we determined the effects of these mutations in animals that carried either a loss-of-function Mc1r mutation (recessive yellow, Mc1r(e)) or a gain-of-function Agouti mutation (lethal yellow, A(y)). We found that the Mc1r(e) mutation suppressed the effects of md and mg, but that md and mg suppressed the effects of A(y) on both coat color and obesity. Plasma levels of α-MSH and of ACTH were unaffected by md or mg. These results suggest that md and mg interfere directly with Agouti signaling, possibly at the level of protein production or receptor regulation. PMID:9258683

  20. Skeleton Genetics: a comprehensive database for genes and mutations related to genetic skeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Xu, Chenyang; Liu, Xinting; Hu, Lin; Xiang, Yanbao; Chen, Qingshuang; Chen, Denghui; Li, Huanzheng; Xu, Xueqin; Tang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic skeletal disorders (GSD) involving the skeletal system arises through disturbances in the complex processes of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis and remain a diagnostic challenge because of their clinical heterogeneity and genetic variety. Over the past decades, tremendous effort platforms have been made to explore the complex heterogeneity, and massive new genes and mutations have been identified in different GSD, but the information supplied by literature is still limited and it is hard to meet the further needs of scientists and clinicians. In this study, combined with Nosology and Classification of genetic skeletal disorders, we developed the first comprehensive and annotated genetic skeletal disorders database, named 'SkeletonGenetics', which contains information about all GSD-related knowledge including 8225 mutations in 357 genes, with detailed information associated with 481 clinical diseases (2260 clinical phenotype) classified in 42 groups defined by molecular, biochemical and/or radiographic criteria from 1698 publications. Further annotations were performed to each entry including Gene Ontology, pathways analysis, protein-protein interaction, mutation annotations, disease-disease clustering and gene-disease networking. Furthermore, using concise search methods, intuitive graphical displays, convenient browsing functions and constantly updatable features, 'SkeletonGenetics' could serve as a central and integrative database for unveiling the genetic and pathways pre-dispositions of GSD.Database URL: http://101.200.211.232/skeletongenetics/. PMID:27580923

  1. Mutation analysis and molecular genetics of epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, L; Uitto, J

    1999-02-01

    Cutaneous basement membrane zone (BMZ) consists of a number of attachment structures that are critical for stable association of the epidermis to the underlying dermis. These include hemidesmosomes, anchoring filaments and anchoring fibrils which form an interconnecting network extending from the intracellular milieu of basal keratinocytes across the dermal-epidermal basement membrane to the underlying dermis. Aberrations in this network structure, e.g. due to genetic lesions in the corresponding genes, can result in fragility of the skin at the level of the cutaneous BMZ. The prototype of such diseases is epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by fragility and blistering of the skin, often associated with extracutaneous manifestations, and inherited either in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. Based on constellations of the phenotypic manifestations, severity of the disease, and the level of tissue separation within the cutaneous BMZ, EB has been divided into clinically distinct subcategories, including the simplex, hemidesmosomal, junctional and dystrophic variants. Elucidation of BMZ gene/protein systems and development of mutation detection strategies have allowed identification of mutations in 10 different BMZ genes which can explain the clinical heterogeneity of EB. These include mutations in the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in the dystrophic (severely scarring) forms of EB; mutations in the laminin 5 genes (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) in a lethal (Herlitz) variant of junctional EB; aberrations in the type XVII collagen gene (COL17A1) in non-lethal forms of junctional EB; mutations in the alpha6 and beta4 integrin genes in a distinct hemidesmosomal variant of EB with congenital pyloric atresia; and mutations in the plectin gene (PLEC1) in a form of EB associated with late-onset muscular dystrophy. Identification of mutations in these gene/protein systems attests to their critical importance in the

  2. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il. PMID:20186514

  3. Prevalence of CDKN2A mutations in pancreatic cancer patients: implications for genetic counseling

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Robert R; Wieben, Eric D; Rabe, Kari G; Pedersen, Katrina S; Wu, Yanhong; Sicotte, Hugues; Petersen, Gloria M

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A have been reported in pancreatic cancer families, but genetic counseling for pancreatic cancer risk has been limited by lack of information on CDKN2A mutation carriers outside of selected pancreatic or melanoma kindreds. Lymphocyte DNA from consecutive, unselected white non-Hispanic patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma was used to sequence CDKN2A. Frequencies of mutations that alter the coding of p16INK4 or p14ARF were quantified overall and in subgroups. Penetrance and likelihood of carrying mutations by family history were estimated. Among 1537 cases, 9 (0.6%) carried germline mutations in CDKN2A, including three previously unreported mutations. CDKN2A mutation carriers were more likely to have a family history of pancreatic cancer (P=0.003) or melanoma (P=0.03), and a personal history of melanoma (P=0.01). Among cases who reported having a first-degree relative with pancreatic cancer or melanoma, the carrier proportions were 3.3 and 5.3%, respectively. Penetrance for mutation carriers by age 80 was calculated to be 58% for pancreatic cancer (95% confidence interval (CI) 8–86%), and 39% for melanoma (95% CI 0–80). Among cases who ever smoked cigarettes, the risk for pancreatic cancer was higher for carriers compared with non-carriers (HR 25.8, P=2.1 × 10−13), but among nonsmokers, this comparison did not reach statistical significance. Germline mutations in CDKN2A among unselected pancreatic cancer patients are uncommon, although notably penetrant, especially among smokers. Carriers of germline mutations of CDKN2A should be counseled to avoid tobacco use to decrease risk of pancreatic cancer in addition to taking measures to decrease melanoma risk. PMID:21150883

  4. Physiology of SLC12 transporters: lessons from inherited human genetic mutations and genetically engineered mouse knockouts

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Among the over 300 members of the solute carrier (SLC) group of integral plasma membrane transport proteins are the nine electroneutral cation-chloride cotransporters belonging to the SLC12 gene family. Seven of these transporters have been functionally described as coupling the electrically silent movement of chloride with sodium and/or potassium. Although in silico analysis has identified two additional SLC12 family members, no physiological role has been ascribed to the proteins encoded by either the SLC12A8 or the SLC12A9 genes. Evolutionary conservation of this gene family from protists to humans confirms their importance. A wealth of physiological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical studies have revealed a great deal of information regarding the importance of this gene family to human health and disease. The sequencing of the human genome has provided investigators with the capability to link several human diseases with mutations in the genes encoding these plasma membrane proteins. The availability of bacterial artificial chromosomes, recombination engineering techniques, and the mouse genome sequence has simplified the creation of targeting constructs to manipulate the expression/function of these cation-chloride cotransporters in the mouse in an attempt to recapitulate some of these human pathologies. This review will summarize the three human disorders that have been linked to the mutation/dysfunction of the Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl, and K-Cl cotransporters (i.e., Bartter's, Gitleman's, and Andermann's syndromes), examine some additional pathologies arising from genetically modified mouse models of these cotransporters including deafness, blood pressure, hyperexcitability, and epithelial transport deficit phenotypes. PMID:23325410

  5. Skeleton Genetics: a comprehensive database for genes and mutations related to genetic skeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Xu, Chenyang; Liu, Xinting; Hu, Lin; Xiang, Yanbao; Chen, Qingshuang; Chen, Denghui; Li, Huanzheng; Xu, Xueqin; Tang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic skeletal disorders (GSD) involving the skeletal system arises through disturbances in the complex processes of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis and remain a diagnostic challenge because of their clinical heterogeneity and genetic variety. Over the past decades, tremendous effort platforms have been made to explore the complex heterogeneity, and massive new genes and mutations have been identified in different GSD, but the information supplied by literature is still limited and it is hard to meet the further needs of scientists and clinicians. In this study, combined with Nosology and Classification of genetic skeletal disorders, we developed the first comprehensive and annotated genetic skeletal disorders database, named ‘SkeletonGenetics’, which contains information about all GSD-related knowledge including 8225 mutations in 357 genes, with detailed information associated with 481 clinical diseases (2260 clinical phenotype) classified in 42 groups defined by molecular, biochemical and/or radiographic criteria from 1698 publications. Further annotations were performed to each entry including Gene Ontology, pathways analysis, protein–protein interaction, mutation annotations, disease–disease clustering and gene–disease networking. Furthermore, using concise search methods, intuitive graphical displays, convenient browsing functions and constantly updatable features, ‘SkeletonGenetics’ could serve as a central and integrative database for unveiling the genetic and pathways pre-dispositions of GSD. Database URL: http://101.200.211.232/skeletongenetics/ PMID:27580923

  6. Frequent HRAS Mutations in Malignant Ectomesenchymoma: Overlapping Genetic Abnormalities With Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Alaggio, Rita; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Zhang, Lei; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Wexler, Leonard H; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-07-01

    Malignant ectomesenchymoma (MEM) is an exceedingly rare pediatric sarcoma with a predilection for infants and young children and is composed of dual malignant mesenchymal and neuroectodermal components. Microscopically, MEM displays areas of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) with intermixed neuronal/neuroblastic foci. The molecular alterations associated with MEM and its relationship with embryonal RMS (ERMS) and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) have not yet been elucidated. In this study we used whole-transcriptome sequencing in 2 MEM index cases with available frozen tissue, followed by screening of the identified genetic abnormalities in 5 additional cases. No candidate fusion genes were detected by FusionSeq analysis; however, the mutation detection algorithms revealed HRAS and PTPRD hotspot mutations in both index cases, with 1 case harboring an additional FBXW7 mutation. As these mutation profiles have been previously described in ERMS we have tested their incidence in a control group of 7 age-matched ERMS. In addition, the gene signature of MEM was compared with that of RMS, MPNST, and neuronal lineage. All 7 MEM patients were male, with a mean age of 7.5 months (range, 0.6 to 17 mo). All except 1 occurred in the pelvic/urogenital region. Most cases showed ERMS elements, with occasional spindle or undifferentiated/round cell areas. The intermixed neuroectodermal components were mostly scattered ganglion cells, ganglioneuroma, or ganglioneuroblastoma. By Sanger sequencing, 6 of 7 (86%) MEMs had HRAS mutations, with no additional case harboring PTPRD or FBXW7 mutations. The only case lacking HRAS mutation showed neuroblastic micronodules without ganglion cells. The trimethylation at lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) expression, typically lost in MPNST, was retained in all cases. In the control ERMS group, 5 of 7 (71%) showed RAS mutations, equally distributed among NRAS, KRAS, and HRAS genes. The expression profiling of MEM showed upregulation of skeletal

  7. Performance impact of mutation operators of a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm for multi-robot task allocation problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Kroll, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation determines the task sequence and distribution for a group of robots in multi-robot systems, which is one of constrained combinatorial optimization problems and more complex in case of cooperative tasks because they introduce additional spatial and temporal constraints. To solve multi-robot task allocation problems with cooperative tasks efficiently, a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm, a crossover-free genetic algorithm employing mutation operators and elitism selection in each subpopulation, is developed in this paper. Moreover, the impact of mutation operators (swap, insertion, inversion, displacement, and their various combinations) is analyzed when solving several industrial plant inspection problems. The experimental results show that: (1) the proposed genetic algorithm can obtain better solutions than the tested binary tournament genetic algorithm with partially mapped crossover; (2) inversion mutation performs better than other tested mutation operators when solving problems without cooperative tasks, and the swap-inversion combination performs better than other tested mutation operators/combinations when solving problems with cooperative tasks. As it is difficult to produce all desired effects with a single mutation operator, using multiple mutation operators (including both inversion and swap) is suggested when solving similar combinatorial optimization problems. PMID:27588254

  8. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  9. Brain somatic mutations: the dark matter of psychiatric genetics?

    PubMed

    Insel, T R

    2014-02-01

    Although inherited DNA sequences have a well-demonstrated role in psychiatric disease risk, for even the most heritable mental disorders, monozygotic twins are discordant at a significant rate. The genetic variation associated with mental disorders has heretofore been based on the search for rare or common variation in blood cells. This search is based on the premise that every somatic cell shares an identical DNA sequence, so that variation found in lymphocytes should reflect variation present in brain cells. Evidence from the study of cancer cells, stem cells and now neurons demonstrate that this premise is false. Somatic mutation is common in human cells and has been implicated in a range of diseases beyond cancer. The exuberant proliferation of cortical precursors during fetal development provides a likely environment for somatic mutation in neuronal and glial lineages. Studies of rare neurodevelopmental disorders, such as hemimegencephaly, demonstrate somatic mutations in affected cortical cells that cannot be detected in unaffected parts of the brain or in peripheral cells. This perspective argues for the need to investigate somatic variation in the brain as an explanation of the discordance in monozygotic twins, a proximate cause of mental disorders in individuals with inherited risk, and a potential guide to novel treatment targets. PMID:24342990

  10. [Osteochondrodysplasia determined genetically by a collagen type II gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Czarny-Ratajczak, M; Rogala, P; Wolnik-Brzozowska, D; Latos-Bieleńska, A

    2001-01-01

    Chondrodysplasias are a heterogenous group of skeletal dysplasias, affecting the growing cartilage. The main part of chondrodysplasias is caused by mutations in various types of collagen genes. The current classification within this group of disorder relies on clinical, histological and radiographic features. Type II collagenopathies comprise part of chondrodysplasias, consisting of hereditary disorders caused by defects in the type II collagen. Collagen type II is coded by a large gene--COL2A1. The chromosomal location for the human COL2A1 gene is 12q13.11-q13.12. Defects in collagen type II are caused by point mutations in the COL2A1 gene. Type II collagenopathies form a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, through severe forms like spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia congenita, Marshall syndrome, to the mild forms--Stickler syndrome and early osteoarthritis. The pathological changes in the patients are observed in the growth plate, nucleus pulposus and vitreous body, where the abnormal collagen type II is distributed. This article presents the genetic background of collagenopathies type II and the results of current molecular studies of the patients. Both the molecular and the clinical studies may promise a better understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype. We present the patients, who were diagnosed at the Department of Medical Genetics and in the Orthopaedic Department in Poznań. PMID:11481990

  11. The role of mutation in genetic copy number variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. K.; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean number of genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  12. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  13. Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency: three additional mutated alleles and establishment of phenotype-genotype relationships of common mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Wedell, A; Ritzén, E M; Haglund-Stengler, B; Luthman, H

    1992-01-01

    Lesions in the gene encoding steroid 21-hydroxylase [steroid hydrogen-donor: oxygen oxidoreductase (21-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.99.10] result in defective adrenal steroid synthesis; the severe forms are known as congenital adrenal hyperplasia. To facilitate complete characterization of mutations in this region of tandemly repeated genes, we have developed selective PCR amplification and direct sequencing of full-length nonpseudogene steroid 21-hydroxylase genes. This technique identifies known mutations, characterizes or excludes unknown mutations, and determines the gene-copy number. Three additional defective alleles were found. A Gly-292----Ser mutation and a frameshift mutation at Arg-484 (GG----C) were identified in patients with severe steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. An allele with three additional sequence variations--C----T at 4 bases upstream of translation initiation, Pro-106----Leu, and Pro-454----Ser--were identified in two siblings with late-onset deficiency. Pro-454 is conserved in four species, indicating its importance for normal enzyme function. Functional consequences of individual alleles have been determined in vivo by studying individuals with only one steroid 21-hydroxylase gene. Detailed analyses of clinical data revealed that genotyping could predict the clinical course of the disease. The locations of disease-causing mutations on different haplotypes of the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene region are described. Images PMID:1496017

  14. Characteristics of phenotype and genetic mutations in rice after spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Wu, H.; Wei, L. J.; Cheng, Z. L.; Xin, P.; Huang, C. L.; Zhang, K. P.; Sun, Y. Q.

    To investigate the mechanism of spaceflight induced mutations, seeds of 11 pure rice varieties carried by Shenzhou-3 spaceship of China in 2002 for six-day flight were planted and investigated. Results showed that mutations could be induced in the first generation (M 1). Five tall mutants were found in DongnongV7 variety, and the average height of the mutants was 31% taller than that of the control. Other traits such as the panicle length were also remarkably different from the control. In the second generation (M 2), various changes of traits were observed in all 11 varieties, including the height, heading date, leaf color, leaf shape, flag leaf angle, awns, panicle length, panicle type, rice shape (length-width ratio), and maturity. The mutation rate for the changes of the plant height and of the rice color (purple) varied from 0.05% to 0.52% among ten varieties except Xixuan-1. Changes of the height, fresh weight, dry weight, and culm width of the five DongnongV7 tall mutants were observed in the progeny individually. By using the AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) method, 21 pairs of primers were employed and the mutated loci rate of the genome in 10 M 2 mutants from 10 varieties was found between 1.7% and 6.2%. In the third generation (M 3), many traits, such as the awn length, main panicle exertion date and plant height, were still segregated widely and diversely. In addition, the leaf color and awn color varied in the progenies of purple rice mutants. Our study suggested that spaceflight induced mutations were dependent on different rice varieties.

  15. Reproductive Endocrinologists' Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, Allison L; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-06-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists' (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies. PMID:26567039

  16. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1−/− GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  17. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1 (flox/flox) mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1 (-/-) GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  18. Novel genetic mutations in a sporadic port-wine stain.

    PubMed

    Lian, Christine Guo; Sholl, Lynette M; Zakka, Labib R; O, Teresa M; Liu, Cynthia; Xu, Shuyun; Stanek, Ewelina; Garcia, Elizabeth; Jia, Yonghui; MacConaill, Laura E; Murphy, George F; Waner, Milton; Mihm, Martin C

    2014-12-01

    IMPORTANCE Port-wine stains (PWSs) are common congenital cutaneous capillary malformations. A somatic GNAQ mutation was recently identified in patients with sporadic PWSs and Sturge-Weber syndrome. However, subsequent studies to confirm or extend this observation are lacking.OBSERVATIONS We report a long-standing, unilateral facial PWS of a man in his early 70s confirmed by histopathological analysis. Staged surgical excision of the vascular malformation was performed, and genomic DNA was extracted from the vascular malformation specimen and normal skin. Targeted next-generation sequencing of the coding sequence of 275 known cancer genes including GNAQ was performed in both specimens. A single-nucleotide variant(c.548G>A, p.Arg183Gln) in GNAQ was identified in the PWS-affected tissue but not in the normal skin sample. In addition, this sequencing approach uncovered several additional novel somatic mutations in the genes SMARCA4, EPHA3, MYB, PDGFR-β, and PIK3CA.CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings confirm the presence of somatic mutations inGNAQ in the affected skin of a patient with congenital PWS, as well as alterations in several other novel genes of possible importance in the pathogenesis of PWS that may also offer substantial therapeutic targets. PMID:25188413

  19. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L; Remmers, Elaine F; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina I; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  20. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J.; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D.; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L.; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  1. Developing a genetic system in Deinococcus radiodurans for analyzing mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mandy; Wolff, Erika; Huang, Tiffany; Garibyan, Lilit; Earl, Ashlee M; Battista, John R; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2004-02-01

    We have applied a genetic system for analyzing mutations in Escherichia coli to Deinococcus radiodurans, an extremeophile with an astonishingly high resistance to UV- and ionizing-radiation-induced mutagenesis. Taking advantage of the conservation of the beta-subunit of RNA polymerase among most prokaryotes, we derived again in D. radiodurans the rpoB/Rif(r) system that we developed in E. coli to monitor base substitutions, defining 33 base change substitutions at 22 different base pairs. We sequenced >250 mutations leading to Rif(r) in D. radiodurans derived spontaneously in wild-type and uvrD (mismatch-repair-deficient) backgrounds and after treatment with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) and 5-azacytidine (5AZ). The specificities of NTG and 5AZ in D. radiodurans are the same as those found for E. coli and other organisms. There are prominent base substitution hotspots in rpoB in both D. radiodurans and E. coli. In several cases these are at different points in each organism, even though the DNA sequences surrounding the hotspots and their corresponding sites are very similar in both D. radiodurans and E. coli. In one case the hotspots occur at the same site in both organisms. PMID:15020457

  2. [Diagnosis of MDS: morphology, chromosome abnormalities and genetic mutations].

    PubMed

    Hata, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of hematological neoplasms associated with ineffective hematopoiesis and that can transform into acute leukemia. The clinical classification of MDS which is defined by cytopenia, the rate of blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, dysplasia, and chromosomal abnormalities, has undergone continuous revision. To increase the accuracy of dysplastic evaluation, IWGM-MDS and the Research Committee for Idiopathic Hematopoietic Disorders, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan have proposed a quantitative and qualitative definition of dysplasia. Recently, refining the definition of dysgranulopoiesis was proposed by IWGM-MDS. Neutrophils with abnormal clumping of chromatin, and harboring more than 4 nuclear projections, were recognized as dysplastic features. At present, karyotypic abnormalities are detected in approximately 50% of de novo MDS and these remain the most critical prognostic factor. In the new cytogenetic scoring system, cytogenetic abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups. This new classification was adopted by the revised IPSS. Approximately 80% to 90% of MDS patients have detectable mutations by whole-exon sequencing or whole genome sequencing. Many genetic mutations had biological and prognostic significance. It is important to further understand the utility of this factor in determining prognosis and in selecting among therapeutic options. PMID:26458436

  3. Developing a genetic system in Deinococcus radiodurans for analyzing mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mandy; Wolff, Erika; Huang, Tiffany; Garibyan, Lilit; Earl, Ashlee M; Battista, John R; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2004-01-01

    We have applied a genetic system for analyzing mutations in Escherichia coli to Deinococcus radiodurans, an extremeophile with an astonishingly high resistance to UV- and ionizing-radiation-induced mutagenesis. Taking advantage of the conservation of the beta-subunit of RNA polymerase among most prokaryotes, we derived again in D. radiodurans the rpoB/Rif(r) system that we developed in E. coli to monitor base substitutions, defining 33 base change substitutions at 22 different base pairs. We sequenced >250 mutations leading to Rif(r) in D. radiodurans derived spontaneously in wild-type and uvrD (mismatch-repair-deficient) backgrounds and after treatment with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) and 5-azacytidine (5AZ). The specificities of NTG and 5AZ in D. radiodurans are the same as those found for E. coli and other organisms. There are prominent base substitution hotspots in rpoB in both D. radiodurans and E. coli. In several cases these are at different points in each organism, even though the DNA sequences surrounding the hotspots and their corresponding sites are very similar in both D. radiodurans and E. coli. In one case the hotspots occur at the same site in both organisms. PMID:15020457

  4. Multiregion Whole-Exome Sequencing Uncovers the Genetic Evolution and Mutational Heterogeneity of Early-Stage Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Harbst, Katja; Lauss, Martin; Cirenajwis, Helena; Isaksson, Karolin; Rosengren, Frida; Törngren, Therese; Kvist, Anders; Johansson, Maria C; Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Baldetorp, Bo; Borg, Åke; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian; Carneiro, Ana; Jönsson, Göran

    2016-08-15

    Cancer genome sequencing has shed light on the underlying genetic aberrations that drive tumorigenesis. However, current sequencing-based strategies, which focus on a single tumor biopsy, fail to take into account intratumoral heterogeneity. To address this challenge and elucidate the evolutionary history of melanoma, we performed whole-exome and transcriptome sequencing of 41 multiple melanoma biopsies from eight individual tumors. This approach revealed heterogeneous somatic mutations in the range of 3%-38% in individual tumors. Known mutations in melanoma drivers BRAF and NRAS were always ubiquitous events. Using RNA sequencing, we found that the majority of mutations were not expressed or were expressed at very low levels, and preferential expression of a particular mutated allele did not occur frequently. In addition, we found that the proportion of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced C>T transitions differed significantly (P < 0.001) between early and late mutation acquisition, suggesting that different mutational processes operate during the evolution of metastatic melanoma. Finally, clinical history reports revealed that patients harboring a high degree of mutational heterogeneity were associated with more aggressive disease progression. In conclusion, our multiregion tumor-sequencing approach highlights the genetic evolution and non-UVB mutational signatures associated with melanoma development and progression, and may provide a more comprehensive perspective of patient outcome. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4765-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216186

  5. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, a genetic cause for familial recurrent neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Yaliwal, Laxmi V.; Desai, Rathnamala M.

    2012-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations have been implicated as risk factors for neural tube defects (NTDs). The best-characterized MTHFR genetic mutation 677C→T is associated with a 2–4 fold increased risk of NTD if patient is homozygous for this mutation. This risk factor is modulated by folate levels in the body. A second mutation in the MTHFR gene is an A→C transition at position 1298. The 1298A→C mutation is also a risk factor for NTD, but with a smaller relative risk than 677C→T mutation. Under conditions of low folate intake or high folate requirements, such as pregnancy, this mutation could become of clinical importance. We present a case report with MTHFR genetic mutation, who presented with recurrent familial pregnancy losses due to anencephaly/NTDs. PMID:22754237

  6. A Multiparametric Computational Algorithm for Comprehensive Assessment of Genetic Mutations in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA (Sanfilippo Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Clayton L.; Lee, Shaun W.

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS-IIIA, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a Lysosomal Storage Disease caused by cellular deficiency of N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH). Given the large heterogeneity of genetic mutations responsible for the disease, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms by which these mutations affect enzyme function is needed to guide effective therapies. We developed a multiparametric computational algorithm to assess how patient genetic mutations in SGSH affect overall enzyme biogenesis, stability, and function. 107 patient mutations for the SGSH gene were obtained from the Human Gene Mutation Database representing all of the clinical mutations documented for Sanfilippo syndrome. We assessed each mutation individually using ten distinct parameters to give a comprehensive predictive score of the stability and misfolding capacity of the SGSH enzyme resulting from each of these mutations. The predictive score generated by our multiparametric algorithm yielded a standardized quantitative assessment of the severity of a given SGSH genetic mutation toward overall enzyme activity. Application of our algorithm has identified SGSH mutations in which enzymatic malfunction of the gene product is specifically due to impairments in protein folding. These scores provide an assessment of the degree to which a particular mutation could be treated using approaches such as chaperone therapies. Our multiparametric protein biogenesis algorithm advances a key understanding in the overall biochemical mechanism underlying Sanfilippo syndrome. Importantly, the design of our multiparametric algorithm can be tailored to many other diseases of genetic heterogeneity for which protein misfolding phenotypes may constitute a major component of disease manifestation. PMID:25807448

  7. Impact of genetic profiles on the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer with KRAS mutation.

    PubMed

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Masaki, Tadahiko; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Furuse, Jyunji; Sugiyama, Masanori; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Reports indicate that, even in KRAS-mutated colon cancer, there are subsets of patients who benefit from anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) treatment. The aim of the present study was to identify genetic profiles that contribute to the responsiveness of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to anti-EGFR MoAb. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of anti-EGFR MoAb in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations according to KRAS mutational subtypes, BRAF and PIK3CA mutational status and PTEN and MET expression. Among 21 patients with KRAS-mutant tumors, 8 (38%) harbored p.G13D, 7 (33%) harbored p.G12V, 5 (24%) harbored p.G12D, and 1 (5%) harbored p.G12C mutation. Patients with the p.G13D mutation exhibited a significantly higher disease control rate than patients with other KRAS mutations (P=0.042), and tended to show a longer progression-free survival (PFS) than patients with other KRAS mutations with marginal significance (P=0.074). Patients with loss of PTEN had significantly shorter PFS than those with normal PTEN expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.044). MET overexpression was significantly associated with shorter PFS compared to normal MET expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.016). Our data demonstrated the potential utility of alterations in PTEN and MET expression as predictive markers for response to anti-EGFR MoAbs in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations. In addition, we confirmed the predictive value of the KRAS p.G13D mutation for better response to anti-EGFR therapies in comparison with other KRAS mutations. PMID:24839940

  8. EAST syndrome: Clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic aspects of mutations in KCNJ10.

    PubMed

    Abdelhadi, Ola; Iancu, Daniela; Stanescu, Horia; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    EAST syndrome is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder secondary to mutations in KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a gene encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, eye, ear and kidney. This condition is characterized by 4 cardinal features; Epilepsy, Ataxia, Sensorineural deafness, and (a renal salt-wasting) Tubulopathy, hence the acronym EAST syndrome. Here we review reported clinical manifestations, in particular the neurological signs and symptoms which typically have the most impact on the quality of life of patients. In addition we review the pathophysiology and genetic aspects of the disease. So far 14 different KCNJ10 mutations have been published which either directly affect channel function or may lead to mislocalisation. Investigations of the pathophysiology may provide clues to potential treatments. PMID:27500072

  9. EAST syndrome: Clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic aspects of mutations in KCNJ10

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Daniela; Stanescu, Horia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT EAST syndrome is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder secondary to mutations in KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a gene encoding a potassium channel expressed in the brain, eye, ear and kidney. This condition is characterized by 4 cardinal features; Epilepsy, Ataxia, Sensorineural deafness, and (a renal salt-wasting) Tubulopathy, hence the acronym EAST syndrome. Here we review reported clinical manifestations, in particular the neurological signs and symptoms which typically have the most impact on the quality of life of patients. In addition we review the pathophysiology and genetic aspects of the disease. So far 14 different KCNJ10 mutations have been published which either directly affect channel function or may lead to mislocalisation. Investigations of the pathophysiology may provide clues to potential treatments. PMID:27500072

  10. Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD): Taking Advantage from Founder Mutations in Genetics Diagnosis, Genetic Diversity and Migration History of the Mediterranean Population.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Bakhchane, Amina; Benrahma, Houda; Romdhane, Lilia; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Abdelhak, Sonia; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean basin has been the theater of migration crossroads followed by settlement of several societies and cultures in prehistoric and historical times, with important consequences on genetic and genomic determinisms. Here, we present the Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD), established to offer web-based access to founder mutation information in the Mediterranean population. Mutation data were collected from the literature and other online resources and systematically reviewed and assembled into this database. The information provided for each founder mutation includes DNA change, amino-acid change, mutation type and mutation effect, as well as mutation frequency and coalescence time when available. Currently, the database contains 383 founder mutations found in 210 genes related to 219 diseases. We believe that MFMD will help scientists and physicians to design more rapid and less expensive genetic diagnostic tests. Moreover, the coalescence time of founder mutations gives an overview about the migration history of the Mediterranean population. MFMD can be publicly accessed from http://mfmd.pasteur.ma. PMID:26173767

  11. Identification of Genetic Mutations in Human Lung Cancer by Targeted Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hongxiang; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Tang, Chuanning; Ye, Hua; Jones, Lindsey; Lou, Feng; Zhang, Dandan; Jiang, Shouwen; Sun, Hong; Dong, Haichao; Zhang, Guangchun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; Yan, He; Yan, Chaowei; Wang, Lu; Su, Ziyi; Li, Yangyang; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Liu, Deruo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most prevalent malignancy and the primary cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Unique mutations patterns can be found in lung cancer subtypes, in individual cancers, or within a single tumor, and drugs that target these genetic mutations and signal transduction pathways are often beneficial to patients. In this study, we used the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Panel to sequence 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes and oncogenes to identify genetic mutations in 48 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human lung cancer samples from Chinese patients. We found frequent mutations in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and TP53 genes. Moreover, we observed that a portion of the lung cancer samples harbored two or more mutations in these key genes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the Ion Torrent sequencing to efficiently identify genetic mutations in individual tumors for targeted lung cancer therapy. PMID:26244006

  12. Genetic (Co)Variation for Life Span in Rhabditid Nematodes: Role of Mutation, Selection, and History

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ambuj; Salomon, Matthew P.; Grigaltchik, Veronica; Baer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms maintaining genetic variation in life span, particularly post-reproductive life span, are poorly understood. We characterized the effects of spontaneous mutations on life span in the rhabditid nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae and standing genetic variance for life span and correlation of life span with fitness in C. briggsae. Mutations decreased mean life span, a signature of directional selection. Mutational correlations between life span and fitness were consistently positive. The average selection coefficient against new mutations in C. briggsae was approximately 2% when homozygous. The pattern of phylogeographic variation in life span is inconsistent with global mutation–selection balance (MSB), but MSB appears to hold at the local level. Standing genetic correlations in C. briggsae reflect mutational correlations at a local scale but not at a broad phylogeographic level. At the local scale, results are broadly consistent with predictions of the “mutation accumulation” hypothesis for the evolution of aging. PMID:19671885

  13. Efficient Improvement of Silage Additives by Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Zoe S.; Gilbert, Richard J.; Merry, Roger J.; Kell, Douglas B.; Theodorou, Michael K.; Griffith, Gareth W.

    2000-01-01

    The enormous variety of substances which may be added to forage in order to manipulate and improve the ensilage process presents an empirical, combinatorial optimization problem of great complexity. To investigate the utility of genetic algorithms for designing effective silage additive combinations, a series of small-scale proof of principle silage experiments were performed with fresh ryegrass. Having established that significant biochemical changes occur over an ensilage period as short as 2 days, we performed a series of experiments in which we used 50 silage additive combinations (prepared by using eight bacterial and other additives, each of which was added at six different levels, including zero [i.e., no additive]). The decrease in pH, the increase in lactate concentration, and the free amino acid concentration were measured after 2 days and used to calculate a “fitness” value that indicated the quality of the silage (compared to a control silage made without additives). This analysis also included a “cost” element to account for different total additive levels. In the initial experiment additive levels were selected randomly, but subsequently a genetic algorithm program was used to suggest new additive combinations based on the fitness values determined in the preceding experiments. The result was very efficient selection for silages in which large decreases in pH and high levels of lactate occurred along with low levels of free amino acids. During the series of five experiments, each of which comprised 50 treatments, there was a steady increase in the amount of lactate that accumulated; the best treatment combination was that used in the last experiment, which produced 4.6 times more lactate than the untreated silage. The additive combinations that were found to yield the highest fitness values in the final (fifth) experiment were assessed to determine a range of biochemical and microbiological quality parameters during full-term silage

  14. PTC124 targets genetic disorders caused by nonsense mutations.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ellen M; Barton, Elisabeth R; Zhuo, Jin; Tomizawa, Yuki; Friesen, Westley J; Trifillis, Panayiota; Paushkin, Sergey; Patel, Meenal; Trotta, Christopher R; Hwang, Seongwoo; Wilde, Richard G; Karp, Gary; Takasugi, James; Chen, Guangming; Jones, Stephen; Ren, Hongyu; Moon, Young-Choon; Corson, Donald; Turpoff, Anthony A; Campbell, Jeffrey A; Conn, M Morgan; Khan, Atiyya; Almstead, Neil G; Hedrick, Jean; Mollin, Anna; Risher, Nicole; Weetall, Marla; Yeh, Shirley; Branstrom, Arthur A; Colacino, Joseph M; Babiak, John; Ju, William D; Hirawat, Samit; Northcutt, Valerie J; Miller, Langdon L; Spatrick, Phyllis; He, Feng; Kawana, Masataka; Feng, Huisheng; Jacobson, Allan; Peltz, Stuart W; Sweeney, H Lee

    2007-05-01

    Nonsense mutations promote premature translational termination and cause anywhere from 5-70% of the individual cases of most inherited diseases. Studies on nonsense-mediated cystic fibrosis have indicated that boosting specific protein synthesis from <1% to as little as 5% of normal levels may greatly reduce the severity or eliminate the principal manifestations of disease. To address the need for a drug capable of suppressing premature termination, we identified PTC124-a new chemical entity that selectively induces ribosomal readthrough of premature but not normal termination codons. PTC124 activity, optimized using nonsense-containing reporters, promoted dystrophin production in primary muscle cells from humans and mdx mice expressing dystrophin nonsense alleles, and rescued striated muscle function in mdx mice within 2-8 weeks of drug exposure. PTC124 was well tolerated in animals at plasma exposures substantially in excess of those required for nonsense suppression. The selectivity of PTC124 for premature termination codons, its well characterized activity profile, oral bioavailability and pharmacological properties indicate that this drug may have broad clinical potential for the treatment of a large group of genetic disorders with limited or no therapeutic options. PMID:17450125

  15. A Highly Sensitive Genetic Protocol to Detect NF1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Carmen Valero, María; Martín, Yolanda; Hernández-Imaz, Elisabete; Marina Hernández, Alba; Meleán, Germán; María Valero, Ana; Javier Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco; Tellería, Dolores; Hernández-Chico, Concepción

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a hereditary disorder caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. Detecting mutation in NF1 is hindered by the gene's large size, the lack of mutation hotspots, the presence of pseudogenes, and the wide variety of possible lesions. We developed a method for detecting germline mutations by combining an original RNA-based cDNA-PCR mutation detection method and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The protocol was validated in a cohort of 56 blood samples from NF1 patients who fulfilled NIH diagnostic criteria, identifying the germline mutation in 53 cases (95% sensitivity). The efficiency and reliability of this approach facilitated detection of different types of mutations, including single-base substitutions, deletions or insertions of one to several nucleotides, microdeletions, and changes in intragenic copy number. Because mutational screening for minor lesions was performed using cDNA and the characterization of mutated alleles was performed at both the RNA and genomic DNA level, the analysis provided insight into the nature of the different mutations and their effect on NF1 mRNA splicing. After validation, we implemented the protocol as a routine test. Here we present the overall unbiased spectrum of NF1 mutations identified in 93 patients in a cohort of 105. The results indicate that this protocol is a powerful new tool for the molecular diagnosis of NF1. PMID:21354044

  16. Additive genetic effect of APOE and BDNF on hippocampus activity.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Karolina; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Persson, Jonas; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Human memory is a highly heritable polygenic trait with complex inheritance patterns. To study the genetics of memory and memory-related diseases, hippocampal functioning has served as an intermediate phenotype. The importance of investigating gene-gene effects on complex phenotypes has been emphasized, but most imaging studies still focus on single polymorphisms. APOE ε4 and BDNF Met, two of the most studied gene variants for variability in memory performance and neuropsychiatric disorders, have both separately been related to poorer episodic memory and altered hippocampal functioning. Here, we investigated the combined effect of APOE and BDNF on hippocampal activation (N=151). No non-additive interaction effects were seen. Instead, the results revealed decreased activation in bilateral hippocampus and parahippocampus as a function of the number of APOE ε4 and BDNF Met alleles present (neither, one, or both). The combined effect was stronger than either of the individual effects, and both gene variables explained significant proportions of variance in BOLD signal change. Thus, there was an additive gene-gene effect of APOE and BDNF on medial temporal lobe (MTL) activation, showing that a larger proportion of variance in brain activation attributed to genetics can be explained by considering more than one gene variant. This effect might be relevant for the understanding of normal variability in memory function as well as memory-related disorders associated with APOE and BDNF. PMID:24321557

  17. Spontaneous mutations and the origin and maintenance of quantitative genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Lyman, Richard F; Lyman, Rachel A; Carbone, Mary Anna; Harbison, Susan T; Magwire, Michael M; Mackay, Trudy Fc

    2016-01-01

    Mutation and natural selection shape the genetic variation in natural populations. Here, we directly estimated the spontaneous mutation rate by sequencing new Drosophila mutation accumulation lines maintained with minimal natural selection. We inferred strong stabilizing natural selection on quantitative traits because genetic variation among wild-derived inbred lines was much lower than predicted from a neutral model and the mutational effects were much larger than allelic effects of standing polymorphisms. Stabilizing selection could act directly on the traits, or indirectly from pleiotropic effects on fitness. However, our data are not consistent with simple models of mutation-stabilizing selection balance; therefore, further empirical work is needed to assess the balance of evolutionary forces responsible for quantitative genetic variation. PMID:27213517

  18. Spontaneous mutations and the origin and maintenance of quantitative genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Lyman, Richard F; Lyman, Rachel A; Carbone, Mary Anna; Harbison, Susan T; Magwire, Michael M; Mackay, Trudy FC

    2016-01-01

    Mutation and natural selection shape the genetic variation in natural populations. Here, we directly estimated the spontaneous mutation rate by sequencing new Drosophila mutation accumulation lines maintained with minimal natural selection. We inferred strong stabilizing natural selection on quantitative traits because genetic variation among wild-derived inbred lines was much lower than predicted from a neutral model and the mutational effects were much larger than allelic effects of standing polymorphisms. Stabilizing selection could act directly on the traits, or indirectly from pleiotropic effects on fitness. However, our data are not consistent with simple models of mutation-stabilizing selection balance; therefore, further empirical work is needed to assess the balance of evolutionary forces responsible for quantitative genetic variation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14625.001 PMID:27213517

  19. Genetic Code Evolution Reveals the Neutral Emergence of Mutational Robustness, and Information as an Evolutionary Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of “neutral emergence”. The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these “pseudaptations”, and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an “unfreezing” of the codon – amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick’s Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content

  20. Genetic code evolution reveals the neutral emergence of mutational robustness, and information as an evolutionary constraint.

    PubMed

    Massey, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    The standard genetic code (SGC) is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of "neutral emergence". The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these "pseudaptations", and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments) reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P), and that its reduction in size leads to an "unfreezing" of the codon - amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick's Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome GC content between organisms, a

  1. Applications in genetic risk estimation of data on the induction of dominant skeletal mutations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the induction of dominant skeleton mutations and of dominant cataract mutations provide means of estimating genetic hazard to humans from radiation. The breeding-test method of studying the induction of dominant skeletal mutations is slow and cumbersome. In an attempt to devise a more rapid method, three non-breeding-test methods have been developed which are likely to have wider application in mutagenicity testing. (ACR)

  2. Estimation of the incidence of a rare genetic disease through a two-tier mutation survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Srinivasan, M.R. ); Raskin, S. Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba )

    1993-06-01

    Recent attempts to detect mutations involving single base changes or small deletions that are specific to genetic diseases provide an opportunity to develop a two-tier mutation-screening program through which incidence of rare genetic disorders and gene carriers may be precisely estimated. A two-tier survey consists of mutation screening in a sample of patients with specific genetic disorders and in a second sample of newborns from the same population in which mutation frequency is evaluated. The authors provide the statistical basis for evaluating the incidence of affected and gene carriers in such two-tier mutation-screening surveys, from which the precision of the estimates is derived. Sample-size requirements of such two-tier mutation-screening surveys are evaluated. Considering examples of cystic fibrosis (CF) and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD), the two most frequent autosomal recessive diseases in Caucasian populations and the two most frequent mutations ([Delta]F508 and G985) that occur on these disease allele-bearing chromosomes, the authors show that, with 50--100 patients and a 20-fold larger sample of newborns screened for these mutations, the incidence of such diseases and their gene carriers in a population may be quite reliably estimated. The theory developed here is also applicable to rare autosomal dominant diseases for which disease-specific mutations are found. 21 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Distinct neurological disorders with C9orf72 mutations: genetics, pathogenesis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Song; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-07-01

    The G4C2 repeat expansion within C9orf72 has been recently identified as the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This mutation has also been detected in a variety of other neurological diseases with distinct clinical manifestations. The exact mechanisms of how this mutation leads to the wide spectrum of clinical syndromes remain unknown. A series of molecular changes together with some potential modifiers may play a key role. Nucleolar stress, nucleocytoplasmic transport defect, oxidative damage, inhibited stress granules assembly, activated endoplasmic reticulum stress, and inhibited proteasome activity are mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. Additional mutations, epigenetic modifiers, and repeat size are potential modifiers that modulate specific phenotypes on the basis of the molecular changes. Here, we summarize distinct C9orf72-related neurological disorders and their corresponding neuropathological changes. Then, we elucidate the existing molecular knowledge and the potential modifiers. Finally, we detail the main target of treatment aiming at controlling expanded RNA transcripts. PMID:27139021

  4. mStruct: Inference of Population Structure in Light of Both Genetic Admixing and Allele Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash; Xing, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional methods for analyzing population structure, such as the Structure program, ignore the influence of the effect of allele mutations between the ancestral and current alleles of genetic markers, which can dramatically influence the accuracy of the structural estimation of current populations. Studying these effects can also reveal additional information about population evolution such as the divergence time and migration history of admixed populations. We propose mStruct, an admixture of population-specific mixtures of inheritance models that addresses the task of structure inference and mutation estimation jointly through a hierarchical Bayesian framework, and a variational algorithm for inference. We validated our method on synthetic data and used it to analyze the Human Genome Diversity Project–Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (HGDP–CEPH) cell line panel of microsatellites and HGDP single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. A comparison of the structural maps of world populations estimated by mStruct and Structure is presented, and we also report potentially interesting mutation patterns in world populations estimated by mStruct. PMID:19363128

  5. Breast Cancer, BRCA Mutations, and Attitudes Regarding Pregnancy and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Ashley H.; Muse, Kimberly I.; Lin, Heather; Jackson, Michelle; Mattair, Danielle N.; Schover, Leslie; Woodard, Terri; McKenzie, Laurie; Theriault, Richard L.; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N.; Arun, Banu; Peterson, Susan K.; Profato, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Background. Women with premenopausal breast cancer may face treatment-related infertility and have a higher likelihood of a BRCA mutation, which may affect their attitudes toward future childbearing. Methods. Premenopausal women were invited to participate in a questionnaire study administered before and after BRCA genetic testing. We used the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to evaluate the pre- and post-testing impact of cancer or carrying a BRCA mutation on attitudes toward future childbearing. The likelihood of pursuing prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was also assessed in this setting. Univariate analyses determined factors contributing to attitudes toward future childbearing and likelihood of PND or PGD. Results. One hundred forty-eight pretesting and 114 post-testing questionnaires were completed. Women with a personal history of breast cancer had less change in IES than those with no history of breast cancer (p = .003). The 18 BRCA-positive women had a greater change in IES than the BRCA-negative women (p = .005). After testing, 31% and 24% of women would use PND and PGD, respectively. BRCA results did not significantly affect attitudes toward PND/PGD. Conclusion. BRCA results and history of breast cancer affect the psychological impact on future childbearing. Intentions to undergo PND or PGD do not appear to change after disclosure of BRCA results. Additional counseling for patients who have undergone BRCA testing may be warranted to educate patients about available fertility preservation options. PMID:24951607

  6. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome - additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Koenighofer, M; Hung, C Y; McCauley, J L; Dallman, J; Back, E J; Mihalek, I; Gripp, K W; Sol-Church, K; Rusconi, P; Zhang, Z; Shi, G-X; Andres, D A; Bodamer, O A

    2016-03-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in 1 of 16 proteins in the RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins; however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. PMID:25959749

  7. Structural and functional characterization of pathogenic non- synonymous genetic mutations of human insulin-degrading enzyme by in silico methods.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Noor A; Kaleemuddin, Mohammed; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Khan, Fazal; Shaik, Nazia S; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a key protease involved in degrading insulin and amyloid peptides in human body. Several non-synonymous genetic mutations of IDE gene have been recently associated with susceptibility to both diabetes and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the consequence of these mutations on the structure of IDE protein and its substrate binding characteristics is not well elucidated. The computational investigation of genetic mutation consequences on structural level of protein is recently found to be an effective alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. Hence, by using a combination of empirical rule and support vector machine based in silico algorithms, this study was able to identify that the pathogenic nonsynonymous genetic mutations corresponding to p.I54F, p.P122T, p.T533R, p.P581A and p.Y609A have more potential role in structural and functional deviations of IDE activity. Moreover, molecular modeling and secondary structure analysis have also confirmed their impact on the stability and secondary properties of IDE protein. The molecular docking analysis of IDE with combinational substrates has revealed that peptide inhibitors compared to small non-peptide inhibitor molecules possess good inhibitory activity towards mutant IDE. This finding may pave a way to design novel potential small peptide inhibitors for mutant IDE. Additionally by un-translated region (UTR) scanning analysis, two regulatory pathogenic genetic mutations i.e., rs5786997 (3' UTR) and rs4646954 (5' UTR), which can influence the translation pattern of IDE gene through sequence alteration of upstream-Open Reading Frame and Internal Ribosome Entry Site elements were identified. Our findings are expected to help in narrowing down the number of IDE genetic variants to be screened for disease association studies and also to select better competitive inhibitors for IDE related diseases. PMID:24059301

  8. Evolution of Escherichia coli to 42 °C and subsequent genetic engineering reveals adaptive mechanisms and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Troy E; Pedersen, Margit; LaCroix, Ryan A; Ebrahim, Ali; Bonde, Mads; Herrgard, Markus J; Palsson, Bernhard O; Sommer, Morten; Feist, Adam M

    2014-10-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) has emerged as a valuable method by which to investigate microbial adaptation to a desired environment. Here, we performed ALE to 42 °C of ten parallel populations of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 grown in glucose minimal media. Tightly controlled experimental conditions allowed selection based on exponential-phase growth rate, yielding strains that uniformly converged toward a similar phenotype along distinct genetic paths. Adapted strains possessed as few as 6 and as many as 55 mutations, and of the 144 genes that mutated in total, 14 arose independently across two or more strains. This mutational recurrence pointed to the key genetic targets underlying the evolved fitness increase. Genome engineering was used to introduce the novel ALE-acquired alleles in random combinations into the ancestral strain, and competition between these engineered strains reaffirmed the impact of the key mutations on the growth rate at 42 °C. Interestingly, most of the identified key gene targets differed significantly from those found in similar temperature adaptation studies, highlighting the sensitivity of genetic evolution to experimental conditions and ancestral genotype. Additionally, transcriptomic analysis of the ancestral and evolved strains revealed a general trend for restoration of the global expression state back toward preheat stressed levels. This restorative effect was previously documented following evolution to metabolic perturbations, and thus may represent a general feature of ALE experiments. The widespread evolved expression shifts were enabled by a comparatively scant number of regulatory mutations, providing a net fitness benefit but causing suboptimal expression levels for certain genes, such as those governing flagellar formation, which then became targets for additional ameliorating mutations. Overall, the results of this study provide insight into the adaptation process and yield lessons important for the future

  9. Expanded Genetic Codes Create New Mutational Routes to Rifampicin Resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hammerling, Michael J; Gollihar, Jimmy; Mortensen, Catherine; Alnahhas, Razan N; Ellington, Andrew D; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, evolutionary questions surrounding the nature of the genetic code have been mostly limited to the realm of conjecture, modeling, and simulation due to the difficulty of altering this fundamental property of living organisms. Concerted genome and protein engineering efforts now make it possible to experimentally study the impact of alternative genetic codes on the evolution of biological systems. We explored how Escherichia coli strains that incorporate a 21st nonstandard amino acid (nsAA) at the recoded amber (TAG) stop codon evolve resistance to the antibiotic rifampicin. Resistance to rifampicin arises from chromosomal mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (RpoB). We found that a variety of mutations that lead to substitutions of nsAAs in the essential RpoB protein confer robust rifampicin resistance. We interpret these results in a framework in which an expanded code can increase evolvability in two distinct ways: by adding a new letter with unique chemical properties to the protein alphabet and by altering the mutational connectivity of amber-adjacent codons by converting a lethal nonsense mutation into a missense mutation. Finally, we consider the implications of these results for the evolution of alternative genetic codes. In our experiments, reliance on a mutation to a reassigned codon for a vital trait is not required for the long-term maintenance of an expanded genetic code and may even destabilize incorporation of an nsAA, a result that is consistent with the codon capture model of genetic code evolution. PMID:27189550

  10. A genetic screen for modifiers of drosophila Src42A identifies mutations in Egfr, rolled and a novel signaling gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q; Zheng, Q; Lu, X

    1999-01-01

    Drosophila Src42A, a close relative of the vertebrate c-Src, has been implicated in the Ras-Mapk signaling cascade. An allele of Src42A, Su(Raf)1, dominantly suppresses the lethality of partial loss-of-function Raf mutations. To isolate genes involved in the same pathway where Src42A functions, we carried out genetic screens for dominant suppressor mutations that prevented Su(Raf)1 from suppressing Raf. Thirty-six mutations representing at least five genetic loci were recovered from the second chromosome. These are Drosophila EGF Receptor (Egfr), rolled, Src42A, and two other new loci, one of which was named semang (sag). During embryogenesis, sag affects the development of the head, tail, and tracheal branches, suggesting that it participates in the pathways of Torso and DFGF-R1 receptor tyrosine kinases. sag also disrupts the embryonic peripheral nervous system. During the development of imaginal discs, sag affects two processes known to require Egfr signaling: the recruitment of photoreceptor cells and wing vein formation. Thus sag functions in several receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated processes. In addition, sag dominantly enhances the phenotypes associated with loss-of-function Raf and rl, but suppresses those of activated Ras1(V12) mutation. This work provides the first genetic evidence that both Src42A and sag are modulators of RTK signaling. PMID:9927462

  11. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  12. An Unusual BRCA Mutation Distribution in a High Risk Cancer Genetics Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-Moseke, Anna C.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Cui, Haiyan; Roe, Denise J.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    The Database of Individuals at High Risk for Breast, Ovarian, or Other Hereditary Cancers at the Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, Arizona, assesses cancer risk factors and outcomes in patients with a family history of cancer or a known genetic mutation. We analyzed the subset of clinic probands who carry deleterious BRCA gene mutations to identify factors that could explain why mutations in BRCA2 out number those in BRCA1. Medical, family, social, ethnic and genetic mutation histories were collected from consenting patients’ electronic medical records. Differences between BRCA1 and BRCA2 probands from this database were analyzed for statistical significance and compared to published analyses.. A significantly higher proportion of our clinic probands carry mutations in BRCA2 than BRCA1, compared with previous reports of mutation prevalence. This also holds true for the Hispanic sub-group. Probands with BRCA2 mutations were significantly more likely than their BRCA1 counterparts to present to the high risk clinic without adiagnosis of cancer. Other differences between the groups were not significant. Six previously unreported BRCA2 mutations appear in our clinic population. The increased proportion of probands carrying deleterious BRCA2 mutations is likely multifactorial, but may reflect aspects of Southern Arizona’s unique ethnic heritage. PMID:23179792

  13. Genetic mutations associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qingjian; Li, Fengjie; Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Kaijin; Qu, Cunye; Chen, Yibu; Li, Meng; Chen, Xuelian; Stucky, Andres; Zhong, Jiangjian; Li, Longkun; Zhong, Jiang F.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, yet early detection and intervention of metastasis could significantly improve their clinical outcomes. We have sequenced and analyzed RNA (Expression) and DNA (Mutations) from the primary tumor (PT), tumor extension (TE) and lymphatic metastatic (LM) sites of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) before treatment. Here, we report a three-nucleotide deletion near the C-region of Plk5 that is specifically associated with the lymphatic metastasis. This mutation is un-detectable in the PT, becomes detectable in the TE and dominates the LM tissue. So while only a few primary cancer cells carry this mutation, the majority of metastatic cells have this mutation. The increasing frequency of this mutation in metastatic tissue suggests that this Plk5 deletion could be used as an early indicator of CCRCC metastasis, and be identified by low cost PCR assay. A large scale clinical trial could reveal whether a simple PCR assay for this mutation at the time of nephrectomy could identify and stratify high-risk CCRCC patients for treatments. PMID:26908440

  14. Genetic Analysis of thr Mutations in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Stuttard, Colin

    1973-01-01

    Previous workers divided threonine-requiring (Thr−) strains of Salmonella into three phenotypes with mutations in four complementation groups. The mutations were deemed to define four genes in the order thrD-C-A-B at minute zero on the Salmonella linkage map. In the present study 12 of these mutants were reexamined together with eight new Thr− strains. The three phenotypes were: homoserine-requiring (Hom−); Thr−, feeders of Hom− strains; Thr−, nonfeeders. Exact correlation between these phenotypic groups and three complementation groups was confirmed by abortive transduction. No evidence was found for intergenic complementation between mutations in Hom− strains. It is proposed that thr mutations define three genes rather than four and that these be renamed thrA (Hom−), thrB (Thr− feeders), and thrC (Thr− nonfeeders) to correspond with the sequence of reactions in threonine biosynthesis. Double mutant trpRthr strains were used in reciprocal three-point transduction tests to establish the order of thr mutation sites. Although revisions were made in the classification or location of several mutations, there was an overall correlation of complementation group, phenotype, and map position. The present data provide a basis for further correlation of threonine genes and biosynthetic enzymes, and analysis of cross regulation in aspartate amino acid biosynthesis in Salmonella. PMID:4583208

  15. Isolation and genetic analysis of mutations allowing the degradation of furans and thiophenes by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulrashid, N.; Clark, D.P.

    1987-03-01

    Successive mutations of Escherichia coli yielded a strain that was able to degrade a variety of heterocyclic oxygen- and sulfur-containing ring compounds. In particular, this strain could use both furan-2-carboxylic acid and thiophene-2-carboxylic acid as sole carbon and energy sources. Nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds were not degraded. This mutant was isolated by selecting first for oxidation of furan derivatives and then for thiphene degradation. Genetic analysis revealed that mutations in three novel genes, thdA (12 min), thdC (92 min), and thdD (98 min), were required for thiphene degradation. In addition, constitutively at both of the previously characterized fadR and atoC loci was required for efficient thiophene breakdown. The pathway of furan and thiophene degradation remains obscure, but the inability of the mutants to degrade 5-nitro or 5-bromo-substituted furan derivatives suggests that hydroxylation at position 5 may be involved. Thiophene derivatives were toxic when they were present at concentrations of 0.1% or greater; however, addition of trace amounts of phenylalanine plus tyrosine greatly reduced this effect.

  16. Detecting novel genetic mutations in Chinese Usher syndrome families using next-generation sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ling-Hui; Jin, Xin; Xu, Hai-Wei; Li, Shi-Ying; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common cause of combined blindness and deafness inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Molecular diagnosis is of great significance in revealing the molecular pathogenesis and aiding the clinical diagnosis of this disease. However, molecular diagnosis remains a challenge due to high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in USH. This study explored an approach for detecting disease-causing genetic mutations in candidate genes in five index cases from unrelated USH families based on targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Through systematic data analysis using an established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, 10 pathogenic mutations in the USH disease genes were identified in the five USH families. Six of these mutations were novel: c.4398G > A and EX38-49del in MYO7A, c.988_989delAT in USH1C, c.15104_15105delCA and c.6875_6876insG in USH2A. All novel variations segregated with the disease phenotypes in their respective families and were absent from ethnically matched control individuals. This study expanded the mutation spectrum of USH and revealed the genotype-phenotype relationships of the novel USH mutations in Chinese patients. Moreover, this study proved that targeted NGS is an accurate and effective method for detecting genetic mutations related to USH. The identification of pathogenic mutations is of great significance for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology of USH. PMID:25252889

  17. Mutation analysis of the entire PKD1 gene: genetic and diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, S; Strmecki, L; Gamble, V; Burton, S; Sneddon, V; Peral, B; Roy, S; Bakkaloglu, A; Komel, R; Winearls, C G; Harris, P C

    2001-01-01

    Mutation screening of the major autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) locus, PKD1, has proved difficult because of the large transcript and complex reiterated gene region. We have developed methods, employing long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and specific reverse transcription-PCR, to amplify all of the PKD1 coding area. The gene was screened for mutations in 131 unrelated patients with ADPKD, using the protein-truncation test and direct sequencing. Mutations were identified in 57 families, and, including 24 previously characterized changes from this cohort, a detection rate of 52.3% was achieved in 155 families. Mutations were found in all areas of the gene, from exons 1 to 46, with no clear hotspot identified. There was no significant difference in mutation frequency between the single-copy and duplicated areas, but mutations were more than twice as frequent in the 3' half of the gene, compared with the 5' half. The majority of changes were predicted to truncate the protein through nonsense mutations (32%), insertions or deletions (29.6%), or splicing changes (6.2%), although the figures were biased by the methods employed, and, in sequenced areas, approximately 50% of all mutations were missense or in-frame. Studies elsewhere have suggested that gene conversion may be a significant cause of mutation at PKD1, but only 3 of 69 different mutations matched PKD1-like HG sequence. A relatively high rate of new PKD1 mutation was calculated, 1.8x10-5 mutations per generation, consistent with the many different mutations identified (69 in 81 pedigrees) and suggesting significant selection against mutant alleles. The mutation detection rate, in this study, of >50% is comparable to that achieved for other large multiexon genes and shows the feasibility of genetic diagnosis in this disorder. PMID:11115377

  18. Population genetics study of isoniazid resistance mutations and evolution of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Brimacombe, Michael; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Cavatore, Magali; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Billman-Jacobe, Helen; Lavender, Caroline; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; León, Clara Inés; Bose, Mridula; Chaves, Fernando; Murray, Megan; Eisenach, Kathleen D; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Cave, M Donald; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Alland, David

    2006-08-01

    The molecular basis for isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is complex. Putative isoniazid resistance mutations have been identified in katG, ahpC, inhA, kasA, and ndh. However, small sample sizes and related potential biases in sample selection have precluded the development of statistically valid and significant population genetic analyses of clinical isoniazid resistance. We present the first large-scale analysis of 240 alleles previously associated with isoniazid resistance in a diverse set of 608 isoniazid-susceptible and 403 isoniazid-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. We detected 12 mutant alleles in isoniazid-susceptible isolates, suggesting that these alleles are not involved in isoniazid resistance. However, mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were strongly associated with isoniazid resistance, while kasA mutations were associated with isoniazid susceptibility. Remarkably, the distribution of isoniazid resistance-associated mutations was different in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates from that in multidrug-resistant isolates, with significantly fewer isoniazid resistance mutations in the isoniazid-monoresistant group. Mutations in katG315 were significantly more common in the multidrug-resistant isolates. Conversely, mutations in the inhA promoter were significantly more common in isoniazid-monoresistant isolates. We tested for interactions among mutations and resistance to different drugs. Mutations in katG, ahpC, and inhA were associated with rifampin resistance, but only katG315 mutations were associated with ethambutol resistance. There was also a significant inverse association between katG315 mutations and mutations in ahpC or inhA and between mutations in kasA and mutations in ahpC. Our results suggest that isoniazid resistance and the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains are complex dynamic processes that may be influenced by interactions between genes and drug-resistant phenotypes. PMID:16870753

  19. The Italian haemophilia B mutation database: a tool for genetic counselling, carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Belvini, Donata; Salviato, Roberta; Di Gaetano, Rosanna; Zanotto, Daniela; Radossi, Paolo; Risato, Renzo; Sartori, Roberto; Tassinari, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Italian database of factor IX gene (F9) mutations has been built since 2001 and is, so far, the most practical instrument for comprehensive genetic counselling, carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. Over time the haemophilia B database has been enriched by entries on a larger number of patients and molecular genetic data identifying heterogeneous mutations spanning the entire F9. Methods Conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis is a variant of heteroduplex analysis, which has been applied for screening F9 for mutations, which are further fully characterised by direct sequencing of the amplified mutated regions. This project has involved 29 Italian haemophilia centres and provides data concerning the analysis of a cohort of 306 unrelated patients with haemophilia B (191 with severe, 67 with moderate and 48 with mild disease, including 8 patients with severe haemophilia B with inhibitors). The recorded data include levels of factor IX clotting activity, inhibitor status and clinical severity. Results Detailed analysis of the mutations revealed 164 different mutations, that are considered as unique molecular events (8 large deletions, 11 small deletions, 1 combined deletion/ insertion, 2 insertions, 104 missense, 20 nonsense, 14 mutations in a splicing site, 3 in the promoter and 1 silent). The data recorded in the Italian F9 mutation database provided the basis to study 85 families with haemophilia B, involving 180 females (20 obligate carriers, 106 carriers and 54 non-carriers) and enabled 14 prenatal diagnoses to be made in 12 females. Conclusions Genetic analysis is required to determine female carrier status reliably. Female relatives may request carrier analysis, when a male relative is first diagnosed as having haemophilia or when they are pregnant. At present, the data collected in the Italian national register of mutations in haemophilia B provide the opportunity to perform prompt and precise determination of carrier status and prenatal

  20. Beyond Mutations: Additional Mechanisms and Implications of SWI/SNF Complex Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Stefanie B.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Lu, Li; Reisman, David

    2015-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a major regulator of gene expression. Its role is to facilitate the shifting and exposure of DNA segments within the promoter and other key domains to transcription factors and other essential cellular proteins. This complex interacts with a wide range of proteins and does not function within a single, specific pathway; thus, it is involved in a multitude of cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation, development, cell adhesion, and growth control. Given SWI/SNF’s prominent role in these processes, many of which are important for blocking cancer development, it is not surprising that the SWI/SNF complex is targeted during cancer initiation and progression both by mutations and by non-mutational mechanisms. Currently, the understanding of the types of alterations, their frequency, and their impact on the SWI/SNF subunits is an area of intense research that has been bolstered by a recent cadre of NextGen sequencing studies. These studies have revealed mutations in SWI/SNF subunits, indicating that this complex is thus important for cancer development. The purpose of this review is to put into perspective the role of mutations versus other mechanisms in the silencing of SWI/SNF subunits, in particular, BRG1 and BRM. In addition, this review explores the recent development of synthetic lethality and how it applies to this complex, as well as how BRM polymorphisms are becoming recognized as potential clinical biomarkers for cancer risk. Significance: Recent reviews have detailed the occurrence of mutations in nearly all SWI/SNF subunits, which indicates that this complex is an important target for cancer. However, when the frequency of mutations in a given tumor type is compared to the frequency of subunit loss, it becomes clear that other non-mutational mechanisms must play a role in the inactivation of SWI/SNF subunits. Such data indicate that epigenetic mechanisms that are known to regulate BRM may also be involved in the loss of

  1. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  2. A novel pseudoderivative-based mutation operator for real-coded adaptive genetic algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Maxinder S; Ramesh, Avinash S; Huang, Lauren A

    2013-01-01

    Recent development of large databases, especially those in genetics and proteomics, is pushing the development of novel computational algorithms that implement rapid and accurate search strategies. One successful approach has been to use artificial intelligence and methods, including pattern recognition (e.g. neural networks) and optimization techniques (e.g. genetic algorithms). The focus of this paper is on optimizing the design of genetic algorithms by using an adaptive mutation rate that is derived from comparing the fitness values of successive generations. We propose a novel pseudoderivative-based mutation rate operator designed to allow a genetic algorithm to escape local optima and successfully continue to the global optimum. Once proven successful, this algorithm can be implemented to solve real problems in neurology and bioinformatics. As a first step towards this goal, we tested our algorithm on two 3-dimensional surfaces with multiple local optima, but only one global optimum, as well as on the N-queens problem, an applied problem in which the function that maps the curve is implicit. For all tests, the adaptive mutation rate allowed the genetic algorithm to find the global optimal solution, performing significantly better than other search methods, including genetic algorithms that implement fixed mutation rates. PMID:24627784

  3. Mutations in metabolic pathways, what role does genetic background play?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) is a key enzyme for the synthesis of urea and the endogenous synthesis of arginine. OTC is present in hepatocytes and enterocytes and catalyzes the synthesis of citrulline. Although the spf-ash mutation results in a reduction in enzyme abundance, ureagenesis is maint...

  4. [Genetic Mutation Accumulation and Clinical Outcome of Immune Checkpoint Blockade Therapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy has recently attracted great attention in the area of oncology. In Japan, since 2014, an anti-PD-1antibody nivolumab and anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab have been available for the treatment of patients with malignant melanoma, and nivolumab has been available for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials using these drugs and other immune checkpoint inhibitors are currently in progress worldwide. The immune checkpoint blockade therapy is a promising new cancer therapy; however, not all patients with cancer can benefit from this therapy. Recent evidence shows that markers reflecting the extent of genetic mutation accumulation, including mutation burden, non-synonymous mutation that produces neoantigen, and microsatellite instability, possibly serve as promising marker to predict who can benefit from the immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Here, I introduce the recent evidence and discuss the correlation between genetic mutation accumulation and clinical outcome of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27306805

  5. CRISPR-Barcoding for Intratumor Genetic Heterogeneity Modeling and Functional Analysis of Oncogenic Driver Mutations.

    PubMed

    Guernet, Alexis; Mungamuri, Sathish Kumar; Cartier, Dorthe; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Jayaprakash, Anitha; Adriouch, Sahil; Vezain, Myriam; Charbonnier, Françoise; Rohkin, Guy; Coutant, Sophie; Yao, Shen; Ainani, Hassan; Alexandre, David; Tournier, Isabelle; Boyer, Olivier; Aaronson, Stuart A; Anouar, Youssef; Grumolato, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Intratumor genetic heterogeneity underlies the ability of tumors to evolve and adapt to different environmental conditions. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology and specific DNA barcodes, we devised a strategy to recapitulate and trace the emergence of subpopulations of cancer cells containing a mutation of interest. We used this approach to model different mechanisms of lung cancer cell resistance to EGFR inhibitors and to assess effects of combined drug therapies. By overcoming intrinsic limitations of current approaches, CRISPR-barcoding also enables investigation of most types of genetic modifications, including repair of oncogenic driver mutations. Finally, we used highly complex barcodes inserted at a specific genome location as a means of simultaneously tracing the fates of many thousands of genetically labeled cancer cells. CRISPR-barcoding is a straightforward and highly flexible method that should greatly facilitate the functional investigation of specific mutations, in a context that closely mimics the complexity of cancer. PMID:27453044

  6. ATRX mutations and glioblastoma: Impaired DNA damage repair, alternative lengthening of telomeres, and genetic instability.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-05-01

    Alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) is mutated in nearly a third of pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) patients. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM. Using this model combined with analysis of multiple human glioma genome-wide datasets, we determined that ATRX mutation leads to genetic instability, impaired non-homologous end joining, and alternate lengthening of telomeres (ALT). PMID:27314101

  7. Additive dominant effect of a SOX10 mutation underlies a complex phenotype of PCWH.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukiko; Inoue, Naoko; Inoue, Yukiko U; Nakamura, Shoko; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Inagaki, Masumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Asami, Junko; Terakawa, Youhei W; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Inoue, Takayoshi; Inoue, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Distinct classes of SOX10 mutations result in peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease, collectively known as PCWH. Meanwhile, SOX10 haploinsufficiency caused by allelic loss-of-function mutations leads to a milder non-neurological disorder, Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease. The cellular pathogenesis of more complex PCWH phenotypes in vivo has not been thoroughly understood. To determine the pathogenesis of PCWH, we have established a transgenic mouse model. A known PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation, c.1400del12, was introduced into mouse Sox10-expressing cells by means of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. By crossing the multiple transgenic lines, we examined the effects produced by various copy numbers of the mutant transgene. Within the nervous systems, transgenic mice revealed a delay in the incorporation of Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve and the terminal differentiation of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord. Transgenic mice also showed defects in melanocytes presenting as neurosensory deafness and abnormal skin pigmentation, and a loss of the enteric nervous system. Phenotypes in each lineage were more severe in mice carrying higher copy numbers, suggesting a gene dosage effect for mutant SOX10. By uncoupling the effects of gain-of-function and haploinsufficiency in vivo, we have demonstrated that the effect of a PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation is solely pathogenic in each SOX10-expressing cellular lineage in a dosage-dependent manner. In both the peripheral and central nervous systems, the primary consequence of SOX10 mutations is hypomyelination. The complex neurological phenotypes in PCWH patients likely result from a combination of haploinsufficiency and additive dominant effect. PMID:25959061

  8. Similar relative mutation rates in the three genetic compartments of Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jimeng; Smith, David Roy; Borza, Tudor; Lee, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Levels of nucleotide substitution at silent sites in organelle versus nuclear DNAs have been used to estimate relative mutation rates among these compartments and explain lineage-specific features of genome evolution. Synonymous substitution divergence values in animals suggest that the rate of mutation in the mitochondrial DNA is 10-50 times higher than that of the nuclear DNA, whereas overall data for most seed plants support relative mutation rates in mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear DNAs of 1:3:10. Little is known about relative mutation rates in green algae, as substitution rate data is limited to only the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas. Here, we measure silent-site substitution rates in the plastid DNA of Chlamydomonas and the three genetic compartments of the streptophyte green alga Mesostigma. In contrast to the situation in animals and land plants, our results support similar relative mutation rates among the three genetic compartments of both Chlamydomonas and Mesostigma. These data are discussed in relation to published intra-species genetic diversity data for the three genetic compartments of Chlamydomonas and are ultimately used to address contemporary hypotheses on the organelle genome evolution. To guide future work, we describe evolutionary divergence data of all publically available Mesostigma viride strains and identify, for the first time, three distinct lineages of Mesostigma. PMID:21621456

  9. Expanding the spectrum of genetic mutations in antenatal Bartter syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Fretzayas, Andreas; Gole, Evangelia; Attilakos, Achilleas; Daskalaki, Anna; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni; Papadopoulou, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia and elevated renin and aldosterone plasma concentrations. BS type II is caused by mutations in the KCNJ1 gene and usually presents with transient hyperkalemia. We report here a novel KCNJ1 mutation in a male neonate, prematurely born after a pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios. The infant presented with typical clinical and laboratory findings of BS type II, such as hyponatremia, hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, severe weight loss, elevated renin and aldosterone levels and transient hyperkalemia in the early postnatal period, which were later normalized. Molecular analysis revealed a compound heterozygous mutation in the KCNJ1 gene, consisting of a novel K76E and an already described V315G mutation, both affecting functional domains of the channel protein. Typical manifestations of antenatal BS in combination with hyperkalemia should prompt the clinician to search for mutations in the KCNJ1 gene first. PMID:23782368

  10. Genetic heterogeneity in five Italian regions: analysis of PAH mutations and minihaplotypes.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, S; Dianzani, I; Lattanzio, P; Spada, M; Romano, V; Calì, F; Andria, G; Ponzone, A; Marra, E; Piazza, A

    2001-01-01

    Molecular analysis of 289 chromosomes has been performed in a cohort of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients whose ancestors lived in five Italian regions, Calabria, Campania, Piemonte, Puglia/Basilicata and Sicilia. Phenylalaninehydroxylase (PAH) gene mutations and minihaplotypes (combinations of PAH gene STR and VNTR systems) have been determined for 78.5 and 64%, respectively, of the chromosomes studied. 21 different minihaplotypes and 24 PKU mutations were found. Heterogeneity tests carried out for the frequencies of mutations and minihaplotypes show that the distribution of eight mutations and four minihaplotypes is statistically heterogeneous in the five Italian regions. Although the evolutionary rate of microsatellites or the age of these mutations is difficult to estimate with accuracy, our findings taken together show a genetic stratification of the Italian population. These results rule out allelic homogeneity of PKU at the molecular level between regions of Italy, yet minihaplotype data may be of practical use for a multistep approach to PAH gene genotyping. PMID:11588399

  11. Biology of lung cancer: genetic mutation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    At present, most cases of unresectable cancer cannot be cured. Genetic mutations, EMT, and cancer stem cells are three major issues linked to poor prognosis in such cases, all connected by inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. Issues on inter-/intra-tumor heterogeneity of genetic mutation could be resolved with recent and future technologies of deep sequencers, whereas, regarding such issues as the "same genome, different epigenome/phenotype", we expect to solve many of these problems in the future through further research in stem cell biology. We herein review and discuss the three major issues in the biology of cancers, especially from the standpoint of stem cell biology. PMID:27376535

  12. Genetic syndromes caused by mutations in epigenetic genes.

    PubMed

    Berdasco, María; Esteller, Manel

    2013-04-01

    The orchestrated organization of epigenetic factors that control chromatin dynamism, including DNA methylation, histone marks, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and chromatin-remodeling proteins, is essential for the proper function of tissue homeostasis, cell identity and development. Indeed, deregulation of epigenetic profiles has been described in several human pathologies, including complex diseases (such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases), metabolic pathologies (type 2 diabetes and obesity) and imprinting disorders. Over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that mutations of genes involved in epigenetic mechanism, such as DNA methyltransferases, methyl-binding domain proteins, histone deacetylases, histone methylases and members of the SWI/SNF family of chromatin remodelers are linked to human disorders, including Immunodeficiency Centromeric instability Facial syndrome 1, Rett syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Sotos syndrome or alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, among others. As new members of the epigenetic machinery are described, the number of human syndromes associated with epigenetic alterations increases. As recent examples, mutations of histone demethylases and members of the non-coding RNA machinery have recently been associated with Kabuki syndrome, Claes-Jensen X-linked mental retardation syndrome and Goiter syndrome. In this review, we describe the variety of germline mutations of epigenetic modifiers that are known to be associated with human disorders, and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs as palliative care strategies in the treatment of such disorders. PMID:23370504

  13. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of sperm epimutations promote genetic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Haque, M Muksitul

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental factors have been shown to induce the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation. This involves the germline transmission of epigenetic information between generations. Exposure specific transgenerational sperm epimutations have been previously observed. The current study was designed to investigate the potential role genetic mutations have in the process, using copy number variations (CNV). In the first (F1) generation following exposure, negligible CNV were identified; however, in the transgenerational F3 generation, a significant increase in CNV was observed in the sperm. The genome-wide locations of differential DNA methylation regions (epimutations) and genetic mutations (CNV) were investigated. Observations suggest the environmental induction of the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of sperm epimutations promote genome instability, such that genetic CNV mutations are acquired in later generations. A combination of epigenetics and genetics is suggested to be involved in the transgenerational phenotypes. The ability of environmental factors to promote epigenetic inheritance that subsequently promotes genetic mutations is a significant advance in our understanding of how the environment impacts disease and evolution. PMID:26237076

  14. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation. PMID:26597662

  15. Genetic Variation and De Novo Mutations in the Parthenogenetic Caucasian Rock Lizard Darevskia unisexualis

    PubMed Central

    Badaeva, Tatiana N.; Malysheva, Daria N.; Korchagin, Vitaly I.; Ryskov, Alexei P.

    2008-01-01

    Unisexual all-female lizards of the genus Darevskia that are well adapted to various habitats are known to reproduce normally by true parthenogenesis. Although they consist of unisexual lineages and lack effective genetic recombination, they are characterized by some level of genetic polymorphism. To reveal the mutational contribution to overall genetic variability, the most straightforward and conclusive way is the direct detection of mutation events in pedigree genotyping. Earlier we selected from genomic library of D. unisexualis two polymorphic microsatellite containg loci Du281 and Du215. In this study, these two loci were analyzed to detect possible de novo mutations in 168 parthenogenetic offspring of 49 D. unisexualis mothers and in 147 offspring of 50 D. armeniaca mothers . No mutant alleles were detected in D. armeniaca offspring at both loci, and in D. unisexualis offspring at the Du215 locus. There were a total of seven mutational events in the germ lines of four of the 49 D. unisexualis mothers at the Du281 locus, yielding the mutation rate of 0.1428 events per germ line tissue. Sequencing of the mutant alleles has shown that most mutations occur via deletion or insertion of single microsatellite repeat being identical in all offspring of the family. This indicates that such mutations emerge at the early stages of embryogenesis. In this study we characterized single highly unstable (GATA)n containing locus in parthenogenetic lizard species D. unisexualis. Besides, we characterized various types of mutant alleles of this locus found in the D. unisexualis offspring of the first generation. Our data has shown that microsatellite mutations at highly unstable loci can make a significant contribution to population variability of parthenogenetic lizards. PMID:18648496

  16. Additive genetic contribution to symptom dimensions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Rahel; Palmer, Rohan H C; Brick, Leslie A; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder with a complex genetic architecture. In this study, genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum-likelihood analysis (GREML) was used to investigate the extent to which variance in depression symptoms/symptom dimensions can be explained by variation in common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of individuals with MDD (N = 1,558) who participated in the National Institute of Mental Health Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. A principal components analysis of items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) obtained prior to treatment revealed 4 depression symptom components: (a) appetite, (b) core depression symptoms (e.g., depressed mood, anhedonia), (c) insomnia, and (d) anxiety. These symptom dimensions were associated with SNP-based heritability (hSNP2) estimates of 30%, 14%, 30%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicated that the genetic contribution of common SNPs to depression symptom dimensions were not uniform. Appetite and insomnia symptoms in MDD had a relatively strong genetic contribution whereas the genetic contribution was relatively small for core depression and anxiety symptoms. While in need of replication, these results suggest that future gene discovery efforts may strongly benefit from parsing depression into its constituent parts. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27124715

  17. Genetic mapping of the mouse neuromuscular mutation kyphoscoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Skynner, M.J.; Coulton, G.R.; Mason, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    The ky mouse mutant, kyphoscoliosis, exhibits a degenerative muscle disease resulting in chronic deformation of the spinal column. Using an interspecific backcross segregating the ky mutation, we have mapped the ky locus to a small region of mouse chromosome 9. ky is nonrecombinant with the microsatellites D9Mit24 and D9Mit169 and lies in a conserved linkage group that encompasses human chromosome 3. s-Laminin (LAMS) and the gene for dystrophin-associated glycoprotein 1 (DAG1), which map to human chromosome 3, are both recombinant with ky, ruling them out as candidates. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. TP53 genetic alterations in Arab breast cancer patients: Novel mutations, pattern and distribution

    PubMed Central

    AL-QASEM, ABEER J.; TOULIMAT, MOHAMED; ELDALI, ABDELMONEIM M.; TULBAH, ASMA; AL-YOUSEF, NUJOUD; AL-DAIHAN, SOOAD K.; AL-TASSAN, NADA; AL-TWEIGERI, TAHER; ABOUSSEKHRA, ABDELILAH

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health concern. The incidence and mortality of breast cancer varies significantly in ethnically and geographically distinct populations. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) breast cancer has shown an increase in incidence and is characterized by early onset and aggressiveness. The tumor suppressor TP53 gene is a crucial genetic factor that plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis. Furthermore, studies have shown a correlation between certain p53 mutations and response to therapy in breast cancer. In the present study, TP53 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of the gene (exons 4–9) from 119 breast cancer tissues. The prevalence of TP53 mutations in Arab breast cancer patients living in the KSA is among the highest in the world (40%). Notably, 73% of the patients whose tumors harbored p53 mutations were less than 50 years of age. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified 7 novel mutations and 16 mutations in breast cancer tissues. Notably, all the novel point mutations were found in exon 4, wherein 29% of the mutations were localized. Furthermore, an excess of G:C→A:T transitions (49%) at non-CpG sites was noted, suggesting exposure to particular environmental carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds. The results indicate that the TP53 gene plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis and the early onset of the disease among Arab female individuals. PMID:22866089

  19. TP53 genetic alterations in Arab breast cancer patients: Novel mutations, pattern and distribution.

    PubMed

    Al-Qasem, Abeer J; Toulimat, Mohamed; Eldali, Abdelmoneim M; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Yousef, Nujoud; Al-Daihan, Sooad K; Al-Tassan, Nada; Al-Tweigeri, Taher; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health concern. The incidence and mortality of breast cancer varies significantly in ethnically and geographically distinct populations. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) breast cancer has shown an increase in incidence and is characterized by early onset and aggressiveness. The tumor suppressor TP53 gene is a crucial genetic factor that plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis. Furthermore, studies have shown a correlation between certain p53 mutations and response to therapy in breast cancer. In the present study, TP53 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of the gene (exons 4-9) from 119 breast cancer tissues. The prevalence of TP53 mutations in Arab breast cancer patients living in the KSA is among the highest in the world (40%). Notably, 73% of the patients whose tumors harbored p53 mutations were less than 50 years of age. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified 7 novel mutations and 16 mutations in breast cancer tissues. Notably, all the novel point mutations were found in exon 4, wherein 29% of the mutations were localized. Furthermore, an excess of G:C→A:T transitions (49%) at non-CpG sites was noted, suggesting exposure to particular environmental carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds. The results indicate that the TP53 gene plays a significant role in breast carcinogenesis and the early onset of the disease among Arab female individuals. PMID:22866089

  20. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  1. Isolated cardiomyopathy caused by a DMD nonsense mutation in somatic mosaicism: genetic normalization in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Juan-Mateu, J; Paradas, C; Olivé, M; Verdura, E; Rivas, E; González-Quereda, L; Rodríguez, M J; Baiget, M; Gallano, P

    2012-12-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a pure cardiac dystrophinopathy phenotype mainly caused by DMD mutations that present a specific transcription effect in cardiac tissue. We report a 26-year-old male who presented with severe dilated cardiomyopathy and high creatine kinase. The patient did not complain of skeletal muscle weakness. A muscle biopsy showed mild dystrophic changes and a low proportion of dystrophin-negative fibres. A molecular study identified a nonsense DMD mutation (p.Arg2098X) in somatic mosaicism. The ratio of mutant versus normal allele in blood and skeletal muscle suggests selective pressure against mutant muscle cells, a process known as genetic normalization. We hypothesize that this process may have mitigated skeletal muscle symptoms in this patient. This is the second report of a DMD somatic mosaic with evidence of genetic normalization in muscle. Somatic DMD mutations should be considered in patients presenting with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:22092019

  2. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials. PMID:26306257

  3. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials. PMID:26306257

  4. Genetics of unstable alleles of the X chromosome genes isolated from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster during the outburst of mutation yellow in 1982 to 1991 in Uman`

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, I.K.; Skibitskii, E.E.

    1995-08-01

    In 1982, a local increase of frequency of mutation yellow-2, which lasted for a decade, occurred in a population of Drosophila melanogaster from Uman` (Ukraine). Genetic properties (phenotypic difference, mutability, and pecularities of complementation) of alleles yellow-2, isolated from the population during the mutation outburst, and of their revertants, were studied. Allelic diversity, which reflected molecular differences in allele structure, was shown to appear. In addition to mutation yellow, isolated in 1990 from the Uman` population, mutational properties of other sex-linked genes (dusky, miniature, rudimentary, singed, and vermilion) isolated from natural populations in 1986 to 1990, were analyzed. Based on these data, the conclusion was drawn that the presence of unstable alleles in populations is not a sufficient condition for mutation outbursts. Comparative analysis of properties of yellow alleles obtained in different periods of the outburst continues. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. ELANE Mutations in Cyclic and Severe Congenital Neutropenia—Genetics and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.; Corey, Seth J.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Tidwell, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    There are two main forms of hereditary neutropenia: cyclic and severe congenital neutropenia (SCN). Cyclic neutropenia is an autosomal dominant disorder in which neutrophil counts fluctuate between nearly normal levels and close to zero with 21-day periodicity. In contrast, SCN, also known as Kostmann syndrome, consists of chronic and profound neutropenia, with a characteristic promyelocytic maturation arrest in the bone marrow. Unlike cyclic neutropenia, SCN displays frequent acquisition of somatic mutations in the gene, CSF3R, encoding the Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor (G-CSFR), and a strong predisposition to developing myelodysplasia (MDS) and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Cyclic neutropenia is caused by heterozygous mutations in the gene, ELANE (formerly known as ELA2), encoding the neutrophil granule serine protease, neutrophil elastase. SCN is genetically heterogeneous, but it is most frequently associated with ELANE mutations. While some of the different missense mutations in ELANE exhibit phenotype-genotype correlation, the same mutations are sometimes found in patients with either form of inherited neutropenia. The mutations lead to production of a mutant polypeptide, but no common biochemical abnormality, including effects on proteolysis, has been identified. Two non-mutually exclusive theories have been advanced to explain how the mutations might produce neutropenia. The mislocalization hypothesis states that mutations within neutrophil elastase or involving other proteins responsible for its intracellular trafficking cause neutrophil elastase to accumulate in inappropriate subcellular compartments. The misfolding hypothesis proposes that mutations prevent the protein from properly folding, thereby inducing the stress response pathway within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We discuss how the mutations themselves provide clues into pathogenesis, describe supporting and contradictory observations for both theories, and highlight

  6. Glucocerebrosidase L444P mutation confers genetic risk for Parkinson’s disease in central China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutations of the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene have reportedly been associated with Parkinson disease (PD) in various ethnic populations such as Singaporean, Japanese, Formosan, Canadian, American, Portuguese, Greek, Brazilian, British, Italian, Ashkenazi Jewish, southern and southwestern Chinese. The purpose of this study is to determine in central China whether or not the reported GBA mutations remain associated with PD. Methods In this project, we conducted a controlled study in a cohort of 208 central Chinese PD patients and 298 controls for three known GBA mutations (L444P, N370S and R120W). Results Our data reveals a significantly higher frequency of L444P mutation in GBA gene of PD cases (3.4%) compared with the controls (0.3%) (P = 0.007, OR = 10.34, 95% CI = 1.26 - 84.71). Specifically, the frequency of L444P mutation was higher in the late onset PD (LOPD) cases compared with that in control subjects. The N370S and R120W mutations were detected in neither the PD group nor the control subjects. Conclusions Our observations demonstrated that the GBA L444P mutation confers genetic risk for PD, especially LOPD, among the population in the central China area. PMID:23227814

  7. Genetic Mutations Associated with Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Marva; Catanzaro, Donald; Catanzaro, Antonino; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) incidence and mortality are declining worldwide; however, poor detection of drug-resistant disease threatens to reverse current progress toward global TB control. Multiple, rapid molecular diagnostic tests have recently been developed to detect genetic mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genes known to confer first-line drug resistance. Their utility, though, depends on the frequency and distribution of the resistance associated mutations in the pathogen population. Mutations associated with rifampicin resistance, one of the two first-line drugs, are well understood and appear to occur in a single gene region in >95% of phenotypically resistant isolates. Mutations associated with isoniazid, the other first-line drug, are more complex and occur in multiple Mtb genes. Objectives/Methodology A systematic review of all published studies from January 2000 through August 2013 was conducted to quantify the frequency of the most common mutations associated with isoniazid resistance, to describe the frequency at which these mutations co-occur, and to identify the regional differences in the distribution of these mutations. Mutation data from 118 publications were extracted and analyzed for 11,411 Mtb isolates from 49 countries. Principal Findings/Conclusions Globally, 64% of all observed phenotypic isoniazid resistance was associated with the katG315 mutation. The second most frequently observed mutation, inhA-15, was reported among 19% of phenotypically resistant isolates. These two mutations, katG315 and inhA-15, combined with ten of the most commonly occurring mutations in the inhA promoter and the ahpC-oxyR intergenic region explain 84% of global phenotypic isoniazid resistance. Regional variation in the frequency of individual mutations may limit the sensitivity of molecular diagnostic tests. Well-designed systematic surveys and whole genome sequencing are needed to identify mutation frequencies in geographic regions where rapid

  8. Could contaminant induced mutations lead to a genetic diversity overestimation?

    PubMed

    Sobral, Olímpia; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Ribeiro, Rui

    2013-07-01

    Contaminant driven genetic erosion reported through the inspection of selectable traits can be underestimated using neutral markers. This divergence was previously reported in the aquatic system of an abandoned pyrite mine. The most sensitive genotypes of the microcrustacean cladoceran Daphnia longispina were found to be lacking in the impacted reservoir near the entrance of the metal rich acid mine drainage (AMD). Since that divergence could be, at least partially, accounted for by mutagenicity and genotoxicity of the AMD, the present study aimed at providing such a characterization. The Allium cepa chromosomal aberration assay, using root meristematic cells, was carried out, by exposing seeds to 100, 10, 1, and 0.1 % of the local AMD. Chromosomal aberrations, cell division phases and cell death were quantified after the AMD exposure and after 24 and 48 h recovery periods. The AMD revealed to be mutagenic and genotoxic, even after diluting it to 1 and 0.1 %. Dilutions within this range were previously found to be below the lethality threshold and to elicit sublethal effects on reproduction of locally collected D. longispina clonal lineages Significant mutagenic effects (micronuclei and chromosomal breaks) were also found at 0.1 % AMD, supporting that exposure may induce permanent genetic alterations. Recovery tests showed that AMD genotoxic effects persisted after the exposure. PMID:23686739

  9. Disclosure of research results in genetic studies of Parkinson's disease caused by LRRK2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Bressman, Susan; Raymond, Deborah; Glickman, Amanda; Tolosa, Eduardo; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of large genetic studies examining both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals, whether and how to disclose genetic research results have become pressing questions. The need is particularly acute in the case of LRRK2 research: Movement centers worldwide are recruiting cohorts of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their family members, including asymptomatic carriers. Clinical features and treatment are complex and evolving, and disclosure policies vary at different sites and have been modified during the course of some studies. We present the major ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and honesty that should guide disclosure policies in studies of families with LRRK2 mutations. We make recommendations regarding genetic counseling, policies of either active or passive disclosure, responsibilities of funders to budget for genetic counseling, clinical genetic testing where locally required for disclosure, and aspects of study design to avoid mandatory disclosure whenever feasible. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:25952684

  10. Disclosure of Research Results in Genetic Studies of Parkinson Disease Due to LRRK2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bressman, Susan; Raymond, Deborah; Glickman, Amanda; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of large genetic studies examining both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals, whether and how to disclose genetic research results have become pressing questions. The need is particularly acute in the case of LRRK2 research: Movement centers worldwide are recruiting cohorts of individuals with PD and their family members, including asymptomatic carriers, clinical features and treatment are complex and evolving, and disclosure policies vary at different sites and have been modified during the course of some studies. Herein, we present the major ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and honesty that should guide disclosure policies in studies of families with LRRK2 mutations. We make recommendations regarding: genetic counseling, policies of either active or passive disclosure, responsibilities of funders to budget for genetic counseling, clinical genetic testing where locally required for disclosure, and aspects of study design to avoid mandatory disclosure whenever feasible. PMID:25952684

  11. Population genetics inside a cell: Mutations and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sidhartha; Shraiman, Boris; Gottschling, Dan

    2012-02-01

    In realistic ecological and evolutionary systems natural selection acts on multiple levels, i.e. it acts on individuals as well as on collection of individuals. An understanding of evolutionary dynamics of such systems is limited in large part due to the lack of experimental systems that can challenge theoretical models. Mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) are subjected to selection acting on cellular as well as organelle levels. It is well accepted that mtDNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unstable and can degrade over time scales comparable to yeast cell division time. We utilize a recent technology designed in Gottschling lab to extract DNA from populations of aged yeast cells and deep sequencing to characterize mtDNA variation in a population of young and old cells. In tandem, we developed a stochastic model that includes the essential features of mitochondrial biology that provides a null model for expected mtDNA variation. Overall, we find approximately 2% of the polymorphic loci that show significant increase in frequency as cells age providing direct evidence for organelle level selection. Such quantitative study of mtDNA dynamics is absolutely essential to understand the propagation of mtDNA mutations linked to a spectrum of age-related diseases in humans.

  12. [Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and genetic mutations including progranulin gene].

    PubMed

    Arai, Tetsuaki; Hasegawa, Masato; Nishihara, Masugi; Nonaka, Takashi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Hashizume, Yoshio; Beach, Thomas G; Morita, Mitsuya; Nakano, Imaharu; Oda, Tatsuro; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2008-11-01

    Research on familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) has led to the discovery of disease-causing genes: microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (PGRN) and valosin-containing protein (VCP). TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as a major component of tau-negative ubiquitin-positive inclusions in familial and sporadic FTLD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which are now referred to as TDP-43 proteinopathy. Recent findings of mutations in TDP-43 gene in familial and sporadic ALS cases confirm the pathogenetic role for TDP-43 in neurodegeneration. TDP-43 proteinopathies have been classified into 4 pathological subtypes. Type 1 is characterized by numerous dystrophic neurites (DNs), Type 2 has numerous neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), Type 3 has NCIs and DNs and Type 4 has neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs) and DNs. There is a close relationship between such pathological subtypes of TDP-43 proteinopathy and the immunoblot pattern of C-terminal fragments of accumulated TDP-43. These results parallel our earlier findings of differing C-terminal tau fragments in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, despite identical composition of tau isoforms. Taken together, these results suggest that elucidating the mechanism of C-terminal fragment origination may shed light on the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders involving TDP-43 proteinopathy and tauopathy. PMID:19198141

  13. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks. VIII. The concept of mutation component and its use in risk estimation for multifactorial diseases.

    PubMed

    Denniston, C; Chakraborty, R; Sankaranarayanan, K

    1998-08-31

    Multifactorial diseases, which include the common congenital abnormalities (incidence: 6%) and chronic diseases with onset predominantly in adults (population prevalence: 65%), contribute substantially to human morbidity and mortality. Their transmission patterns do not conform to Mendelian expectations. The model most frequently used to explain their inheritance and to estimate risks to relatives is a Multifactorial Threshold Model (MTM) of disease liability. The MTM assumes that: (i) the disease is due to the joint action of a large number of genetic and environmental factors, each of which contributing a small amount of liability, (ii) the distribution of liability in the population is Gaussian and (iii) individuals whose liability exceeds a certain threshold value are affected by the disease. For most of these diseases, the number of genes involved or the environmental factors are not fully known. In the context of radiation exposures of the population, the question of the extent to which induced mutations will cause an increase in the frequencies of these diseases has remained unanswered. In this paper, we address this problem by using a modified version of MTM which incorporates mutation and selection as two additional parameters. The model assumes a finite number of gene loci and threshold of liability (hence, the designation, Finite-Locus Threshold Model or FLTM). The FLTM permits one to examine the relationship between broad-sense heritability of disease liability and mutation component (MC), the responsiveness of the disease to a change in mutation rate. Through the use of a computer program (in which mutation rate, selection, threshold, recombination rate and environmental variance are input parameters and MC and heritability of liability are output estimates), we studied the MC-heritability relationship for (i) a permanent increase in mutation rate (e.g., when the population sustains radiation exposure in every generation) and (ii) a one-time increase

  14. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  15. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility. PMID:26549413

  16. A General Population Genetic Framework for Antagonistic Selection That Accounts for Demography and Recurrent Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Antagonistic selection—where alleles at a locus have opposing effects on male and female fitness (“sexual antagonism”) or between components of fitness (“antagonistic pleiotropy”)—might play an important role in maintaining population genetic variation and in driving phylogenetic and genomic patterns of sexual dimorphism and life-history evolution. While prior theory has thoroughly characterized the conditions necessary for antagonistic balancing selection to operate, we currently know little about the evolutionary interactions between antagonistic selection, recurrent mutation, and genetic drift, which should collectively shape empirical patterns of genetic variation. To fill this void, we developed and analyzed a series of population genetic models that simultaneously incorporate these processes. Our models identify two general properties of antagonistically selected loci. First, antagonistic selection inflates heterozygosity and fitness variance across a broad parameter range—a result that applies to alleles maintained by balancing selection and by recurrent mutation. Second, effective population size and genetic drift profoundly affect the statistical frequency distributions of antagonistically selected alleles. The “efficacy” of antagonistic selection (i.e., its tendency to dominate over genetic drift) is extremely weak relative to classical models, such as directional selection and overdominance. Alleles meeting traditional criteria for strong selection (Nes >> 1, where Ne is the effective population size, and s is a selection coefficient for a given sex or fitness component) may nevertheless evolve as if neutral. The effects of mutation and demography may generate population differences in overall levels of antagonistic fitness variation, as well as molecular population genetic signatures of balancing selection. PMID:22298707

  17. A general population genetic framework for antagonistic selection that accounts for demography and recurrent mutation.

    PubMed

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G

    2012-04-01

    Antagonistic selection--where alleles at a locus have opposing effects on male and female fitness ("sexual antagonism") or between components of fitness ("antagonistic pleiotropy")--might play an important role in maintaining population genetic variation and in driving phylogenetic and genomic patterns of sexual dimorphism and life-history evolution. While prior theory has thoroughly characterized the conditions necessary for antagonistic balancing selection to operate, we currently know little about the evolutionary interactions between antagonistic selection, recurrent mutation, and genetic drift, which should collectively shape empirical patterns of genetic variation. To fill this void, we developed and analyzed a series of population genetic models that simultaneously incorporate these processes. Our models identify two general properties of antagonistically selected loci. First, antagonistic selection inflates heterozygosity and fitness variance across a broad parameter range--a result that applies to alleles maintained by balancing selection and by recurrent mutation. Second, effective population size and genetic drift profoundly affect the statistical frequency distributions of antagonistically selected alleles. The "efficacy" of antagonistic selection (i.e., its tendency to dominate over genetic drift) is extremely weak relative to classical models, such as directional selection and overdominance. Alleles meeting traditional criteria for strong selection (N(e)s > 1, where N(e) is the effective population size, and s is a selection coefficient for a given sex or fitness component) may nevertheless evolve as if neutral. The effects of mutation and demography may generate population differences in overall levels of antagonistic fitness variation, as well as molecular population genetic signatures of balancing selection. PMID:22298707

  18. POLE and POLD1 mutations in 529 kindred with familial colorectal cancer and/or polyposis: review of reported cases and recommendations for genetic testing and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Fernando; Pineda, Marta; Aiza, Gemma; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Navarro, Matilde; Puente, Diana A.; Pons, Tirso; González, Sara; Iglesias, Silvia; Darder, Esther; Piñol, Virginia; Soto, José Luís; Valencia, Alfonso; Blanco, Ignacio; Urioste, Miguel; Brunet, Joan; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel; Puente, Xose S.; Valle, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Germ-line mutations in the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 have been recently associated with polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. Here, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the phenotypic characteristics of this syndrome to establish specific criteria for POLE and POLD1 mutation screening and to help define the clinical management of mutation carriers. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Methods: The exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 were studied in 529 kindred, 441 with familial nonpolyposis CRC and 88 with polyposis, by using pooled DNA amplification and massively parallel sequencing. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Results: Seven novel or rare genetic variants were identified. In addition to the POLE p.L424V recurrent mutation in a patient with polyposis, CRC and oligodendroglioma, six novel or rare POLD1 variants (four of them, p.D316H, p.D316G, p.R409W, and p.L474P, with strong evidence for pathogenicity) were identified in nonpolyposis CRC families. Phenotypic data from these and previously reported POLE/POLD1 carriers point to an associated phenotype characterized by attenuated or oligo-adenomatous colorectal polyposis, CRC, and probably brain tumors. In addition, POLD1 mutations predispose to endometrial and breast tumors. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. Conclusion: Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of the POLE/POLD1-associated syndrome and identify novel pathogenic variants. We propose guidelines for genetic testing and surveillance recommendations. Genet Med 18 4, 325–332. PMID:26133394

  19. Genetic analysis and SOD1 mutation screening in Iranian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afagh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Rohani, Mohammad; Zamani, Babak; Sedighi, Behnaz; Shamshiri, Hosein; Fan, Jian-Bing; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2013-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease, and the most common in European populations. Results of genetic analysis and mutation screening of SOD1 in a cohort of 60 Iranian ALS patients are here reported. Initially, linkage analysis in 4 families identified a disease-linked locus that included the known ALS gene, SOD1. Screening of SOD1 identified homozygous p.Asp90Ala causing mutations in all the linked families. Haplotype analysis suggests that the p.Asp90Ala alleles in the Iranian patients might share a common founder with the renowned Scandinavian recessive p.Asp90Ala allele. Subsequent screening in all the patients resulted in identification of 3 other mutations in SOD1, including p.Leu84Phe in the homozygous state. Phenotypic features of the mutation-bearing patients are presented. SOD1 mutations were found in 11.7% of the cohort, 38.5% of the familial ALS probands, and 4.25% of the sporadic ALS cases. SOD1 mutations contribute significantly to ALS among Iranians. PMID:23062701

  20. The distinct genetic pattern of ALS in Turkey and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Özoğuz, Aslıhan; Uyan, Özgün; Birdal, Güneş; Iskender, Ceren; Kartal, Ece; Lahut, Suna; Ömür, Özgür; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Eken, Aslı Gündoğdu; Sen, Nesli Ece; Kavak, Pınar; Saygı, Ceren; Sapp, Peter C; Keagle, Pamela; Parman, Yeşim; Tan, Ersin; Koç, Filiz; Deymeer, Feza; Oflazer, Piraye; Hanağası, Haşmet; Gürvit, Hakan; Bilgiç, Başar; Durmuş, Hacer; Ertaş, Mustafa; Kotan, Dilcan; Akalın, Mehmet Ali; Güllüoğlu, Halil; Zarifoğlu, Mehmet; Aysal, Fikret; Döşoğlu, Nilgün; Bilguvar, Kaya; Günel, Murat; Keskin, Özlem; Akgün, Tahsin; Özçelik, Hilmi; Landers, John E; Brown, Robert H; Başak, A Nazlı

    2015-04-01

    The frequency of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mutations has been extensively investigated in several populations; however, a systematic analysis in Turkish cases has not been reported so far. In this study, we screened 477 ALS patients for mutations, including 116 familial ALS patients from 82 families and 361 sporadic ALS (sALS) cases. Patients were genotyped for C9orf72 (18.3%), SOD1 (12.2%), FUS (5%), TARDBP (3.7%), and UBQLN2 (2.4%) gene mutations, which together account for approximately 40% of familial ALS in Turkey. No SOD1 mutations were detected in sALS patients; however, C9orf72 (3.1%) and UBQLN2 (0.6%) explained 3.7% of sALS in the population. Exome sequencing revealed mutations in OPTN, SPG11, DJ1, PLEKHG5, SYNE1, TRPM7, and SQSTM1 genes, many of them novel. The spectrum of mutations reflect both the distinct genetic background and the heterogeneous nature of the Turkish ALS population. PMID:25681989

  1. Prevalence of gene expression additivity in genetically stable wheat allohexaploids.

    PubMed

    Chelaifa, Houda; Chagué, Véronique; Chalabi, Smahane; Mestiri, Imen; Arnaud, Dominique; Deffains, Denise; Lu, Yunhai; Belcram, Harry; Huteau, Virginie; Chiquet, Julien; Coriton, Olivier; Just, Jérémy; Jahier, Joseph; Chalhoub, Boulos

    2013-02-01

    The reprogramming of gene expression appears as the major trend in synthetic and natural allopolyploids where expression of an important proportion of genes was shown to deviate from that of the parents or the average of the parents. In this study, we analyzed gene expression changes in previously reported, highly stable synthetic wheat allohexaploids that combine the D genome of Aegilops tauschii and the AB genome extracted from the natural hexaploid wheat Triticum aestivum. A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of transcriptional changes using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array was conducted. Prevalence of gene expression additivity was observed where expression does not deviate from the average of the parents for 99.3% of 34,820 expressed transcripts. Moreover, nearly similar expression was observed (for 99.5% of genes) when comparing these synthetic and natural wheat allohexaploids. Such near-complete additivity has never been reported for other allopolyploids and, more interestingly, for other synthetic wheat allohexaploids that differ from the ones studied here by having the natural tetraploid Triticum turgidum as the AB genome progenitor. Our study gave insights into the dynamics of additive gene expression in the highly stable wheat allohexaploids. PMID:23278496

  2. Mutation analysis of TMC1 identifies four new mutations and suggests an additional deafness gene at locus DFNA36-DFNB7/11

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Nele; Alasti, Fatemeh; Dieltjens, Nele; Pawlik, Barbara; Wollnik, Bernd; Uyguner, Oya; Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Weil, Dominique; Petit, Christine; Danis, Evi; Yang, Tao; Pandelia, Efthimia; Petersen, Michael B.; Goossens, Dirk; Favero, Jurgen Del; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Smith, Richard JH; Van Camp, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most frequent sensorineural disorder, affecting 1 in 1000 newborns. In more than half of these babies, the hearing loss is inherited. Hereditary hearing loss is a very heterogeneous trait, with about 100 gene localizations and 44 gene identifications for nonsyndromic hearing loss. TMC1 has been identified as the disease-causing gene for autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss at the DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 loci, respectively. To date, two dominant and 18 recessive TMC1 mutations have been reported as the cause of hearing loss in 34 families. In this report, we describe linkage to DFNA36 and DFNB7/11 in one family with dominant and 10 families with recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. In addition, mutation analysis of TMC1 was performed in 51 familial Turkish patients with autosomal recessive hearing loss. TMC1 mutations were identified in seven of the families segregating recessive hearing loss. The pathogenic variants we found included two known mutations, c.100C>T and c.1165C>T, and four new mutations, c.2350C>T, c.776+1G>A, c.767_768del and c.1166G>A. The absence of TMC1 mutations in the remaining six linked families implies the presence of mutations outside the coding region of this gene, or alternatively, at least one additional deafness-causing gene in this region. The analysis of copy number variations in TMC1 as well as DNA sequencing of 15 additional candidate genes did not reveal any proven pathogenic changes, leaving both hypotheses open. PMID:18616530

  3. Exome sequencing of lymphomas from three dog breeds reveals somatic mutation patterns reflecting genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Elvers, Ingegerd; Turner-Maier, Jason; Swofford, Ross; Koltookian, Michele; Johnson, Jeremy; Stewart, Chip; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Rosenberg, Mara; Thomas, Rachael; Mauceli, Evan; Getz, Gad; Palma, Federica Di; Modiano, Jaime F.; Breen, Matthew; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Alföldi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy in developed countries. Outcome is strongly determined by molecular subtype, reflecting a need for new and improved treatment options. Dogs spontaneously develop lymphoma, and the predisposition of certain breeds indicates genetic risk factors. Using the dog breed structure, we selected three lymphoma predisposed breeds developing primarily T-cell (boxer), primarily B-cell (cocker spaniel), and with equal distribution of B- and T-cell lymphoma (golden retriever), respectively. We investigated the somatic mutations in B- and T-cell lymphomas from these breeds by exome sequencing of tumor and normal pairs. Strong similarities were evident between B-cell lymphomas from golden retrievers and cocker spaniels, with recurrent mutations in TRAF3-MAP3K14 (28% of all cases), FBXW7 (25%), and POT1 (17%). The FBXW7 mutations recurrently occur in a specific codon; the corresponding codon is recurrently mutated in human cancer. In contrast, T-cell lymphomas from the predisposed breeds, boxers and golden retrievers, show little overlap in their mutation pattern, sharing only one of their 15 most recurrently mutated genes. Boxers, which develop aggressive T-cell lymphomas, are typically mutated in the PTEN-mTOR pathway. T-cell lymphomas in golden retrievers are often less aggressive, and their tumors typically showed mutations in genes involved in cellular metabolism. We identify genes with known involvement in human lymphoma and leukemia, genes implicated in other human cancers, as well as novel genes that could allow new therapeutic options. PMID:26377837

  4. Mutations in Soviet public health science: post-Lysenko medical genetics, 1969-1991.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    This paper traces the integration of human genetics with Soviet public health science after the Lysenko era. For nearly three decades, USSR biology pursued its own version of anti-bourgeois, Soviet 'creative Darwinism', departing from western, post-WWII scientific developments. After Lysenko was suspended, research niches of immunology, biophysics and mutation research formed the basis of new departments at the Institute of Medical Genetics, which was founded in 1969 as part of the Soviet Academy of Medical Sciences. Focussing on early research activities and collaborations at the institute, I show how the concept of mutagenesis, a pivotal issue during the Cold War, became mobilized from Drosophila genetics to human heredity and to society as a whole. This mode of scaling up and down through population studies shaped not only Soviet human biology and genetics; it also brought about changes in clinical practice and public health as well as in the monitoring and regulation of mutagenic agents in the environment. PMID:24947269

  5. Limited family structure and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype as predictors of BRCA mutations in a genetic counseling cohort of early-onset sporadic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Manzano, Arancha; Blanco, Ignacio; Vega, Ana; Custodio, Ana; Teulé, Alex; Fachal, Laura; Martínez, Beatriz; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Cruz-Hernández, Juan Jesús; Chirivella, Isabel; Garcés, Vicente; Garre, Pilar; Romero, Atocha; Caldés, Trinidad; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; de la Hoya, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset diagnosis is an eligibility criterion for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) testing in sporadic breast cancer patients. Limited family structure has been proposed as a predictor of BRCA mutation status in this group of patients. An overwhelming amount of data supports a strong association between BRCA1 mutations and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, we analyze the feasibility of using limited family structure and TNBC as predictors of BRCA mutation status in early-onset breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. We have conducted the study in a cohort of sporadic early-onset (≤35 years) breast cancer patients (N = 341) previously selected for BRCA genetic testing in Academic Hereditary Cancer Clinics from Spain. A retrospective review of medical records available at the time of risk assessment allowed us classifying patients according to family structure and TNBC. In addition, BRCAPRO score was calculated for all patients. Association between categorical variables was investigated using the Fisher's exact test. Binary Logistic Regression Analysis was used for multivariate analysis. Limited family structure (OR 3.61, p = 0.013) and TNBC (OR 3.14, p = 0.013) were independent predictors of BRCA mutation status. Mutation prevalence in the subgroup of patients with at least one positive predictor was 14%, whereas it dropped to 3% in non-TNBCs with adequate family history (OR 5.31, 95% CI 1.38-23.89, p = 0.006). BRCAPRO correctly discerned between limited and adequate family structures. Limited family structure and TNBC are feasible predictors of BRCA mutation status in sporadic early-onset (≤35 years) breast cancer patients attending genetic counseling units. The low prevalence of mutations observed in non-TNBCs with adequate family structure suggests that this subgroup of patients might be excluded from genetic testing. PMID:25342642

  6. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Clinical Course, Genetic Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients. PMID:25337067

  7. Genetic mapping of hph2, a mutation affecting amino acid transport in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Symula, D J; Shedlovsky, A; Dove, W F

    1997-02-01

    We describe the genetic mapping of hyperphenylal-aninemia 2 (hph2), a recessive mutation in the mouse that causes deficient amino acid transport similar to Hartnup disorder, a human genetic amino acid transport disorder. The hph2 locus was mapped in three separate crosses to identify candidate genes for hph2 and a region of homology in the human genome where we propose the Hartnup Disorder gene might lie. The mutation maps to mouse Chromosome (Chr) 7 distal of the simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) marker D7Mit140 and does not recombine with D7Nds4, an SSLP marker in the fibroblast growth factor 3 (Fgf3) gene. Unexpectedly, the mutant chromosome affects recombination frequency in the D7Mit12 to D7Nds4 interval. PMID:9060407

  8. Blue genes: An integrative laboratory to differentiate genetic transformation from gene mutation for underclassmen.

    PubMed

    Militello, Kevin T; Chang, Ming-Mei; Simon, Robert D; Lazatin, Justine C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of students to understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype, and the mechanisms by which genotypes and phenotypes can change is essential for students studying genetics. To this end, we have developed a four-week laboratory called Blue Genes, which is designed to help novice students discriminate between two mechanisms by which the genetic material can be altered: genetic transformation and gene mutation. In the first week of the laboratory, students incubate a plasmid DNA with calcium chloride-treated Escherichia coli JM109 cells and observe a phenotype change from ampicillin sensitive to ampicillin resistant and from white color to blue color on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal) and isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Over the course of the next three weeks, students use a battery of approaches including plasmid DNA isolation experiments, restriction maps, and PCR to differentiate between mutation and transformation. The students ultimately come to the conclusion that the changes in phenotypes are due to genetic transformation and not mutation based on the evidence generated over the four-week period. Pre-laboratory tests and post-laboratory tests indicate that this set of exercises is successful in helping students differentiate between transformation and mutation. The laboratory is designed for underclassmen and is a good prerequisite for an apprentice-based research opportunity, although it is not designed as a class based research experience. Potential modifications and future directions of the laboratory based upon student experiences and assessment are presented. PMID:26525488

  9. [Retrotransposon MDG4 and its role in genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Liubomirskaia, N V; Kim, A I; Il'in, Iu V

    2003-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a ten-year study of genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster caused by transposition of the gypsy retrotransposon. The results of other authors working with an analogous system are analyzed. Possible mechanisms are suggested for the interaction of gypsy with the cell gene flamenco that participates in transposition control of this mobile element. PMID:12669411

  10. Mutation screening of three Chinese families with genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Li, Jingyun; Wang, Mengyang; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Yuping; Wu, Liwen

    2011-08-15

    Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a familial autosomal dominant condition characterized by genetic heterogeneity. Five genes for GEFS+ identified in large families account for only a small proportion of families. Mutation in the majority of families with GEFS+ has not identified yet. The aim of our study is to search for the gene responsible for GEFS+ in three Chinese families by linkage analyses and a sequencing approach and to investigate the importance of coding and noncoding regions variations of four known GEFS+ genes (SCN1A, SCN1B, GABRG2 and SCN2A) in Chinese families. Results showed that a 6-cM candidate interval at 5q33-34 with a maximum LOD scores of 2.043 was identified in families B. Sequencing candidate gene GABRG2 and GABRA1 in this region did not identify a causative mutation. Moreover, no mutation was found in coding and noncoding regions of the four genes in three Chinese families. Besides excluding coding regions of four known GEFS+ genes, we also excluded the possibility of a mutation in the promoter, exon-intron boundaries, 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs), and 3' UTRs of four known GEFS+ genes in three Chinese families. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the heterogeneity of the etiologies of GEFS+. There are as yet undiscovered mechanisms underlying GEFS+. PMID:21704126

  11. De novo Mutations in Schizophrenia Implicate Chromatin Remodeling and Support a Genetic Overlap with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Shane E.; Gillis, Jesse; Kramer, Melissa; Lihm, Jayon; Yoon, Seungtai; Berstein, Yael; Mistry, Meeta; Pavlidis, Paul; Solomon, Rebecca; Ghiban, Elena; Antoniou, Eric; Kelleher, Eric; O’Brien, Carol; Donohoe, Gary; Gill, Michael; Morris, Derek W.; McCombie, W. Richard.; Corvin, Aiden

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric disorder with a broadly undiscovered genetic etiology. Recent studies of de novo mutations (DNM) in schizophrenia and autism have reinforced the hypothesis that rare genetic variation contributes to risk. We carried out exome sequencing on 57 trios with sporadic or familial schizophrenia. In sporadic trios, we observed a ~3.5-fold increase in the proportion of nonsense de novo mutations (DNMs) (0.101 vs. 0.031, empirical P=0.01, BH-corrected P=0.044). These mutations were significantly more likely to occur in genes with highly ranked probabilities of haploinsufficiency (P=0.0029, corrected P=0.006). DNMs of potential functional consequence were also found to occur in genes predicted to be less tolerant to rare variation (P=2.01×10−5, corrected P =2.1×10−3). Genes with DNMs overlapped with genes implicated in autism (e.g. AUTS2, CDH8, MECP2) and intellectual disability (ID) (e.g. HUWE1 and TRAPPC9), supporting a shared genetic etiology between these disorders. Functionally CHD8, MECP2 and HUWE1 converge on epigenetic regulation of transcription suggesting that this may be an important risk mechanism. Our results were consistent in an analysis of additional exome based sequencing studies of other neurodevelopmental disorders. These findings suggest that perturbations in genes which function in the epigenetic regulation of brain development and cognition could have a central role in the susceptibility to, pathogenesis, and treatment of mental disorders. PMID:24776741

  12. Genetic evidence for the spread of a benzimidazole resistance mutation across southern India from a single origin in the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Umer; Redman, Elizabeth M; Raman, Muthusamy; Gilleard, John S

    2015-09-01

    It is important to understand how anthelmintic drug resistance mutations arise and spread in order to determine appropriate mitigation strategies. We hypothesised that a molecular genetic study of Haemonchus contortus in southern India, a region where resistance may be less advanced than in western Europe and North America, might provide some important insights into the origin and spread of anthelmintic resistance. The F200Y (TAC) isotype-1 β-tubulin benzimidazole resistance mutation is common in H. contortus throughout the world and the F167Y (TAC) and E198A (GCA) mutations, although less common, have been reported in a number of different countries. We have investigated the haplotypic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of isotype-1 β-tubulin benzimidazole resistance alleles for 23 H. contortus populations from small ruminants across southern India. The F200Y (TAC) mutation was most common, being detected in 18/23 populations at frequencies between 9% and 84% and the E198A (GCA) mutation was also detected in 8/23 populations at frequencies between 8% and 18%. The F167Y (TAC) mutation was not detected in any of the 23 populations. Phylogenetic haplotype network analysis suggested that the F200Y (TAC) mutation has arisen multiple independent times in the region with at least three independent origins of resistance alleles across the populations surveyed. In contrast, the E198A (GCA) mutation was present on a single haplotype which, given the high level of haplotypic diversity of the susceptible alleles in the region, suggests this particular mutation has spread from a single origin, likely by anthropogenic animal movement. Population genetic analysis of 12 of the H. contortus populations, using a panel of eight microsatellite markers, revealed extremely low genetic differentiation between populations, consistent with the hypothesis of high gene flow among sites. Additionally, there was no significant genetic differentiation between H. contortus taken from

  13. "My funky genetics": BRCA1/2 mutation carriers' understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new reprogenetic technologies.

    PubMed

    Werner-Lin, Allison; Rubin, Lisa R; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2012-06-01

    Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid the birth of a BRCA-mutation-positive child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child's inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. Thirty-nine female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and posttest assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically related children, yet stated their genetically "well" partner's lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically "well" partners' participation in family planning and risk management decisions. Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to the ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision-making. PMID:22709328

  14. ‘My funky genetics’: BRCA1/2 mutation carriers’ understanding of genetic inheritance and reproductive merger in the context of new repro-genetic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Doyle, Maya; Stern, Rikki; Savin, Katie; Hurley, Karen; Sagi, Michal

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Deleterious mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes elevate lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Each child of a mutation-positive parent has a 50% chance of inheriting it. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) permits prospective parents to avoid transmitting a BRCA1/2 mutation to a child, introducing predictability into a process historically defined by chance. This investigation explored how BRCA1/2 mutation carriers understand genetic inheritance and consider a child’s inheritance of a BRCA1/2 mutation, given the opportunities that exist to pursue PGD. METHOD 39 female and male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers of reproductive age were recruited from urban cancer and reproductive medical centers. Participants completed a standardized educational presentation on PGD and prenatal diagnosis, with pre- and post-test assessments. An interdisciplinary team of qualitative researchers analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. FINDINGS Participants expressed the belief that reproduction yields children with unique genetic strengths and challenges, including the BRCA1/2 mutation, family traits for which predictive tests do not exist, and hypothetical genetic risks. Participants expressed preference for biologically-related children, yet stated their genetically ‘well’ partner’s lineage would be marred through reproductive merger, requiring the well partner to assume the burden of the BRCA1/2 mutation via their children. Participants expressed diverse views of genetically ‘well’ partners’ participation in family planning and risk management decisions. DISCUSSION Pressure to use reprogenetic technology may grow as genetic susceptibility testing becomes more widely available. Work with individuals and couples across the disease spectrum must be attuned to they ways beliefs about genetic inheritance play into reproductive decision making. PMID:22709328

  15. Comprehensive Genetic Screening of KCNQ4 in a Large Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss Cohort: Genotype-Phenotype Correlations and a Founder Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Takehiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Iwasa, Yoh-ichiro; Yano, Takuya; Kumakawa, Kozo; Abe, Satoko; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Kojima, Hiromi; Namba, Atsushi; Oshikawa, Chie; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    The present study of KCNQ4 mutations was carried out to 1) determine the prevalence by unbiased population-based genetic screening, 2) clarify the mutation spectrum and genotype/phenotype correlations, and 3) summarize clinical characteristics. In addition, a review of the reported mutations was performed for better understanding of this deafness gene. The screening using 287 probands from unbiased Japanese autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) families identified 19 families with 7 different disease causing mutations, indicating that the frequency is 6.62% (19/287). While the majority were private mutations, one particular recurrent mutation, c.211delC, was observed in 13 unrelated families. Haplotype analysis in the vicinity of c.211delC suggests existence of a common ancestor. The majority of the patients showed all frequency, but high-frequency predominant, sensorineural hearing loss. The present study adds a new typical audiogram configuration characterized by mid-frequency predominant hearing loss caused by the p.V230E mutation. A variant at the N-terminal site (c. 211delC) showed typical ski-slope type audiogram configuration. Concerning clinical features, onset age was from 3 to 40 years old, and mostly in the teens, and hearing loss was gradually progressive. Progressive nature is a common feature of patients with KCNQ4 mutations regardless of the mutation type. In conclusion, KCNQ4 mutations are frequent among ADNSHL patients, and therefore screening of the gene and molecular confirmation of these mutations have become important in the diagnosis of these conditions. PMID:23717403

  16. Frequencies and geographic distributions of genetic mutations in transthyretin- and non-transthyretin-related familial amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Zhen, D B; Swiecicki, P L; Zeldenrust, S R; Dispenzieri, A; Mauermann, M L; Gertz, M A

    2015-10-01

    Inherited forms of amyloidosis are rare; of these, transthyretin-related (ATTR) is the most common, but non-ATTR has been described as well. We studied a large case series of ATTR and a small series of non-ATTR to better determine the mutation frequencies and geographic distributions of these inherited forms of amyloidosis in the United States. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 284 ATTR and non-ATTR patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 1 January 1970 through 29 January 2013. Mutations were identified by DNA sequencing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, or mass spectroscopy. The genetic testing method was unknown for several patients, but a small proportion were identified by family history or by classical clinical presentation associated with a specific mutation. The most common ATTR mutations were Thr60Ala (24%), Val30Met (15%), Val122Ile (10%), and Ser77Tyr (5%). Non-ATTR mutations included gelsolin (n = 3), apolipoprotein A-I (n = 6), apolipoprotein A-II (n = 1), fibrinogen A-α (n = 9), and lysozyme (n = 1). Although rare, ATTR and, to a lesser extent, non-ATTR are prevalent in the United States and should be considered for patients presenting in the appropriate clinical context. PMID:25211232

  17. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality. PMID:27450674

  18. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Louis, Ard A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps—a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure—to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  19. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  20. The Quality of Genetic Counseling and Connected Factors as Evaluated by Male BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kajula, Outi; Kääriäinen, Maria; Moilanen, Jukka S; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2016-06-01

    There is little written about the quality of genetic counseling for men with the BRCA1/2 mutation. The purpose of this study was to describe the quality of genetic counseling and connected factors according to Finnish male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers' (n = 35) perspectives and reasons for seeking genetic counseling. Data were collected from the Departments of Clinical Genetics at five Finnish university hospitals. The exploratory study design was conducted using a 51-item questionnaire based on a previously devised quality of counseling model and analyzed using non-parametric tests and principle content analysis. The satisfaction level with genetic counseling was high, especially with regard to the content of genetic counseling. The benefit of genetic counseling on the quality of life differed significantly (p < 0.001-0.009) from other factors. In particular, genetic counseling was in some cases associated to reduce the quality of life. Only 49 % of the male carriers felt they received sufficient counseling on social support. Attention to individual psychosocial support was proposed as an improvement to genetic counseling. Primary and secondary reasons for seeking genetic counseling and background information, such as education, affected the perceived quality of genetic counseling. The results of the study could be used to tailor genetic counseling for male BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:26416184

  1. Mutation-Based Learning to Improve Student Autonomy and Scientific Inquiry Skills in a Large Genetics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jinlu

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory education can play a vital role in developing a learner's autonomy and scientific inquiry skills. In an innovative, mutation-based learning (MBL) approach, students were instructed to redesign a teacher-designed standard experimental protocol by a "mutation" method in a molecular genetics laboratory course. Students could…

  2. The Evolution of Human Intelligence and the Coefficient of Additive Genetic Variance in Human Brain Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geoffrey F.; Penke, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Most theories of human mental evolution assume that selection favored higher intelligence and larger brains, which should have reduced genetic variance in both. However, adult human intelligence remains highly heritable, and is genetically correlated with brain size. This conflict might be resolved by estimating the coefficient of additive genetic…

  3. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  4. Mutational analysis of the human mitochondrial genome branches into the realm of bacterial genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, N.

    1996-10-01

    This is shaping up as a vintage year for studies of the genetics and evolution of the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). In a theoretical and experimental tour de force, Shenkar et al. (1996), on pages 772-780 of this issue, derive the mutation rate of the 4,977-bp (or {open_quotes}common{close_quotes}) deletion in the human mtDNA through refinement and extension of fluctuation analysis, a technique that was first used >50 years ago. Shenkar et al., in essence, have solved or bypassed many of the difficulties that are inherent in the application of fluctuation analysis to human mitochondrial gene mutations. Their study is important for two principal reasons. In the first place, high levels of this deletion cause a variety of pathological disorders, including Kearns-Sayre syndrome and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Their current report, therefore, is a major step in the elucidation of the molecular genetic pathogenesis of this group of mitochondrial disorders. For example, it now may be feasible to analyze the effects of selection on transmission and segregation of this deletion and, perhaps, other mtDNA mutations as well. Second, and at a broader level, the approach of Shenkar et al. should find widespread applicability to the study of other mtDNA mutations. It has been recognized for several years that mammalian mtDNA mutates much more rapidly than nuclear DNA, a phenomenon with potentially profound evolutionary implications. It is exciting and useful, both experimentally and theoretically, that this {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} approach can be used for {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} applications. 56 refs.

  5. Benefit of transferred mutations is better predicted by the fitness of recipients than by their ecological or genetic relatedness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinhua; Diaz Arenas, Carolina; Stoebel, Daniel M; Flynn, Kenneth; Knapp, Ethan; Dillon, Marcus M; Wünsche, Andrea; Hatcher, Philip J; Moore, Francisco B-G; Cooper, Vaughn S; Cooper, Tim F

    2016-05-01

    The effect of a mutation depends on its interaction with the genetic background in which it is assessed. Studies in experimental systems have demonstrated that such interactions are common among beneficial mutations and often follow a pattern consistent with declining evolvability of more fit genotypes. However, these studies generally examine the consequences of interactions between a small number of focal mutations. It is not clear, therefore, that findings can be extrapolated to natural populations, where new mutations may be transferred between genetically divergent backgrounds. We build on work that examined interactions between four beneficial mutations selected in a laboratory-evolved population of Escherichia coli to test how they interact with the genomes of diverse natural isolates of the same species. We find that the fitness effect of transferred mutations depends weakly on the genetic and ecological similarity of recipient strains relative to the donor strain in which the mutations were selected. By contrast, mutation effects were strongly inversely correlated to the initial fitness of the recipient strain. That is, there was a pattern of diminishing returns whereby fit strains benefited proportionally less from an added mutation. Our results strengthen the view that the fitness of a strain can be a major determinant of its ability to adapt. They also support a role for barriers of transmission, rather than differential selection of transferred DNA, as an explanation of observed phylogenetically determined patterns of restricted recombination among E. coli strains. PMID:27091964

  6. Mutation Is a Sufficient and Robust Predictor of Genetic Variation for Mitotic Spindle Traits in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Farhadifar, Reza; Ponciano, José Miguel; Andersen, Erik C; Needleman, Daniel J; Baer, Charles F

    2016-08-01

    Different types of phenotypic traits consistently exhibit different levels of genetic variation in natural populations. There are two potential explanations: Either mutation produces genetic variation at different rates or natural selection removes or promotes genetic variation at different rates. Whether mutation or selection is of greater general importance is a longstanding unresolved question in evolutionary genetics. We report mutational variances (VM) for 19 traits related to the first mitotic cell division in Caenorhabditis elegans and compare them to the standing genetic variances (VG) for the same suite of traits in a worldwide collection C. elegans Two robust conclusions emerge. First, the mutational process is highly repeatable: The correlation between VM in two independent sets of mutation accumulation lines is ∼0.9. Second, VM for a trait is a good predictor of VG for that trait: The correlation between VM and VG is ∼0.9. This result is predicted for a population at mutation-selection balance; it is not predicted if balancing selection plays a primary role in maintaining genetic variation. PMID:27334268

  7. The 5q deletion size in myeloid malignancies is correlated to additional chromosomal aberrations and to TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Anna; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the long arm of chromosome 5 (del(5q)) are recurrent abnormalities in myeloid malignancies. We analyzed del(5q) and accompanying molecular mutations in MDS, MPN and MDS/MPN cases. A high del(5q) frequency was revealed in MDS (1869/11398 cases; 16%), followed by MDS/MPN (37/1107; 3%) and MPN (97/6373; 2%). To investigate potential associations of the del(5q) size with the respective phenotypes, we applied array CGH analyses in selected cohorts of 61 MDS, 22 MDS/MPN and 23 MPN cases. The size varied between 16 and 119 Mb with no differences between the entities. However, MPN and MDS/MPN cases with del(5q) sole showed a significantly smaller del(5q) than cases with additional aberrations. Sequence analysis of 27 genes revealed ≥1 mutation in 91% of patients. The highest mutation frequencies in the total cohort were observed for TP53 (31%), JAK2 (23%) and DNMT3A (18%). The molecular mutation patterns in the del(5q) cohorts were different between the entities but resembled known patterns of cohorts not selected for del(5q). Further, TP53 mutations were significantly more frequent in cases with a larger deletion size (P = 0.003). The results suggest a correlation of large del(5q) with TP53 mutations and with additional chromosomal aberrations possibly contributing to more severe courses of these cases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218649

  8. A novel CFTR disease-associated mutation causes addition of an extra N-linked oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Hämmerle, M M; Aleksandrov, A A; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R

    2000-11-01

    We have examined the influence of a novel missense mutation in the fourth extracytoplasmic loop (EL4) of CFTR detected in a patient with cystic fibrosis. This substitution (T908N) creates a consensus sequence (N X S/T) for addition of an N-linked oligosaccharide chain near the C-terminal end of EL4. Oligosaccharyl transferase generally does not have access to this consensus sequence if it is closer than about twelve amino acids from the membrane. However, the T908N site is used, even though it is within four residues of the predicted membrane interface and the oligosaccharide chain added binds calnexin, a resident chaperone of the ER membrane. The chloride channel activity of this variant CFTR is abnormal as evidenced by a reduced rate of (36)Cl(-) efflux and a noisy single channel open state. This may reflect some displacement of the membrane spanning sequence C-terminal of EL4 since it contains residues influencing the ion pore. PMID:11443282

  9. A study of deafness-related genetic mutations as a basis for strategies to prevent hereditary hearing loss in Hebei, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junzhen; Cao, Qinying; Zhang, Ning; Ge, Jun; Sun, Donglan; Feng, Qingqi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder, and at least 50% of cases are due to a genetic etiology. Two-thirds of individuals with congenital deafness are nonsyndromic. Among the nonsyndromic forms, the large majority are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. The current work summarizes mutations in the GJB2, SLC26A4, 12SrRNA, and GJB3 and their prevalence in 318 students with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss at schools for the deaf or special needs schools in 9 cities in Hebei Province, China. Deafness gene mutations were identified in 137 students via a gene chip, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, fluorescence quantitative PCR, and gene sequencing. Mutations were detected at a rate of 43.08%. A homozygous mutation of the GJB2 gene was found in 16 students (5.03%), a heterozygous mutation of that gene was found in 38 (11.95%), a homozygous mutation of the SLC26A4 gene was found in 22 (6.92%), a heterozygous mutation of that gene was found in 59 (18.55%), and a heterozygous mutation of the mitochondrial 12SrRNA gene was found in 2 (0.63%). In addition, there were 15 families in which a student's parents had normal hearing. Compound heterozygous mutations of the GJB2 gene were found in 3 families (20%) and mutations of the SLC26A4 gene were found in 9 (60%). Thus, this study has provided a molecular diagnostic basis for the causes of deafness, and this study has also provided a scientific basis for the early prevention of and intervention in deafness. PMID:26361564

  10. Application of a New Genetic Deafness Microarray for Detecting Mutations in the Deaf in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Feng, Yong; Jiang, Lu; Pan, Qian; Liu, Yalan; Liu, Chang; He, Chufeng; Chen, Hongsheng; Liu, Xueming; Hu, Chang; Hu, Yiqiao; Mei, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the GoldenGate microarray as a diagnostic tool and to elucidate the contribution of the genes on this array to the development of both nonsyndromic and syndromic sensorineural hearing loss in China. Methods We developed a microarray to detect 240 mutations underlying syndromic and nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. The microarray was then used for analysis of 382 patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (including 15 patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome), 21 patients with Waardenburg syndrome, and 60 unrelated controls. Subsequently, we analyzed the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of this new approach after Sanger sequencing-based verification, and also determined the contribution of the genes on this array to the development of distinct hearing disorders. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the microarray chip were 98.73% and 98.34%, respectively. Genetic defects were identified in 61.26% of the patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss, and 9 causative genes were identified. The molecular etiology was confirmed in 19.05% and 46.67% of the patients with Waardenburg syndrome and enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome, respectively. Conclusion Our new mutation-based microarray comprises an accurate and comprehensive genetic tool for the detection of sensorineural hearing loss. This microarray-based detection method could serve as a first-pass screening (before next-generation-sequencing screening) for deafness-causing mutations in China. PMID:27018795

  11. Genetic studies to characterize the origin of the mutation in placental aromatase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, N; Ogawa, H; Shozu, M; Yamada, K

    1992-01-01

    Placental aromatase deficiency has recently been shown to be due to expression of RNA transcripts encoding abnormal aromatase molecules with 29 extra amino acids. To establish whether this aromatase deficiency is a hereditary or sporadic disease, we examined the genetic defect of the aromatase gene in the family of a patient. Direct sequencing of fragments of the aromatase gene prepared by PCR revealed that the splicing donor sequence (GT) of intron 6 in controls was mutated to GC in the patient, whereas the parents showed signals of both GT and GC. Subcloning of PCR products of the parents gave two different types of clones with GT and GC sequences in this site. Furthermore, for diagnosis of this deficiency, competitive-oligo-nucleotide-priming PCR of genomic DNA was performed in the presence of both normal and mutational oligonucleotide primers labeled with two kinds of fluorescent dyes, and the products were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and were detected fluorometrically in the gel. Genomic DNA of the patient gave a PCR product primed only by the mutational primer, whereas that of controls gave a product primed only by the normal primer. The PCR products of the parents were primed by both primers. The results obtained by this fluorometric method were also confirmed by differential hybridizations with specific oligonucleotide probes. Thus these findings indicate that this deficiency is an autosomal hereditary disease and that the patient is a homozygote, while the parents are heterozygotes, for this mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1496995

  12. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Micol; Rosignoli, Monica; Castiglione, Alessandro; Minazzi, Federica; Trevisi, Patrizia; Aimoni, Claudia; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Martini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. Methods. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations) on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Results. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years). Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males) presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children) ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0). Conclusions. Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities, even if central

  13. BRCA Genetic Screening in Middle Eastern and North African: Mutational Spectrum and Founder BRCA1 Mutation (c.798_799delTT) in North African

    PubMed Central

    Laraqui, Abdelilah; Uhrhammer, Nancy; EL Rhaffouli, Hicham; Sekhsokh, Yassine; Lahlou-Amine, Idriss; Bajjou, Tahar; Hilali, Farida; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Al Bouzidi, Abderrahmane; Bakri, Youssef; Amzazi, Said; Bignon, Yves-Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to both hereditary and sporadic breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) has not yet been thoroughly investigated in MENA. Methods. To establish the knowledge about BRCA1 mutations and their correlation with the clinical aspect in diagnosed cases of HBOC in MENA populations. A systematic review of studies examining BRCA1 in BC women in Cyprus, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia was conducted. Results. Thirteen relevant references were identified, including ten studies which performed DNA sequencing of all BRCA1 exons. For the latter, 31 mutations were detected in 57 of the 547 patients ascertained. Familial history of BC was present in 388 (71%) patients, of whom 50 were mutation carriers. c.798_799delTT was identified in 11 North African families, accounting for 22% of total identified BRCA1 mutations, suggesting a founder allele. A broad spectrum of other mutations including c.68_69delAG, c.181T>G, c.5095C>T, and c.5266dupC, as well as sequence of unclassified variants and polymorphisms, was also detected. Conclusion. The knowledge of genetic structure of BRCA1 in MENA should contribute to the assessment of the necessity of preventive programs for mutation carriers and clinical management. The high prevalence of BC and the presence of frequent mutations of the BRCA1 gene emphasize the need for improving screening programs and individual testing/counseling. PMID:25814778

  14. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: genetics, mutations and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying-Cai; Blumenfeld, Jon; Rennert, Hanna

    2011-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common, monogenic multi-systemic disorder characterized by the development of renal cysts and various extrarenal manifestations. Worldwide, it is a common cause of end-stage renal disease. ADPKD is caused by mutation in either one of two principal genes, PKD1 and PKD2, but has large phenotypic variability among affected individuals, attributable to PKD genic and allelic variability and, possibly, modifier gene effects. Recent studies have generated considerable information regarding the genetic basis and molecular diagnosis of this disease, its pathogenesis, and potential strategies for targeted treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, including mechanisms responsible for disease development, the role of gene variations and mutations in disease presentation, and the putative role of microRNAs in ADPKD etiology. The emerging and important role of genetic testing and the advent of novel molecular diagnostic applications also are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Polycystic Kidney Disease. PMID:21392578

  15. The Impact on Genetic Testing of Mutational Patterns of CFTR Gene in Different Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina M; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Testino, Giancarlo; Truglio, Gessica; Strom, Roberto; Quattrucci, Serena

    2016-07-01

    More than 2000 sequence variations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene are known. The marked genetic heterogeneity, poor functional characterization of the vast majority of sequence variations, and an uncertain genotype-phenotype relationship complicate the definition of mutational search strategies. We studied the effect of the marked genetic heterogeneity detected in a case series comprising 610 patients of cystic fibrosis (CF), grouped in different clinical macrocategories, on the operative characteristics of the genetic test designed to fully characterize CF patients. The detection rate in each clinical macrocategory and at each mutational step was found to be influenced by genetic heterogeneity. The definition of a single mutational panel that is suitable for all clinical macrocategories proved impossible. Only for classic CF with pancreas insufficiency did a reduced number of mutations yield a detection rate of diagnostic value. All other clinical macrocategories required an extensive genetic search. The search for specific mutational classes appears to be useful only in specific CF clinical forms. A flowchart defining a mutational search that may be adopted for different CF clinical forms, optimized in respect to those already available, is proposed. The findings also have consequences for carrier screening strategies. PMID:27157324

  16. C. elegans rrf-1 mutations maintain RNAi efficiency in the soma in addition to the germline.

    PubMed

    Kumsta, Caroline; Hansen, Malene

    2012-01-01

    Gene inactivation through RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a valuable tool for studying gene function in C. elegans. When combined with tissue-specific gene inactivation methods, RNAi has the potential to shed light on the function of a gene in distinct tissues. In this study we characterized C. elegans rrf-1 mutants to determine their ability to process RNAi in various tissues. These mutants have been widely used in RNAi studies to assess the function of genes specifically in the C. elegans germline. Upon closer analysis, we found that two rrf-1 mutants carrying different loss-of-function alleles were capable of processing RNAi targeting several somatically expressed genes. Specifically, we observed that the intestine was able to process RNAi triggers efficiently, whereas cells in the hypodermis showed partial susceptibility to RNAi in rrf-1 mutants. Other somatic tissues in rrf-1 mutants, such as the muscles and the somatic gonad, appeared resistant to RNAi. In addition to these observations, we found that the rrf-1(pk1417) mutation induced the expression of several transgenic arrays, including the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16. Unexpectedly, rrf-1(pk1417) mutants showed increased endogenous expression of the DAF-16 target gene sod-3; however, the lifespan and thermo-tolerance of rrf-1(pk1417) mutants were similar to those of wild-type animals. In sum, these data show that rrf-1 mutants display several phenotypes not previously appreciated, including broader tissue-specific RNAi-processing capabilities, and our results underscore the need for careful characterization of tissue-specific RNAi tools. PMID:22574120

  17. Bap1 Is a Bona Fide Tumor Suppressor: Genetic Evidence from Mouse Models Carrying Heterozygous Germline Bap1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Cheung, Mitchell; Xu, Jinfei; Pei, Jianming; Sementino, Eleonora; Menges, Craig W; Cai, Kathy Q; Rauscher, Frank J; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Testa, Joseph R

    2016-05-01

    Individuals harboring inherited heterozygous germline mutations in BAP1 are predisposed to a range of benign and malignant tumor types, including malignant mesothelioma, melanoma, and kidney carcinoma. However, evidence to support a tumor-suppressive role for BAP1 in cancer remains contradictory. To test experimentally whether BAP1 behaves as a tumor suppressor, we monitored spontaneous tumor development in three different mouse models with germline heterozygous mutations in Bap1, including two models in which the knock-in mutations are identical to those reported in human BAP1 cancer syndrome families. We observed spontaneous malignant tumors in 54 of 93 Bap1-mutant mice (58%) versus 4 of 43 (9%) wild-type littermates. All three Bap1-mutant models exhibited a high incidence and similar spectrum of neoplasms, including ovarian sex cord stromal tumors, lung and mammary carcinomas, and spindle cell tumors. Notably, we also observed malignant mesotheliomas in two Bap1-mutant mice, but not in any wild-type animals. We further confirmed that the remaining wild-type Bap1 allele was lost in both spontaneous ovarian tumors and mesotheliomas, resulting in the loss of Bap1 expression. Additional studies revealed that asbestos exposure induced a highly significant increase in the incidence of aggressive mesotheliomas in the two mouse models carrying clinically relevant Bap1 mutations compared with asbestos-exposed wild-type littermates. Collectively, these findings provide genetic evidence that Bap1 is a bona fide tumor suppressor gene and offer key insights into the contribution of carcinogen exposure to enhanced cancer susceptibility. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2836-44. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26896281

  18. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    SciTech Connect

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  19. The saga of cystatin C gene mutation causing amyloid angiopathy and brain hemorrhage--clinical genetics in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Jensson, O; Palsdottir, A; Thorsteinsson, L; Arnason, A

    1989-11-01

    Firstly, we review investigations of hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy, which is caused by a mutation in the cystatin C gene. Symptoms of brain haemorrhages, which lead to death in young adults, are the hallmark of this disorder. The mutation can now be detected by the RFLP method using Alu I restriction enzyme and cystatin C cDNA probe. Secondly, we give an overview of other clinical genetic studies in Iceland with emphasis on activities initiated or sponsored by the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland. The list of references covers most publications on genetic studies of Icelanders. PMID:2689007

  20. Suppressors of a genetic regulatory mutation affecting isoleucine-valine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, J E; Calhoun, D H

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutant PS187 carries a mutation, ilvA538, in the structural gene for the biosynthetic L-threonine deaminase that leads to a leucine-sensitive growth phenotype, an isoleucine- and leucine-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and pleiotropic effects resulting in abnormally low and invariant expression of some of the isoleucine-valine biosynthetic enzymes. Fifty-eight derivatives of strain PS187 were isolated as resistant to growth inhibition by leucine, by valine, or by valine plus glycly-valine and were biochemically, genetically, and physiologically characterized. All of these derivatives produced the feedback-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and thus presumably possess the ilvA538 allele of the parent strain. Elevated synthesis of L-threonine deaminase was observed in 41 of the 58 isolates. Among 18 strains analyzed genetically, only those with mutations linked to the ilv gene clusters at 83 min produced elevated levels of L-threonine deaminase. One of the strains, MSR91, isolated as resistant to valine plus glycyl-valine, was chosen for more detailed study. The locus in strain MSR91 conferring resistance was located in four factor crosses between ilvE and rbs, and is in or near the ilvO gene postulated to be a site controlling the expression of the ilvEDA genes. Synthesis of the ilvEDA gene products in strain MSR91 is constitutive and derepressed approximately 200-fold relative to the parent strain, indicating that the genetic regulatory effects of the ilvA538 allele have been suppressed. Strain MSR91 should be suitable for use in purification of the ilvA538 gene product, since enzyme synthesis is fully derepressed and the suppressor mutation is clearly not located within the ilvA gene. PMID:361682

  1. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  2. NOTCH1 mutations identify a genetic subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with high risk of transformation and poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Villamor, N; Conde, L; Martínez-Trillos, A; Cazorla, M; Navarro, A; Beà, S; López, C; Colomer, D; Pinyol, M; Aymerich, M; Rozman, M; Abrisqueta, P; Baumann, T; Delgado, J; Giné, E; González-Díaz, M; Hernández, J M; Colado, E; Payer, A R; Rayon, C; Navarro, B; José Terol, M; Bosch, F; Quesada, V; Puente, X S; López-Otín, C; Jares, P; Pereira, A; Campo, E; López-Guillermo, A

    2013-04-01

    NOTCH1 has been found recurrently mutated in a subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To analyze biological features and clinical impact of NOTCH1 mutations in CLL, we sequenced this gene in 565 patients. NOTCH1 mutations, found in 63 patients (11%), were associated with unmutated IGHV, high expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, trisomy 12, advanced stage and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Sequential analysis in 200 patients demonstrated acquisition of mutation in one case (0.5%) and disappearance after treatment in two. Binet A and B patients with NOTCH1-mutated had a shorter time to treatment. NOTCH1-mutated patients were more frequently refractory to therapy and showed shorter progression-free and overall survival after complete remission. Overall survival was shorter in NOTCH1-mutated patients, although not independently from IGHV. NOTCH1 mutation increased the risk of transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma independently from IGHV, with this being validated in resampling tests of replicability. In summary, NOTCH1 mutational status, that was rarely acquired during the course of the disease, identify a genetic subgroup with high risk of transformation and poor outcome. This recently identified genetic subgroup of CLL patients deserves prospective studies to define their best management. PMID:23295735

  3. Dew inspired breathing-based detection of genetic point mutation visualized by naked eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liping; Wang, Tongzhou; Huang, Tianqi; Hou, Wei; Huang, Guoliang; Du, Yanan

    2014-09-01

    A novel label-free method based on breathing-induced vapor condensation was developed for detection of genetic point mutation. The dew-inspired detection was realized by integration of target-induced DNA ligation with rolling circle amplification (RCA). The vapor condensation induced by breathing transduced the RCA-amplified variances in DNA contents into visible contrast. The image could be recorded by a cell phone for further or even remote analysis. This green assay offers a naked-eye-reading method potentially applied for point-of-care liver cancer diagnosis in resource-limited regions.

  4. Dew inspired breathing-based detection of genetic point mutation visualized by naked eye

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liping; Wang, Tongzhou; Huang, Tianqi; Hou, Wei; Huang, Guoliang; Du, Yanan

    2014-01-01

    A novel label-free method based on breathing-induced vapor condensation was developed for detection of genetic point mutation. The dew-inspired detection was realized by integration of target-induced DNA ligation with rolling circle amplification (RCA). The vapor condensation induced by breathing transduced the RCA-amplified variances in DNA contents into visible contrast. The image could be recorded by a cell phone for further or even remote analysis. This green assay offers a naked-eye-reading method potentially applied for point-of-care liver cancer diagnosis in resource-limited regions. PMID:25199907

  5. Estimation of Additive, Dominance, and Imprinting Genetic Variance Using Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marcos S.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Janss, Luc; Knol, Egbert F.; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, exploration of genetic variance in humans, plants, and livestock species has been limited mostly to the use of additive effects estimated using pedigree data. However, with the development of dense panels of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the exploration of genetic variation of complex traits is moving from quantifying the resemblance between family members to the dissection of genetic variation at individual loci. With SNPs, we were able to quantify the contribution of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance to the total genetic variance by using a SNP regression method. The method was validated in simulated data and applied to three traits (number of teats, backfat, and lifetime daily gain) in three purebred pig populations. In simulated data, the estimates of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance were very close to the simulated values. In real data, dominance effects account for a substantial proportion of the total genetic variance (up to 44%) for these traits in these populations. The contribution of imprinting to the total phenotypic variance of the evaluated traits was relatively small (1–3%). Our results indicate a strong relationship between additive variance explained per chromosome and chromosome length, which has been described previously for other traits in other species. We also show that a similar linear relationship exists for dominance and imprinting variance. These novel results improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of the evaluated traits and shows promise to apply the SNP regression method to other traits and species, including human diseases. PMID:26438289

  6. Clinical, histological and genetic characterization of reducing body myopathy caused by mutations in FHL1

    PubMed Central

    Schessl, Joachim; Taratuto, Ana L.; Sewry, Caroline; Battini, Roberta; Chin, Steven S.; Maiti, Baijayanta; Dubrovsky, Alberto L.; Erro, Marcela G.; Espada, Graciela; Robertella, Monica; Saccoliti, Maria; Olmos, Patricia; Bridges, Leslie R.; Standring, Peter; Hu, Ying; Zou, Yaqun; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Scavina, Mena; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Mitchell, Christina A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Muntoni, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We recently identified the X-chromosomal four and a half LIM domain gene FHL1 as the causative gene for reducing body myopathy, a disorder characterized by progressive weakness and intracytoplasmic aggregates in muscle that exert reducing activity on menadione nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT). The mutations detected in FHL1 affected highly conserved zinc coordinating residues within the second LIM domain and lead to the formation of aggregates when transfected into cells. Our aim was to define the clinical and morphological phenotype of this myopathy and to assess the mutational spectrum of FHL1 mutations in reducing body myopathy in a larger cohort of patients. Patients were ascertained via the detection of reducing bodies in muscle biopsy sections stained with menadione-NBT followed by clinical, histological, ultrastructural and molecular genetic analysis. A total of 11 patients from nine families were included in this study, including seven sporadic patients with early childhood onset disease and four familial cases with later onset. Weakness in all patients was progressive, sometimes rapidly so. Respiratory failure was common and scoliosis and spinal rigidity were significant in some of the patients. Analysis of muscle biopsies confirmed the presence of aggregates of FHL1 positive material in all biopsies. In two patients in whom sequential biopsies were available the aggregate load in muscle sections appeared to increase over time. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that cytoplasmic bodies were regularly seen in conjunction with the reducing bodies. The mutations detected were exclusive to the second LIM domain of FHL1 and were found in both sporadic as well as familial cases of reducing body myopathy. Six of the nine mutations affected the crucial zinc coordinating residue histidine 123. All mutations in this residue were de novo and were associated with a severe clinical course, in particular in one male patient (H123Q). Mutations in the zinc coordinating residue

  7. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  8. A Genotypic-Oriented View of CFTR Genetics Highlights Specific Mutational Patterns Underlying Clinical Macrocategories of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Marco; Bruno, Sabina Maria; Pierandrei, Silvia; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Stamato, Antonella; Narzi, Fabiana; Amato, Annalisa; Cimino, Giuseppe; Bertasi, Serenella; Quattrucci, Serena; Strom, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The genotype–phenotype relationship in this disease is still unclear, and diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic challenges persist. We enrolled 610 patients with different forms of CF and studied them from a clinical, biochemical, microbiological and genetic point of view. Overall, there were 125 different mutated alleles (11 with novel mutations and 10 with complex mutations) and 225 genotypes. A strong correlation between mutational patterns at the genotypic level and phenotypic macrocategories emerged. This specificity appears to largely depend on rare and individual mutations, as well as on the varying prevalence of common alleles in different clinical macrocategories. However, 19 genotypes appeared to underlie different clinical forms of the disease. The dissection of the pathway from the CFTR mutated genotype to the clinical phenotype allowed to identify at least two components of the variability usually found in the genotype–phenotype relationship. One component seems to depend on the genetic variation of CFTR, the other component on the cumulative effect of variations in other genes and cellular pathways independent from CFTR. The experimental dissection of the overall biological CFTR pathway appears to be a powerful approach for a better comprehension of the genotype–phenotype relationship. However, a change from an allele-oriented to a genotypic-oriented view of CFTR genetics is mandatory, as well as a better assessment of sources of variability within the CFTR pathway. PMID:25910067

  9. Mutation analyses of molecularly cloned satellite tobacco mosaic virus during serial passage in plants: evidence for hotspots of genetic change.

    PubMed

    Kurath, G; Dodds, J A

    1995-07-01

    The high level of genetic diversity and rapid evolution of viral RNA genomes are well documented, but few studies have characterized the rate and nature of ongoing genetic change over time under controlled experimental conditions, especially in plant hosts. The RNA genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was used as an effective model for such studies because of advantageous features of its genome structure and because the extant genetic heterogeneity of STMV has been characterized previously. In the present study, the process of genetic change over time was studied by monitoring multiple serial passage lines of STMV populations for changes in their consensus sequences. A total of 42 passage lines were initiated by inoculation of tobacco plants with a helper tobamovirus and one of four STMV RNA inocula that were transcribed from full-length infectious STMV clones or extracted from purified STMV type strain virions. Ten serial passages were carried out for each line and the consensus genotypes of progeny STMV populations were assessed for genetic change by RNase protection analyses of the entire 1,059-nt STMV genome. Three different types of genetic change were observed, including the fixation of novel mutations in 9 of 42 lines, mutation at the major heterogeneity site near nt 751 in 5 of the 19 lines inoculated with a single genotype, and selection of a single major genotype in 6 of the 23 lines inoculated with mixed genotypes. Sequence analyses showed that the majority of mutations were single base substitutions. The distribution of mutation sites included three clusters in which mutations occurred at or very near the same site, suggesting hot spots of genetic change in the STMV genome. The diversity of genetic changes in sibling lines is clear evidence for the important role of chance and random sampling events in the process of genetic diversification of STMV virus populations. PMID:7489510

  10. EpilepsyGene: a genetic resource for genes and mutations related to epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xia; Li, Jinchen; Shao, Qianzhi; Chen, Huiqian; Lin, Zhongdong; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Wu, Jinyu

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic neurological disorders, afflicting about 3.5-6.5 per 1000 children and 10.8 per 1000 elderly people. With intensive effort made during the last two decades, numerous genes and mutations have been published to be associated with the disease. An organized resource integrating and annotating the ever-increasing genetic data will be imperative to acquire a global view of the cutting-edge in epilepsy research. Herein, we developed EpilepsyGene (http://61.152.91.49/EpilepsyGene). It contains cumulative to date 499 genes and 3931 variants associated with 331 clinical phenotypes collected from 818 publications. Furthermore, in-depth data mining was performed to gain insights into the understanding of the data, including functional annotation, gene prioritization, functional analysis of prioritized genes and overlap analysis focusing on the comorbidity. An intuitive web interface to search and browse the diversified genetic data was also developed to facilitate access to the data of interest. In general, EpilepsyGene is designed to be a central genetic database to provide the research community substantial convenience to uncover the genetic basis of epilepsy. PMID:25324312

  11. EpilepsyGene: a genetic resource for genes and mutations related to epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Xia; Li, Jinchen; Shao, Qianzhi; Chen, Huiqian; Lin, Zhongdong; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Wu, Jinyu

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent chronic neurological disorders, afflicting about 3.5–6.5 per 1000 children and 10.8 per 1000 elderly people. With intensive effort made during the last two decades, numerous genes and mutations have been published to be associated with the disease. An organized resource integrating and annotating the ever-increasing genetic data will be imperative to acquire a global view of the cutting-edge in epilepsy research. Herein, we developed EpilepsyGene (http://61.152.91.49/EpilepsyGene). It contains cumulative to date 499 genes and 3931 variants associated with 331 clinical phenotypes collected from 818 publications. Furthermore, in-depth data mining was performed to gain insights into the understanding of the data, including functional annotation, gene prioritization, functional analysis of prioritized genes and overlap analysis focusing on the comorbidity. An intuitive web interface to search and browse the diversified genetic data was also developed to facilitate access to the data of interest. In general, EpilepsyGene is designed to be a central genetic database to provide the research community substantial convenience to uncover the genetic basis of epilepsy. PMID:25324312

  12. Mutation extraction tools can be combined for robust recognition of genetic variants in the literature.

    PubMed

    Jimeno Yepes, Antonio; Verspoor, Karin

    2014-01-01

    As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the amount of data being collected and studied for the purpose of understanding the genetic basis of disease is increasing dramatically. Much of the source information relevant to such efforts is available only from unstructured sources such as the scientific literature, and significant resources are expended in manually curating and structuring the information in the literature. As such, there have been a number of systems developed to target automatic extraction of mutations and other genetic variation from the literature using text mining tools. We have performed a broad survey of the existing publicly available tools for extraction of genetic variants from the scientific literature. We consider not just one tool but a number of different tools, individually and in combination, and apply the tools in two scenarios. First, they are compared in an intrinsic evaluation context, where the tools are tested for their ability to identify specific mentions of genetic variants in a corpus of manually annotated papers, the Variome corpus. Second, they are compared in an extrinsic evaluation context based on our previous study of text mining support for curation of the COSMIC and InSiGHT databases. Our results demonstrate that no single tool covers the full range of genetic variants mentioned in the literature. Rather, several tools have complementary coverage and can be used together effectively. In the intrinsic evaluation on the Variome corpus, the combined performance is above 0.95 in F-measure, while in the extrinsic evaluation the combined recall performance is above 0.71 for COSMIC and above 0.62 for InSiGHT, a substantial improvement over the performance of any individual tool. Based on the analysis of these results, we suggest several directions for the improvement of text mining tools for genetic variant extraction from the literature. PMID:25285203

  13. Genetics and Epigenetics of Glioblastoma: Applications and Overall Incidence of IDH1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aizhen; Hou, Chunfeng; Chen, Hongfang; Zong, Xuan; Zong, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most fatal brain cancer found in humans. Patients suffering from glioblastoma have a dismal prognosis, with a median survival of 15 months. The tumor may develop rapidly de novo in older patients or through progression from anaplastic astrocytomas in younger patients if glioblastoma is primary or secondary, respectively. During the past decade, significant advances have been made in the understanding of processes leading to glioblastoma, and several important genetic defects that appear to be important for the development and progression of this tumor have been identified. Particularly, the discovery of recurrent mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene has shed new light on the molecular landscape in glioblastoma. Indeed, emerging research on the consequences of mutant IDH1 protein expression suggests that its neomorphic enzymatic activity catalyzing the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate influences a range of cellular programs that affect the epigenome and contribute to glioblastoma development. One of the exciting observations is the presence of IDH1 mutation in the vast majority of secondary glioblastoma, while it is almost absent in primary glioblastoma. Growing data indicate that this particular mutation has clinical and prognostic importance and will become a critical early distinction in diagnosis of glioblastoma. PMID:26858939

  14. Relationship of causative genetic mutations in maple syrup urine disease with their clinical expression.

    PubMed

    Nellis, Mary M; Kasinski, Andrea; Carlson, Martha; Allen, Richard; Schaefer, Anna Marie; Schwartz, Edward M; Danner, Dean J

    2003-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease [MSUD] is a rare inborn error of metabolism inherited as an autosomal recessive trait through mutations in any of three different genes that encode components of the branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase [BCKD] complex. In this work, the genotype of affected individuals was correlated with their clinical histories. These individuals were diagnosed and followed in a single centralized clinic, and their molecular genetic characterization was done by one laboratory. Three individuals had mutant alleles in the gene for the E1alpha component, five had mutations in the gene for E1beta, and three had mutations in the gene for E2. The results emphasize the diversity of the molecular and clinical presentations for individuals with MSUD and support the complexity of diseases termed "single gene traits." Of primary importance is early identification of at risk infants through newborn screening programs to minimize many of the complications associated with this protein intolerance. Attention to abnormal neurological signs in the neonate or evidence of neurological decompensation in older infants and children by a centralized medical management team minimizes permanent brain damage and improves survival. PMID:14567968

  15. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations and genetic background shape the fitness effect of resistance across species of Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Vogwill, T; Kojadinovic, M; MacLean, R C

    2016-05-11

    Antibiotic resistance often evolves by mutations at conserved sites in essential genes, resulting in parallel molecular evolution between divergent bacterial strains and species. Whether these resistance mutations are having parallel effects on fitness across bacterial taxa, however, is unclear. This is an important point to address, because the fitness effects of resistance mutations play a key role in the spread and maintenance of resistance in pathogen populations. We address this idea by measuring the fitness effect of a collection of rifampicin resistance mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) across eight strains that span the diversity of the genus Pseudomonas We find that almost 50% of rpoB mutations have background-dependent fitness costs, demonstrating that epistatic interactions between rpoB and the rest of the genome are common. Moreover, epistasis is typically strong, and it is the dominant genetic determinant of the cost of resistance mutations. To investigate the functional basis of epistasis, and because rpoB plays a central role in transcription, we measured the effects of common rpoB mutations on transcriptional efficiency across three strains of Pseudomonas Transcriptional efficiency correlates strongly to fitness across strains, and epistasis arises because individual rpoB mutations have differential effects on transcriptional efficiency in different genetic backgrounds. PMID:27170722

  16. Epistasis between antibiotic resistance mutations and genetic background shape the fitness effect of resistance across species of Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Kojadinovic, M.; MacLean, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance often evolves by mutations at conserved sites in essential genes, resulting in parallel molecular evolution between divergent bacterial strains and species. Whether these resistance mutations are having parallel effects on fitness across bacterial taxa, however, is unclear. This is an important point to address, because the fitness effects of resistance mutations play a key role in the spread and maintenance of resistance in pathogen populations. We address this idea by measuring the fitness effect of a collection of rifampicin resistance mutations in the β subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) across eight strains that span the diversity of the genus Pseudomonas. We find that almost 50% of rpoB mutations have background-dependent fitness costs, demonstrating that epistatic interactions between rpoB and the rest of the genome are common. Moreover, epistasis is typically strong, and it is the dominant genetic determinant of the cost of resistance mutations. To investigate the functional basis of epistasis, and because rpoB plays a central role in transcription, we measured the effects of common rpoB mutations on transcriptional efficiency across three strains of Pseudomonas. Transcriptional efficiency correlates strongly to fitness across strains, and epistasis arises because individual rpoB mutations have differential effects on transcriptional efficiency in different genetic backgrounds. PMID:27170722

  17. Genetic interactions contribute less than additive effects to quantitative trait variation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Kotenko, Iulia; Sadhu, Meru J.; Treusch, Sebastian; Albert, Frank W.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mapping studies of quantitative traits typically focus on detecting loci that contribute additively to trait variation. Genetic interactions are often proposed as a contributing factor to trait variation, but the relative contribution of interactions to trait variation is a subject of debate. Here we use a very large cross between two yeast strains to accurately estimate the fraction of phenotypic variance due to pairwise QTL–QTL interactions for 20 quantitative traits. We find that this fraction is 9% on average, substantially less than the contribution of additive QTL (43%). Statistically significant QTL–QTL pairs typically have small individual effect sizes, but collectively explain 40% of the pairwise interaction variance. We show that pairwise interaction variance is largely explained by pairs of loci at least one of which has a significant additive effect. These results refine our understanding of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits and help guide future mapping studies. PMID:26537231

  18. Genetic mutations of avian leukosis virus subgroup J strains extended their host range.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanwei; Cai, Liming; Wang, Yanming; Wei, Rongrong; He, Menglian; Wang, Shanhui; Wang, Guihua; Cheng, Ziqiang

    2014-03-01

    The genetic diversity of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is determined not only by the env gene, but also by its 3' UTR and 3' LTR. They all play important roles in extending the host range and tumour development. In the present study, one ALV-J strain (ZB110604-6) from Black-Bone Silky Fowl (BSF) and three ALV-J strains (ZB110604-3/4/5) from grey partridge (GP), which bore multiple tumours and breed in one house of Farm A, were demonstrated extending their host to GP, while two other ALV-J strains (LC110515-3/4) from BSF of Farm B could not infect the embryo fibroblast of GP. The BSF is a unique species of chicken in China, while the GP is a close relative of the pheasant that previously demonstrated resistance to ALV-J. Histopathology showed that various tumours were induced by ALV-J in the two species. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the isolates from Farms A and B, rather than species, belong to two different clusters of ALV-J. Genetic mutations analysis revealed that the isolates obtained from Farm A showed a higher frequency of mutation in the hypervariable region 2 domain than in other variable regions of the gp85 gene. From the nucleotide alignment of the 3' UTR and 3' LTR gene, and the spectrum of tumours observed in this study, we speculate that the deletions or mutations in the redundant transmembrane region, E element and U3 (CAAT boxes, CArG box and Y box) might associate with tumour formation and development. The extension of the host range of ALV-J to the GP suggested that housing different species together provides more opportunities for ALV-J to evolve rapidly. PMID:24272684

  19. Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH): clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Saqib; Ahmad, Wasim; Hassan, Muhammad J

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH) is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7) for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL) identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1) orientation of mitotic spindles, 2) chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3) DNA damage-response signaling, 4) transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5) certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder. PMID:21668957

  20. Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH): clinical manifestations, genetic heterogeneity and mutation continuum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH) is a rare disorder of neurogenic mitosis characterized by reduced head circumference at birth with variable degree of mental retardation. In MCPH patients, brain size reduced to almost one-third of its original volume due to reduced number of generated cerebral cortical neurons during embryonic neurogensis. So far, seven genetic loci (MCPH1-7) for this condition have been mapped with seven corresponding genes (MCPH1, WDR62, CDK5RAP2, CEP152, ASPM, CENPJ, and STIL) identified from different world populations. Contribution of ASPM and WDR62 gene mutations in MCPH World wide is more than 50%. By and large, primary microcephaly patients are phenotypically indistinguishable, however, recent studies in patients with mutations in MCPH1, WDR62 and ASPM genes showed a broader clinical and/or cellular phenotype. It has been proposed that mutations in MCPH genes can cause the disease phenotype by disturbing: 1) orientation of mitotic spindles, 2) chromosome condensation mechanism during embryonic neurogenesis, 3) DNA damage-response signaling, 4) transcriptional regulations and microtubule dynamics, 5) certain unknown centrosomal mechanisms that control the number of neurons generated by neural precursor cells. Recent discoveries of mammalian models for MCPH have open up horizons for researchers to add more knowledge regarding the etiology and pathophysiology of MCPH. High incidence of MCPH in Pakistani population reflects the most probable involvement of consanguinity. Genetic counseling and clinical management through carrier detection/prenatal diagnosis in MCPH families can help reducing the incidence of this autosomal recessive disorder. PMID:21668957

  1. Age-specific Parkinson disease risk in GBA mutation carriers: information for genetic counseling

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Huma Q.; Balwani, Manisha; Bier, Louise; Alcalay, Roy N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We sought to estimate age-specific risk of Parkinson disease in relatives of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligate carriers of GBA mutations and who were not ascertained by family history of Parkinson disease. Methods A validated family history of Parkinson disease questionnaire was administered to 119 patients with Gaucher disease who were evaluated at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine from 2009 to 2012; the ages of their parents, siblings, and children, history of Parkinson disease, age at onset of Parkinson disease, and ethnic background were obtained. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to estimate age-specific Parkinson disease penetrance among parents of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligatory GBA mutation carriers. Results Two participants with Gaucher disease were affected by Parkinson disease (5.4% of those who were 60 years or older). Of the 224 informative parents of patients with Gaucher disease, 11 had Parkinson disease (4.9%). Among the parents (obligatory carriers), cumulative risk of Parkinson disease by ages 65 and 85 was estimated to be 2.2% ±2.1% and 10.9% ±7.2%, respectively. Conclusion We provide useful age-specific estimates of Parkinson disease penetrance in patients with Gaucher disease and GBA heterozygous carriers for genetic counseling. Although GBA mutations may increase the risk for PD, the vast majority of patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygotes may not develop the disease. Further studies are needed to identify what modifies the risk of Parkinson disease in GBA mutation carriers. PMID:22935721

  2. Prevalence and Type of BRCA Mutations in Hispanics Undergoing Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment in the Southwestern United States: A Report From the Clinical Cancer Genetics Community Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Clague, Jessica; Martir-Negron, Arelis; Ogaz, Raquel; Herzog, Josef; Ricker, Charité; Jungbluth, Chelsy; Cina, Cheryl; Duncan, Paul; Unzeitig, Gary; Saldivar, J. Salvador; Beattie, Mary; Feldman, Nancy; Sand, Sharon; Port, Danielle; Barragan, Deborah I.; John, Esther M.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Larson, Garrett P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and type of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations among Hispanics in the Southwestern United States and their potential impact on genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA). Patients and Methods Hispanics (n = 746) with a personal or family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were enrolled in an institutional review board–approved registry and received GCRA and BRCA testing within a consortium of 14 clinics. Population-based Hispanic breast cancer cases (n = 492) enrolled in the Northern California Breast Cancer Family Registry, negative by sequencing for BRCA mutations, were analyzed for the presence of the BRCA1 ex9-12del large rearrangement. Results Deleterious BRCA mutations were detected in 189 (25%) of 746 familial clinic patients (124 BRCA1, 65 BRCA2); 21 (11%) of 189 were large rearrangement mutations, of which 62% (13 of 21) were BRCA1 ex9-12del. Nine recurrent mutations accounted for 53% of the total. Among these, BRCA1 ex9-12del seems to be a Mexican founder mutation and represents 10% to 12% of all BRCA1 mutations in clinic- and population-based cohorts in the United States. Conclusion BRCA mutations were prevalent in the largest study of Hispanic breast and/or ovarian cancer families in the United States to date, and a significant proportion were large rearrangement mutations. The high frequency of large rearrangement mutations warrants screening in every case. We document the first Mexican founder mutation (BRCA1 ex9-12del), which, along with other recurrent mutations, suggests the potential for a cost-effective panel approach to ancestry-informed GCRA. PMID:23233716

  3. Genetic analysis of suppressors of the PF10 mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, S.K.; Gibbons, W.; Inwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    A mutation at the PF10 locus of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to abnormal cell motility. The asymmetric form of the ciliary beat stroke characteristic of wild-type flagella is modified by this mutation to a nearly symmetric beat. We report here that this abnormal motility is a conditional phenotype that depends on light intensity. In the absence of light or under low light intensities, the motility is more severely impaired than at higher light intensities. By UV mutagenesis we obtained 11 intragenic and 70 extragenic strains that show reversion of the pf10 motility phenotype observed in low light. The intragenic events reverted the motility phenotype of the pf10 mutation completely. The extragenic events define at least seven suppressor loci; these map to linkage groups IV, VII, IX, XI, XII and XVII. Suppressor mutations at two of the seven loci (LIS1 and LIS2) require light for their suppressor activity. Forty-eight of the 70 extragenic suppressors were examined in heterozygous diploid cells; 47 of these mutants were recessive to the wild-type allele and one mutant (bop5-1) was dominant to the wild-type allele. Complementation analysis of the 47 recessive mutants showed unusual patterns. Most mutants within a recombinationally defined group failed to complement one another, although there were pairs that showed intra-allelic complementation. Additionally, some of the mutants at each recombinationally defined locus failed to complement mutants at other loci. They define dominant enhancers of one another.

  4. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers. PMID:27455559

  5. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex) versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context of results from genome

  6. Genetic analysis and functional characterization of novel mutations in a series of patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Szarvas, Nóra; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Csuka, Dorottya; Takács, Beáta; Rusai, Krisztina; Müller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Réti, Marienn; Haris, Ágnes; Wagner, László; Török, Szilárd; Kelen, Kata; Szabó, Attila J; Reusz, György S; Morgan, B Paul; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2016-03-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disorder caused by dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway, and associated with mutations in genes of complement components and regulators. In the recent years several studies have been published describing these mutations, however, no data is available from the Central and Eastern European region. In this study we present a detailed genetic analysis of our 30 patients, hospitalized with the diagnosis of aHUS in the past 7 years. We analyzed the genetic variants of genes CFH, CFI, CD46, THBD, CFB and C3; furthermore the possible effect of mutations that may alter the function or level of factor H protein was also investigated. We identified 27 (12 novel and 15 previously described) potentially disease-causing mutations in the candidate genes in 23 patients. Genetic analysis of family members revealed that in most cases the disease develops in individuals with multiple genetic risk factors, which may explain the low penetrance of the mutations. Here we showed that two novel mutations (p.W198R, p.P1161T) and a previously reported one (p.R1215Q) in CFH caused impaired regulation as indicated by increased lysis in hemolytic test, while four CFH mutations (p.V609D, p.S722X, p.T1216del and p.C448Y) were associated with decreased factor H protein level in serum as determined by allele-specific immunoassay. These results further point to the necessity of complete genetic workup of patients with aHUS and to the importance of functional characterization of novel variations. PMID:26826462

  7. A specific superoxide dismutase mutation is on the same genetic background in sporadic and familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, C.; Brock, D.J.H.; Swingler, R.J.

    1996-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disease of motor neurons, causing progressive muscular atrophy, weakness, and death from respiratory failure, often within 2-3 years. Although most cases are sporadic, some 5%-10% are inherited as autosomal dominants with age-dependent penetrance. An ALS locus has been mapped to chromosome 21q, and causative mutations identified in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. A majority of SOD1 mutations have been found in cases with a clear family history of ALS. However, we and others have also described SOD1 mutations in patients where the disease appears to be sporadic. This is especially true for the missense mutation in codon 113 of the SOD1 gene, which substitutes threonine for isoleucine (I113T). One explanation for this finding is that this codon is a mutational hot spot with sporadic cases representing new mutations. Another is that the inherited nature of the cases is disguised by the reduced penetrance of this specific mutation. We have now shown that each of six unrelated cases of I113T mutation that we have collected in the Scottish population occurs on the same genetic background. Association analysis of multiple flanking loci on chromosome 21q supports the conclusion of a founder effect, with the original mutational event occurring {ge}10 generations ago. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Evidence of intermetastatic heterogeneity for pathological response and genetic mutations within colorectal liver metastases following preoperative chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sebagh, Mylène; Allard, Marc-Antoine; Bosselut, Nelly; Dao, Myriam; Vibert, Eric; Lewin, Maïté; Lemoine, Antoinette; Cherqui, Daniel; Adam, René; Cunha, Antonio Sa

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy, colorectal liver metastases (CLM) are expected to demonstrate a similar behaviour because of similar organ microenvironment and tumour cell chemosensitivity. We focused on the occurrence of pathological and genetic heterogeneity within CLM. Methods Patients resected for multiple CLM between 2004 and 2011 after > three cycles of chemotherapy were included. Pathological heterogeneity was arbitrarily defined as a > 50% difference in the percentage of remaining tumour cells between individual CLM. In patients with pathological heterogeneity, the mutational genotyping (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA) was determined from the most heterogeneous CLM. Results Pathological heterogeneity was observed in 31 of 157 patients with multiple CLM (median = 4, range, 2–32) (19.7%). In 72.4% of them, we found a concordance of the mutation status between the paired CLM: both wild-type in 55%, and both mutated in 17.2%. We observed a discordance of the mutation status of 27.6% between CLM: one mutated and the other wild-type. The mutated CLM was the less florid one in 75% of patients with genetic heterogeneity. Conclusions Pathological heterogeneity is present in 19.7% of patients with multiple CLM. Genetic heterogeneity is present in 27.6% of patients with pathological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity could refine guide management for tissue sampling. PMID:26943031

  9. Genetic diversity and mutation of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (Newcastle disease virus) in wild birds and evidence for intercontinental spread

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew B.; Ogawa, Haruko; Ip, Hon S.; Imai, Kunitoshi; Bui, V. N.; Yamaguchi, Emi; Silko, N. Y.; Afonso, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), or Newcastle disease virus, is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, one of the most economically important diseases for poultry production worldwide and a cause of periodic epizootics in wild birds in North America. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity of APMV-1 isolated from migratory birds sampled in Alaska, Japan, and Russia and assessed the evidence for intercontinental virus spread using phylogenetic methods. Additionally, we predicted viral virulence using deduced amino acid residues for the fusion protein cleavage site and estimated mutation rates for the fusion gene of class I and class II migratory bird isolates. All 73 isolates sequenced as part of this study were most closely related to virus genotypes previously reported for wild birds; however, five class II genotype I isolates formed a monophyletic clade exhibiting previously unreported genetic diversity, which met criteria for the designation of a new sub-genotype. Phylogenetic analysis of wild-bird isolates provided evidence for intercontinental virus spread, specifically viral lineages of APMV-1 class II genotype I sub-genotypes Ib and Ic. This result supports migratory bird movement as a possible mechanism for the redistribution of APMV-1. None of the predicted deduced amino acid motifs for the fusion protein cleavage site of APMV-1 strains isolated from migratory birds in Alaska, Japan, and Russia were consistent with those of previously identified virulent viruses. These data therefore provide no support for these strains contributing to the emergence of avian pathogens. The estimated mutation rates for fusion genes of class I and class II wild-bird isolates were faster than those reported previously for non-virulent APMV-1 strains. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into the diversity, spread, and evolution of APMV-1 in wild birds.

  10. A Nonsyndromic Autosomal Dominant Oligodontia with A Novel Mutation of PAX9-A Clinical and Genetic Report

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Praveen; Athimuthu, Anantharaj; Bhat, Prasanna Kumar; Puttashamachari, Yogish

    2015-01-01

    Oligodontia is congenital absence of one or more teeth which has familial abnormality and attributable to various mutations or polymorphisms of genes often associated with malformative syndromes. The present case reports a rare case of non syndromic oligodontia in an 8-year-old girl with missing 14 permanent teeth excluding third molars in mixed dentition. It is a rare finding which has not been frequently documented in Indian children. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 have been described in families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent incisors, lateral incisors, premolars and molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. This phonotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 revealed a novel mutation in the paired domain of the molecule. The multiple sequence alignment and SNP analysis of the PAX9 exon 2 revealed two mutations. PMID:26266225

  11. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination – including the optic disc – might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  12. Diverse Renal Phenotypes Observed in a Single Family with a Genetic Mutation in Paired Box Protein 2.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi, Yoichi; Morioka, Tetsuo; Morita, Takashi; Yanagihara, Toshio; Oyama, Yuko; Morisada, Naoya; Iijima, Kazumoto; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    A common renal phenotype of paired box protein 2 (PAX2) mutations is renal coloboma syndrome. We report a single family with diverse renal phenotypes associated with PAX2 mutation. The proband presented steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with optic coloboma, whereas his two sons showed severe renal hypoplasia with end-stage renal disease, with or without optic coloboma. In all three cases, a heterozygous PAX2 genetic mutation was identified (exon 2; NM_003987.3:c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28). Based on histopathological findings of the proband, we hypothesized that autophagic dysfunction was associated with the pathophysiology of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with PAX2 mutation. Detailed funduscopic examination - including the optic disc - might be useful for the diagnosis of renal anomalies associated with PAX2 mutation. PMID:27226968

  13. Hereditary nephrotic syndrome: a systematic approach for genetic testing and a review of associated podocyte gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Several genes have been implicated in genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome occurring in children. It is now known that the phenotypes associated with mutations in these genes display significant variability, rendering genetic testing and counselling a more complex task. This review will focus on the recent clinical findings associated with those genes known to be involved in isolated steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in children and, thereby, propose an approach for appropriate mutational screening. The recurrence of proteinuria after transplantation in patients with hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome will also be discussed. PMID:20333530

  14. Impact of Mutation Type and Amplicon Characteristics on Genetic Diversity Measures Generated Using a High-Resolution Melting Diversity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Matthew M.; Donnell, Deborah; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2013-01-01

    We adapted high-resolution melting (HRM) technology to measure genetic diversity without sequencing. Diversity is measured as a single numeric HRM score. Herein, we determined the impact of mutation types and amplicon characteristics on HRM diversity scores. Plasmids were generated with single-base changes, insertions, and deletions. Different primer sets were used to vary the position of mutations within amplicons. Plasmids and plasmid mixtures were analyzed to determine the impact of mutation type, position, and concentration on HRM scores. The impact of amplicon length and G/C content on HRM scores was also evaluated. Different mutation types affected HRM scores to varying degrees (1-bp deletion < 1-bp change < 3-bp insertion < 9-bp insertion). The impact of mutations on HRM scores was influenced by amplicon length and the position of the mutation within the amplicon. Mutations were detected at concentrations of 5% to 95%, with the greatest impact at 50%. The G/C content altered melting temperature values of amplicons but had no impact on HRM scores. These data are relevant to the design of assays that measure genetic diversity using HRM technology. PMID:23178437

  15. Clinical, immunologic, and genetic characteristics of RAG mutations in 15 Chinese patients with SCID and Omenn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaoming; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Chaohong; Zhang, Yongjie; Tang, Wenjing; Dai, Rongxin; Wu, Junfeng; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Yu; Ding, Yuan; Jiang, Liping; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in Recombination Activating Genes (RAG1 and RAG2) are common genetic causes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Omenn syndrome (OS). The clinical, immunologic, and genetic characteristics of RAG mutations in Chinese patients with SCID or OS have not been studied in detail. In this research, 22 RAG mutations were identified in 15 Chinese patients, including 10 novel mutations in RAG1 (R108X, M630T, E510X, S666P, E669K, C730Y, A857V, K847E, L922PfsX7, and L1025FfsX39) and 4 in RAG2 (R73C, I427GfsX12, P432L, and 311insL). L1025FfsX39 is a potential RAG1 hot-spot mutation in the Chinese population. The distribution of RAG1 mutations rather than mutation type seemed to differ between SCID and OS patients. The thymic output of T lymphocytes, TCR rearrangement, and T cell proliferation were severely impaired in RAG mutant patients. These findings will contribute to the early diagnosis and treatment of SCID and OS to a certain extent. PMID:26476733

  16. [Genetic and cytological analyses of the male sterility mutation induced in a sorghum tissue culture with streptomycin].

    PubMed

    El'konin, L A; Tsvetova, M I

    2008-05-01

    Treatment of sorghum callus cultures with 500-1000 mg/l streptomycin led to a high regeneration frequency of plants with complete or partial male sterility (MS), up to 100% of all green regenerants. The induced MS mutation (ms-str) was preserved in the F1 and BC1 progenies and was genetically unstable: many families produced semisterile and fertile revertants, whose progenies again contained semisterile and sterile mutants. The ms-str mutation was maintained through eight generations via selection and self-pollination of semisterile plants. The mutation was inherited as a recessive nuclear mutation in tester crosses of sterile plants segregated in the progenies of fertile and semisterile revertants and was expressed only in single cases in a test cross for ms-str transfer through pollen of hybrids with restored male fertility. Recessive nuclear mutations determining a low plant height (dwarfness) and the lack of waxy bloom on the stem and leaves (bloomless) were found in male-sterile plants with the ms-str mutation. Cytological analysis of sterile plants reveal multiple alterations of various pollen development stages and tapetal cells: cytomyxis, defects of chromosome conjugation, distorted cytokinesis in meiotic division II, a lack of tetrad separation, a defective formation of the microspore coat, generation of microspores with two to four nuclei, and the formation of micronuclei and large vacuoles in tapetal cells. A possible transfer of the induced cytoplasmic MS mutation into the nuclear genome and the causes of the high genetic instability are discussed. PMID:18672800

  17. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information. 146.122 Section 146.122 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET Requirements Relating to Access...

  18. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary). 54.9802-3T Section 54.9802-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.9802-3T...

  19. 29 CFR 2590.702-1 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information. 2590.702-1 Section 2590.702-1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GROUP HEALTH PLANS RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR GROUP HEALTH PLANS Health...

  20. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary). 54.9802-3T Section 54.9802-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.9802-3T...

  1. 26 CFR 54.9802-3T - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information (temporary). 54.9802-3T Section 54.9802-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES § 54.9802-3T...

  2. Genetic CJD with a novel E200G mutation in the prion protein gene and comparison with E200K mutation cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A novel point mutation resulting in a glutamate-to-glycine substitution in PRNP at codon 200, E200G with codon 129 MV polymorphism (cis valine) and type 2 PrPSc was identified in a patient with a prolonged disease course leading to pathology-proven Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease. Despite the same codon as the most common genetic form of human PRNP mutation, E200K, this novel mutation (E200G) presented with a different clinical and pathological phenotype, including prolonged duration, large vacuoles, no vacuolation in the hippocampus, severe neuronal loss in the thalamus, mild cerebellar involvement, and abundant punctate linear and curvilinear deposition of PrPSc in synaptic boutons and axonal terminals along the dendrites. PMID:24330864

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of some mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in Moldova: Characterization of molecular markers and their linkage to various mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Gimbovskaya, S.D.; Kalinin, V.N.; Ivashchenko, T.E.; Baranov, V.S.

    1994-12-01

    Sixty-one patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from Moldova were tested for mutations {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Frequencies of various alleles of the repeated GATT sequence in intron 6B of the GFTR gene, their linkage to other polymorphic markers, and various mutations were determined. The frequency of occurrence of mutation {Delta}F508 was only 25%. An absolute majority of CF patients (80%) had pancreatic insufficiency. Mutations G551D and R553X were not found in our sample. Each of 31 chromosomes with mutation {Delta}F508 carry the 6-GATT allele. Most {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} (78%) and normal (80%) chromosomes were marked by the 7-GATT allele. Twenty-seven {Delta}F508 chromosomes (96.4%) belong to haplotype B6, and only one to D6. Most chromosomes with {open_quotes}non {Delta}F508{close_quotes} mutations are associated with haplotypes D7 (26.3%) and C7 (21%). In addition, a significant portion of chromosomes from this subgroup were associated with haplotypes A7 (23.7%), A6 (10.5%), and C6 (2.7%), which are not yet described for mutant chromosomes. The results obtained demonstrate that CF in Moldova is mainly associated with mutations other than {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Severe forms of the disease, with pancreatic insufficiency, are more frequently caused by these mutations; moreover, our data provides strong evidence for the presence of at least seven additional CF mutations in Moldova, apart from {Delta}F508, G551D, and R553X. Some of these are probably not described.

  4. Establishment and application of a multiplex genetic mutation-detection method of lung cancer based on MassARRAY platform

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Jian-Guang; Chen, Shi-Liang; Guo, Wei-Bang; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to establish a method for highly parallel multiplexed detection of genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer samples through Agena iPLEX chemistry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis on MassARRAY mass spectrometry platform. Methods: We reviewed the related literature and data on lung cancer treatments. We also identified 99 mutation hot spots in 13 target genes closely related to the pathogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 297 primers, composed of 99 paired forward and reverse amplification primers and 99 matched extension primers, were designed using Assay Design software. The detection method was established by analyzing eight cell lines and six lung cancer specimens. The proposed method was then validated through comparisons by using a LungCartaTM kit. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were evaluated by directly sequencing EGFR and KRAS genes in 100 lung cancer cases. Results: The proposed method was able to detect multiplex genetic mutations in lung cancer cell lines. This finding was consistent with the observations on previously reported mutations. The proposed method can also detect such mutations in clinical lung cancer specimens. This result was consistent with the observations with LungCartaTM kit. However, an FGFR2 mutation was detected only through the proposed method. The measured sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 96.3%, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed MassARRAY technology-based multiplex method can detect genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to detect mutations in other cancer tissues. PMID:27144063

  5. Differences in Disease Severity but Similar Telomere Lengths in Genetic Subgroups of Patients with Telomerase and Shelterin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vulliamy, Tom J.; Kirwan, Michael J.; Beswick, Richard; Hossain, Upal; Baqai, Charlotte; Ratcliffe, Anna; Marsh, Judith; Walne, Amanda; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2011-01-01

    The bone marrow failure syndrome dyskeratosis congenita (DC) has been considered to be a disorder of telomere maintenance in which disease features arise due to accelerated shortening of telomeres. By screening core components of the telomerase and shelterin complexes in patients with DC and related bone marrow failure syndromes we have identified 24 novel mutations: 11 in the RNA component of telomerase (TERC), 8 in the reverse transcriptase component (TERT), 4 in dyskerin (DKC1) and 1 in TRF1-interacting nuclear factor 2 (TINF2). This has prompted us to review these genetic subtypes in terms of telomere length, telomerase activity and clinical presentation among 194 genetically characterised index cases recruited onto the registry in London. While those with DKC1 and TINF2 mutations present at a younger age and have more disease features than those with TERC or TERT mutations, there is no difference in telomere length between these groups. There is no difference in the age of onset and numbers of disease features seen in those with TERC and TERT mutations despite the fact that the latter show higher levels of telomerase activity in vitro. The incidence of aplastic anaemia is greater in patients with TERC or TINF2 mutations compared to patients with DKC1 mutations, and cancer incidence is highest in patients with TERC mutations. These data are the first to provide robust comparisons between different genetic subtypes of telomerase and shelterin mutations (the “telomereopathies”) and clearly demonstrate that disease severity is not explained by telomere length alone. PMID:21931702

  6. Genetic analysis of jumbled spine and ribs (Jsr) mutation affecting the vertebral development in mice.

    PubMed

    Okano, Shinya; Asano, Atsushi; Kon, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2002-10-01

    The jumbled spine and ribs (Jsr) mouse was derived from a spontaneous mutation. As the phenotype, a shortened trunk and kinky tail are characteristic Jsr traits. In this study, on high resolution mapping it was found that Lunatic fringe (Lfng) mapped at the same position as Jsr. Lfng was identified as the candidate gene for Jsr, but sequence analysis of this gene revealed no substitution in the coding region of cDNA. Therefore, we adopted the strategy of positional cloning for Jsr using a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. A BAC contig was constructed from three BAC clones showing positive signals of Lfng and 11MMHAP75FRD8.seq near the Jsr locus on chromosome 5. Based on the genetic mapping of both T7 and sp6 ends of a clone of BAC382-O-7 (BAC382), the Jsr gene was considered to exist in BAC382 and to be positioned near the sp6 side. PMID:12392169

  7. Genetically Modeled Mice with Mutations in Mitochondrial Metabolic Enzymes for the Study of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Piruat, José I.; Millán-Uclés, África

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has long been implicated in progression of cancer. As a paradigm, the “Warburg effect,” which by means of a switch toward anaerobic metabolism enables cancer cells to proliferate in oxygen limiting conditions, is well established. Besides this metabolic transformation of tumors, it has been discovered that mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are the etiological factors in different types of cancer. This confers to mitochondrial dysfunction a causative role, rather than resultant, in tumor genesis beyond its role in tumor progression and development. Mitochondrial proteins encoded by tumor-suppressor genes are part of the succinate-dehydrogenase, the fumarate-hydratase, and the mitochondrial isocitrate-dehydrogenase enzymes, all of them participating in the Krebs cycle. The spectrum of tumors associated with mutations in these genes is becoming larger and varies between each enzyme. Several mechanisms of tumorigenesis have been proposed for the different enzymatic defects, most of them based on studies using cellular and animal models. Regarding the molecular pathways implicated in the oncogenic transformation, one of the first accepted theories was based on the constitutive expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif1α) at normal oxygen tension, a theory referred to as “pseudo-hypoxic drive.” This mechanism has been linked to the three types of mutations, thus suggesting a central role in cancer. However, other alternative molecular processes, such as oxidative stress or altered chromatin remodeling, have been also proposed to play an onco-pathogenic role. In the recent years, the role of oncometabolites, a new concept emerged from biochemical studies upon these tumors, has acquired relevance as responsible for tumor formation. Nevertheless, the actual contribution of each of these mechanisms has not been definitively established. In this review, we summarize the results obtained from mouse strains

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Genetic diversity within the R408W phenylketonuria mutation lineages in Europe.

    PubMed

    Tighe, Orna; Dunican, Donncha; O'Neill, Charles; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Beattie, Diane; Graham, Colin; Zschocke, Johannes; Cali, Francesco; Romano, Valentino; Hrabincova, Eva; Kozak, Libor; Nechyporenko, Marina; Livshits, Ludmilla; Guldberg, Per; Jurkowska, Monika; Zekanowski, Cezary; Perez, Belen; Desviat, Lourdes Ruiz; Ugarte, Magdalena; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Knappskog, Per; Treacy, Eileen; Naughten, Eileen; Tyfield, Linda; Byck, Susan; Scriver, Charles R; Mayne, Philip D; Croke, David T

    2003-04-01

    The R408W phenylketonuria mutation in Europe has arisen by recurrent mutation in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus and is associated with two major PAH haplotypes. R408W-2.3 exhibits a west-to-east cline of relative frequency reaching its maximum in the Balto-Slavic region, while R408W-1.8 exhibits an east-to-west cline peaking in Connacht, the most westerly province of Ireland. Spatial autocorrelation analysis has demonstrated that the R408W-2.3 cline, like that of R408W-1.8, is consistent with a pattern likely to have been established by human dispersal. Genetic diversity within wild-type and R408W chromosomes in Europe was assessed through variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) nucleotide sequence variation and tetranucleotide short tandem repeat (STR) allelic associations. Wild-type VNTR-8 chromosomes exhibited two major cassette sequence organizations: (a1)5-b3-b2-c1 and (a1)5-b5-b2-c1. R408W-1.8 was predominantly associated with (a1)5-B5-B2-C1. Both wild-type vntr-3 and r408w-2.3 chromosomes exhibited a single invariant cassette sequence organization, a2-b2-c1. STR allele distributions associated with the cassette variants were consistent with greater diversity in the wild-type VNTR-8 lineage and were suggestive of different levels of diversity between R408W-1.8 and R408W-2.3. The finding of greater genetic diversity within the wild-type VNTR-8 lineage compared to VNTR-3 suggests that VNTR-8 may be older within the European population. However, in the absence of a more extensive STR data-set, no such conclusions are possible for the respective R408W mutant lineages. PMID:12655548

  10. The genetic landscape of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: inheritance, mutations, modifier genes, and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Christoph; Eichler, Florian S; Berger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding a peroxisomal ABC transporter. In this review, we compare estimates of incidence derived from different populations in order to provide an overview of the worldwide incidence of X-ALD. X-ALD presents with heterogeneous phenotypes ranging from adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) to inflammatory demyelinating cerebral ALD (CALD). A large number of different mutations has been described, providing a unique opportunity for analysis of functional domains within ABC transporters. Yet the molecular basis for the heterogeneity of clinical symptoms is still largely unresolved, as no correlation between genotype and phenotype exists in X-ALD. Beyond ABCD1, environmental triggers and other genetic factors have been suggested as modifiers of the disease course. Here, we summarize the findings of numerous reports that aimed at identifying modifier genes in X-ALD and discuss potential problems and future approaches to address this issue. Different options for prenatal diagnosis are summarized, and potential pitfalls when applying next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Recently, the measurement of very long-chain fatty acids in lysophosphatidylcholine for the identification of peroxisomal disorders was included in newborn screening programs. PMID:25999754

  11. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin . E-mail: caoxin@njmu.edu.cn

    2006-08-11

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA{sup Ser(UCN)} genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families.

  12. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. Yet it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but rather are due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the under-explored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the “wild-type” genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs. PMID:23453263

  13. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  14. Identification of Novel Mutations in ABCA4 Gene: Clinical and Genetic Analysis of Indian Patients with Stargardt Disease.

    PubMed

    Battu, Rajani; Verma, Anshuman; Hariharan, Ramesh; Krishna, Shuba; Kiran, Ravi; Jacob, Jemima; Ganapathy, Aparna; Ramprasad, Vedam L; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) is the leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration associated with progressive central vision loss, photophobia, and colour vision abnormalities. In this study, we have described the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from an Indian cohort. The next generation sequencing was carried out in five clinically confirmed unrelated patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 184 retinal specific genes. Sequencing results were analyzed by read mapping and variant calling in genes of interest, followed by their verification and interpretation. Genetic analysis revealed ABCA4 mutations in all of the five unrelated patients. Among these, four patients were found with compound heterozygous mutations and another one had homozygous mutation. All the affected individuals showed signs and symptoms consistent with the disease phenotype. We report two novel ABCA4 mutations in Indian patients with STGD disease, which expands the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. Screening for causative mutations in patients with STGD using panel of targeted gene sequencing by NGS would be a cost effective tool, might be helpful in confirming the precise diagnosis, and contributes towards the genetic counselling of asymptomatic carriers and isolated patients. PMID:25922843

  15. Identification of Novel Mutations in ABCA4 Gene: Clinical and Genetic Analysis of Indian Patients with Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Verma, Anshuman; Hariharan, Ramesh; Krishna, Shuba; Kiran, Ravi; Jacob, Jemima; Ganapathy, Aparna; Ramprasad, Vedam L.; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2015-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD) is the leading cause of juvenile macular degeneration associated with progressive central vision loss, photophobia, and colour vision abnormalities. In this study, we have described the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from an Indian cohort. The next generation sequencing was carried out in five clinically confirmed unrelated patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 184 retinal specific genes. Sequencing results were analyzed by read mapping and variant calling in genes of interest, followed by their verification and interpretation. Genetic analysis revealed ABCA4 mutations in all of the five unrelated patients. Among these, four patients were found with compound heterozygous mutations and another one had homozygous mutation. All the affected individuals showed signs and symptoms consistent with the disease phenotype. We report two novel ABCA4 mutations in Indian patients with STGD disease, which expands the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. Screening for causative mutations in patients with STGD using panel of targeted gene sequencing by NGS would be a cost effective tool, might be helpful in confirming the precise diagnosis, and contributes towards the genetic counselling of asymptomatic carriers and isolated patients. PMID:25922843

  16. Mutations at the Smo Genetic Locus Affect the Shape of Diverse Cell Types in the Rice Blast Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, J. E.; Valent, B.; Chumley, F. G.

    1989-01-01

    Teflon film surfaces are highly conducive to the formation of infection structures (appressoria) in the plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe grisea. We have utilized Teflon films to screen and select for mutants of M. grisea that are defective in appressorium formation. This approach and several others yielded a group of 14 mutants with a similar phenotype. All the mutant strains make abnormally shaped conidia and appressoria. When two mutant strains are crossed, abnormally shaped asci are formed. Ascus shape is normal when a mutant strain is crossed with a wild-type strain. Despite dramatic alterations in cell shape these strains otherwise grow, form conidia, undergo meiosis, and infect plants normally. This mutant phenotype, which we have termed Smo(-), for abnormal spore morphology, segregates in simple Mendelian fashion in crosses with wild-type strains. Some ascospore lethality is associated with smo mutations. In genetic crosses between mutants, smo mutations fail to recombine and do not demonstrate complementation of the abnormal ascus shape phenotype. We conclude that the smo mutations are alleles of a single genetic locus and are recessive with regard to the the ascus shape defect. Mutations at the SMO locus also permit germinating M. grisea conidia to differentiate appressoria on surfaces that are not normally conducive to infection structure formation. A number of spontaneous smo mutations have been recovered. The frequent occurrence of this mutation suggests that the SMO locus may be highly mutable. PMID:17246498

  17. Mosaicism: The embryo as a target for induction of mutations leading to cancer and genetic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.; Zingg, B.

    1995-12-31

    Mosaicismhas been observed in both germinal and somatic tissues of several species, including humans. Mutational events occurring during early embryogenesis can give rise to an organism with a significant number of cells with the mutant genotype in one or more tissues. In the F{sub 1} generation, this event will usually be perceived as a de novo germinal mutation rather than a transmitted variant allele, unless significant effort is directed toward detecting the mosaicism. Similarly, mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in proliferating somatic cells can generate populations of cells that are at increased risk of transforming into tumor cells. The number of potential preneoplastic cells is larger when the mutagenic event occurs in early development than if it occurs in the mature adult. Experimental data confirm that treatment of the developing embryo or fetus with carcinogenic and mutagenic agents increases the cancer incidence in these animals and the frequency of mutations in the offspring of the animals that were exposed in utero. The available data are conclusive that the developing organism is at risk from exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. However, the data are insufficient to estimate the level of risk associated with similar exposures to the adult organism. The potential risk from exposure of the developing embryo is increased relative to the risk from adult exposure if the sensitivity of the individual cells to damage in the adult and the embryo are equivalent. It seems apparent that the potential risks of cancer and heritable disease following in utero exposure are sufficient to warrant additional attention. It is important to obtain data for estimating the relative contribution of in utero exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents to the total health burden and for the subsequent development of appropriate regulations. 60 refs., 2 figs.

  18. "Sickle Cell Anemia: Tracking down a Mutation": An Interactive Learning Laboratory That Communicates Basic Principles of Genetics and Cellular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients…

  19. NGS-Based Assay for the Identification of Individuals Carrying Recessive Genetic Mutations in Reproductive Medicine.

    PubMed

    Abulí, Anna; Boada, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Coroleu, Buenaventura; Veiga, Anna; Armengol, Lluís; Barri, Pedro N; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity of carrier screening in gamete donation (GD) programs. We have developed and validated an NGS carrier-screening test (qCarrier test) that includes 200 genes associated with 368 disorders (277 autosomal recessive and 37 X-linked). Carrier screening is performed on oocyte donation candidates and the male partner of oocyte recipient. Carriers of X-linked conditions are excluded from the GD program, whereas donors are chosen who do not carry mutations for the same gene/disease as the recipients. The validation phase showed a high sensitivity (>99% sensitivity) detecting all single-nucleotide variants, 13 indels, and 25 copy-number variants included in the validation set. A total of 1,301 individuals were analysed with the qCarrier test, including 483 candidate oocyte donors and 635 receptor couples, 105 females receiving sperm donation, and 39 couples seeking pregnancy. We identified 56% of individuals who are carriers for at least one genetic condition and 1.7% of female donors who were excluded from the program due to a carrier state of X-linked conditions. Globally, 3% of a priori assigned donations had a high reproductive risk that could be minimized after testing. Genetic counselling at different stages is essential for helping to facilitate a successful and healthy pregnancy. PMID:26990548

  20. Multidisciplinary investigation links backward-speech trait and working memory through genetic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Prekovic, Stefan; Đurđević, Dušica Filipović; Csifcsák, Gábor; Šveljo, Olivera; Stojković, Oliver; Janković, Milica; Koprivšek, Katarina; Covill, Laura E; Lučić, Milos; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Helsen, Christine; Ceroni, Fabiola; Claessens, Frank; Newbury, Dianne F

    2016-01-01

    Case studies of unusual traits can provide unique snapshots of the effects of modified systems. In this study, we report on an individual from a Serbian family with the ability to rapidly, accurately and voluntarily speak backwards. We consider psychological, neural and genetic correlates of this trait to identify specific relevant neural mechanisms and new molecular pathways for working memory and speech-related tasks. EEG data suggest that the effect of word reversal precedes semantic integration of visually presented backward-words, and that event-related potentials above the frontal lobe are affected by both word reversal and the maintenance of backward-words in working memory. fMRI revealed that the left fusiform gyrus may facilitate the production of backward-speech. Exome sequencing identified three novel coding variants of potential significance in the RIC3, RIPK1 and ZBED5 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that, in this individual, the ability to speak backwards is afforded by an extraordinary working memory capacity. We hypothesise that this is served by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain to the frontal cortex and supported by visual semantic loops within the left fusiform gyrus and that these neural processes may be mediated by a genetic mutation in RIC3; a chaperone for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:26838027

  1. More breast cancer patients prefer BRCA-mutation testing without prior face-to-face genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Sie, Aisha S; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Brunner, Han G; Prins, Judith B; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2014-06-01

    Currently, most breast cancer (BC) patients receive face-to-face genetic counseling (DNA-intake) prior to BRCA-mutation testing, with generic information regarding hereditary BC and BRCA-mutation testing. This prospective study evaluated a novel format: replacing the intake consultation with telephone, written and digital information sent home, and face-to-face contact following BRCA-mutation testing (DNA-direct). From August 2011 to February 2012, 161 of 233 eligible BC patients referred to our Human Genetics department chose between DNA-direct (intervention) or DNA-intake (control). Exclusion criteria were psychological problems (n = 33), difficulty with Dutch text (n = 5), known BRCA-family (n = 3), non-BRCA-referral (n = 1). 30 declined genetic counseling or study participation. Participants received questionnaires including satisfaction and psychological distress. 59 % chose DNA-direct (p = 0.03), of whom 90 % were satisfied and would choose DNA-direct again (including 6/8 BRCA-mutation carriers); although 27 % hesitated to recommend DNA-direct to other patients. General distress (GHQ-12, p = 0.001) and heredity-specific distress (IES, p = 0.02) scored lower in DNA-direct than DNA-intake, both at baseline and follow-up 2 weeks after BRCA-result disclosure; all scores remained below clinical relevance. DNA-direct participants reported higher website use (53 vs. 32 %, p = 0.01), more referrer information about personal consequences (41 vs. 20 %, p = 0.004) and lower decisional conflict (median 20 [0-88] vs. 25 [0-50], p = 0.01). Processing time in DNA-direct was reduced by 1 month. Mutation detection rate was 8 % in both groups. All BRCA-mutation carriers fulfilled current testing criteria. In conclusion, more BC patients preferred DNA-direct over intake consultation prior to BRCA-mutation testing, the majority being strongly to moderately satisfied with the procedure followed, without increased distress. PMID:24068317

  2. Mutational breeding and genetic engineering in the development of high grain protein content.

    PubMed

    Wenefrida, Ida; Utomo, Herry S; Linscombe, Steve D

    2013-12-01

    Cereals are the most important crops in the world for both human consumption and animal feed. Improving their nutritional values, such as high protein content, will have significant implications, from establishing healthy lifestyles to helping remediate malnutrition problems worldwide. Besides providing a source of carbohydrate, grain is also a natural source of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, specific oils, and other disease-fighting phytocompounds. Even though cereal grains contain relatively little protein compared to legume seeds, they provide protein for the nutrition of humans and livestock that is about 3 times that of legumes. Most cereal seeds lack a few essential amino acids; therefore, they have imbalanced amino acid profiles. Lysine (Lys), threonine (Thr), methionine (Met), and tryptophan (Trp) are among the most critical and are a limiting factor in many grain crops for human nutrition. Tremendous research has been put into the efforts to improve these essential amino acids. Development of high protein content can be outlined in four different approaches through manipulating seed protein bodies, modulating certain biosynthetic pathways to overproduce essential and limiting amino acids, increasing nitrogen relocation to the grain through the introduction of transgenes, and exploiting new genetic variance. Various technologies have been employed to improve protein content including conventional and mutational breeding, genetic engineering, marker-assisted selection, and genomic analysis. Each approach involves a combination of these technologies. Advancements in nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics continue to improve public knowledge at a rapid pace on the importance of specific aspects of food nutrition for optimum fitness and health. An understanding of the molecular basis for human health and genetic predisposition to certain diseases through human genomes enables individuals to personalize their nutritional requirements. It is critically important

  3. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Methods We genotyped rs3814113 in 10 029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10-9) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10-4). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:21169536

  4. Genetic recombination of bacterial plasmid DNA: effect of RecF pathway mutations on plasmid recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodner, R; Fishel, R A; Howard, M

    1985-01-01

    Tn5 insertion mutations in the recN gene, and in what appears to be a new RecF pathway gene designated recO and mapping at approximately 55.4 min on the standard genetic map, were isolated by screening Tn5 insertion mutations that cotransduced with tyrA. The recO1504::Tn5 mutation decreased the frequency of recombination during Hfr-mediated crosses and increased the susceptibility to killing by UV irradiation and mitomycin C when present in a recB recC sbcB background, but only increased the sensitivity to killing by UV irradiation when present in an otherwise Rec+ background. The effects of these and other RecF pathway mutations on plasmid recombination were tested. Mutations in the recJ, recO, and ssb genes, when present in otherwise Rec+ E. coli strains, decreased the frequency of plasmid recombination, whereas the lexA3, recAo281, recN, and ruv mutations had no effect on plasmid recombination. Tn5 insertion mutations in the lexA gene increased the frequency of plasmid recombination. These data indicate that plasmid recombination events in wild-type Escherichia coli strains are catalyzed by a recombination pathway that is related to the RecF recombination pathway and that some component of this pathway besides the recA gene product is regulated by the lexA gene product. PMID:2993230

  5. Additive genetic risk from five serotonin system polymorphisms interacts with interpersonal stress to predict depression.

    PubMed

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E; Adam, Emma K; Redei, Eva E; Hammen, Constance; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral genetic research supports polygenic models of depression in which many genetic variations each contribute a small amount of risk, and prevailing diathesis-stress models suggest gene-environment interactions (G×E). Multilocus profile scores of additive risk offer an approach that is consistent with polygenic models of depression risk. In a first demonstration of this approach in a G×E predicting depression, we created an additive multilocus profile score from 5 serotonin system polymorphisms (1 each in the genes HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR2C, and 2 in TPH2). Analyses focused on 2 forms of interpersonal stress as environmental risk factors. Using 5 years of longitudinal diagnostic and life stress interviews from 387 emerging young adults in the Youth Emotion Project, survival analyses show that this multilocus profile score interacts with major interpersonal stressful life events to predict major depressive episode onsets (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.815, p = .007). Simultaneously, there was a significant protective effect of the profile score without a recent event (HR = 0.83, p = .030). The G×E effect with interpersonal chronic stress was not significant (HR = 1.15, p = .165). Finally, effect sizes for genetic factors examined ignoring stress suggested such an approach could lead to overlooking or misinterpreting genetic effects. Both the G×E effect and the protective simple main effect were replicated in a sample of early adolescent girls (N = 105). We discuss potential benefits of the multilocus genetic profile score approach and caveats for future research. PMID:26595467

  6. Pattern of inbreeding depression, condition dependence, and additive genetic variance in Trinidadian guppy ejaculate traits

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Clelia; Devigili, Alessandro; Dosselli, Ryan; Pilastro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In polyandrous species, a male's reproductive success depends on his fertilization capability and traits enhancing competitive fertilization success will be under strong, directional selection. This leads to the prediction that these traits should show stronger condition dependence and larger genetic variance than other traits subject to weaker or stabilizing selection. While empirical evidence of condition dependence in postcopulatory traits is increasing, the comparison between sexually selected and ‘control’ traits is often based on untested assumption concerning the different strength of selection acting on these traits. Furthermore, information on selection in the past is essential, as both condition dependence and genetic variance of a trait are likely to be influenced by the pattern of selection acting historically on it. Using the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing fish with high levels of multiple paternity, we performed three independent experiments on three ejaculate quality traits, sperm number, velocity, and size, which have been previously shown to be subject to strong, intermediate, and weak directional postcopulatory selection, respectively. First, we conducted an inbreeding experiment to determine the pattern of selection in the past. Second, we used a diet restriction experiment to estimate their level of condition dependence. Third, we used a half-sib/full-sib mating design to estimate the coefficients of additive genetic variance (CVA) underlying these traits. Additionally, using a simulated predator evasion test, we showed that both inbreeding and diet restriction significantly reduced condition. According to predictions, sperm number showed higher inbreeding depression, stronger condition dependence, and larger CVA than sperm velocity and sperm size. The lack of significant genetic correlation between sperm number and velocity suggests that the former may respond to selection independently one from other ejaculate quality traits

  7. Genetic mutation analysis at early stages of cell line development using next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wright, Chapman; Groot, Joost; Swahn, Samantha; McLaughlin, Helen; Liu, Mei; Xu, Chongfeng; Sun, Chao; Zheng, Eric; Estes, Scott

    2016-05-01

    A central goal for most biopharmaceutical companies is to reduce the development timeline to reach clinical proof of concept. This objective requires the development of tools that ensure the quality of biotherapeutic material destined for the clinic. Recent advances in high throughput protein analytics provide confidence in our ability to assess productivity and product quality attributes at early stages of cell line development. However, one quality attribute has, until recently, been absent from the standard battery of analytical tests facilitating informed choices early in cell line selection: genetic sequence confirmation. Techniques historically used for mutation analysis, such as detailed mass spectrometry, have limitations on the sample number and turnaround times making it less attractive at early stages. Thus, we explored the utility of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) as a solution to address these limitations. Amplicon sequencing is one such NGS technique that is robust, rapid, sensitive, and amenable to multiplexing, all of which are essential attributes for our purposes. Here we report a NGS method based upon amplicon sequencing that has been successfully incorporated into our cell line development workflow alongside other high-throughput protein analytical assays. The NGS method has demonstrated its value by identifying at least one Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) clone expressing a variant form of the biotherapeutic in each of the four clinical programs in which it has been utilized. We believe this sequence confirmation method is essential to safely accelerating the time to clinical proof of concept of biotherapeutics, and guard against delays related to sequence mutations. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:813-817, 2016. PMID:27004436

  8. Genetic and structure-function studies of missense mutations in human endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hamid; Tempczyk-Russell, Anna; Haubold, Kurt; Santorico, Stephanie A; Shokati, Touraj; Christians, Uwe; Churchill, Mair E A

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) plays a pivotal role in HDL metabolism. We sought to characterize EL and its interaction with HDL as well as its natural variants genetically, functionally and structurally. We screened our biethnic population sample (n = 802) for selected missense mutations (n = 5) and identified T111I as the only common variant. Multiple linear regression analyses in Hispanic subjects revealed an unexpected association between T111I and elevated LDL-C (p-value = 0.012) and total cholesterol (p-value = 0.004). We examined lipase activity of selected missense mutants (n = 10) and found different impacts on EL function, ranging from normal to complete loss of activity. EL-HDL lipidomic analyses indicated that EL has a defined remodeling of HDL without exhaustion of the substrate and a distinct and preference for several fatty acids that are lipid mediators and known for their potent pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Structural studies using homology modeling revealed a novel α/β motif in the C-domain, unique to EL. The EL dimer was found to have the flexibility to expand and to bind various sizes of HDL particles. The likely impact of the all known missense mutations (n = 18) on the structure of EL was examined using molecular modeling and the impact they may have on EL lipase activity using a novel structure-function slope based on their structural free energy differences. The results of this multidisciplinary approach delineated the impact of EL and its variants on HDL. Moreover, the results suggested EL to have the capacity to modulate vascular health through its role in fatty acid-based signaling pathways. PMID:23536757

  9. Genetic and molecular characterization of a Notch mutation in its Delta- and Serrate-binding domain in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    de Celis, J F; Barrio, R; del Arco, A; García-Bellido, A

    1993-01-01

    The Drosophila Notch gene product is a transmembrane protein that functions as a receptor of intercellular signals in several Drosophila developmental processes. Two other transmembrane proteins, encoded by the genes Delta and Serrate, genetically and molecularly behave as Notch ligands. All these proteins share the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats in their extracellular domain. The Notch protein has 36 EGF-like repeats, 2 of which, numbers 11 and 12, are required for the interaction with the Delta and Serrate ligands. We have isolated and molecularly characterized a Notch mutation in its Delta- and Serrate-binding domain that behaves genetically as both a Notch antimorphic and a loss-of-function mutation. This mutation, NM1, carries a Glu-->Val substitution in the Notch EGF repeat 12. The NM1 allele interacts with other Notch alleles such as Abruptex and split and with mutations in the Notch-ligand genes Delta and Serrate. The basis for the genetic antimorphism of NM1 seems to reside in the titration of Notch wild-type products into NM1/N+ nonfunctional dimers and/or the titration of Delta products into nonfunctional ligand-receptor complexes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8483919

  10. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  11. Genetic diagnosis of Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy using next-generation sequencing: validation analysis of DMD mutations

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Mariko; Minami, Narihiro; Goto, Kanako; Goto, Yuichi; Noguchi, Satoru; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) are the most common inherited neuromuscular disease. The genetic diagnosis is not easily made because of the large size of the dystrophin gene, complex mutational spectrum and high number of tests patients undergo for diagnosis. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has been used as the initial diagnostic test of choice. Although MLPA can diagnose 70% of DMD/BMD patients having deletions/duplications, the remaining 30% of patients with small mutations require further analysis, such as Sanger sequencing. We applied a high-throughput method using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing technology and diagnosed 92% of patients with DMD/BMD in a single analysis. We designed a multiplex primer pool for DMD and sequenced 67 cases having different mutations: 37 with deletions/duplications and 30 with small mutations or short insertions/deletions in DMD, using an Ion PGM sequencer. The results were compared with those from MLPA or Sanger sequencing. All deletions were detected. In contrast, 50% of duplications were correctly identified compared with the MLPA method. Small insertions in consecutive bases could not be detected. We estimated that Ion Torrent sequencing could diagnose ~92% of DMD/BMD patients according to the mutational spectrum of our cohort. Our results clearly indicate that this method is suitable for routine clinical practice providing novel insights into comprehensive genetic information for future molecular therapy. PMID:26911353

  12. Genetic basis for increased intestinal permeability in families with Crohn's disease: role of CARD15 3020insC mutation?

    PubMed Central

    Buhner, S; Buning, C; Genschel, J; Kling, K; Herrmann, D; Dignass, A; Kuechler, I; Krueger, S; Schmidt, H H‐J; Lochs, H

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim A genetically impaired intestinal barrier function has long been suspected to be a predisposing factor for Crohn's disease (CD). Recently, mutations of the capsase recruitment domain family, member 15 (CARD15) gene have been identified and associated with CD. We hypothesise that a CARD15 mutation may be associated with an impaired intestinal barrier. Methods We studied 128 patients with quiescent CD, 129 first degree relatives (CD‐R), 66 non‐related household members (CD‐NR), and 96 healthy controls. The three most common CARD15 polymorphisms (R702W, G908R, and 3020insC) were analysed and intestinal permeability was determined by the lactulose/mannitol ratio. Results Intestinal permeability was significantly increased in CD and CD‐R groups compared with CD‐NR and controls. Values above the normal range were seen in 44% of CD and 26% of CD‐R but only in 6% of CD‐NR, and in none of the controls. A household community with CD patients, representing a common environment, was not associated with increased intestinal permeability in family members. However, 40% of CD first degree relatives carrying a CARD15 3020insC mutation and 75% (3/4) of those CD‐R with combined 3020insC and R702W mutations had increased intestinal permeability compared with only 15% of wild‐types, indicating a genetic influence on barrier function. R702W and G908R mutations were not associated with high permeability. Conclusions In healthy first degree relatives, high mucosal permeability is associated with the presence of a CARD15 3020insC mutation. This indicates that genetic factors may be involved in impairment of intestinal barrier function in families with IBD. PMID:16000642

  13. Additive Genetic Variation in Schizophrenia Risk Is Shared by Populations of African and European Descent

    PubMed Central

    de Candia, Teresa R.; Lee, S. Hong; Yang, Jian; Browning, Brian L.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Hewitt, John K.; Goddard, Michael E.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Visscher, Peter M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Keller, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the extent to which the proportion of schizophrenia’s additive genetic variation tagged by SNPs is shared by populations of European and African descent, we analyzed the largest combined African descent (AD [n = 2,142]) and European descent (ED [n = 4,990]) schizophrenia case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) data set available, the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia (MGS) data set. We show how a method that uses genomic similarities at measured SNPs to estimate the additive genetic correlation (SNP correlation [SNP-rg]) between traits can be extended to estimate SNP-rg for the same trait between ethnicities. We estimated SNP-rg for schizophrenia between the MGS ED and MGS AD samples to be 0.66 (SE = 0.23), which is significantly different from 0 (p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003), but not 1 (p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.26). We re-estimated SNP-rg between an independent ED data set (n = 6,665) and the MGS AD sample to be 0.61 (SE = 0.21, p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003, p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.16). These results suggest that many schizophrenia risk alleles are shared across ethnic groups and predate African-European divergence. PMID:23954163

  14. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1) genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. Results. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S) gene polymorphism. IVS1−37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Conclusion. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population. PMID:24616641

  15. Molecular genetic analysis in mild hyperhomocysteinemia: A common mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is a genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Stevens, E.M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genetic aberrations in the cystathionine P-synthase (CBS) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genes may account for reduced enzyme activities and elevated plasma homocysteine levels. In 15 unrelated Dutch patients with homozygous CBS deficiency, we observed the 833T{yields}C (1278T) mutation in 50% of the alleles. Very recently, we identified a common mutation (677C{yields}T; A{yields}V) in the MTHFR gene, which, in homozygous state, is responsible for the thermolabile phenotype and which is associated with decreased specific MTHFR activity and elevated homocysteine levels. We screened 60 cardiovascular patients and 111 controls for these two mutations, to determine whether these mutations are risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease. Heterozygosity for the 833T{yields}C mutation in the CBS gene was observed in one individual of the control group but was absent in patients with premature cardiovascular disease. Homozygosity for the 677C-{yields}T mutation in the MTHFR gene was found in 9 (15%) of 60 cardiovascular patients and in only 6 ({approximately}5%) of 111 control individuals (odds ratio 3.1 [95% confidence interval 1.0-9.21]). Because of both the high prevalence of the 833T-{yields}C mutation among homozygotes for CBS deficiency and its absence in 60 cardiovascular patients, we may conclude that heterozygosity for CBS deficiency does not appear to be involved in premature cardiovascular disease. However, a frequent homozygous mutation in the MTHFR gene is associated with a threefold increase in risk for premature cardiovascular disease. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Searching for additional endocrine functions of the skeleton: genetic approaches and implications for therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianwen; Flaherty, Stephen; Karsenty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of whole organism physiology has greatly advanced in the past decades through mouse genetics. In particular, genetic studies have revealed that most organs interact with one another through hormones in order to maintain normal physiological functions and the homeostasis of the entire organism. Remarkably, through these studies many unexpected novel endocrine means to regulate physiological functions have been uncovered. The skeletal system is one example. In this article, we review a series of studies that over the years have identified bone as an endocrine organ. The mechanism of action, pathological relevance, and therapeutic implications of the functions of the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin are discussed. In the last part of this review we discuss the possibility that additional endocrine functions of the skeleton may exist.

  17. Genetic Panel Screening of Nearly 100 Mutations Reveals New Insights into the Breed Distribution of Risk Variants for Canine Hereditary Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Jonas; Möller, Fredrik; Kyöstilä, Kaisa; Sankari, Satu; Hytönen, Marjo; Giger, Urs; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Background The growing number of identified genetic disease risk variants across dog breeds challenges the current state-of-the-art of population screening, veterinary molecular diagnostics, and genetic counseling. Multiplex screening of such variants is now technologically feasible, but its practical potential as a supportive tool for canine breeding, disease diagnostics, pet care, and genetics research is still unexplored. Results To demonstrate the utility of comprehensive genetic panel screening, we tested nearly 7000 dogs representing around 230 breeds for 93 disease-associated variants using a custom-designed genotyping microarray (the MyDogDNA® panel test). In addition to known breed disease-associated mutations, we discovered 15 risk variants in a total of 34 breeds in which their presence was previously undocumented. We followed up on seven of these genetic findings to demonstrate their clinical relevance. We report additional breeds harboring variants causing factor VII deficiency, hyperuricosuria, lens luxation, von Willebrand’s disease, multifocal retinopathy, multidrug resistance, and rod-cone dysplasia. Moreover, we provide plausible molecular explanations for chondrodysplasia in the Chinook, cerebellar ataxia in the Norrbottenspitz, and familiar nephropathy in the Welsh Springer Spaniel. Conclusions These practical examples illustrate how genetic panel screening represents a comprehensive, efficient and powerful diagnostic and research discovery tool with a range of applications in veterinary care, disease research, and breeding. We conclude that several known disease alleles are more widespread across different breeds than previously recognized. However, careful follow up studies of any unexpected discoveries are essential to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, as is readiness to provide genetic counseling on their implications for the dog and its breed. PMID:27525650

  18. A general model for likelihood computations of genetic marker data accounting for linkage, linkage disequilibrium, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Egeland, Thore; Mostad, Petter

    2015-09-01

    Several applications necessitate an unbiased determination of relatedness, be it in linkage or association studies or in a forensic setting. An appropriate model to compute the joint probability of some genetic data for a set of persons given some hypothesis about the pedigree structure is then required. The increasing number of markers available through high-density SNP microarray typing and NGS technologies intensifies the demand, where using a large number of markers may lead to biased results due to strong dependencies between closely located loci, both within pedigrees (linkage) and in the population (allelic association or linkage disequilibrium (LD)). We present a new general model, based on a Markov chain for inheritance patterns and another Markov chain for founder allele patterns, the latter allowing us to account for LD. We also demonstrate a specific implementation for X chromosomal markers that allows for computation of likelihoods based on hypotheses of alleged relationships and genetic marker data. The algorithm can simultaneously account for linkage, LD, and mutations. We demonstrate its feasibility using simulated examples. The algorithm is implemented in the software FamLinkX, providing a user-friendly GUI for Windows systems (FamLinkX, as well as further usage instructions, is freely available at www.famlink.se ). Our software provides the necessary means to solve cases where no previous implementation exists. In addition, the software has the possibility to perform simulations in order to further study the impact of linkage and LD on computed likelihoods for an arbitrary set of markers. PMID:25425094

  19. Clinical, muscle pathological, and genetic features of Japanese facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2 (FSHD2) patients with SMCHD1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Kohei; Goto, Kanako; Arai, Mami; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Noguchi, Satoru; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2 (FSHD2) is a genetic muscular disorder characterized by DNA hypomethylation on the 4q-subtelomeric macrosatellite repeat array, D4Z4. FSHD2 is caused by heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (SMCHD1). Because there has been no study on FSHD2 in Asian populations, it is not known whether this disease mechanism is widely seen. To identify FSHD2 patients with SMCHD1 mutations in the Japanese population, bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to measure DNA methylation on the D4Z4 repeat array, and in patients with DNA hypomethylation, the SMCHD1 gene was sequenced by the Sanger method. Twenty patients with D4Z4 hypomethylation were identified. Of these, 13 patients from 11 unrelated families had ten novel and one reported SMCHD1 mutations: four splice-site, two nonsense, two in-frame deletion, two out-of-frame deletion, and one missense mutations. One of the splice-site mutations was homozygous in the single patient identified with this. In summary, we identified novel SMCHD1 mutations in a Japanese cohort of FSHD2 patients, confirming the presence of this disease in a wider population than previously known. PMID:27061275

  20. RET and EDNRB mutation screening in patients with Hirschsprung disease: Functional studies and its implications for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Widowati, Titis; Melhem, Shamiram; Patria, Suryono Y; de Graaf, Bianca M; Sinke, Richard J; Viel, Martijn; Dijkhuis, Jos; Sadewa, Ahmad H; Purwohardjono, Rochadi; Soenarto, Yati; Hofstra, Robert Mw; Sribudiani, Yunia

    2016-06-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a major cause of chronic constipation in children. HSCR can be caused by germline mutations in RET and EDNRB. Defining causality of the mutations identified is difficult and almost exclusively based on in silico predictions. Therefore, the reported frequency of pathogenic mutations might be overestimated. We combined mutation analysis with functional assays to determine the frequencies of proven pathogenic RET and EDNRB mutations in HSCR. We sequenced RET and EDNRB in 57 HSCR patients. The identified RET-coding variants were introduced into RET constructs and these were transfected into HEK293 cells to determine RET phosphorylation and activation via ERK. An exon trap experiment was performed to check a possible splice-site mutation. We identified eight rare RET-coding variants, one possible splice-site variant, but no rare EDNRB variants. Western blotting showed that three coding variants p.(Pr270Leu), p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys) resulted in lower activation of RET. Moreover, only two RET variants (p.(Ala756Val) and p.(Tyr1062Cys)) resulted in reduced ERK activation. Splice-site assays on c.1880-11A>G could not confirm its pathogenicity. Our data suggest that indeed almost half of the identified rare variants are proven pathogenic and that, hence, functional studies are essential for proper genetic counseling. PMID:26395553

  1. Effect of multiplicative and additive noise on genetic transcriptional regulatory mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Mei; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Liu, Liang-Gang; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2009-02-01

    A multiplicative noise and an additive noise are introduced in the kinetic model of Smolen-Baxter-Byrne [P. Smolen, D.A. Baxter, J.H. Byrne, Amer. J. Physiol. Cell. Physiol. 274 (1998) 531], in which the expression of gene is controlled by protein concentration of transcriptional activator. The Fokker-Planck equation is solved and the steady-state probability distribution is obtained numerically. It is found that the multiplicative noise converts the bistability to monostability that can be regarded as a noise-induced transition. The additive noise reduces the transcription efficiency. The correlation between the multiplicative noise and the additive noise works as a genetic switch and regulates the gene transcription effectively.

  2. Characterization and genetic mapping of a mutation affecting apurinic endonuclease activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J E; Pattee, P A

    1986-01-01

    Protoplast fusion between the Rec- mutant RN981 (L. Wyman, R. V. Goering, and R. P. Novick, Genetics 76:681-702, 1974) of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 and a Rec+ NCTC 8325 derivative yielded Rec+ recombinants that exhibited the increased sensitivity to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine characteristic of RN981. Transformation analyses identified a specific mutation, designated ngr-374, that was responsible not only for N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine sensitivity, but also sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrous acid, and UV irradiation. However, ngr-374-carrying recombinants showed no significant increase in their sensitivity to mitomycin C or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide and were unaffected in recombination proficiency. In vitro assays showed that ngr-374-carrying strains had lower apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities than the wild type. The chromosomal locus occupied by ngr-374 was shown to exist in the gene order omega(Chr::Tn551)40-ngr-374-thrB106. PMID:2430940

  3. Genetics of mutations affecting the development of a barley floral bract.

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, C; Faccioli, P; Terzi, V; Stanca, A M; Cerioli, S; Castiglioni, P; Fink, R; Capone, R; Müller, K J; Bossinger, G; Rohde, W; Salamini, F

    2000-01-01

    Two groups of mutants that affect the morphology of the lemma, a floral bract of barley, are described. The first comprises phenotypes associated with mutant alleles of calcaroides loci. On the lemma of these mutants, a well-organized neomorphic structure is formed, termed the sac. We provide a morphological description of wild-type (WT) and mutant lemmas, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), showing that both consist of similar tissues, but that the mutant is characterized by reversed growth polarity. The sac is a unique structure among grasses, and it is remarkable that recessive mutations at five different genetic loci lead to the same organ. The second group of mutants carry recessive alleles of two leafy lemma genes, both of which are necessary to cause the transformation of the lemma into a structure having all characteristics of a vegetative leaf, as shown by SEM analysis. The presence of sheath, blade, and ligule in the mutant lemma suggests that wild-type lemma development is interrupted at a leaf-like stage. The genes cal a, b, C, d, 23, lel1, and lel2 have now been mapped at precise positions on linkage groups 2, 7, 7, 3, 7, 5, and 7, respectively. The mutants considered in this article are unaffected in other floral organs. A model for lemma development is suggested. PMID:10757774

  4. FEMALE AND MALE GENETIC EFFECTS ON OFFSPRING PATERNITY: ADDITIVE GENETIC (CO)VARIANCES IN FEMALE EXTRA-PAIR REPRODUCTION AND MALE PATERNITY SUCCESS IN SONG SPARROWS (MELOSPIZA MELODIA)

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically. PMID:24724612

  5. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.; Carvalho, Livia S.; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha kleine; Cowing, Jill A.; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J.; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J.; Munro, Peter M.G.; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W.B.; Ali, Robin R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype–genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1rd8/rd8/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1rd8/rd8 lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1rd8/rd8 lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling—features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1rd8/rd8 line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype–phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  6. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Carvalho, Livia S; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Cowing, Jill A; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J; Munro, Peter M G; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype-genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1(rd8/rd8)/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling-features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1(rd8/rd8) line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  7. [Mutational Analysis of Hemophilia B in Russia: Molecular-Genetic Study].

    PubMed

    Surin, V L; Demidova, E Yu; Selivanova, D S; Luchinina, Yu A; Salomashkina, V V; Pshenichnikova, O S; Likhacheva, E A

    2016-04-01

    Hemophilia B is a hereditary X-linked coagulation disorder. This pathology is caused by various defects in the factor IX gene, which is, being about 34 kb long and consisting of eight exons, localized in the Xq27 locus of the. X-chromosome long arm. Mutations were revealed in 56 unrelated patients with hemophilia B in this study by using direct sequencing of factor IX gene functionally important fragments. Forty-six mutations were found with prevailing missense mutations (n = 30). The rest of the mutations were nonsense (n = 4) and splicing (n = 4) mutations, large deletions (n = 3), microdeletions (n = 2), microinsertions (n = 2), and promoter mutations (n = 1). Eleven of 46 mutations were previously unknown for human populations. PMID:27529981

  8. Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Huchard, E; Charmantier, A; English, S; Bateman, A; Nielsen, J F; Clutton-Brock, T

    2014-09-01

    Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a cooperative mongoose. Our results indicate that (i) the correlation between early growth (prior to nutritional independence) and adult mass is positive but weak, and there are frequent changes (compensatory growth) in post-independence growth trajectories; (ii) among parameters describing growth trajectories, those describing growth rate (prior to and at nutritional independence) show undetectable heritability while associated size parameters (mass at nutritional independence and asymptotic mass) are moderately heritable (0.09 ≤ h(2) < 0.3); and (iii) additive genetic effects, rather than early environmental effects, mediate the covariance between early growth and adult mass. These results reveal that meerkat growth trajectories remain plastic throughout development, rather than showing early and irreversible divergence, and that the weak effects of early growth on adult mass, an important determinant of breeding success, are partly genetic. In contrast to most cooperative invertebrates, the acquisition of breeding status is often determined after sexual maturity and strongly impacted by chance in many cooperative vertebrates, who may therefore retain the ability to adjust their morphology to environmental changes and social opportunities arising throughout their development, rather than specializing early. PMID:24962704

  9. AB085. Imprinting mutation of CDKN1C in Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: inheritance, genetic counselling and surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Hui Bein; Ong, Winnie Peitee; Haniffa, Muzhirah Aisha Md; Leong, Huey Yin; Krishnan, Thurga; Poh, Rozaida Yuen Ying; Thong, Meow Keong; Ishak, Mohd Taufik; Keng, Wee Teik

    2015-01-01

    Background Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS), a genetic overgrowth disorder is typified by exomphalos, macroglossia and neonatal gigantism. The molecular basis is known in approximately 80% of patients and is heterogeneous involving epigenetic and genetic changes at chromosome 11p15.5. An uncommon cause is a point mutation at CDKN1C found in approximately 5% of cases. When found, 1/3 of CDKN1C mutation is familial. We describe the first Malaysian family with CDKN1C mutation c.232C > T (Q78X), their clinical features, issues related to genetic counselling and subsequent follow-up. Case presentation Fifteen children fulfilling the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of BWS were included in a research study to uncover their genotype. One patient was found to carry the CDKN1C mutation c.232C > T (Q78X). This patient was the first child born to unrelated parents at 30+6/40 gestation. He was large for gestational age with a birth weight of 2.21 kg. He had an exomphalos, bilateral dysplastic kidneys and facial dysmorphism consistent with BWS. After a stormy neonatal period, he succumbed on day 17 of life. Before his molecular analysis was completed, his mother gave birth to a girl at 37+1/40 gestation; birth weight was 3.4 kg. This child was antenatally diagnosed with exomphalos and amniocentesis revealed normal karyotype. At birth, she had facial features of BWS, cleft palate and normal kidneys. Her exomphalos was surgically corrected on day 3 of life, after which she progressed well albeit with mild developmental delay. Their mother is phenotypically normal and carries the said pathogenic CDKN1C mutation. She is currently pregnant with her third child. Genetic counselling was provided and she fully comprehends the recurrence risk of 50% in this pregnancy as well as the availability of prenatal diagnostic testing. Prenatal testing was declined. Discussion and conclusions The diagnosis of BWS can be confidently achieved with well-established clinical criteria. However

  10. De novo rearrangements found in 2% of index patients with spinal muscular atrophy: mutational mechanisms, parental origin, mutation rate, and implications for genetic counseling.

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, B; Schmidt, T; Hahnen, E; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Krawczak, M; Müller-Myhsok, B; Schönling, J; Zerres, K

    1997-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a relatively common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder. We have identified de novo rearrangements in 7 (approximately 2%) index patients from 340 informative SMA families. In each, the rearrangements resulted in the absence of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene (telSMN), in two cases accompanied by the loss of the neuronal apoptosis-inhibitory protein gene . Haplotype analysis revealed unequal recombination in four cases, with loss of markers Ag1-CA and C212, which are near the 5' ends of the SMN genes. In one case, an interchromosomal rearrangement involving both the SMN genes and a regrouping of Ag1-CA and C212 alleles must have occurred, suggesting either interchromosomal gene conversion or double recombination. In two cases, no such rearrangement was observed, but loss of telSMN plus Ag1-CA and C212 alleles in one case suggested intrachromosomal deletion or gene conversion. In six of the seven cases, the de novo rearrangement had occurred during paternal meiosis. Direct detection of de novo SMA mutations by molecular genetic means has allowed us to estimate for the first time the mutation rate for a recessive disorder in humans. The sex-averaged rate of 1.1 x 10(-4), arrived at in a proband-based approach, compares well with the rate of 0.9 x 10(-4) expected under a mutation-selection equilibrium for SMA. These findings have important implications for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in that they emphasize the relevance of indirect genotype analysis in combination with direct SMN-gene deletion testing in SMA families. PMID:9345102

  11. De novo rearrangements found in 2% of index patients with spinal muscular atrophy: mutational mechanisms, parental origin, mutation rate, and implications for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Wirth, B; Schmidt, T; Hahnen, E; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Krawczak, M; Müller-Myhsok, B; Schönling, J; Zerres, K

    1997-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a relatively common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder. We have identified de novo rearrangements in 7 (approximately 2%) index patients from 340 informative SMA families. In each, the rearrangements resulted in the absence of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene (telSMN), in two cases accompanied by the loss of the neuronal apoptosis-inhibitory protein gene . Haplotype analysis revealed unequal recombination in four cases, with loss of markers Ag1-CA and C212, which are near the 5' ends of the SMN genes. In one case, an interchromosomal rearrangement involving both the SMN genes and a regrouping of Ag1-CA and C212 alleles must have occurred, suggesting either interchromosomal gene conversion or double recombination. In two cases, no such rearrangement was observed, but loss of telSMN plus Ag1-CA and C212 alleles in one case suggested intrachromosomal deletion or gene conversion. In six of the seven cases, the de novo rearrangement had occurred during paternal meiosis. Direct detection of de novo SMA mutations by molecular genetic means has allowed us to estimate for the first time the mutation rate for a recessive disorder in humans. The sex-averaged rate of 1.1 x 10(-4), arrived at in a proband-based approach, compares well with the rate of 0.9 x 10(-4) expected under a mutation-selection equilibrium for SMA. These findings have important implications for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in that they emphasize the relevance of indirect genotype analysis in combination with direct SMN-gene deletion testing in SMA families. PMID:9345102

  12. Common genetic variation at BARD1 is not associated with Breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, Amanda B.; Marquart, Louise; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga; Wan, Fei; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne-Catharine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Blum, Joanne L.; Tung, Nadine; Weitzel, Jeff; Lynch, Henry; Garber, Judy; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Selkirk, Christina G.; Daly, Mary; Isaacs, Claudine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Buecher, Bruno; Belotti, Muriel; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Pujol, Pascal; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Os, Theo A.; Wijnen, Juul; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Durocher, Francine; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Thomassen, Mads; Domchek, Susan; Nathanson, Kate; Caligo, MA; Jernström, Helena; Liljegren, Annelie; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Ganz, Patricia A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tomlinson, Gail; Neuhausen, Susan; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Knowledge of factors that can improve breast cancer risk assessment in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers may improve personalized cancer prevention strategies. Methods A cohort of 5,546 BRCA1 and 2,865 BRCA2 mutation carriers was used to evaluate risk of breast cancer associated with BARD1 Cys557Ser. In a second non-independent cohort of 1,537 of BRCA1 and 839 BRCA2 mutation carriers, BARD1 haplotypes were also evaluated. Results The BARD1 Cys557Ser variant was not significantly associated with risk of breast cancer from single SNP analysis, with a pooled effect estimate of 0.90 (95%CI: 0.71-1.15) in BRCA1 carriers and 0.87 (95%CI: 0.59-1.29) in BRCA2 carriers. Further analysis of haplotypes at BARD1 also revealed no evidence that additional common genetic variation not captured by Cys557Ser was associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusion Evidence to date does not support a role for BARD1 variation, including the Cy557Ser variant, as a modifier of risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Impact Interactors of BRCA1/2 have been implicated as modifiers of BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk. Our finding that BARD1 does not contribute to this risk modification may focus research on other genes that do modify BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk. PMID:21393566

  13. Digenic mutations in severe congenital neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Germeshausen, Manuela; Zeidler, Cornelia; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Lanciotti, Marina; Ballmaier, Matthias; Welte, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Mutations in different genes have been described as causative for severe neutropenia, e.g. ELANE, HAX1 and G6PC3. Although congenital neutropenia is considered to be a group of monogenic disorders, the phenotypic heterogeneity even within the yet defined genetic subtypes points to additional genetic and/or epigenetic influences on the disease phenotype. We describe congenital neutropenia patients with mutations in two candidate genes each, including 6 novel mutations. Two of them had a heterozygous ELANE mutation combined with a homozygous mutation in G6PC3 or HAX1, respectively. The other 2 patients combined homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in G6PC3 or HAX1 with a heterozygous mutation in the respective other gene. Our results suggest that digenicity may underlie this disorder of myelopoiesis at least in some congenital neutropenia patients. PMID:20220065

  14. A genome-editing strategy to treat β-hemoglobinopathies that recapitulates a mutation associated with a benign genetic condition.

    PubMed

    Traxler, Elizabeth A; Yao, Yu; Wang, Yong-Dong; Woodard, Kaitly J; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hughes, Jim R; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A; Li, Chunliang; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2016-09-01

    Disorders resulting from mutations in the hemoglobin subunit beta gene (HBB; which encodes β-globin), mainly sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia, become symptomatic postnatally as fetal γ-globin expression from two paralogous genes, hemoglobin subunit gamma 1 (HBG1) and HBG2, decreases and adult β-globin expression increases, thereby shifting red blood cell (RBC) hemoglobin from the fetal (referred to as HbF or α2γ2) to adult (referred to as HbA or α2β2) form. These disorders are alleviated when postnatal expression of fetal γ-globin is maintained. For example, in hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH), a benign genetic condition, mutations attenuate γ-globin-to-β-globin switching, causing high-level HbF expression throughout life. Co-inheritance of HPFH with β-thalassemia- or SCD-associated gene mutations alleviates their clinical manifestations. Here we performed CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing of human blood progenitors to mutate a 13-nt sequence that is present in the promoters of the HBG1 and HBG2 genes, thereby recapitulating a naturally occurring HPFH-associated mutation. Edited progenitors produced RBCs with increased HbF levels that were sufficient to inhibit the pathological hypoxia-induced RBC morphology found in SCD. Our findings identify a potential DNA target for genome-editing-mediated therapy of β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:27525524

  15. Genetic and biochemical characterization of mutations affecting the ability of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to metabolize D-xylose

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.P.; Zahab, D.M.; Mahmourides, G.; Maleszka, R.; Schneider, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Induced mutants, selected for their defective growth on D-xylose while retaining the ability to grow normally on D-glucose, were studied in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast capable of converting D-xylose to ethanol. Fourteen of the mutations were found to occur at nine distinct loci, and data indicated that many more loci remain to be detected. Most of the mutations were pleiotropic in character, and the expression of some of them was much affected by nutritional conditions and by genetic background. Mutations at several loci resulted in poor growth on at least one compound that was either an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, succinate or {alpha}-ketoglutarate, or on compounds metabolizable via this cycle, ethanol or glycerol. An initial biochemical characterization of the mutants was undertaken. Analysis for xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulose kinase activity showed that one or more of these activities was affected in 12 of 13 mutants. However, drastic reduction in activity of a single enzyme was confined to that of xylitol dehydrogenase by mutations at three different loci and to that of D-xylose reductase by mutation at another locus. Growth of these latter four mutants was normal on all carbon sources tested that were not five-carbon sugars.

  16. An F1 genetic screen for maternal-effect mutations affecting embryonic pattern formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Luschnig, Stefan; Moussian, Bernard; Krauss, Jana; Desjeux, Isabelle; Perkovic, Josip; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale screens for female-sterile mutations have revealed genes required maternally for establishment of the body axes in the Drosophila embryo. Although it is likely that the majority of components involved in axis formation have been identified by this approach, certain genes have escaped detection. This may be due to (1) incomplete saturation of the screens for female-sterile mutations and (2) genes with essential functions in zygotic development that mutate to lethality, precluding their identification as female-sterile mutations. To overcome these limitations, we performed a genetic mosaic screen aimed at identifying new maternal genes required for early embryonic patterning, including zygotically required ones. Using the Flp-FRT technique and a visible germline clone marker, we developed a system that allows efficient screening for maternal-effect phenotypes after only one generation of breeding, rather than after the three generations required for classic female-sterile screens. We identified 232 mutants showing various defects in embryonic pattern or morphogenesis. The mutants were ordered into 10 different phenotypic classes. A total of 174 mutants were assigned to 86 complementation groups with two alleles on average. Mutations in 45 complementation groups represent most previously known maternal genes, while 41 complementation groups represent new loci, including several involved in dorsoventral, anterior-posterior, and terminal patterning. PMID:15166158

  17. Guided macro-mutation in a graded energy based genetic algorithm for protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahmood A; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Khatib, Firas; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    Protein structure prediction is considered as one of the most challenging and computationally intractable combinatorial problem. Thus, the efficient modeling of convoluted search space, the clever use of energy functions, and more importantly, the use of effective sampling algorithms become crucial to address this problem. For protein structure modeling, an off-lattice model provides limited scopes to exercise and evaluate the algorithmic developments due to its astronomically large set of data-points. In contrast, an on-lattice model widens the scopes and permits studying the relatively larger proteins because of its finite set of data-points. In this work, we took the full advantage of an on-lattice model by using a face-centered-cube lattice that has the highest packing density with the maximum degree of freedom. We proposed a graded energy-strategically mixes the Miyazawa-Jernigan (MJ) energy with the hydrophobic-polar (HP) energy-based genetic algorithm (GA) for conformational search. In our application, we introduced a 2×2 HP energy guided macro-mutation operator within the GA to explore the best possible local changes exhaustively. Conversely, the 20×20 MJ energy model-the ultimate objective function of our GA that needs to be minimized-considers the impacts amongst the 20 different amino acids and allow searching the globally acceptable conformations. On a set of benchmark proteins, our proposed approach outperformed state-of-the-art approaches in terms of the free energy levels and the root-mean-square deviations. PMID:26878130

  18. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  19. Single-cell codetection of metabolic activity, intracellular functional proteins, and genetic mutations from rare circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yin; Sun, Shuai; Wang, Zhihua; Wu, Wenjun; Zhao, Xiaodong; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Yan; Tian, Jianhui; Xu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Deng, Yuliang; Shi, Qihui

    2015-10-01

    The high glucose uptake and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways in cancer cells has long made these features, together with the mutational spectrum, prime diagnostic targets of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Further, an ability to characterize these properties at a single cell resolution is widely believed to be essential, as the known extensive heterogeneity in CTCs can obscure important correlations in data obtained from cell population-based methods. However, to date, it has not been possible to quantitatively measure metabolic, proteomic, and genetic data from a single CTC. Here we report a microchip-based approach that allows for the codetection of glucose uptake, intracellular functional proteins, and genetic mutations at the single-cell level from rare tumor cells. The microchip contains thousands of nanoliter grooves (nanowells) that isolate individual CTCs and allow for the assessment of their glucose uptake via imaging of a fluorescent glucose analog, quantification of a panel of intracellular signaling proteins using a miniaturized antibody barcode microarray, and retrieval of the individual cell nuclei for subsequent off-chip genome amplification and sequencing. This approach integrates molecular-scale information on the metabolic, proteomic, and genetic status of single cells and permits the inference of associations between genetic signatures, energy consumption, and phosphoproteins oncogenic signaling activities in CTCs isolated from blood samples of patients. Importantly, this microchip chip-based approach achieves this multidimensional molecular analysis with minimal cell loss (<20%), which is the bottleneck of the rare cell analysis. PMID:26378744

  20. Genetic Rearrangements of Six Wheat–Agropyron cristatum 6P Addition Lines Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat–A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat–A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  1. Additional mutations in SRSF2, ASXL1 and/or RUNX1 identify a high-risk group of patients with KIT D816V(+) advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Jawhar, M; Schwaab, J; Schnittger, S; Meggendorfer, M; Pfirrmann, M; Sotlar, K; Horny, H-P; Metzgeroth, G; Kluger, S; Naumann, N; Haferlach, C; Haferlach, T; Valent, P; Hofmann, W-K; Fabarius, A; Cross, N C P; Reiter, A

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with KIT D816V(+) advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM) are characterized by somatic mutations in additional genes. We sought to clarify the prognostic impact of such mutations. Genotype and clinical characteristics of 70 multi-mutated KIT D816V(+) advanced SM patients were included in univariate and multivariate analyses. The most frequently identified mutated genes were TET2 (n=33 of 70 patients), SRSF2 (n=30), ASXL1 (n=20), RUNX1 (n=16) and JAK2 (n=11). In univariate analysis, overall survival (OS) was adversely influenced by mutations in SRSF2 (P<0.0001), ASXL1 (P=0.002) and RUNX1 (P=0.03), but was not influenced by mutations in TET2 or JAK2. In multivariate analysis, SRSF2 and ASXL1 remained the most predictive adverse indicators concerning OS. Furthermore, we found that inferior OS and adverse clinical characteristics were significantly influenced by the number of mutated genes in the SRSF2/ASXL1/RUNX1 (S/A/R) panel (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the presence and number of mutated genes within the S/A/R panel are adversely associated with advanced disease and poor survival in KIT D816V(+) SM. On the basis of these findings, inclusion of molecular markers should be considered in upcoming prognostic scoring systems for patients with SM. PMID:26464169

  2. Genetic and phenotypic diversity of NHE6 mutations in Christianson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pescosolido, Matthew F.; Stein, David M.; Schmidt, Michael; Achkar, Christelle Moufawad El; Sabbagh, Mark; Rogg, Jeffrey M.; Tantravahi, Umadevi; McLean, Rebecca L.; Liu, Judy S.; Poduri, Annapurna; Morrow, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recently, Christianson syndrome (CS) has been determined to be caused by mutations in the X-linked Na+/H+ Exchanger 6 (NHE6). We aimed to determine the diagnostic criteria and mutational spectrum for CS. Methods Twelve independent pedigrees (14 boys, ages 4 to 19) with mutations in NHE6 were administered standardized research assessments and mutations were characterized. Results The mutational spectrum was composed of 9 single nucleotide variants (SNVs), 2 indels and 1 CNV deletion. All mutations were protein-truncating or splicing mutations. We identified two recurrent mutations (c.1498 c>t, p.R500X; and c.1710 g>a, p.W570X). Otherwise, all mutations were unique. In our study, seven of 12 mutations (58%) were de novo, in contrast to prior literature wherein mutations were largely inherited. We also report prominent neurological, medical and behavioral symptoms. All CS participants were non-verbal and had intellectual disability, epilepsy and ataxia. Many had prior diagnoses of autism and/or Angelman syndrome. Other neurologic symptoms included eye movement abnormalities (79%), postnatal microcephaly (92%) and MRI evidence of cerebellar atrophy (33%). Regression was noted in 50%, with recurrent presentations involving loss of words and/or the ability to walk. Medical symptoms, particularly gastrointestinal symptoms, were common. Height and body mass index measures were below normal ranges in most participants. Behavioral symptoms included hyperkinetic behavior (100%) and a majority exhibited high pain threshold. Interpretation This is the largest cohort of independent CS pedigrees reported. We propose diagnostic criteria for CS. CS represents a novel neurogenetic disorder with general relevance to autism, intellectual disability, Angelman syndrome, epilepsy and regression. PMID:25044251

  3. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  4. Heritability of heterozygosity offers a new way of understanding why dominant gene action contributes to additive genetic variance.

    PubMed

    Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2015-07-01

    Whenever allele frequencies are unequal, nonadditive gene action contributes to additive genetic variance and therefore the resemblance between parents and offspring. The reason for this has not been easy to understand. Here, we present a new single-locus decomposition of additive genetic variance that may give greater intuition about this important result. We show that the contribution of dominant gene action to parent-offspring resemblance only depends on the degree to which the heterozygosity of parents and offspring covary. Thus, dominant gene action only contributes to additive genetic variance when heterozygosity is heritable. Under most circumstances this is the case because individuals with rare alleles are more likely to be heterozygous, and because they pass rare alleles to their offspring they also tend to have heterozygous offspring. When segregating alleles are at equal frequency there are no rare alleles, the heterozygosities of parents and offspring are uncorrelated and dominant gene action does not contribute to additive genetic variance. PMID:26100570

  5. Alternative mutational pathways, outside the VPg, of rice yellow mottle virus to overcome eIF(iso)4G-mediated rice resistance under strong genetic constraints.

    PubMed

    Poulicard, Nils; Pinel-Galzi, Agnès; Fargette, Denis; Hébrard, Eugénie

    2014-01-01

    The adaptation of rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV) to rymv1-mediated resistance has been reported to involve mutations in the viral genome-linked protein (VPg). In this study, we analysed several cases of rymv1-2 resistance breakdown by an isolate with low adaptability. Surprisingly, in these rarely occurring resistance-breaking (RB) genotypes, mutations were detected outside the VPg, in the ORF2a/ORF2b overlapping region. The causal role of three mutations associated with rymv1-2 resistance breakdown was validated via directed mutagenesis of an infectious clone. In resistant plants, these mutations increased viral accumulation as efficiently as suboptimal RB mutations in the VPg. Interestingly, these mutations are located in a highly conserved, but unfolded, domain. Altogether, our results indicate that under strong genetic constraints, a priori unfit genotypes can follow alternative mutational pathways, i.e. outside the VPg, to overcome rymv1-2 resistance. PMID:24141250

  6. [Muscular dystrophy due to mutations in anoctamin 5: clinical and molecular genetic findings].

    PubMed

    Deschauer, M; Joshi, P R; Gläser, D; Hanisch, F; Stoltenburg, G; Zierz, S

    2011-12-01

    Recessive mutations in the anoctamin 5 (ANO5) gene have been recently identified in families with limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L) and distal non-dysferlin Miyoshi myopathy. Anoctamin 5 is supposed to be a putative calcium-activated chloride channel. We report five German patients (four index patients) with muscle dystrophy due to mutations in the ANO5 gene. Sequencing of the ANO5 exons 5, 13 and 20 was performed to screen for a common c.191dupA mutation and two other reported mutations (c.1295C>G and p.R758C). The whole coding region of the ANO5 gene was sequenced to identify new mutations. Phenotypically, three patients showed LGMD and one patient Miyoshi type distal myopathy. One sibling had asymptomatic hyperCKemia. The age at onset was 64, 38 and 40 years in patients with LGMD and 23 years in the patient with distal myopathy. The four symptomatic patients showed remarkable asymmetric muscle involvement. There was marked CK elevation (11 to 30 times). Electron microscopy showed multifocal gaps in the sarcolemmal membrane. All patients harboured the common c.191dupA mutation in at least one allele. Two patients with LGMD were homozygous and the third patient and his asymptomatic sister were compound heterozygous for the c.191dupA mutation and a novel p.T548I mutation. The patient with distal myopathy harboured the p.R758C mutation in the second allele. Mutations in the ANO5 gene seem to be a relatively common cause of muscular dystrophy in Germany. Cases with late onset or asymptomatic hyperCKemia can occur. Clinically, asymmetric manifestation is typical. PMID:21739273

  7. Mitochondrial D310 mutations in colorectal adenomas: an early but not causative genetic event during colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Legras, Antoine; Lièvre, Astrid; Bonaiti-Pellié, Catherine; Cottet, Vanessa; Pariente, Alexandre; Nalet, Bernard; Lafon, Jacques; Faivre, Jean; Bonithon-Kopp, Claire; Goasguen, Nicolas; Penna, Christophe; Olschwang, Sylviane; Laurent-Puig, Pierre

    2008-05-15

    Somatic mutations of the D310 sequence of the mitochondrial DNA are reported in human cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRC). The presence of these mutations at early or late steps of colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Their prevalence increased significantly with the number of cytosines in the D310 sequence of the matched normal tissue (D310 polymorphism), suggesting that this polymorphism could be a risk factor for CRC. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the prevalence of D310 mutations in 64 colorectal adenomas and 36 liver metastases from 15 CRC patients, (ii) to assess the relation between D310 polymorphism and the risk of colorectal adenoma in a case-control study including 613 cases with colorectal adenoma and 572 polyp-free (PF) controls. D310 mutations were found in colorectal adenomas and liver metastases from CRC patients in 27 and 33%, respectively and so are an early genetic event in colorectal carcinogenesis. The frequency of the mutations increased significantly with the number of cytosines in the matched normal tissue D310 sequence (p < 0.001) but the distribution of D310 polymorphisms was not significantly different between adenoma cases (large (>9 mm) and small (<5 mm) adenomas) and PF controls (C(4)-C(7)TC(6): 47, 52 and 49%; C(8)TC(6): 44, 39 and 41%; C(9)-C(10)TC(6): 9, 9 and 10%, respectively; p > 0.05), suggesting that germline D310 polymorphism is not a risk factor for colorectal adenomas. Considering their high frequency in colorectal adenomas, mitochondrial D310 mutations could represent a biomarker for early detection of CRC although their causative role in colorectal carcinogenesis remains uncertain. PMID:18224678

  8. Genetic mutation analysis in Japanese patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akiko; Morisaki, Hiroko; Nakaji, Mai; Kitano, Masataka; Kim, Ki-Sung; Sagawa, Koichi; Ishikawa, Shiro; Satokata, Ichiro; Mitani, Yoshihide; Kato, Hitoshi; Hamaoka, Kenji; Echigo, Shigeyuki; Shiraishi, Isao; Morisaki, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect occurring in humans and some transcriptional factors have been identified as causative. However, additional mutation analysis of these genes is necessary to develop effective diagnostic and medical treatment methods. We conducted sequence analysis of the coding regions of NKX2.5, GATA4, TBX1, TBX5, TBX20, CFC1 and ZIC3 in 111 Japanese patients with non-syndromic CHD and 9 of their relatives. All patient samples were also analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification using probes involved in chromosome deletion related to CHD. Five novel variations of TBX5, GATA4 and TBX20 were detected in 6 of the patients, whereas none were found in 200 controls. The TBX5 variation p.Pro108Thr, located in the T-box domain, was identified in a patient with tricuspid atresia, an exon-intron boundary variation of GATA4 (IVS4+5G>A) was detected in a Tetralogy of Fallot patient and an 8p23 microdeletion was detected in one patient with atrioventricular septal defect and psychomotor delay. A total of seven non-synonymous polymorphisms were found in the patients and controls. Accumulation of novel variations of genes involving the cardiac development may be required for better understanding of CHD. PMID:26490186

  9. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-06-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  10. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Li; Mu, Kai; Ma, Xiang-Wei; Sun, Jing-Li; Bai, Xiao-Zhong; Lin, Chang-Kun; Jin, Chun-Lian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. Results: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. Conclusion: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis. PMID:25330515

  11. Characterization of a New DGKE Intronic Mutation in Genetically Unsolved Cases of Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mele, Caterina; Lemaire, Mathieu; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Piras, Rossella; Bresin, Elena; Bettoni, Serena; Bick, David; Helbling, Daniel; Veith, Regan; Valoti, Elisabetta; Donadelli, Roberta; Murer, Luisa; Neunhäuserer, Maria; Breno, Matteo; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Lifton, Richard; Noris, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Genetic and acquired abnormalities causing dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, nonimmune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. However, in a substantial proportion of patients the disease-associated alterations are still unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing were performed in two unrelated families with infantile recessive aHUS. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals was used to test for the presence of aberrant mRNA species. Expression of mutant diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKE) protein was evaluated with western blotting. Results Whole-exome sequencing analysis with conventional variant filtering parameters did not reveal any obvious candidate mutation in the first family. The report of aHUS-associated mutations in DGKE, encoding DGKE, led to re-examination of the noncoding DGKE variants obtained from next-generation sequencing, allowing identification of a novel intronic DGKE mutation (c.888+40A>G) that segregated with disease. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals revealed aberrant forms of DGKE mRNA predicted to cause profound abnormalities in the protein catalytic site. By whole-genome sequencing, the same mutation was found in compound heterozygosity with a second nonsense DGKE mutation in all affected siblings of another unrelated family. Homozygous and compound heterozygous patients presented similar clinical features, including aHUS presentation in the first year of life, multiple relapsing episodes, and proteinuria, which are prototypical of DGKE-associated aHUS. Conclusions This is the first report of a mutation located beyond the exon-intron boundaries in aHUS. Intronic mutations such as these are underreported because conventional filtering parameters used to process next-generation sequencing data routinely

  12. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    PubMed

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes. PMID:26801640

  13. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  14. Nonsense Mutations in the Maltose A Region of the Genetic Map of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Dolph; Hofnung, Maurice; Schwartz, Maxime

    1969-01-01

    The isolation of one amber mutation in malQ, one ochre mutation in malP, and seven amber mutations in malT is reported. A study of their phenotypic expressions in the presence of the amber suppressor suIII and the ochre suppressor suc suggests that (i) malQ is the structural gene for amylomaltase; (ii) malQ and the structural gene for maltodextrin phosphorylase, malP, belong to the same operon; (iii) the malT product, which promotes the expression of the malP-malQ operon, is a protein synthesized in limiting amounts by the wild-type strain. PMID:4902812

  15. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Drenth, Joost P.H.; Waxman, Stephen G.

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX α subunit, known as Nav1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Nav1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Nav1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Nav1.7 result in loss of Nav1.7 function and a condition known as channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain, a rare disorder in which affected individuals are unable to feel physical pain. This review highlights these recent developments and discusses the critical role of Nav1.7 in pain sensation in humans. PMID:18060017

  16. Clinical and genetic studies in a family with a new splice-site mutation in the choroideremia gene

    PubMed Central

    Piane, Maria; Cascone, Nikhil C.; Pasquale, Nadia; Ciarnella, Angela; Recupero, Santi M.; Chessa, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical and molecular findings of an Italian family with a new mutation in the choroideremia (CHM) gene. Methods We performed a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, macular optical coherence tomography, perimetry, electroretinography, and fluorescein angiography in an Italian family. The clinical diagnosis was supported by western blot analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with CHM and carriers, using a monoclonal antibody against the 415 C-terminal amino acids of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1). Sequencing of the CHM gene was undertaken on genomic DNA from affected men and carriers; the RNA transcript was analyzed with reverse transcriptase-PCR. Results The affected men showed a variability in the rate of visual change and in the degree of clinical and functional ophthalmologic involvement, mainly age-related, while the women displayed aspecific areas of chorioretinal degeneration. Western blot did not show a detectable amount of normal REP-1 protein in affected men who were hemizygous for a novel mutation, c.819+2T>A at the donor splicing site of intron 6 of the CHM gene; the mutation was confirmed in heterozygosity in the carriers. Conclusions Western blot of the REP-1 protein confirmed the clinical diagnosis, and molecular analysis showed the new in-frame mutation, c.819+2T>A, leading to loss of function of the REP-1 protein. These results emphasize the value of a diagnostic approach that correlates genetic and ophthalmologic data for identifying carriers in families with CHM. An early diagnosis might be crucial for genetic counseling of this type of progressive and still untreatable disease. PMID:24672218

  17. Racial variations in frequency and phenotypes of APC and MUTYH mutations in 6,169 individuals undergoing genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Inra, Jennifer A.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Grover, Shilpa; McFarland, Ashley; Syngal, Sapna; Kastrinos, Fay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether differences in frequency and phenotype of APC and MUTYH mutations exist among racially/ethnically diverse populations. Methods 6169 individuals with personal and/or family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) and polyps were studied. APC testing involved full sequencing/large rearrangement analysis (FS/LRA); MUTYH involved “panel testing” (for Y165C, G382D mutations), or FS/LRA, performed by Myriad Genetics, a commercial laboratory. Subjects were identified as Caucasian, Asian, African American (AA), or Other. Statistical tests included Chi-Square, Fisher’s Exact, ANOVA and z-approximation. Results 17.5% had pathogenic APC mutations. 4.8% were biallelic MUTYH carriers. 18% were non-Caucasian with >100 adenomas and younger ages of adenoma or CRC diagnosis (p<0.0001) than Caucasians. The overall APC mutation rate was higher in Asians, AAs and Others compared to Caucasians (25.2%, 30.9%, 24%, 15.5%;p<0.0001) but similar in all groups when adjusted for polyp burden. More MUTYH biallelic carriers were Caucasian or Other than Asian or AA (5%, 7%, 2.7%, 0.3%;p<0.0001). Among Caucasians, 5% were biallelic carriers identified by panel testing versus 2% by sequencing/LRA (p=0.002). Among non-Caucasians, 3% undergoing panel testing were biallelic carriers versus 10% identified by sequencing/LRA(p<0.0002). Conclusion Non-Caucasians undergo genetic testing at more advanced stages of polyposis and/or younger ages of CRC/polyp diagnosis. Restricted MUTYH analysis may miss significant numbers of biallelic carriers, particularly in non-Caucasians. PMID:25590978

  18. Attitudes and distress levels in women at risk to carry a BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutation who decline genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Lodder, Litanja; Frets, Petra G; Trijsburg, R Willem; Klijn, Jan G M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus, Madeleine M A; Bartels, Carina C M; Meijers-Heijboer, E Johanna; Verhoog, Leon C; Niermeijer, Martinus F

    2003-06-15

    Genetic testing enables women at risk for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer to find out whether they have inherited the gene mutation, and if so, to opt for undergoing frequent surveillance and/or prophylactic surgery. However, the option to know about one's genetic status is not always seen as a benefit by women at risk. Motives for declining genetic testing were explored in 13 women at 25% or 50% risk to be a BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carrier, who participated in a surveillance program for breast/ovarian cancer (the non-tested group). We hypothesized that high anxiety might be an important motive to decline testing. In addition, we investigated whether the non-tested group differed from a reference group of women who did undergo the test (tested group; n = 85) with regard to biographical factors, experience with cancer in relatives, and personality traits. Most non-tested women (10/13) were satisfied with participating in the surveillance program. Four reported to feel emotionally unprepared to cope with the consequences of testing. Compared with the tested group, the non-tested women had similar mean distress levels (which were not high), but a higher education level, they were more often childless, showed more reluctance towards prophylactic surgery, were younger when first confronted with a relative affected with breast/ovarian cancer, and were longer aware of the genetic nature of the disease. This study showed that women were more likely to have thoroughly reflected on their decision not to undergo genetic testing, than to deny the whole issue due to high anxiety. Being confronted at a relatively young age with breast/ovarian cancer in a relative, and being aware of the genetic risk for a many years, may have resulted in the risk for cancer becoming an integrated part of their lives. However, generalization of these results to women who neither underwent the test nor participated in a surveillance program should be considered with caution. PMID:12784290

  19. Genetic alterations in uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors: BRAF, FGFR1, and MYB mutations occur at high frequency and align with morphology.

    PubMed

    Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Orisme, Wilda; Wen, Ji; Santiago, Teresa; Gupta, Kirti; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Haupfear, Kelly; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Easton, John; Mulder, Heather; Boggs, Kristy; Shao, Ying; Rusch, Michael; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Shuoguo; Lee, Ryan P; Brat, Daniel; Peter Collins, V; Dahiya, Sonika; George, David; Konomos, William; Kurian, Kathreena M; McFadden, Kathryn; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Nickols, Hilary; Perry, Arie; Shurtleff, Sheila; Gajjar, Amar; Boop, Fredrick A; Klimo, Paul D; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Baker, Suzanne J; Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Downing, James R; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Ellison, David W

    2016-06-01

    Low-grade neuroepithelial tumors (LGNTs) are diverse CNS tumors presenting in children and young adults, often with a history of epilepsy. While the genetic profiles of common LGNTs, such as the pilocytic astrocytoma and 'adult-type' diffuse gliomas, are largely established, those of uncommon LGNTs remain to be defined. In this study, we have used massively parallel sequencing and various targeted molecular genetic approaches to study alterations in 91 LGNTs, mostly from children but including young adult patients. These tumors comprise dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs; n = 22), diffuse oligodendroglial tumors (d-OTs; n = 20), diffuse astrocytomas (DAs; n = 17), angiocentric gliomas (n = 15), and gangliogliomas (n = 17). Most LGNTs (84 %) analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) were characterized by a single driver genetic alteration. Alterations of FGFR1 occurred frequently in LGNTs composed of oligodendrocyte-like cells, being present in 82 % of DNETs and 40 % of d-OTs. In contrast, a MYB-QKI fusion characterized almost all angiocentric gliomas (87 %), and MYB fusion genes were the most common genetic alteration in DAs (41 %). A BRAF:p.V600E mutation was present in 35 % of gangliogliomas and 18 % of DAs. Pathogenic alterations in FGFR1/2/3, BRAF, or MYB/MYBL1 occurred in 78 % of the series. Adult-type d-OTs with an IDH1/2 mutation occurred in four adolescents, the youngest aged 15 years at biopsy. Despite a detailed analysis, novel genetic alterations were limited to two fusion genes, EWSR1-PATZ1 and SLMAP-NTRK2, both in gangliogliomas. Alterations in BRAF, FGFR1, or MYB account for most pathogenic alterations in LGNTs, including pilocytic astrocytomas, and alignment of these genetic alterations and cytologic features across LGNTs has diagnostic implications. Additionally, therapeutic options based upon targeting the effects of these alterations are already in clinical trials. PMID:26810070

  20. Genetic analysis of a pleiotropic deletion mutation (delta igf) in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, T

    1983-01-01

    A delta igf mutation of Bacillus subtilis (formerly called fdpAl) is a large deletion causing pleiotropic defects. The mapping of the delta igf deletion by phage PBS1 transduction revealed the following map order: sacA, thiC, hsrE, delta igf, ts199, purA. To analyze the pleiotropic nature of the delta igf mutation, mutants affected in each property of the pleiotropic mutation were isolated, and the mutations were mapped. iol and gnt mutants could not grow on inositol and gluconate, respectively, and fdp mutants were affected only in fructose-bisphosphatase. The map order from sacA to purA was as follows: sacA, thiC, hsrE, iol-6, gnt-4, fdp-74, hsrB, ts199, purA. The delta igf deletion covered loci from iol-6 to hsrB. PMID:6302085

  1. The genetic epidemiology of the form of microcephaly ascribed to mutation at the WDR62 locus.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alan Edmund

    2016-08-01

    The disorder associated with mutation in the WDR62 gene MCPH2 is taken as the prototype of a condition which has a recessive mode of inheritance. The mutant homozygote has relatively lower fitness defined by the selection coefficient. Formulae which relate the incidence of the disorder to the mutation rate and the gene frequency in equilibrium when some degree of inbreeding occurs in the population are given. PMID:27570775

  2. The genetic epidemiology of the form of microcephaly ascribed to mutation at the WDR62 locus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The disorder associated with mutation in the WDR62 gene MCPH2 is taken as the prototype of a condition which has a recessive mode of inheritance. The mutant homozygote has relatively lower fitness defined by the selection coefficient. Formulae which relate the incidence of the disorder to the mutation rate and the gene frequency in equilibrium when some degree of inbreeding occurs in the population are given. PMID:27570775

  3. Idh1 mutations contribute to the development of T-cell malignancies in genetically engineered mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhenyue; Cairns, Rob A.; Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y.; Sheng, Yi; Lemonnier, François; Wakeham, Andrew; Snow, Bryan E.; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Ye, Jing; Larsen, Dana M.; Straley, Kimberly S.; Tobin, Erica R.; Narayanaswamy, Rohini; Gaulard, Philippe; Mak, Tak W.

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are key drivers of hematopoietic malignancies. Although these mutations are most commonly associated with myeloid diseases, they also occur in malignancies of the T-cell lineage. To investigate their role in these diseases and provide tractable disease models for further investigation, we analyzed the T-cell compartment in a conditional knock-in (KI) mouse model of mutant Idh1. We observed the development of a spontaneous T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in these animals. The disease was transplantable and maintained expression of mutant IDH1. Whole-exome sequencing revealed the presence of a spontaneous activating mutation in Notch1, one of the most common mutations in human T-ALL, suggesting Idh1 mutations may have the capacity to cooperate with Notch1 to drive T-ALL. To further investigate the Idh1 mutation as an oncogenic driver in the T-cell lineage, we crossed Idh1-KI mice with conditional Trp53 null mice, a well-characterized model of T-cell malignancy, and found that T-cell lymphomagenesis was accelerated in mice bearing both mutations. Because both IDH1 and p53 are known to affect cellular metabolism, we compared the requirements for glucose and glutamine in cells derived from these tumors and found that cells bearing the Idh1 mutation have an increased dependence on both glucose and glutamine. These data suggest that mutant IDH1 contributes to malignancy in the T-cell lineage and may alter the metabolic profile of malignant T cells. PMID:26787889

  4. Spatio-temporal genetic heterogeneity of CTNNB1 mutations in sporadic desmoid type fibromatosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Jérôme; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Hostein, Isabelle; Karanian-Philippe, Marie; Chevreau, Christine; Breibach, Florence; Coutts, Michael; Dadone, Bérengère; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Gugenheim, Jean; Duffaud, Florence; Pedeutour, Florence

    2016-03-01

    Desmoid type fibromatosis (DT) is a rare lesion of unclear pathogenesis that most often presents a mutation of the (β-catenin) gene. The natural history and clinical evolution are highly variable between patients and to date there is no consensus on optimal therapy. We report two cases of a patient with multiple DT lesions. Molecular investigations performed in both patients on multiple tumors at different anatomical sites revealed non-identical CTNNB1 mutations. The first patient was a 39-year-old man with a history of recurrent DT. In two of the DT lesions, three different mutations were found in codons 41 and 45, respectively. The lesions showed marked inflammatory features, characterized by IgG4 positive lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and a foreign body reaction, which increased in intensity over time. The patient was eventually treated with a COX-2 inhibitor and the remaining mass was stabilized. In the two DT lesions of the second patient, CTNNB1 mutations S45P and T41A were found. The presence of different mutations in multiple focally recurrent sporadic DT lesions indicates that they do not have a clonal relationship. Our data suggest that a CTNNB1 mutation is a necessary event probably by providing a selective growth advantage. An IgG4 host antigen response is discussed as a potential predisposing factor for one of the patients. PMID:26666421

  5. A molecular model for the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the mouse lethal yellow (A{sup y}) mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E.J.; Klebig, M.L.; Stubbs, L.J.; Russell, L.B.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Vugt, M.J. van |

    1994-03-29

    Lethal yellow (A{sup y}) is a mutation at the mouse agouti locus in chromosome 2 that causes a number of dominant pleiotropic effects, including a completely yellow coat color, obesity, an insulin-resistant type II diabetic condition, and an increased propensity to develop a variety of spontaneous and induced tumors. Additionally, homozygosity for A{sup y} results in preimplantation lethality, which terminates development by the blastocyst stage. The A{sup y} mutation is the result of a 170-kb deletion that removes all but the promoter and noncoding first exon of another gene called Raly, which lies in the same transcriptional orientation as agouti and maps 280 kb proximal to the 3{prime} end of the agouti gene. The authors present a model for the structure of the A{sub y} allele that can explain the dominant pleiotropic effects associated with this mutation, as well as the recessive lethality, which is unrelated to the agouti gene.

  6. Successful Treatment of Genetically Profiled Pediatric Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma Targeting Oncogenic STAT3 Mutation.

    PubMed

    McEachron, Troy A; Kirov, Ivan; Wungwattana, Minkkwan; Cortes, Daisy; Zabokrtsky, Keri B; Sassoon, Aaron; Craig, David; Carpten, John D; Sender, Leonard S

    2016-04-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTCL) is a distinct type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma predominantly observed in Asian and Latin American adult males. A 12-year-old Hispanic female diagnosed with ENKTCL was enrolled in our genomic profiling research protocol. We identified specific somatic alterations consistent with diagnosis of ENKTCL as well as oncogenic mutations in MAP2K1 and STAT3. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an immunophenotypically confirmed and genetically profiled case of ENKTCL in a female pediatric patient in the United States, including its unique treatment and favorable outcome. PMID:26727971

  7. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10-15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  8. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A.; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10–15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  9. Genetic adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis: strong and weak mutators with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds emerge in mucA and/or lasR mutants.

    PubMed

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Wassermann, Tina; Høiby, Niels

    2010-04-01

    During the chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods due to adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Hypermutability is considered to play an important role in this adaptive evolution and it has been demonstrated that mutator populations are amplified in the CF lung by hitchhiking with adaptive mutations. Two of the genes that are frequently mutated in isolates from chronic infection are mucA and lasR. Loss-of-function mutations in these genes determine the phenotypic switch to mucoidy and loss of quorum sensing, which are considered hallmarks of chronic virulence. The aims of our study were to investigate (1) the genetic background of the P. aeruginosa subpopulations with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype and their dynamics during the chronic lung infection, and (2) the time sequence in which the hypermutable, mucoid and quorum-sensing-negative phenotypes emerge during chronic lung infection. For these purposes the sequences of mutS, mutL, uvrD, mutT, mutY and mutM anti-mutator genes as well as of mucA and lasR were analysed in 70 sequential P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from the respiratory secretions of 10 CF patients (one to three isolates per time point). Analysis of the genetic background of the mutator phenotype showed that mutS was the most commonly affected gene followed by mutL in isolates with strong mutator phenotype. The mutT, mutY, mutM genes were affected in isolates with low fold-changes in the mutation frequencies compared to the reference strain PAO1. Isolates with non-mutator, weak or strong mutator phenotype were represented at all time points showing co-existence of these subpopulations, which suggests parallel evolution of the various mutators in the different focal niches of infection in the CF lung. Mutations in mucA and lasR occurred earlier than mutations in the anti-mutator genes, showing that hypermutability is not a prerequisite for the

  10. Patients with genetically heterogeneous synchronous colorectal cancer carry rare damaging germline mutations in immune-related genes.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Matteo; Gambardella, Gennaro; Benedetti, Lorena; Iannelli, Fabio; Patel, Dominic; Basso, Gianluca; Guerra, Rosalinda F; Mourikis, Thanos P; Puccio, Ignazio; Sinha, Shruti; Laghi, Luigi; Spencer, Jo; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (syCRCs) are physically separated tumours that develop simultaneously. To understand how the genetic and environmental background influences the development of multiple tumours, here we conduct a comparative analysis of 20 syCRCs from 10 patients. We show that syCRCs have independent genetic origins, acquire dissimilar somatic alterations, and have different clone composition. This inter- and intratumour heterogeneity must be considered in the selection of therapy and in the monitoring of resistance. SyCRC patients show a higher occurrence of inherited damaging mutations in immune-related genes compared to patients with solitary colorectal cancer and to healthy individuals from the 1,000 Genomes Project. Moreover, they have a different composition of immune cell populations in tumour and normal mucosa, and transcriptional differences in immune-related biological processes. This suggests an environmental field effect that promotes multiple tumours likely in the background of inflammation. PMID:27377421

  11. Patients with genetically heterogeneous synchronous colorectal cancer carry rare damaging germline mutations in immune-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Matteo; Gambardella, Gennaro; Benedetti, Lorena; Iannelli, Fabio; Patel, Dominic; Basso, Gianluca; Guerra, Rosalinda F.; Mourikis, Thanos P.; Puccio, Ignazio; Sinha, Shruti; Laghi, Luigi; Spencer, Jo; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Ciccarelli, Francesca D.

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (syCRCs) are physically separated tumours that develop simultaneously. To understand how the genetic and environmental background influences the development of multiple tumours, here we conduct a comparative analysis of 20 syCRCs from 10 patients. We show that syCRCs have independent genetic origins, acquire dissimilar somatic alterations, and have different clone composition. This inter- and intratumour heterogeneity must be considered in the selection of therapy and in the monitoring of resistance. SyCRC patients show a higher occurrence of inherited damaging mutations in immune-related genes compared to patients with solitary colorectal cancer and to healthy individuals from the 1,000 Genomes Project. Moreover, they have a different composition of immune cell populations in tumour and normal mucosa, and transcriptional differences in immune-related biological processes. This suggests an environmental field effect that promotes multiple tumours likely in the background of inflammation. PMID:27377421

  12. SDH Subunit Mutation Status in Saliva: Genetic Testing in Patients with Pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Osinga, T E; Xekouki, P; Nambuba, J; Faucz, F R; de la Luz Sierra, M; Links, T P; Kema, I P; Adams, K; Stratakis, C A; van der Horst-Schrivers, A N A; Pacak, K

    2016-04-01

    Germline mutations occur in up to 30-40% of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, with mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits B (SDHB) and D (SDHD) being the most common. Blood samples are favored for obtaining high quality DNA, however, leukocytes can also be obtained by collecting saliva. The aim of this study was to determine whether SDHB and SDHD gene mutations in patients with pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma could be determined using a salivary sample. Paired blood and salivary samples were collected from 30 patients: 9 SDHB mutation positive, 13 with a SDHD mutation, and 8 without any SDHx mutations. The Oragene DISCOVER kit was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva. Blood DNA was extracted from EDTA blood samples. The DNA purification and concentration were measured by spectrophotometry. The 8 exons of SDHB and the 4 exons of SDHD were amplified and sequenced by PCR-based bidirectional Sanger sequencing. Total DNA yields from blood DNA were similar to those obtained from saliva DNA [mean (±SD) saliva vs. blood DNA concentration 514.6 (±580.8) ng/µl vs. 360.9 (±262.7) ng/µl; p=0.2)]. The purity of the saliva DNA samples was lower than that of blood [mean OD260/OD280 ratio 1.78 (±0.13) vs. 1.87 (±0.04); p=0.001, respectively], indicating more protein contamination in the saliva-extracted DNA. This study shows that salivary DNA collected from patients with pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma is a good alternative for extraction of genomic DNA for its high DNA concentration and acceptable purity and can be used as an alternative to blood derived DNA in screening for SDHB and SDHD mutations. PMID:26916530

  13. Maintenance of Genetic Variability under the Pressure of Neutral and Deleterious Mutations in a Finite Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Hsiung

    1979-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of deleterious mutations on various measures of genic variation, approximate formulas have been developed for the frequency spectrum, the mean number of alleles in a sample, and the mean homozygosity; in some particular cases, exact formulas have been obtained. The assumptions made are that two classes of mutations exist, neutral and deleterious, and that selection is strong enough to keep deleterious alleles in low frequencies, the mode of selection being either genic or recessive. The main findings are: (1) If the expected value (q) of the sum of the frequencies of deleterious alleles is about 10% or less, then the presence of deleterious alleles causes only a minor reduction in the mean number of neutral alleles in a sample, as compared to the case of q = 0. Also, the low- and intermediate-frequency parts of the frequency spectrum of neutral alleles are little affected by the presence of deleterious alleles, though the high-frequency part may be changed drastically. (2) The contribution of deleterious mutations to the expected total number of alleles in a sample can be quite large even if q is only 1 or 2%. (3) The mean homozygosity is roughly equal to (1—2q)/(1+θ1), where θ1 is twice the number of new neutral mutations occurring in each generation in the total population. Thus, deleterious mutations increase the mean heterozygosity by about 2q/(1+θ1). The present results have been applied to study the controversial problem of how deleterious mutations may affect the testing of the neutral mutation hypothesis. PMID:488709

  14. Compensatory mutations, antibiotic resistance and the population genetics of adaptive evolution in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, B R; Perrot, V; Walker, N

    2000-01-01

    In the absence of the selecting drugs, chromosomal mutations for resistance to antibiotics and other chemotheraputic agents commonly engender a cost in the fitness of microorganisms. Recent in vivo and in vitro experimental studies of the adaptation to these "costs of resistance" in Escherichia coli, HIV, and Salmonella typhimurium found that evolution in the absence of these drugs commonly results in the ascent of mutations that ameliorate these costs, rather than higher-fitness, drug-sensitive revertants. To ascertain the conditions under which this compensatory evolution, rather than reversion, will occur, we did computer simulations, in vitro experiments, and DNA sequencing studies with low-fitness rpsL (streptomycin-resistant) mutants of E. coli with and without mutations that compensate for the fitness costs of these ribosomal protein mutations. The results of our investigation support the hypothesis that in these experiments, the ascent of intermediate-fitness compensatory mutants, rather than high-fitness revertants, can be attributed to higher rates of compensatory mutations relative to that of reversion and to the numerical bottlenecks associated with serial passage. We argue that these bottlenecks are intrinsic to the population dynamics of parasitic and commensal microbes and discuss the implications of these results to the problem of drug resistance and adaptive evolution in parasitic and commmensal microorganisms in general. PMID:10757748

  15. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum: a clinical, pathophysiological and genetic update including 11 novel ABCC6 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, N; Martin, L; Calvas, P; Le Bert, M; Hovnanian, A

    2005-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an inherited systemic disease of connective tissue primarily affecting the skin, retina, and cardiovascular system. It is characterised pathologically by elastic fibre mineralisation and fragmentation (so called "elastorrhexia"), and clinically by high heterogeneity in age of onset and the extent and severity of organ system involvement. PXE was recently associated with mutations in the ABCC6 (ATP binding cassette subtype C number 6) gene. At least one ABCC6 mutation is found in about 80% of patients. These mutations are identifiable in most of the 31 ABCC6 exons and consist of missense, nonsense, frameshift mutations, or large deletions. No correlation between the nature or location of the mutations and phenotype severity has yet been established. Recent findings support exclusive recessive inheritance. The proposed prevalence of PXE is 1/25 000, but this is probably an underestimate. ABCC6 encodes the protein ABCC6 (also known as MRP6), a member of the large ATP dependent transmembrane transporter family that is expressed predominantly in the liver and kidneys, and only to a lesser extent in tissues affected by PXE. The physiological substrates of ABCC6 remain to be determined, but the current hypothesis is that PXE should be considered to be a metabolic disease with undetermined circulating molecules interacting with the synthesis, turnover, or maintenance of elastic fibres. PMID:15894595

  16. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Clinical characteristics and molecular genetic analysis of 22 patients with neonatal diabetes from the South-Eastern region of Turkey: predominance of non-KATP channel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Demirbilek, Huseyin; Arya, Ved Bhushan; Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Houghton, Jayne A L; Baran, Riza Taner; Akar, Melek; Tekes, Selahattin; Tuzun, Heybet; Mackay, Deborah J; Flanagan, Sarah E; Hattersley, Andrew T; Ellard, Sian; Hussain, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare form of monogenic diabetes and usually presents in the first 6 months of life. We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and molecular genetics of a large Turkish cohort of NDM patients from a single centre and estimate an annual incidence rate of NDM in South-Eastern Anatolian region of Turkey. Design and methods NDM patients presenting to Diyarbakir Children State Hospital between 2010 and 2013, and patients under follow-up with presumed type 1 diabetes mellitus, with onset before 6 months of age were recruited. Molecular genetic analysis was performed. Results Twenty-two patients (59% males) were diagnosed with NDM (TNDM-5; PNDM-17). Molecular genetic analysis identified a mutation in 20 (95%) patients who had undergone a mutation analysis. In transient neonatal diabetes (TNDM) patients, the genetic cause included chromosome 6q24 abnormalities (n=3), ABCC8 (n=1) and homozygous INS (n=1). In permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM) patients, homozygous GCK (n=6), EIF2AK3 (n=3), PTF1A (n=3), and INS (n=1) and heterozygous KCNJ11 (n=2) mutations were identified. Pancreatic exocrine dysfunction was observed in patients with mutations in the distal PTF1A enhancer. Both patients with a KCNJ11 mutation responded to oral sulphonylurea. A variable phenotype was associated with the homozygous c.-331C>A INS mutation, which was identified in both a PNDM and TNDM patient. The annual incidence of PNDM in South-East Anatolian region of Turkey was one in 48 000 live births. Conclusions Homozygous mutations in GCK, EIF2AK3 and the distal enhancer region of PTF1A were the commonest causes of NDM in our cohort. The high rate of detection of a mutation likely reflects the contribution of new genetic techniques (targeted next-generation sequencing) and increased consanguinity within our cohort. PMID:25755231

  18. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  19. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  20. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  1. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  2. Efficiency of carcinogenesis: is the mutator phenotype inevitable?

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Cancer development requires multiple oncogenic mutations. Pathogenic mechanisms which accelerate this process may be favored carcinogenic pathways. Mutator mutations are mutations in genetic stability genes, and increase the mutation rate, speeding up the accumulation of oncogenic mutations. The mutator hypothesis states that mutator mutations play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Alternatively, tumors might arise by mutations occurring at the normal rate followed by selection and expansion of various premalignant lineages on the path to cancer. This alternative pathway is a significant argument against the mutator hypothesis. Mutator mutations may also lead to accumulation of deleterious mutations, which could lead to extinction of premalignant lineages before they become cancerous, another argument against the mutator hypothesis. Finally, the need for acquisition of a mutator mutation imposes an additional step on the carcinogenic process. Accordingly, the mutator hypothesis has been a seminal but controversial idea for several decades despite considerable experimental and theoretical work. To resolve this debate, the concept of efficiency has been introduced as a metric for comparing carcinogenic mechanisms, and a new theoretical approach of focused quantitative modeling has been applied. The results demonstrate that, given what is already known, the predominance of mutator mechanisms is likely inevitable, as they overwhelm less efficient non-mutator pathways to cancer. PMID:20934514

  3. Induction of mutations by bismuth-212 alpha particles at two genetic loci in human B-lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Metting, N F; Palayoor, S T; Macklis, R M; Atcher, R W; Liber, H L; Little, J B

    1992-12-01

    The human lymphoblast cell line TK6 was exposed to the alpha-particle-emitting radon daughter 212Bi by adding DTPA-chelated 212Bi directly to the cell suspension. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity at two genetic loci were measured, and the molecular nature of mutant clones was studied by Southern blot analysis. Induced mutant fractions were 2.5 x 10(-5)/Gy at the hprt locus and 3.75 x 10(-5)/Gy at the tk locus. Molecular analysis of HPRT- mutant DNAs showed a high frequency (69%) of clones with partial or full deletions of the hprt gene among radiation-induced mutants compared with spontaneous mutants (31%). Chi-squared analyses of mutational spectra show a significant difference (P < or = 0.005) between spontaneous mutants and alpha-particle-induced mutants. Comparison with published studies of accelerator-produced heavy-ion exposures of TK6 cells indicates that the induction of mutations at the hprt locus, and perhaps a subset of mutations at the tk locus, is a simple linear function of particle fluence regardless of the ion species or its LET. PMID:1475356

  4. Degenerate in vitro genetic selection reveals mutations that diminish alfalfa mosaic virus RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding.

    PubMed

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-08-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3'-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5' hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3'-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3' RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3' hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  5. Cure of ADPKD by selection for spontaneous genetic repair events in Pkd1-mutated iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Tao; Nagata, Shogo; Hirano, Kunio; Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Horie, Shigeo; Ainscough, Justin; Tada, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated by epigenetic reprogramming of personal somatic cells have limited therapeutic capacity for patients suffering from genetic disorders. Here we demonstrate restoration of a genomic mutation heterozygous for Pkd1 (polycystic kidney disease 1) deletion (Pkd1(+/-) to Pkd1(+/R+)) by spontaneous mitotic recombination. Notably, recombination between homologous chromosomes occurred at a frequency of 1~2 per 10,000 iPSCs. Southern blot hybridization and genomic PCR analyses demonstrated that the genotype of the mutation-restored iPSCs was indistinguishable from that of the wild-type cells. Importantly, the frequency of cyst generation in kidneys of adult chimeric mice containing Pkd1(+/R+) iPSCs was significantly lower than that of adult chimeric mice with parental Pkd1(+/-) iPSCs, and indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice. This repair step could be directly incorporated into iPSC development programmes prior to cell transplantation, offering an invaluable step forward for patients carrying a wide range of genetic disorders. PMID:22347511

  6. Horka, a dominant mutation of Drosophila, induces nondisjunction and, through paternal effect, chromosome loss and genetic mosaics

    SciTech Connect

    Szabad, J.; Mathe, E.; Puro, J.

    1995-04-01

    Fs(3) Horka (Horka) was described as a dominant female-sterile mutation of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic and cytological data show that Horka induces mostly equational nondisjunction during spermatogenesis but not chromosome loss and possesses a predominant paternal effect: the X, second, third and the fourth chromosomes, but not the Y, are rendered unstable while undergoing spermatogenesis and may be lost in the descending zygotes. The frequency of Horka-induced chromosome loss is usually 2-4% but varies with the genetic background and can be over 20%. The X chromosome loss occurs during the gonomeric and the initial cleavage divisions. Loss of the X and fourth chromosomes shows no correlation. We propose, based on similarities in the mutant phenotypes with the chromosome destabilizing mutations nonclaret disjunctional and paternal loss, that the normal Horka{sup +} product is required for function of the centromeres and/or nearby regions. Horka is a convenient tool for the generation of gynandromorphs, autosome mosaics and for the study of gene expression in mosaics. 55 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Marker rescue of temperature-sensitive mutations of vaccinia virus WR: correlation of genetic and physical maps.

    PubMed Central

    Ensinger, M J; Rovinsky, M

    1983-01-01

    The physical map locations of 62 temperature-sensitive mutations of vaccinia virus WR have been determined by marker rescue experiments, using cloned HindIII fragments of wild-type DNA. Since vaccinia virus DNA is not infectious, marker rescue was performed by infecting monolayers of cells at the nonpermissive temperature with a low multiplicity of the mutant to be rescued and transfecting with calcium phosphate-precipitated recombinant DNA. Wild-type recombinants were measured by using either a direct plaque assay technique or a two-step procedure in which the final yield of virus from the transfected cells was assayed at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. Mutants that had been previously assigned to the same complementation-recombination group were rescued by the same HindIII fragment, with the exception of three mutants in one group that were rescued by either one of two adjacent fragments. A comparison between the genetic linkage map of the temperature-sensitive mutations in 30 mutants with their physical locations demonstrated that not only was the order of the genetic map correct but also recombination frequencies generally reflected actual physical distances. PMID:6312100

  8. Horka, a Dominant Mutation of Drosophila, Induces Nondisjunction And, through Paternal Effect, Chromosome Loss and Genetic Mosaics

    PubMed Central

    Szabad, J.; Mathe, E.; Puro, J.

    1995-01-01

    Fs(3) Horka (Horka) was described as a dominant female-sterile mutation of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic and cytological data show that Horka induces mostly equational nondisjunction during spermatogenesis but not chromosome loss and possesses a dominant paternal effect: the X, second, third and the fourth chromosomes, but not the Y, are rendered unstable while undergoing spermatogenesis and may be lost in the descending zygotes. The frequency of Horka-induced chromosome loss is usually 2-4% but varies with the genetic background and can be over 20%. The X chromosome loss occurs during the gonomeric and the initial cleavage divisions. Loss of the X and fourth chromosomes shows no correlation. We propose, based on similarities in the mutant phenotypes with the chromosome destabilizing mutations nonclaret disjunctional and paternal loss, that the normal Horka(+) product is required for function of the centromeres and/or nearby regions. Horka is a convenient tool for the generation of gynandromorphs, autosome mosaics and for the study of gene expression in mosaics. PMID:7789762

  9. PTCH mutations and deletions in patients with typical nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and in patients with a suspected genetic predisposition to basal cell carcinoma: a French study

    PubMed Central

    Soufir, N; Gerard, B; Portela, M; Brice, A; Liboutet, M; Saiag, P; Descamps, V; Kerob, D; Wolkenstein, P; Gorin, I; Lebbe, C; Dupin, N; Crickx, B; Basset-Seguin, N; Grandchamp, B

    2006-01-01

    The patched (PTCH) mutation rate in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) reported in various studies ranges from 40 to 80%. However, few studies have investigated the role of PTCH in clinical conditions suggesting an inherited predisposition to basal cell carcinoma (BCC), although it has been suggested that PTCH polymorphisms could predispose to multiple BCC (MBCC). In this study, we therefore performed an exhaustive analysis of PTCH (mutations detection and deletion analysis) in 17 patients with the full complement of criteria for NBCCS (14 sporadic and three familial cases), and in 48 patients suspected of having a genetic predisposition to BCC (MBCC and/or age at diagnosis ⩽40 years and/or familial BCC). Eleven new germline alterations of the PTCH gene were characterised in 12 out of 17 patients harbouring the full complement of criteria for the syndrome (70%). These were frameshift mutations in five patients, nonsense mutations in five patients, a small inframe deletion in one patient, and a large germline deletion in another patient. Only one missense mutation (G774R) was found, and this was in a patient affected with MBCC, but without any other NBCCS criterion. We therefore suggest that patients harbouring the full complement of NBCCS criteria should as a priority be screened for PTCH mutations by sequencing, followed by a deletion analysis if no mutation is detected. In other clinical situations that suggest genetic predisposition to BCC, germline mutations of PTCH are not common. PMID:16909134

  10. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  11. Imprints from genetic drift and mutation imply relative divergence times across marine transition zones in a pan-European small pelagic fish (Sprattus sprattus)

    PubMed Central

    Limborg, M T; Hanel, R; Debes, P V; Ring, A K; André, C; Tsigenopoulos, C S; Bekkevold, D

    2012-01-01

    Geographic distributions of most temperate marine fishes are affected by postglacial recolonisation events, which have left complex genetic imprints on populations of marine species. This study investigated population structure and demographic history of European sprat (Sprattus sprattus L.) by combining inference from both mtDNA and microsatellite genetic markers throughout the species' distribution. We compared effects from genetic drift and mutation for both genetic markers in shaping genetic differentiation across four transition zones. Microsatellite markers revealed significant isolation by distance and a complex population structure across the species′ distribution (overall θST=0.038, P<0.01). Across transition zones markers indicated larger effects of genetic drift over mutations in the northern distribution of sprat contrasting a stronger relative impact of mutation in the species' southern distribution in the Mediterranean region. These results were interpreted to reflect more recent divergence times between northern populations in accordance with previous findings. This study demonstrates the usefulness of comparing inference from different markers and estimators of divergence for phylogeographic and population genetic studies in species with weak genetic structure, as is the case in many marine species. PMID:22549515

  12. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  13. Mutations in lettuce improvement.

    PubMed

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  14. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  15. Planning additional drilling campaign using two-space genetic algorithm: A game theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Ozer, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Grade and tonnage are the most important technical uncertainties in mining ventures because of the use of estimations/simulations, which are mostly generated from drill data. Open pit mines are planned and designed on the basis of the blocks representing the entire orebody. Each block has different estimation/simulation variance reflecting uncertainty to some extent. The estimation/simulation realizations are submitted to mine production scheduling process. However, the use of a block model with varying estimation/simulation variances will lead to serious risk in the scheduling. In the medium of multiple simulations, the dispersion variances of blocks can be thought to regard technical uncertainties. However, the dispersion variance cannot handle uncertainty associated with varying estimation/simulation variances of blocks. This paper proposes an approach that generates the configuration of the best additional drilling campaign to generate more homogenous estimation/simulation variances of blocks. In other words, the objective is to find the best drilling configuration in such a way as to minimize grade uncertainty under budget constraint. Uncertainty measure of the optimization process in this paper is interpolation variance, which considers data locations and grades. The problem is expressed as a minmax problem, which focuses on finding the best worst-case performance i.e., minimizing interpolation variance of the block generating maximum interpolation variance. Since the optimization model requires computing the interpolation variances of blocks being simulated/estimated in each iteration, the problem cannot be solved by standard optimization tools. This motivates to use two-space genetic algorithm (GA) approach to solve the problem. The technique has two spaces: feasible drill hole configuration with minimization of interpolation variance and drill hole simulations with maximization of interpolation variance. Two-space interacts to find a minmax solution

  16. Genetics and Molecular Modeling of New Mutations of Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis in a Single Italian Center

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Callea, Francesco; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Torre, Giuliano; De Ville De Goyet, Jean; Francalanci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestases (FICs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. Three distinct forms are described: FIC1 and FIC2, associated with low/normal GGT level in serum, which are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and defects in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump protein, respectively; FIC3, linked to high GGT level, involves impaired biliary phospholipid secretion due to defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein. Different mutations in these genes may cause either a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) or a benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC). For the purposes of the present study we genotyped 27 children with intrahepatic cholestasis, diagnosed on either a clinical or histological basis. Two BRIC, 23 PFIC and 2 BRIC/PFIC were identified. Thirty-four different mutations were found of which 11 were novel. One was a 2Mb deletion (5’UTR- exon 18) in ATP8B1. In another case microsatellite analysis of chromosome 2, including ABCB11, showed uniparental disomy. Two cases were compound heterozygous for BRIC/PFIC2 mutations. Our results highlight the importance of the pathogenic role of novel mutations in the three genes and unusual modes of their transmission. PMID:26678486

  17. Interaction between murine spf-ash mutation and genetic background yields different metabolic phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spf-ash mutation in mice results in reduced hepatic and intestinal ornithine transcarbamylase. However, a reduction in enzyme activity only translates in reduced ureagenesis and hyperammonemia when an unbalanced nitrogen load is imposed. Six-week-old wild-type control and spf-ash mutant male mic...

  18. Biochemical and genetic analysis of the effects of amylose-extender mutation in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Nishi, A; Nakamura, Y; Tanaka, N; Satoh, H

    2001-10-01

    Biochemical analysis of amylose-extender (ae) mutant of rice (Oryza sativa) revealed that the mutation in the gene for starch-branching enzyme IIb (BEIIb) specifically altered the structure of amylopectin in the endosperm by reducing short chains with degree of polymerization of 17 or less, with the greatest decrease in chains with degree of polymerization of 8 to 12. The extent of such change was correlated with the gelatinization properties of the starch granules, as determined in terms of solubility in urea solution. The ae mutation caused a dramatic reduction in the activity of BEIIb. The activity of soluble starch synthase I (SSI) in the ae mutant was significantly lower than in the wild type, suggesting that the mutation had a pleiotropic effect on the SSI activity. In contrast, the activities of BEI, BEIIa, ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, isoamylase, isoamylase, pullulanase, and Suc synthase were not affected by the mutation. Therefore, it is stressed that the function of BEIIb cannot be complemented by BEIIa and BEI. These results strongly suggest that BEIIb plays a specific role in the transfer of short chains, which might then be extended by SS to form the A and B(1) chains of amylopectin cluster in rice endosperm. PMID:11598221

  19. Genetics and Molecular Modeling of New Mutations of Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis in a Single Italian Center.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Callea, Francesco; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Torre, Giuliano; De Ville De Goyet, Jean; Francalanci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestases (FICs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders of childhood that disrupt bile formation and present with cholestasis of hepatocellular origin. Three distinct forms are described: FIC1 and FIC2, associated with low/normal GGT level in serum, which are caused by impaired bile salt secretion due to defects in ATP8B1 encoding the FIC1 protein and defects in ABCB11 encoding bile salt export pump protein, respectively; FIC3, linked to high GGT level, involves impaired biliary phospholipid secretion due to defects in ABCB4, encoding multidrug resistance 3 protein. Different mutations in these genes may cause either a progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) or a benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC). For the purposes of the present study we genotyped 27 children with intrahepatic cholestasis, diagnosed on either a clinical or histological basis. Two BRIC, 23 PFIC and 2 BRIC/PFIC were identified. Thirty-four different mutations were found of which 11 were novel. One was a 2Mb deletion (5'UTR- exon 18) in ATP8B1. In another case microsatellite analysis of chromosome 2, including ABCB11, showed uniparental disomy. Two cases were compound heterozygous for BRIC/PFIC2 mutations. Our results highlight the importance of the pathogenic role of novel mutations in the three genes and unusual modes of their transmission. PMID:26678486

  20. Genetic variation and prediction of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits in an Angus-Brahman multibreed herd.

    PubMed

    Elzo, M A; West, R L; Johnson, D D; Wakeman, D L

    1998-07-01

    Estimates of covariances and sire expected progeny differences of additive and nonadditive genetic effects for six carcass traits were obtained using records from 486 straightbred and crossbred steers from 121 sires born between 1989 and 1995 in the Angus-Brahman multibreed herd of the University of Florida. Steers were slaughtered at a similar carcass composition end point. Covariances were estimated by REML procedures, using a generalized expectation-maximization algorithm applied to multibreed populations. Straightbred and crossbred estimates of heritabilities and additive genetic correlations were within ranges found in the literature for steers slaughtered on an age- or weight-constant basis for hot carcass weight, longissimus muscle area, and shear force but equal to or less than the lower bound of these ranges for fat-related traits. Maximum values of interactibilities (i.e., ratios of nonadditive variances to phenotypic variances in the F1) and nonadditive genetic correlations were smaller than heritabilities and additive genetic correlations in straightbreds and crossbred groups. Sire additive and total direct genetic predictions for longissimus muscle area, marbling, and shear force tended to decrease with the fraction of Brahman alleles, whereas those for hot carcass weight and fat thickness over the longissimus were higher, and those for kidney fat were lower in straightbreds and F1 than in other crossbred groups. Nonadditive genetic predictions were similar across sire groups of all Angus and Brahman fractions. These results suggest that slaughtering steers on a similar carcass composition basis reduces variability of fat-related traits while retaining variability for non-fat-related traits comparable to slaughtering steers on a similar age or weight basis. Selection for carcass traits within desirable (narrow) ranges and slaughter of steers at similar compositional end point seems to be a good combination to help produce meat products of consistent

  1. Muir-Torre Syndrome and founder mismatch repair gene mutations: A long gone historical genetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ponti, G; Manfredini, M; Tomasi, A; Pellacani, G

    2016-09-10

    A "cancer predisposing syndrome" later labeled as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome, was firstly described by Warthin, about one century ago. An increased predisposition to the development of multiple familial tumors is described as characteristic of this syndrome where visceral and cutaneous malignancies may appear at an early age namely endometrial, gastric, small bowel, ureteral and renal pelvis, ovarian, hepatobiliary tract, pancreatic, brain (Turcot Syndrome) and sebaceous glands (Muir-Torre Syndrome). The latter, a variant of Lynch Syndrome, is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin adenomas, carcinomas and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Both Lynch Syndrome and Muir-Torre Syndrome have been recognized due to germline mutations in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. To date, 56 Lynch Syndrome founder mutations dependent on MLH1, MSH2 and, although less frequently found, MSH6 and PMS2 are described. Some of these founder mutations, principally of MSH2 gene, have been described to cause Muir-Torre phenotype and have been traced in large and outbreed Muir-Torre Syndrome families living in different US and European territories. Due to the evidences of highly specific Muir-Torre phenotypes related to the presence of widespread MSH2 founder mutations, preliminary search for these MSH2 common mutations in individuals carrying sebaceous tumors and/or keratoacanthomas, at early age or in association to visceral and familial tumors, permits cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic strategies for Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndromes. PMID:26143115

  2. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  3. Mutation, radiation, and species survival: The genetics studies of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Lindee, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    This is an analysis of the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, an American agency which studied the effects of radiation on survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, 1947-1975. Funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and directed by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, the ABCC was the largest and longest medical study of the estimated 300,000 survivors. The morphological genetics study dominated the ABCCs first decade. James Neel and his principal collaborator William J. Schull tracked more than 76,000 pregnancies. Their results (1956) suggested the bombs radiation had no detectable impact on the offspring of survivors. Though geneticists knew that radiation caused heritable mutations in experimental organisms such as Drosophila, and believed it caused mutations in humans, the Neel-Schull findings were not a surprise. The practical difficulties of the study, and the relatively small increase in abnormal births to be expected, made a finding of significant effects unlikely. The Neel-Schull approach reflected the scientific debate over genetic load, and the Muller-Dobzhansky classical-balance controversy. Yet the findings also reflected the post-war debate over atomic energy and weapons testing. Many extra-scientific forces militated against a finding of positive effects at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Negative findings were consistent with the needs of the Atomic Energy Commission, the State Department and the U.S. military. This dissertation explores how both the scientific debate about genetic load, and the political debate about atmospheric weapons testing, shaped this complex epidemiological study.

  4. Factor analysis models for structuring covariance matrices of additive genetic effects: a Bayesian implementation

    PubMed Central

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Gianola, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Multivariate linear models are increasingly important in quantitative genetics. In high dimensional specifications, factor analysis (FA) may provide an avenue for structuring (co)variance matrices, thus reducing the number of parameters needed for describing (co)dispersion. We describe how FA can be used to model genetic effects in the context of a multivariate linear mixed model. An orthogonal common factor structure is used to model genetic effects under Gaussian assumption, so that the marginal likelihood is multivariate normal with a structured genetic (co)variance matrix. Under standard prior assumptions, all fully conditional distributions have closed form, and samples from the joint posterior distribution can be obtained via Gibbs sampling. The model and the algorithm developed for its Bayesian implementation were used to describe five repeated records of milk yield in dairy cattle, and a one common FA model was compared with a standard multiple trait model. The Bayesian Information Criterion favored the FA model. PMID:17897592

  5. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  6. Targeted high-throughput sequencing for diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous diseases: efficient mutation detection in Bardet-Biedl and Alström Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Redin, Claire; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Mhamdi, Oussema; Geoffroy, Véronique; Stoetzel, Corinne; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Lacombe, Didier; Ouertani, Ines; Petit, Florence; Till, Marianne; Verloes, Alain; Jost, Bernard; Chaabouni, Habiba Bouhamed; Dollfus, Helene; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Muller, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a pleiotropic recessive disorder that belongs to the rapidly growing family of ciliopathies. It shares phenotypic traits with other ciliopathies, such as Alström syndrome (ALMS), nephronophthisis (NPHP) or Joubert syndrome. BBS mutations have been detected in 16 different genes (BBS1-BBS16) without clear genotype-to-phenotype correlation. This extensive genetic heterogeneity is a major concern for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling. While various strategies have been recently proposed to optimise mutation detection, they either fail to detect mutations in a majority of patients or are time consuming and costly. Method We tested a targeted exon-capture strategy coupled with multiplexing and high-throughput sequencing on 52 patients: 14 with known mutations as proof-of-principle and 38 with no previously detected mutation. Thirty genes were targeted in total including the 16 BBS genes, the 12 known NPHP genes, the single ALMS gene ALMS1 and the proposed modifier CCDC28B. Results This strategy allowed the reliable detection of causative mutations (including homozygous/heterozygous exon deletions) in 68% of BBS patients without previous molecular diagnosis and in all proof-of-principle samples. Three probands carried homozygous truncating mutations in ALMS1 confirming the major phenotypic overlap between both disorders. The efficiency of detecting mutations in patients was positively correlated with their compliance with the classical BBS phenotype (mutations were identified in 81% of ‘classical’ BBS patients) suggesting that only a few true BBS genes remain to be identified. We illustrate some interpretation problems encountered due to the multiplicity of identified variants. Conclusion This strategy is highly efficient and cost effective for diseases with high genetic heterogeneity, and guarantees a quality of coverage in coding sequences of target genes suited for diagnosis purposes. PMID:22773737

  7. A CACNB4 mutation shows that altered Ca(v)2.1 function may be a genetic modifier of severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Iori; Ouchida, Mamoru; Miki, Takafumi; Mimaki, Nobuyoshi; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Nishiki, Teiichi; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Mori, Yasuo; Matsui, Hideki

    2008-12-01

    Mutations of SCN1A, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel alpha1 subunit, represent the most frequent genetic cause of severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI). The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in other seizure susceptibility genes are also present and could modify the disease severity. All coding exons of SCN1B, GABRG2, and CACNB4 genes were screened for mutations in 38 SCN1A-mutation-positive SMEI probands. We identified one proband who was heterozygous for a de novo SCN1A nonsense mutation (R568X) and another missense mutation (R468Q) of the CACNB4 gene. The latter mutation was inherited from his father who had a history of febrile seizures. An electrophysiological analysis of heterologous expression system exhibited that R468Q-CACNB4 showed greater Ba(2+) current density compared with the wild-type CACNB4. The greater Ca(v)2.1 currents caused by the R468Q-CACNB4 mutation may increase the neurotransmitter release in the excitatory neurons under the condition of insufficient inhibitory neurons caused primarily by the SCN1A mutation. PMID:18755274

  8. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  9. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) aggregate in Alzheimer’s disease due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently identified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) tangle-like aggregates and RNA splicing abnormalities in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However little is known about snRNP biology in early onset AD due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations or trisomy 21 in Down syndrome. Therefore we investigated snRNP biochemical and pathologic features in these disorders. Findings We performed quantitative proteomics and immunohistochemistry in postmortem brain from genetic AD cases. Electron microscopy was used to characterize ultrastructural features of pathologic aggregates. U1-70k and other snRNPs were biochemically enriched in the insoluble fraction of human brain from subjects with presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations. Aggregates of U1 snRNP-immunoreactivity formed cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in cortex of AD subjects with PS1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations as well as trisomy 21. Ultrastructural analysis with electron microscopy in an APP mutation case demonstrated snRNP immunogold labeling of paired helical filaments (PHF). Conclusions These studies identify U1 snRNP pathologic changes in brain of early onset genetic forms of AD. Since dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21 result in dysfunctional amyloid processing, the findings suggest that aberrant β-amyloid processing may influence U1 snRNP aggregate formation. PMID:24773620

  10. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  11. Divergent Metabolic Phenotype between Two Sisters with Congenital Generalized Lipodystrophy Due to Double AGPAT2 Homozygous Mutations. A Clinical, Genetic and In Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Víctor A.; Smalley, Susan V.; Goldenberg, Denisse; Lagos, Carlos F.; Hodgson, María I.; Santos, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extreme reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. CGL type 1 is the most frequent form and is caused by mutations in AGPAT2. Genetic and clinical studies were performed in two affected sisters of a Chilean family. These patients have notoriously dissimilar metabolic abnormalities that correlate with differential levels of circulating leptin and soluble leptin receptor fraction. Sequencing of AGPAT2 exons and exon-intron boundaries revealed two homozygous mutations in both sisters. Missense mutation c.299G>A changes a conserved serine in the acyltransferase NHX4D motif of AGPAT2 (p.Ser100Asn). Intronic c.493-1G>C mutation destroy a conserved splicing site that likely leads to exon 4 skipping and deletion of whole AGPAT2 substrate binding domain. In silico protein modeling provided insights of the mechanisms of lack of catalytic activity owing to both mutations. PMID:24498038

  12. Genome-Enabled Estimates of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variances and Prediction of Apple Phenotypes Across Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Molloy, Claire; Muñoz, Patricio; Daetwyler, Hans; Chagné, David; Volz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The nonadditive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of phenotypes, so estimates of both the additive and nonadditive effects are desirable for breeding and selection purposes. Our main objectives were to: estimate additive, dominance and epistatic variances of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) phenotypes using relationship matrices constructed from genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; and compare the accuracy of genomic predictions using genomic best linear unbiased prediction models with or without including nonadditive genetic effects. A set of 247 clonally replicated individuals was assessed for six fruit quality traits at two sites, and also genotyped using an Illumina 8K SNP array. Across several fruit quality traits, the additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributed about 30%, 16%, and 19%, respectively, to the total phenotypic variance. Models ignoring nonadditive components yielded upwardly biased estimates of additive variance (heritability) for all traits in this study. The accuracy of genomic predicted genetic values (GEGV) varied from about 0.15 to 0.35 for various traits, and these were almost identical for models with or without including nonadditive effects. However, models including nonadditive genetic effects further reduced the bias of GEGV. Between-site genotypic correlations were high (>0.85) for all traits, and genotype-site interaction accounted for <10% of the phenotypic variability. The accuracy of prediction, when the validation set was present only at one site, was generally similar for both sites, and varied from about 0.50 to 0.85. The prediction accuracies were strongly influenced by trait heritability, and genetic relatedness between the training and validation families. PMID:26497141

  13. [The mutation spectrum of the GJB2 gene in Belarussian patients with hearing loss. Results of pilot genetic screening of hearing impairment in newborns].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Marcul', D N; Khorov, O G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-02-01

    A total of 111 unrelated probands and their 8 sibs from Grodno oblast (Belarus) with bilateral isolated sensorineural hearing impairment were studied for the presence of mutations in the connexin 26--GJB2gene. Mutations were detected in 51 probands (46% of the sample). A significantly higher frequency of the GJB2gene mutations was observed in familial cases of the disease with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance (in 78% of families). Detected peculiarities of the GJB2 gene mutation spectrum demonstrated that use of the algorithm, which was developed for Russian patients, is optimal for the molecular study of patients from Be- larus. In the sample of patients with hearing loss, the highest (among other similar samples studied in the world) allele frequency of c.313_326de114 mutation (7% out of all pathological GJB2 alleles) was registered; Polish origin of this deletion was suggested. It was demonstrated that detection of the GJB2 gene mutation on only one patient's chromosome is insufficient to confirm a molecular genetic diagnosis of hearing loss of the DFNB1 genetic type (autosomal recessive hearing loss caused by the GJB2 gene mutations). Pilot screening in the presence of GJB2 gene mutations in newborns from Grodno oblast was conducted. The material from 235 children was studied during the screening; nine heterozygous carriers of the mutation were found. The c.35delG mutation was detected in a homozygous state in a single newborn (hearing loss of moderate severity was subsequently audiologically confirmed in this child). PMID:25711030

  14. Method for optimal sensor deployment on 3D terrains utilizing a steady state genetic algorithm with a guided walk mutation operator based on the wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Unaldi, Numan; Temel, Samil; Asari, Vijayan K

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical issues of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is the deployment of a limited number of sensors in order to achieve maximum coverage on a terrain. The optimal sensor deployment which enables one to minimize the consumed energy, communication time and manpower for the maintenance of the network has attracted interest with the increased number of studies conducted on the subject in the last decade. Most of the studies in the literature today are proposed for two dimensional (2D) surfaces; however, real world sensor deployments often arise on three dimensional (3D) environments. In this paper, a guided wavelet transform (WT) based deployment strategy (WTDS) for 3D terrains, in which the sensor movements are carried out within the mutation phase of the genetic algorithms (GAs) is proposed. The proposed algorithm aims to maximize the Quality of Coverage (QoC) of a WSN via deploying a limited number of sensors on a 3D surface by utilizing a probabilistic sensing model and the Bresenham's line of sight (LOS) algorithm. In addition, the method followed in this paper is novel to the literature and the performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the Delaunay Triangulation (DT) method as well as a standard genetic algorithm based method and the results reveal that the proposed method is a more powerful and more successful method for sensor deployment on 3D terrains. PMID:22666078

  15. Method for Optimal Sensor Deployment on 3D Terrains Utilizing a Steady State Genetic Algorithm with a Guided Walk Mutation Operator Based on the Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Unaldi, Numan; Temel, Samil; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical issues of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) is the deployment of a limited number of sensors in order to achieve maximum coverage on a terrain. The optimal sensor deployment which enables one to minimize the consumed energy, communication time and manpower for the maintenance of the network has attracted interest with the increased number of studies conducted on the subject in the last decade. Most of the studies in the literature today are proposed for two dimensional (2D) surfaces; however, real world sensor deployments often arise on three dimensional (3D) environments. In this paper, a guided wavelet transform (WT) based deployment strategy (WTDS) for 3D terrains, in which the sensor movements are carried out within the mutation phase of the genetic algorithms (GAs) is proposed. The proposed algorithm aims to maximize the Quality of Coverage (QoC) of a WSN via deploying a limited number of sensors on a 3D surface by utilizing a probabilistic sensing model and the Bresenham's line of sight (LOS) algorithm. In addition, the method followed in this paper is novel to the literature and the performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the Delaunay Triangulation (DT) method as well as a standard genetic algorithm based method and the results reveal that the proposed method is a more powerful and more successful method for sensor deployment on 3D terrains. PMID:22666078

  16. Genetic and Proteomic Characterization of rpoB Mutations and Their Effect on Nematicidal Activity in Photorhabdus luminescens LN2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuehong; Yan, Xun; Liu, Mingxing; Han, Richou

    2012-01-01

    Rifampin resistant (RifR) mutants of the insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens LN2 from entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LN2 were genetically and proteomically characterized. The RifR mutants showed typical phase one characters of Photorhabdus bacteria, and insecticidal activity against Galleria mellonella larvae, but surprisingly influenced their nematicidal activity against axenic infective juveniles (IJs) of H. bacteriophora H06, an incompatible nematode host. 13 out of 34 RifR mutants lost their nematicidal activity against H06 IJs but supported the reproduction of H06 nematodes. 7 nematicidal-producing and 7 non-nematicidal-producing RifR mutants were respectively selected for rpoB sequence analysis. rpoB mutations were found in all 14 RifR mutants. The rpoB (P564L) mutation was found in all 7 mutants which produced nematicidal activity against H06 nematodes, but not in the mutants which supported H06 nematode production. Allelic exchange assays confirmed that the Rif-resistance and the impact on nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria were conferred by rpoB mutation(s). The non-nematicidal-producing RifR mutant was unable to colonize in the intestines of H06 IJs, but able to colonize in the intestines of its indigenous LN2 IJs. Proteomic analysis revealed different protein expression between wild-type strain and RifR mutants, or between nematicidal-producing and non nematicidal-producing mutants. At least 7 putative proteins including DsbA, HlpA, RhlE, RplC, NamB (a protein from T3SS), and 2 hypothetical proteins (similar to unknown protein YgdH and YggE of Escherichia coli respectively) were probably involved in the nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria against H06 nematodes. This hypothesis was further confirmed by creating insertion-deletion mutants of three selected corresponding genes (the downregulated rhlE and namB, and upregualted dsbA). These results indicate that the rpoB mutations greatly influence the symbiotic

  17. Growth behavior of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2013-01-01

    The probability of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele for growing to a size NC for a range of population sizes N, sequence lengths L, selective advantages s, and measuring parameters C was calculated for a haploid, asexual population in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive selective advantage of the reversal allele over the optimal allele. The growing probability in the stochastic region was inversely proportional to the measuring parameter when C < 1 /Ns, bent when C ≈ 1/ Ns and saturated when C > 1/ Ns. The crossing time and the time dependence of the increase in relative density of the reversal allele in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was approximated using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model with the same selective advantage and corresponding effective mutation rate. The growth behavior of additional offspring with the reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was controlled by the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared to the optimal allele and could be described by using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model, in spite of there being many other alleles with lower fitness, and in spite of there being two alleles, the optimal and reversal allele, separated by a low-fitness valley with a tunable depth and width.

  18. A multi-case report of the pathways to and through genetic testing and cancer risk management for BRCA mutation-positive women aged 18-25.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Lindsey M; Werner-Lin, Allison

    2013-02-01

    Much of the extant literature addressing the psychosocial aspects of BRCA1/2 mutation testing and risk management aggregates mutation carriers of all ages in study recruitment, data analysis, and interpretation. This analytic strategy does not adequately address the needs of the youngest genetic testing consumers, i.e., women aged 18-25. Despite low absolute cancer risk estimates before age 30, BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women aged 18-25 feel vulnerable to a cancer diagnosis but find themselves in a management quandary because the clinical utility of screening and prevention options are not yet well defined for such young carriers. We present three cases, selected from a larger study of 32 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women who completed or considered genetic testing before age 25, to demonstrate the unique developmental, relational and temporal influences, as well as the challenges, experienced by very young BRCA mutation-positive women as they complete genetic testing and initiate cancer risk management. The first case describes the maturation of a young woman whose family participated in a national cancer registry. The second addresses the experiences and expectations of a young woman who completed genetic testing after learning that her unaffected father was a mutation carrier. The third case highlights the experiences of a young woman parentally bereaved in childhood, who presented for genetic counseling and testing due to intense family pressure. Together, these cases suggest that BRCA1/2-positive women aged 18-25 are challenged to reconcile their burgeoning independence from their families with risk-related support needs. Loved ones acting in ways meant to care for these young women may inadvertently apply pressure, convoluting family support dynamics and autonomous decision-making. Ongoing support from competent healthcare professionals will enable these young women to remain informed and receive objective counsel about their risk-management decisions. PMID

  19. Clinical impact of c-MET expression and genetic mutational status in colorectal cancer patients after liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nagashima, Kengo; Okita, Natsuko; Takashima, Atsuo; Honma, Yoshitaka; Iwasa, Satoru; Kato, Ken; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    c-MET is implicated in the pathogenesis and growth of a wide variety of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between c-MET expression and tumor recurrence in CRC patients after curative liver resection, and to evaluate concordance in c-MET expression and various mutations of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA between primary CRC and paired liver metastases. A cohort of patients was tested for c-MET immunoreactivity (i.e. immunohistochemistry [IHC]) and KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations. Analyses were performed both on primary tumors and paired liver metastases, and the association between IHC and mutations results were assessed. A total of 108 patients were eligible. A total of 53% of patients underwent simultaneous resection of primary tumors and metastases, and the others underwent metachronous resection. Levels of concordance between primary tumors and metastases were 65.7%, 87.7%, 100% and 95.2% for c-MET, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA, respectively. High levels of c-MET expression (c-MET-high) in the primary tumors were observed in 52% of patients. Relapse-free survival was significantly shorter for patients with c-MET-high primary tumors (9.7 months) than for those with c-MET-low primary tumors (21.1 months) (P = 0.013). These results suggest that a high level of genetic concordance in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA between primary tumors and liver metastases, and c-MET-high in the primary tumors were associated with shorter relapse-free survival after hepatic metastasectomy. PMID:24863535

  20. A GENETIC MUTATION THAT REDUCES CALCIUM OXALATE CONTENT INCREASES CALCIUM AVAILABILITY IN MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalate is considered an antinutrient that renders calcium unavailable for nutritional absorption by humans. Efforts have been made to generate and identify edible plants with decreased levels of this antinutrient. The extent to which a food can be nutritionally improved through genetic alterations ...

  1. The structure and regulation of genes and consequences of their genetic mutations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fundamental genetic unit of heredity, the gene, is a nucleic acid sequence characterized by three main parts: a promoter region where gene expression levels are controlled by transcription factors and other accessory proteins, the coding region (often interrupted by intervening sequences or intr...

  2. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovine lentiviruses cause incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative diseases that affect millions of sheep worldwide. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been recently associated with lentivirus infections in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the two most common TMEM1...

  3. A GENETIC MUTATION THAT REDUCES CALCIUM OXALATE CONTENT INCREASES CALCIUM AVAILABILITY IN MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalate is considered an antinutrient that renders calcium unavailable for nutritional absorption by humans. Efforts have been made to generate and identify edible plants with decreased levels of this antinutrient. The extent to which a food can be nutritionally improved through genetic alteration...

  4. Cooperation between phenotypic plasticity and genetic mutations can account for the cumulative selection in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Ken; Kinjo, Akira R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose the cooperative model of phenotype-driven evolution, in which natural selection operates on a phenotype caused by both genetic and epigenetic factors. The conventional theory of evolutionary synthesis assumes that a phenotypic value (P) is the sum of genotypic value (G) and environmental deviation (E), P=G+E, where E is the fluctuations of the phenotype among individuals in the absence of environmental changes. In contrast, the cooperative model assumes that an evolution is triggered by an environmental change and individuals respond to the change by phenotypic plasticity (epigenetic changes). The phenotypic plasticity, while essentially qualitative, is denoted by a quantitative value F which is modeled as a normal random variable like E, but with a much larger variance. Thus, the fundamental equation of the cooperative model is given as P=G+F where F includes the effect of E. Computer simulations using a genetic algorithm demonstrated that the cooperative model realized much faster evolution than the evolutionary synthesis. This accelerated evolution was found to be due to the cumulative evolution made possible by a ratchet mechanism due to the epigenetic contribution to the phenotypic value. The cooperative model can well account for the phenomenon of genetic assimilation, which, in turn, suggests the mechanism of cumulative selection. The cooperative model may also serve as a theoretical basis to understand various ideas and phenomena of the phenotype-driven evolution such as genetic assimilation, the theory of facilitated phenotypic variation, and epigenetic inheritance over generations. PMID:27493504

  5. Blue Genes: An Integrative Laboratory to Differentiate Genetic Transformation from Gene Mutation for Underclassmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Militello, Kevin T.; Chang, Ming-Mei; Simon, Robert D.; Lazatin, Justine C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of students to understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype, and the mechanisms by which genotypes and phenotypes can change is essential for students studying genetics. To this end, we have developed a four-week laboratory called Blue Genes, which is designed to help novice students discriminate between two mechanisms by…

  6. [A diagnostic analysis of a genetic mutation associated with a deficiency of leukocyte adhesion in cattle].

    PubMed

    Kostetskiĭ, I E; Kirilenko, S M; Glazko, V I; Sozinov, A A

    1996-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte adhesion (BLAD) is a recessive autosomal disease in Holstein-Friesian cattle caused by point mutation in CD18 gene encoding neutrophil-surface glycoprotein. To determine BLAD carriers, the convenient primers were chosen to amplify the mutant region of gene with the following restriction analysis. A screening program for BLAD has been initiated. Among 190 animals from different Ukrainian farms 6 were heterozygous according to the tested trait, i.e., BLAD deficient. No homozygous BLAD carriers were detected. PMID:9281202

  7. Mutation-Based Learning to Improve Student Autonomy and Scientific Inquiry Skills in a Large Genetics Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinlu

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory education can play a vital role in developing a learner's autonomy and scientific inquiry skills. In an innovative, mutation-based learning (MBL) approach, students were instructed to redesign a teacher-designed standard experimental protocol by a “mutation” method in a molecular genetics laboratory course. Students could choose to delete, add, reverse, or replace certain steps of the standard protocol to explore questions of interest to them in a given experimental scenario. They wrote experimental proposals to address their rationales and hypotheses for the “mutations”; conducted experiments in parallel, according to both standard and mutated protocols; and then compared and analyzed results to write individual lab reports. Various autonomy-supportive measures were provided in the entire experimental process. Analyses of student work and feedback suggest that students using the MBL approach 1) spend more time discussing experiments, 2) use more scientific inquiry skills, and 3) find the increased autonomy afforded by MBL more enjoyable than do students following regimented instructions in a conventional “cookbook”-style laboratory. Furthermore, the MBL approach does not incur an obvious increase in labor and financial costs, which makes it feasible for easy adaptation and implementation in a large class. PMID:24006394

  8. Genetic instability and atherosclerosis: can somatic mutations account for the development of cardiovascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Andreassi, M G; Botto, N; Colombo, M G; Biagini, A; Clerico, A

    2000-01-01

    Several observations suggest that cancer and atherosclerosis may entail fundamentally common biological mechanisms. The accumulation of lipids and the proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the main histological features of sclerotic plaque formation. The most prominent theory concerning the pathophysiological mechanisms of atherosclerotic plaque formation is the "inflammatory response to injury" hypothesis, which states that SMC proliferation is an inflammation-fibroproliferative reaction to different insults to the artery wall. However, recent evidence suggests that alterations at the DNA level may contribute significantly to the development of the disease. In accordance with these findings, the "monoclonal" hypothesis of atherosclerosis has been suggested. This hypothesis proposes that atherosclerosis begins as a mutation or viral infection, transforming a single, isolated smooth muscle cell into the progenitor of a proliferative clone, as seen in carcinogenesis. Studies of DNA damage in atherosclerotic tissues are lacking. Biological evidence for the hypothesis that cancer and atherosclerosis may share pathological mechanisms is discussed, emphasizing the need to perform studies investigating the involvement of somatic mutations in heart diseases. PMID:10861945

  9. Genetic and epigenetic mutations of tumor suppressive genes in sporadic pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhang, Xun; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-04-01

    Human pituitary adenomas are the most common intracranial neoplasms. Approximately 5% of them are familial adenomas. Patients with familial tumors carry germline mutations in predisposition genes, including AIP, MEN1 and PRKAR1A. These mutations are extremely rare in sporadic pituitary adenomas, which therefore are caused by different mechanisms. Multiple tumor suppressive genes linked to sporadic tumors have been identified. Their inactivation is caused by epigenetic mechanisms, mainly promoter hypermethylation, and can be placed into two groups based on their functional interaction with tumor suppressors RB or p53. The RB group includes CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, RB1, BMP4, CDH1, CDH13, GADD45B and GADD45G; AIP and MEN1 genes also belong to this group. The p53 group includes MEG3, MGMT, PLAGL1, RASSF1, RASSF3 and SOCS1. We propose that the tumor suppression function of these genes is mainly mediated by the RB and p53 pathways. We also discuss possible tumor suppression mechanisms for individual genes. PMID:24035864

  10. Genetic prion disease with codon 196 PRNP mutation: clinical and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Schelzke, Gabi; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Romero, Carlos; Varges, Daniela; Breithaupt, Maren; Taratuto, Ana L; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Zerr, Inga

    2011-04-01

    Ten percent to 15% of all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy are characterized by a mutation in prion protein gene (PRNP). They are distinct with respect to clinical signs, disease onset, disease duration, and diagnostic findings. During our surveillance activities in Germany, we identified 7 patients with the rare mutation E196K in PRNP gene, thereof 4 patients belonging to 2 families. The clinical syndromes were characterized by nonspecific and psychiatric symptoms at disease onset and progressed to predominant motor signs. These patients showed a late median disease onset of 71 years and short disease duration of 6.5 months. In absence of family history, they mimicked sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In clinical tests they were 100% positive for 14-3-3 protein detection in cerebrospinal fluid and less sensitive for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities. As a secondary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormality, we have seen conspicuous common involvement of the subcortical white matter in 57%. Four patients underwent autopsy-pathological lesions revealed striking similarity to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but also involvement of the white matter. PMID:21232818

  11. Genetic mapping of glutaric aciduria, type 3, to chromosome 7 and identification of mutations in c7orf10.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Eric A; Strauss, Kevin A; Tortorelli, Silvia; Bennett, Michael J; Knerr, Ina; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G

    2008-11-01

    While screening Old Order Amish children for glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) between 1989 and 1993, we found three healthy children who excreted abnormal quantities of glutaric acid but low 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, a pattern consistent with glutaric aciduria type 3 (GA3). None of these children had the GCDH c.1262C-->T mutation that causes GA1 among the Amish. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes, we identified a shared homozygous 4.7 Mb region on chromosome 7. This region contained 25 genes including C7orf10, an open reading frame with a putative mitochondrial targeting sequence and coenzyme-A transferase domain. Direct sequencing of C7orf10 revealed that the three Amish individuals were homozygous for a nonsynonymous sequence variant (c.895C-->T, Arg299Trp). We then sequenced three non-Amish children with GA3 and discovered two nonsense mutations (c.322C-->T, Arg108Ter, and c.424C-->T, Arg142Ter) in addition to the Amish mutation. Two pathogenic alleles were identified in each of the six patients. There was no consistent clinical phenotype associated with GA3. In affected individuals, urine molar ratios of glutarate to its derivatives (3-hydroxyglutarate, glutarylcarnitine, and glutarylglycine) were elevated, suggesting impaired formation of glutaryl-CoA. These observations refine our understanding of the lysine-tryptophan degradation pathway and have important implications for the pathophysiology of GA1. PMID:18926513

  12. Genetic Mapping of Glutaric Aciduria, Type 3, to Chromosome 7 and Identification of Mutations in C7orf10

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Eric A.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Tortorelli, Silvia; Bennett, Michael J.; Knerr, Ina; Morton, D. Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G.

    2008-01-01

    While screening Old Order Amish children for glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) between 1989 and 1993, we found three healthy children who excreted abnormal quantities of glutaric acid but low 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, a pattern consistent with glutaric aciduria type 3 (GA3). None of these children had the GCDH c.1262C→T mutation that causes GA1 among the Amish. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes, we identified a shared homozygous 4.7 Mb region on chromosome 7. This region contained 25 genes including C7orf10, an open reading frame with a putative mitochondrial targeting sequence and coenzyme-A transferase domain. Direct sequencing of C7orf10 revealed that the three Amish individuals were homozygous for a nonsynonymous sequence variant (c.895C→T, Arg299Trp). We then sequenced three non-Amish children with GA3 and discovered two nonsense mutations (c.322C→T, Arg108Ter, and c.424C→T, Arg142Ter) in addition to the Amish mutation. Two pathogenic alleles were identified in each of the six patients. There was no consistent clinical phenotype associated with GA3. In affected individuals, urine molar ratios of glutarate to its derivatives (3-hydroxyglutarate, glutarylcarnitine, and glutarylglycine) were elevated, suggesting impaired formation of glutaryl-CoA. These observations refine our understanding of the lysine-tryptophan degradation pathway and have important implications for the pathophysiology of GA1. PMID:18926513

  13. Somatic Mutations and Genetic Variants of NOTCH1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Occurrence and Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Fan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chung, Chia-Min; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Lin, You-Zhe; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ka-Wo; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Hua, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Yuan-Chien; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic variants have been associated with cancer occurrence, however it may be the acquired somatic mutations (SMs) that drive cancer development. This study investigates the potential SMs and related genetic variants associated with the occurrence and development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We identified several SMs in NOTCH1 from whole-exome sequencing and validated them in a 13-year cohort of 128 HNSCC patients using a high-resolution melting analysis and resequencing. Patients who have NOTCH1 SMs show higher 5-year relapse-free recurrence (P = 0.0013) and lower survival proportion (P = 0.0447) when the risk-associated SMs were analysed by Cox proportional hazard models. Interestingly, the NOTCH1 gene rs139994842 that shares linkage with SMs is associated with HNSCC risk (OR = 3.46), increasing when SMs in NOTCH1 are involved (OR = 7.74), and furthermore when there are SMs in conjunction to betel quid chewing (OR = 32.11), which is a related independent environmental risk factor after adjusting for substances use (alcohol, betel quid, cigarettes) and age. The findings indicate that betel quid chewing is highly associated with NOTCH1 SMs (especially with changes in EGF-like domains), and that rs139994842 may potentially serve as an early predictive and prognostic biomarker for the occurrence and development of HNSCC. PMID:27035284

  14. Somatic Mutations and Genetic Variants of NOTCH1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Occurrence and Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Fan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chung, Chia-Min; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Lin, You-Zhe; Lee, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ka-Wo; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Hua, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Yuan-Chien; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic variants have been associated with cancer occurrence, however it may be the acquired somatic mutations (SMs) that drive cancer development. This study investigates the potential SMs and related genetic variants associated with the occurrence and development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We identified several SMs in NOTCH1 from whole-exome sequencing and validated them in a 13-year cohort of 128 HNSCC patients using a high-resolution melting analysis and resequencing. Patients who have NOTCH1 SMs show higher 5-year relapse-free recurrence (P = 0.0013) and lower survival proportion (P = 0.0447) when the risk-associated SMs were analysed by Cox proportional hazard models. Interestingly, the NOTCH1 gene rs139994842 that shares linkage with SMs is associated with HNSCC risk (OR = 3.46), increasing when SMs in NOTCH1 are involved (OR = 7.74), and furthermore when there are SMs in conjunction to betel quid chewing (OR = 32.11), which is a related independent environmental risk factor after adjusting for substances use (alcohol, betel quid, cigarettes) and age. The findings indicate that betel quid chewing is highly associated with NOTCH1 SMs (especially with changes in EGF-like domains), and that rs139994842 may potentially serve as an early predictive and prognostic biomarker for the occurrence and development of HNSCC. PMID:27035284

  15. Genetics and phenomics of hypothyroidism and goiter due to iodotyrosine deiodinase (DEHAL1) gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José C; Visser, Theo J

    2010-06-30

    Iodotyrosine deiodinase is a thyroidal enzyme that deiodinates mono- and di-iodotyrosines (MIT, DIT) and recycles iodine, a scarce element in the environment, for the efficient synthesis of thyroid hormone. Failure of this enzyme leads to hypothyroidism, goiter and mental retardation, a clinical phenotype yet described in the 1950s, whose diagnostic hallmark is the elevation of iodotyrosines in serum and urine. DEHAL1, the gene responsible for this activity, was recently isolated and the molecular basis for the iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency (ITDD) unraveled. The current clinical picture of mutations in DEHAL1 mostly recapitulates the "classical" phenotype of ITDD, including the psychomotor deficits. This is probably due to the lack of expression of the disease at the beginning of life, which causes ITDD being undetected in current screening programs for congenital hypothyroidism. This worrying feature calls for efforts to improve the preclinical detection of iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency in the neonatal time. PMID:20298747

  16. A genetic screen of the Drosophila X chromosome for mutations that modify Deformed function.

    PubMed Central

    Florence, B; McGinnis, W

    1998-01-01

    We have screened the Drosophila X chromosome for genes whose dosage affects the function of the homeotic gene Deformed. One of these genes, extradenticle, encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that heterodimerizes with Deformed and other homeotic Hox proteins. Mutations in the nejire gene, which encodes a transcriptional adaptor protein belonging to the CBP/p300 family, also interact with Deformed. The other previously characterized gene identified as a Deformed interactor is Notch, which encodes a transmembrane receptor. These three genes underscore the importance of transcriptional regulation and cell-cell signaling in Hox function. Four novel genes were also identified in the screen. One of these, rancor, is required for appropriate embryonic expression of Deformed and another homeotic gene, labial. Both Notch and nejire affect the function of another Hox gene, Ultrabithorax, indicating they may be required for homeotic activity in general. PMID:9832527

  17. Mutation scanning in a single and a stacked genetically modified (GM) event by real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017×MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  18. Mutation Scanning in a Single and a Stacked Genetically Modified (GM) Event by Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G.; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017 × MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  19. Genetic variation in the GDNF promoter affects its expression and modifies the severity of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jieping; Dang, Ruihua; Torigoe, Daisuke; Li, Anqi; Lei, Chuzhao; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is necessary for the migration of neural crest stem cells in the gut. However, mutations in GDNF per se are deemed neither necessary nor sufficient to cause Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR). In a previous study, a modifier locus on chromosome 2 in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations was identified, and several mutations in the putative regulatory region of the Gdnf gene in AGH-Ednrb(sl) rats were detected. Specifically, the mutation -232C>T has been shown to be strongly associated with the severity of HSCR. In the present study, the influence of genetic variations on the transcription of the Gdnf gene was tested using dual-luciferase assay. Results showed that the mutation -613C>T, located near the mutation -232C>T in AGH-Ednrb(sl) rats, decreased Gdnf transcription in an in vitro dual-luciferase expression assay. These data suggested an important role of -613C in Gdnf transcription. Expression levels of the Gdnf gene may modify the severity of HSCR in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations. PMID:26318480

  20. Functional analysis reveals splicing mutations of the CASQ2 gene in patients with CPVT: implication for genetic counselling and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Rendu, John; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Goldenberg, Alice; David, Nadine; Faivre, Laurence; Barthez, Olivier; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Marty, Isabelle; Lunardi, Joel; Fauré, Julien

    2011-09-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a rare and severe arrhythmogenic disorder. Although usually transmitted in a recessive form, few cases of dominant mutations have been reported. Thirteen mutations in the CASQ2 gene have been reported so far in association with CPVT. We performed molecular analysis of the CASQ2 gene in 43 probands with CPVT and identified eight mutations in five patients. Six mutations were novel: one was a single nucleotide deletion, three affected consensus splice sites, and two had unknown consequences: the c.939 + 5G>C and the synonymous c.381C>T variations. We demonstrated that these two variations affected CASQ2 splicing using a splicing minigene assay. These data increased significantly the number of CASQ2 mutations described in association with CPVT, revealed the high prevalence of splicing and truncating mutations in this gene and brought new insight regarding the dominant inheritance of the disease. Moreover, our report of the first splicing abnormalities in CASQ2 caused by intronic mutation or synonymous change underlines the absolute necessity to perform extensive molecular analysis for genetic diagnosis and counseling of CPVT. PMID:21618644

  1. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  2. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-11-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  3. Genetic Inhibition Of The Ubiquitin Ligase Rnf5 Attenuates Phenotypes Associated To F508del Cystic Fibrosis Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tomati, Valeria; Sondo, Elvira; Armirotti, Andrea; Caci, Emanuela; Pesce, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Gianotti, Ambra; Ju Jeon, Young; Cilli, Michele; Pistorio, Angela; Mastracci, Luca; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Scholte, Bob; Ronai, Ze’ev; Galietta, Luis J. V.; Pedemonte, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CFTR chloride channel. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 (F508del), the most frequent CF mutation, impairs CFTR trafficking and gating. F508del-CFTR mistrafficking may be corrected by acting directly on mutant CFTR itself or by modulating expression/activity of CFTR-interacting proteins, that may thus represent potential drug targets. To evaluate possible candidates for F508del-CFTR rescue, we screened a siRNA library targeting known CFTR interactors. Our analysis identified RNF5 as a protein whose inhibition promoted significant F508del-CFTR rescue and displayed an additive effect with the investigational drug VX-809. Significantly, RNF5 loss in F508del-CFTR transgenic animals ameliorated intestinal malabsorption and concomitantly led to an increase in CFTR activity in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, we found that RNF5 is differentially expressed in human bronchial epithelia from CF vs. control patients. Our results identify RNF5 as a target for therapeutic modalities to antagonize mutant CFTR proteins. PMID:26183966

  4. ReCAP: Economic Evaluation Alongside a Clinical Trial of Telephone Versus In-Person Genetic Counseling for BRCA1/2 Mutations in Geographically Underserved Areas

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yaojen; Near, Aimee M.; Butler, Karin M.; Hoeffken, Amanda; Edwards, Sandra L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Kohlmann, Wendy; Gammon, Amanda; Buys, Saundra S.; Schwartz, Marc D.; Peshkin, Beth N.; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2016-01-01

    QUESTION ASKED: Many individuals at risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations do not have access to trained genetic counselors. This study conducted an economic evaluation alongside a clinical trial of approaches to extending the reach of genetic testing services to geographically underserved populations. SUMMARY ANSWER: Telephone genetic counseling was less expensive than in-person services delivered in the community per individual counseled, individual tested, or mutation detected. For example, it cost an average of $120 (range, $80 to $200) per person counseled in the telephone counseling arm compared with $270 (range, $180 to $400) for in-person counseling. One-way sensitivity analyses showed that the average cost per participant remained consistently lower in the telephone counseling arm than in the in-person counseling arm across the range values for each cost parameter and for each study outcome. METHODS: Microcosting was used to enumerate resources for counseling delivered at 14 primary care clinics (nine geographically remote, five urban) in Utah. Staff time and travel, space, overhead, patient time costs, and test costs were calculated on the basis of actual intervention use and valued using national data for wage rates, space, and overhead. We calculated the costs per arm for pretest counseling, uptake of BRCA1/BRCA2 testing, per mutation detected, and per completion of post-test genetic counseling at 6 months afterrandomization. Costs and effects were not discounted. BIAS, CONFOUNDING FACTOR(S), DRAWBACKS: The findings may not be generalizable to women in other geographically underserved regions in terms of socio-demographic characteristics and mutation risk. Next, we included only costs related to genetic counseling and testing. Counseling and testing may affect other costs, such as those related to increased or decreased short-term use of medical care or long-term health behaviors. REAL-LIFE IMPLICATIONS: Telephone counseling is a cost-efficient method to

  5. Computer simulation for the growing probability of additional offspring with an advantageous reversal allele in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2016-01-01

    This study calculated the growing probability of additional offspring with the advantageous reversal allele in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape using the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The growing probability was calculated for various population sizes, N, sequence lengths, L, selective advantages, s, fitness parameters, k and measuring parameters, C. The saturated growing probability in the stochastic region was approximately the effective selective advantage, s*, when C≫1/Ns* and s*≪1. The present study suggests that the growing probability in the stochastic region in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model can be described using the theoretical formula for the growing probability in the Moran two-allele model. The selective advantage ratio, which represents the ratio of the effective selective advantage to the selective advantage, does not depend on the population size, selective advantage, measuring parameter and fitness parameter; instead the selective advantage ratio decreases with the increasing sequence length.

  6. In situ mapping of the effect of additional mutations on starch granule structure in amylose-extender (ae) maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongli; Wellner, Nikolaus; Parker, Mary L; Morris, Victor J; Cheng, Fang

    2015-03-15

    Optical (KI/I2-staining, polarised) and FTIR microscopy has been used to monitor starch granule structure within wild-type (wt), GEMS-0067 and waxy-amylose-extender (wx-ae) maize mutant kernels. In the GEMS-0067 mutant containing the high amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) plus the recessive ae gene, structural heterogeneity characteristic of the ae mutation was reduced markedly. However, enhanced variation in granule shape and size was observed distributed spatially within the kernel, which appears to be related to new heterogeneity in internal starch granule structure. In wx-ae starch mutants the ae gene led to heterogeneity of starch granule structure equivalent to that in single ae mutants, plus new structural heterogeneity coincident with novel induced variation in granule size and shape. PMID:25542125

  7. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  8. Molecular analysis of genetic mutations among cross-resistant second-line injectable drugs reveals a new resistant mutation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Malinga, Lesibana; Brand, Jeannette; Olorunju, Steve; Stoltz, Anton; van der Walt, Martie

    2016-08-01

    Mutations causing mono and cross-resistance among amikacin, kanamycin and capreomycin of second-line injectable drugs (SLIDs) namely are not well understood. We investigated 124 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for mutations within rrs, eis, tlyA and efflux pump (Rv1258c and Rv0194) genes involved in resistance towards SLIDs. The distribution of mutations across these genes were significantly different in strains with mono-resistance or cross-resistance. A new mutation G878A was found in rrs gene, among strains with capreomycin mono-resistant, or in strains with cross-resistance of capreomycin, kanamycin and amikacin. This mutation was associated with the Euro-American X3 lineage (P < 0.0001). Mutations in the two efflux genes Rv1258c and Rv0194 were confined to strains with only capreomycin/amikacin/kanamycin cross-resistance. We further investigated the minimum inhibitory concentration of capreomycin on isolates with new G878A mutation ranging from 8 μg/mL to 64 μg/mL. Inclusion of G878A on new molecular assays could increase the sensitivity of capreomycin resistance detection. PMID:27298046

  9. CF Mutation Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Cystic Fibrosis Genotyping; CF DNA Analysis; CF Gene Mutation Panel; CF Molecular Genetic Testing Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation Panel Related tests: Sweat Test ; Trypsinogen ; ...

  10. Clinical, pathological, and genetic analysis of a Korean family with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections carrying a novel Asp26Tyr mutation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Eun-Hyung; Choi, Seung Hyuk; Jang, Shin Yi; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Lee, Inchul; Song, Jae-Kwan; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Non-syndromic familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs), inherited in an autosomal dominant manner in up to 19% of patients, are genetically heterogeneous. The ACTA2 gene, which encodes the vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of alpha-actin, is known to cause TAADs and occlusive vascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and premature ischemic stroke. We have investigated a Korean family with DeBakey type I aortic dissection related to pregnancy and a strong family history of TAADs. All affected family members underwent surgical repair of the ascending aorta. Other clinical features of familial TAAD, including inguinal hernias, iris flocculi, and livedo reticularis, were not observed. Histologic studies of aortic tissues showed medial degeneration and SMC hyperplasia in the aorta, consistent with previous observations. Molecular analyses of the ACTA2 gene showed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.76G>T; p.Asp26Tyr). Further analysis of a female patient and members of her family revealed that two affected sisters and her asymptomatic son had the same mutation. The novel Asp26Tyr mutation resides in SM alpha-actin subdomain 1 and is linked to TAAD with hypertrophy and disarray of SMCs and severe migraine, but not to livedo reticularis or iris flocculi. This study expands the spectrum of mutations of the ACTA2 gene by identifying a novel missense mutation. This is the first report of a pathologically- and genetically-confirmed family with TAAD in Korea. PMID:20689142

  11. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals further genetic heterogeneity in axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy and a mutation in HSPB1

    PubMed Central

    Ylikallio, Emil; Johari, Mridul; Konovalova, Svetlana; Moilanen, Jukka S; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Auranen, Mari; Pajunen, Leila; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2014-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies. The dominantly inherited axonal CMT2 displays striking genetic heterogeneity, with 17 presently known disease genes. The large number of candidate genes, combined with lack of genotype–phenotype correlations, has made genetic diagnosis in CMT2 time-consuming and costly. In Finland, 25% of dominant CMT2 is explained by either a GDAP1 founder mutation or private MFN2 mutations but the rest of the families have remained without molecular diagnosis. Whole-exome and genome sequencing are powerful techniques to find disease mutations for CMT patients but they require large amounts of sequencing to confidently exclude heterozygous variants in all candidate genes, and they generate a vast amount of irrelevant data for diagnostic needs. Here we tested a targeted next-generation sequencing approach to screen the CMT2 genes. In total, 15 unrelated patients from dominant CMT2 families from Finland, in whom MFN2 and GDAP1 mutations had been excluded, participated in the study. The targeted approach produced sufficient sequence coverage for 95% of the 309 targeted exons, the rest we excluded by Sanger sequencing. Unexpectedly, the screen revealed a disease mutation only in one family, in the HSPB1 gene. Thus, new disease genes underlie CMT2 in the remaining families, indicating further genetic heterogeneity. We conclude that targeted next-generation sequencing is an efficient tool for genetic screening in CMT2 that also aids in the selection of patients for genome-wide approaches. PMID:23963299

  12. Genetic heterogeneity of activating mutations of the luteinizing hormone receptor gene in familial male-limited precocious puberty

    SciTech Connect

    Laue, L.; Chan, W.Y.; Wu, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial male-limited precocious puberty (FMPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by elevated serum levels of testosterone, low levels of gonadotropins, and Leydig cell hyperplasia. Recently, 3 mutations have been found in FMPP families which encode substitution of Gly for Asp 578, Ile for Met 571, and Ile for Thr 577 in transmembrane helix 6 (TM 6) of the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR). We have studied 28 additional unrelated FMPP families. Genomic DNA was isolated from affected males and PCR was performed to amplify a fragment of the LHR gene encoding amino acid residues 441 to 594. MspI restriction enzyme digests were positive for the Asp 578 to Gly mutation in 22 families. Four new mutations were found in the remaining 6 families: an A to C transition encoding substitution of Leu for Ile 542 in transmembrane helix 5 (TM 5), an A to G transition encoding substitution of Gly for Asp 564 in the third cytoplasmic loop, a G to T transition encoding substitution of Try for Asp 578 in TM 6, and a T to C transition encoding substitution of Arg for Cys 581 in TM 6 of the LHR. 293 cells transfected with cDNAs for each of the 4 mutant LHRs, created by site-directed mutagenesis of the wild-type LHR cDNA, exhibited markedly increased levels of basal cAMP production in the absence of agonist, indicating constitutive activation of the mutant LHRs. We conclude that substitution of residues at multiple sites with TM 5, TM 6, and the intervening third cytoplasmic loop of the LHR cause constitutive receptor activation resulting in FMPP. These findings allow future diagnosis of affected patients and provide the basis to study the receptor domains involved in G-protein activation.

  13. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple. PMID:25606403

  14. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n = 62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24, genome OO), by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments) and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent. PMID:27148282

  15. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.) Extracted from Intergeneric Allopolyploid and Additions with Orychophragmus

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Mayank; Dang, Yanwei; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization with the merger of the genomes from different species has been shown to be associated with genetic and epigenetic changes. But the maintenance of such alterations related to one parental species after the genome is extracted from the allopolyploid remains to be detected. In this study, the genome of Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, genomes AACC) was extracted from its intergeneric allohexaploid (2n = 62, genomes AACCOO) with another crucifer Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24, genome OO), by backcrossing and development of alien addition lines. B. napus-type plants identified in the self-pollinated progenies of nine monosomic additions were analyzed by the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphism, sequence-specific amplified polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism. They showed modifications to certain extents in genomic components (loss and gain of DNA segments and transposons, introgression of alien DNA segments) and DNA methylation, compared with B. napus donor. The significant differences in the changes between the B. napus types extracted from these additions likely resulted from the different effects of individual alien chromosomes. Particularly, the additions which harbored the O. violaceus chromosome carrying dominant rRNA genes over those of B. napus tended to result in the development of plants which showed fewer changes, suggesting a role of the expression levels of alien rRNA genes in genomic stability. These results provided new cues for the genetic alterations in one parental genome that are maintained even after the genome becomes independent. PMID:27148282

  16. Genetic evidence for a role of parC mutations in development of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Heisig, P

    1996-04-01

    Fifteen strains of Escherichia coli with MICs of ciprofloxacin (CIP) between 0.015 and 256 micrograms/ml were examined for the presence of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene and in an analogous region of the parC gene. No mutation was found in a susceptible isolate (MIC of CIP, 0.015 microgram/ml). Four moderately resistant strains (MIC of CIP 0.06 to 4 micrograms/ml) carried one gyrA mutation affecting serine 83, but in only one strain was an additional parC mutation (Gly-78 to Asp) detected. All ten highly resistant strains examined (MIC of CIP, > 4 micrograms/ml) carried two gyrA mutations affecting residues serine 83 and aspartate 87, and at least one parC mutation. These parC mutations included alterations of serine 80 to arginine or isoleucine and glutamate 84 to glycine or lysine. The parC+ and two mutant alleles (parCI-80 and parCI-80,G-84) were inserted into the mobilizable vector pBP507. Transfer of a plasmid-coded parC+ allele into parC+ strains did not alter the susceptibilities towards ciprofloxacin or nalidixic acid, while a significant increase in susceptibility was detectable for parC mutants. This increase, however, did not restore wild-type susceptibility, whereas transfer of a plasmid-coded gyrA+ allele alone or in combination with parC+ did. These data are in agreement with the view that topoisomerase IV is a secondary, less sensitive target for quinolone action in Escherichia coli and that the development of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli requires at least one parC mutation in addition to the gyrA mutation(s). PMID:8849244

  17. Incompatibilities Involving Yeast Mismatch Repair Genes: A Role for Genetic Modifiers and Implications for Disease Penetrance and Variation in Genomic Mutation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Demogines, Ann; Wong, Alex; Aquadro, Charles; Alani, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Genetic background effects underlie the penetrance of most genetically determined phenotypes, including human diseases. To explore how such effects can modify a mutant phenotype in a genetically tractable system, we examined an incompatibility involving the MLH1 and PMS1 mismatch repair genes using a large population sample of geographically and ecologically diverse Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The mismatch repair incompatibility segregates into naturally occurring yeast strains, with no strain bearing the deleterious combination. In assays measuring the mutator phenotype conferred by different combinations of MLH1 and PMS1 from these strains, we observed a mutator phenotype only in combinations predicted to be incompatible. Surprisingly, intragenic modifiers could be mapped that specifically altered the strength of the incompatibility over a 20-fold range. Together, these observations provide a powerful model in which to understand the basis of disease penetrance and how such genetic variation, created through mating, could result in new mutations that could be the raw material of adaptive evolution in yeast populations. PMID:18566663

  18. Two distinct origins of a common BRCA1 mutation in breast-ovarian cancer families: a genetic study of 15 185delAG-mutation kindreds.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, D. B.; Wagner-Costalas, J.; Schultz, D. C.; Lynch, H. T.; Daly, M.; Godwin, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    We screened 163 women from breast-ovarian cancer-prone families, as well as 178 individuals affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer but unselected for family history, for germ-line mutations in exon 2 of BRCA1, by SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. A total of 25 mutations were detected. Thirteen of 64 Jewish Ashkenazi women and 2 non-Jewish individuals were found to possess the 185delAG mutation. Haplotype data for all 15 individuals, with markers intragenic to BRCA1, suggest that the Jewish Ashkenazi individuals share a common ancestry that is distinct from the lineage shared by the other two women. These data provide the first evidence of two distinct lines of transmission for the 185delAG mutation, only one of which has its origins in the Jewish Ashkenazi population. Our screening also uncovered 10 affected individuals with an 11-bp deletion at nucleotide 188 of BRCA1 (188del11), 4 of whom are Ashkenazi Jews. This is only the third reported mutation detected within the Jewish Ashkenazi population and may represent the second most common alteration in BRCA1 found in Ashkenazi Jews in the United States. The observed overrepresentation of specific mutations within a subgroup of the general population may eventually contribute to the development of inexpensive and routine tests for BRCA1 mutations, as well as to the elucidation of other contributory factors (e.g., diet, environment, and chemical exposures) that may play a key role in cancer initiation and development. The implications of the mutational data, as well as the role that founder effect, demographic history, and penetrance play in the resulting observed phenomena, are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8651293

  19. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of alfalfa mosaic virus: evidence for additional genetic variability.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Giuseppe; Acanfora, Nadia; Orílio, Anelise F; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is a plant virus that is distributed worldwide and can induce necrosis and/or yellow mosaic on a large variety of plant species, including commercially important crops. It is the only virus of the genus Alfamovirus in the family Bromoviridae. AMV isolates can be clustered into two genetic groups that correlate with their geographic origin. Here, we report for the first time the complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of AMV found infecting Cape honeysuckle (Tecoma capensis) and named Tec-1. The tripartite genome of Tec-1 is composed of 3643 nucleotides (nt) for RNA1, 2594 nt for RNA2 and 2037 nt for RNA3. Comparative sequence analysis of the coat protein gene revealed that the isolate Tec-1 is distantly related to subgroup I of AMV and more closely related to subgroup II, although forming a distinct phylogenetic clade. Therefore, we propose to split subgroup II of AMV into two subgroups, namely IIA, comprising isolates previously included in subgroup II, and IIB, including the novel Spanish isolate Tec-1. PMID:21327783

  20. Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

    2009-10-01

    Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented. PMID:19582477

  1. The unstable 'clone': evidence from monitoring AFLP-based mutations for short-term clonal genetic variation in two asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.).

    PubMed

    Loxdale, H D; Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2013-02-01

    Clones have been in the forefront of biological interest for many years. Even so, open discussions continue to surround the concept of clonality, which has been recently much debated in the scientific literature, both in terms of philosophical meaning as well as empirical determination. Philosophically, the clone is the horizontally produced lineage from a single fertlized egg (e.g. mammals by division of the fertilized egg and representing a single generation) or vertically produced offspring (e.g. aphids representing different successive generations) from a single asexual stem mother (originally for a particular lineage, following hatching of the overwintering sexual egg in the spring); empirically, the aspect of genetic fidelity is also considered important, so-called clones being assumed to have an identical genome among clone mates. In reality of course, such members of a clonal lineage must differ at various regions of the genome, since mutation is a fundamental property of the DNA itself. Yet few studies have so far set out to show this empirically in eukaryotic organisms, which indulge in periods of asexual reproduction, sometimes, as in aphids, over many generations. In the present study, we have investigated asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.), a global pest of cereals, over five successive generations employing AFLP-PCR molecular techniques. Our main interest was to see how much variation was present in the early generations and if this variation was transmitted through the asexual lineages. By monitoring AFLP-based polymorphisms, we show that, in this aphid species, of a total of 110 individuals from two lineages tested (termed SA and SB), random mutations (band deletions, more rarely additions) were apparent from the third generation onwards, and although some mutations were found to be transmitted transgenerationally, others were rarely transmitted through the particular lineages they were detected in. Using Arlequin v. 2

  2. Mutation in the 3'untranslated region of APP as a genetic determinant of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Goupil, Claudia; Richard, Anne-Claire; Pottier, Cyril; Dorval, Véronique; Sarov-Rivière, Mariana; Riant, Florence; Hervé, Dominique; Amouyel, Philippe; Guerchet, Maelenn; Ndamba-Bandzouzi, Bebene; Mbelesso, Pascal; Dartigues, Jean-François; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Hébert, Sébastien S; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Aβ-related cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a major cause of primary non-traumatic brain hemorrhage. In families with an early onset of the disease, CAA can be due to amyloid precursor protein (APP) pathogenic variants or duplications. APP duplications lead to a ~1.5-fold increased APP expression, resulting in Aβ overproduction and deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal vessels. We hypothesized that rare variants in the 3'untranslated region (UTR) of APP might lead to APP overexpression in patients with CAA and no APP pathogenic variant or duplication. We performed direct sequencing of the whole APP 3'UTR in 90 patients with CAA and explored the functional consequences of one previously unreported variant. We identified three sequence variants in four patients, of which a two-base pair deletion (c.*331_*332del) was previously unannotated and absent from 175 controls of same ethnicity. This latter variant was associated with increased APP expression in vivo and in vitro. Bioinformatics and functional assays showed that the APP c.*331_*332del variant affected APP messenger RNA (mRNA) structure and binding of two microRNAs (miR-582-3p and miR-892b), providing a mechanism for the observed effects on APP expression. These results identify APP 3'UTR sequence variants as genetic determinants of Aβ-CAA. PMID:25828868

  3. Germline MLH1 and MSH2 mutational spectrum including frequent large genomic aberrations in Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families: Implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta E; Olah, Edith

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of germline MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutations and evaluate the clinical characteristics of Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. METHODS: Thirty-six kindreds were tested for mutations using conformation sensitive gel electrophoreses, direct sequencing and also screening for genomic rearrangements applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). RESULTS: Eighteen germline mutations (50%) were identified, 9 in MLH1 and 9 in MSH2. Sixteen of these sequence alterations were considered pathogenic, the remaining two were non-conservative missense alterations occurring at highly conserved functional motifs. The majority of the definite pathogenic mutations (81%, 13/16) were found in families fulfilling the stringent Amsterdam I/II criteria, including three rearrangements revealed by MLPA (two in MSH2 and one in MLH1). However, in three out of sixteen HNPCC-suspected families (19%), a disease-causing alteration could be revealed. Furthermore, nine mutations described here are novel, and none of the sequence changes were found in more than one family. CONCLUSION: Our study describes for the first time the prevalence and spectrum of germline mismatch repair gene mutations in Hungarian HNPCC and suspected-HNPCC families. The results presented here suggest that clinical selection criteria should be relaxed and detection of genomic rearrangements should be included in genetic screening in this population. PMID:17569143

  4. Molecular genetic analysis of U2AF59 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: differential sensitivity of introns to mutational inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Romfo, C M; Lakhe-Reddy, S; Wise, J A

    1999-01-01

    The large subunit of the mammalian U2AF heterodimer (U2AF65) is essential for splicing in vitro. To expand our understanding of how this protein functions in vivo, we have created a null allele of the gene encoding the Schizosaccharomyces pombe ortholog, U2AF59, and employed it in a variety of genetic complementation assays. First, analysis of an extensive series of double amino acid substitutions indicates that this splicing factor is surprisingly refractory to mutations. Second, despite extensive structural conservation, we find that metazoan large subunit orthologs cannot substitute in vivo for fission yeast U2AF59. Third, because the activity of U2AF65 in vitro involves binding to the 3' polypyrimidine tract, we examined the splicing of introns containing or lacking this feature in a U2AF59 mutant described here as well as a previously isolated temperature-sensitive mutant (Potashkin et al., 1993, Science 262:573-575). Our data indicate that all four introns tested, including two that lack extensive runs of pyrimidines between the branchpoint and 3' splice site, show splicing defects upon shifting to the nonpermissive condition. In all cases, splicing is blocked prior to the first transesterification reaction in the mutants, consistent with the role inferred for human U2AF65 based on in vitro experiments. PMID:9917066

  5. Crossover versus Mutation: A Comparative Analysis of the Evolutionary Strategy of Genetic Algorithms Applied to Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    PubMed Central

    Osaba, E.; Carballedo, R.; Diaz, F.; Onieva, E.; de la Iglesia, I.; Perallos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Since their first formulation, genetic algorithms (GAs) have been one of the most widely used techniques to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The basic structure of the GAs is known by the scientific community, and thanks to their easy application and good performance, GAs are the focus of a lot of research works annually. Although throughout history there have been many studies analyzing various concepts of GAs, in the literature there are few studies that analyze objectively the influence of using blind crossover operators for combinatorial optimization problems. For this reason, in this paper a deep study on the influence of using them is conducted. The study is based on a comparison of nine techniques applied to four well-known combinatorial optimization problems. Six of the techniques are GAs with different configurations, and the remaining three are evolutionary algorithms that focus exclusively on the mutation process. Finally, to perform a reliable comparison of these results, a statistical study of them is made, performing the normal distribution z-test. PMID:25165731

  6. Phenotypic, metabolic, and molecular genetic characterization of six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by novel mutations in the CYP11B1 gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Eiden-Plach, Antje; Hannemann, Frank; Malunowicz, Ewa M; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of steroidogenesis. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene is the second most common form of CAH. In this study, 6 patients suffering from CAH were diagnosed with 11β-OHD using urinary GC-MS steroid metabolomics analysis. The molecular basis of the disorder was investigated by molecular genetic analysis of the CYP11B1 gene, functional characterization of splicing and missense mutations, and analysis of the missense mutations in a computer model of CYP11B1. All patients presented with abnormal clinical signs of hyperandrogenism. Their urinary steroid metabolomes were characterized by excessive excretion rates of metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol as well as metabolites of 11-deoxycorticosterone, and allowed definite diagnosis. Patient 1 carries compound heterozygous mutations consisting of a novel nonsense mutation p.Q102X (c.304C>T) in exon 2 and the known missense mutation p.T318R (c.953C>G) in exon 5. Two siblings (patient 2 and 3) were compound heterozygous carriers of a known splicing mutation c.1200+1G>A in intron 7 and a known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. Minigene experiments demonstrated that the c.1200+1G>A mutation caused abnormal pre-mRNA splicing (intron retention). Two further siblings (patient 4 and 5) were compound heterozygous carriers of a novel missense mutation p.R332G (c.994C>G) in exon 6 and the known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. A CYP11B1 activity study in COS-1 cells showed that only 11% of the enzyme activity remained in the variant p.R332G. Patient 6 carried a so far not described homozygous deletion g.2470_5320del of 2850 bp corresponding to a loss of the CYP11B1 exons 3-8. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical 6 base pair repeats (GCTTCT) upstream and downstream of the gene. Experiments analyzing the influence of mutations on splicing and on enzyme

  7. Progressive Ataxia and Palatal Tremor: Think about POLG Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mongin, Marie; Delorme, Cécile; Lenglet, Timothée; Jardel, Claude; Vignal, Catherine; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) can be observed in both acquired brainstem or cerebellar lesions and genetic disorders. Phenomenology shown PAPT due to mutation in POLG, the gene encoding the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. Educational value POLG mutation should be considered in patients with PAPT, particularly when additional clues such as a sensory neuronopathy or an ophthalmoplegia are present.

  8. Co-Occurence of Reciprocal Translocation and COL2A1 Mutation in a Fetus with Severe Skeletal Dysplasia: Implications for Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Tilman; Nanda, Indrajit; Rehn, Monika; Zollner, Ursula; Ernestus, Karen; Wirth, Clemens; Schlüter, Gregor; Schmid, Michael; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2015-01-01

    Achondrogenesis type II is an autosomal-dominant disease leading to severe micromelic dwarfism. Here, we report on the postmortem identification of a de novo heterozygous mutation in the COL2A1 gene (c.1529G>A, p.Gly510Asp) in a fetus who presented with generalized hydrops fetalis and severe micromelia during prenatal sonographic examinations. Initially, a reciprocal translocation t(4;17)(q31;p13) was detected in this fetus by chorionic villus sampling. Subsequent chromosomal analysis of maternal and paternal blood showed that the patient's mother was carrier of the same reciprocal translocation. SNP array analysis of the fetus did not provide evidence for chromosomal imbalances or CNVs that could be associated with the fetal phenotype. The coexistence of a cytogenetic (reciprocal translocation) and a molecular genetic (COL2A1 mutation) abnormality in the fetus carries important implications for genetic counseling. PMID:25823796

  9. PTEN Germline Mutations in Patients Initially Tested for Other Hereditary Cancer Syndromes: Would Use of Risk Assessment Tools Reduce Genetic Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Mester, Jessica L.; Moore, Rebekah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. PTEN Hamartoma Tumor syndrome (PHTS) includes patients with Cowden syndrome or other syndromes with germline mutation of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. The risk for breast, colorectal, and endometrial cancer and polyposis is increased, creating clinical overlap with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), Lynch syndrome (LS), and adenomatous polyposis syndromes (APS). We reviewed our series of patients with PHTS to determine how often testing criteria for these syndromes were met and how often other-gene testing was ordered before testing PTEN. Patients and Methods. Patients were prospectively recruited by relaxed International Cowden Consortium criteria or presence of known germline PTEN mutation. Mutations were identified by mutation scanning/multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis and confirmed by sequencing/quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients were excluded if they were adopted, were <18 years of age, or if they were diagnosed with Cowden syndrome before 1998. Standard risk-assessment models were applied to determine whether patients met HBOC testing criteria, LS-relevant Amsterdam II/Bethesda 2004 criteria, or had adenomatous polyps. Prior probability of PTEN mutation was estimated with the Cleveland Clinic PTEN risk calculator. Results. Of 137 PTEN mutation-positive adult probands, 59 (43.1%) met testing criteria for HBOC or LS. Of these, 45 (32.8%) were first offered HBOC, LS, or APS testing. Of those who underwent APS testing, none of the six patients met criteria. Initial risk assessment by a genetics specialist was significantly associated with immediate PTEN testing in patients also meeting HBOC testing criteria. Using this PTEN risk assessment tool could have spared gene testing for 22 unlikely syndromes, at a total cost of $66,080. Conclusion. PHTS is an important differential diagnosis for patients referred for HBOC, LS, or APS. Risk assessment tools may help focus genetic analysis and aid in the

  10. Effects of genetic correction on the differentiation of hair cell-like cells from iPSCs with MYO15A mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-R; Tang, Z-H; Zheng, J; Shi, H-S; Ding, J; Qian, X-D; Zhang, C; Chen, J-L; Wang, C-C; Li, L; Chen, J-Z; Yin, S-K; Shao, J-Z; Huang, T-S; Chen, P; Guan, M-X; Wang, J-F

    2016-08-01

    Deafness or hearing loss is a major issue in human health. Inner ear hair cells are the main sensory receptors responsible for hearing. Defects in hair cells are one of the major causes of deafness. A combination of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology with genome-editing technology may provide an attractive cell-based strategy to regenerate hair cells and treat hereditary deafness in humans. Here, we report the generation of iPSCs from members of a Chinese family carrying MYO15A c.4642G>A and c.8374G>A mutations and the induction of hair cell-like cells from those iPSCs. The compound heterozygous MYO15A mutations resulted in abnormal morphology and dysfunction of the derived hair cell-like cells. We used a CRISPR/Cas9 approach to genetically correct the MYO15A mutation in the iPSCs and rescued the morphology and function of the derived hair cell-like cells. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of generating inner ear hair cells from human iPSCs and the functional rescue of gene mutation-based deafness by using genetic correction. PMID:26915297

  11. Genetic background strongly modifies the severity of symptoms of Hirschsprung disease, but not hearing loss in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ruihua; Torigoe, Daisuke; Suzuki, Sari; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Moritoh, Kanako; Sasaki, Nobuya; Agui, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is thought to result as a consequence of multiple gene interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate the developing gut. However, it remains unknown whether the single complete deletion of important HSCR-associated genes is sufficient to result in HSCR disease. In this study, we found that the null mutation of the Ednrb gene, thought indispensable for enteric neuron development, is insufficient to result in HSCR disease when bred onto a different genetic background in rats carrying Ednrb(sl) mutations. Moreover, we found that this mutation results in serious congenital sensorineural deafness, and these strains may be used as ideal models of Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 (WS4). Furthermore, we evaluated how the same changed genetic background modifies three features of WS4 syndrome, aganglionosis, hearing loss, and pigment disorder in these congenic strains. We found that the same genetic background markedly changed the aganglionosis, but resulted in only slight changes to hearing loss and pigment disorder. This provided the important evidence, in support of previous studies, that different lineages of neural crest-derived cells migrating along with various pathways are regulated by different signal molecules. This study will help us to better understand complicated diseases such as HSCR and WS4 syndrome. PMID:21915282

  12. Functional and molecular genetic analyses of nine newly identified XPD-deficient patients reveal a novel mutation resulting in TTD as well as in XP/CS complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Annika; Gratchev, Alexei; Seebode, Christina; Hofmann, Lars; Schubert, Steffen; Laspe, Petra; Apel, Antje; Ohlenbusch, Andreas; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Weishaupt, Carsten; Oji, Vinzenz; Schön, Michael P; Emmert, Steffen

    2013-07-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group D protein is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER) as well as in basal transcription. Determined by the type of XPD mutation, six different clinical entities have been distinguished: XP, XP with neurological symptoms, trichothiodystrophy (TTD), XP⁄TTD complex, XP⁄Cockayne syndrome (CS) complex or the cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome (COFS). We identified nine new XPD-deficient patients. Their fibroblasts showed reduced post-UV cell survival, reduced NER capacity, normal XPD mRNA expression and partly reduced XPD protein expression. Six patients exhibited a XP phenotype in accordance with established XP-causing mutations (c.2079G>A, p.R683Q; c.2078G>T, p.R683W; c.1833G>T, p.R601L; c.1878G>C, p.R616P; c.1878G>A, p.R616Q). One TTD patient was homozygous for the known TTD-causing mutation p.R722W (c.2195C>T). Two patients were compound heterozygous for a TTD-causing mutation (c.366G>A, p.R112H) and a novel p.D681H (c.2072G>C) amino acid exchange, but exhibited different TTD and XP/CS complex phenotypes, respectively. Interestingly, the XP/CS patient's cells exhibited a reduced but well detectable XPD protein expression compared with hardly detectable XPD expression of the TTD patient's cells. Same mutations with different clinical outcomes in NER-defective patients demonstrate the complexity of phenotype-genotype correlations, for example relating to additional genetic variations (parental consanguinity), different allelic expression due to SNPs or differences in the methylation status. PMID:23800062

  13. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversion mutations in 166 unrelated haemophilia A families: frequency and utility in genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Vnencak-Jones, C L; Iii, J A; Janco, R L; Cohen, M P; Dupont, W D; Kazazian, H H; Rossiter, J P

    1996-01-01

    Haemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder of variable severity that is caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). The disease results from mutations in the FVIII gene which are heterogenous both in type and position within the gene. Recently, however, inversion mutations were found to be common to patients with severe disease (Lakich et al., 1993). These mutations result from intrachromosomal recombinations between DNA sequences in the A gene (located in intron 22 of the FVIII gene) and one of two A genes upstream to the FVIII gene. To determine the frequency of these inversions we performed Southern blot analysis on banked DNA from 166 consecutive, unrelated haemophilia A families previously referred for carrier or prenatal testing. In 57/166 (34%) families an inversion or other unique mutation was detected. The distal and proximal A genes lying upstream to the FVIII gene were involved in 79% and 18% of the mutations, respectively, but in 3% of the families the sequences involved in the mutation have not been identified. In 20/38 (53%) families with severe disease a mutation was detected. Interestingly, the relative risk of developing inhibitors in patients with FVIII gene inversions or other 3° mutations detected by this assay, as compared to patients with no detectable mutation by this assay, was 3.8. In families for which a mutation is detected, direct DNA testing is an accurate and inexpensive alternative to linkage analysis for prenatal or haemophilia A carrier testing. PMID:27213900

  14. mCSM-lig: quantifying the effects of mutations on protein-small molecule affinity in genetic disease and emergence of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pires, Douglas E V; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2016-01-01

    The ability to predict how a mutation affects ligand binding is an essential step in understanding, anticipating and improving the design of new treatments for drug resistance, and in understanding genetic diseases. Here we present mCSM-lig, a structure-guided computational approach for quantifying the effects of single-point missense mutations on affinities of small molecules for proteins. mCSM-lig uses graph-based signatures to represent the wild-type environment of mutations, and small-molecule chemical features and changes in protein stability as evidence to train a predictive model using a representative set of protein-ligand complexes from the Platinum database. We show our method provides a very good correlation with experimental data (up to ρ = 0.67) and is effective in predicting a range of chemotherapeutic, antiviral and antibiotic resistance mutations, providing useful insights for genotypic screening and to guide drug development. mCSM-lig also provides insights into understanding Mendelian disease mutations and as a tool for guiding protein design. mCSM-lig is freely available as a web server at http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/mcsm_lig. PMID:27384129

  15. Reverse genetic screen for loss-of-function mutations uncovers a frameshifting deletion in the melanophilin gene accountable for a distinctive coat color in Belgian Blue cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanbo; Sartelet, Arnaud; Tamma, Nico; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2016-02-01

    In the course of a reverse genetic screen in the Belgian Blue cattle breed, we uncovered a 10-bp deletion (c.87_96del) in the first coding exon of the melanophilin gene (MLPH), which introduces a premature stop codon (p.Glu32Aspfs*1) in the same exon, truncating 94% of the protein. Recessive damaging mutations in the MLPH gene are well known to cause skin, hair, coat or plumage color dilution phenotypes in numerous species, including human, mice, dog, cat, mink, rabbit, chicken and quail. Large-scale array genotyping undertaken to identify p.Glu32Aspfs*1 homozygous mutant animals revealed a mutation frequency of 5% in the breed and allowed for the identification of 10 homozygous mutants. As expression of a colored coat requires at least one wild-type allele at the co-dominant Roan locus encoded by the KIT ligand gene (KITLG), homozygous mutants for p.Ala227Asp corresponding with the missense mutation were excluded. The six remaining colored calves displayed a distinctive dilution phenotype as anticipated. This new coat color was named 'cool gray'. It is the first damaging mutation in the MLPH gene described in cattle and extends the already long list of species with diluted color due to recessive mutations in MLPH and broadens the color palette of gray in this breed. PMID:26582259

  16. mCSM-lig: quantifying the effects of mutations on protein-small molecule affinity in genetic disease and emergence of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Douglas E. V.; Blundell, Tom L.; Ascher, David B.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to predict how a mutation affects ligand binding is an essential step in understanding, anticipating and improving the design of new treatments for drug resistance, and in understanding genetic diseases. Here we present mCSM-lig, a structure-guided computational approach for quantifying the effects of single-point missense mutations on affinities of small molecules for proteins. mCSM-lig uses graph-based signatures to represent the wild-type environment of mutations, and small-molecule chemical features and changes in protein stability as evidence to train a predictive model using a representative set of protein-ligand complexes from the Platinum database. We show our method provides a very good correlation with experimental data (up to ρ = 0.67) and is effective in predicting a range of chemotherapeutic, antiviral and antibiotic resistance mutations, providing useful insights for genotypic screening and to guide drug development. mCSM-lig also provides insights into understanding Mendelian disease mutations and as a tool for guiding protein design. mCSM-lig is freely available as a web server at http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/mcsm_lig. PMID:27384129

  17. Implementation of the Realized Genomic Relationship Matrix to Open-Pollinated White Spruce Family Testing for Disentangling Additive from Nonadditive Genetic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gamal El-Dien, Omnia; Ratcliffe, Blaise; Klápště, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Charles; El-Kassaby, Yousry A.

    2016-01-01

    The open-pollinated (OP) family testing combines the simplest known progeny evaluation and quantitative genetics analyses as candidates’ offspring are assumed to represent independent half-sib families. The accuracy of genetic parameter estimates is often questioned as the assumption of “half-sibling” in OP families may often be violated. We compared the pedigree- vs. marker-based genetic models by analysing 22-yr height and 30-yr wood density for 214 white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] OP families represented by 1694 individuals growing on one site in Quebec, Canada. Assuming half-sibling, the pedigree-based model was limited to estimating the additive genetic variances which, in turn, were grossly overestimated as they were confounded by very minor dominance and major additive-by-additive epistatic genetic variances. In contrast, the implemented genomic pairwise realized relationship models allowed the disentanglement of additive from all nonadditive factors through genetic variance decomposition. The marker-based models produced more realistic narrow-sense heritability estimates and, for the first time, allowed estimating the dominance and epistatic genetic variances from OP testing. In addition, the genomic models showed better prediction accuracies compared to pedigree models and were able to predict individual breeding values for new individuals from untested families, which was not possible using the pedigree-based model. Clearly, the use of marker-based relationship approach is effective in estimating the quantitative genetic parameters of complex traits even under simple and shallow pedigree structure. PMID:26801647

  18. A genetic association study of two genes linked to neurodegeneration in a Sardinian multiple sclerosis population: the TARDBP Ala382Thr mutation and C9orf72 expansion.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, L; Murru, M R; Fenu, G; Corongiu, D; Frau, J; Cuccu, S; Coghe, G C; Tranquilli, S; Cocco, E; Marrosu, M G

    2015-10-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammation and accompanied and followed by neurodegeneration. Missense mutations of the TAR DNA Binding Protein gene (TARDBP) located in the chromosome 1p36.22 region, and the hexanucleotide repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) are pathogenic in other neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Assuming that TARDBP Ala382Thr mutation and C9orf72 expansion may underlie MS, we evaluated their frequency in a large cohort of MS patients and controls from Sardinia, an island characterized by a very high frequency of MS and an unusual genetic background. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and analyzed for the presence of a TARDBP Ala382Thr mutation and C9orf72 expansion. Difference in the frequency of these mutations between MS patients and controls was calculated using the χ(2) test with a standard 2×2 table. The Ala382Thr mutation in its heterozygous state was found in 27/1833 patients (1.4%) and 20/1475 controls (1.3%), whereas C9orf72 pathogenic repeat expansion was found in 6/1014 MS patients (0.6%) and 2/333 controls (0.6%). Individuals carrying the mutations did not present with other neurodegenerative conditions and any differences were reported between groups. TARDBP Ala382Thr mutation and C9orf72 expansion do not play a major role in MS pathogenesis in the Sardinian population. Further analyses on larger samples of MS patients from other populations are needed to better define the possible role of these genes in the complex interplay between neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in MS. PMID:26233805

  19. Combination of genetic screening and molecular dynamics as a useful tool for identification of disease-related mutations: ZASP PDZ domain G54S mutation case.

    PubMed

    Fratev, Filip; Mihaylova, Elina; Pajeva, Ilza

    2014-05-27

    Cypher/ZASP (LDB3 gene) is known to interact with a network of proteins. It binds to α-actinin and the calcium voltage channels (LTCC) via its PDZ domain. Here we report the identification of a highly conserved ZASP G54S mutation classified as a variant of unknown significance in a sample of an adult with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The initial bioinformatics calculations strongly evaluated G54S as damaging. Furthermore, we employed accelerated and classical molecular dynamics and free energy calculations to study the structural impact of this mutation on the ZASP apo form and to address the question of whether it can be linked to HCM. Seventeen independent MD runs and simulations of 2.5 μs total were performed and showed that G54S perturbs the α2 helix position via destabilization of the adjacent loop linked to the β5 sheet. This also leads to the formation of a strong H-bond between peptide target residues Leu17 and Gln66, thus restricting both the α-actinin2 and LTCC C-terminal peptides to access their natural binding site and reducing in this way their binding capacity. On the basis of these observations and the adult's clinical data, we propose that ZASP(G54S) and presumably other ZASP PDZ domain mutations can cause HCM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported ZASP PDZ domain mutation that might be linked to HCM. The integrated workflow used in this study can be applied for the identification and description of other mutations that might be related to particular diseases. PMID:24730657

  20. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  1. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  2. Mutation rate estimation for 15 autosomal STR loci in a large population from Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Hua; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Li; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    STR, short tandem repeats, are well known as a type of powerful genetic marker and widely used in studying human population genetics. Compared with the conventional genetic markers, the mutation rate of STR is higher. Additionally, the mutations of STR loci do not lead to genetic inconsistencies between the genotypes of parents and children; therefore, the analysis of STR mutation is more suited to assess the population mutation. In this study, we focused on 15 autosomal STR loci. DNA samples from a total of 42,416 unrelated healthy individuals (19,037 trios) from the population of Mainland China collected between Jan 2012 and May 2014 were successfully investigated. In our study, the allele frequencies, paternal mutation rates, maternal mutation rates and average mutation rates were detected. Furthermore, we also investigated the relationship between paternal ages, maternal ages, area, the time of pregnancy and average mutation rate. We found that the paternal mutation rate was higher than the maternal mutation rate and the paternal, maternal, and average mutation rates had a positive correlation with paternal age, maternal age and the time of pregnancy respectively. Additionally, the average mutation rate of coastal areas was higher than that of inland areas. PMID:26273562

  3. Efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo Implementation of Bayesian Analysis of Additive and Dominance Genetic Variances in Noninbred Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Patrik; Hallander, Jon; Hoti, Fabian; Sillanpää, Mikko J.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and fast computation of quantitative genetic variance parameters is of great importance in both natural and breeding populations. For experimental designs with complex relationship structures it can be important to include both additive and dominance variance components in the statistical model. In this study, we introduce a Bayesian Gibbs sampling approach for estimation of additive and dominance genetic variances in the traditional infinitesimal model. The method can handle general pedigrees without inbreeding. To optimize between computational time and good mixing of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, we used a hybrid Gibbs sampler that combines a single site and a blocked Gibbs sampler. The speed of the hybrid sampler and the mixing of the single-site sampler were further improved by the use of pretransformed variables. Two traits (height and trunk diameter) from a previously published diallel progeny test of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and two large simulated data sets with different levels of dominance variance were analyzed. We also performed Bayesian model comparison on the basis of the posterior predictive loss approach. Results showed that models with both additive and dominance components had the best fit for both height and diameter and for the simulated data with high dominance. For the simulated data with low dominance, we needed an informative prior to avoid the dominance variance component becoming overestimated. The narrow-sense heritability estimates in the Scots pine data were lower compared to the earlier results, which is not surprising because the level of dominance variance was rather high, especially for diameter. In general, the hybrid sampler was considerably faster than the blocked sampler and displayed better mixing properties than the single-site sampler. PMID:18558655

  4. Efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation of Bayesian analysis of additive and dominance genetic variances in noninbred pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Patrik; Hallander, Jon; Hoti, Fabian; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2008-06-01

    Accurate and fast computation of quantitative genetic variance parameters is of great importance in both natural and breeding populations. For experimental designs with complex relationship structures it can be important to include both additive and dominance variance components in the statistical model. In this study, we introduce a Bayesian Gibbs sampling approach for estimation of additive and dominance genetic variances in the traditional infinitesimal model. The method can handle general pedigrees without inbreeding. To optimize between computational time and good mixing of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, we used a hybrid Gibbs sampler that combines a single site and a blocked Gibbs sampler. The speed of the hybrid sampler and the mixing of the single-site sampler were further improved by the use of pretransformed variables. Two traits (height and trunk diameter) from a previously published diallel progeny test of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and two large simulated data sets with different levels of dominance variance were analyzed. We also performed Bayesian model comparison on the basis of the posterior predictive loss approach. Results showed that models with both additive and dominance components had the best fit for both height and diameter and for the simulated data with high dominance. For the simulated data with low dominance, we needed an informative prior to avoid the dominance variance component becoming overestimated. The narrow-sense heritability estimates in the Scots pine data were lower compared to the earlier results, which is not surprising because the level of dominance variance was rather high, especially for diameter. In general, the hybrid sampler was considerably faster than the blocked sampler and displayed better mixing properties than the single-site sampler. PMID:18558655

  5. MRP1 and P-glycoprotein expression assays would be useful in the additional detection of treatment non-responders in CML patients without ABL1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Young Jin; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the ability of the rhodamine-123 efflux assay, multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1) expression assay and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression assay to discriminate chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients who had failed treatment or were at risk of failure. Each assay was performed in blood samples from CML patients (n=224) treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, taken at diagnosis (n=14) and follow-up (n=210). Patient samples were categorized as optimal response (n=120), suboptimal response (n=54), and treatment failure (n=36). Treatment-failed patients had a significantly higher MRP1 expression (5.24% vs. 3.54%, P=0.006) and Pgp expression (5.25% vs. 3.48%, P=0.005) than responders. Both MRP1 (%) and Pgp (%) were highly specific (95.2% and 94.5%) and relatively accurate (83.0% and 82.5%) in the detection of treatment non-responders. Of treatment-failed patients, 41.2% had a positive result in at least one assay and of these patients without ABL1 kinase domain mutation, 51.9% were positive in at least one assay. However, the rhodamine-123 efflux assay failed to discriminate two patient groups. Thus, both MRP1 and Pgp expression assays could be useful for additional identification of treatment non-responders in CML patients without ABL1 mutation. PMID:26248945

  6. Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by a novel ADCK3 mutation that elongates the protein: clinical, genetic and biochemical characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Hersheson, Joshua; Plagnol, Vincent; Fawcett, Katherine; Duberley, Kate E C; Preza, Elisavet; Hargreaves, Iain P; Chalasani, Annapurna; Laurá, Matilde; Wood, Nick W; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Background The autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The large number of ARCA genes leads to delay and difficulties obtaining an exact diagnosis in many patients and families. Ubiquinone (CoQ10) deficiency is one of the potentially treatable causes of ARCAs as some patients respond to CoQ10 supplementation. The AarF domain containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3) is one of several genes associated with CoQ10 deficiency. ADCK3 encodes a mitochondrial protein which functions as an electron-transfer membrane protein complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Methods We report two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani family who presented with cerebellar ataxia and severe myoclonus from adolescence. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical assessment of fibroblasts were performed in the index patient. Results A novel homozygous frameshift mutation in ADCK3 (p.Ser616Leufs*114), was identified in both siblings. This frameshift mutation results in the loss of the stop codon, extending the coding protein by 81 amino acids. Significant CoQ10 deficiency and reduced MRC enzyme activities in the index patient's fibroblasts suggested that the mutant protein may reduce the efficiency of mitochondrial electron transfer. CoQ10 supplementation was initiated following these genetic and biochemical analyses. She gained substantial improvement in myoclonic movements, ataxic gait and dysarthric speech after treatment. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of diagnosing ADCK3 mutations and the potential benefit of treatment for patients. The identification of this new mutation broadens the phenotypic spectrum associated with ADCK3 mutations and provides further understanding of their pathogenic mechanism. PMID:24218524

  7. Genetic basis of hyperlysinemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperlysinemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of L-lysine degradation. To date only one causal mutation in the AASS gene encoding α-aminoadipic semialdehyde synthase has been reported. We aimed to better define the genetic basis of hyperlysinemia. Methods We collected the clinical, biochemical and molecular data in a cohort of 8 hyperlysinemia patients with distinct neurological features. Results We found novel causal mutations in AASS in all affected individuals, including 4 missense mutations, 2 deletions and 1 duplication. In two patients originating from one family, the hyperlysinemia was caused by a contiguous gene deletion syndrome affecting AASS and PTPRZ1. Conclusions Hyperlysinemia is caused by mutations in AASS. As hyperlysinemia is generally considered a benign metabolic variant, the more severe neurological disease course in two patients with a contiguous deletion syndrome may be explained by the additional loss of PTPRZ1. Our findings illustrate the importance of detailed biochemical and genetic studies in any hyperlysinemia patient. PMID:23570448

  8. Evolution of the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E; Carter, Patrick A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-11-22

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix ( G: ). Yet knowledge of G: in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G: itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G: when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G: induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G: induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G: and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change. PMID:26582016

  9. Selection for increased desiccation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: Additive genetic control and correlated responses for other stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.A.; Parsons, P.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Previously we found that Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for increased desiccation resistance have lowered metabolic rate and behavioral activity levels, and show correlated responses for resistance to starvation and a toxic ethanol level. These results were consistent with a prediction that increased resistance to many environmental stresses may be genetically correlated because of a reduction in metabolic energy expenditure. Here we present experiments on the genetic basis of the selection response and extend the study of correlated responses to other stresses. The response to selection was not sex-specific and involved X-linked and autosomal genes acting additively. Activity differences contributed little to differences in desiccation resistance between selected and control lines. Selected lines had lower metabolic rates than controls in darkness when activity was inhibited. Adults from selected lines showed increased resistance to a heat shock, {sup 60}Co-gamma-radiation, and acute ethanol and acetic acid stress. The desiccation, ethanol and starvation resistance of isofemale lines set up from the F2s of a cross between one of the selected and one of the control lines were correlated. Selected and control lines did not differ in ether-extractable lipid content or in resistance to acetone, ether or a cold shock.

  10. The modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS as additional diagnostic tool for genetically distinct hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Rasenack, Maria; Athanasopoulou, Ioanna M; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Lipski, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Vittore, Debora; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the nerve ultrasound characteristics in genetically distinct inherited neuropathies, the value of the modified ultrasound pattern sum score (mUPSS) to differentiate between the subtypes and the correlation of ultrasound with nerve conduction studies (NCS), disease duration and severity. All patients underwent a standardized neurological examination, ultrasound, and NCS. In addition, genetic testing was performed. Consequently, mUPSS was applied, which is a sum-score of cross-sectional areas (CSA) at predefined anatomical points in different nerves. 31 patients were included (10xCharcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)1a, 3xCMT1b, 3xCMTX, 9xCMT2, 6xHNPP [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies]). Generalized, homogeneous nerve enlargement and significantly increased UPS scores emphasized the diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy, particularly CMT1a and CMT1b. The amount of enlargement did not depend on disease duration, symptom severity, height and weight. In CMTX the nerves were enlarged, as well, however, only in the roots and lower limbs, most prominent in men. In CMT2 no significant enlargement was detectable. In HNPP the CSA values were increased at entrapped sites, and not elsewhere. However, a distinction from CMT1, which also showed enlarged CSA values at entrapment sites, was only possible by calculating the entrapment ratios and entrapment score. The mUPSS allowed distinction between CMT1a (increased UPS scores, entrapment ratios <1.0) and HNPP (low UPS scores, entrapment ratios >1.4), while CMT1b and CMTX showed intermediate UPS types and entrapment ratios <1.0. Although based on few cases, ultrasound revealed consistent and homogeneous nerve alteration in certain inherited neuropathies. The modified UPSS is a quantitative tool, which may provide useful information for diagnosis, differentiation and follow-up evaluation in addition to NCS and molecular testing. PMID:26559821

  11. Genetic variations in GJA3, GJA8, LIM2, and age-related cataract in the Chinese population: a mutation screening study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhou; Wang, Binbin; Hu, Shanshan; Zhang, Chunmei; Ma, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of genetic variations in three known cataract-associated genes, gap junction protein α3 (GJA3), gap junction protein α8 (GJA8), lens intrinsic membrane protein 2 (LIM2), encoding lens fiber cell membrane proteins in the development of age-related cataracts. Methods One hundred and forty-five sporadic age-related cataract patients and one hundred and fifty-six unrelated random healthy controls participated in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. All exons of GJA3, GJA8, and LIM2 were sequenced after being amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional consequences of the mutations were analyzed using PolyPhen. Results We found five novel variations in 145 patients and none of them presented in the 156 controls. There are two variations in GJA3 (c.-39C>G, c. 415G>A); one in GJA8 (c. 823G>A), and two in LIM2 (c.57G>A, c.67A>C). PolyPhen predicted that the LIM2 c.67A>C mutation may have potential pathogenicity. Conclusions The genetic mutation in GJA3, GJA8, and LIM2 may slightly contribute to the development of age-related cataracts. This study showed a potential relationship between lens fiber cell membrane protein genes and the development of age-related cataracts in the Chinese population. PMID:21386927

  12. Towards a male-only release system for SIT with the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, using a genetic sexing strain with a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation.

    PubMed

    Meats, A; Maheswaran, P; Frommer, M; Sved, J

    2002-09-01

    Flies that are homozygous for the recessive autosomal mutation bent wings have a limited ability to fly and are less tolerant of high temperatures than normal flies in both the egg and puparial stages. The differences between the mutant and normal flies were found sufficient to be the basis of a genetic sexing strain. Genetic sexing strains were created using translocations of the autosome bearing the wild-type allele of bent wings (chromosome 2) to the Y chromosome, and crossing male flies carrying the translocation to mutant bent wings females. In the resulting strain, the females were homozygous for the bent wings mutation and the males were phenotypically normal for wing characters. Several translocations were recovered after irradiation, but only one translocation involving chromosome 2 was both stable and expressed in a stock that was vigorous enough for long-term viability. Unfortunately, all stocks containing the translocation showed high levels of temperature-dependent lethality, including, inexplicably, both males and females. Translocation stocks showing this effect included bent wings, another second chromosome mutation, white marks, and an otherwise normal stock. This phenomenon is probably rare, as it has not been reported before. It is likely that bent wings could be suitably used with another translocation. PMID:12484529

  13. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions. PMID:26297554

  14. WT1 mutations in T-ALL.

    PubMed

    Tosello, Valeria; Mansour, Marc R; Barnes, Kelly; Paganin, Maddalena; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Jenkinson, Sarah; Allen, Christopher G; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Palomero, Teresa; Real, Pedro; Murty, Vundavalli; Yao, Xiaopan; Richards, Susan M; Goldstone, Anthony; Rowe, Jacob; Basso, Giuseppe; Wiernik, Peter H; Paietta, Elisabeth; Pieters, Rob; Horstmann, Martin; Meijerink, Jules P P; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2009-07-30

    The molecular mechanisms involved in disease progression and relapse in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) are poorly understood. We used single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis to analyze paired diagnostic and relapsed T-ALL samples to identify recurrent genetic alterations in T-ALL. This analysis showed that diagnosis and relapsed cases have common genetic alterations, but also that relapsed samples frequently lose chromosomal markers present at diagnosis, suggesting that relapsed T-ALL emerges from an ancestral clone different from the major leukemic population at diagnosis. In addition, we identified deletions and associated mutations in the WT1 tumor suppressor gene in 2 of 9 samples. Subsequent analysis showed WT1 mutations in 28 of 211 (13.2%) of pediatric and 10 of 85 (11.7%) of adult T-ALL cases. WT1 mutations present in T-ALL are predominantly heterozygous frameshift mutations resulting in truncation of the C-terminal zinc finger domains of this transcription factor. WT1 mutations are most prominently found in T-ALL cases with aberrant rearrangements of the oncogenic TLX1, TLX3, and HOXA transcription factor oncogenes. Survival analysis demonstrated that WT1 mutations do not confer adverse prognosis in pediatric and adult T-ALL. Overall, these results identify the presence of WT1 mutations as a recurrent genetic alteration in T-ALL. PMID:19494353

  15. Molecular Genetic Characterization of 151 Mut-Type Methylmalonic Aciduria Patients and Identification of 41 Novel Mutations in MUT.

    PubMed

    Forny, Patrick; Schnellmann, Anne-Sophie; Buerer, Celine; Lutz, Seraina; Fowler, Brian; Froese, D Sean; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-08-01

    Isolated methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of propionate metabolism that is most commonly caused by mutations in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT) gene (mut-type MMA). We investigated a cohort of 151 patients, classifying 114 patients as mut(0) and 32 as mut(-) (five not defined). As per the definition, mut(-) patients showed a higher propionate incorporation ratio in vitro, which was correlated to a considerably later age of onset compared with mut(0) patients. In all patients, we found a total of 110 different mutations, of which 41 were novel. While the missense alleles p.Asn219Tyr, p.Arg369His, and p.Arg694Trp recurred in >10 alleles, 47 mutations were identified only once, suggesting many patients carry private mutations. Deficient alleles in the mut(-) subclass were almost exclusively caused by missense mutations, found disproportionately in the C-terminal cofactor binding domain. On the contrary, only half of the mut(0) mutations were of the missense type. Western blot analysis revealed reduced MUT protein for all 34 cell lines (27 mut(0) , seven mut(-) ) tested, suggesting protein instability as a major mechanism of deficiency in mut-type MMA. This large-scale evaluation helps to characterize the landscape of MUT mutations and their relationship to dysfunction and disease. PMID:27167370

  16. Genetics of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Brautbar, Ariel; Leary, Emili; Rasmussen, Kristen; Wilson, Don P; Steiner, Robert D; Virani, Salim

    2015-04-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and premature cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 200-500 for heterozygotes in North America and Europe. Monogenic FH is largely attributed to mutations in the LDLR, APOB, and PCSK9 genes. Differential diagnosis is critical to distinguish FH from conditions with phenotypically similar presentations to ensure appropriate therapeutic management and genetic counseling. Accurate diagnosis requires careful phenotyping based on clinical and biochemical presentation, validated by genetic testing. Recent investigations to discover additional genetic loci associated with extreme hypercholesterolemia using known FH families and population studies have met with limited success. Here, we provide a brief overview of the genetic determinants, differential diagnosis, genetic testing, and counseling of FH genetics. PMID:25712136

  17. Genetic polymorphisms and mutation rates of 27 Y-chromosomal STRs in a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yong-Ji; Zhang, Chu-chu; Li, Ran; Yang, Yang; Ou, Xue-Ling; Tong, Da-yue; Sun, Hong-Yu

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we collected blood samples from 1033 father-son pairs of a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China, of which 1007 fathers were unrelated male individuals. All together, 2040 male individuals were analyzed at 27 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) with Yfiler(®) Plus system. A total of 1003 different haplotypes were observed among 1007 unrelated fathers, with the overall haplotype diversity (HD) 0.999992 and discrimination capacity (DC) 0.996. The gene diversity (GD) values for the 27 Y-STR loci ranged from 0.4400 at DYS438 to 0.9597 at DYS385a/b. 11 off-ladder alleles and 25 copy number variants were detected in 1007 males. Population relationships were analyzed by comparison with 19 other worldwide populations. With 27,920 allele transfers in 1033 father-son pairs, 124 mutation events occurred, of which 118 were one-step mutations and 6 were two-step mutations. Eleven father-son pairs were found to have mutations at two loci, while one pair at three loci. The estimated locus-specific mutation rates varied from 0 to 1.74×10(-2), with an average estimated mutation rate 4.4×10(-3) (95%CI: 3.7×10(-3) to 5.3×10(-3)). Mutations were most frequently observed at three rapidly mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs), DYS576, DYS518 and DYS627. However, at DYS570, DYS449 and DYF387S1 loci, which were also described as RM Y-STRs, the mutation rates in Guangdong Han population were not as high as estimated in other populations. PMID:26619377

  18. Genetic subgroup of small ruminant lentiviruses that infects sheep homozygous for TMEM154 frameshift deletion mutation A4delta53

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small Ruminant Lentivirus (SRLV) infections of sheep are influenced by genetics on both the host and pathogen sides. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane 154 (TMEM154) gene associates with infection susceptibility, and distinct SRLV genetic subtypes infect sheep in association with their TM...

  19. The strains recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471) can be certified as non-genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Yamada, Masami; Awogi, Takumi; Hakura, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial reverse mutation test, commonly called Ames test, is used worldwide. In Japan, the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are regulated under the Cartagena Domestic Law, and organisms obtained by self-cloning and/or natural occurrence would be exempted from the law case by case. The strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli recommended for use in the bacterial reverse mutation test (OECD guideline 471), have been considered as non-GMOs because they can be constructed by self-cloning or naturally occurring bacterial strains, or do not disturb the biological diversity. The present article explains the reasons why these tester strains should be classified as non-GMOs. PMID:27350822

  20. Genetic Manipulation of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Development of Strains Lacking Photosystem I for the Analysis of Mutations in Photosystem II).

    PubMed Central

    Smart, L. B.; Bowlby, N. R.; Anderson, S. L.; Sithole, I.; McIntosh, L.

    1994-01-01

    We have taken a genetic approach to eliminating the presence of photosystem I (PSI) in site-directed mutants of photosystem II (PSII) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. By selecting under light-activated heterotrophic conditions, we have inactivated the psaA-psaB operon encoding the PSI reaction center proteins in cells containing deletions of the three psbA genes. We have also introduced deletions into both copies of psbD in a strain containing a mutation that inactivates psaA (ADK9). These strains, designated D1-/PSI- and D2-/PSI-, may serve as recipient strains for the incorporation of site-directed mutations in either psbA2 or psbD1. The characterization of these cells, which lack both PSI and PSII, is described. PMID:12232086

  1. Incorporating information about pre-implantation genetic diagnosis into discussions about testing and risk-management for BRCA1/2 mutations: A qualitative study of patient preferences

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Karen; Rubin, Lisa; Werner-Lin, Allison; Sagi, Michal; Kemel, Yelena; Stern, Rikki; Phillips, Aliza; Cholst, Ina; Kauff, Noah; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies show that BRCA1/2 mutation carriers are interested in learning about reproductive options such as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent passing their risk onto their children. However, attitudes vary widely, and the procedure raises complex ethical and psychosocial issues. This complexity, plus the highly technical nature of PGD, makes it difficult to integrate PGD information into genetic counseling sessions that already cover probabilistic, emotionally-charged risk information. Method Thirty-three reproductive age BRCA1/2 mutation carriers who had previously undergone genetic counseling viewed a tutorial about PGD and were interviewed about attitudes towards PGD, and preferences about how to include PGD information in genetic counseling. Results Most participants preferred to be briefly informed of availability of PGD information, and to receive written materials about PGD, but with the option of deferring detailed discussion if they already feel overloaded or perceive that PGD is not immediately relevant to their risk management and/or childbearing plans. For some, the stress of testing temporarily interfered with information processing, producing states of cognitive avoidance (“in a fog,” “tuning out”). Some preferred to discuss PGD with a physician with whom they had an ongoing relationship (e.g., OB/GYN, primary care provider, oncologist). Conclusions Providers offering cancer genetic testing can consider indicating availability of PGD information, while attending to patients’ level of interest and ability to absorb information. Research is needed to link patient responses to information overload to psychosocial outcomes (e.g., distress, decision quality). Continuing medical education is needed to support providers in facilitating informed decisions about PGD. PMID:22736296

  2. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ . PMID:26503432

  3. Prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among 403 women with triple-negative breast cancer: implications for genetic screening selection criteria: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Fostira, Florentia; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Pertesi, Maroulio; Timotheadou, Eleni; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Glentis, Stavros; Bournakis, Evangelos; Bobos, Mattheos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papakostas, Pavlos; Pentheroudakis, George; Gogas, Helen; Skarlos, Pantelis; Samantas, Epaminontas; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Kosmidis, Paris A; Koutras, Angelos; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fountzilas, George

    2012-07-01

    In spite the close association of the triple-negative breast cancer immunophenotype with hereditary breast cancers and the BRCA1 pathway, there is a lack of population studies that determine the frequency of BRCA1 mutations among triple-negative breast cancer patients. To address this, we have screened a large sample of 403 women diagnosed with triple-negative invasive breast cancer, independently of their age or family history, for germline BRCA1 mutations. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 20-83). The overall prevalence of triple-negative cases among the initial patient group with invasive breast cancer was 8%. BRCA1 was screened by direct DNA sequencing in all patients, including all exons where a mutation was previously found in the Greek population (exons 5, 11, 12, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24-77% of the BRCA1 coding region), including diagnostic PCRs to detect the three Greek founder large genomic rearrangements. Sixty-five deleterious BRCA1 mutations were identified among the 403 triple-negative breast cancer patients (16%). Median age of onset for mutation carriers was 39 years. Among a total of 106 women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer (<40 years), 38 (36%) had a BRCA1 mutation, while 27% of women with triple-negative breast cancer diagnosed before 50 years (56/208) had a BRCA1 mutation. A mutation was found in 48% (50/105) of the triple-negative breast cancer patients with family history of breast or ovarian cancer. It is noteworthy, however, that of the 65 carriers, 15 (23%) had no reported family history of related cancers. All but one of the carriers had grade III tumors (98%). These results indicate that women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer, and ideally all triple-negative breast cancer patients, are candidates for BRCA1 genetic testing even in the absence of a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. PMID:22434525

  4. Molecular genetics of cone-rod dystrophy in Chinese patients: New data from 61 probands and mutation overview of 163 probands.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Xiao, Xueshan; Li, Shiqiang; Jia, Xiaoyun; Wang, Panfeng; Sun, Wenmin; Xu, Yan; Xin, Wei; Guo, Xiangming; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2016-05-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CORD) is a common form of inherited retinal degeneration. Previously, we have conducted serial mutational analysis in probands with CORD either by Sanger sequencing or whole exome sequencing (WES). In the current study, variants in all genes from RetNet were selected from the whole exome sequencing data of 108 CORD probands (including 61 probands reported here for the first time) and were analyzed by multistep bioinformatics analysis, followed by Sanger sequencing and segregation validation. Data from the previous studies and new data from this study (163 probands in total) were summarized to provide an overview of the molecular genetics of CORD. The following potentially pathogenic mutations were identified in 93 of the 163 (57.1%) probands: CNGA3 (32.5%), ABCA4 (3.8%), ALMS1 (3.1%), GUCY2D (3.1%), CACNA1F (2.5%), CRX (1.8%), PDE6C (1.8%), CNGB3 (1.8%), GUCA1A (1.2%), UNC119 (0.6%), RPGRIP1 (1.2%), RDH12 (0.6%), KCNV2 (0.6%), C21orf2 (0.6%), CEP290 (0.6%), USH2A (0.6%) and SNRNP200 (0.6%). The 17 genes with mutations included 12 known CORD genes and five genes (ALMS1, RDH12, CEP290, USH2A, and SNRNP200) associated with other forms of retinal degeneration. Mutations in CNGA3 is most common in this cohort. This is a systematic molecular genetic analysis of Chinese patients with CORD. PMID:26992781

  5. Impact of AhR, CYP1A1 and GSTM1 genetic polymorphisms on TP53 R273G mutations in individuals exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Long, Jiangang; Chen, Lan; Shah, Walayat; Kong, Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study was to undertaken to investigate the impacts of AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1 genetic polymorphisms on the R273G mutation in exon 8 of the tumor suppressor p53 gene (TP53) among polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposed to coke-oven workers. One hundred thirteen workers exposed to PAH and 82 control workers were recruited. We genotyped for polymorphisms in the AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1, and TP53 R273G mutation in blood by PCR methods, and determined the levels of 1-hydroxypyrene as PAH exposure marker in urine using the high pressure liquid chromatography assay. We found that the distribution of alcohol users and the urinary excretion of 1-OHP in the exposed workers were significantly higher than that of the control workers (p=0.004, p<0.001, respectively). Significant differences were observed in the p53 genotype distributions of smoking subjects (p=0.01, 95%CI: 1.23-6.01) and PAH exposure (p=0.008, 95%CI: 1.24-4.48), respectively. Further, significant differences were observed in the p53 exon 8 mutations for the genetic polymorphisms of Lys/Arg for AhR (p=0.02, 95%CI: 0.70-15.86), Val/Val for CYP1A1 (p=0.04, 95%CI: 0.98-19.09) and null for GSTM1 (p=0.02, 95%CI: 1.19-6.26), respectively. Our findings indicated that polymorphisms of PAH metabolic genes, such as AhR, CYP1A1, GSTM1 polymorphisms may interact with p53 genetic variants and may contribute to PAH related cancers. PMID:24761888

  6. Estimating mutation rate: how to count mutations?

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun-Xin; Huai, Haying

    2003-01-01

    Mutation rate is an essential parameter in genetic research. Counting the number of mutant individuals provides information for a direct estimate of mutation rate. However, mutant individuals in the same family can share the same mutations due to premeiotic mutation events, so that the number of mutant individuals can be significantly larger than the number of mutation events observed. Since mutation rate is more closely related to the number of mutation events, whether one should count only independent mutation events or the number of mutants remains controversial. We show in this article that counting mutant individuals is a correct approach for estimating mutation rate, while counting only mutation events will result in underestimation. We also derived the variance of the mutation-rate estimate, which allows us to examine a number of important issues about the design of such experiments. The general strategy of such an experiment should be to sample as many families as possible and not to sample much more offspring per family than the reciprocal of the pairwise correlation coefficient within each family. To obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of mutation rate, the number of sampled families needs to be in the same or higher order of magnitude as the reciprocal of the mutation rate. PMID:12807798

  7. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Aponte, Jennifer; Sega, Gary A; Hauser, Loren John; Dhar, Madhu; Withrow, Catherine; Carpenter, D A; Rinchik, Eugene M.; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Johnson, Dabney K

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  8. Genetic Brain Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  9. MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism and PR (PROGINS) mutation as genetic factors for preterm delivery, fetal death and low birth weight: A Northeast Indian population based study

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Diptika; Bose, Purabi Deka; Das, Somdatta; Das, Chandana Ray; Datta, Ratul; Bose, Sujoy

    2015-01-01

    Preterm delivery (PTD) is one of the most significant contributors to neonatal mortality, morbidity, and long-term adverse consequences for health; with highest prevalence reported from India. The incidence of PTD is alarmingly very high in Northeast India. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the associative role of MTHFR gene polymorphism and progesterone receptor (PR) gene mutation (PROGINS) in susceptibility to PTD, negative pregnancy outcome and low birth weights (LBW) in Northeast Indian population. Methods A total of 209 PTD cases {extreme preterm (< 28 weeks of gestation, n = 22), very preterm (28–32 weeks of gestation, n = 43) and moderate preterm (32–37 weeks of gestation, n = 144) and 194 term delivery cases were studied for MTHFR C677T polymorphism and PR (PROGINS) gene mutation. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results Distribution of MTHFR and PR mutation was higher in PTD cases. Presence of MTHFR C677T polymorphism was significantly associated and resulted in the increased risk of PTD (p < 0.001), negative pregnancy outcome (p < 0.001) and LBW (p = 0.001); more significantly in extreme and very preterm cases. Presence of PR mutation (PROGINS) also resulted in increased risk of PTD and negative pregnancy outcome; but importantly was found to increase the risk of LBW significantly in case of very preterm (p < 0.001) and moderately preterm (p < 0.001) delivery cases. Conclusions Both MTHFR C677T polymorphism and PR (PROGINS) mutation are evident genetic risk factors associated with the susceptibility of PTD, negative pregnancy outcome and LBW. MTHFR C677T may be used as a prognostic marker to stratify subpopulation of pregnancy cases predisposed to PTD; thereby controlling the risks associated with PTD. PMID:25709895

  10. Timing, rates and spectra of human germline mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Sarah J.; Hardwick, Robert J.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Turki, Saeed Al; Dominiczak, Anna; Morris, Andrew; Porteous, David; Smith, Blair; Stratton, Michael R.; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations are a driving force behind genome evolution and genetic disease. We investigated genome-wide mutation rates and spectra in multi-sibling families. Mutation rate increased with paternal age in all families, but the number of additional mutations per year differed more than two-fold between families. Meta-analysis of 6,570 mutations showed that germline methylation influences mutation rates. In contrast to somatic mutations, we found remarkable consistency of germline mutation spectra between the sexes and at different paternal ages. 3.8% of mutations were mosaic in the parental germline, resulting in 1.3% of mutations being shared between siblings. The number of these shared mutations varied significantly between families. Our data suggest that the mutation rate per cell division is higher during both early embryogenesis and differentiation of primordial germ cells, but is reduced substantially during post-pubertal spermatogenesis. These findings have important consequences for the recurrence risks of disorders caused by de novo mutations. PMID:26656846

  11. Timing, rates and spectra of human germline mutation.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, Raheleh; Wuster, Arthur; Lindsay, Sarah J; Hardwick, Robert J; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Al Turki, Saeed; Dominiczak, Anna; Morris, Andrew; Porteous, David; Smith, Blair; Stratton, Michael R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations are a driving force behind genome evolution and genetic disease. We investigated genome-wide mutation rates and spectra in multi-sibling families. The mutation rate increased with paternal age in all families, but the