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Sample records for additional genetic variants

  1. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex) versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context of results from genome

  2. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  3. Genetic variants in adult liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Dröge, C; Häussinger, D; Keitel, V

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, understanding of genetic variants contributing to liver disease development has considerably improved through novel genotyping techniques. Genetic variants of single genes are known to be decisive for the development of monogenetic liver diseases of varying severity. Identification of genetic variants is an important part of the diagnostic process, e. g. the majority of patients with high iron [Fe] (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis carry the homozygous mutation p.C282Y. Detection of mutations in genes encoding hepatobiliary transport proteins like familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1 (FIC1), bile salt export pump (BSEP), or multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3) is the basis to differentiate various forms of intrahepatic cholestasis. Moreover, genetic variants in a variety of genes are known to act as disease modifiers and represent risk factors for disease progression and the development of cirrhosis or even hepatocellular carcinoma. Success of drug treatment or appearance of severe side effects can also be influenced by specific genetic variants. All these aspects underscore the increasing importance of genetic variants, which in the future may help to identify patients at risk for disease progression or help to guide treatment decisions. In the present overview, specific frequent genetic variants are summarized that play roles in monogenetic liver diseases, forms of intrahepatic cholestasis, gallstone development, fatty liver disease, drug-induced liver injury, and liver disease progression as well as hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:26666282

  4. Epigenomic functional characterization of genetic susceptibility variants in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Amr H; Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic vasculitides are poorly understood inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels that are frequently associated with significant organ damage. Genetic risk variants contribute to the susceptibility of vasculitis, but functional consequences of these genetic variants are largely unknown. Most genetic risk variants in immune-mediated diseases, including systemic vasculitis, are localized to non-coding genetic regions suggesting they might increase disease risk by influencing regulatory elements within the genome. Long range regulatory interactions pose an additional obstacle in localizing functional consequences associated with risk variants to specific genes or cell types. We used cell-type specific enrichment patterns of histone changes that mark poised, primed, and active enhancers, and DNase hypersensitivity to identify specific immune cells mediating genetic risk in vasculitis. Our data suggest that genetic risk variants in ANCA-associated vasculitis are significantly enriched in enhancer elements in Th17 cells, supporting a role for Th17 cells in this disease. Primed and active enhancer elements in B cells can be potentially affected by genetic risk variants associated with Kawasaki disease. Genetic risk in Behçet's disease and Takayasu arteritis might affect enhancer elements in multiple cell types, possibly explained by influencing enhancers in hematopoietic stem cells. Interestingly, our analyses indicate a role for B cells in Kawasaki disease, Behçet's disease, and Takayasu arteritis, and suggest that further work to characterize the involvement of B cells in these diseases is warranted. PMID:26492816

  5. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  6. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  7. Characterization of additional vitamin D binding protein variants.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lei; Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S; Wong, Betty Y L; Williams, Rashida; Carpenter, Thomas O; Cole, David E C

    2016-05-01

    The gene (GC) for the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) shows significant genetic variation. Two missense variants, p.D432E and p.T436K, are common polymorphisms and both may influence vitamin D metabolism. However, less common variants, identified biochemically, have been reported previously. This study aimed to identify the underlying mutations by molecular screening and to characterize the mutant proteins by mass spectrometry. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) was used for screening genetic variants in GC exons and exon/intron boundaries of genomic DNA samples. Sanger sequencing identified the specific mutations. An immuno-capture coupled mass spectrometry method was used to characterize protein variants in serum samples. Initial molecular screening identified 10 samples (out of 761) containing an alanine deletion at codon 246 in exon 7 (p.A246del, c.737_739delCTG), and 1 sample (out of 97) containing a cysteine to phenylalanine substitution at codon 311 in exon 8 (p.C311F, c.932G>T). The mutant allele proteins and posttranslational modified products were distinguishable from the wild-type proteins by mass spectrum profiling. Loss of a disulfide bond due to loss of cysteine-311 was accompanied by the appearance of a novel mixed disulfide species, consistent with S-cysteinylation of the remaining unpaired cysteine-299 in the mutant protein. We confirm earlier biochemical studies indicating that there are additional deleterious GC mutations, some of which may be low-frequency variants. The major findings of this study indicate that additional mutant proteins are secreted and can be identified in the circulation. By combining molecular screening and mass spectrometric methods, mutant DBP species can be identified and characterized. PMID:26924582

  8. Vcfanno: fast, flexible annotation of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Brent S; Layer, Ryan M; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    The integration of genome annotations is critical to the identification of genetic variants that are relevant to studies of disease or other traits. However, comprehensive variant annotation with diverse file formats is difficult with existing methods. Here we describe vcfanno, which flexibly extracts and summarizes attributes from multiple annotation files and integrates the annotations within the INFO column of the original VCF file. By leveraging a parallel "chromosome sweeping" algorithm, we demonstrate substantial performance gains by annotating ~85,000 variants per second with 50 attributes from 17 commonly used genome annotation resources. Vcfanno is available at https://github.com/brentp/vcfanno under the MIT license. PMID:27250555

  9. Characterizing Genetic Variants for Clinical Action

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Erin M.; Din-Lovinescu, Corina; Berg, Jonathan S.; Brooks, Lisa D.; Duncanson, Audrey; Dunn, Michael; Good, Peter; Hubbard, Tim; Jarvik, Gail P.; O'Donnell, Christopher; Sherry, Stephen T.; Aronson, Naomi; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Blumberg, Bruce; Calonge, Ned; Colhoun, Helen M.; Epstein, Robert S.; Flicek, Paul; Gordon, Erynn S.; Green, Eric D.; Green, Robert C.; Hurles, Matthew; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Knaus, William; Ledbetter, David H.; Levy, Howard P.; Lyon, Elaine; Maglott, Donna; McLeod, Howard L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Wicklund, Catherine; Manolio, Teri A.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Williams, Marc S.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, DNA sequencing studies, and other genomic studies are finding an increasing number of genetic variants associated with clinical phenotypes that may be useful in developing diagnostic, preventive, and treatment strategies for individual patients. However, few common variants have been integrated into routine clinical practice. The reasons for this are several, but two of the most significant are limited evidence about the clinical implications of the variants and a lack of a comprehensive knowledge base that captures genetic variants, their phenotypic associations, and other pertinent phenotypic information that is openly accessible to clinical groups attempting to interpret sequencing data. As the field of medicine begins to incorporate genome-scale analysis into clinical care, approaches need to be developed for collecting and characterizing data on the clinical implications of variants, developing consensus on their actionability, and making this information available for clinical use. The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Wellcome Trust thus convened a workshop to consider the processes and resources needed to: 1) identify clinically valid genetic variants; 2) decide whether they are actionable and what the action should be; and 3) provide this information for clinical use. This commentary outlines the key discussion points and recommendations from the workshop. PMID:24634402

  10. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  11. CRY2 Genetic Variants Associate with Dysthymia

    PubMed Central

    Kovanen, Leena; Kaunisto, Mari; Donner, Kati; Saarikoski, Sirkku T.; Partonen, Timo

    2013-01-01

    People with mood disorders often have disruptions in their circadian rhythms. Recent molecular genetics has linked circadian clock genes to mood disorders. Our objective was to study two core circadian clock genes, CRY1 and CRY2 as well as TTC1 that interacts with CRY2, in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. Of these three genes, 48 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose selection was based on the linkage disequilibrium and potential functionality were genotyped in 5910 individuals from a nationwide population-based sample. The diagnoses of major depressive disorder, dysthymia and anxiety disorders were assessed with a structured interview (M-CIDI). In addition, the participants filled in self-report questionnaires on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Logistic and linear regression models were used to analyze the associations of the SNPs with the phenotypes. Four CRY2 genetic variants (rs10838524, rs7121611, rs7945565, rs1401419) associated significantly with dysthymia (false discovery rate q<0.05). This finding together with earlier CRY2 associations with winter depression and with bipolar type 1 disorder supports the view that CRY2 gene has a role in mood disorders. PMID:23951166

  12. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  13. Genetic susceptibility variants in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Ross, Owen A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinsonism is an umbrella term for a group of disorders characterized by the clinical signs of tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. On neuropathologic examination parkinsonism can display alternate protein pathologies (e.g. α-synucleinopathy or tauopathy) but the degeneration of nigral neurons is consistent. The main forms of parkinsonism are, Parkinson's disease (PD), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD). Genetic studies from candidate gene, to unbiased genome-wide approaches including association and next-generation sequencing have nominated a number of disease determinants. Within this review we will highlight the genetic loci that are associated with disease and discuss the implications and importance for a better understanding of the genes involved and thus the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders. PMID:26414118

  14. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, eNOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25512783

  15. CYP4F2 genetic variant alters required warfarin dose

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Michael D.; Awad, Tarif; Johnson, Julie A.; Gage, Brian F.; Falkowski, Mat; Gardina, Paul; Hubbard, Jason; Turpaz, Yaron; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Eby, Charles; King, Cristi R.; Brower, Amy; Schmelzer, John R.; Glurich, Ingrid; Vidaillet, Humberto J.; Yale, Steven H.; Qi Zhang, Kai; Berg, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    Warfarin is an effective, commonly prescribed anticoagulant used to treat and prevent thrombotic events. Because of historically high rates of drug-associated adverse events, warfarin remains underprescribed. Further, interindividual variability in therapeutic dose mandates frequent monitoring until target anticoagulation is achieved. Genetic polymorphisms involved in warfarin metabolism and sensitivity have been implicated in variability of dose. Here, we describe a novel variant that influences warfarin requirements. To identify additional genetic variants that contribute to warfarin requirements, screening of DNA variants in additional genes that code for drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transport proteins was undertaken using the Affymetrix drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters panel. A DNA variant (rs2108622; V433M) in cytochrome P450 4F2 (CYP4F2) was associated with warfarin dose in 3 independent white cohorts of patients stabilized on warfarin representing diverse geographic regions in the United States and accounted for a difference in warfarin dose of approximately 1 mg/day between CC and TT subjects. Genetic variation of CYP4F2 was associated with a clinically relevant effect on warfarin requirement. PMID:18250228

  16. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  17. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Jiao, Shuo; Bien, Stephanie A; Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V; Curtis, Keith R; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hayes, Richard B; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jenkins, Mark A; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M; Newcomb, Polly A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Potter, John D; Schoen, Robert E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  18. Simultaneous identification and prioritization of variants in familial, de novo, and somatic genetic disorders with VariantMaster.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Federico A; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Nikolaev, Sergey; Guipponi, Michel; Robyr, Daniel; Bottani, Armand; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing interest in clinical genetics pertaining to the utilization of high-throughput sequencing data for accurate diagnoses of monogenic diseases. Moreover, massive whole-exome sequencing of tumors has provided significant advances in the understanding of cancer development through the recognition of somatic driver variants. To improve the identification of the variants from HTS, we developed VariantMaster, an original program that accurately and efficiently extracts causative variants in familial and sporadic genetic diseases. The algorithm takes into account predicted variants (SNPs and indels) in affected individuals or tumor samples and utilizes the row (BAM) data to robustly estimate the conditional probability of segregation in a family, as well as the probability of it being de novo or somatic. In familial cases, various modes of inheritance are considered: X-linked, autosomal dominant, and recessive (homozygosity or compound heterozygosity). Moreover, VariantMaster integrates phenotypes and genotypes, and employs Annovar to produce additional information such as allelic frequencies in the general population and damaging scores to further reduce the number of putative variants. As a proof of concept, we successfully applied VariantMaster to identify (1) de novo mutations in a previously described data set, (2) causative variants in a rare Mendelian genetic disease, and (3) known and new "driver" mutations in previously reported cancer data sets. Our results demonstrate that VariantMaster is considerably more accurate in terms of precision and sensitivity compared with previously published algorithms. PMID:24389049

  19. Genetic variants of dental plaque Methanobrevibacter oralis.

    PubMed

    Huynh, H T T; Nkamga, V D; Drancourt, M; Aboudharam, G

    2015-06-01

    Methanobrevibacter oralis is the major methanogenic archaea found in the oral cavity. It has been implicated in periodontitis, including the severe form. It is unknown whether certain M. oralis genetic variants are associated with severe periodontitis. Here, we developed multispacer sequence typing (MST) as a sequencing-based genotyping method for the assessment of M. oralis. The sequencing of four intergenic spacers from a collection of 17 dental plaque M. oralis isolates obtained from seven individuals revealed 482 genetic polymorphisms, including 401 single nucleotide polymorphisms (83.2 %), 55 deletions (11.4 %) and 26 insertions (5.4 %). Concatenation of the four spacers yielded nine genotypes, which were clustered into six groups with an index of discrimination of 0.919. One periodontitis patient may have harboured up to three genetic variants of M. oralis, revealing the previously unknown diversity of this archaea. MST will allow for the study of the dynamics of M. oralis populations, including inter-individual transmission and any correlations with the severity of periodontitis. PMID:25633825

  20. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  1. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Bernales, Cecily Q; Ross, Jay P; Forwell, Amanda L; Yee, Irene M; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93-1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  2. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  3. Filtering genetic variants and placing informative priors based on putative biological function.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Stefanie; Malzahn, Dörthe; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Almeida, Marcio; Liu, Xiao Qing; Bailey, Julia N

    2016-01-01

    High-density genetic marker data, especially sequence data, imply an immense multiple testing burden. This can be ameliorated by filtering genetic variants, exploiting or accounting for correlations between variants, jointly testing variants, and by incorporating informative priors. Priors can be based on biological knowledge or predicted variant function, or even be used to integrate gene expression or other omics data. Based on Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 19 data, this article discusses diversity and usefulness of functional variant scores provided, for example, by PolyPhen2, SIFT, or RegulomeDB annotations. Incorporating functional scores into variant filters or weights and adjusting the significance level for correlations between variants yielded significant associations with blood pressure traits in a large family study of Mexican Americans (GAW19 data set). Marker rs218966 in gene PHF14 and rs9836027 in MAP4 significantly associated with hypertension; additionally, rare variants in SNUPN significantly associated with systolic blood pressure. Variant weights strongly influenced the power of kernel methods and burden tests. Apart from variant weights in test statistics, prior weights may also be used when combining test statistics or to informatively weight p values while controlling false discovery rate (FDR). Indeed, power improved when gene expression data for FDR-controlled informative weighting of association test p values of genes was used. Finally, approaches exploiting variant correlations included identity-by-descent mapping and the optimal strategy for joint testing rare and common variants, which was observed to depend on linkage disequilibrium structure. PMID:26866982

  4. SIGIRR Genetic Variants in Premature Infants With Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Menden, Heather; Helbling, Daniel; Li, Keguo; Gastonguay, Adam; Ramchandran, Ramani; Dimmock, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a severe form of bowel disease that develops in premature infants. Although animal data and human studies suggest that aberrant activation of the intestinal immune system contributes to NEC, the pathogenesis remains unclear. We hypothesized that inherited defects in the regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling can contribute to NEC susceptibility in premature infants. A forward genetic screen done in an infant with lethal NEC using exome sequencing identified a novel stop mutation (p.Y168X) and a rare missense variant (p.S80Y) in SIGIRR, a gene that inhibits intestinal Toll-like receptor signaling. Functional studies carried out in human embryonic kidney cells and intestinal epithelial cells demonstrated that SIGIRR inhibited inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide, a cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria implicated in NEC. The genetic variants identified in the infant with NEC resulted in loss of SIGIRR function and exaggerated inflammation in response to lipopolysaccharide. Additionally, Sanger sequencing identified missense, stop, or splice region SIGIRR variants in 10 of 17 premature infants with stage II+ NEC. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports of a phenotype associated with SIGIRR in humans. Our data provide novel mechanistic insight into the probable causation of NEC and support additional investigation of the hypothesis that inherited defects in the regulation of innate immune signaling can contribute to NEC susceptibility in premature infants. PMID:25963006

  5. Reducing Communication in Algebraic Multigrid Using Additive Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Yang, Ulrike Meier

    2014-02-12

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) has proven to be an effective scalable solver on many high performance computers. However, its increasing communication complexity on coarser levels has shown to seriously impact its performance on computers with high communication cost. Moreover, additive AMG variants provide not only increased parallelism as well as decreased numbers of messages per cycle but also generally exhibit slower convergence. Here we present various new additive variants with convergence rates that are significantly improved compared to the classical additive algebraic multigrid method and investigate their potential for decreased communication, and improved communication-computation overlap, features that are essential for good performance on future exascale architectures.

  6. The personal genome browser: visualizing functions of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Juan, Liran; Teng, Mingxiang; Zang, Tianyi; Hao, Yafeng; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Chengwu; Liu, Yongzhuang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Tianjiao; Wang, Yadong

    2014-07-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have brought us into the individual genome era. Projects such as the 1000 Genomes Project have led the individual genome sequencing to become more and more popular. How to visualize, analyse and annotate individual genomes with knowledge bases to support genome studies and personalized healthcare is still a big challenge. The Personal Genome Browser (PGB) is developed to provide comprehensive functional annotation and visualization for individual genomes based on the genetic-molecular-phenotypic model. Investigators can easily view individual genetic variants, such as single nucleotide variants (SNVs), INDELs and structural variations (SVs), as well as genomic features and phenotypes associated to the individual genetic variants. The PGB especially highlights potential functional variants using the PGB built-in method or SIFT/PolyPhen2 scores. Moreover, the functional risks of genes could be evaluated by scanning individual genetic variants on the whole genome, a chromosome, or a cytoband based on functional implications of the variants. Investigators can then navigate to high risk genes on the scanned individual genome. The PGB accepts Variant Call Format (VCF) and Genetic Variation Format (GVF) files as the input. The functional annotation of input individual genome variants can be visualized in real time by well-defined symbols and shapes. The PGB is available at http://www.pgbrowser.org/. PMID:24799434

  7. Multimodal genetic diagnosis of solid variant alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Torres, Lurdes; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Henrique, Rui; Pinto, Armando; Bizarro, Susana; Ferreira, Ana M; Lopes, Carlos; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2005-12-01

    The most common types of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are alveolar RMS (ARMS), which are characterized by the specific translocation t(2;13)(q35;q14) or its rarer variant, t(1;13)(p36;q14), producing the fusion genes PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR, respectively, and embryonal RMS (ERMS), which is characterized by multiple numeric chromosome changes. A solid variant of ARMS that is morphologically indistinguishable from ERMS has been described recently. We present two cases with an initial histopathologic diagnosis of ERMS in which the combined findings by cytogenetic, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses demonstrate that both tumors were in fact the solid variant of ARMS. The cytogenetic analysis of patient 1 revealed a t(2;13)(q35;q14) and the RT-PCR study detected the corresponding PAX3-FKHR chimeric transcript. In patient 2, the cytogenetic finding of multiple trisomies was compatible with the initial histopathologic diagnosis of ERMS, but the finding of a PAX7-FKHR fusion transcript by RT-PCR pointed to the diagnosis of ARMS. Interestingly, the CGH findings of this case reconciled the molecular and cytogenetic data by detecting, in addition to the trisomies, amplification of chromosomal bands 1p36 and 13q14, where the PAX7 and FKHR genes are located, respectively. Our data indicate that this multimodal genetic analysis could be important for the differential diagnosis of these tumors. Furthermore, our findings and previous studies indicate that there are no apparent genetic differences between solid variant and typical ARMS. PMID:16337856

  8. [Genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients].

    PubMed

    Piña-Aguilar, Raúl Eduardo; Chima-Galán, María del Carmen; Yerena-de-vega, María de la Concepción A; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Guerrero, Cecilia; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Moreno-García, Jesús Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Recently Mexican Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Colleges (Federación Mexicana de Colegios de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, FEMECOG) published the Mexican guideline forthe management of male infertility, which suggests performing genetic laboratory tests as part of diagnosis and management of infertile patients and states that these should receive genetic counseling. This paper reviews the genetic approach proposed by Mexican guideline. A systematic review of medical literature was performed in Pubmed and Web of Knowledge from 1980 to 2012 in order to find reports of genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients. Also it is discussed the current knowledge of these variants, their clinical implications and finally the guidelines and recommendations for their molecular diagnosis. Most genetic variants in Mexican infertile patients are chromosome abnormalities. In relation to other variants there is only a report of Y chromosome microdeletions, repeated CAG in androgen receptor and more common mutations in CFTR, and other article reporting mutations in CFTR in patients with congenital absence of vas deferens. Little is known about the genetics of Mexican infertile patients apart from chromosome abnormalities. However, the contribution of genetics as etiology of male infertility is taking more relevance and currently the consensual management of infertile male should include the screening of genetic background. This review pretends to be a quick guide for clinicians who want to know about reports of genetic variants related to male infertility in Mexican population and how to approach their diagnosis. PMID:23819425

  9. A practical approach to genetic screening for influenza virus variants.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, S

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a quick genetic approach to the screening of influenza virus variants. Multiplex reverse transcription (MRT) and multiplex PCR (MPCR) were used to amplify and differentiate the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of different types and subtypes of influenza viruses. Heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) was then used to differentiate strains within the same type and subtype. Three primers complementary to the consensus 3' termini of viral genomic RNA segments of human influenza virus types A, B, and C were used in a single MRT reaction to prime the synthesis of cDNA of all the viral genome segments. The cDNA was then amplified in an MPCR containing primers for the HA genes of the H1 and H3 subtypes of type A, the HA gene of type B, and the counterpart of type C virus. Amplicons of the different types and subtypes differ in size, thus allowing typing and subtyping. The regions amplified cover most of the HA1 portion of the HA genes and therefore amplicons of variants identified by the described HMA can be sequenced directly. In the HMA, the amplicon of an individual strain was mixed with that of a reference strain and heteroduplexes derived from mismatches migrated more slowly than homoduplexes of the same size in electrophoresis, with the mobility shift pattern indicating the divergence of amplicons. The whole process from viral RNA extraction to HMA can be completed within 2 days and thus provides a quick screening before further analysis by hemagglutination inhibition testing and sequencing. In addition, all segments of the viral genome can be amplified from a single MRT reaction, which can yield valuable sources of products for future genetic analyses. This method should facilitate genetic screening and characterization of influenza virus variants. PMID:9316919

  10. Genetic susceptibility variants associated with colorectal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Abulí, Anna; Lozano, Juan José; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo; Bessa, Xavier; Muñoz, Jenifer; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Bujanda, Luis; Reñé, Josep M; Clofent, Juan; Morillas, Juan Diego; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in Western countries. Once a tumour develops, a differentiated prognosis could be determined by lifestyle habits or inherited and somatic genetic factors. Finding such prognostic factors will be helpful in order to identify cases with a shorter survival or at a higher risk of recurrence that may benefit from more intensive treatment and follow-up surveillance. Sixteen CRC genetic susceptibility variants were directly genotyped in a cohort of 1235 CRC patients recruited by the EPICOLON Spanish consortium. Univariate Cox and multivariate regression analyses were performed taking as primary outcomes overall survival (OS), disease-free survival and recurrence-free interval. Genetic variants rs9929218 at 16q22.1 and rs10795668 at 10p14 may have an effect on OS. The G allele of rs9929218 was linked with a better OS [GG genotype, genotypic model: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.93, P = 0.0179; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.94, P = 0.0202]. Likewise, the G allele of rs10795668 was associated with better clinical outcome (GG genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-1.01, P = 0.0570; GA genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.92, P = 0.0137; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.94, P = 0.0194). In conclusion, CRC susceptibility variants rs9929218 and rs10795668 may exert some influence in modulating patient's survival and they deserve to be further tested in additional CRC cohorts in order to confirm their potential as prognosis or predictive biomarkers. PMID:23712746

  11. The personal genome browser: visualizing functions of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Liran; Teng, Mingxiang; Zang, Tianyi; Hao, Yafeng; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Chengwu; Liu, Yongzhuang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Tianjiao; Wang, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have brought us into the individual genome era. Projects such as the 1000 Genomes Project have led the individual genome sequencing to become more and more popular. How to visualize, analyse and annotate individual genomes with knowledge bases to support genome studies and personalized healthcare is still a big challenge. The Personal Genome Browser (PGB) is developed to provide comprehensive functional annotation and visualization for individual genomes based on the genetic–molecular–phenotypic model. Investigators can easily view individual genetic variants, such as single nucleotide variants (SNVs), INDELs and structural variations (SVs), as well as genomic features and phenotypes associated to the individual genetic variants. The PGB especially highlights potential functional variants using the PGB built-in method or SIFT/PolyPhen2 scores. Moreover, the functional risks of genes could be evaluated by scanning individual genetic variants on the whole genome, a chromosome, or a cytoband based on functional implications of the variants. Investigators can then navigate to high risk genes on the scanned individual genome. The PGB accepts Variant Call Format (VCF) and Genetic Variation Format (GVF) files as the input. The functional annotation of input individual genome variants can be visualized in real time by well-defined symbols and shapes. The PGB is available at http://www.pgbrowser.org/. PMID:24799434

  12. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  13. Occurrence of genetic variants of Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    PubMed

    Tham, Wilhem; Lopez-Valladares, Gloria; Helmersson, Seved; Wennström, Stefan; Österlund, Anders; Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise

    2013-09-01

    Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes saved from outbreaks of listeriosis, cases of sporadic listeriosis, and similar events do not always belong to a solitary genetic variant. Variants of the same strain may have evolved from a unique clone, and plasmid loss or gain and phage-mediated genetic changes are suggested as the main mechanism. Some of these reports are summarized in this short communication. PMID:23988078

  14. Schizophrenia genetic variants are not associated with intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, A. F.; Bakker, S. C.; van Haren, N. E. M.; Derks, E. M.; Buizer-Voskamp, J. E.; Cahn, W.; Ripke, S.; Ophoff, R. A.; Kahn, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with lower pre-morbid intelligence (IQ) in addition to (pre-morbid) cognitive decline. Both schizophrenia and IQ are highly heritable traits. Therefore, we hypothesized that genetic variants associated with schizophrenia, including copy number variants (CNVs) and a polygenic schizophrenia (risk) score (PSS), may influence intelligence. Method IQ was estimated with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). CNVs were determined from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data using the QuantiSNP and PennCNV algorithms. For the PSS, odds ratios for genome-wide SNP data were calculated in a sample collected by the Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Consortium (8690 schizophrenia patients and 11 831 controls). These were used to calculate individual PSSs in our independent sample of 350 schizophrenia patients and 322 healthy controls. Results Although significantly more genes were disrupted by deletions in schizophrenia patients compared to controls (p=0.009), there was no effect of CNV measures on IQ. The PSS was associated with disease status (R2=0.055, p=2.1×10−7) and with IQ in the entire sample (R2=0.018, p=0.0008) but the effect on IQ disappeared after correction for disease status. Conclusions Our data suggest that rare and common schizophrenia-associated variants do not explain the variation in IQ in healthy subjects or in schizophrenia patients. Thus, reductions in IQ in schizophrenia patients may be secondary to other processes related to schizophrenia risk. PMID:23410598

  15. Reducing Communication in Algebraic Multigrid Using Additive Variants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Yang, Ulrike Meier

    2014-02-12

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) has proven to be an effective scalable solver on many high performance computers. However, its increasing communication complexity on coarser levels has shown to seriously impact its performance on computers with high communication cost. Moreover, additive AMG variants provide not only increased parallelism as well as decreased numbers of messages per cycle but also generally exhibit slower convergence. Here we present various new additive variants with convergence rates that are significantly improved compared to the classical additive algebraic multigrid method and investigate their potential for decreased communication, and improved communication-computation overlap, features that are essential for goodmore » performance on future exascale architectures.« less

  16. Multivariate Methods for Genetic Variants Selection and Risk Prediction in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Malovini, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Napolitano, Carlo; Guffanti, Guia

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies have contributed to major advancements in genetics research, as these technologies now facilitate affordable mapping of the entire genome for large sets of individuals. Given this, genome-wide association studies are proving to be powerful tools in identifying genetic variants that have the capacity to modify the probability of developing a disease or trait of interest. However, when the study's goal is to evaluate the effect of the presence of genetic variants mapping to specific chromosomes regions on a specific phenotype, the candidate loci approach is still preferred. Regardless of which approach is taken, such a large data set calls for the establishment and development of appropriate analytical methods in order to translate such knowledge into biological or clinical findings. Standard univariate tests often fail to identify informative genetic variants, especially when dealing with complex traits, which are more likely to result from a combination of rare and common variants and non-genetic determinants. These limitations can partially be overcome by multivariate methods, which allow for the identification of informative combinations of genetic variants and non-genetic features. Furthermore, such methods can help to generate additive genetic scores and risk stratification algorithms that, once extensively validated in independent cohorts, could serve as useful tools to assist clinicians in decision-making. This review aims to provide readers with an overview of the main multivariate methods for genetic data analysis that could be applied to the analysis of cardiovascular traits. PMID:27376073

  17. Human thromboxane A2 receptor genetic variants: in silico, in vitro and "in platelet" analysis.

    PubMed

    Gleim, Scott; Stitham, Jeremiah; Tang, Wai Ho; Li, Hong; Douville, Karen; Chelikani, Prashen; Rade, Jeffrey J; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2013-01-01

    Thromboxane and its receptor have emerged as key players in modulating vascular thrombotic events. Thus, a dysfunctional hTP genetic variant may protect against (hypoactivity) or promote (hyperactivity) vascular events, based upon its activity on platelets. After extensive in silico analysis, six hTP-α variants were selected (C(68)S, V(80)E, E(94)V, A(160)T, V(176)E, and V(217)I) for detailed biochemical studies based on structural proximity to key regions involved in receptor function and in silico predictions. Variant biochemical profiles ranged from severe instability (C(68)S) to normal (V(217)I), with most variants demonstrating functional alteration in binding, expression or activation (V(80)E, E(94)V, A(160)T, and V(176)E). In the absence of patient platelet samples, we developed and validated a novel megakaryocyte based system to evaluate human platelet function in the presence of detected dysfunctional genetic variants. Interestingly, variant V80E exhibited reduced platelet activation whereas A160T demonstrated platelet hyperactivity. This report provides the most comprehensive in silico, in vitro and "in platelet" evaluation of hTP variants to date and highlightscurrent inherent problems in evaluating genetic variants, with possible solutions. The study additionally provides clinical relevance to characterized dysfunctional hTP variants. PMID:23840660

  18. Genetic Variants Associated with Breast Cancer Risk: Comprehensive Field Synopsis, Meta-Analysis, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Over 1,000 reports have been published during the past two decades on associations between genetic variants in candidate genes and breast cancer risk. Results have been generally inconsistent. We conducted literature searches and meta-analyses to provide a field synopsis of the current understanding of the genetic architecture of breast cancer risk. Methods Systematic literature searches for candidate gene association studies of breast cancer risk were conducted in two stages using PubMed on or before February 28, 2010. A total of 24,500 publications were identified, of which, 1,059 were deemed eligible for inclusion. Meta-analyses were conducted for 279 genetic variants in 128 candidate genes or chromosomal loci that had a minimum of three data sources available. Variants with significant associations by meta-analysis were assessed using the Venice criteria and scored as having strong, moderate, or weak cumulative evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Findings Fifty-one variants in 40 genes showed statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. Cumulative epidemiologic evidence for an association with breast cancer risk was graded as strong for 10 variants in six genes (ATM, CASP8, CHEK2, CTLA4, NBN, and TP53), moderate for four variants in four genes (ATM, CYP19A1, TERT, and XRCC3), and weak for 37 additional variants. Additionally, in meta-analyses that included a minimum of 10,000 cases and 10,000 controls, convincing evidence of no association with breast cancer risk was identified for 45 variants in 37 genes. Interpretation While most genetic variants evaluated in previous candidate gene studies showed no association with breast cancer risk in meta-analyses, 14 variants in 9 genes were found to have moderate to strong evidence for an association with breast cancer risk. Further evaluation of these variants is warranted. PMID:21514219

  19. Rare genetic variant analysis on blood pressure in related samples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The genetic variants associated with blood pressure identified so far explain only a small proportion of the total heritability of this trait. With recent advances in sequencing technology and statistical methodology, it becomes feasible to study the association between blood pressure and rare genetic variants. Using real baseline phenotype data and imputed dosage data from Genetic Analysis Workshop 18, we performed a candidate gene association analysis. We focused on 8 genes shown to be associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure to identify the association with both common and rare genetic variants, and then did a genome-wide rare-variant analysis on blood pressure. We performed association analysis for rare coding and splicing variants within each gene region and all rare variants in each sliding window, using either burden tests or sequence kernel association tests accounting for familial correlation. With a sample size of only 747, we failed to find any novel associated genetic loci. Consequently, we performed analyses on simulated data, with knowledge of the underlying simulating model, to evaluate the type I error rate and power for the methods used in real data analysis. PMID:25519320

  20. Determining the Pathogenicity of Genetic Variants Associated with Cardiac Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine. PMID:25608792

  1. ClinLabGeneticist: a tool for clinical management of genetic variants from whole exome sequencing in clinical genetic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlian; Liao, Jun; Zhang, Jinglan; Cheng, Wei-Yi; Hakenberg, Jörg; Ma, Meng; Webb, Bryn D; Ramasamudram-Chakravarthi, Rajasekar; Karger, Lisa; Mehta, Lakshmi; Kornreich, Ruth; Diaz, George A; Li, Shuyu; Edelmann, Lisa; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Routine clinical application of whole exome sequencing remains challenging due to difficulties in variant interpretation, large dataset management, and workflow integration. We describe a tool named ClinLabGeneticist to implement a workflow in clinical laboratories for management of variant assessment in genetic testing and disease diagnosis. We established an extensive variant annotation data source for the identification of pathogenic variants. A dashboard was deployed to aid a multi-step, hierarchical review process leading to final clinical decisions on genetic variant assessment. In addition, a central database was built to archive all of the genetic testing data, notes, and comments throughout the review process, variant validation data by Sanger sequencing as well as the final clinical reports for future reference. The entire workflow including data entry, distribution of work assignments, variant evaluation and review, selection of variants for validation, report generation, and communications between various personnel is integrated into a single data management platform. Three case studies are presented to illustrate the utility of ClinLabGeneticist. ClinLabGeneticist is freely available to academia at http://rongchenlab.org/software/clinlabgeneticist . PMID:26338694

  2. Association of genetic variants of GRIN2B with autism.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongcheng; Chen, Jingjing; Guo, Hui; Ou, Jianjun; Peng, Yu; Liu, Qiong; Shen, Yidong; Shi, Lijuan; Liu, Yalan; Xiong, Zhimin; Zhu, Tengfei; Luo, Sanchuan; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhao, Jingping; Xia, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Autism (MIM 209850) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social communication impairments and restricted repetitive behaviors. It has a high heritability, although much remains unclear. To evaluate genetic variants of GRIN2B in autism etiology, we performed a system association study of common and rare variants of GRIN2B and autism in cohorts from a Chinese population, involving a total sample of 1,945 subjects. Meta-analysis of a triad family cohort and a case-control cohort identified significant associations of multiple common variants and autism risk (Pmin = 1.73 × 10(-4)). Significantly, the haplotype involved with the top common variants also showed significant association (P = 1.78 × 10(-6)). Sanger sequencing of 275 probands from a triad cohort identified several variants in coding regions, including four common variants and seven rare variants. Two of the common coding variants were located in the autism-related linkage disequilibrium (LD) block, and both were significantly associated with autism (P < 9 × 10(-3)) using an independent control cohort. Burden analysis and case-only analysis of rare coding variants identified by Sanger sequencing did not find this association. Our study for the first time reveals that common variants and related haplotypes of GRIN2B are associated with autism risk. PMID:25656819

  3. Explaining additional genetic variation in complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew R.; Wray, Naomi R.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of complex traits, discovering >6000 variants associated with >500 quantitative traits and common complex diseases in humans. The associations identified so far represent only a fraction of those which influence phenotype, as there are likely to be very many variants across the entire frequency spectrum, each of which influences multiple traits, with only a small average contribution to the phenotypic variance. This presents a considerable challenge to further dissection of the remaining unexplained genetic variance within populations, which limits our ability to predict disease risk, identify new drug targets, improve and maintain food sources, and understand natural diversity. This challenge will be met within the current framework through larger sample size, better phenotyping including recording of non-genetic risk factors, focused study designs, and an integration of multiple sources of phenotypic and genetic information. The current evidence supports the application of quantitative genetic approaches, and we argue that one should retain simpler theories until simplicity can be traded for greater explanatory power. PMID:24629526

  4. Granuloma annulare: Clinical and histologic variants, epidemiology, and genetics.

    PubMed

    Piette, Evan W; Rosenbach, Misha

    2016-09-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a poorly understood condition characterized by a set of clinical morphologic variants with 2 predominant histopathologic patterns of inflammation. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the available information about the clinical variants and histopathologic features, current epidemiologic data, and potential genetic underpinnings of GA. Much of the current understanding of GA is based on retrospective studies, case series, and case reports; this review aims to synthesize the available information and present it clearly for practicing dermatologists. PMID:27543209

  5. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  6. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  7. Breast cancer risk assessment using genetic variants and risk factors in a Singapore Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Genetic variants for breast cancer risk identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Western populations require further testing in Asian populations. A risk assessment model incorporating both validated genetic variants and established risk factors may improve its performance in risk prediction of Asian women. Methods A nested case-control study of female breast cancer (411 cases and 1,212 controls) within the Singapore Chinese Health Study was conducted to investigate the effects of 51 genetic variants identified in previous GWAS on breast cancer risk. The independent effect of these genetic variants was assessed by creating a summed genetic risk score (GRS) after adjustment for body mass index and the Gail model risk factors for breast cancer. Results The GRS was an independent predictor of breast cancer risk in Chinese women. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of breast cancer for the second, third, and fourth quartiles of the GRS were 1.26 (0.90 to 1.76), 1.47 (1.06 to 2.04) and 1.75 (1.27 to 2.41) respectively (P for trend <0.001). In addition to established risk factors, the GRS improved the classification of 6.2% of women for their absolute risk of breast cancer in the next five years. Conclusions Genetic variants on top of conventional risk factors can improve the risk prediction of breast cancer in Chinese women. PMID:24941967

  8. MicroRNA variants as genetic determinants of bone mass.

    PubMed

    Dole, Neha S; Delany, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant genetic variants that contribute to the heritability of bone mass. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are key post-transcriptional regulators that modulate the differentiation and function of skeletal cells by targeting multiple genes in the same or distinct signaling pathways. SNPs in miRNA genes and miRNA binding sites can alter miRNA abundance and mRNA targeting. This review describes the potential impact of miRNA-related SNPs on skeletal phenotype. Although many associations between SNPs and bone mass have been described, this review is limited to gene variants for which a function has been experimentally validated. SNPs in miRNA genes (miR-SNPs) that impair miRNA processing and alter the abundance of mature miRNA are discussed for miR-146a, miR-125a, miR-196a, miR-149 and miR-27a. SNPs in miRNA targeting sites (miR-TS-SNPs) that alter miRNA binding are described for the bone remodeling genes bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1 (Bmpr1), fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2), osteonectin (Sparc) and histone deacetylase 5 (Hdac5). The review highlights two aspects of miRNA-associated SNPs: the mechanism for altering miRNA mediated gene regulation and the potential of miR-associated SNPs to alter osteoblast, osteoclast or chondrocyte differentiation and function. Given the polygenic nature of skeletal diseases like osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, validating the function of additional miRNA-associated SNPs has the potential to enhance our understanding of the genetic determinants of bone mass and predisposition to selected skeletal diseases. PMID:26723575

  9. Variobox: automatic detection and annotation of human genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paulo; Lopes, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Santos, Rosário; Dalgleish, Raymond; Oliveira, José Luís

    2014-02-01

    Triggered by the sequencing of the human genome, personalized medicine has been one of the fastest growing research areas in the last decade. Multiple software and hardware technologies have been developed by several projects, culminating in the exponential growth of genetic data. Considering the technological developments in this field, it is now fairly easy and inexpensive to obtain genetic profiles for unique individuals, such as those performed by several genetic analysis companies. The availability of computational tools that simplify genetic data analysis and the disclosure of biomedical evidences are of utmost importance. We present Variobox, a desktop tool to annotate, analyze, and compare human genes. Variobox obtains variant annotation data from WAVe, protein metadata annotations from Protein Data Bank, and sequences are obtained from Locus Reference Genomic or RefSeq databases. To explore the data, Variobox provides an advanced sequence visualization that enables agile navigation through genetic regions. DNA sequencing data can be compared with reference sequences retrieved from LRG or RefSeq records, identifying and automatically annotating new potential variants. These features and data, ranging from patient sequences to HGVS-compliant variant descriptions, are combined in an intuitive interface to analyze genes and variants. Variobox is a Java application, available at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/variobox. PMID:24186831

  10. MAOA Variants and Genetic Susceptibility to Major Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zichao; Huang, Liang; Luo, Xiong-Jian; Wu, Lichuan; Li, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is a mitochondrial enzyme involved in the metabolism of several biological amines such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, which are important neurochemicals in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric illnesses. MAOA is regarded as a functional plausible susceptibility gene for psychiatric disorders, whereas previous hypothesis-driven association studies obtained controversial results, a reflection of small sample size, genetic heterogeneity, or true negative associations. In addition, MAOA is not analyzed in most of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on psychiatric disorders, since it is located on Chromosome Xp11.3. Therefore, the effects of MAOA variants on genetic predisposition to psychiatric disorders remain obscure. To fill this gap, we collected psychiatric phenotypic (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder) and genetic data in up to 18,824 individuals from diverse ethnic groups. We employed classical fixed (or random) effects inverse variance weighted methods to calculate summary odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). We identified a synonymous SNP rs1137070 showing significant associations with major depressive disorder (p = 0.00067, OR = 1.263 for T allele) and schizophrenia (p = 0.0039, OR = 1.225 for T allele) as well as a broad spectrum of psychiatric phenotype (p = 0.000066, OR = 1.218 for T allele) in both males and females. The effect size was similar between different ethnic populations and different gender groups. Collectively, we confirmed that MAOA is a risk gene for psychiatric disorders, and our results provide useful information toward a better understanding of genetic mechanism involving MAOA underlying risk of complex psychiatric disorders. PMID:26227907

  11. Host Genetic Variants in the Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Monika; Baur, Katharina; Geier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) are currently replacing antiviral therapy for Hepatitis C infection. Treatment related side effects are even worse and the emergence of resistant viruses must be avoided because of the direct-antiviral action. Altogether it remains a challenge to take treatment decisions in a clinical setting with cost restrictions. Genetic host factors are hereby essential to implement an individualized treatment concept. In recent years results on different genetic variants have been published with a strong association with therapy response, fibrosis and treatment-related side effects. Polymorphisms of the IL28B gene were identified as accurate predictors for therapy response and spontaneous clearance of HCV infection and are already used for diagnostic decisions. For RBV-induced side effects, such as hemolytic anemia, associations to genetic variants of inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) were described and different SLC28 transporters for RBV-uptake have been successfully analyzed. Fibrosis progression has been associated with variants of Vitamin D receptor (VDR) and ABCB11 (bile salt export pump). Cirrhotic patients especially have a high treatment risk and low therapy response, so that personalized antiviral treatment is mandatory. This review focuses on different host genetic variants in the pathogenesis of Hepatitis C at the beginning of a new area of treatment. PMID:23342360

  12. TM6SF2 E167K Variant, a Novel Genetic Susceptibility Variant, Contributing to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Zhen; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang; Xin, Yong-Ning; Lin, Zhong-Hua; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common causes of liver dysfunction worldwide, and its prevalence is highly associated with genetic susceptibility. The transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2) E167K variant represents a general genetic determinant of hepatic triglyceride content and lobular inflammation, and its presence appears to be directly involved in the pathogenesis and development of NAFLD. Although this variant appears to be a novel powerful modifier in the development of NAFLD, whether it is associated with an increased risk of NAFLD-related liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be determined. The aim of this review is to describe the functions of the TM6SF2 E167K variant and its association with NAFLD, with particular emphasis on the underlying mechanisms of its role in the development and progression of NAFLD. Additionally, the links between the TM6SF2 E167K variant and NAFLD-related liver fibrosis and HCC will be discussed. PMID:26807382

  13. Multivariate Methods for Genetic Variants Selection and Risk Prediction in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Malovini, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Napolitano, Carlo; Guffanti, Guia

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies have contributed to major advancements in genetics research, as these technologies now facilitate affordable mapping of the entire genome for large sets of individuals. Given this, genome-wide association studies are proving to be powerful tools in identifying genetic variants that have the capacity to modify the probability of developing a disease or trait of interest. However, when the study’s goal is to evaluate the effect of the presence of genetic variants mapping to specific chromosomes regions on a specific phenotype, the candidate loci approach is still preferred. Regardless of which approach is taken, such a large data set calls for the establishment and development of appropriate analytical methods in order to translate such knowledge into biological or clinical findings. Standard univariate tests often fail to identify informative genetic variants, especially when dealing with complex traits, which are more likely to result from a combination of rare and common variants and non-genetic determinants. These limitations can partially be overcome by multivariate methods, which allow for the identification of informative combinations of genetic variants and non-genetic features. Furthermore, such methods can help to generate additive genetic scores and risk stratification algorithms that, once extensively validated in independent cohorts, could serve as useful tools to assist clinicians in decision-making. This review aims to provide readers with an overview of the main multivariate methods for genetic data analysis that could be applied to the analysis of cardiovascular traits. PMID:27376073

  14. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  15. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  16. Genetic variants regulating immune cell levels in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Valeria; Steri, Maristella; Sole, Gabriella; Sidore, Carlo; Virdis, Francesca; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Busonero, Fabio; Mulas, Antonella; Floris, Matteo; Mentzen, Wieslawa I; Urru, Silvana A M; Olla, Stefania; Marongiu, Michele; Piras, Maria G; Lobina, Monia; Maschio, Andrea; Pitzalis, Maristella; Urru, Maria F; Marcelli, Marco; Cusano, Roberto; Deidda, Francesca; Serra, Valentina; Oppo, Manuela; Pilu, Rosella; Reinier, Frederic; Berutti, Riccardo; Pireddu, Luca; Zara, Ilenia; Porcu, Eleonora; Kwong, Alan; Brennan, Christine; Tarrier, Brendan; Lyons, Robert; Kang, Hyun M; Uzzau, Sergio; Atzeni, Rossano; Valentini, Maria; Firinu, Davide; Leoni, Lidia; Rotta, Gianluca; Naitza, Silvia; Angius, Andrea; Congia, Mauro; Whalen, Michael B; Jones, Chris M; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Fiorillo, Edoardo; Sanna, Serena; Cucca, Francesco

    2013-09-26

    The complex network of specialized cells and molecules in the immune system has evolved to defend against pathogens, but inadvertent immune system attacks on "self" result in autoimmune disease. Both genetic regulation of immune cell levels and their relationships with autoimmunity are largely undetermined. Here, we report genetic contributions to quantitative levels of 95 cell types encompassing 272 immune traits, in a cohort of 1,629 individuals from four clustered Sardinian villages. We first estimated trait heritability, showing that it can be substantial, accounting for up to 87% of the variance (mean 41%). Next, by assessing ∼8.2 million variants that we identified and confirmed in an extended set of 2,870 individuals, 23 independent variants at 13 loci associated with at least one trait. Notably, variants at three loci (HLA, IL2RA, and SH2B3/ATXN2) overlap with known autoimmune disease associations. These results connect specific cellular phenotypes to specific genetic variants, helping to explicate their involvement in disease. PMID:24074872

  17. Role of genetic variants in ADIPOQ in human eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Kerstin; Keller, Maria; Horstmann, Annette; Liu, Xuanshi; Eichelmann, Fabian; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Böttcher, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of adiponectin and its negative correlation with BMI are well described. Adiponectin serum levels are altered in eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating. Here, we tested the hypothesis that (1) adiponectin serum levels correlate with human eating behavior factors and (2) that genetic variants of the ADIPOQ locus influence both serum levels and eating behavior. We analyzed 11 SNPs within ADIPOQ and in the 5' UTR and measured serum adiponectin levels in 1,036 individuals from the German Sorbs population. The German version of the three-factor eating questionnaire (FEV) was completed by 548 Sorbs. For replication purposes, we included an independent replication cohort from Germany (N = 350). In the Sorbs, we observed positive correlations of restraint with adiponectin serum levels (P = 0.001; r = 0.148) which, however, did not withstand adjustment for covariates (P = 0.083; r = 0.077). In addition, four SNPs were nominally associated with serum adiponectin levels (all P < 0.05). Of these, two variants (rs3774261; rs1501229, all P < 0.05) were also related to disinhibition. Furthermore, three variants were exclusively associated with hunger (rs2036373, P = 0.049) and disinhibition (rs822396; rs864265, all P < 0.05). However, none of these associations withstood Bonferroni corrections for multiple testing (all P > 9.3 × 10(-4)). In our replication cohort, we observed similar effect directions at rs1501229 for disinhibition and hunger. A meta-analysis resulted in nominal statistical significance P = 0.036 (Z score 2.086) and P = 0.017 (Z score 2.366), respectively. Given the observed relationship of the SNPs with adiponectin levels and eating behavior, our data support a potential role of adiponectin in human eating behavior. Whether the relationship with eating behavior is mediated by the effects of circulating adiponectin warrants further investigations. PMID:25542302

  18. JCL roundtable: Lessons from genetic variants altering lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brown, William Virgil; Ference, Brian A; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-01-01

    Because the Human Genome Project reached its first major milestone in completing the full sequence of human DNA, many new discoveries have been made relating genetic variants to disease. The new methodology that allows much more rapid and focused analyses of selected genes and the ability to screen the entire exome of any individual has provided tools to examine literally thousands of individuals for a given study. Genetic analysis has become a large-scale epidemiologic tool for examining variants in gene structure and correlating them with phenotypic markers of human disorders. These genome-wide association studies have been quite revealing about the mechanism of disorders of many types. These tools have been applied to the appearance of clinical atherosclerosis and to the chronic metabolic risk factors for this disease process. We are joined by 2 individuals who have made very significant contributions to this area of research: Dr Brian Ference of Wayne State University School of Medicine and Dr Sekar Kathiresan from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. In our discussion, we are going to focus on genetic variants, which lead to changes in lipoprotein concentrations and those that have an association with earlier onset of clinical vascular disease. This roundtable was recorded during the November 2016 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Florida. PMID:27206929

  19. Genetic variants associated with sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Daniel F.; Kline, Lawrence E.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Murray, Sarah S.; Shadan, Farhad F.; Dawson, Arthur; Poceta, J. Steven; Cronin, John; Jamil, Shazia M.; Tranah, Gregory J.; Loving, Richard T.; Grizas, Alexandra P.; Hahn, Elizabeth K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The diagnostic boundaries of sleep disorders are under considerable debate. The main sleep disorders are partly heritable; therefore, defining heritable pathophysiologic mechanisms could delineate diagnoses and suggest treatment. We collected clinical data and DNA from consenting patients scheduled to undergo clinical polysomnograms, to expand our understanding of the polymorphisms associated with the phenotypes of particular sleep disorders. Methods Patients at least 21 years of age were recruited to contribute research questionnaires, and to provide access to their medical records, saliva for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and polysomnographic data. From these complex data, 38 partly overlapping phenotypes were derived indicating complaints, subjective and objective sleep timing, and polysomnographic disturbances. A custom chip was used to genotype 768 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Additional assays derived ancestry-informative markers (eg, 751 participants of European ancestry). Linear regressions controlling for age, gender, and ancestry were used to assess the associations of each phenotype with each of the SNPs, highlighting those with Bonferroni-corrected significance. Results In peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 beta (PPARGC1B), rs6888451 was associated with several markers of obstructive sleep apnea. In aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (ARNTL), rs10766071 was associated with decreased polysomnographic sleep duration. The association of rs3923809 in BTBD9 with periodic limb movements in sleep was confirmed. SNPs in casein kinase 1 delta (CSNK1D rs11552085), cryptochrome 1 (CRY1 rs4964515), and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor A (RORA rs11071547) were less persuasively associated with sleep latency and time of falling asleep. Conclusions SNPs associated with several sleep phenotypes were suggested, but due to risks of false discovery, independent replications are needed before

  20. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Luke C; Atkins, Janice L; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N; Ruth, Katherine S; Tuke, Marcus A; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R; Freathy, Rachel M; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M; Harries, Lorna W; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M; Melzer, David

    2016-03-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus(CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7x10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  1. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Luke C.; Atkins, Janice L.; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N.; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tuke, Marcus A.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N.; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M.; Harries, Lorna W.; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Melzer, David

    2016-01-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus (CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7×10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  2. Cerebral palsy: causes, pathways, and the role of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Alastair H; Thompson, Suzanna C; Gecz, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is heterogeneous with different clinical types, comorbidities, brain imaging patterns, causes, and now also heterogeneous underlying genetic variants. Few are solely due to severe hypoxia or ischemia at birth. This common myth has held back research in causation. The cost of litigation has devastating effects on maternity services with unnecessarily high cesarean delivery rates and subsequent maternal morbidity and mortality. CP rates have remained the same for 50 years despite a 6-fold increase in cesarean birth. Epidemiological studies have shown that the origins of most CP are prior to labor. Increased risk is associated with preterm delivery, congenital malformations, intrauterine infection, fetal growth restriction, multiple pregnancy, and placental abnormalities. Hypoxia at birth may be primary or secondary to preexisting pathology and international criteria help to separate the few cases of CP due to acute intrapartum hypoxia. Until recently, 1-2% of CP (mostly familial) had been linked to causative mutations. Recent genetic studies of sporadic CP cases using new-generation exome sequencing show that 14% of cases have likely causative single-gene mutations and up to 31% have clinically relevant copy number variations. The genetic variants are heterogeneous and require function investigations to prove causation. Whole genome sequencing, fine scale copy number variant investigations, and gene expression studies may extend the percentage of cases with a genetic pathway. Clinical risk factors could act as triggers for CP where there is genetic susceptibility. These new findings should refocus research about the causes of these complex and varied neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26003063

  3. Genetic Variants Associated with Port-Wine Stains

    PubMed Central

    Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Tan, Oon T.; Margraf, Rebecca; Stevenson, David A.; Grimmer, J. Fredrik; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Background Port-wine stains (PWS) are capillary malformations, typically located in the dermis of the head and neck, affecting 0.3% of the population. Current theories suggest that port-wine stains are caused by somatic mutations that disrupt vascular development. Objectives Understanding PWS genetic determinants could provide insight into new treatments. Methods Our study used a custom next generation sequencing (NGS) panel and digital polymerase chain reaction to investigate genetic variants in 12 individuals with isolated port-wine stains. Importantly, affected and healthy skin tissue from the same individual were compared. A subtractive correction method was developed to eliminate background noise from NGS data. This allowed the detection of a very low level of mosaicism. Results A novel somatic variant GNAQ, c.547C>G, p.Arg183Gly was found in one case with 4% allele frequency. The previously reported GNAQ c.548G>A, p.Arg183Gln was confirmed in 9 of 12 cases with an allele frequency ranging from 1.73 to 7.42%. Digital polymerase chain reaction confirmed novel variants detected by next generation sequencing. Two novel somatic variants were also found in RASA1, although neither was predicted to be deleterious. Conclusions This is the second largest study on isolated, non-syndromic PWS. Our data suggest that GNAQ is the main genetic determinant in this condition. Moreover, isolated port-wine stains are distinct from capillary malformations seen in RASA1 disorders, which will be helpful in clinical evaluation. PMID:26192947

  4. Postmortem genetic screening for the identification, verification, and reporting of genetic variants contributing to the sudden death of the young.

    PubMed

    Methner, D Nicole R; Scherer, Steven E; Welch, Katherine; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Eng, Christine M; Belmont, John W; Powell, Mark C; Korchina, Viktoriya; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Wolf, Dwayne A; Sanchez, Luis A; Kahn, Roger

    2016-09-01

    Each year in the United States, thousands of cases of sudden and unexpected deaths of infants, children, and young adults are assigned an undetermined cause of death after postmortem investigation and autopsy. Heritable genetic variants have been suggested as the cause of up to a third of sudden death (SD) cases. Elucidation of the genetic variants involved in SD cases is important to not only help establish cause and manner of death of these individuals, but to also aid in determining whether familial genetic testing should be considered. Previously, these types of postmortem screenings have not been a feasible option for most county medical examiners' and coroners' offices. We sequenced full exons of 64 genes associated with SD in the largest known cohort (351) of infant and young SD decedents using massively parallel sequencing at <$600 per sample. Genetic variants were assessed through literature review and clinical evaluation by a multidisciplinary consortium of experts. Thirteen individuals (3.7%), eight infants (2.8% of those <1 yr of age) and five children/young adults (7.0% of those >1 yr of age), were found to have a reportable genetic variant contributing to SD. These percentages represent an estimate lower than those previously reported. Overall yields and results likely vary between studies due to differences in evaluation techniques and reporting. Additionally, we recommend ongoing assessment of data, including nonreported novel variants, as technology and literature continually advance. This study demonstrates a strategy to implement molecular autopsies in medicolegal investigations of young SD decedents. PMID:27435932

  5. Privacy preserving protocol for detecting genetic relatives using rare variants

    PubMed Central

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Joo, Jong Wha J; Wadia, Akshay; Guan, Feng; Ostrosky, Rafail; Sahai, Amit; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput sequencing technologies have impacted many areas of genetic research. One such area is the identification of relatives from genetic data. The standard approach for the identification of genetic relatives collects the genomic data of all individuals and stores it in a database. Then, each pair of individuals is compared to detect the set of genetic relatives, and the matched individuals are informed. The main drawback of this approach is the requirement of sharing your genetic data with a trusted third party to perform the relatedness test. Results: In this work, we propose a secure protocol to detect the genetic relatives from sequencing data while not exposing any information about their genomes. We assume that individuals have access to their genome sequences but do not want to share their genomes with anyone else. Unlike previous approaches, our approach uses both common and rare variants which provide the ability to detect much more distant relationships securely. We use a simulated data generated from the 1000 genomes data and illustrate that we can easily detect up to fifth degree cousins which was not possible using the existing methods. We also show in the 1000 genomes data with cryptic relationships that our method can detect these individuals. Availability: The software is freely available for download at http://genetics.cs.ucla.edu/crypto/. Contact: fhormoz@cs.ucla.edu or eeskin@cs.ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online PMID:24931985

  6. Additive genetic effect of APOE and BDNF on hippocampus activity.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Karolina; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Persson, Jonas; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Human memory is a highly heritable polygenic trait with complex inheritance patterns. To study the genetics of memory and memory-related diseases, hippocampal functioning has served as an intermediate phenotype. The importance of investigating gene-gene effects on complex phenotypes has been emphasized, but most imaging studies still focus on single polymorphisms. APOE ε4 and BDNF Met, two of the most studied gene variants for variability in memory performance and neuropsychiatric disorders, have both separately been related to poorer episodic memory and altered hippocampal functioning. Here, we investigated the combined effect of APOE and BDNF on hippocampal activation (N=151). No non-additive interaction effects were seen. Instead, the results revealed decreased activation in bilateral hippocampus and parahippocampus as a function of the number of APOE ε4 and BDNF Met alleles present (neither, one, or both). The combined effect was stronger than either of the individual effects, and both gene variables explained significant proportions of variance in BOLD signal change. Thus, there was an additive gene-gene effect of APOE and BDNF on medial temporal lobe (MTL) activation, showing that a larger proportion of variance in brain activation attributed to genetics can be explained by considering more than one gene variant. This effect might be relevant for the understanding of normal variability in memory function as well as memory-related disorders associated with APOE and BDNF. PMID:24321557

  7. Genetic variants associated with autoimmunity drive NFκB signaling and responses to inflammatory stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Housley, William J.; Fernandez, Salvador D.; Vera, Kenneth; Murikinati, Sasidhar R.; Grutzendler, Jaime; Cuerdon, Nicole; Glick, Laura; De Jager, Phillip L.; Mitrovic, Mitja; Cotsapas, Chris; Hafler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NFκB is a central regulator of inflammation and genome-wide association studies in subjects with autoimmune disease have identified a number of variants within the NFκB signaling cascade. In addition, causal variant fine-mapping has demonstrated that autoimmune disease susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis (MS) and ulcerative colitis are strongly enriched within binding sites for NFkB. Here, we report that MS-associated variants proximal to NFκB1 and in an intron of TNFRSF1A (TNFR1) are associated with increased NFκB signaling after TNFα stimulation. Both variants result in increased degradation of IκBα, a negative regulator of NFκB, and nuclear translocation of p65 NFκB. The variant proximal to NFκB1 controls signaling responses by altering expression of NFκB itself, with the GG risk genotype expressing 20-fold more p50 NFκB and diminished expression of the negative regulators of the NFκB pathway TNFAIP3, BCL3, and CIAP1. Finally naïve CD4 T cells from patients with MS express enhanced activation of p65 NFκB. These results demonstrate that genetic variants associated with risk of developing MS alter NFκB signaling pathways, resulting in enhanced NFκB activation and greater responsiveness to inflammatory stimuli. As such, this suggests that rapid genetic screening for variants associated with NFκB signaling may identify individuals amenable to NFκB or cytokine blockade. PMID:26062845

  8. Human Thromboxane A2 Receptor Genetic Variants: In Silico, In Vitro and “In Platelet” Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gleim, Scott; Stitham, Jeremiah; Tang, Wai Ho; Li, Hong; Douville, Karen; Chelikani, Prashen; J.Rade, Jeffrey; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2013-01-01

    Thromboxane and its receptor have emerged as key players in modulating vascular thrombotic events. Thus, a dysfunctional hTP genetic variant may protect against (hypoactivity) or promote (hyperactivity) vascular events, based upon its activity on platelets. After extensive in silico analysis, six hTP-α variants were selected (C68S, V80E, E94V, A160T, V176E, and V217I) for detailed biochemical studies based on structural proximity to key regions involved in receptor function and in silico predictions. Variant biochemical profiles ranged from severe instability (C68S) to normal (V217I), with most variants demonstrating functional alteration in binding, expression or activation (V80E, E94V, A160T, and V176E). In the absence of patient platelet samples, we developed and validated a novel megakaryocyte based system to evaluate human platelet function in the presence of detected dysfunctional genetic variants. Interestingly, variant V80E exhibited reduced platelet activation whereas A160T demonstrated platelet hyperactivity. This report provides the most comprehensive in silico, in vitro and “in platelet” evaluation of hTP variants to date and highlightscurrent inherent problems in evaluating genetic variants, with possible solutions. The study additionally provides clinical relevance to characterized dysfunctional hTP variants. PMID:23840660

  9. Examination of genetic variants influencing lipid traits in pediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Mentch, Frank D.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Qiu, Haijun; Guo, Yiran; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward C.; Thomas, Kelly; Bender, Amber; Albano, Anthony; Otieno, George; Garris, Maria; Seidler, Kallyn; Moy, Alexander; Kim, Cecilia E.; Keating, Brendan; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Grundmeier, Robert; Sleiman, Patrick A.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2012-01-01

    Previous large-scale genome-wide association studies in adult populations have implicated ∽100 loci in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or triglyceride levels. However, whether these loci also contribute to variations of lipid traits in pediatric populations remain unknown. Here we assayed a population of Philadelphia children by high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and performed association analysis on lipid traits ascertained from lipid measurements stored in electronic medical records. We examined previously reported lipid trait associations, and found that most of them show identical direction of association in our pediatric cohorts, including genome-wide significant association on cholesteryl ester transfer protein with HDL-C levels (rs3764261, P = 2.1 × 10−8) and other significant associations on oxysterol-binding protein-like protein 7, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. Additionally, we identified suggestive association on low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1B with HDL-C levels (rs17736712, P = 2.1 × 10−7), but this signal is not supported by previous meta-analysis on adult cohorts. Finally, we examined rare copy number variants and identified deletions encompassing tetratricopeptide repeat domain 39B in two children with extreme lipid measures. Our results highlight the commonalities and differences of genetic components in determining lipid traits in pediatric versus adult populations. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the unique utility of automated information retrieval from electronic medical records in facilitating the identification of genotype-phenotype associations.

  10. Butyrylcholinesterase Genetic Variants: Association with Cocaine Dependence and Related Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Negrão, André Brooking; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Guindalini, Camila; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Messas, Guilherme Peres; Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Vallada, Homero

    2013-01-01

    Objective The search for genetic vulnerability factors in cocaine dependence has focused on the role that neuroplasticity plays in addiction. However, like many other drugs, the ability of an individual to metabolize cocaine can also influence susceptibility to dependence. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) metabolizes cocaine, and genetic variants of the BChE gene (BCHE) alter its catalytic activity. Therefore, we hypothesize that cocaine users with polymorphisms in BCHE can show diverse addictive behaviors due to differences in effective plasma concentrations of cocaine. Those polymorphisms might also influence users to prefer one of the two main preparations (crack or powder cocaine), despite having equal access to both. The present work investigates polymorphisms in BCHE and if those genetic variants constitute risk factors for cocaine dependence and for crack cocaine use. Methods A total of 1,436 individuals (698 cocaine-dependent patients and 738 controls) were genotyped for three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BCHE: rs1803274, rs4263329, and rs4680662. Results For rs4263329, a nominal difference was found between cases and controls. For rs1803274 (the functional SNP), a statistically significant difference was found between patients who used crack cocaine exclusively and those who used only powder cocaine (P = 0.027; OR = 4.36; 95% CI = 1.18–16.04). Allele frequencies and genotypes related to other markers did not differ between cases and controls or between the two cocaine subgroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the AA genotype of rs1803274 is a risk factor for crack cocaine use, which is more addictive than powder cocaine use. Further studies are needed in order to confirm this preliminary result and clarify the role of BCHE and its variants in cocaine dependence. PMID:24312228

  11. Genetic variants associated with neurodegenerative Alzheimer disease in natural models.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Claudia; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Ardiles, Álvaro O; Ewer, John; Palacios, Adrián G

    2016-01-01

    The use of transgenic models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases has made valuable contributions to the field. However, some important limitations, including protein overexpression and general systemic compensation for the missing genes, has caused researchers to seek natural models that show the main biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Here we review some of these models-most of them rodents, focusing especially on the genetic variations in biomarkers for Alzheimer diseases, in order to explain their relationships with variants associated with the occurrence of the disease in humans. PMID:26919851

  12. Genetic polymorphisms of pharmacogenomic VIP variants in the lhoba population of southwest China

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongjun; Yang, Hua; Geng, Tingting; Feng, Tian; Yuan, Dongya; Kang, Longli; Luo, Manling; Jin, Tianbo

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well-established that differences among ethnic groups in drug responses are primarily due to the genetic diversity of pharmacogenes. A number of genes or variants that play a crucial role in drug responses have been designated Very Important Pharmacogenes (VIP) by the PharmGKB database. Clarifying the polymorphic distribution of VIPs in different ethnic groups will aid in personalized medicine for specific populations. Methods: We sequenced 85 VIP variants in the Lhoba population based on the PharmGKB database. The polymorphic distribution of the 85 VIP variants in 100 Lhoba subjects was determined and compared with that of 11 major HapMap populations, including ASW, CEU, CHB, CHD, GIH, JPT, LWK, MEX, MKK, TSI, and YRI. We used χ2 tests to identify significantly different loci between these populations. We downloaded SNP allele frequencies from the ALlele FREquency Database to observe the global genetic variation distribution for these specific loci. And then we used Structure software to perform the genetic structure analysis of 12 populations. Results: Based on comparisons of selected available loci, we found that 23, 28, 16, 10, 20, 16, 24, 19, 22, 21 and 36 of the selected VIP variant genotype frequencies in the Lhoba population differed from those of the ASW, CEU, CHB, CHD, GIH, JPT, LWK, MEX, MKK, TSI, and YRI populations, respectively. In addition, Pairwise FST values and clustering analyses also showed the VIP variants in Lhoba exhibited a close genetic affinity with CHD, CHB and JPT populations. Conclusion: Our results complement pharmacogenomic data on the Lhoba ethnic group and may be helpful in the diagnosis of certain diseases in minorities. PMID:26722533

  13. Pharmacogenetics of Statin-Induced Myopathy: A Focused Review of the Clinical Translation of Pharmacokinetic Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Talameh, Jasmine A; Kitzmiller, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and are extremely effective in reducing major cardiovascular events in the millions of Americans with hyperlipidemia. However, many patients (up to 25%) cannot tolerate or discontinue statin therapy due to statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Patients will continue to experience SIM at unacceptably high rates or experience unnecessary cardiovascular events (as a result of discontinuing or decreasing their statin therapy) until strategies for predicting or mitigating SIM are identified. A promising strategy for predicting or mitigating SIM is pharmacogenetic testing, particularly of pharmacokinetic genetic variants as SIM is related to statin exposure. Data is emerging on the association between pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM. A current, critical evaluation of the literature on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM for potential translation to clinical practice is lacking. This review focuses specifically on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and their association with SIM clinical outcomes. We also discuss future directions, specific to the research on pharmacokinetic genetic variants, which could speed the translation into clinical practice. For simvastatin, we did not find sufficient evidence to support the clinical translation of pharmacokinetic genetic variants other than SLCO1B1. However, SLCO1B1 may also be clinically relevant for pravastatin- and pitavastatin-induced myopathy, but additional studies assessing SIM clinical outcome are needed. CYP2D6*4 may be clinically relevant for atorvastatin-induced myopathy, but mechanistic studies are needed. Future research efforts need to incorporate statin-specific analyses, multi-variant analyses, and a standard definition of SIM. As the use of statins is extremely common and SIM continues to occur in a significant number of patients, future research investments in pharmacokinetic genetic variants have the potential to make a profound impact on

  14. SEPTIN12 Genetic Variants Confer Susceptibility to Teratozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hung; Wang, Ya-Yun; Chen, Hau-Inh; Kuo, Yung-Che; Chiou, Yu-Wei; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Wu, Ching-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Chin; Chiang, Han-Sun; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that 10–15% of couples are infertile and male factors account for about half of these cases. With the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), many infertile men have been able to father offspring. However, teratozoospermia still remains a big challenge to tackle. Septins belong to a family of cytoskeletal proteins with GTPase activity and are involved in various biological processes e.g. morphogenesis, compartmentalization, apoptosis and cytokinesis. SEPTIN12, identified by c-DNA microarray analysis of infertile men, is exclusively expressed in the post meiotic male germ cells. Septin12+/+/Septin12+/− chimeric mice have multiple reproductive defects including the presence of immature sperm in the semen, and sperm with bent neck (defect of the annulus) and nuclear DNA damage. These facts make SEPTIN12 a potential sterile gene in humans. In this study, we sequenced the entire coding region of SEPTIN12 in infertile men (n = 160) and fertile controls (n = 200) and identified ten variants. Among them is the c.474 G>A variant within exon 5 that encodes part of the GTP binding domain. The variant creates a novel splice donor site that causes skipping of a portion of exon 5, resulting in a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal half of SEPTIN12. Most individuals homozygous for the c.474 A allele had teratozoospermia (abnormal sperm <14%) and their sperm showed bent tail and de-condensed nucleus with significant DNA damage. Ex vivo experiment showed truncated SEPT12 inhibits filament formation in a dose-dependent manner. This study provides the first causal link between SEPTIN12 genetic variant and male infertility with distinctive sperm pathology. Our finding also suggests vital roles of SEPT12 in sperm nuclear integrity and tail development. PMID:22479503

  15. Genetic variants and cognitive aging: destiny or a nudge?

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Lustig, Cindy

    2014-06-01

    One would be hard-pressed to find a human trait that is not heritable at least to some extent, and genetics have played an important role in behavioral science for more than half a century. With the advent of high-throughput molecular methods and the increasing availability of genomic analyses, genetics have acquired a firm foothold in public discourse. However, although the proliferation of genetic association studies and ever-expanding library of single-nucleotide polymorphisms have generated some fascinating results, they have thus far fallen short of delivering the anticipated dramatic breakthroughs. In this collection of eight articles, we present a spectrum of efforts aimed at finding more nuanced and meaningful ways of integrating genomic findings into the study of cognitive aging. The articles present examples of Mendelian randomization in the service of investigating difficult-to-manipulate biochemical properties of human participants. Furthermore, in an important step forward, they acknowledge the interactive effects of genes and physiological risk factors on age-related difference and change in cognitive performance, as well as the possibility of modifying the negative effect of genetic variants by lifestyle changes. PMID:24956004

  16. Population Analysis of Large Copy Number Variants and Hotspots of Human Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Itsara, Andy; Cooper, Gregory M.; Baker, Carl; Girirajan, Santhosh; Li, Jun; Absher, Devin; Krauss, Ronald M.; Myers, Richard M.; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Mefford, Heather; Ying, Phyllis; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to human genetic and phenotypic diversity. However, the distribution of larger CNVs in the general population remains largely unexplored. We identify large variants in ∼2500 individuals by using Illumina SNP data, with an emphasis on “hotspots” prone to recurrent mutations. We find variants larger than 500 kb in 5%–10% of individuals and variants greater than 1 Mb in 1%–2%. In contrast to previous studies, we find limited evidence for stratification of CNVs in geographically distinct human populations. Importantly, our sample size permits a robust distinction between truly rare and polymorphic but low-frequency copy number variation. We find that a significant fraction of individual CNVs larger than 100 kb are rare and that both gene density and size are strongly anticorrelated with allele frequency. Thus, although large CNVs commonly exist in normal individuals, which suggests that size alone can not be used as a predictor of pathogenicity, such variation is generally deleterious. Considering these observations, we combine our data with published CNVs from more than 12,000 individuals contrasting control and neurological disease collections. This analysis identifies known disease loci and highlights additional CNVs (e.g., 3q29, 16p12, and 15q25.2) for further investigation. This study provides one of the first analyses of large, rare (0.1%–1%) CNVs in the general population, with insights relevant to future analyses of genetic disease. PMID:19166990

  17. CNVs: Harbinger of a Rare Variant Revolution in Psychiatric Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Dheeraj; Sebat, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The genetic bases of neuropsychiatric disorders are beginning to yield to scientific inquiry. Genome-wide studies of copy number variation (CNV) have given rise to a new understanding of disease etiology, bringing rare variants to the forefront. A proportion of risk for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Autism can be explained by rare mutations. Such alleles arise by de novo mutation in the individual or in recent ancestry. Alleles can have specific effects on behavioral and neuroanatomical traits; however expressivity is variable, particularly for neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Knowledge from CNV studies reflects the nature of rare alleles in general and will serve as a guide as we move forward into a new era of whole genome sequencing. PMID:22424231

  18. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

    PubMed

    Peter, Beate; Wijsman, Ellen M; Nato, Alejandro Q; Matsushita, Mark M; Chapman, Kathy L; Stanaway, Ian B; Wolff, John; Oda, Kaori; Gabo, Virginia B; Raskind, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1) on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS. PMID:27120335

  19. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    PubMed Central

    Wijsman, Ellen M.; Nato, Alejandro Q.; Matsushita, Mark M.; Chapman, Kathy L.; Stanaway, Ian B.; Wolff, John; Oda, Kaori; Gabo, Virginia B.; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1) on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS. PMID:27120335

  20. The number of candidate variants in exome sequencing for Mendelian disease under no genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Jo; Mano, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    There has been recent success in identifying disease-causing variants in Mendelian disorders by exome sequencing followed by simple filtering techniques. Studies generally assume complete or high penetrance. However, there are likely many failed and unpublished studies due in part to incomplete penetrance or phenocopy. In this study, the expected number of candidate single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in exome data for autosomal dominant or recessive Mendelian disorders was investigated under the assumption of "no genetic heterogeneity." All variants were assumed to be under the "null model," and sample allele frequencies were modeled using a standard population genetics theory. To investigate the properties of pedigree data, full-sibs were considered in addition to unrelated individuals. In both cases, particularly regarding full-sibs, the number of SNVs remained very high without controls. The high efficacy of controls was also confirmed. When controls were used with a relatively large total sample size (e.g., N = 20, 50), filtering incorporating of incomplete penetrance and phenocopy efficiently reduced the number of candidate SNVs. This suggests that filtering is useful when an assumption of no "genetic heterogeneity" is appropriate and could provide general guidelines for sample size determination. PMID:23762180

  1. Susceptibility genetic variants associated with early-onset colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, María Dolores; López-Dóriga, Adriana; Bujanda, Luis; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Muñoz, Jenifer; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Jover, Rodrigo; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cosme, Angel; Enríquez-Navascués, José María; Moreno, Victor; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2012-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Western countries. Hereditary forms only correspond to 5% of CRC burden. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified common low-penetrant CRC genetic susceptibility loci. Early-onset CRC (CRC<50 years old) is especially suggestive of hereditary predisposition although 85-90% of heritability still remains unidentified. CRC<50 patients (n = 191) were compared with a late-onset CRC group (CRC>65 years old) (n = 1264). CRC susceptibility variants at 8q23.3 (rs16892766), 8q24.21 (rs6983267), 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842), 15q13.3 (rs4779584), 18q21 (rs4939827), 14q22.2 (rs4444235), 16q22.1 (rs9929218), 19q13.1 (rs10411210) and 20p12.3 (rs961253) were genotyped in all DNA samples. A genotype-phenotype correlation with clinical and pathological characteristics in both groups was performed. Risk allele carriers for rs3802842 [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.05, P = 0.0096, dominant model) and rs4779584 (OR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.02-1.9, P = 0.0396, dominant model) were more frequent in the CRC<50 group, whereas homozygotes for rs10795668 risk allele were also more frequent in the early-onset CRC (P = 0.02, codominant model). Regarding early-onset cases, 14q22 (rs4444235), 11q23 (rs3802842) and 20p12 (rs961253) variants were more associated with family history of CRC or tumors of the Lynch syndrome spectrum excluding CRC. In our entire cohort, sum of risk alleles was significantly higher in patients with a CRC family history (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.06-1.85, P = 0.01). In conclusion, variants at 10p14 (rs10795668), 11q23.1 (rs3802842) and 15q13.3 (rs4779584) may have a predominant role in predisposition to early-onset CRC. Association of CRC susceptibility variants with some patient's familiar and personal features could be relevant for screening and surveillance strategies in this high-risk group and it should be explored in further studies. PMID:22235025

  2. Short communication: Genetic variants of Sarcocystis cruzi in infected Malaysian cattle based on 18S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yit Han; Fong, Mun Yik; Subramaniam, Vellayan; Shahari, Shahhaziq; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are pathogenic parasites that infect a wide range of animals, including cattle. A high prevalence of cattle sarcocystosis has been reported worldwide, but its status is unknown in Malaysia. This study focused on utilizing 18S rDNA to identify Sarcocystis species in Malaysian cattle and to determine their genetic variants. In this study, only Sarcocystis cruzi was detected in Malaysian cattle. The intra-species S. cruzi phylogenetic tree analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), respectively displayed two minor groups among the parasite isolates. This finding was supported by high Wright FST value (FST=0.647). The definitive hosts (dogs) may play a fundamental role in the development of S. cruzi genetic variants. Additionally, the existence of microheterogeneity within the S. cruzi merozoites and/or distinct genetic variants arisen from independent merozoites in mature sarcocysts, possibly contributed to the existence of intra-species variations within the population. PMID:26679818

  3. miRVaS: a tool to predict the impact of genetic variants on miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; Dierckx, Jenne; Del Favero, Jurgen; De Rijk, Peter

    2016-02-18

    Genetic variants in or near miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA expression and targeting. As user-friendly software for the impact prediction of miRNA variants on a large scale is still lacking, we created a tool called miRVaS. miRVaS automates this prediction by annotating the location of the variant relative to functional regions within the miRNA hairpin (seed, mature, loop, hairpin arm, flanks) and by annotating all predicted structural changes within the miRNA due to the variant. In addition, the tool defines the most important region that is predicted to have structural changes and calculates a conservation score that is indicative of the reliability of the structure prediction. The output is presented in a tab-separated file, which enables fast screening, and in an html file, which allows visual comparison between wild-type and variant structures. All separate images are provided for downstream use. Finally, we tested two different approaches on a small test set of published functionally validated genetic variants for their capacity to predict the impact of variants on miRNA expression. PMID:26384425

  4. miRVaS: a tool to predict the impact of genetic variants on miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; Dierckx, Jenne; Del Favero, Jurgen; De Rijk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants in or near miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA expression and targeting. As user-friendly software for the impact prediction of miRNA variants on a large scale is still lacking, we created a tool called miRVaS. miRVaS automates this prediction by annotating the location of the variant relative to functional regions within the miRNA hairpin (seed, mature, loop, hairpin arm, flanks) and by annotating all predicted structural changes within the miRNA due to the variant. In addition, the tool defines the most important region that is predicted to have structural changes and calculates a conservation score that is indicative of the reliability of the structure prediction. The output is presented in a tab-separated file, which enables fast screening, and in an html file, which allows visual comparison between wild-type and variant structures. All separate images are provided for downstream use. Finally, we tested two different approaches on a small test set of published functionally validated genetic variants for their capacity to predict the impact of variants on miRNA expression. PMID:26384425

  5. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R.; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I.; Brown, Eric C.; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H. H.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2015-01-01

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26022996

  6. The population genetics of pharmacogenomics VIP variants in the Sherpa population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Ren, Yongchao; Shi, Xugang; Yuan, Dongya; Liu, Kai; Geng, Tingting; Li, Gang; Kang, Longli; Jin, Tian-bo

    2016-02-01

    Polymorphic distributions of pharmacogenes among some ethnicities are under-represented in current pharmacogenetic research. Particularly, there is a paucity of pharmacogenetic information in the Sherpa population in Tibet. We used the Sequenom MassARRAY single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping technology to detect 86 very important pharmacogene (VIP) variants in Sherpas and compared the genotypic frequencies of these variants with HapMap populations. Overall, 59 of the 60 previously reported variants in the HapMap populations were found in our study. We found minimal differences between populations of Sherpas and Chinese Han in Beijing (CHB), Chinese in Metropolitan Denver, Colorado (CHD), Japanese in Tokyo, Japan (JPT), and Mexicans in Los Angeles, California (MEX) after a strict Bonferroni correction. Only 8, 4, 5, 4 VIP genotypes, respectively, were different in these groups. Additionally, pairwise FST values and clustering analyses showed that the VIP variants in the Sherpa population exhibited a close genetic affinity with the CHB and JPT populations, but they were most similar to the CHD population. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis underlying ethnic differences in drug response, which may potentially benefit the development of personalized medicine for the Sherpa population. PMID:26825850

  7. Identification of genetic variants associated with susceptibility to West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease.

    PubMed

    Long, D; Deng, X; Singh, P; Loeb, M; Lauring, A S; Seielstad, M

    2016-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection results in a diverse spectrum of outcomes, and host genetics are likely to influence susceptibility to neuroinvasive disease (West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND)). We performed whole-exome sequencing of 44 individuals with WNND and identified alleles associated with severe disease by variant filtration in cases, kernel association testing in cases and controls and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) imputation into a larger cohort of WNND cases and seropositive controls followed by genome-wide association analysis. Variant filtration prioritized genes based on the enrichment of otherwise rare variants, but did not unambiguously implicate variants shared by a majority of cases. Kernel association demonstrated enrichment for risk and protective alleles in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and HLA-DQB1 loci that have well understood roles in antiviral immunity. Two loci, HERC5 and an intergenic region between CD83 and JARID2, were implicated by multiple imputed SNPs and exceeded genome-wide significance in a discovery cohort (n=862). SNPs at two additional loci, TFCP2L1 and CACNA1H, achieved genome-wide significance after association testing of directly genotyped and imputed SNPs in a discovery cohort (n=862) and a separate replication cohort (n=1387). The context of these loci suggests that immunoregulatory, ion channel and endothelial barrier functions may be important elements of the host response to WNV. PMID:27170560

  8. Differential Expression and Functionality of TRPA1 Protein Genetic Variants in Conditions of Thermal Stimulation*

    PubMed Central

    May, Denisa; Baastrup, Jonas; Nientit, Maria Raphaela; Binder, Andreas; Schünke, Michael; Baron, Ralf; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2012-01-01

    The role of genetic modifications of the TRPA1 receptor has been well documented in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We recently reported that the E179K variant of TRPA1 appears to be crucial for the generation of paradoxical heat sensation in pain patients. Here, we describe the consequences of the single amino acid exchange at position 179 in the ankyrin repeat 4 of human TRPA1. TRPA1 wild type Lys-179 protein expressed in HEK cells exhibited intact biochemical properties, inclusive trafficking into the plasma membrane, formation of large protein complexes, and the ability to be activated by cold. Additionally, a strong increase of Lys-179 protein expression was observed in cold (4 °C) and heat (49 °C)-treated cells. In contrast, HEK cells expressing the variant Lys-179 TRPA1 failed to get activated by cold possibly due to the loss of ability to interact with other proteins or other TRPA1 monomers during oligomerization. In conclusion, the detailed understanding of TRPA1 genetic variants might provide a fruitful strategy for future development of pain treatments. PMID:22665484

  9. Differential expression and functionality of TRPA1 protein genetic variants in conditions of thermal stimulation.

    PubMed

    May, Denisa; Baastrup, Jonas; Nientit, Maria Raphaela; Binder, Andreas; Schünke, Michael; Baron, Ralf; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2012-08-01

    The role of genetic modifications of the TRPA1 receptor has been well documented in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We recently reported that the E179K variant of TRPA1 appears to be crucial for the generation of paradoxical heat sensation in pain patients. Here, we describe the consequences of the single amino acid exchange at position 179 in the ankyrin repeat 4 of human TRPA1. TRPA1 wild type Lys-179 protein expressed in HEK cells exhibited intact biochemical properties, inclusive trafficking into the plasma membrane, formation of large protein complexes, and the ability to be activated by cold. Additionally, a strong increase of Lys-179 protein expression was observed in cold (4 °C) and heat (49 °C)-treated cells. In contrast, HEK cells expressing the variant Lys-179 TRPA1 failed to get activated by cold possibly due to the loss of ability to interact with other proteins or other TRPA1 monomers during oligomerization. In conclusion, the detailed understanding of TRPA1 genetic variants might provide a fruitful strategy for future development of pain treatments. PMID:22665484

  10. Pharmacogenomic variants have larger effect sizes than genetic variants associated with other dichotomous complex traits.

    PubMed

    Maranville, J C; Cox, N J

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that pharmacogenomic phenotypes are influenced by genetic variants with larger effect sizes than other phenotypes, such as complex disease risk. This is presumed to reflect the fact that relevant environmental factors (drug exposure) are appropriately measured and taken into account. To test this hypothesis, we performed a systematic comparison of effect sizes between pharmacogenomic and non-pharmacogenomic phenotypes across all genome-wide association studies (GWAS) reported in the NHGRI GWAS catalog. We found significantly larger effect sizes for studies focused on pharmacogenomic phenotypes, as compared with complex disease risk, morphological phenotypes and endophenotypes. We found no significant differences in effect sizes between pharmacogenomic studies focused on adverse events versus those focused on drug efficacy. Furthermore, we found that this pattern persists among sample size-matched studies, suggesting that this pattern does not reflect overestimation of effect sizes due to smaller sample sizes in pharmacogenomic studies.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 7 July 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.47. PMID:26149738

  11. Genetic risk variants in African Americans with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Noriko; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Harbo, Hanne F.; Caillier, Stacy J.; Santaniello, Adam; Khankhanian, Pouya; Maiers, Martin; Spellman, Stephen; Cereb, Nezih; Yang, SooYoung; Pando, Marcelo J.; Piccio, Laura; Cross, Anne H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Hauser, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the association of established multiple sclerosis (MS) risk variants in 3,254 African Americans (1,162 cases and 2,092 controls). Methods: Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1, HLA-DQB1, and HLA-A alleles were typed by molecular techniques. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was conducted for 76 MS-associated SNPs and 52 ancestry informative marker SNPs selected throughout the genome. Self-declared ancestry was refined by principal component analysis of the ancestry informative marker SNPs. An ancestry-adjusted multivariate model was applied to assess genetic associations. Results: The following major histocompatibility complex risk alleles were replicated: HLA-DRB1*15:01 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.02 [95% confidence interval: 1.54–2.63], p = 2.50e-07), HLA-DRB1*03:01 (OR = 1.58 [1.29–1.94], p = 1.11e-05), as well as HLA-DRB1*04:05 (OR = 2.35 [1.26–4.37], p = 0.007) and the African-specific risk allele of HLA-DRB1*15:03 (OR = 1.26 [1.05–1.51], p = 0.012). The protective association of HLA-A*02:01 was confirmed (OR = 0.72 [0.55–0.93], p = 0.013). None of the HLA-DQB1 alleles were associated with MS. Using a significance threshold of p < 0.01, outside the major histocompatibility complex region, 8 MS SNPs were also found to be associated with MS in African Americans. Conclusion: MS genetic risk in African Americans only partially overlaps with that of Europeans and could explain the difference of MS prevalence between populations. PMID:23771490

  12. Primary osteoarthritis of the hip: a genetic disease caused by European genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Hoaglund, Franklin T

    2013-03-01

    Primary osteoarthritis of the hip is a separate phenotype that occurs at a rate of 3% to 6% in the populations of the world with European ancestry. In all non-European populations, there is a consistent rarity of primary osteoarthritis that suggests a different etiology for these few patients. Family, sibling, and twin studies prove primary osteoarthritis to be a genetic disease with a 50% heritability caused by European genetic variants. The genetic basis is reinforced by the lower rate of primary osteoarthritis in American minorities consistent with their degree of European gene admixture. Whether the mechanism of degeneration of primary osteoarthritis may be secondary through a morphologic deformity, such as femoroacetabular impingement, remains unknown. The virtual absence of the disease in non-Europeans indicates that the European gene component is necessary for the expression of this separate phenotype of osteoarthritis. PMID:23467870

  13. Multiple sclerosis associated genetic variants of CD226 impair regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Piédavent-Salomon, Melanie; Willing, Anne; Engler, Jan Broder; Steinbach, Karin; Bauer, Simone; Eggert, Britta; Ufer, Friederike; Kursawe, Nina; Wehrmann, Sabine; Jäger, Jan; Reinhardt, Stefanie; Friese, Manuel A

    2015-11-01

    Recent association studies have linked numerous genetic variants with an increased risk for multiple sclerosis, although their functional relevance remains largely unknown. Here we investigated phenotypical and functional consequences of a genetic variant in the CD226 gene that, among other autoimmune diseases, predisposes to multiple sclerosis. Phenotypically, effector and regulatory CD4(+) memory T cells of healthy individuals carrying the predisposing CD226 genetic variant showed, in comparison to carriers of the protective variant, reduced surface expression of CD226 and an impaired induction of CD226 after stimulation. This haplotype-dependent reduction in CD226 expression on memory T cells was abrogated in patients with multiple sclerosis, as CD226 expression was comparable to healthy risk haplotype carriers irrespective of genetic variant. Functionally, FOXP3-positive regulatory T cells from healthy carriers of the genetic protective variant showed superior suppressive capacity, which was again abrogated in multiple sclerosis patients. Mimicking the phenotype of human CD226 genetic risk variant carriers, regulatory T cells derived from Cd226-deficient mice showed similarly reduced inhibitory activity, eventually resulting in an exacerbated disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis. Therefore, by combining human and mouse analyses we show that CD226 exhibits an important role in the activation of regulatory T cells, with its genetically imposed dysregulation impairing regulatory T cell function. PMID:26359290

  14. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  18. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saadeldin, Mona K.; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M.; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5′UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer. PMID:25628642

  19. Cumulative association between age-related macular degeneration and less studied genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1: a meta and gene-cluster analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihong; Dong, Shuqian; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Haina; Dai, Fei; Yang, Jingyun

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the cumulative effect of the less studied genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1 on age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We performed an extensive literature search for studies on the association between AMD and the less studied genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1. Multiple meta-analyses were performed to evaluate the association between individual genetic variants and AMD. A gene-cluster analysis was used to investigate the cumulative effect of these less studied genetic variants on AMD. A total of 23 studies from 20 published papers met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. Several genetic variants in the gene cluster are significantly associated with AMD in our meta-analyses or in individual studies. Gene-cluster analysis reveals a strong cumulative association between these genetic variants in this gene cluster and AMD (p<10−5). However, two previously suspected SNPs in ARMS2, including rs2736911, the SNP having the largest number of studies in our meta-analyses; and rs3793917, the SNP with the largest sample size, were not significantly associated with AMD (both p’s>0.12). Sensitivity analyses reveal significant association of AMD with rs2736911 in Chinese but not in Caucasian, with c.372_815del443ins54 in Caucasian but not in Chinese, and with rs1049331 in both ethnic groups. These less studied genetic variants have a significant cumulative effect on wet AMD. Our study provides evidence of the joint contribution of genetic variants in PLEKHA1/ARMS2/HTRA1 to AMD risk, in addition to the two widely studied genetic variants whose association with AMD was well established. PMID:24013816

  20. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses.

    PubMed

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick; Nivard, Michel G; Fontana, Mark Alan; Meddens, S Fleur W; Linnér, Richard Karlsson; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davies, Gail; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    2016-06-01

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated with neuroticism, including 2 inversion polymorphisms. The two loci associated with depressive symptoms replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal or pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association. PMID:27089181

  1. Inherited genetic variants associated with occurrence of multiple primary melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, David C.; Orlow, Irene; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Luo, Li; Kricker, Anne; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gruber, Stephen B.; Marrett, Loraine D.; Gallagher, Richard P.; Zanetti, Roberto; Rosso, Stefano; Dwyer, Terence; Sharma, Ajay; La Pilla, Emily; From, Lynn; Busam, Klaus J.; Cust, Anne E.; Ollila, David W.; Begg, Colin B.; Berwick, Marianne; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies including genome-wide association studies have identified several putative low-penetrance susceptibility loci for melanoma. We sought to determine their generalizability to genetic predisposition for multiple primary melanoma in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma (GEM) Study. GEM is a case-control study of 1,206 incident cases of multiple primary melanoma and 2,469 incident first primary melanoma participants as the control group. We investigated the odds of developing multiple primary melanoma for 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from 21 distinct genetic regions previously reported to be associated with melanoma. ORs and 95% CIs were determined using logistic regression models adjusted for baseline features (age, sex, age by sex interaction, and study center). We investigated univariable models and built multivariable models to assess independent effects of SNPs. Eleven SNPs in 6 gene neighborhoods (TERT/CLPTM1L, TYRP1, MTAP, TYR, NCOA6, and MX2) and a PARP1 haplotype were associated with multiple primary melanoma. In a multivariable model that included only the most statistically significant findings from univariable modeling and adjusted for pigmentary phenotype, back nevi, and baseline features, we found TERT/CLPTM1L rs401681 (P = 0.004), TYRP1 rs2733832 (P = 0.006), MTAP rs1335510 (P = 0.0005), TYR rs10830253 (P = 0.003), and MX2 rs45430 (P = 0.008) to be significantly associated with multiple primary melanoma while NCOA6 rs4911442 approached significance (P = 0.06). The GEM study provides additional evidence for the relevance of these genetic regions to melanoma risk and estimates the magnitude of the observed genetic effect on development of subsequent primary melanoma. PMID:25837821

  2. Genetic Diversity within Alphaherpesviruses: Characterization of a Novel Variant of Herpes Simplex Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Désiré, Nathalie; Marlet, Julien; Dacheux, Laurent; Seang, Sophie; Caumes, Eric; Bourhy, Hervé; Agut, Henri; Boutolleau, David

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Very low levels of variability have been reported for the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) genome. We recently described a new genetic variant of HSV-2 (HSV-2v) characterized by a much higher degree of variability for the UL30 gene (DNA polymerase) than observed for the HG52 reference strain. Retrospective screening of 505 clinical isolates of HSV-2 by a specific real-time PCR assay targeting the UL30 gene led to the identification of 13 additional HSV-2v isolates, resulting in an overall prevalence of 2.8%. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of microsatellite markers and gene sequences showed clear differences between HSV-2v and classical HSV-2. Thirteen of the 14 patients infected with HSV-2v originated from West or Central Africa, and 9 of these patients were coinfected with HIV. These results raise questions about the origin of this new virus. Preliminary results suggest that HSV-2v may have acquired genomic segments from chimpanzee alphaherpesvirus (ChHV) by recombination. IMPORTANCE This article deals with the highly topical question of the origin of this new HSV-2 variant identified in patients with HIV coinfection originating mostly from West or Central Africa. HSV-2v clearly differed from classical HSV-2 isolates in phylogenetic analyses and may be linked to simian ChHV. This new HSV-2 variant highlights the possible occurrence of recombination between human and simian herpesviruses under natural conditions, potentially presenting greater challenges for the future. PMID:26401046

  3. Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus serotype 1: Genetic composition and envelope protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chem, Y K; Chua, K B; Malik, Y; Voon, K

    2015-06-01

    Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus type 1 (MabEV DEN-1) was discovered and isolated in an outbreak of dengue in Klang Valley, Malaysia from December 2004 to March 2005. This study was done to investigate whether DEN152 (an isolate of MabEV DEN-1) is a product of recombination event or not. In addition, the non-synonymous mutations that correlate with the monoclonal antibody-escape variant were determined in this study. The genomes of DEN152 and two new DEN-1 isolates, DENB04 and DENK154 were completely sequenced, aligned, and compared. Phylogenetic tree was plotted and the recombination event on DEN152 was investigated. DEN152 is sub-grouped under genotype I and is closely related genetically to a DEN-1 isolated in Japan in 2004. DEN152 is not a recombinant product of any parental strains. Four amino acid substitutions were unique only to DEN 152. These amino acid substitutions were (Ser)[326](Leu), (Ser)[340](Leu) at the deduced E protein, (Ile)[250](Thr) at NS1 protein, and (Thr)[41](Ser) at NS5 protein. Thus, DEN152 is an isolate of the emerging monoclonal antibody-escape variant DEN-1 that escaped diagnostic laboratory detection. PMID:26691263

  4. Joint Identification of Genetic Variants for Physical Activity in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoun; Kim, Jaehee; Min, Haesook; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Yeonjung; Lee, Andy H.; Park, Taesung

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited research on genome-wide association with physical activity (PA). This study ascertained genetic associations between PA and 344,893 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in 8842 Korean samples. PA data were obtained from a validated questionnaire that included information on PA intensity and duration. Metabolic equivalent of tasks were calculated to estimate the total daily PA level for each individual. In addition to single- and multiple-SNP association tests, a pathway enrichment analysis was performed to identify the biological significance of SNP markers. Although no significant SNP was found at genome-wide significance level via single-SNP association tests, 59 genetic variants mapped to 76 genes were identified via a multiple SNP approach using a bootstrap selection stability measure. Pathway analysis for these 59 variants showed that maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) was enriched. Joint identification of SNPs could enable the identification of multiple SNPs with good predictive power for PA and a pathway enriched for PA. PMID:25026172

  5. Genetic variants in the Hippo pathway predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Pin; Lin, Victor C; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Juang, Shin-Hun; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2015-01-01

    While localized prostate cancer is potentially curative, many patients still show biochemical recurrence (BCR) after curative treatments such as radical prostatectomy (RP). The Hippo pathway has recently been shown to be an evolutionarily conserved regulator of tissue growth, and its perturbation can trigger tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the Hippo pathway may influence clinical outcomes in localized prostate cancer patients. We genotyped 53 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from seven core Hippo pathway genes in 246 localized prostate cancer patients treated with RP. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify significant SNPs that correlated with BCR. For replication, five associated SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 212 patients. After adjusting for known clinicopathologic factors, the association between STK3 rs7827435 and BCR (P = 0.018) was replicated in the second stage (P = 0.026; Pcombined = 0.001). Additional integrated in silico analysis provided evidence that rs7827435 affects STK3 expression, which in turn is significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. In conclusion, genetic variants of the Hippo pathway contribute to the variable outcomes of prostate cancer, and the discovery of these biomarkers provides a molecular approach for prognostic risk assessment. PMID:25707771

  6. The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and the potential importance of common regulatory genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Saffen, David

    2015-10-01

    Currently, there is great interest in identifying genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), due in part to recent increases in the frequency of diagnosis of these disorders worldwide. While there is nearly universal agreement that ASDs are complex diseases, with multiple genetic and environmental contributing factors, there is less agreement concerning the relative importance of common vs rare genetic variants in ASD liability. Recent observations that rare mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) are frequently associated with ASDs, combined with reduced fecundity of individuals with these disorders, has led to the hypothesis that ASDs are caused primarily by de novo or rare genetic mutations. Based on this model, large-scale whole-genome DNA sequencing has been proposed as the most appropriate method for discovering ASD liability genes. While this approach will undoubtedly identify many novel candidate genes and produce important new insights concerning the genetic causes of these disorders, a full accounting of the genetics of ASDs will be incomplete absent an understanding of the contributions of common regulatory variants, which are likely to influence ASD liability by modifying the effects of rare variants or, by assuming unfavorable combinations, directly produce these disorders. Because it is not yet possible to identify regulatory genetic variants by examination of DNA sequences alone, their identification will require experimentation. In this essay, I discuss these issues and describe the advantages of measurements of allelic expression imbalance (AEI) of mRNA expression for identifying cis-acting regulatory variants that contribute to ASDs. PMID:26335735

  7. A bivariate mann-whitney approach for unraveling genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yalu; Schaid, Daniel J; Lu, Qing

    2013-04-01

    Although comorbidity among complex diseases (e.g., drug dependence syndromes) is well documented, genetic variants contributing to the comorbidity are still largely unknown. The discovery of genetic variants and their interactions contributing to comorbidity will likely shed light on underlying pathophysiological and etiological processes, and promote effective treatments for comorbid conditions. For this reason, studies to discover genetic variants that foster the development of comorbidity represent high-priority research projects, as manifested in the behavioral genetics studies now underway. The yield from these studies can be enhanced by adopting novel statistical approaches, with the capacity of considering multiple genetic variants and possible interactions. For this purpose, we propose a bivariate Mann-Whitney (BMW) approach to unravel genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity, as well as those unique to each comorbid condition. Through simulations, we found BMW outperformed two commonly adopted approaches in a variety of underlying disease and comorbidity models. We further applied BMW to datasets from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment, investigating the contribution of 184 known nicotine dependence (ND) and alcohol dependence (AD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the comorbidity of ND and AD. The analysis revealed a candidate SNP from CHRNA5, rs16969968, associated with both ND and AD, and replicated the findings in an independent dataset with a P-value of 1.06 × 10(-03) . PMID:23334941

  8. Evaluation of Oxidative Stress Response Related Genetic Variants, Pro-oxidants, Antioxidants and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Nicole; Hein, David W.; Brock, Guy; Kidd, La Creis R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress and detoxification mechanisms have been commonly studied in Prostate Cancer (PCa) due to their function in the detoxification of potentially damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and carcinogens. However, findings have been either inconsistent or inconclusive. These mixed findings may, in part, relate to failure to consider interactions among oxidative stress response related genetic variants along with pro- and antioxidant factors. Methods We examined the effects of 33 genetic and 26 environmental oxidative stress and defense factors on PCa risk and disease aggressiveness among 2,286 men from the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility project (1,175 cases, 1,111 controls). Single and joint effects were analyzed using a comprehensive statistical approach involving logistic regression, multi-dimensionality reduction, and entropy graphs. Results Inheritance of one CYP2C8 rs7909236 T or two SOD2 rs2758331 A alleles was linked to a 1.3- and 1.4-fold increase in risk of developing PCa, respectively (p-value = 0.006–0.013). Carriers of CYP1B1 rs1800440GG, CYP2C8 rs1058932TC and, NAT2 (rs1208GG, rs1390358CC, rs7832071TT) genotypes were associated with a 1.3 to 2.2-fold increase in aggressive PCa [p-value = 0.04–0.001, FDR 0.088–0.939]. We observed a 23% reduction in aggressive disease linked to inheritance of one or more NAT2 rs4646247 A alleles (p = 0.04, FDR = 0.405). Only three NAT2 sequence variants remained significant after adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing, namely NAT2 rs1208, rs1390358, and rs7832071. Lastly, there were no significant gene-environment or gene-gene interactions associated with PCa outcomes. Conclusions Variations in genes involved in oxidative stress and defense pathways may modify PCa. Our findings do not firmly support the role of oxidative stress genetic variants combined with lifestyle/environmental factors as modifiers of PCa and disease progression. However, additional multi-center studies poised

  9. Using The ENCODE Resource For Functional Annotation Of Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Pazin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This article illustrates the use of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) resource to generate or refine hypotheses from genomic data on disease and other phenotypic traits. First, the goals and history of ENCODE and related epigenomics projects are reviewed. Second, the rationale for ENCODE and the major data types used by ENCODE are briefly described, as are some standard heuristics for their interpretation. Third, the use of the ENCODE resource is examined. Standard use cases for ENCODE, accessing the ENCODE resource, and accessing data from related projects are discussed. Finally, access to resources from ENCODE and related epigenomics projects are reviewed. (Although the focus of this article is the use of ENCODE data, some of the same approaches can be used with the data from other projects.) While this article is focused on the case of interpreting genetic variation data, essentially the same approaches can be used with the ENCODE resource, or with data from other projects, to interpret epigenomic and gene regulation data, with appropriate modification (Rakyan et al. 2011; Ng et al. 2012). Such approaches could allow investigators to use genomic methods to study environmental and stochastic processes, in addition to genetic processes. PMID:25762420

  10. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation. PMID:26597662

  11. A genome-wide survey of CD4+ lymphocyte regulatory genetic variants identifies novel asthma genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Zhou, Xiaobo; Thibault, Derek M.; Himes, Blanca E.; Liu, Andy; Szefler, Stanley J.; Strunk, Robert; Castro, Mario; Hansel, Nadia N.; Diette, Gregory B.; Vonakis, Becky M.; Adkinson, N. Franklin; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Barraza-Villareal, Albino; Lemanske, Robert F.; Solway, Julian; Krishnan, Jerry; White, Steven R.; Cheadle, Chris; Berger, Alan E.; Fan, Jinshui; Boorgula, Meher Preethi; Nicolae, Dan; Gilliland, Frank; Barnes, Kathleen; London, Stephanie J.; Martinez, Fernando; Ober, Carole; Celedón, Juan C.; Carey, Vincent J.; Weiss, Scott T.; Raby, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have yet to identify the majority of genetic variants involved in asthma. We hypothesized that expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping can identify novel asthma genes by enabling prioritization of putative functional variants for association testing. Objective We evaluated 6,706 cis-acting expression-associated variants (eSNP) identified through a genome-wide eQTL survey of CD4+ lymphocytes for association with asthma. Methods eSNP were tested for association with asthma in 359 asthma cases and 846 controls from the Childhood Asthma Management Program, with verification using family-based testing. Significant associations were tested for replication in 579 parent-child trios with asthma from Costa Rica. Further functional validation was performed by Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE)-qPCR and Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR in lung derived epithelial cell lines (Beas-2B and A549) and Jurkat cells, a leukemia cell line derived from T lymphocytes. Results Cis-acting eSNP demonstrated associations with asthma in both cohorts. We confirmed the previously-reported association of ORMDL3/GSDMB variants with asthma (combined p=2.9 × 108). Reproducible associations were also observed for eSNP in three additional genes: FADS2 (p=0.002), NAGA (p=0.0002), and F13A1 (p=0.0001). We subsequently demonstrated that FADS2 mRNA is increased in CD4+ lymphocytes in asthmatics, and that the associated eSNPs reside within DNA segments with histone modifications that denote open chromatin status and confer enhancer activity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the utility of eQTL mapping in the identification of novel asthma genes, and provide evidence for the importance of FADS2, NAGA, and F13A1 in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:24934276

  12. Association of Obesity-related Genetic Variants With Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Report From the Shanghai Endometrial Cancer Genetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Delahanty, Ryan J.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Wen, Wanqing; Xu, Wang-Hong; Cai, Hui; He, Jing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer, the most common gynecologic malignancy. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple genetic markers for obesity. The authors evaluated the association of obesity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with endometrial cancer using GWAS data from their recently completed study, the Shanghai Endometrial Cancer Genetics Study, which comprised 832 endometrial cancer cases and 2,049 controls (1996–2005). Thirty-five SNPs previously associated with obesity or body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) at a minimum significance level of ≤5 × 10−7 in the US National Human Genome Research Institute's GWAS catalog (http://genome.gov/gwastudies) and representing 26 unique loci were evaluated by either direct genotyping or imputation. The authors found that for 22 of the 26 unique loci tested (84.6%), the BMI-associated risk variants were present at a higher frequency in cases than in population controls (P = 0.0003). Multiple regression analysis showed that 9 of 35 BMI-associated variants, representing 7 loci, were significantly associated (P ≤ 0.05) with the risk of endometrial cancer; for all but 1 SNP, the direction of association was consistent with that found for BMI. For consistent SNPs, the allelic odds ratios ranged from 1.15 to 1.29. These 7 loci are in the SEC16B/RASAL, TMEM18, MSRA, SOX6, MTCH2, FTO, and MC4R genes. The associations persisted after adjustment for BMI, suggesting that genetic markers of obesity provide value in addition to BMI in predicting endometrial cancer risk. PMID:21976109

  13. A rare genetic variant of the ryanodine receptor in a suspected malignant hyperthermia susceptible patient.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Emily Jane; Wilkerson, Carlos; Kraeva, Natalia; Rosenberg, Henry; Kennedy, Tara

    2016-09-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) remains a diagnostic challenge. This case report describes the anesthetic management of a suspected intraoperative MH episode and the subsequent, genetic sequence analysis of 3 genes associated with MH. The results of the molecular genetic testing revealed heterozygosity for a rare variant, c.12553G>A (p.Ala4185Thr), in the RYR1 gene encoding the ryanodine receptor. Although the RYR1 gene has previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of MH, (1) this particular variant has only been reported in one other case of MH; (2) the role for diagnostic genetic testing in the diagnosis of MH will be examined. PMID:27555149

  14. Genetic Variants in Transcription Factors Are Associated With the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, S; Yee, SW; Stocker, S; Mosley, JD; Kubo, M; Castro, R; Mefford, JA; Wen, C; Liang, X; Witte, J; Brett, C; Maeda, S; Simpson, MD; Hedderson, MM; Davis, RL; Roden, DM; Giacomini, KM; Savic, RM

    2014-01-01

    One-third of type 2 diabetes patients do not respond to metformin. Genetic variants in metformin transporters have been extensively studied as a likely contributor to this high failure rate. Here, we investigate, for the first time, the effect of genetic variants in transcription factors on metformin pharmacokinetics (PK) and response. Overall, 546 patients and healthy volunteers contributed their genome-wide, pharmacokinetic (235 subjects), and HbA1c data (440 patients) for this analysis. Five variants in specificity protein 1 (SP1), a transcription factor that modulates the expression of metformin transporters, were associated with changes in treatment HbA1c (P < 0.01) and metformin secretory clearance (P < 0.05). Population pharmacokinetic modeling further confirmed a 24% reduction in apparent clearance in homozygous carriers of one such variant, rs784888. Genetic variants in other transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-α and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α, were significantly associated with HbA1c change only. Overall, our study highlights the importance of genetic variants in transcription factors as modulators of metformin PK and response. PMID:24853734

  15. Genetic variant in DIP2A gene is associated with developmental dyslexia in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rui; Shao, Shanshan; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Xiaohui; Guo, Shengnan; Zou, Li; Zhong, Rong; Lou, Jiao; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Jiajia; Song, Ranran

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that there is a substantial heritable component including several risk loci and candidate genes for developmental dyslexia (DD). DIP2A has been identified to be partially deleted on chromosome region 21q22.3, which cosegregates with DD. And it fits into a theoretical molecular network of DD implicated in the development of DD. Compared with some DD candidate genes that have been extensively studied (e.g., DYX1C1, DCDC2, KIAA0319, and ROBO1), very little is known about the association between candidate gene DIP2A and DD susceptibility. And given the linguistic and genetic differences between Chinese and other Western populations, it is worthwhile validating the association of DIP2A in Chinese dyslexic children. Here, we investigated two genetic variants, selected by bioinformatics analysis, in DIP2A in a Chinese population with 409 dyslexic cases and 410 healthy controls. We observed a significantly increased DD risk associated with rs2255526 G allele (OR = 1.297, 95% CI = 1.036-1.623, Padjusted  = 0.023) and GG genotypes (OR = 1.833, 95% CI = 1.043-3.223, Padjusted  = 0.035), compared with their wild-type counterparts. In addition, it was marginally significantly associated with DD under the recessive model (OR = 1.677, 95% CI = 0.967-2.908, Padjusted  = 0.066) and the dominant model (OR = 1.314, 95% CI = 0.992-1.741, Padjusted  = 0.057). However, we found no evidence of an association of SNP rs16979358 with DD. In conclusion, this study showed that a genetic variant in the DIP2A gene was associated with increased DD risk in China. PMID:26452339

  16. Genetic associations of nonsynonymous exonic variants with psychophysiological endophenotypes.

    PubMed

    Vrieze, Scott I; Malone, Stephen M; Pankratz, Nathan; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Miller, Michael B; Kang, Hyun Min; McGue, Matt; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Iacono, William G

    2014-12-01

    We mapped ∼85,000 rare nonsynonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to 17 psychophysiological endophenotypes in 4,905 individuals, including antisaccade eye movements, resting EEG, P300 amplitude, electrodermal activity, affect-modulated startle eye blink. Nonsynonymous SNPs are predicted to directly change or disrupt proteins encoded by genes and are expected to have significant biological consequences. Most such variants are rare, and new technologies can efficiently assay them on a large scale. We assayed 247,870 mostly rare SNPs on an Illumina exome array. Approximately 85,000 of the SNPs were polymorphic, rare (MAF < .05), and nonsynonymous. Single variant association tests identified a SNP in the PARD3 gene associated with theta resting EEG power. The sequence kernel association test, a gene-based test, identified a gene PNPLA7 associated with pleasant difference startle, the difference in startle magnitude between pleasant and neutral images. No other single nonsynonymous variant, or gene-based group of variants, was strongly associated with any endophenotype. PMID:25387709

  17. Genetic variants in IL2RA and IL7R affect multiple sclerosis disease risk and progression.

    PubMed

    Traboulsee, Anthony L; Bernales, Cecily Q; Ross, Jay P; Lee, Joshua D; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2014-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common demyelinating neurodegenerative disease with a strong genetic component. Previous studies have associated genetic variants in IL2RA and IL7R in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this study, we describe the association between IL2RA (rs2104286) and IL7R (rs6897932) in the Canadian population. Genotyping 1,978 MS patients and 830 controls failed to identify any significant association between these variants and disease risk. However, stratified analysis for family history of disease and disease course identified a trend towards association for IL2RA in patients without a family history (p = 0.05; odds ratio = 0.77) and a significant association between IL7R and patients who developed progressive MS (PrMS) (p = 0.002; odds ratio = 0.73). Although not statistically significant, the effect of IL2RA (rs2104286) in patients without a family history of MS indicates that the genetic components for familial and sporadic disease are perhaps distinct. This data suggests that the onset of sporadic disease is likely determined by a large number of variants of small effect, whereas MS in patients with a family history of disease is caused by a few deleterious variants. In addition, the significant association between PrMS and rs6897932 indicates that IL7R may not be disease-causing but a determinant of disease course. Further characterization of the effect of IL2RA and IL7R genetic variants in defined MS subtypes is warranted to evaluate the effect of these genes on specific clinical outcomes and to further elucidate the mechanisms of disease onset and progression. PMID:24770783

  18. Testing Genetic Association with Rare and Common Variants in Family Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Malzahn, Dörthe; Balliu, Brunilda; Li, Cong; Bailey, Julia N.

    2015-01-01

    With the advance of next-generation sequencing technologies in recent years, rare genetic variant data have now become available for genetic epidemiology studies. For family samples however, only a few statistical methods for association analysis of rare genetic variants have been developed. Rare variant approaches are of great interest particularly for family data because samples enriched for trait-relevant variants can be ascertained and rare variants are putatively enriched through segregation. To facilitate the evaluation of existing and new rare variant testing approaches for analyzing family data, Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 (GAW18) provided genotype and next-generation sequencing data and longitudinal blood pressure traits from extended pedigrees of Mexican-American families from the San Antonio Family Study. Our GAW18 group members analyzed real and simulated phenotype data from GAW18 by using generalized linear mixed-effects models or principal components to adjust for familial correlation or by testing binary traits using a correction factor for familial effects. With one exception, approaches dealt with the extended pedigrees in their original state using information based on the kinship matrix or alternative genetic similarity measures. For simulated data, our group demonstrated that the family-based kernel machine score test is superior in power to family-based single-marker or burden tests, except in a few specific scenarios. For real data, three contributions identified significant associations. They substantially reduced the number of tests before performing the association analysis. We conclude from our real data analyses that further development of strategies for targeted testing or more focused screening of genetic variants is strongly desirable. PMID:25112186

  19. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  20. Quantitative determination of casein genetic variants in goat milk: Application in Girgentana dairy goat breed.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Maria; Segreto, Roberta; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Sardina, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-01

    The study was conducted to develop a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method to quantify casein genetic variants (αs2-, β-, and κ-casein) in milk of homozygous individuals of Girgentana goat breed. For calibration experiments, pure genetic variants were extracted from individual milk samples of animals with known genotypes. The described HPLC approach was precise, accurate and highly suitable for quantification of goat casein genetic variants of homozygous individuals. The amount of each casein per allele was: αs2-casein A = 2.9 ± 0.8 g/L and F = 1.8 ± 0.4 g/L; β-casein C = 3.0 ± 0.8 g/L and C1 = 2.0 ± 0.7 g/L and κ-casein A = 1.6 ± 0.3 g/L and B = 1.1 ± 0.2 g/L. A good correlation was found between the quantities of αs2-casein genetic variants A and F, and β-casein C and C1 with other previously described method. The main important result was obtained for κ-casein because, till now, no data were available on quantification of single genetic variants for this protein. PMID:26304408

  1. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person’s genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  2. Deleterious Rare Variants Reveal Risk for Loss of GABAA Receptor Function in Patients with Genetic Epilepsy and in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ciria C; Klassen, Tara L; Jackson, Laurel G; Gurba, Katharine; Hu, Ningning; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Macdonald, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies (GEs) account for approximately 50% of all seizure disorders, and familial forms include mutations in single GABAA receptor subunit genes (GABRs). In 144 sporadic GE cases (GECs), exome sequencing of 237 ion channel genes identified 520 GABR variants. Among these variants, 33 rare variants in 11 GABR genes were present in 24 GECs. To assess functional risk of variants in GECs, we selected 8 variants found in GABRA, 3 in GABRB, and 3 in GABRG and compared them to 18 variants found in the general population for GABRA1 (n = 9), GABRB3 (n = 7), and GABRG2 (n = 2). To identify deleterious variants and gain insight into structure-function relationships, we studied the gating properties, surface expression and structural perturbations of the 32 variants. Significant reduction of GABAA receptor function was strongly associated with variants scored as deleterious and mapped within the N-terminal and transmembrane domains. In addition, 12 out of 17 variants mapped along the β+/α- GABA binding interface, were associated with reduction in channel gating and were predicted to cause structural rearrangements of the receptor by in silico simulations. Missense or nonsense mutations of GABRA1, GABRB3 and GABRG2 primarily impair subunit biogenesis. In contrast, GABR variants affected receptor function by impairing gating, suggesting that different mechanisms are operating in GABR epilepsy susceptibility variants and disease-causing mutations. The functional impact of single GABR variants found in individuals with sporadic GEs warrants the use of molecular diagnosis and will ultimately improve the treatment of genetic epilepsies by using a personalized approach. PMID:27622563

  3. Variants of the CNTNAP2 5' promoter as risk factors for autism spectrum disorders: a genetic and functional approach.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, A G; Kopp, M; Waltes, R; Haslinger, D; Duketis, E; Jarczok, T A; Poustka, F; Voran, A; Graab, U; Meyer, J; Klauck, S M; Fulda, S; Freitag, C M

    2015-07-01

    Contactin-associated protein-like 2 gene (CNTNAP2), a member of the Neurexin gene superfamily, is one of the best-replicated risk genes for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). ASD are predominately genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments of language development, social interaction and communication, as well as stereotyped behavior and interests. Although CNTNAP2 expression levels were proposed to alter ASD risk, no study to date has focused on its 5' promoter. Here, we directly sequenced the CNTNAP2 5' promoter region of 236 German families with one child with ASD and detected four novel variants. Furthermore, we genotyped the three most frequent variants (rs150447075, rs34712024, rs71781329) in an additional sample of 356 families and found nominal association of rs34712024G with ASD and rs71781329GCG[7] with language development. The four novel and the three known minor alleles of the identified variants were predicted to alter transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). At the functional level, the respective sequences spanning these seven variants were bound by nuclear factors. In a luciferase promoter assay, the respective minor alleles showed cell line-specific and differentiation stage-dependent effects at the level of promoter activation. The novel potential rare risk-variant M2, a G>A mutation -215 base pairs 5' of the transcriptional start site, significantly reduced promoter efficiency in HEK293T and in undifferentiated and differentiated neuroblastoid SH-SY5Y cells. This variant was transmitted to a patient with autistic disorder. The under-transmitted, protective minor G allele of the common variant rs34712024, in contrast, increased transcriptional activity. These results lead to the conclusion that the pathomechanism of CNTNAP2 promoter variants on ASD risk is mediated by their effect on TFBSs, and thus confirm the hypothesis that a reduced CNTNAP2 level during neuronal development increases liability for ASD

  4. Onco-lncRNA HOTAIR and its functional genetic variants in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Lv, Zheng; An, Changming; Shi, Meng; Pan, Wenting; Zhou, Liqing; Yang, Wenjun; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) and its functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is still largely unclear. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of lncRNA HOTAIR and its three haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPs) in PTC. There was higher expression of HOTAIR in PTC tissues compared to normal tissues. A series of gain-loss assays demonstrated that HOTAIR acts as a PTC oncogene via promoting tumorigenic properties of PTC cells. Additionally, the functional HOTAIR rs920778 genetic variant was a PTC susceptibility SNP. Subjects with the HOTAIR rs920778 TT genotype had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.88, 1.25 and 1.61 (P = 6.0 × 10(-6), P = 0.028 and P = 3.2 × 10(-5)) for developing PTC in Shandong, Jiangsu and Jilin case-control sets compared with subjects with the CC genotype. This statistically significant associations were only found between the rs920778 genetic polymorphism and PTC risk in females but not in males. The allele-specific regulation on HOTAIR expression by the rs920778 SNP was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that functional SNPs influencing lncRNA regulation may explain a part of PTC genetic basis. PMID:27549736

  5. Onco-lncRNA HOTAIR and its functional genetic variants in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; Lv, Zheng; An, Changming; Shi, Meng; Pan, Wenting; Zhou, Liqing; Yang, Wenjun; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) and its functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is still largely unclear. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of lncRNA HOTAIR and its three haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPs) in PTC. There was higher expression of HOTAIR in PTC tissues compared to normal tissues. A series of gain-loss assays demonstrated that HOTAIR acts as a PTC oncogene via promoting tumorigenic properties of PTC cells. Additionally, the functional HOTAIR rs920778 genetic variant was a PTC susceptibility SNP. Subjects with the HOTAIR rs920778 TT genotype had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.88, 1.25 and 1.61 (P = 6.0 × 10−6, P = 0.028 and P = 3.2 × 10−5) for developing PTC in Shandong, Jiangsu and Jilin case-control sets compared with subjects with the CC genotype. This statistically significant associations were only found between the rs920778 genetic polymorphism and PTC risk in females but not in males. The allele-specific regulation on HOTAIR expression by the rs920778 SNP was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that functional SNPs influencing lncRNA regulation may explain a part of PTC genetic basis. PMID:27549736

  6. Genetic Variants Associated with Increased Risk of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: A Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Matullo, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Betti, Marta; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ferrante, Daniela; Voglino, Floriana; Cadby, Gemma; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosa, Fabio; Russo, Alessia; Hirvonen, Ari; Casalone, Elisabetta; Tunesi, Sara; Padoan, Marina; Giordano, Mara; Aspesi, Anna; Casadio, Caterina; Ardissone, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Libener, Roberta; Guaschino, Roberto; Piccolini, Ezio; Neri, Monica; Musk, Arthur W. B.; de Klerk, Nicholas H.; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; James, Alan L.; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce W.; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle J.; Mirabelli, Dario; Ugolini, Donatella; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5–17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs) in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes), causing at most a 2–3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14). Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52–95.28). These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:23626673

  7. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Matullo, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Betti, Marta; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ferrante, Daniela; Voglino, Floriana; Cadby, Gemma; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosa, Fabio; Russo, Alessia; Hirvonen, Ari; Casalone, Elisabetta; Tunesi, Sara; Padoan, Marina; Giordano, Mara; Aspesi, Anna; Casadio, Caterina; Ardissone, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Libener, Roberta; Guaschino, Roberto; Piccolini, Ezio; Neri, Monica; Musk, Arthur W B; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; James, Alan L; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce W; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle J; Mirabelli, Dario; Ugolini, Donatella; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs) in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes), causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14). Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28). These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:23626673

  8. Sleep duration does not mediate or modify association of common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tare, Archana; Lane, Jacqueline M.; Cade, Brian E.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Chen, Ting-hsu; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Lauderdale, Diane S.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Gharib, Sina A.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.; Redline, Susan; Saxena, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Short and long sleep duration are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We aimed to investigate whether genetic variants for fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes associate with short or long sleep duration and whether sleep duration modifies the association of genetic variants with these traits. Methods We examined the cross-sectional relationship between self-reported habitual sleep duration and prevalence of type 2 diabetes in individuals of European descent participating in five studies included in the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe), totalling 1,474 cases and 8,323 controls. We tested for association of 16 fasting glucose-associated variants, 27 type 2 diabetes-associated variants and aggregate genetic risk scores with continuous and dichotomised (≤5 h or ≥9 h) sleep duration using regression models adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Finally, we tested whether a gene × behaviour interaction of variants with sleep duration had an impact on fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes risk. Results Short sleep duration was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes in CARe (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.08, 1.61; p = 0.008). Variants previously associated with fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes and genetic risk scores were not associated with sleep duration. Furthermore, no study-wide significant interaction was observed between sleep duration and these variants on glycaemic traits. Nominal interactions were observed for sleep duration and PPARG rs1801282, CRY2 rs7943320 and HNF1B rs4430796 in influencing risk of type 2 diabetes (p < 0.05). Conclusions/interpretation Our findings suggest that differences in habitual sleep duration do not mediate or modify the relationship between common variants underlying glycaemic traits (including in circadian rhythm genes) and diabetes. PMID:24280871

  9. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris; Ritchie, Graham R.S.; Creixell, Pau; Karchin, Rachel; Vazquez, Miguel; Fink, J. Lynn; Kassahn, Karin S.; Pearson, John V.; Bader, Gary; Boutros, Paul C.; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Ouellette, B.F. Francis; Reimand, Jüri; Linding, Rune; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Valencia, Alfonso; Butler, Adam; Dronov, Serge; Flicek, Paul; Shannon, Nick B.; Carter, Hannah; Ding, Li; Sander, Chris; Stuart, Josh M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor, but only a minority drive tumor progression. We present the result of discussions within the ICGC on how to address the challenge of identifying mutations that contribute to oncogenesis, tumor maintenance or response to therapy, and recommend computational techniques to annotate somatic variants and predict their impact on cancer phenotype. PMID:23900255

  10. Identification of Gender-Specific Genetic Variants in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Dargis, Natasha; Lamontagne, Maxime; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Sbarra, Laura; Henry, Cyndi; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-02-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart defect and has a male predominance of 3 to 1. A large proportion of patients develop valvular and aortic complications. Despite the high prevalence of BAV, its cause and genetic origins remain elusive. The goal of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with BAV. Nine genes previously associated with BAV (NOTCH1, AXIN1, EGFR, ENG, GATA5, NKX2-5, NOS3, PDIA2, and TGFBR2) were sequenced in 48 patients with BAV using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Pathogenicity of genetic variants was evaluated with the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion framework. A selection of 89 variants identified by sequencing or in previous BAV genetic studies was genotyped, and allele frequencies were compared in 323 patients with BAV confirmed at surgery and 584 controls. Analyses were also performed by gender. Nine novel and 19 potentially pathogenic variants were identified by next-generation sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing, but they were not associated with BAV in the case-control population. A significant association was observed between an in silico-predicted benign EGFR intronic variant (rs17290301) and BAV. Analyses performed by gender revealed different variants associated with BAV in men (EGFR rs533525993 and TEX26 rs12857479) and women (NOTCH1 rs61751489, TGFBR2 rs1155705, and NKX2-5 rs2277923). In conclusion, these results constitute the first association between EGFR genetic variants and BAV in humans and support a possible role of gender-specific polymorphisms in the development of BAV. PMID:26708639

  11. Association study of DISC1 genetic variants with the risk of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Jin, Chunhui; Zhou, Zhenhe; Zhang, Fuquan; Yuan, Jianmin; Liu, Xiaowei; Cheng, Zaohuo

    2016-06-01

    Our previous study confirmed that the 'AA' genotype carriers of DISC1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs821616 had a significantly increased risk for schizophrenia (SCZ) in comparison with noncarriers. To further explore the relationship of DISC1 genetic variants with the risk of SCZ in Han Chinese, we designed the present two-step study. We sequenced the promoter and untranslated regions of the DISC1 gene using genomic DNA of 100 SCZ patients and identified 17 SNPs. All SNPs were then genotyped and analyzed through a case-control study with 1154 healthy controls and 1447 patients. In an association analysis, neither allelic nor genotypic modeling indicated a significant association between the risk of SCZ and all SNPs. In addition, we observed that a two-marker haplotype was nominally associated with protection for SCZ (P=0.0476). The present findings, at least in part, provide some clues for further investigating the association of DISC1 variants with SCZ susceptibility. PMID:26945459

  12. Point substitutions in albumin genetic variants from Asia.

    PubMed Central

    Arai, K; Madison, J; Shimizu, A; Putnam, F W

    1990-01-01

    Despite their rarity and physiologically neutral character, more inherited structural variants of serum albumin (alloalbumins) are known than for any other human protein except hemoglobin. Including three previously unreported examples described here, we have identified 13 different point substitutions in alloalbumins of Japanese origin. Of these only albumin B and two proalbumins have been reported in other ethnic groups, and these are the most common variants of European origin. Some alloalbumins of Asiatic origin, but not yet identified in Japanese, are present in diverse ethnic groups. An alloalbumin found in indigenes of New Guinea (lysine----asparagine at position 313) is also present in Caucasians of various European descents. Albumin Lambadi, occurring in a tribal group in south India, has a mutation (glutamic acid----lysine at position 501) also found as a rare variant in individuals of diverse ethnic origin resident on four continents. These results suggest that some alloalbumins with the same substitution may have originated by independent mutations in various populations. This, together with the apparent clustering of point substitutions in the protein structure, may reflect hypermutability of the albumin gene. PMID:2404284

  13. Genetic Load of Loss-of-Function Polymorphic Variants in Great Apes.

    PubMed

    de Valles-Ibáñez, Guillem; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Luisi, Pierre; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Casals, Ferran

    2016-03-01

    Loss of function (LoF) genetic variants are predicted to disrupt gene function, and are therefore expected to substantially reduce individual's viability. Knowing the genetic burden of LoF variants in endangered species is of interest for a better understanding of the effects of declining population sizes on species viability. In this study, we have estimated the number of LoF polymorphic variants in six great ape populations, based on whole-genome sequencing data in 79 individuals. Our results show that although the number of functional variants per individual is conditioned by the effective population size, the number of variants with a drastic phenotypic effect is very similar across species. We hypothesize that for those variants with high selection coefficients, differences in effective population size are not important enough to affect the efficiency of natural selection to remove them. We also describe that mostly CpG LoF mutations are shared across species, and an accumulation of LoF variants at olfactory receptor genes in agreement with its pseudogenization in humans and other primate species. PMID:26912403

  14. Genetic Load of Loss-of-Function Polymorphic Variants in Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    de Valles-Ibáñez, Guillem; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Luisi, Pierre; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Casals, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Loss of function (LoF) genetic variants are predicted to disrupt gene function, and are therefore expected to substantially reduce individual’s viability. Knowing the genetic burden of LoF variants in endangered species is of interest for a better understanding of the effects of declining population sizes on species viability. In this study, we have estimated the number of LoF polymorphic variants in six great ape populations, based on whole-genome sequencing data in 79 individuals. Our results show that although the number of functional variants per individual is conditioned by the effective population size, the number of variants with a drastic phenotypic effect is very similar across species. We hypothesize that for those variants with high selection coefficients, differences in effective population size are not important enough to affect the efficiency of natural selection to remove them. We also describe that mostly CpG LoF mutations are shared across species, and an accumulation of LoF variants at olfactory receptor genes in agreement with its pseudogenization in humans and other primate species. PMID:26912403

  15. Association of genetic variants with myocardial infarction in Japanese individuals with or without metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KAWAMIYA, TOSHIKI; KATO, KIMIHIKO; HORIBE, HIDEKI; YOKOI, KIYOSHI; OGURI, MITSUTOSHI; YOSHIDA, TETSURO; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO; WATANABE, SACHIRO; SATOH, KEI; AOYAGI, YUKITOSHI; NOZAWA, YOSHINORI; MUROHARA, TOYOAKI; YAMADA, YOSHIJI

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly complex, with both genetic and environmental factors being thought to play an important role. Although MetS has been recognized as a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI), the genetic risk for MI in individuals with or without MetS has remained uncharacterized. We examined a possible association of genetic variants with MI in individuals with or without MetS separately. The study population comprised 4,424 individuals, including 1,918 individuals with MetS (903 subjects with MI and 1,015 controls) and 2,506 individuals without MetS (499 subjects with MI and 2,007 controls). The 150 polymorphisms examined in the present study were selected by genome-wide association studies of MI and ischemic stroke with the use of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set. Initial screening by the Chi-square test revealed that the C→T polymorphism (rs1794429) of LRPAP1, the A→G polymorphism (rs12373237) of LAMA3 and the A→G polymorphism (rs3782257) of NCOR2 were significantly (false discovery rate of <0.05) associated with MI for individuals with MetS, and that the C→G polymorphism (rs13051704) of TFF1 was significantly related to MI for individuals without MetS. Subsequent multivariable logistic analysis with adjustment for covariates revealed that rs1794429 of LRPAP1 (recessive model; P=0.0218; odds ratio=0.71) and rs3782257 of NCOR2 (dominant model; P=0.0057; odds ratio=1.94) were significantly associated with MI among individuals with MetS, and that rs13051704 of TFF1 (additive model; P=0.0100; odds ratio=0.55) was significantly associated with MI among individuals without MetS. The genetic variants that confer susceptibility to MI differ between individuals with or without MetS. Stratification of subjects according to the presence or absence of MetS may thus be important for personalized prevention of MI based on genetic information. PMID:22993627

  16. Association of genetic variants with myocardial infarction in Japanese individuals with or without metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawamiya, Toshiki; Kato, Kimihiko; Horibe, Hideki; Yokoi, Kiyoshi; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Fujimaki, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Sachiro; Satoh, Kei; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2010-11-01

    The etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly complex, with both genetic and environmental factors being thought to play an important role. Although MetS has been recognized as a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI), the genetic risk for MI in individuals with or without MetS has remained uncharacterized. We examined a possible association of genetic variants with MI in individuals with or without MetS separately. The study population comprised 4,424 individuals, including 1,918 individuals with MetS (903 subjects with MI and 1,015 controls) and 2,506 individuals without MetS (499 subjects with MI and 2,007 controls). The 150 polymorphisms examined in the present study were selected by genome-wide association studies of MI and ischemic stroke with the use of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set. Initial screening by the Chi-square test revealed that the C→T polymorphism (rs1794429) of LRPAP1, the A→G polymorphism (rs12373237) of LAMA3 and the A→G polymorphism (rs3782257) of NCOR2 were significantly (false discovery rate of <0.05) associated with MI for individuals with MetS, and that the C→G polymorphism (rs13051704) of TFF1 was significantly related to MI for individuals without MetS. Subsequent multivariable logistic analysis with adjustment for covariates revealed that rs1794429 of LRPAP1 (recessive model; P=0.0218; odds ratio=0.71) and rs3782257 of NCOR2 (dominant model; P=0.0057; odds ratio=1.94) were significantly associated with MI among individuals with MetS, and that rs13051704 of TFF1 (additive model; P=0.0100; odds ratio=0.55) was significantly associated with MI among individuals without MetS. The genetic variants that confer susceptibility to MI differ between individuals with or without MetS. Stratification of subjects according to the presence or absence of MetS may thus be important for personalized prevention of MI based on genetic information. PMID:22993627

  17. Surfactant protein A genetic variants associate with severe respiratory insufficiency in pandemic influenza A virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inherited variability in host immune responses influences susceptibility and outcome of Influenza A virus (IAV) infection, but these factors remain largely unknown. Components of the innate immune response may be crucial in the first days of the infection. The collectins surfactant protein (SP)-A1, -A2, and -D and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) neutralize IAV infectivity, although only SP-A2 can establish an efficient neutralization of poorly glycosylated pandemic IAV strains. Methods We studied the role of polymorphic variants at the genes of MBL (MBL2), SP-A1 (SFTPA1), SP-A2 (SFTPA2), and SP-D (SFTPD) in 93 patients with H1N1 pandemic 2009 (H1N1pdm) infection. Results Multivariate analysis showed that two frequent SFTPA2 missense alleles (rs1965708-C and rs1059046-A) and the SFTPA2 haplotype 1A0 were associated with a need for mechanical ventilation, acute respiratory failure, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The SFTPA2 haplotype 1A1 was a protective variant. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression also showed that diplotypes not containing the 1A1 haplotype were associated with a significantly shorter time to ICU admission in hospitalized patients. In addition, rs1965708-C (P = 0.0007), rs1059046-A (P = 0.0007), and haplotype 1A0 (P = 0.0004) were associated, in a dose-dependent fashion, with lower PaO2/FiO2 ratio, whereas haplotype 1A1 was associated with a higher PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P = 0.001). Conclusions Our data suggest an effect of genetic variants of SFTPA2 on the severity of H1N1pdm infection and could pave the way for a potential treatment with haplotype-specific (1A1) SP-A2 for future IAV pandemics. PMID:24950659

  18. Genetic Variants in Diseases of the Extrapyramidal System

    PubMed Central

    Oczkowska, Anna; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge on the genetics of movement disorders has advanced significantly in recent years. It is now recognized that disorders of the basal ganglia have genetic basis and it is suggested that molecular genetic data will provide clues to the pathophysiology of normal and abnormal motor control. Progress in molecular genetic studies, leading to the detection of genetic mutations and loci, has contributed to the understanding of mechanisms of neurodegeneration and has helped clarify the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases. Molecular studies have also found application in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, increasing the range of genetic counseling and enabling a more accurate diagno-sis. It seems that understanding pathogenic processes and the significant role of genetics has led to many experiments that may in the future will result in more effective treatment of such diseases as Parkinson’s or Huntington’s. Currently used molecular diagnostics based on DNA analysis can identify 9 neurodegenerative diseases, including spinal cerebellar ataxia inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, dentate-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy, Friedreich’s disease, ataxia with ocu-lomotorapraxia, Huntington's disease, dystonia type 1, Wilson’s disease, and some cases of Parkinson's disease. PMID:24653660

  19. Negative-dominance phenomenon with genetic variants of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, many pathological genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac (monomeric) sodium channel Nav1.5, have been described. Negative dominance is a classical genetic concept involving a "poison" mutant peptide that negatively interferes with the co-expressed wild-type protein, thus reducing its cellular function. This phenomenon has been described for genetic variants of multimeric K(+) channels, which mechanisms are well understood. Unexpectedly, several pathologic SCN5A variants that are linked to Brugada syndrome also demonstrate such a dominant-negative (DN) effect. The molecular determinants of these observations, however, are not yet elucidated. This review article summarizes recent findings that describe the mechanisms underlying the DN phenomenon of genetic variants of K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-) and Na(+) channels, and in particular Brugada syndrome variants of Nav1.5. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26907222

  20. Genetic variants in pigmentation genes, pigmentary phenotypes, and risk of skin cancer in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Nan, Hongmei; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Han, Jiali

    2009-08-15

    (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.08-2.19). These associations remained similar after adjusting for pigmentary phenotypes and MC1R variants. The statistical power of our study was modest and additional studies are warranted to confirm the associations observed in the present study. Our study provides evidence for the contribution of pigmentation genetic variants, in addition to the MC1R variants, to variation in human pigmentary phenotypes and possibly the development of skin cancer. PMID:19384953

  1. Genetic association of marbling score with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of the bovine genome.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J; Lee, C

    2016-04-01

    Selection signals of Korean cattle might be attributed largely to artificial selection for meat quality. Rapidly increased intragenic markers of newly annotated genes in the bovine genome would help overcome limited findings of genetic markers associated with meat quality at the selection signals in a previous study. The present study examined genetic associations of marbling score (MS) with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of Korean cattle. A total of 39 092 nucleotide variants of 407 Korean cattle were utilized in the association analysis. A total of 129 variants were selected within newly annotated genes in the bovine genome. Their genetic associations were analyzed using the mixed model with random polygenic effects based on identical-by-state genetic relationships among animals in order to control for spurious associations produced by population structure. Genetic associations of MS were found (P<3.88×10-4) with six intragenic nucleotide variants on bovine autosomes 3 (cache domain containing 1, CACHD1), 5 (like-glycosyltransferase, LARGE), 16 (cell division cycle 42 binding protein kinase alpha, CDC42BPA) and 21 (snurportin 1, SNUPN; protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 9, PTPN9; chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, CSPG4). In particular, the genetic associations with CDC42BPA and LARGE were confirmed using an independent data set of Korean cattle. The results implied that allele frequencies of functional variants and their proximity variants have been augmented by directional selection for greater MS and remain selection signals in the bovine genome. Further studies of fine mapping would be useful to incorporate favorable alleles in marker-assisted selection for MS of Korean cattle. PMID:26621608

  2. Genetic Variants in REC8, RNF212, and PRDM9 Influence Male Recombination in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Wouter; Druet, Tom; Charlier, Carole; Georges, Michel

    2012-01-01

    We use >250,000 cross-over events identified in >10,000 bovine sperm cells to perform an extensive characterization of meiotic recombination in male cattle. We map Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) influencing genome-wide recombination rate, genome-wide hotspot usage, and locus-specific recombination rate. We fine-map three QTL and present strong evidence that genetic variants in REC8 and RNF212 influence genome-wide recombination rate, while genetic variants in PRDM9 influence genome-wide hotspot usage. PMID:22844258

  3. A KRAS-variant in ovarian cancer acts as a genetic marker of cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Elena; Lu, Lingeng; Boeke, Marta; Barnett, Rachel; Nallur, Sunitha; Chin, Lena J; Pelletier, Cory; Blitzblau, Rachel; Tassi, Renata; Paranjape, Trupti; Hui, Pei; Godwin, Andrew K; Yu, Herbert; Risch, Harvey; Rutherford, Thomas; Schwartz, Peter; Santin, Alessandro; Matloff, Ellen; Zelterman, Daniel; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2010-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the single most deadly form of women's cancer, typically presenting as an advanced disease at diagnosis in part due to a lack of known risk factors or genetic markers of risk. The KRAS oncogene and altered levels of the microRNA (miRNA) let-7 are associated with an increased risk of developing solid tumors. In this study, we investigated a hypothesized association between an increased risk of OC and a variant allele of KRAS at rs61764370, referred to as the KRAS-variant, which disrupts a let-7 miRNA binding site in this oncogene. Specimens obtained were tested for the presence of the KRAS-variant from nonselected OC patients in three independent cohorts, two independent ovarian case-control studies, and OC patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) as well as their family members. Our results indicate that the KRAS-variant is associated with more than 25% of nonselected OC cases. Further, we found that it is a marker for a significant increased risk of developing OC, as confirmed by two independent case-control analyses. Lastly, we determined that the KRAS-variant was present in 61% of HBOC patients without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, previously considered uninformative, as well as in their family members with cancer. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that the KRAS-variant is a genetic marker for increased risk of developing OC, and they suggest that the KRAS-variant may be a new genetic marker of cancer risk for HBOC families without other known genetic abnormalities. PMID:20647319

  4. Genetic variants associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility and mortality: a genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carlos; Barber, Mathew; Huang, Yong; Broderick, Steven M; Wade, Michael S; Hysi, Pirro; Scuirba, Joseph; Richards, Thomas J; Juan-Guardela, Brenda M; Vij, Rekha; Han, MeiLan K; Martinez, Fernando J; Kossen, Karl; Seiwert, Scott D; Christie, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease that probably involves several genetic loci. Several rare genetic variants and one common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of MUC5B have been associated with the disease. Our aim was to identify additional common variants associated with susceptibility and ultimately mortality in IPF. Methods First, we did a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS): stage one was a discovery GWAS; and stages two and three were independent case-control studies. DNA samples from European-American patients with IPF meeting standard criteria were obtained from several US centres for each stage. Data for European-American control individuals for stage one were gathered from the database of genotypes and phenotypes; additional control individuals were recruited at the University of Pittsburgh to increase the number. For controls in stages two and three, we gathered data for additional sex-matched European-American control individuals who had been recruited in another study. DNA samples from patients and from control individuals were genotyped to identify SNPs associated with IPF. SNPs identified in stage one were carried forward to stage two, and those that achieved genome-wide significance (p<5 × 10−8) in a meta-analysis were carried forward to stage three. Three case series with follow-up data were selected from stages one and two of the GWAS using samples with follow-up data. Mortality analyses were done in these case series to assess the SNPs associated with IPF that had achieved genome-wide significance in the meta-analysis of stages one and two. Finally, we obtained gene-expression profiling data for lungs of patients with IPF from the Lung Genomics Research Consortium and analysed correlation with SNP genotypes. Findings In stage one of the GWAS (542 patients with IPF, 542 control individuals matched one-by-one to cases by genetic ancestry estimates), we identified 20 loci. Six SNPs

  5. Exome sequencing of case-unaffected-parents trios reveals recessive and de novo genetic variants in sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Yu, Bing; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Pamphlett, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of genetic variants to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains largely unknown. Either recessive or de novo variants could result in an apparently sporadic occurrence of ALS. In an attempt to find such variants we sequenced the exomes of 44 ALS-unaffected-parents trios. Rare and potentially damaging compound heterozygous variants were found in 27% of ALS patients, homozygous recessive variants in 14% and coding de novo variants in 27%. In 20% of patients more than one of the above variants was present. Genes with recessive variants were enriched in nucleotide binding capacity, ATPase activity, and the dynein heavy chain. Genes with de novo variants were enriched in transcription regulation and cell cycle processes. This trio study indicates that rare private recessive variants could be a mechanism underlying some case of sporadic ALS, and that de novo mutations are also likely to play a part in the disease. PMID:25773295

  6. Genetic variants of the unsaturated fatty acid receptor GPR120 relating to obesity in dogs

    PubMed Central

    MIYABE, Masahiro; GIN, Azusa; ONOZAWA, Eri; DAIMON, Mana; YAMADA, Hana; ODA, Hitomi; MORI, Akihiro; MOMOTA, Yutaka; AZAKAMI, Daigo; YAMAMOTO, Ichiro; MOCHIZUKI, Mariko; SAKO, Toshinori; TAMURA, Katsutoshi; ISHIOKA, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 120 is an unsaturated fatty acid receptor, which is associated with various physiological functions. It is reported that the genetic variant of GPR120, p.Arg270His, is detected more in obese people, and this genetic variation functionally relates to obesity in humans. Obesity is a common nutritional disorder also in dogs, but the genetic factors have not ever been identified in dogs. In this study, we investigated the molecular structure of canine GPR120 and searched for candidate genetic variants which may relate to obesity in dogs. Canine GPR120 was highly homologous to those of other species, and seven transmembrane domains and two N-glycosylation sites were conserved. GPR120 mRNA was expressed in lung, jejunum, ileum, colon, hypothalamus, hippocampus, spinal cord, bone marrow, dermis and white adipose tissues in dogs, as those in mice and humans. Genetic variants of GPR120 were explored in client-owned 141 dogs, resulting in that 5 synonymous and 4 non-synonymous variants were found. The variant c.595C>A (p.Pro199Thr) was found in 40 dogs, and the gene frequency was significantly higher in dogs with higher body condition scores, i.e. 0.320 in BCS4–5 dogs, 0.175 in BCS3 dogs and 0.000 in BCS2 dogs. We conclude that c.595C>A (p.Pro199Thr) is a candidate variant relating to obesity, which may be helpful for nutritional management of dogs. PMID:25960032

  7. Estimating Genetic Effects and Quantifying Missing Heritability Explained by Identified Rare-Variant Associations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dajiang J.; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has led to many complex-trait rare-variant (RV) association studies. Although single-variant association analysis can be performed, it is grossly underpowered. Therefore, researchers have developed many RV association tests that aggregate multiple variant sites across a genetic region (e.g., gene), and test for the association between the trait and the aggregated genotype. After these aggregate tests detect an association, it is only possible to estimate the average genetic effect for a group of RVs. As a result of the "winner’s curse," such an estimate can be biased. Although for common variants one can obtain unbiased estimates of genetic parameters by analyzing a replication sample, for RVs it is desirable to obtain unbiased genetic estimates for the study where the association is identified. This is because there can be substantial heterogeneity of RV sites and frequencies even among closely related populations. In order to obtain an unbiased estimate for aggregated RV analysis, we developed bootstrap-sample-split algorithms to reduce the bias of the winner’s curse. The unbiased estimates are greatly important for understanding the population-specific contribution of RVs to the heritability of complex traits. We also demonstrate both theoretically and via simulations that for aggregate RV analysis the genetic variance for a gene or region will always be underestimated, sometimes substantially, because of the presence of noncausal variants or because of the presence of causal variants with effects of different magnitudes or directions. Therefore, even if RVs play a major role in the complex-trait etiologies, a portion of the heritability will remain missing, and the contribution of RVs to the complex-trait etiologies will be underestimated. PMID:23022102

  8. Community acquired pneumonia: genetic variants influencing systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Agüero, J M; Millán, S; Rodríguez de Castro, F; Martín-Loeches, I; Solé Violán, J

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response depends on several factors, including pathogenicity and duration of the stimulus, and also on the balance between inflammatory and antiinflammatory response. Several studies have presented evidence of the importance of genetic factors in severe infections. The innate immune response prevents the invasion and spread of pathogens during the first hours after infection. Each of the different processes involved in innate immunity may be affected by genetic polymorphisms, which can result in susceptibility or resistance to infection. The results obtained in the different studies do not irrefutably prove the role or function of a gene in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections. However, they can generate new hypotheses, suggest new candidate genes based on their role in the inflammatory response, and constitute a first step in understanding the underlying genetic factors. PMID:24183496

  9. Genetic Variants Related to Height and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Michael A.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Siscovick, David S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Increased height is a known independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, whether genetic determinants of height influence risk is uncertain. In this candidate gene study, we examined the association of 209 height-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with incident AF in 3,309 persons of European descent from the Cardiovascular Health Study, a prospective cohort study of older adults (aged ≥65 years) enrolled in 1989–1990. After a median follow-up period of 13.2 years, 879 participants developed incident AF. The height-associated SNPs together explained approximately 10% of the variation in height (P = 6.0 × 10−8). Using an unweighted genetic height score, we found a nonsignificant association with risk of AF (per allele, hazard ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.02; P = 0.06). In weighted analyses, we found that genetically predicted height was strongly associated with AF risk (per 10 cm, hazard ratio = 1.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.64; P = 0.03). Importantly, for all models, the inclusion of actual height completely attenuated the genetic height effect. Finally, we identified 1 nonsynonymous SNP (rs1046934) that was independently associated with AF and may warrant future study. In conclusion, we found that genetic determinants of height appear to increase the risk of AF, primarily via height itself. This approach of examining SNPs associated with an intermediate phenotype should be considered as a method for identifying novel genetic targets. PMID:24944287

  10. Are all the previously reported genetic variants in limb girdle muscular dystrophy genes pathogenic?

    PubMed

    Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Savarese, Marco; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of variants in autosomal genes associated with the limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) have been reported as being causative. However, in most cases the proof of pathogenicity derives from their non-occurrence in hundreds of healthy controls and/or from segregation studies in small families. The limited statistics of the genetic variations in the general population may hamper a correct interpretation of the effect of variants on the protein. To clarify the meaning of low-frequency variants in LGMD genes, we have selected all variants described as causative in the Leiden Open Variation Database and the Human Gene Mutation Database. We have systematically searched for their frequency in the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and in our internal database. Surprisingly, the ESP contains about 4% of the variants previously associated with a dominant inheritance and about 9% of those associated with a recessive inheritance. The putative disease alleles are much more frequent than those estimated considering the disease prevalence. In conclusion, we hypothesize that a number of disease-associated variants are non-pathogenic and that other variations are not fully penetrant, even if they affect the protein function, suggesting a more complex genetic mechanisms for such heterogeneous disorders. PMID:25898921

  11. Are all the previously reported genetic variants in limb girdle muscular dystrophy genes pathogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Savarese, Marco; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of variants in autosomal genes associated to the limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) have been reported as being causative. However, in most cases the proof of pathogenicity derives from their non-occurrence in hundreds of healthy controls and/or from segregation studies in small families. The limited statistics of the genetic variations in the general population may hamper a correct interpretation of the effect of variants on the protein. To clarify the meaning of low-frequency variants in LGMD genes, we have selected all variants described as causative in the Leiden Open Variation Database and the Human Gene Mutation Database. We have systematically searched for their frequency in the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and in our internal database. Surprisingly, the ESP contains about 4% of the variants previously associated with a dominant inheritance and about 9% of those associated with a recessive inheritance. The putative disease alleles are much more frequent than those estimated considering the disease prevalence. In conclusion, we hypothesize that a number of disease-associated variants are nonpathogenic and that other variations are not fully penetrant, even if they affect the protein function, suggesting a more complex genetic mechanisms for such heterogeneous disorders. PMID:25898921

  12. A preliminary investigation of genetic counselors’ information needs when receiving a variant of uncertain significance result: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Courtney L.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Malo, Teri L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore genetic counselors’ information preferences on reports of variant of uncertain significance (VUS) results from cancer genetic testing. Methods This mixed methods report (quantitative and qualitative approaches) utilized a survey of genetic counselors containing closed- and open-ended questions to explore genetic counselors’ information needs and perceptions of the industry’s current information sharing practices. Descriptive statistics were calculated for responses to the closed-ended questions and thematic analysis guided the interpretation of the open-ended questions. Results Of the 267 participants (28.6% response rate), the majority indicated a perceived lack of information on VUS laboratory reports, were concerned about the perceived practice of withholding information, and stated the information they wanted to see. Although most did not indicate how additional information would be used, some reported they would provide information directly to patients, and others reported the information would be used to contextualize the VUS result when counseling patients. Conclusion This analysis identified information genetic counselors believe is needed on VUS reports indicating what they believe are best practices in lieu of guidelines for laboratories currently providing genetic testing services, and implies needed guidelines for reporting VUS. Future studies should explore how genetic counselors use additional information contained on VUS reports. PMID:25569439

  13. Differential distribution and titre of selected grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 genetic variants within grapevine rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Kar Mun; Cohen, Daniel; Pearson, Michael N

    2016-05-01

    In this study of three grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3) genetic variants in two grapevine rootstock hosts, GLRaV-3 detection was shown to be affected by the virus distribution, titre, and the genetic variant. Group VI and NZ2 GLRaV-3 variants had reduced detectability compared with the group I variant. Differences in the genomic and subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) expression levels, and differences in the level of expression between the genetic variants were also observed. The observed differences in virus titre and sgRNA expression levels suggest differences in plant-virus interactions by the various GLRaV-3 genetic variants. PMID:26906692

  14. Functional genetic variants in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) modulate emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Hodge, Rachel; Narasimhan, Sneha; Nall, Aleksandra; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Mickey, Brian J.; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Bogdan, Ryan; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Drabant, Emily; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David; Doyle, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Emotional behavior is in part heritable and often disrupted in psychopathology. Identification of specific genetic variants that drive this heritability may provide important new insight into molecular and neurobiological mechanisms involved in emotionality. Our results demonstrate that the presynaptic vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism is functional in vitro, with the Ile allele leading to increased monoamine transport into presynaptic vesicles. Moreover, we show that the Thr136Ile variant predicts differential responses in emotional brain circuits consistent with its effects in vitro. Lastly, deep sequencing of bipolar disorder (BPD) patients and controls identified several rare novel VMAT1 variants. The variant Phe84Ser was only present in individuals with BPD and leads to marked increase monoamine transport in vitro. Taken together, our data show that VMAT1 polymorphisms influence monoamine signaling, the functional response of emotional brain circuits, and risk for psychopathology. PMID:23337945

  15. Case-control study of diabetes-related genetic variants and pancreatic cancer risk in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kuruma, Sawako; Egawa, Naoto; Kurata, Masanao; Honda, Goro; Kamisawa, Terumi; Ueda, Junko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ueno, Makoto; Nakao, Haruhisa; Mori, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Wakai, Kenji; Nakamura, Kozue; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Nojima, Masanori; Takahashi, Mami; Shimada, Kazuaki; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Shogo; Lin, Yingsong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether diabetes-related genetic variants are associated with pancreatic cancer risk. METHODS: We genotyped 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PPARG2 (rs1801282), ADIPOQ (rs1501299), ADRB3 (rs4994), KCNQ1 (rs2237895), KCNJ11 (rs5219), TCF7L2 (rs7903146), and CDKAL1 (rs2206734), and examined their associations with pancreatic cancer risk in a multi-institute case-control study including 360 cases and 400 controls in Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on lifestyle factors. Genotyping was performed using Fluidigm SNPtype assays. Unconditional logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between these diabetes-associated variants and pancreatic cancer risk. RESULTS: With the exception of rs1501299 in the ADIPOQ gene (P = 0.09), no apparent differences in genotype frequencies were observed between cases and controls. Rs1501299 in the ADPIOQ gene was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk; compared with individuals with the AA genotype, the age- and sex-adjusted OR was 1.79 (95%CI: 0.98-3.25) among those with the AC genotype and 1.86 (95%CI: 1.03-3.38) among those with the CC genotype. The ORs remained similar after additional adjustment for body mass index and cigarette smoking. In contrast, rs2237895 in the KCNQ1 gene was inversely related to pancreatic cancer risk, with a multivariable-adjusted OR of 0.62 (0.37-1.04) among individuals with the CC genotype compared with the AA genotype. No significant associations were noted for other 5 SNPs. CONCLUSION: Our case-control study indicates that rs1501299 in the ADIPOQ gene may be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. These findings should be replicated in additional studies. PMID:25516658

  16. Genetic variant in IL-33 is associated with idiopathic recurrent miscarriage in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jun; Tong, Yu; Xie, Lan; Ma, Tao; Yang, Jiyun

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is the occurrence of repeated pregnancies that end in miscarriage of the fetus before 20 weeks of gestation. At least 50% of the RM patients are considered idiopathic. High IL-33 levels are critical in early pregnancy and impact the outcome of subsequent pregnancies. However, the association of polymorphisms of IL-33 with idiopathic RM is still unclear. The present study was initiated to investigate whether IL-33 polymorphisms are risk factors for idiopathic RM in Chinese Han population. Study subjects comprised of 321 cases and 384 controls. Five polymorphisms (rs10435816, rs16924159, rs16924171, rs1929992, rs1332290) in IL-33 and serum IL-33 concentrations were assessed. rs16924159 variant exhibits significant association with RM in additive and recessive genetic model (additive model P = 0.015, recessive model P = 0.007). In contrast, rs10435816, rs16924171, rs1929992 and rs1332290 are not significantly associated with RM. Serum IL-33 levels are significantly lower in RM cases than in control (173.51 ± 94.12 versus. 200.97 ± 110.06 (pg/ml), P = 4.57 × 10−4). There are lower levels of serum IL-33 in rs16924159 homozygous mutant (AA) than homozygous wild-type (GG) in this study population, including cases and control groups (172.18 ± 103.01 versus. 205.82 ± 119.01 (pg/ml), P = 0.006). Reduced IL-33 levels and rs16924159 IL-33 variant may contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic RM in Chinese Han population. PMID:27026387

  17. Genetics Talks to Epigenetics? The Interplay Between Sequence Variants and Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zaina, Silvio; Pérez-Luque, Elva L; Lund, Gertrud

    2010-01-01

    Transcription is regulated by two major mechanisms. On the one hand, changes in DNA sequence are responsible for genetic gene regulation. On the other hand, chromatin structure regulates gene activity at the epigenetic level. Given the fundamental participation of these mechanisms in transcriptional regulation of virtually any gene, they are likely to co-regulate a significant proportion of the genome. The simple concept behind this idea is that a mutation may have a significant impact on local chromatin structure by modifying DNA methylation patterns or histone type recruitment. Yet, the relevance of these interactions is poorly understood. Elucidating how genetic and epigenetic mechanisms co-participate in regulating transcription may assist in some of the unresolved cases of genetic variant-phenotype association. One example is loci that have biologically predictable functions but genotypes that fail to correlate with phenotype, particularly disease outcome. Conversely, a crosstalk between genetics and epigenetics may provide a mechanistic explanation for cases in which a convincing association between phenotype and a genetic variant has been established, but the latter does not lie in a promoter or protein coding sequence. Here, we review recently published data in the field and discuss their implications for genetic variant-phenotype association studies. PMID:21286314

  18. Psoriasis Patients Are Enriched for Genetic Variants That Protect against HIV-1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyan; Hayashi, Genki; Lai, Olivia Y.; Dilthey, Alexander; Kuebler, Peter J.; Wong, Tami V.; Martin, Maureen P.; Fernandez Vina, Marcelo A.; McVean, Gil; Wabl, Matthias; Leslie, Kieron S.; Maurer, Toby; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Carrington, Mary; Bowcock, Anne M.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis. PMID:22577363

  19. Which Genetics Variants in DNase-Seq Footprints Are More Likely to Alter Binding?

    PubMed

    Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Kalita, Cynthia A; Harvey, Chris T; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Large experimental efforts are characterizing the regulatory genome, yet we are still missing a systematic definition of functional and silent genetic variants in non-coding regions. Here, we integrated DNaseI footprinting data with sequence-based transcription factor (TF) motif models to predict the impact of a genetic variant on TF binding across 153 tissues and 1,372 TF motifs. Each annotation we derived is specific for a cell-type condition or assay and is locally motif-driven. We found 5.8 million genetic variants in footprints, 66% of which are predicted by our model to affect TF binding. Comprehensive examination using allele-specific hypersensitivity (ASH) reveals that only the latter group consistently shows evidence for ASH (3,217 SNPs at 20% FDR), suggesting that most (97%) genetic variants in footprinted regulatory regions are indeed silent. Combining this information with GWAS data reveals that our annotation helps in computationally fine-mapping 86 SNPs in GWAS hit regions with at least a 2-fold increase in the posterior odds of picking the causal SNP. The rich meta information provided by the tissue-specificity and the identity of the putative TF binding site being affected also helps in identifying the underlying mechanism supporting the association. As an example, the enrichment for LDL level-associated SNPs is 9.1-fold higher among SNPs predicted to affect HNF4 binding sites than in a background model already including tissue-specific annotation. PMID:26901046

  20. Genetic variants in IRS2 may contribute to obesity and diabetes familial risk in Hispanic children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IRS2 is a key regulator of glucose homeostasis and an obesity candidate gene, however, its role in children’s susceptibility to obesity and diabetes risk is unknown. Our specific aim was to identify genetic variants explaining a statistically significant quantitative trait locus on chromosome 13q fo...

  1. Which Genetics Variants in DNase-Seq Footprints Are More Likely to Alter Binding?

    PubMed Central

    Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Harvey, Chris T.; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Large experimental efforts are characterizing the regulatory genome, yet we are still missing a systematic definition of functional and silent genetic variants in non-coding regions. Here, we integrated DNaseI footprinting data with sequence-based transcription factor (TF) motif models to predict the impact of a genetic variant on TF binding across 153 tissues and 1,372 TF motifs. Each annotation we derived is specific for a cell-type condition or assay and is locally motif-driven. We found 5.8 million genetic variants in footprints, 66% of which are predicted by our model to affect TF binding. Comprehensive examination using allele-specific hypersensitivity (ASH) reveals that only the latter group consistently shows evidence for ASH (3,217 SNPs at 20% FDR), suggesting that most (97%) genetic variants in footprinted regulatory regions are indeed silent. Combining this information with GWAS data reveals that our annotation helps in computationally fine-mapping 86 SNPs in GWAS hit regions with at least a 2-fold increase in the posterior odds of picking the causal SNP. The rich meta information provided by the tissue-specificity and the identity of the putative TF binding site being affected also helps in identifying the underlying mechanism supporting the association. As an example, the enrichment for LDL level-associated SNPs is 9.1-fold higher among SNPs predicted to affect HNF4 binding sites than in a background model already including tissue-specific annotation. PMID:26901046

  2. The genetic basis of severe combined immunodeficiency and its variants

    PubMed Central

    Tasher, Diana; Dalal, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndromes are characterized by a block in T lymphocyte differentiation that is variably associated with abnormal development of other lymphocyte lineages (B and/or natural killer [NK] cells), leading to death early in life unless treated urgently by hematopoietic stem cell transplant. SCID comprises genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous conditions, of which the genetic basis for approximately 85% of the underlying immunologic defects have been recently elucidated. A major obstacle in deciphering the pathogenesis of SCID syndromes is that different mutations in a single gene may give rise to distinct clinical conditions and that a similar clinical phenotype can result from mutations in different genes. Mutation analysis is now an important component of the complete evaluation of a patient with SCID since it has a dramatic impact on many aspects of this potentially life-threatening disease such as genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis, modalities of treatment, and, eventually, prognosis. Dr Robert Good, one of the founders of modern immunology, described the SCID syndrome as “experiments of nature.” By understanding the cellular and genetic basis of these immunodeficiency diseases and, eventually, normal immunity, we optimize the “bedside to research laboratory and back again” approach to medicine. PMID:23776382

  3. FAVR (Filtering and Annotation of Variants that are Rare): methods to facilitate the analysis of rare germline genetic variants from massively parallel sequencing datasets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Characterising genetic diversity through the analysis of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) data offers enormous potential to significantly improve our understanding of the genetic basis for observed phenotypes, including predisposition to and progression of complex human disease. Great challenges remain in resolving genetic variants that are genuine from the millions of artefactual signals. Results FAVR is a suite of new methods designed to work with commonly used MPS analysis pipelines to assist in the resolution of some of the issues related to the analysis of the vast amount of resulting data, with a focus on relatively rare genetic variants. To the best of our knowledge, no equivalent method has previously been described. The most important and novel aspect of FAVR is the use of signatures in comparator sequence alignment files during variant filtering, and annotation of variants potentially shared between individuals. The FAVR methods use these signatures to facilitate filtering of (i) platform and/or mapping-specific artefacts, (ii) common genetic variants, and, where relevant, (iii) artefacts derived from imbalanced paired-end sequencing, as well as annotation of genetic variants based on evidence of co-occurrence in individuals. We applied conventional variant calling applied to whole-exome sequencing datasets, produced using both SOLiD and TruSeq chemistries, with or without downstream processing by FAVR methods. We demonstrate a 3-fold smaller rare single nucleotide variant shortlist with no detected reduction in sensitivity. This analysis included Sanger sequencing of rare variant signals not evident in dbSNP131, assessment of known variant signal preservation, and comparison of observed and expected rare variant numbers across a range of first cousin pairs. The principles described herein were applied in our recent publication identifying XRCC2 as a new breast cancer risk gene and have been made publically available as a suite of software

  4. Human Papillomavirus Type 6 and 11 Genetic Variants Found in 71 Oral and Anogenital Epithelial Samples from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Danielewski, Jennifer A.; Garland, Suzanne M.; McCloskey, Jenny; Hillman, Richard J.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) (n = 17), genital warts (n = 43), anal cancer (n = 6) and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5), was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65%) clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04). This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02). Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific

  5. Novel Genetic Variants Modify the Effect of Smoking on Carotid Plaque Burden in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Della-Morte, David; Wang, Liyong; Beecham, Ashley; Blanton, Susan H.; Zhao, Hongyu; Sacco, Ralph L.; Rundek, Tatjana; Dong, Chuanhui

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Smoking greatly increases the risk of atherosclerotic plaque and the effect may vary from individual to individual. A genome-wide scan was performed for smoking×single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) interactions on carotid plaque burden (CPB) to identify the potential genetic moderators in Hispanics. Methods Carotid B-mode ultrasonography and genotyping by the Affymetrix 6.0 chip were performed in a discovery sample of 665 Caribbean Hispanics, followed by replication analyses in 264 Caribbean Hispanics. CPB was expressed as the sum of plaque areas over the segments in common and internal carotid arteries and bifurcation. Smoking was classified as 0, <20, and ≥20 cigarette pack-years. Assuming an additive genetic model, regression analysis was conducted to test for smoking×SNP interaction on the cube root transformed CPB while controlling for age, sex, and the top 3 principal components of ancestry. Results Two SNPs showed a significant interaction with smoking on CPB with the similar effects in both discovery (P<1.0e−5) and replication (P<0.05) populations. Specifically, for SNP rs10205487 within MXD1, more smoking was significantly associated with greater CPB in A allele carriers (beta±SE: 0.24±0.08, P=0.005 in AG carriers; beta±SE: 0.48±0.12, P=0.0002 in AA carriers) but not in GG (P=0.06). For SNP rs7001413 within LY96 and JPH1, more smoking was significantly associated with greater CPB in GG carriers (beta±SE: 0.24±0.06, P=6.8e−5) but not in T carriers (P=0.06). Conclusions Our study suggests that genetic variants may modulate the effect of smoking on CPB and highlights several genes for further investigation of their role in atherosclerosis, especially in smoking population. PMID:24954085

  6. The Impact of Ancestry and Common Genetic Variants on QT Interval in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Gustav; Avery, Christy L.; Evans, Daniel S.; Nalls, Michael A.; Meng, Yan A.; Smith, Erin N.; Palmer, Cameron; Tanaka, Toshiko; Mehra, Reena; Butler, Anne M.; Young, Taylor; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Li, Guo; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Magnani, Jared W.; Chen, Wei; Bis, Joshua C.; Curb, J. David; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Rotter, Jerome I.; Liu, Yongmei; Newman, Anne B.; Limacher, Marian C.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Quibrera, P. Miguel; Schork, Nicholas J.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Solomon, Allen J.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Wallace, Robert; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Zhu-Ming; Post, Wendy S.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Taylor, Herman A.; Murray, Sarah S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Arking, Dan E.; Evans, Michele K.; Fox, Ervin R.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Heckbert, Susan R.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic differences in cardiac arrhythmia incidence have been reported, with a particularly high incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and low incidence of atrial fibrillation in individuals of African ancestry. We tested the hypotheses that African ancestry and common genetic variants are associated with prolonged duration of cardiac repolarization, a central pathophysiological determinant of arrhythmia, as measured by the electrocardiographic QT interval. Methods and Results First, individual estimates of African and European ancestry were inferred from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in seven population-based cohorts of African Americans (n=12 097) and regressed on measured QT interval from electrocardiograms. Second, imputation was performed for 2.8 million SNPs and a genome-wide association (GWA) study of QT interval performed in ten cohorts (n=13 105). There was no evidence of association between genetic ancestry and QT interval (p=0.94). Genome-wide significant associations (p<2.5×10−8) were identified with SNPs at two loci, upstream of the genes NOS1AP (rs12143842, p=2×10−15) and ATP1B1 (rs1320976, p=2×10−10). The most significant SNP in NOS1AP was the same as the strongest SNP previously associated with QT interval in individuals of European ancestry. Low p-values (p<10−5) were observed for SNPs at several other loci previously identified in GWA studies in individuals of European ancestry, including KCNQ1, KCNH2, LITAF and PLN. Conclusions We observed no difference in duration of cardiac repolarization with global genetic indices of African ancestry. In addition, our GWA study extends the association of polymorphisms at several loci associated with repolarization in individuals of European ancestry to include African Americans. PMID:23166209

  7. Common genetic risk variants are associated with positive symptoms and decision-making ability in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew K; Robinson, G; Reutens, D; Mowry, B

    2015-09-30

    Schizophrenia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with broad deficits across cognitive domains. As large genomewide association studies uncover the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, the relationship between common genetic variants and clinical and cognitive characteristics will form part of an integrative approach to understanding genetic effects on the clinical phenotype. In the current study, association between common genetic risk variants and clinical and cognitive variables was investigated. Common risk variants were associated with positive symptoms and decision-making ability from the Cambridge Gambling Task with trends in other domains. PMID:26070766

  8. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Price, Erin P; Inman-Bamber, John; Thiruvenkataswamy, Venugopal; Huygens, Flavia; Giffard, Philip M

    2007-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV) subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH) data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data. PMID:17672919

  9. The contribution of genetic variants to disease depends on the ruler.

    PubMed

    Witte, John S; Visscher, Peter M; Wray, Naomi R

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of disease has evolved from descriptions of overall heritability or familiality to the identification of large numbers of risk loci. One can quantify the impact of such loci on disease using a plethora of measures, which can guide future research decisions. However, different measures can attribute varying degrees of importance to a variant. In this Analysis, we consider and contrast the most commonly used measures - specifically, the heritability of disease liability, approximate heritability, sibling recurrence risk, overall genetic variance using a logarithmic relative risk scale, the area under the receiver-operating curve for risk prediction and the population attributable fraction - and give guidelines for their use that should be explicitly considered when assessing the contribution of genetic variants to disease. PMID:25223781

  10. Allele-Specific Methylation Occurs at Genetic Variants Associated with Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, John N.; Raj, Towfique; Fagerness, Jes; Stahl, Eli; Viloria, Fernando T.; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Seddon, Johanna; Daly, Mark; Chess, Andrew; Plenge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize that the phenomenon of allele-specific methylation (ASM) may underlie the phenotypic effects of multiple variants identified by Genome-Wide Association studies (GWAS). We evaluate ASM in a human population and document its genome-wide patterns in an initial screen at up to 380,678 sites within the genome, or up to 5% of the total genomic CpGs. We show that while substantial inter-individual variation exists, 5% of assessed sites show evidence of ASM in at least six samples; the majority of these events (81%) are under genetic influence. Many of these cis-regulated ASM variants are also eQTLs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes and/or in high linkage-disequilibrium with variants linked to complex disease. Finally, focusing on autoimmune phenotypes, we extend this initial screen to confirm the association of cis-regulated ASM with multiple complex disease-associated variants in an independent population using next-generation bisulfite sequencing. These four variants are implicated in complex phenotypes such as ulcerative colitis and AIDS progression disease (rs10491434), Celiac disease (rs2762051), Crohn's disease, IgA nephropathy and early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (rs713875) and height (rs6569648). Our results suggest cis-regulated ASM may provide a mechanistic link between the non-coding genetic changes and phenotypic variation observed in these diseases and further suggests a route to integrating DNA methylation status with GWAS results. PMID:24911414

  11. Mutation extraction tools can be combined for robust recognition of genetic variants in the literature.

    PubMed

    Jimeno Yepes, Antonio; Verspoor, Karin

    2014-01-01

    As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the amount of data being collected and studied for the purpose of understanding the genetic basis of disease is increasing dramatically. Much of the source information relevant to such efforts is available only from unstructured sources such as the scientific literature, and significant resources are expended in manually curating and structuring the information in the literature. As such, there have been a number of systems developed to target automatic extraction of mutations and other genetic variation from the literature using text mining tools. We have performed a broad survey of the existing publicly available tools for extraction of genetic variants from the scientific literature. We consider not just one tool but a number of different tools, individually and in combination, and apply the tools in two scenarios. First, they are compared in an intrinsic evaluation context, where the tools are tested for their ability to identify specific mentions of genetic variants in a corpus of manually annotated papers, the Variome corpus. Second, they are compared in an extrinsic evaluation context based on our previous study of text mining support for curation of the COSMIC and InSiGHT databases. Our results demonstrate that no single tool covers the full range of genetic variants mentioned in the literature. Rather, several tools have complementary coverage and can be used together effectively. In the intrinsic evaluation on the Variome corpus, the combined performance is above 0.95 in F-measure, while in the extrinsic evaluation the combined recall performance is above 0.71 for COSMIC and above 0.62 for InSiGHT, a substantial improvement over the performance of any individual tool. Based on the analysis of these results, we suggest several directions for the improvement of text mining tools for genetic variant extraction from the literature. PMID:25285203

  12. Multivariable Mendelian randomization: the use of pleiotropic genetic variants to estimate causal effects.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G

    2015-02-15

    A conventional Mendelian randomization analysis assesses the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome by using genetic variants that are solely associated with the risk factor of interest as instrumental variables. However, in some cases, such as the case of triglyceride level as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it may be difficult to find a relevant genetic variant that is not also associated with related risk factors, such as other lipid fractions. Such a variant is known as pleiotropic. In this paper, we propose an extension of Mendelian randomization that uses multiple genetic variants associated with several measured risk factors to simultaneously estimate the causal effect of each of the risk factors on the outcome. This "multivariable Mendelian randomization" approach is similar to the simultaneous assessment of several treatments in a factorial randomized trial. In this paper, methods for estimating the causal effects are presented and compared using real and simulated data, and the assumptions necessary for a valid multivariable Mendelian randomization analysis are discussed. Subject to these assumptions, we demonstrate that triglyceride-related pathways have a causal effect on the risk of coronary heart disease independent of the effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:25632051

  13. Multivariable Mendelian Randomization: The Use of Pleiotropic Genetic Variants to Estimate Causal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G.

    2015-01-01

    A conventional Mendelian randomization analysis assesses the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome by using genetic variants that are solely associated with the risk factor of interest as instrumental variables. However, in some cases, such as the case of triglyceride level as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it may be difficult to find a relevant genetic variant that is not also associated with related risk factors, such as other lipid fractions. Such a variant is known as pleiotropic. In this paper, we propose an extension of Mendelian randomization that uses multiple genetic variants associated with several measured risk factors to simultaneously estimate the causal effect of each of the risk factors on the outcome. This “multivariable Mendelian randomization” approach is similar to the simultaneous assessment of several treatments in a factorial randomized trial. In this paper, methods for estimating the causal effects are presented and compared using real and simulated data, and the assumptions necessary for a valid multivariable Mendelian randomization analysis are discussed. Subject to these assumptions, we demonstrate that triglyceride-related pathways have a causal effect on the risk of coronary heart disease independent of the effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:25632051

  14. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Iksoo; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data) to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket) for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively. PMID:26406920

  15. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; Da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-01-01

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%–5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10−6]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations. PMID:26507003

  16. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-10-01

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%-5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10-6]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations.

  17. Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients Show Accumulation of Genetic Variants in PARS2

    PubMed Central

    Henmyr, Viktor; Lind-Halldén, Christina; Halldén, Christer; Säll, Torbjörn; Carlberg, Daniel; Bachert, Claus; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) have identified a total of 53 CRS-associated SNPs that were subsequently evaluated for their reproducibility in a recent study. The rs2873551 SNP in linkage disequilibrium with PARS2 showed the strongest association signal. The present study aims to comprehensively screen for rare variants in PARS2 and evaluate for accumulation of such variants in CRS-patients. Sanger sequencing and long-range PCR were used to screen for rare variants in the putative promoter region and coding sequence of 310 CRS-patients and a total of 21 variants were detected. The mutation spectrum was then compared with data from European populations of the 1000Genomes project (EUR) and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC). The CRS population showed a significant surplus of low-frequency variants compared with ExAC data. Haplotype analysis of the region showed a significant excess of rare haplotypes in the CRS population compared to the EUR population. Two missense mutations were also genotyped in the 310 CRS patients and 372 CRS-negative controls, but no associations with the disease were found. This is the first re-sequencing study in CRS research and also the first study to show an association of rare variants with the disease. PMID:27348859

  18. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of weight loss strategies.

    PubMed

    Deram, Sophie; Villares, Sandra M F

    2009-03-01

    Body weight excess has an increasingly high prevalence in the world. Obesity is a complex disease of multifactorial origin with a polygenic condition affected by environmental factors. Weight loss is a primary strategy to treat obesity and its morbidities. Weight changes through life depend on the interaction of environmental, behavioral and genetic factors. Interindividual variation of weight loss in response to different types of interventions (behavioral, caloric restriction, exercise, drug or surgery) has been observed. In this article, currently available data on the role of candidate gene polymorphisms in weight loss are reviewed. Even though control of weight loss by genotype was described in twin and family studies, it is premature to recommend use of genotyping in the design of therapeutic diets or drug treatment. Future studies will have to be large in order to assess the effects of multiple polymorphisms, and will have to control factors other than diet. PMID:19466204

  19. A Comparison of Genetic Programming Variants for Hyper-Heuristics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Sean

    2015-03-01

    Modern society is faced with ever more complex problems, many of which can be formulated as generate-and-test optimization problems. General-purpose optimization algorithms are not well suited for real-world scenarios where many instances of the same problem class need to be repeatedly and efficiently solved, such as routing vehicles over highways with constantly changing traffic flows, because they are not targeted to a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics automate the design of algorithms to create a custom algorithm for a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics typically employ Genetic Programming (GP) and this project has investigated the relationship between the choice of GP and performance in Hyper-heuristics. Results are presented demonstrating the existence of problems for which there is a statistically significant performance differential between the use of different types of GP.

  20. Common Genetic Variants and Response to Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Bollmann, Andreas; Lubitz, Steven A.; Ueberham, Laura; Saini, Harsimran; Montgomery, Jay; Edwards, Todd; Yoneda, Zachary; Sinner, Moritz F.; Arya, Arash; Sommer, Philipp; Delaney, Jessica; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Saavedra, Pablo; Kanagasundram, Arvindh; Whalen, S. Patrick; Roden, Dan M.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Ellis, Christopher R.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Darbar, Dawood; Husser, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Background Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosomes 4q25 (rs2200733, rs10033464 near PITX2), 1q21 (rs13376333 in KCNN3), and 16q22 (rs7193343 in ZFHX3) have consistently been associated with the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). Single-center studies have shown that 4q25 risk alleles predict recurrence of AF after catheter ablation of AF. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to test the hypothesis that these 4 AF susceptibility SNPs modulate response to AF ablation. Methods and Results Patients underwent de novo AF ablation between 2008 and 2012 at Vanderbilt University, the Heart Center Leipzig, and Massachusetts General Hospital. The primary outcome was 12-month recurrence, defined as an episode of AF, atrial flutter, or atrial tachycardia lasting >30 seconds after a 3-month blanking period. Multivariable analysis of the individual cohorts using a Cox proportional hazards model was performed. Summary statistics from the 3 centers were analyzed using fixed effects meta-analysis. A total of 991 patients were included (Vanderbilt University, 245; Heart Center Leipzig, 659; and Massachusetts General Hospital, 87). The overall single procedure 12-month recurrence rate was 42%. The overall risk allele frequency for these SNPs ranged from 12% to 35%. Using a dominant genetic model, the 4q25 SNP, rs2200733, predicted a 1.4-fold increased risk of recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.3 [95% confidence intervals, 1.1–1.6]; P=0.011). The remaining SNPs, rs10033464 (4q25), rs13376333 (1q21), and rs7193343 (16q22) were not significantly associated with recurrence. Conclusions Among the 3 genetic loci most strongly associated with AF, the chromosome 4q25 SNP rs2200733 is significantly associated with recurrence of atrial arrhythmias after catheter ablation for AF. PMID:25684755

  1. Are genetic variants for tobacco smoking associated with cannabis involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.; Kapoor, Manav; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Schuckit, Marc; Brooks, Andrew; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Saccone, Nancy; Tischfield, Jay; Bierut, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cannabis users are highly likely to also be tobacco cigarette smokers and a proportion of this comorbidity is attributable to shared genetic influences. Three large meta-analyses of genomewide association studies (GWAS) of tobacco smoking have identified multiple genomewide significant (p<5 × 10−8) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We examine whether these SNPs are associated with tobacco smoking and with cannabis involvement in an independent sample. Method Eleven SNPs associated with cigarettes per day (CPD), ever versus never smoking and current smoking/smoking cessation at p < 5 ×10−8 were selected from three published meta-analyses. Association analyses were conducted with similar tobacco smoking measures in 2,716 European-American subjects from the Study of Addictions Genes and Environment (SAGE) and with lifetime and current cannabis use and DSM-IV cannabis abuse/dependence. Results Cannabis use and tobacco smoking correlated at 0.54. Rs16969968 in CHRNA5 (and its proxy, rs1051730 in CHRNA3) and rs1451240, a proxy for rs13280604 in CHRNB3, were associated with CPD after Bonferroni correction (p<.006). rs1451240 was also associated with DSM-IV cannabis abuse/dependence. Rs6265 in BDNF was associated with smoking initiation, as in the original meta-analysis and also with lifetime cannabis use. Associations with cannabis involvement were no longer significant upon adjustment for the tobacco smoking measures. Conclusions The modest associations between cannabis involvement and SNPs for tobacco smoking were not independent of the comorbidity between tobacco and cannabis involvement. Larger samples of individuals might be required to articulate the specific genetic architecture of cannabis involvement. PMID:25770649

  2. Multiple distinct CHRNB3-CHRNA6 variants are genetic risk factors for nicotine dependence in African Americans and European Americans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric O.; Breslau, Naomi; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Sadler, Brooke; Brooks, Andrew I.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Goate, Alison M.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Studies have shown association between common variants in the α6–β3 nicotinic receptor subunit gene cluster and nicotine dependence in European Ancestry populations. We investigate whether this generalizes to African Americans, whether the association is specific to nicotine dependence, and whether this region contains additional genetic contributors to nicotine dependence. Design We examined consistency of association across studies and race between the α6β3 nicotinic receptor subunit locus and nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine dependence in three independent studies. Setting United States of America Participants European Americans and African Americans from three case control studies of substance dependence. Measurements Subjects were evaluated using the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism. Nicotine dependence was determined using the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence. Findings rs13273442 was significantly associated to nicotine dependence across all three studies in both ancestry groups (OR=0.75, p=5.8 × 10−4 European Americans; OR=0.80, p=0.05 African Americans). No other substance dependence was consistently associated to this variant in either group. Another SNP in the region, rs4952, remains modestly associated with nicotine dependence in the combined data after conditioning on rs13273442. Conclusions The common variant rs13273442 in the CHRNB3-CHNRA6 region is significantly associated to nicotine dependence in European Americans and African Americans across studies recruited for nicotine, alcohol, and cocaine dependence. Although these data are modestly powered for other substances, our results provide no evidence that correlates of rs13273442 represent a general substance dependence liability. Additional variants likely account for some of the association of this region to nicotine dependence. PMID:24401102

  3. Genetic Panel Screening of Nearly 100 Mutations Reveals New Insights into the Breed Distribution of Risk Variants for Canine Hereditary Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Jonas; Möller, Fredrik; Kyöstilä, Kaisa; Sankari, Satu; Hytönen, Marjo; Giger, Urs; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Background The growing number of identified genetic disease risk variants across dog breeds challenges the current state-of-the-art of population screening, veterinary molecular diagnostics, and genetic counseling. Multiplex screening of such variants is now technologically feasible, but its practical potential as a supportive tool for canine breeding, disease diagnostics, pet care, and genetics research is still unexplored. Results To demonstrate the utility of comprehensive genetic panel screening, we tested nearly 7000 dogs representing around 230 breeds for 93 disease-associated variants using a custom-designed genotyping microarray (the MyDogDNA® panel test). In addition to known breed disease-associated mutations, we discovered 15 risk variants in a total of 34 breeds in which their presence was previously undocumented. We followed up on seven of these genetic findings to demonstrate their clinical relevance. We report additional breeds harboring variants causing factor VII deficiency, hyperuricosuria, lens luxation, von Willebrand’s disease, multifocal retinopathy, multidrug resistance, and rod-cone dysplasia. Moreover, we provide plausible molecular explanations for chondrodysplasia in the Chinook, cerebellar ataxia in the Norrbottenspitz, and familiar nephropathy in the Welsh Springer Spaniel. Conclusions These practical examples illustrate how genetic panel screening represents a comprehensive, efficient and powerful diagnostic and research discovery tool with a range of applications in veterinary care, disease research, and breeding. We conclude that several known disease alleles are more widespread across different breeds than previously recognized. However, careful follow up studies of any unexpected discoveries are essential to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, as is readiness to provide genetic counseling on their implications for the dog and its breed. PMID:27525650

  4. Identifying Genetic Variants for Addiction via Propensity Score Adjusted Generalized Kendall's Tau.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Li, Ni; Zhang, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Identifying replicable genetic variants for addiction has been extremely challenging. Besides the common difficulties with genome-wide association studies (GWAS), environmental factors are known to be critical to addiction, and comorbidity is widely observed. Despite the importance of environmental factors and comorbidity for addiction study, few GWAS analyses adequately considered them due to the limitations of the existing statistical methods. Although parametric methods have been developed to adjust for covariates in association analysis, difficulties arise when the traits are multivariate because there is no ready-to-use model for them. Recent nonparametric development includes U-statistics to measure the phenotype-genotype association weighted by a similarity score of covariates. However, it is not clear how to optimize the similarity score. Therefore, we propose a semiparametric method to measure the association adjusted by covariates. In our approach, the nonparametric U-statistic is adjusted by parametric estimates of propensity scores using the idea of inverse probability weighting. The new measurement is shown to be asymptotically unbiased under our null hypothesis while the previous non-weighted and weighted ones are not. Simulation results show that our test improves power as opposed to the non-weighted and two other weighted U-statistic methods, and it is particularly powerful for detecting gene-environment interactions. Finally, we apply our proposed test to the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) to identify genetic variants for addiction. Novel genetic variants are found from our analysis, which warrant further investigation in the future. PMID:25382885

  5. Identifying Genetic Variants for Addiction via Propensity Score Adjusted Generalized Kendall’s Tau

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Li, Ni; Zhang, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Identifying replicable genetic variants for addiction has been extremely challenging. Besides the common difficulties with genome-wide association studies (GWAS), environmental factors are known to be critical to addiction, and comorbidity is widely observed. Despite the importance of environmental factors and comorbidity for addiction study, few GWAS analyses adequately considered them due to the limitations of the existing statistical methods. Although parametric methods have been developed to adjust for covariates in association analysis, difficulties arise when the traits are multivariate because there is no ready-to-use model for them. Recent nonparametric development includes U-statistics to measure the phenotype-genotype association weighted by a similarity score of covariates. However, it is not clear how to optimize the similarity score. Therefore, we propose a semiparametric method to measure the association adjusted by covariates. In our approach, the nonparametric U-statistic is adjusted by parametric estimates of propensity scores using the idea of inverse probability weighting. The new measurement is shown to be asymptotically unbiased under our null hypothesis while the previous non-weighted and weighted ones are not. Simulation results show that our test improves power as opposed to the non-weighted and two other weighted U-statistic methods, and it is particularly powerful for detecting gene-environment interactions. Finally, we apply our proposed test to the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) to identify genetic variants for addiction. Novel genetic variants are found from our analysis, which warrant further investigation in the future. PMID:25382885

  6. Genome-wide scans of genetic variants for psychophysiological endophenotypes: a methodological overview.

    PubMed

    Iacono, William G; Malone, Stephen M; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Vrieze, Scott I

    2014-12-01

    This article provides an introductory overview of the investigative strategy employed to evaluate the genetic basis of 17 endophenotypes examined as part of a 20-year data collection effort from the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research. Included are characterization of the study samples, descriptive statistics for key properties of the psychophysiological measures, and rationale behind the steps taken in the molecular genetic study design. The statistical approach included (a) biometric analysis of twin and family data, (b) heritability analysis using 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), (c) genome-wide association analysis of these SNPs and 17,601 autosomal genes, (d) follow-up analyses of candidate SNPs and genes hypothesized to have an association with each endophenotype, (e) rare variant analysis of nonsynonymous SNPs in the exome, and (f) whole genome sequencing association analysis using 27 million genetic variants. These methods were used in the accompanying empirical articles comprising this special issue, Genome-Wide Scans of Genetic Variants for Psychophysiological Endophenotypes. PMID:25387703

  7. Admixture and the organization of genetic diversity in a butterfly species complex revealed through common and rare genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah; Lucas, Lauren K; Buerkle, C Alex; Forister, Matthew L; Fordyce, James A; Nice, Chris C

    2014-09-01

    Detailed information about the geographic distribution of genetic and genomic variation is necessary to better understand the organization and structure of biological diversity. In particular, spatial isolation within species and hybridization between them can blur species boundaries and create evolutionary relationships that are inconsistent with a strictly bifurcating tree model. Here, we analyse genome-wide DNA sequence and genetic ancestry variation in Lycaeides butterflies to quantify the effects of admixture and spatial isolation on how biological diversity is organized in this group. We document geographically widespread and pervasive historical admixture, with more restricted recent hybridization. This includes evidence supporting previously known and unknown instances of admixture. The genome composition of admixed individuals varies much more among than within populations, and tree- and genetic ancestry-based analyses indicate that multiple distinct admixed lineages or populations exist. We find that most genetic variants in Lycaeides are rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%). Because the spatial and taxonomic distributions of alleles reflect demographic and selective processes since mutation, rare alleles, which are presumably younger than common alleles, were spatially and taxonomically restricted compared with common variants. Thus, we show patterns of genetic variation in this group are multifaceted, and we argue that this complexity challenges simplistic notions concerning the organization of biological diversity into discrete, easily delineated and hierarchically structured entities. PMID:24866941

  8. Puzzling role of genetic risk factors in human longevity: "risk alleles" as pro-longevity variants.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Yashin, Anatoliy; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kulminski, Alexander; Akushevich, Igor; Wu, Deqing; Joshi, Gaurang; Land, Kenneth C; Stallard, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Complex diseases are major contributors to human mortality in old age. Paradoxically, many genetic variants that have been associated with increased risks of such diseases are found in genomes of long-lived people, and do not seem to compromise longevity. Here we argue that trade-off-like and conditional effects of genes can play central role in this phenomenon and in determining longevity. Such effects may occur as result of: (i) antagonistic influence of gene on the development of different health disorders; (ii) change in the effect of gene on vulnerability to death with age (especially, from "bad" to "good"); (iii) gene-gene interaction; and (iv) gene-environment interaction, among other factors. A review of current knowledge provides many examples of genetic factors that may increase the risk of one disease but reduce chances of developing another serious health condition, or improve survival from it. Factors that may increase risk of a major disease but attenuate manifestation of physical senescence are also discussed. Overall, available evidence suggests that the influence of a genetic variant on longevity may be negative, neutral or positive, depending on a delicate balance of the detrimental and beneficial effects of such variant on multiple health and aging related traits. This balance may change with age, internal and external environments, and depend on genetic surrounding. We conclude that trade-off-like and conditional genetic effects are very common and may result in situations when a disease "risk allele" can also be a pro-longevity variant, depending on context. We emphasize importance of considering such effects in both aging research and disease prevention. PMID:26306600

  9. Insight into Neutral and Disease-Associated Human Genetic Variants through Interpretable Predictors

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bastiaan A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; de Ridder, Dick; de Beer, Tjaart A. P.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of methods that predict human nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be neutral or disease-associated have been developed over the last decade. These methods are used for pinpointing disease-associated variants in the many variants obtained with next-generation sequencing technologies. The high performances of current sequence-based predictors indicate that sequence data contains valuable information about a variant being neutral or disease-associated. However, most predictors do not readily disclose this information, and so it remains unclear what sequence properties are most important. Here, we show how we can obtain insight into sequence characteristics of variants and their surroundings by interpreting predictors. We used an extensive range of features derived from the variant itself, its surrounding sequence, sequence conservation, and sequence annotation, and employed linear support vector machine classifiers to enable extracting feature importance from trained predictors. Our approach is useful for providing additional information about what features are most important for the predictions made. Furthermore, for large sets of known variants, it can provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for variants being disease-associated. PMID:25826299

  10. Insight into neutral and disease-associated human genetic variants through interpretable predictors.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bastiaan A; Reinders, Marcel J T; de Ridder, Dick; de Beer, Tjaart A P

    2015-01-01

    A variety of methods that predict human nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be neutral or disease-associated have been developed over the last decade. These methods are used for pinpointing disease-associated variants in the many variants obtained with next-generation sequencing technologies. The high performances of current sequence-based predictors indicate that sequence data contains valuable information about a variant being neutral or disease-associated. However, most predictors do not readily disclose this information, and so it remains unclear what sequence properties are most important. Here, we show how we can obtain insight into sequence characteristics of variants and their surroundings by interpreting predictors. We used an extensive range of features derived from the variant itself, its surrounding sequence, sequence conservation, and sequence annotation, and employed linear support vector machine classifiers to enable extracting feature importance from trained predictors. Our approach is useful for providing additional information about what features are most important for the predictions made. Furthermore, for large sets of known variants, it can provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for variants being disease-associated. PMID:25826299

  11. Disclosing pathogenic genetic variants to research participants: Quantifying an emerging ethical responsibility

    PubMed Central

    Cassa, Christopher A.; Savage, Sarah K.; Taylor, Patrick L.; Green, Robert C.; McGuire, Amy L.; Mandl, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    There is an emerging consensus that when investigators obtain genomic data from research participants, they may incur an ethical responsibility to inform at-risk individuals about clinically significant variants discovered during the course of their research. With whole-exome sequencing becoming commonplace and the falling costs of full-genome sequencing, there will be an increasingly large number of variants identified in research participants that may be of sufficient clinical relevance to share. An explicit approach to triaging and communicating these results has yet to be developed, and even the magnitude of the task is uncertain. To develop an estimate of the number of variants that might qualify for disclosure, we apply recently published recommendations for the return of results to a defined and representative set of variants and then extrapolate these estimates to genome scale. We find that the total number of variants meeting the threshold for recommended disclosure ranges from 3955–12,579 (3.79%–12.06%, 95% CI) in the most conservative estimate to 6998–17,189 (6.69%–16.48%, 95% CI) in an estimate including variants with variable disease expressivity. Additionally, if the growth rate from the previous 4 yr continues, we estimate that the total number of disease-associated variants will grow 37% over the next 4 yr. PMID:22147367

  12. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis genes and breast cancer risk in Caucasians and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Nan, Hongmei; Dorgan, Joanne F; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Elevated circulating levels of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are associated with increased breast cancer risk in prospective studies. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis genes may contribute to these circulating hormone levels, and consequently to breast cancer risk. No previous studies have examined the effects of genetic variants in HPA axis genes on breast cancer risk. We evaluated the associations of 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five HPA axis genes (NR3C1, NR3C2, CRH, CRHR1, and CRHBP) with the risk of breast cancer in the Women's Insights and Shared Experiences (WISE) Study of Caucasians (346 cases and 442 controls), as well as African Americans (149 cases and 246 controls). Of the 49 SNPs evaluated, one showed a nominal significant association (P for trend < 0.05) with breast cancer risk among Caucasians, and another two among African Americans. The age-adjusted additive odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) of the SNP rs11747190[A] in the CRHBP gene for the risk of breast cancer among Caucasian women was 1.45 (1.09-1.94). The age-adjusted additive ORs (95% CIs) of two SNPs (CRHBP rs1700688[T] and CRHR1 rs17689471[C]) for the risk of breast cancer among African American women were 1.84 (1.13-2.98) and 2.48 (1.20-5.13), respectively. However, these SNPs did not show significant associations after correction for multiple testing. Our findings do not provide strong supportive evidence for the contribution of genetic variants in these HPA axis genes to the risk of developing breast cancer in either Caucasians or African Americans. PMID:26417403

  13. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis genes and breast cancer risk in Caucasians and African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Hongmei; Dorgan, Joanne F; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Elevated circulating levels of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are associated with increased breast cancer risk in prospective studies. Genetic variants in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis genes may contribute to these circulating hormone levels, and consequently to breast cancer risk. No previous studies have examined the effects of genetic variants in HPA axis genes on breast cancer risk. We evaluated the associations of 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five HPA axis genes (NR3C1, NR3C2, CRH, CRHR1, and CRHBP) with the risk of breast cancer in the Women’s Insights and Shared Experiences (WISE) Study of Caucasians (346 cases and 442 controls), as well as African Americans (149 cases and 246 controls). Of the 49 SNPs evaluated, one showed a nominal significant association (P for trend < 0.05) with breast cancer risk among Caucasians, and another two among African Americans. The age-adjusted additive odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) of the SNP rs11747190[A] in the CRHBP gene for the risk of breast cancer among Caucasian women was 1.45 (1.09-1.94). The age-adjusted additive ORs (95% CIs) of two SNPs (CRHBP rs1700688[T] and CRHR1 rs17689471[C]) for the risk of breast cancer among African American women were 1.84 (1.13-2.98) and 2.48 (1.20-5.13), respectively. However, these SNPs did not show significant associations after correction for multiple testing. Our findings do not provide strong supportive evidence for the contribution of genetic variants in these HPA axis genes to the risk of developing breast cancer in either Caucasians or African Americans. PMID:26417403

  14. Admixture mapping of genetic variants for uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Wiener, Howard; Aissani, Brahim

    2015-09-01

    Uterine leiomyoma (UL) are benign neoplasms arising from the smooth muscle cells of the uterus. One of the established risk factors for UL is African American ethnicity. Studies have consistently shown that African Americans have two to three times higher risk compared with that of non-Hispanic Whites. However, there is still no adequate explanation for the higher risk among African Americans. To investigate the genetic contribution to the observed difference between the African American and European American populations, we conducted an admixture scan in 525 eligible African American women participants to the NIEHS uterine fibroid study (NIEHS-UFS). In models with no stratification, we found multiple genomic regions showing significant and suggestive evidence of association, with chromosomal band 2q32.2 at rs256552 showing the highest score (Z-score=7.86, Bonferroni adjusted P-value=5.5 × 10(-12)) consistent with the suggestive evidence reported for this genomic region in the Black Women's Health Study. However, in models stratified by the body mass index (BMI) covariate, chromosome 1q42.2 was the sole genomic region that consistently showed suggestive associations across the BMI categories tested (Z-scores ⩽-3.96, Bonferroni adjusted P-values ⩽0.107). In age-stratified models, a significant association was observed in the older category (age >40) reaching a Z-score of 6.44 (Bonferroni-adjusted P-value=1.64 × 10(-7)) at rs256552. The mean percentage of European ancestry among cases was lower than that among controls in the NIEHS-UFS study. However, our study did not show a significant association between mean percentage of European ancestry and UL. PMID:26040208

  15. Admixture mapping of genetic variants for uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kui; Wiener, Howard; Aissani, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma (UL) are benign neoplasms arising from the smooth muscle cells of the uterus. One of the established risk factors for UL is African American ethnicity. Studies have consistently shown that African Americans have 2-3 times higher risk compared with that of non-Hispanic Whites. However, there is still no adequate explanation for the higher risk among African Americans. To investigate the genetic contribution to the observed difference between the African American and European American populations, we conducted an admixture scan in 525 eligible African American women participants to the NIEHS uterine fibroid study (NIEHS-UFS). In models with no stratification, we found multiple genomic regions showing significant and suggestive evidence of association, with chromosomal band 2q32.2 at rs256552 showing the highest score (Z-score = 7.86, Bonferroni adjusted p-value = 5.5×10-12) consistent with the suggestive evidence reported for this genomic region in the Black Women's Health Study. However, in models stratified by the body mass index (BMI) covariate, chromosomal 1q42.2 was the sole genomic region that consistently showed suggestive associations across the BMI categories tested (Z-scores ≤ -3.96, Bonferroni adjusted p-values ≤ 0.107). In age-stratified models, a significant association was observed in the older category (age > 40) reaching a Z-score of 6.44 (Bonferroni-adjusted p-value = 1.64 × 10-7) at rs256552. The mean percentage of European ancestry among cases was lower than that among controls in the NIEHS-UFS study. However, our study did not show a significant association between mean percentage of European ancestry and UL. PMID:26040208

  16. Genetic variants in microRNA genes: impact on microRNA expression, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; De Rijk, Peter; Del Favero, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression and like any other gene, their coding sequences are subject to genetic variation. Variants in miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA functionality at all levels, including miRNA transcription, maturation, and target specificity, and as such they can also contribute to disease. The impact of variants in miRNA genes is the focus of the present review. To put these effects into context, we first discuss the requirements of miRNA transcripts for maturation. In the last part an overview of available databases and tools and experimental approaches to investigate miRNA variants related to human disease is presented. PMID:26052338

  17. Anjozorobe Hantavirus, a New Genetic Variant of Thailand Virus Detected in Rodents from Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Razafindralambo, Nadia Kaloina; Lacoste, Vincent; Olive, Marie-Marie; Barivelo, Tony Andrianaivo; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Lavergne, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Until now, there was only serological evidence that hantaviruses were circulating in rodents and infecting humans from Madagascar. To assess the presence of a hantavirus on the island, between October, 2008, and March, 2010, we sampled 585 rodents belonging to seven species in the Anjozorobe-Angavo forest corridor, 70 km north from the capital city Antananarivo. A hantavirus was detected from organs of the ubiquist roof rat (Rattus rattus) and of the endemic Major's tufted-tailed rat (Eliurus majori). Amazingly, sequence analysis of the S (small), M (medium), and L (large) coding DNA sequence of this virus showed that the Anjozorobe strain (proposed name) was a new genetic variant of Thailand virus (THAIV) that comprises other variants found in Southeast Asia. Because THAIV is suspected of causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans, ongoing studies are addressing the risk of infection by this new variant in the Malagasy population. PMID:24575755

  18. Distribution of genetic variants of transcobalamin II in Nigerian black populations.

    PubMed Central

    Porck, H J; Fleming, A F; Frants, R R

    1984-01-01

    Transcobalamin II ( TC2 ) phenotyping was performed in Nigerian black males from several ethnic groups, using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with autoradiography. The TC2 gene frequencies in the total Nigerian sample amounted to .064 (X), .124 (S), .498 (M), and .313 (F). Compared to white populations, the frequency of TC2 *X is low while the frequencies of TC2 *S and TC2 *F are high, which confirms previous studies on blacks. In some of the rare phenotypes we found, in addition to common TC2 variants, TC2 gene products with an electrophoretic mobility intermediary to X and S, and to M and F, indicative of further microheterogeneity in the genetic system of TC2 . The TC2 gene frequency data indicate interpopulation heterogeneity for this marker. Major differences were found between the Sudan and Guinea Savanna Group ( SGSG ) and the Middle Belt Group, and between the SGSG and the Ibos . The results of our comparative study confirm to some extent similar surveys, which have been based on the distribution of the ABO blood groups. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6731442

  19. A subset of genetic susceptibility variants for colorectal cancer also has prognostic value.

    PubMed

    Noci, S; Dugo, M; Bertola, F; Melotti, F; Vannelli, A; Dragani, T A; Galvan, A

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the possible influence of 86 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), known to associate with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), on overall survival and time to recurrence (TTR) in 733 Italian CRC patients followed up for up to 84 months after surgery. In the Cox multivariate analysis, adjusted for gender, age, pathological stage and adjuvant chemotherapy (yes/no), the risk of death significantly increased by rare allele count (P<0.05) for rs1801133 (MTHFR), rs4939827 (SMAD7), rs2306283 (SLCO1B1) and rs12898159 (BMP4), whereas for rs736775 (GPX3) the opposite was observed. Two additional SNPs associated with TTR, namely rs16892766 (downstream of EIF3H) and rs10749971 (COLCA2). Our findings show that some genetic variants previously found to associate with CRC risk are also associated with survival after treatment. The identification of alleles defining subgroups of patients with worse clinical outcome may have application in developing pharmacogenetic strategies aimed at personalizing CRC treatment. PMID:25963333

  20. Associating disease-related genetic variants in intergenic regions to the genes they impact

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheng Soon

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to assist in interpretation of the functional impact of intergenic disease-associated SNPs that is not limited to search strategies proximal to the SNP. The method builds on two sources of external knowledge: the growing understanding of three-dimensional spatial relationships in the genome, and the substantial repository of information about relationships among genetic variants, genes, and diseases captured in the published biomedical literature. We integrate chromatin conformation capture data (HiC) with literature support to rank putative target genes of intergenic disease-associated SNPs. We demonstrate that this hybrid method outperforms a genomic distance baseline on a small test set of expression quantitative trait loci, as well as either method individually. In addition, we show the potential for this method to uncover relationships between intergenic SNPs and target genes across chromosomes. With more extensive chromatin conformation capture data becoming readily available, this method provides a way forward towards functional interpretation of SNPs in the context of the three dimensional structure of the genome in the nucleus. PMID:25374782

  1. NAT2 and NER genetic variants and sporadic prostate cancer susceptibility in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Hooker, S; Bonilla, C; Akereyeni, F; Ahaghotu, C; Kittles, R A

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy that disproportionately affects African-American men. Environmental factors and variation in genes responsible for chemical and dietary carcinogen metabolism and DNA damage repair may modulate risk. Fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms in NAT2 and four NER genes (ERCC1, XPF/ERCC4, XPG/ERCC5 and CSB/ERCC6) were genotyped in a case-control study of 254 African-American prostate cancer cases and 301 healthy controls from Washington, DC. Smoking status, BMI, age and genetic ancestry were included as covariates in the association analyses. We found that individuals homozygous for the XPG/ERCC5 -72C/T promoter polymorphism had a significant reduction in risk, for prostate cancer (OR=0.12; 95% CI=0.03-0.48). A haplotype trend regression test also revealed a protective effect for the haplotype bearing the T allele (P=0.003). In silica analyses suggest a functional implication for the promoter variant since it deletes a GCF transcriptional factor-binding site responsible for the downregulation of transcription. The protective effect of the promoter SNP on risk for prostate cancer was independent of smoking. In contrast, none of the SNPs typed for NAT2, ERCC1, ERCC4 and ERCC6 showed significant association with risk. Additional tests for genotype interactions were not significant. We note that there may be other factors, such as dietary exposures, which may modulate prostate cancer risk in combination with genetic variation within the NAT2 and NER genes. Our results, in combination with previous observations of LOH for ERCC5 in prostate tumors, provide further evidence for a role of XPG/ERCC5 in the etiology of prostate cancer. PMID:18026184

  2. Replication of a Genetic Variant for Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Penney, Kathryn L.; Shui, Irene M.; Feng, Ziding; Sesso, Howard D.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stanford, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few genetic variants have been confirmed as being associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). A recent study identified 22 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with PCSM in a Seattle-based patient cohort. Five of these associations were replicated in an independent Swedish cohort. Methods We genotyped these 22 SNPs in Physicians’ Health Study (PHS) participants diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa). Utilizing the same model found to be most significant in the Seattle cohort, we examined the association of these SNPs with lethal disease with Cox proportional hazards models. Results One SNP, rs5993891 in the ARVCF gene on chromosome 22q11, which had also replicated in the Swedish cohort, was also significantly associated with PCSM in the PHS cohort (hazard ratio (HR)=0.32; P=0.01). When we tested this SNP in an additional cohort (Health Professionals Follow-up Study, HPFS), the association was null (HR=0.95, P=0.90); however, a meta-analysis across all studies showed a statistically significant association with a HR of 0.52 (0.29–0.93, P=0.03). Conclusions The association of rs5993891 with PCSM was further replicated in PHS and remains significant in a meta-analysis, though there was no association in HPFS. This SNP may contribute to a genetic panel of SNPs to determine at diagnosis whether a patient is more likely to exhibit an indolent or aggressive form of PCa. This study also emphasizes the importance of multiple rounds of replication. PMID:25939514

  3. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah A.; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature. PMID:27197206

  4. A general framework for estimating the relative pathogenicity of human genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Martin; Witten, Daniela M.; Jain, Preti; O’Roak, Brian J.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Shendure, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to sequence human genomes has exceeded our ability to interpret genetic variation. Current genomic annotations tend to exploit a single information type (e.g. conservation) and/or are restricted in scope (e.g. to missense changes). Here, we describe Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion (CADD), a framework that objectively integrates many diverse annotations into a single, quantitative score. We implement CADD as a support vector machine trained to differentiate 14.7 million high-frequency human derived alleles from 14.7 million simulated variants. We pre-compute “C-scores” for all 8.6 billion possible human single nucleotide variants and enable scoring of short insertions/deletions. C-scores correlate with allelic diversity, annotations of functionality, pathogenicity, disease severity, experimentally measured regulatory effects, and complex trait associations, and highly rank known pathogenic variants within individual genomes. The ability of CADD to prioritize functional, deleterious, and pathogenic variants across many functional categories, effect sizes and genetic architectures is unmatched by any current annotation. PMID:24487276

  5. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  6. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants.

    PubMed

    Uricchio, Lawrence H; Zaitlen, Noah A; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2016-07-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature. PMID:27197206

  7. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Véronique; Pizot, Cécile; Redin, Claire; Piton, Amélie; Vasli, Nasim; Stoetzel, Corinne; Blavier, André; Laporte, Jocelyn; Muller, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs) or small insertion/deletions (indels). High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians. Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status) in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients. Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/. PMID:25780760

  8. Toward Prospective Prediction of Pharmacokinetics in OATP1B1 Genetic Variant Populations

    PubMed Central

    Li, R; Barton, H A; Maurer, T S

    2014-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly being used to provide human pharmacokinetic (PK) predictions for organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates based on in vitro assay data. As a natural extension in the application of these models, in this study, we incorporated in vitro information of three major OATP1B1 genetic variants into a previously reported PBPK model to predict the impact of OATP1B1 polymorphisms on human PK. Using pravastatin and rosuvastatin as examples, we showed that the predicted plasma concentration–time profiles in groups carrying different OATP1B1 genetic variants reasonably matched the clinical observations from multiple studies. This modeling and simulation approach may aid decision making in early pharmaceutical research and development as well as patient-specific dose adjustment in clinical practice. PMID:25494035

  9. Interactions Within Susceptible Hosts Drive Establishment of Genetically Distinct Variants of an Insect-Borne Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, G K; Zhang, S; Bratburd, J R; Daane, K M; Cooper, M L; Almeida, R P P

    2015-08-01

    Coinfections are common, leading to pathogen interactions during transmission and establishment in a host. However, few studies have tested the relative strengths of pathogen interactions in vectors and hosts that determine the outcome of infection. We tested interactions between two genetically distinct variants of the mealybug-transmitted Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3. The transmission efficiency of each variant in single variant inoculations by two vector species was determined. The effects of vector species, a coinfected source, and simultaneous inoculation from multiple hosts to one host on variant establishment were examined. Within-vector interactions could have a role in transmission from hosts containing mixed infections, but not when vectors were moved from separate singly infected source plants to a single recipient plant. The invasive Planococcus ficus (Signoret) was a more efficient vector than Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret). Transmission efficiency of the two variants did not differ in single variant inoculations. Overall infections were the same whether from singly or coinfected source plants. In mixed inoculations, establishment of one variant was reduced. Mixed inoculations from two singly infected source plants resulted in fewer mixed infections than expected by chance. Therefore, the observed outcome was determined subsequent to host inoculation rather than in the vector. The outcome may be due to resource competition between pathogens. Alternatively apparent competition may be responsible; the pathogens' differential ability to overcome host defenses and colonize the host may determine the final outcome of new infections. Detailed knowledge of interactions between pathogens during transmission and establishment could improve understanding and management of disease spread. PMID:26470292

  10. DANN: a deep learning approach for annotating the pathogenicity of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Daniel; Chen, Yifei; Xie, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Annotating genetic variants, especially non-coding variants, for the purpose of identifying pathogenic variants remains a challenge. Combined annotation-dependent depletion (CADD) is an algorithm designed to annotate both coding and non-coding variants, and has been shown to outperform other annotation algorithms. CADD trains a linear kernel support vector machine (SVM) to differentiate evolutionarily derived, likely benign, alleles from simulated, likely deleterious, variants. However, SVMs cannot capture non-linear relationships among the features, which can limit performance. To address this issue, we have developed DANN. DANN uses the same feature set and training data as CADD to train a deep neural network (DNN). DNNs can capture non-linear relationships among features and are better suited than SVMs for problems with a large number of samples and features. We exploit Compute Unified Device Architecture-compatible graphics processing units and deep learning techniques such as dropout and momentum training to accelerate the DNN training. DANN achieves about a 19% relative reduction in the error rate and about a 14% relative increase in the area under the curve (AUC) metric over CADD’s SVM methodology. Availability and implementation: All data and source code are available at https://cbcl.ics.uci.edu/public_data/DANN/. Contact: xhx@ics.uci.edu PMID:25338716

  11. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W.; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D.; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A.; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H.; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index—the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed a genome-wide association screen in patients collected from nine countries for two traits, presence or absence of oligoclonal bands (n = 3026) and immunoglobulin G index levels (n = 938), followed by a replication in 3891 additional patients. We replicate previously suggested association signals for oligoclonal band status in the major histocompatibility complex region for the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype, correlated with HLA-DRB1*1501, and rs34083746*G, correlated with HLA-DQA1*0301 (P comparing two haplotypes = 8.88 × 10−16). Furthermore, we identify a novel association signal of rs9807334, near the ELAC1/SMAD4 genes, for oligoclonal band status (P = 8.45 × 10−7). The previously reported association of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus with immunoglobulin G index reaches strong evidence for association in this data set (P = 3.79 × 10−37). We identify two novel associations in the major histocompatibility complex region with immunoglobulin G index: the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype (P = 1.59 × 10−22), shared with oligoclonal band status, and an additional independent effect of rs6457617*G (P = 3.68 × 10−6). Variants identified in this study account for up to 2-fold differences in the odds of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such

  12. The functional influences of common ABCB1 genetic variants on the inhibition of P-glycoprotein by Antrodia cinnamomea extracts.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Teng, Yu-Ning; Chen, Ying-Yi; Hung, Chin-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea is a traditional healthy food that has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anticacer effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the ethanolic extract of A. cinnamomea (EEAC) can affect the efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the effect of ABCB1 genetic variants on the interaction between EEAC and P-gp. To investigate the mechanism of this interaction, Flp-In™-293 cells stably transfected with various genotypes of human P-gp were established and the expression of P-gp was confirmed by Western blot. The results of the rhodamine 123 efflux assay demonstrated that EEAC efficiently inhibited wild-type P-gp function at an IC50 concentration of 1.51 ± 0.08 µg/mL through non-competitive inhibition. The IC50 concentrations for variant-type 1236T-2677T-3435T P-gp and variant-type 1236T-2677A-3435T P-gp were 5.56 ± 0.49 µg/mL and 3.33±0.67 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, the inhibition kinetics of EEAC also changed to uncompetitive inhibition in variant-type 1236T-2677A-3435T P-gp. The ATPase assay revealed that EEAC was an ATPase stimulator and was capable of reducing verapamil-induced ATPase levels. These results indicate that EEAC may be a potent P-gp inhibitor and higher dosages may be required in subjects carrying variant-types P-gp. Further studies are required to translate this basic knowledge into clinical applications. PMID:24586917

  13. Genetic variants of the vitamin K dependent coagulation system and intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogenesis of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in premature infants is multifactorial. Little is known about the impact of genetic variants in the vitamin K-dependent coagulation system on the development of IVH. Methods Polymorphisms in the genes encoding vitamin K epoxide reductase complex 1 (VKORC1 -1639G>A) and coagulation factor 7 (F7 -323Ins10) were examined prospectively in 90 preterm infants <32 weeks gestational age with respect to coagulation profile and IVH risk. Results F7-323Ins10 was associated with lower factor VII levels, but not with individual IVH risk. In VKORC1-wildtype infants, logistic regression analysis revealed a higher IVH risk compared to carriers of the -1639A allele. Levels of the vitamin K-dependent coagulation parameters assessed in the first hour after birth did not differ between VKORC1-wildtype infants and those carrying -1639A alleles. Conclusions Our data support the assumption that genetic variants in the vitamin K-dependent coagulation system influence the coagulation profile and the IVH risk in preterm infants. Further studies focussing on short-term changes in vitamin K-kinetics and the coagulation profile during the first days of life are required to further understand a possible link between development of IVH and genetic variants affecting the vitamin K-metabolism. PMID:25179312

  14. Genetic characterization of Greek population isolates reveals strong genetic drift at missense and trait-associated variants

    PubMed Central

    Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Xifara, Dionysia Kiara; Colonna, Vincenza; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Southam, Lorraine; Gilly, Arthur; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Fatumo, Segun; Matchan, Angela; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ntalla, Ioanna; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Chen, Yuan; Kiagiadaki, Chrysoula; Zengini, Eleni; Mamakou, Vasiliki; Athanasiadis, Antonis; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Kariakli, Vassiliki-Eirini; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Karabarinde, Alex; Sandhu, Manjinder; McVean, Gil; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Karaleftheri, Maria; Xue, Yali; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    Isolated populations are emerging as a powerful study design in the search for low-frequency and rare variant associations with complex phenotypes. Here we genotype 2,296 samples from two isolated Greek populations, the Pomak villages (HELIC-Pomak) in the North of Greece and the Mylopotamos villages (HELIC-MANOLIS) in Crete. We compare their genomic characteristics to the general Greek population and establish them as genetic isolates. In the MANOLIS cohort, we observe an enrichment of missense variants among the variants that have drifted up in frequency by more than fivefold. In the Pomak cohort, we find novel associations at variants on chr11p15.4 showing large allele frequency increases (from 0.2% in the general Greek population to 4.6% in the isolate) with haematological traits, for example, with mean corpuscular volume (rs7116019, P=2.3 × 10−26). We replicate this association in a second set of Pomak samples (combined P=2.0 × 10−36). We demonstrate significant power gains in detecting medical trait associations. PMID:25373335

  15. Effect of Genetic Variants in Two Chemokine Decoy Receptor Genes, DARC and CCBP2, on Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Huan; Chen, Ao-Xiang; Fan, Lei; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of two chemokine decoy receptors (CDRs), DARC and D6, on breast cancer metastasis is mainly due to their ability to sequester pro-malignant chemokines. We hypothesized that genetic variants in the DARC and CCBP2 (encoding D6) genes may be associated with breast cancer progression. In the present study, we evaluated the genetic contributions of DARC and CCBP2 to metastatic potential, indicated by lymph node metastasis (LNM). Ten single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (potentially functional SNPs and block-based tagging SNPs) in DARC and CCBP2 were genotyped in 785 breast cancer patients who had negative lymph nodes and 678 patients with positive lymph nodes. Two non-synonymous SNPs, rs12075 (G42D) in DARC and rs2228468 (S373Y) in CCBP2, were observed to be associated with LNM in univariate analysis and remained significant after adjustment for conventional clinical risk factors, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.54 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37 to 0.79) and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.62 to 0.98), respectively. Additional functional experiments revealed that both of these significant SNPs could affect metastasis of breast cancer in xenograft models by differentially altering the chemokine sequestration ability of their corresponding proteins. Furthermore, heterozygous GD genotype of G42D on human erythrocytes had a significantly stronger chemokine sequestration ability than homozygous GG of G42D ex vivo. Our data suggest that the genetic variants in the CDR genes are probably associated with the varied metastatic potential of breast cancer. The underlying mechanism, though it needs to be further investigated, may be that CDR variants could affect the chemokine sequestration ability of CDR proteins. PMID:24260134

  16. Comprehensive assessment of genetic sequence variants in the antioxidant 'master regulator' NRF2 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, Michael; Newman, Jeremy R B; Shan, Jianguo; Bentley, Steven; Wood, Stephen A; Silburn, Peter A; Mellick, George D

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder influenced by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The molecular mechanisms that underlie PD are unknown; however, oxidative stress and impairment of antioxidant defence mechanisms have been implicated as major contributors to disease pathogenesis. Previously, we have reported a PD patient-derived cellular model generated from biopsies of the olfactory mucosa, termed hONS cells, in which the NRF2-mediated antioxidant response pathway genes were among the most differentially-expressed. To date, few studies have examined the role of the NRF2 encoding gene, NFE2L2, and PD. In this study, we comprehensibly assessed whether rare and common NFE2L2 genetic variations modify susceptibility to PD using a large Australian case-control sample (PD=1338, controls=1379). We employed a haplotype-tagging approach that identified an association with the tagging SNP rs2364725 and PD (OR = 0.849 (0.760-0.948), P = 0.004). Further genetic screening in hONS cell lines produced no obvious pathogenic variants in the coding regions of NFE2L2. Finally, we investigated the relationship between xenobiotic exposures and NRF2 function, through gene-environment interactions, between NFE2L2 SNPs and smoking or pesticide exposure. Our results demonstrated a significant interaction between rs2706110 and pesticide exposure (OR = 0.597 (0.393-0.900), P = 0.014). In addition, we were able to identify some age-at-onset modifying SNPs and replicate an 'early-onset' haplotype that contains a previously identified 'functional promoter' SNP (rs6721961). Our results suggest a role of NFE2L2 genetic variants in modifying PD susceptibility and onset. Our findings also support the utility of testing gene-environment interactions in genetic studies of PD. PMID:26010367

  17. Phenotype-Based Genetic Association Studies (PGAS)—Towards Understanding the Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to Schizophrenia Subphenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric diseases ranging from schizophrenia to affective disorders and autism are heritable, highly complex and heterogeneous conditions, diagnosed purely clinically, with no supporting biomarkers or neuroimaging criteria. Relying on these “umbrella diagnoses”, genetic analyses, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS), were undertaken but failed to provide insight into the biological basis of these disorders. “Risk genotypes” of unknown significance with low odds ratios of mostly <1.2 were extracted and confirmed by including ever increasing numbers of individuals in large multicenter efforts. Facing these results, we have to hypothesize that thousands of genetic constellations in highly variable combinations with environmental co-factors can cause the individual disorder in the sense of a final common pathway. This would explain why the prevalence of mental diseases is so high and why mutations, including copy number variations, with a higher effect size than SNPs, constitute only a small part of variance. Elucidating the contribution of normal genetic variation to (disease) phenotypes, and so re-defining disease entities, will be extremely labor-intense but crucial. We have termed this approach PGAS (“phenotype-based genetic association studies”). Ultimate goal is the definition of biological subgroups of mental diseases. For that purpose, the GRAS (Göttingen Research Association for Schizophrenia) data collection was initiated in 2005. With >3000 phenotypical data points per patient, it comprises the world-wide largest currently available schizophrenia database (N > 1200), combining genome-wide SNP coverage and deep phenotyping under highly standardized conditions. First PGAS results on normal genetic variants, relevant for e.g., cognition or catatonia, demonstrated proof-of-concept. Presently, an autistic subphenotype of schizophrenia is being defined where an unfortunate accumulation of normal genotypes, so-called pro

  18. Developmental, transcriptome, and genetic alterations associated with parthenocarpy in the grapevine seedless somatic variant Corinto bianco.

    PubMed

    Royo, Carolina; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Nebish, Anna; Martínez, Óscar; Rey, Manuel; Aroutiounian, Rouben; Ibáñez, Javier; Martínez-Zapater, José M

    2016-01-01

    Seedlessness is a relevant trait in grapevine cultivars intended for fresh consumption or raisin production. Previous DNA marker analysis indicated that Corinto bianco (CB) is a parthenocarpic somatic variant of the seeded cultivar Pedro Ximenes (PX). This study compared both variant lines to determine the basis of this parthenocarpic phenotype. At maturity, CB seedless berries were 6-fold smaller than PX berries. The macrogametophyte was absent from CB ovules, and CB was also pollen sterile. Occasionally, one seed developed in 1.6% of CB berries. Microsatellite genotyping and flow cytometry analyses of seedlings generated from these seeds showed that most CB viable seeds were formed by fertilization of unreduced gametes generated by meiotic diplospory, a process that has not been described previously in grapevine. Microarray and RNA-sequencing analyses identified 1958 genes that were differentially expressed between CB and PX developing flowers. Genes downregulated in CB were enriched in gametophyte-preferentially expressed transcripts, indicating the absence of regular post-meiotic germline development in CB. RNA-sequencing was also used for genetic variant calling and 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms distinguishing the CB and PX variant lines were detected. Among these, CB-specific polymorphisms were considered as candidate parthenocarpy-responsible mutations, including a putative deleterious substitution in a HAL2-like protein. Collectively, these results revealed that the absence of a mature macrogametophyte, probably due to meiosis arrest, coupled with a process of fertilization-independent fruit growth, caused parthenocarpy in CB. This study provides a number of grapevine parthenocarpy-responsible candidate genes and shows how genomic approaches can shed light on the genetic origin of woody crop somatic variants. PMID:26454283

  19. Reproductive aging-associated common genetic variants and the risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A younger age at menarche and an older age at menopause are well established risk factors for breast cancer. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several novel genetic loci associated with these two traits. However, the association between these loci and breast cancer risk is unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated 19 and 17 newly identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the ReproGen Consortium that have been associated with age at menarche and age at natural menopause, respectively, and assessed their associations with breast cancer risk in 6 population-based studies among up to 3,683 breast cancer cases and 34,174 controls in white women of European ancestry. In addition, we used these SNPs to calculate genetic risk scores (GRSs) based on their associations with each trait. Results After adjusting for age and potential population stratification, two age at menarche associated SNPs (rs1079866 and rs7821178) and one age at natural menopause associated SNP (rs2517388) were associated with breast cancer risk (p values, 0.003, 0.009 and 0.023, respectively). The odds ratios for breast cancer corresponding to per-risk-allele were 1.14 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.24), 1.08 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.15) and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20), respectively, and were in the direction predicted by their associations with age at menarche or age at natural menopause. These associations did not appear to be attenuated by further controlling for self-reported age at menarche, age at natural menopause, or known breast cancer susceptibility loci. Although we did not observe a statistically significant association between any GRS for reproductive aging and breast cancer risk, the 4th and 5th highest quintiles of the younger age at menarche GRS had odds ratios of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.28) and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.00 to 1.27), respectively, compared to the lowest quintile. Conclusions Our study suggests that three genetic variants, independent of their

  20. Genetic variants associated with lean and obese type 2 diabetes in a Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiaomu; Xing, Xiaoyan; Hong, Jing; Zhang, Xuelian; Yang, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is highly phenotypically heterogeneous. Genetics of the heterogeneity of lean and obese T2D is not clear. The aim of the present study was to identify the associations of T2D-related genetic variants with the risks for lean and obese T2D among the Chinese Han population. A case–control study consisting of 5338 T2D patients and 4663 normal glycemic controls of Chinese Han recruited in the Chinese National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Study was conducted. T2D cases were identified according to the 1999 World Health Organization criteria. Lean T2D was defined as T2D patient with a body mass index (BMI) <23 kg/m2, whereas obese T2D was defined as T2D patient with a BMI ≥28 kg/m2. Twenty-five genome-wide association studies previously validated T2D-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. A genotype risk score (GRS) based on the 25 SNPs was created. After adjusting for multiple covariates, SNPs in or near CDKAL1, CDKN2BAS, KCNQ1, TCF7L2, CDC123/CAMK1D, HHEX, and TCF2 were associated with the risk for lean T2D, and SNPs in or near KCNQ1 and FTO were associated with the risk for obese T2D. The results showed that the GRS for 25 T2D-related SNPs was more strongly associated with the risk for lean T2D (Ptrend = 2.66 × 10−12) than for obese T2D (Ptrend = 2.91 × 10−5) in our study population. Notably, the T2D GRS contributed to lower obesity-related measurements and greater β-cell dysfunction, including lower insulin levels in oral glucose tolerance test, decreased insulinogenic index, and Homeostasis Model Assessment for β-cell Function. In conclusion, our findings identified T2D-related genetic loci that contribute to the risk of lean and obese T2D individually and additively in a Chinese Han population. Moreover, the study highlights the contribution of known T2D genomic loci to the heterogeneity of lean and obese T2D in Chinese Hans. PMID:27281091

  1. Multiple genetic variants predict steady-state nevirapine clearance in HIV-infected Cambodians

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Julie; Chou, Monidarin; Richardson, Danielle M.; Verstuyft, Céline; Leger, Paul D.; Mentré, France; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Haas, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In a previous analysis involving protocol ANRS 12154, interindividual variability in steady-state nevirapine clearance among HIV-infected Cambodians was partially explained by CYP2B6 516G→T (CYP2B6*6). Here, we examine whether additional genetic variants predict nevirapine clearance in this cohort. Methods Analyses included Phnom Penh ESTHER (Ensemble pour une Solidarité Thérapeutique Hospitalière en Réseau) cohort participants who had consented for genetic testing. All participants were receiving nevirapine plus two nucleoside analogs. The mean individual nevirapine clearance estimates were derived from a population model developed on nevirapine concentrations at 18 and 36 months of therapy. Polymorphisms were assayed in ABCB1, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and NR1I2. Results Of 198 assayed loci, 130 were polymorphic. Among 129 individuals with evaluable genetic data, nevirapine clearance ranged from 1.06 to 5.00 l/h in 128 individuals and was 7.81 l/h in one individual. In bivariate linear regression, CYP2B6 516G→T (CYP2B6*6) was associated with lower nevirapine clearances (P = 3.5 × 10–6). In a multivariate linear regression model conditioned on CYP2B6 516G→T, independent associations were identified with CYP2B6 rs7251950, CYP2B6 rs2279343, and CYP3A4 rs2687116. The CYP3A4 association disappeared after censoring the outlier clearance value. A model that included CYP2B6 516G→T (P = 1.0 × 10–9), rs7251950 (P = 4.8 × 10–5), and rs2279343 (P = 7.1 × 10–5) explained 11% of interindividual variability in nevirapine clearance. Conclusion Among HIV-infected Cambodians, several CYP2B6 polymorphisms were associated independently with steady-state nevirapine clearance. The prediction of nevirapine clearance was improved by considering several polymorphisms in combination. PMID:23104099

  2. Association of Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Variants with Breast Cancer Survival among Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Ben; Cai, Hui; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the genetic susceptibility of T2D was associated with overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) outcomes for breast cancer (BC). Methods Included in the study were 6346 BC patients who participated in three population-based epidemiological studies of BC and were genotyped with either GWAS or Exome-chip. We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) for diabetes using risk variants identified from the GWAS catalog (http://genome.gov/gwastudies) that were associated with T2D risk at a minimum significance level of P ≤ 5.0E-8 among Asian population and evaluated its associations with BC outcomes with Cox proportional hazards models. Results During a median follow-up of 8.08 years (range, 0.01–16.95 years), 1208 deaths were documented in 6346 BC patients. Overall, the diabetes GRS was not associated with OS and DFS. Analyses stratified by estrogen receptor status (ER) showed that the diabetes GRS was inversely associated with OS among women with ER- but not in women with ER+ breast cancer; the multivariable adjusted HR was 1.38 (95% CI: 1.05–1.82) when comparing the highest to the lowest GRS quartiles. The association of diabetes GRS with OS varied by diabetes status (P for interaction <0.01). In women with history of diabetes, higher diabetes GRS was significantly associated with worse OS, with HR of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.28–3.88) for the highest vs. lowest quartile, particularly among women with an ER- breast cancer, with corresponding HR being 4.59 (95% CI: 1.04–20.28). No significant association between the diabetes GRS and OS was observed across different BMI and PR groups. Conclusions Our study suggested that genetic susceptibility of T2D was positively associated with total mortality among women with ER- breast cancer, particularly among subjects with a history of diabetes. Additional studies are warranted to verify the associations and elucidate the underlying biological mechanism. PMID:25679392

  3. Genetic variants in multisynthetase complex genes are associated with DNA damage levels in Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zhu, Meng; Chen, Weihong; Xie, Kaipeng; Shen, Wei; Yuan, Jing; Cheng, Yang; Geng, Liguo; Wang, Yuzhuo; Jin, Guangfu; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Du, Jiangbo; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Hu, Zhibin; Wu, Tangchun; Shen, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and ARS-interacting multi-functional proteins (AIMPs) form a multisynthetase complex (MSC) and play an important role in the process of DNA damage repair. We hypothesized that genetic variants in key ARSs and AIMPs might regulate the DNA damage response. Therefore, we systematically screened 23 potentially functional polymorphisms in MSC genes and evaluated the association between the genetic variants and DNA damage levels in 307 subjects from three cities in southern, central and northern China (Zhuhai, Wuhan and Tianjin, respectively). We examined personal 24-h PM2.5 exposure levels and DNA damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes for each subject. We found that the variant allele of rs12199241 in AIMP3 was significantly associated with DNA damage levels (β=0.343, 95%CI: 0.133-0.554, P=0.001). Meanwhile, the results of rs5030754 in EPRS and rs3784929 in KARS indicated their suggestive roles in DNA damage processes (β=0.331, 95%CI: 0.062-0.599, P=0.016 for rs5030754; β=0.192, 95%CI: 0.016-0.368, P=0.033 for rs3784929, respectively). After multiple testing, rs12199241 was still significantly associated with DNA damage levels. Combined analysis of these three polymorphisms showed a significant allele-dosage association between the number of risk alleles and higher DNA damage levels (Ptrend<0.001). These findings indicate that genetic variants in MSC genes may account for PM2.5-modulated DNA damage levels in Chinese populations. PMID:26871430

  4. Genetic and Functional Sequence Variants of the SIRT3 Gene Promoter in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoyun; Pang, Shuchao; Huang, Jian; Cui, Yinghua; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD), including myocardial infarction (MI), is a common complex disease that is caused by atherosclerosis. Although a large number of genetic variants have been associated with CAD, only 10% of CAD cases could be explained. It has been proposed that low frequent and rare genetic variants may be main causes for CAD. SIRT3, a mitochondrial deacetylase, plays important roles in mitochondrial function and metabolism. Lack of SIRT3 in experimental animal leads to several age-related diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, SIRT3 gene variants may contribute to the MI development. In this study, SIRT3 gene promoter was genetically and functionally analyzed in large cohorts of MI patients (n = 319) and ethnic-matched controls (n = 322). Total twenty-three DNA sequence variants (DSVs) were identified, including 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Six novel heterozygous DSVs, g.237307A>G, g.237270G>A, g.237023_25del, g.236653C>A, g.236628G>C, g.236557T>C, and two SNPs g.237030C>T (rs12293349) and g.237022C>G (rs369344513), were identified in nine MI patients, but in none of controls. Three SNPs, g.236473C>T (rs11246029), g.236380_81ins (rs71019893) and g.236370C>G (rs185277566), were more significantly frequent in MI patients than controls (P<0.05). These DSVs and SNPs, except g.236557T>C, significantly decreased the transcriptional activity of the SIRT3 gene promoter in cultured HEK-293 cells and H9c2 cells. Therefore, these DSVs identified in MI patients may change SIRT3 level by affecting the transcriptional activity of SIRT3 gene promoter, contributing to the MI development as a risk factor. PMID:27078640

  5. Genetic purgatory and the cardiac channelopathies: Exposing the variants of uncertain/unknown significance issue.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Merriam-Webster's online dictionary defines purgatory as "an intermediate state after death for expiatory purification" or more specifically as "a place or state of punishment wherein according to Roman Catholic doctrine the souls of those who die in God׳s grace may make satisfaction for past sins and so become fit for heaven." Alternatively, it is defined as "a place or state of temporary suffering or misery." Either way, purgatory is a place where you are stuck, and you don't want to be stuck there. It is in this context that the term genetic purgatory is introduced. Genetic purgatory is a place where the genetic test-ordering physician and patients and their families are stuck when a variant of uncertain/unknown significance (VUS) has been elucidated. It is in this dark place where suffering and misery are occurring because of unenlightened handling of a VUS, which includes using the VUS for predictive genetic testing and making radical treatment recommendations based on the presence or absence of a so-called maybe mutation. Before one can escape from this miserable place, one must first recognize that one is stuck there. Hence, the purpose of this review article is to fully expose the VUS issue as it relates to the cardiac channelopathies and make the cardiologists/geneticists/genetic counselors who order such genetic tests believers in genetic purgatory. Only then can one meaningfully attempt to get out of that place and seek to promote a VUS to disease-causative mutation status or demote it to an utterly innocuous and irrelevant variant. PMID:26144349

  6. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Steven C.; Sirota, Marina; Chen, Richard; Butte, Atul J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2016-01-01

    Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford), and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED); data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups. PMID:27115429

  7. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  8. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity - an overview of human studies.

    PubMed

    Leońska-Duniec, A; Ahmetov, I I; Zmijewski, P

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  9. Efficient Improvement of Silage Additives by Using Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Zoe S.; Gilbert, Richard J.; Merry, Roger J.; Kell, Douglas B.; Theodorou, Michael K.; Griffith, Gareth W.

    2000-01-01

    The enormous variety of substances which may be added to forage in order to manipulate and improve the ensilage process presents an empirical, combinatorial optimization problem of great complexity. To investigate the utility of genetic algorithms for designing effective silage additive combinations, a series of small-scale proof of principle silage experiments were performed with fresh ryegrass. Having established that significant biochemical changes occur over an ensilage period as short as 2 days, we performed a series of experiments in which we used 50 silage additive combinations (prepared by using eight bacterial and other additives, each of which was added at six different levels, including zero [i.e., no additive]). The decrease in pH, the increase in lactate concentration, and the free amino acid concentration were measured after 2 days and used to calculate a “fitness” value that indicated the quality of the silage (compared to a control silage made without additives). This analysis also included a “cost” element to account for different total additive levels. In the initial experiment additive levels were selected randomly, but subsequently a genetic algorithm program was used to suggest new additive combinations based on the fitness values determined in the preceding experiments. The result was very efficient selection for silages in which large decreases in pH and high levels of lactate occurred along with low levels of free amino acids. During the series of five experiments, each of which comprised 50 treatments, there was a steady increase in the amount of lactate that accumulated; the best treatment combination was that used in the last experiment, which produced 4.6 times more lactate than the untreated silage. The additive combinations that were found to yield the highest fitness values in the final (fifth) experiment were assessed to determine a range of biochemical and microbiological quality parameters during full-term silage

  10. Direct Correlation of Cell Toxicity to Conformational Ensembles of GeneticVariants.

    PubMed

    Somavarapu, Arun Kumar; Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-12-16

    We report a systematic analysis of conformational ensembles generated from multiseed molecular dynamics simulations of all 15 known genetic variants of Aβ42. We show that experimentally determined variant toxicities are largely explained by random coil content of the amyloid ensembles (correlation with smaller EC50 values; R(2) = 0.54, p = 0.01), and to some extent the helix character (more helix-character is less toxic, R(2) = 0.32, p = 0.07) and hydrophobic surface (R(2) = 0.37, p = 0.04). Our findings suggest that qualitative structural features of the amyloids, rather than the quantitative levels, are fundamentally related to neurodegeneration. The data provide molecular explanations for the high toxicity of E22 variants and for the protective features of the recently characterized A2T variant. The identified conformational features, for example, the local helix-coil-strand transitions of the C-terminals of the peptides, are of likely interest in the direct targeting of amyloids by rational drug design. PMID:26447342

  11. Msx1 Gene Variant - Its Presence in Tooth Absence - A Case Control Genetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Naveen Admala; Adusumilli, Gopinath; Devanna, Raghu; Pichai, Saravanan; Rohra, Mayur Gobindram; Arjunan, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Background: Non Syndromic tooth agenesis is a congenital anomaly with significant medical, psychological and social ramifications. There is sufficient evidence to hypothesize that locus for this condition can be identified by candidate genes. The aim of this study was to test whether MSX1 671 T>C gene variant was involved in etiology of Non Syndromic tooth agenesis in Raichur Patients. Materials & Methods: Blood samples were collected with informed consent from 50 subjects having Non Syndromic tooth agenesis and 50 controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood samples, Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed (PCR) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) was performed for digestion products that were evaluated. Results: The Results showed positive correlation between MSX1671 T>C gene variant and Non Syndromic tooth agenesis in Raichur Patients. Conclusion: MSX1 671 T>C gene variant may be a good screening marker for Non Syndromic tooth agenesis in Raichur Patients . How to cite this article:Reddy NA, Adusumilli G, Devanna R, Pichai S, Rohra MG, Arjunan S. Msx1 Gene Variant - Its Presence in Tooth Absence - A Case Control Genetic Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):20-6. PMID:24324300

  12. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kathryn L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Jacob J; Christiansen, Morten H; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population. PMID:27064276

  13. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population. PMID:27064276

  14. M2SG: mapping human disease-related genetic variants to protein sequences and genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renkai; Cong, Qian; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a manually curated compendium of human genetic variants and the corresponding phenotypes, mostly human diseases. Instead of directly documenting the native sequences for gene entries, OMIM links its entries to protein and DNA sequences in other databases. However, because of the existence of gene isoforms and errors in OMIM records, mapping a specific OMIM mutation to its corresponding protein sequence is not trivial. Combining computer programs and extensive manual curation of OMIM full-text descriptions and original literature, we mapped 98% of OMIM amino acid substitutions (AASs) and all SwissProt Variant (SwissVar) disease-related AASs to reference sequences and confidently mapped 99.96% of all AASs to the genomic loci. Based on the results, we developed an online database and interactive web server (M2SG) to (i) retrieve the mapped OMIM and SwissVar variants for a given protein sequence; and (ii) obtain related proteins and mutations for an input disease phenotype. This database will be useful for analyzing sequences, understanding the effect of mutations, identifying important genetic variations and designing experiments on a protein of interest. Availability and implementation: The database and web server are freely available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/M2S/mut2seq.cgi. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24002112

  15. The genetic stability of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) molecular variants.

    PubMed Central

    Góra-Sochacka, A; Kierzek, A; Candresse, T; Zagórski, W

    1997-01-01

    RNA viruses propagate as a population of genetically related entities composing a quasi-species. Specific representatives are the result of both a high mutation rate during replication and competition between the continuously arising sequence variants. Similar to other RNA pathogens, potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) propagates as a population of similar but nonidentical sequences. The sequence of progeny molecules derived from cloned molecular variants of PSTVd were studied after one and six consecutive plant passages. Although the severe parental sequence S23 was found to be genetically stable, all five other parental sequences analyzed, irrespective of their pathogenicity, led to the appearance of complex populations. Divergence of the progeny was observed at the sequence level, but also, more surprisingly, at the level of the pathogenicity of individual progeny molecules. In two cases, the parental sequence was retained in the progeny population. In the other cases, it was completely out-competed and eliminated, sometimes in as little as one plant passage. Although it has been observed previously that artificially mutated PSTVd molecules may revert rapidly to the wild-type sequence, this study presents direct evidence for the rapid evolution of naturally occurring PSTVd sequence variants. PMID:8990400

  16. A Rare Truncating BRCA2 Variant and Genetic Susceptibility to Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Anantharaman, Devasena; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Gaborieau, Valérie; Chabrier, Amélie; Vallée, Maxime P.; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V.; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S.; Conway, David I.; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M.; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Fernández Garrote, Leticia; Polesel, Jerry; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A.; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Deleterious BRCA2 genetic variants markedly increase risk of developing breast cancer. A rare truncating BRCA2 genetic variant, rs11571833 (K3326X), has been associated with a 2.5-fold risk of lung squamous cell carcinoma but only a modest 26% increase in breast cancer risk. We analyzed the association between BRCA2 SNP rs11571833 and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer risk with multivariable unconditional logistic regression adjusted by sex and combinations of study and country for 5942 UADT squamous cell carcinoma case patients and 8086 control patients from nine different studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. rs11571833 was associated with UADT cancers (odds ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval = 1.89 to 3.38, P = 3x10-10) and was present in European, Latin American, and Indian populations but extremely rare in Japanese populations. The association appeared more apparent in smokers (current or former) compared with never smokers (P het = .026). A robust association between a truncating BRCA2 variant and UADT cancer risk suggests that treatment strategies orientated towards BRCA2 mutations may warrant further investigation in UADT tumors. PMID:25838448

  17. Genetic Polymorphisms Analysis of Pharmacogenomic VIP Variants in Miao Ethnic Group of Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianbo; Aikemu, Ainiwaer; Zhang, Mingxia; Geng, Tingting; Feng, Tian; Kang, Longli; Luo, Manlin

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic polymorphisms have a potential clinical role in determining both inter-individual and inter-ethnic differences in drug efficacy, but we have not found any pharmacogenomics information regarding minorities, such as the Miao ethnic group. Our study aimed to screen numbers of the Miao ethnic group for genotype frequencies of VIP variants and to determine differences between the Miao and other human populations worldwide. Material/Methods In this study, we genotyped 66 Very Important Pharmacogene (VIP) variants selected from PharmGKB in 98 unrelated, healthy Miao individuals from the Guizhou province and compared our data with 12 other populations, including 11 populations from the HapMap data set and Xi’an Han Chinese. Results Using the χ2 test, we found that the allele frequencies of the VDR rs1544410 and VKORC1 (rs9934438) variants in the Miao population are quite different from that in other ethnic groups. Furthermore, we found that genotype frequencies of rs1801133 (MTHFR) in the 13 selected populations are significantly different. Population structure and F-statistics (Fst) analysis show that the genetic background of the Miao is relatively close to that of Chinese in metropolitan Denver, CO, USA (CHD). Conclusions Our results help complete the information provided by the pharmacogenomics database of the Miao ethnic group and provide a theoretical basis for safer drug administration, which may be useful for diagnosing and treating diseases in this population. PMID:26632549

  18. A rare truncating BRCA2 variant and genetic susceptibility to upper aerodigestive tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Delahaye-Sourdeix, Manon; Anantharaman, Devasena; Timofeeva, Maria N; Gaborieau, Valérie; Chabrier, Amélie; Vallée, Maxime P; Lagiou, Pagona; Holcátová, Ivana; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Agudo, Antonio; Castellsagué, Xavier; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Barzan, Luigi; Canova, Cristina; Thakker, Nalin S; Conway, David I; Znaor, Ariana; Healy, Claire M; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonilia; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabianova, Eleonora; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Menezes, Ana; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Eluf-Neto, José; Boffetta, Paolo; Fernández Garrote, Leticia; Polesel, Jerry; Lener, Marcin; Jaworowska, Ewa; Lubiński, Jan; Boccia, Stefania; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja A; Mahimkar, Manoj B; Matsuo, Keitaro; Franceschi, Silvia; Byrnes, Graham; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D

    2015-05-01

    Deleterious BRCA2 genetic variants markedly increase risk of developing breast cancer. A rare truncating BRCA2 genetic variant, rs11571833 (K3326X), has been associated with a 2.5-fold risk of lung squamous cell carcinoma but only a modest 26% increase in breast cancer risk. We analyzed the association between BRCA2 SNP rs11571833 and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer risk with multivariable unconditional logistic regression adjusted by sex and combinations of study and country for 5942 UADT squamous cell carcinoma case patients and 8086 control patients from nine different studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. rs11571833 was associated with UADT cancers (odds ratio = 2.53, 95% confidence interval = 1.89 to 3.38, P = 3x10(-10)) and was present in European, Latin American, and Indian populations but extremely rare in Japanese populations. The association appeared more apparent in smokers (current or former) compared with never smokers (P het = .026). A robust association between a truncating BRCA2 variant and UADT cancer risk suggests that treatment strategies orientated towards BRCA2 mutations may warrant further investigation in UADT tumors. PMID:25838448

  19. Mapping genetic variants underlying differences in the central nitrogen metabolism in fermenter yeasts.

    PubMed

    Jara, Matías; Cubillos, Francisco A; García, Verónica; Salinas, Francisco; Aguilera, Omayra; Liti, Gianni; Martínez, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Different populations within a species represent a rich reservoir of allelic variants, corresponding to an evolutionary signature of withstood environmental constraints. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are widely utilised in the fermentation of different kinds of alcoholic beverages, such as, wine and sake, each of them derived from must with distinct nutrient composition. Importantly, adequate nitrogen levels in the medium are essential for the fermentation process, however, a comprehensive understanding of the genetic variants determining variation in nitrogen consumption is lacking. Here, we assessed the genetic factors underlying variation in nitrogen consumption in a segregating population derived from a cross between two main fermenter yeasts, a Wine/European and a Sake isolate. By linkage analysis we identified 18 main effect QTLs for ammonium and amino acids sources. Interestingly, majority of QTLs were involved in more than a single trait, grouped based on amino acid structure and indicating high levels of pleiotropy across nitrogen sources, in agreement with the observed patterns of phenotypic co-variation. Accordingly, we performed reciprocal hemizygosity analysis validating an effect for three genes, GLT1, ASI1 and AGP1. Furthermore, we detected a widespread pleiotropic effect on these genes, with AGP1 affecting seven amino acids and nine in the case of GLT1 and ASI1. Based on sequence and comparative analysis, candidate causative mutations within these genes were also predicted. Altogether, the identification of these variants demonstrate how Sake and Wine/European genetic backgrounds differentially consume nitrogen sources, in part explaining independently evolved preferences for nitrogen assimilation and representing a niche of genetic diversity for the implementation of practical approaches towards more efficient strains for nitrogen metabolism. PMID:24466135

  20. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  1. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  2. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  3. 45 CFR 146.122 - Additional requirements prohibiting discrimination based on genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individual has a genetic variant associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is a genetic test... manifested with respect to A. Example 2. (i) Facts. Individual B has several family members with colon cancer... hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). B's physician, a health care professional with...

  4. Genome-wide association analyses identify new risk variants and the genetic architecture of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    van Rheenen, Wouter; Shatunov, Aleksey; Dekker, Annelot M; McLaughlin, Russell L; Diekstra, Frank P; Pulit, Sara L; van der Spek, Rick A A; Võsa, Urmo; de Jong, Simone; Robinson, Matthew R; Yang, Jian; Fogh, Isabella; van Doormaal, Perry Tc; Tazelaar, Gijs H P; Koppers, Max; Blokhuis, Anna M; Sproviero, William; Jones, Ashley R; Kenna, Kevin P; van Eijk, Kristel R; Harschnitz, Oliver; Schellevis, Raymond D; Brands, William J; Medic, Jelena; Menelaou, Androniki; Vajda, Alice; Ticozzi, Nicola; Lin, Kuang; Rogelj, Boris; Vrabec, Katarina; Ravnik-Glavač, Metka; Koritnik, Blaž; Zidar, Janez; Leonardis, Lea; Grošelj, Leja Dolenc; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Salachas, François; Meininger, Vincent; de Carvalho, Mamede; Pinto, Susana; Mora, Jesus S; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Polak, Meraida; Chandran, Siddharthan; Colville, Shuna; Swingler, Robert; Morrison, Karen E; Shaw, Pamela J; Hardy, John; Orrell, Richard W; Pittman, Alan; Sidle, Katie; Fratta, Pietro; Malaspina, Andrea; Topp, Simon; Petri, Susanne; Abdulla, Susanne; Drepper, Carsten; Sendtner, Michael; Meyer, Thomas; Ophoff, Roel A; Staats, Kim A; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Basak, A Nazli; Tunca, Ceren; Hamzeiy, Hamid; Parman, Yesim; Meitinger, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Andres, Christian R; Maurel, Cindy; Bensimon, Gilbert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Brice, Alexis; Payan, Christine A M; Saker-Delye, Safaa; Dürr, Alexandra; Wood, Nicholas W; Tittmann, Lukas; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Amouyel, Philippe; Tzourio, Christophe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Hofman, Albert; Curtis, Charles; Blauw, Hylke M; van der Kooi, Anneke J; de Visser, Marianne; Goris, An; Weber, Markus; Shaw, Christopher E; Smith, Bradley N; Pansarasa, Orietta; Cereda, Cristina; Del Bo, Roberto; Comi, Giacomo P; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Bertolin, Cinzia; Sorarù, Gianni; Mazzini, Letizia; Pensato, Viviana; Gellera, Cinzia; Tiloca, Cinzia; Ratti, Antonia; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Brunetti, Maura; Arcuti, Simona; Capozzo, Rosa; Zecca, Chiara; Lunetta, Christian; Penco, Silvana; Riva, Nilo; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano; Muller, Bernard; Stuit, Robbert Jan; Blair, Ian; Zhang, Katharine; McCann, Emily P; Fifita, Jennifer A; Nicholson, Garth A; Rowe, Dominic B; Pamphlett, Roger; Kiernan, Matthew C; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witte, Otto W; Ringer, Thomas; Prell, Tino; Stubendorff, Beatrice; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Leigh, P Nigel; Casale, Federico; Chio, Adriano; Beghi, Ettore; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Tortelli, Rosanna; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Powell, John; Ludolph, Albert C; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Robberecht, Wim; Van Damme, Philip; Franke, Lude; Pers, Tune H; Brown, Robert H; Glass, Jonathan D; Landers, John E; Hardiman, Orla; Andersen, Peter M; Corcia, Philippe; Vourc'h, Patrick; Silani, Vincenzo; Wray, Naomi R; Visscher, Peter M; de Bakker, Paul I W; van Es, Michael A; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Lewis, Cathryn M; Breen, Gerome; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan H

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate the genetic architecture of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and find associated loci, we assembled a custom imputation reference panel from whole-genome-sequenced patients with ALS and matched controls (n = 1,861). Through imputation and mixed-model association analysis in 12,577 cases and 23,475 controls, combined with 2,579 cases and 2,767 controls in an independent replication cohort, we fine-mapped a new risk locus on chromosome 21 and identified C21orf2 as a gene associated with ALS risk. In addition, we identified MOBP and SCFD1 as new associated risk loci. We established evidence of ALS being a complex genetic trait with a polygenic architecture. Furthermore, we estimated the SNP-based heritability at 8.5%, with a distinct and important role for low-frequency variants (frequency 1-10%). This study motivates the interrogation of larger samples with full genome coverage to identify rare causal variants that underpin ALS risk. PMID:27455348

  5. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Alisa K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E.; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R. B.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bouchard, Claude; Brunner, Eric; Budimir, Danijela; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Couper, David; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Egan, Josephine M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eury, Elodie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Fox, Caroline S; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Galan, Pilar; de Geus, Eco; Gigante, Bruna; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goel, Anuj; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Ola; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joseph; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Jhun, Min A.; Johnson, Paul C.D.; Jukema, J Wouter; Jula, Antti; Kao, W.H.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo; Lannfelt, Lars; Lathrop, G Mark; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Marmot, Michael; Meneton, Pierre; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Miljkovic, Iva; Narisu, Narisu; O’Connell, Jeff; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S.; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pehlic, Marina; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda; Pericic, Marijana; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Räikkönen, Katri; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rehnberg, Emil; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saaristo, Timo; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B.; Saxena, Richa; Schwarz, Peter; Seedorf, Udo; Sennblad, Bengt; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Johannes H.; Small, Kerrin S.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Trompet, Stella; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vikström, Max; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Wheeler, Eleanor; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wright, Alan F.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zelenika, Diana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Wareham, Nicholas J.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Ines; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.; Langenberg, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction, but contributed little to our understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways may be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interaction between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a novel joint meta-analytical approach to test associations with fasting insulin (FI) and glucose (FG) on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown FI loci at P<5×10−8 in combined discovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol levels, suggestive of a role for these FI loci in insulin resistance pathways. The localization of these additional loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology. PMID:22581228

  6. Effects of oxytocin and genetic variants on brain and behaviour: Implications for treatment in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeusz, Cali F; Ganella, Eleni P; Labuschagne, Izelle; Bousman, Chad; Pantelis, Christos

    2015-11-01

    Impairments in social cognition and poor social functioning are core features of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. In recent years, there has been a move towards developing new treatment strategies that specifically target social cognitive and social behavioural deficits. Oxytocin (OXT) is one such strategy that has gained increasing attention. There is a strong rationale for studying OXT in psychosis, from both an evolutionary perspective and neurodevelopmental-cognitive model of schizophrenia. Thus, the aim of this review was to critique and examine the observational and clinical oxytocin trial literature in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. A handful of clinical trials suggest that OXT treatment may be beneficial for remediating social cognitive impairments, psychiatric symptoms, and improving social outcomes. However, inconsistencies exist in this literature, which may be explained by individual differences in the underlying neural response to OXT treatment and/or variation in the oxytocin and oxytocin receptor genes. Therefore, we additionally reviewed the evidence for structural and functional neural intermediate phenotypes in humans that link genetic variants to social behaviour/thinking, and discuss the implications of such interactions in the context of dysfunctional brain networks in schizophrenia. Factors that pose challenges for future OXT clinical research include the impact of age, sex, and ancestry, task-specific effects, bioavailability and pharmacokinetics, as well as neurotransmitter and drug interactions. While initial findings from OXT single dose/clinical trial studies are promising, more interdisciplinary research in both healthy and psychiatric populations is needed before determining whether OXT is a viable treatment option/adjunct for addressing poor illness outcomes in psychotic disorders. PMID:26123171

  7. Novel Associations between FAAH Genetic Variants and Postoperative Central Opioid related Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar; Zhang, Xue; Chidambaran, Vidya; Mavi, Jagroop; Pilipenko, Valentina; Mersha, Tesfaye B.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Martin, Lisa J.; McAuliffe, John

    2014-01-01

    Opioid effects are potentiated by cannabinoid agonists including anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Inter-individual variability in responses to opioids is a major clinical problem. Multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries occur every year in due to opioid induced respiratory depression in surgical patients and drug abusers of opioids and cannabinoids. This study aimed to determine specific associations between genetic variants of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and postoperative central opioid adverse effects in children undergoing tonsillectomy. This is a prospective genotype blinded observational study 259 healthy children between 6 and 15 years that received standard perioperative care with a standard anesthetic and an intraoperative dose of morphine were enrolled. Associations between frequent polymorphisms of FAAH and central postoperative opioid adverse effects including, respiratory depression (RD), postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and prolonged stay in Post Anesthesia Recovery Room (PACU) due to RD and PONV were analyzed. Five specific FAAH SNPs had significant associations with more than 2 fold increased risk for refractory PONV (adjusted p<0.0018), and nominal associations (p<0.05) with RD and prolonged PACU stay in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. FAAH SNP, rs324420 is a missense mutation with altered FAAH function and it is linked with other FAAH SNPs associated with PONV and RD in our cohort; association between PONV and rs324420 was confirmed in our extended cohort with additional 66 white children. Specific FAAH polymorphisms are associated with refractory PONV, opioid-related respiratory depression, and prolonged PACU stay due to opioid adverse effects in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:25558980

  8. Epistatic interaction of genetic depression risk variants in the human subgenual cingulate cortex during memory encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schott, B H; Assmann, A; Schmierer, P; Soch, J; Erk, S; Garbusow, M; Mohnke, S; Pöhland, L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, N; Barman, A; Wüstenberg, T; Haddad, L; Grimm, O; Witt, S; Richter, S; Klein, M; Schütze, H; Mühleisen, T W; Cichon, S; Rietschel, M; Noethen, M M; Tost, H; Gundelfinger, E D; Düzel, E; Heinz, A; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Seidenbecher, C I; Walter, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have pointed to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the neuronal calcium channel CaV1.2 (CACNA1C; rs1006737) and the presynaptic active zone protein Piccolo (PCLO; rs2522833) as risk factors for affective disorders, particularly major depression. Previous neuroimaging studies of depression-related endophenotypes have highlighted the role of the subgenual cingulate cortex (CG25) in negative mood and depressive psychopathology. Here, we aimed to assess how recently associated PCLO and CACNA1C depression risk alleles jointly affect memory-related CG25 activity as an intermediate phenotype in clinically healthy humans. To investigate the combined effects of rs1006737 and rs2522833 on the CG25 response, we conducted three functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of episodic memory formation in three independent cohorts (N=79, 300, 113). An epistatic interaction of PCLO and CACNA1C risk alleles in CG25 during memory encoding was observed in all groups, with carriers of no risk allele and of both risk alleles showing higher CG25 activation during encoding when compared with carriers of only one risk allele. Moreover, PCLO risk allele carriers showed lower memory performance and reduced encoding-related hippocampal activation. In summary, our results point to region-specific epistatic effects of PCLO and CACNA1C risk variants in CG25, potentially related to episodic memory. Our data further suggest that genetic risk factors on the SNP level do not necessarily have additive effects but may show complex interactions. Such epistatic interactions might contribute to the ‘missing heritability' of complex phenotypes. PMID:24643163

  9. Functional FEN1 genetic variants and haplotypes are associated with glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Xiao-Guang; Li, Jinpeng; Yuan, Qipeng; Jiang, Tao; Yang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    As a tumor suppressor, FEN1 plays an essential role in keeping genomic instability and preventing tumorigenesis. There are two functional genetic variants (-69G>A and 4150G>T) in the FEN1 gene, which have been associated with DNA damage levels in coke-oven workers as well as risks of lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer in general populations. However, it is still unknown how these polymorphisms and their haplotypes are associated with glioma risk. Therefore, we investigated the role of these polymorphisms in glioma development using a case-control design in a Chinese population. The impact of the haplotypes constructed by these two polymorphisms on glioma risk was also examined. It was observed that the FEN1-69GG or 4150GG genotype were significantly associated to increased glioma risk compared with the -69AA or 4150TT genotype [Odds ratios (OR) = 1.87, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-2.85, P = 0.003; or OR = 1.87, 95 % CI = 1.23-2.84, P = 0.003). The associations were more pronounced among female subjects (For -69AG or GG genotype: OR = 2.35, 95 % CI = 1.22-4.52; for 4150TG or GG genotype: OR = 2.33, 95 % CI = 1.21-4.48) and patients with grade 1 or 2 disease (For -69AG or GG genotype: OR = 2.21, 95 % CI = 1.20-4.05; for 4150TG or GG genotype: OR = 2.45, 95 % CI = 1.31-4.58). Additionally, the G(-69)G(4150) haplotype was also significantly associated with increased glioma risk compared with the A(-69)T(4150) haplotype. Our results suggest that FEN1 polymorphisms and haplotypes are associated with glioma risk. PMID:23184144

  10. Novel associations between FAAH genetic variants and postoperative central opioid-related adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sadhasivam, S; Zhang, X; Chidambaran, V; Mavi, J; Pilipenko, V; Mersha, T B; Meller, J; Kaufman, K M; Martin, L J; McAuliffe, J

    2015-10-01

    Opioid effects are potentiated by cannabinoid agonists including anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Inter-individual variability in responses to opioids is a major clinical problem. Multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries occur every year because of opioid-induced respiratory depression (RD) in surgical patients and drug abusers of opioids and cannabinoids. This study aimed to determine specific associations between genetic variants of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and postoperative central opioid adverse effects in children undergoing tonsillectomy. This is a prospective genotype-blinded observational study in which 259 healthy children between 6 and 15 years of age who received standard perioperative care with a standard anesthetic and an intraoperative dose of morphine were enrolled. Associations between frequent polymorphisms of FAAH and central postoperative opioid adverse effects including, RD, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and prolonged stay in Post Anesthesia Recovery Room (postoperative anesthesia care unit, PACU) due to RD and PONV were analyzed. Five specific FAAH single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had significant associations with more than twofold increased risk for refractory PONV (adjusted P<0.0018), and nominal associations (P<0.05) with RD and prolonged PACU stay in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. The FAAH SNP, rs324420, is a missense mutation with altered FAAH function and it is linked with other FAAH SNPs associated with PONV and RD in our cohort; association between PONV and rs324420 was confirmed in our extended cohort with additional 66 white children. Specific FAAH polymorphisms are associated with refractory PONV, opioid-related RD, and prolonged PACU stay due to opioid adverse effects in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:25558980

  11. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-01-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the LINC00340, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1 and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated 8 additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNP at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2101 cases and 4202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNP associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014; Pcombined=0.0050; OR=0.88, rs2979704; Pcombined=0.0072; OR=0.87, rs105911; Pcombined=0.0049; OR=0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biological investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens was associated with better overall survival (P=0.03; HR=0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and progression. PMID:25312269

  12. US variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus: histological lesions and genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyi; Hayes, Jeff; Byrum, Beverly; Zhang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was first recognized in pigs in the United States (US) in May 2013. Since then, the virus has spread to over 30 states and caused significant economic losses in the US swine industry due to the high mortality in newborn piglets less than 2 weeks of age. A mild-variant strain OH851 of PEDV in the US was first reported in January 2014. Here, we report histological changes in the small intestines of five piglets infected with the variant strain OH851 of PEDV. The lesions observed were milder, compared to the US classical strain of PEDV. Our study, for the first time, reports the histological lesions caused by the variant PEDV OH851 strain from a field case. In addition, genomic characterization demonstrated that US variant PEDV is more closely related to European-like strains in the first 1170 nt of the 5' spike gene but to US classical PEDV strains in the remaining genome, suggesting that the variant PEDV strain may derive from a recombinant event between the US classical and European-like PEDV strains. PMID:27059242

  13. Improved genetic counseling in Alport syndrome by new variants of COL4A5 gene.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rosado, Francisco; Campos, Ana; Alvarez-Cubero, Maria Jesus; Ruiz, Ana; Entrala-Bernal, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    There are current requirements of using genetic databases for offering a better genetic assistance to patients of some syndromes, especially those with X-linked heredity patterns (like Alport Syndrome) for the high probability of having descendants affected by the disease. We describe the first reported case of COL4A5 gene missense c.1499 G>T mutation in a 16-year-old girl confirmed to be affected by Alport Syndrome after genetic counseling. Next Generation Sequencing procedures let discover this mutation and offer an accurate clinical treatment to this patient. Current scientific understanding of genetic syndromes suggests the high importance of updated databases and the inclusion of Variant of Unknown Significance related to clinical cases. All of this updating could enable patients to have a better opportunity of diagnosis and having genetic and clinical counseling. This event is even more important in women planning to start a family to have correct genetic counseling regarding the risk posed to offspring, and allowing the decision to undergo prenatal testing. PMID:26063487

  14. Association of Genetic Variants with Isolated Fasting Hyperglycaemia and Isolated Postprandial Hyperglycaemia in a Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Li; Zhao, Zhigang; Li, Qiang; Ge, Jiapu; Chen, Gang; Guo, Xiaohui; Lu, Juming; Weng, Jianping; Jia, Weiping; Ji, Linong; Xiao, Jianzhong; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Jie; Tian, Haoming; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhu, Dalong; Zhou, Zhiguang; Shan, Guangliang; Yang, Wenying

    2013-01-01

    Background Though multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with type 2 diabetes have been identified, the genetic bases of isolated fasting hyperglycaemia (IFH) and isolated postprandial hyperglycaemia (IPH) were still unclear. In present study, we aimed to investigate the association of genome-wide association study-validated genetic variants and IFH or IPH in Han Chinese. Methods/Principal Findings We genotyped 27 validated SNPs in 6,663 unrelated individuals comprising 341 IFH, 865 IPH, 1,203 combined fasting hyperglycaemia and postprandial hyperglycaemia, and 4,254 normal glycaemic subjects of Han ancestry. The distributions of genotype frequencies of FTO, CDKAL1 and GCKR were significant different between individuals with IFH and those with IPH (SNP(ptrend): rs8050136(0.0024), rs9939609(0.0049), rs7756992(0.0122), rs780094(0.0037)). Risk allele of FTO specifically increased the risk of IFH (rs8050136: OR 1.403 [95% CI 1.125–1.750], p = 0.0027; rs9939609: 1.398 [1.120–1.744], p = 0.0030). G allele of CDKAL1 specifically increased the risk of IPH (1.217 [1.092–1.355], p = 0.0004). G allele of GCKR increased the risk of IFH (1.167 [0.999–1.362], p = 0.0513), but decreased the risk of IPH (0.891 [0.801–0.991], p = 0.0331). In addition, TCF7L2 and KCNQ1 increased the risk of both IFH and IPH. When combined, each additional risk allele associated with IFH increased the risk for IFH by 1.246-fold (p<0.0001), while each additional risk allele associated with IPH increased the risk for IPH by 1.190-fold (p<0.0001). Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that genotype distributions of variants from FTO, GCKR, CDKAL1 were different between IPH and IFH in Han Chinese. Variants of genes modulating insulin sensitivity (FTO, GCKR) contributed to the risk of IFH, while variants of genes related to beta cell function (CDKAL1) increase the risk of IPH. PMID:23990951

  15. Genetic variant associations of human SP-A and SP-D with acute and chronic lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Silveyra, Patricia; Floros, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex, maintains alveolar integrity and plays an important role in lung host defense, and control of inflammation. Altered inflammatory processes and surfactant dysfunction are well described events that occur in patients with acute or chronic lung disease that can develop secondary to a variety of insults. Genetic variants of surfactant proteins, including single nucleotide polymorphisms, haplotypes, and other genetic variations have been associated with acute and chronic lung disease throughout life in several populations and study groups. The hydrophilic surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-D, also known as collectins, in addition to their surfactant-related functions, are important innate immunity molecules as these, among others, exhibit the ability to bind and enhance clearance of a wide range of pathogens and allergens. This review focuses on published association studies of human surfactant proteins A and D genetic polymorphisms with respiratory, and non-respiratory diseases in adults, children, and newborns. The potential role of genetic variations in pulmonary disease or pathogenesis is discussed following an evaluation, and comparison of the available literature. PMID:22201752

  16. Genetic divergence of Chikungunya virus plaque variants from the Comoros Island (2005).

    PubMed

    Wasonga, Caroline; Inoue, Shingo; Rumberia, Cecilia; Michuki, George; Kimotho, James; Ongus, Juliette R; Sang, Rosemary; Musila, Lillian

    2015-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) from a human sample collected during the 2005 Chikungunya outbreak in the Comoros Island, showed distinct and reproducible large (L2) and small (S7) plaques which were characterized in this study. The parent strain and plaque variants were analysed by in vitro growth kinetics in different cell lines and their genetic similarity assessed by whole genome sequencing, comparative sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. In vitro growth kinetic assays showed similar growth patterns of both plaque variants in Vero cells but higher viral titres of S7 compared to L2 in C6/36 cells. Amino acids (AA) alignments of the CHIKV plaque variants and S27 African prototype strain, showed 30 AA changes in the non-structural proteins (nsP) and 22 AA changes in the structural proteins. Between L2 and S7, only two AAs differences were observed. A missense substitution (C642Y) of L2 in the nsP2, involving a conservative AA substitution and a nonsense substitution (R524X) of S7 in the nsP3, which has been shown to enhance O'nyong-nyong virus infectivity and dissemination in Anopheles mosquitoes. The phenotypic difference observed in plaque size could be attributed to one of these AA substitutions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the parent strain and its variants clustered closely together with each other and with Indian Ocean CHIKV strains indicating circulation of isolates with close evolutionary relatedness in the same outbreak. These observations pave way for important functional studies to understand the significance of the identified genetic changes in virulence and viral transmission in mosquito and mammalian hosts. PMID:26347221

  17. Association of genetic variants with response to iron supplements in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Athiyarath, Rekha; Shaktivel, Kalaiselvi; Abraham, Vinod; Singh, Daisy; Bondu, Joseph Dian; Chapla, Aaron; George, Biju; Srivastava, Alok; Edison, Eunice Sindhuvi

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy is high in India where iron supplementation is a regular practice. The response to oral iron is influenced by several factors such as age, body mass index, gravida, socioeconomic status, food, vitamin deficiency and compliance to supplements. The major challenge is to understand the various modulators of iron status in this high-risk group so that we can improve the diagnosis and the management of these patients. The current study was designed to evaluate the iron status during pregnancy and to identify factors which might be influencing their response to oral iron. We investigated a total of 181 pregnant women with anemia (Hb < 11 g/dl) and evaluated the impact of probable factors on anemia and their iron status. Assessment of the response was based on hemoglobin and serum ferritin or transferrin saturation level after 8 and 20 weeks of iron supplementation. Socioeconomic, clinical, hematological, biochemical and genetic factors were all evaluated. Molecular analysis revealed that HFE variant allele (G) (rs1799945) was significantly associated with an adequate response to iron supplementation. We identified five subjects with a sustained poor response, and targeted re-sequencing of eleven iron-related genes was performed in them. We have identified seven novel variants in them, and in silico analysis suggested that these variants may have an iron regulatory effect. Taken together, our findings underscore the association of genetic variants with response to supplements in pregnancy, and they can be extended to other diseases where anemia and iron deficiency coexist. PMID:26024779

  18. Working-memory endophenotype and dyslexia-associated genetic variant predict dyslexia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Männel, Claudia; Meyer, Lars; Wilcke, Arndt; Boltze, Johannes; Kirsten, Holger; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia, a severe impairment of literacy acquisition, is known to have a neurological basis and a strong genetic background. However, effects of individual genetic variations on dyslexia-associated deficits are only moderate and call for the assessment of the genotype's impact on mediating neuro-endophenotypes by the imaging genetics approach. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in German participants with and without dyslexia, we investigated gray matter changes and their association with impaired phonological processing, such as reduced verbal working memory. These endophenotypical alterations were, together with dyslexia-associated genetic variations, examined on their suitability as potential predictors of dyslexia. We identified two gray matter clusters in the left posterior temporal cortex related to verbal working memory capacity. Regional cluster differences correlated with genetic risk variants in TNFRSF1B. High-genetic-risk participants exhibit a structural predominance of auditory-association areas relative to auditory-sensory areas, which may partly compensate for deficient early auditory-sensory processing stages of verbal working memory. The reverse regional predominance observed in low-genetic-risk participants may in turn reflect reliance on these early auditory-sensory processing stages. Logistic regression analysis further supported that regional gray matter differences and genetic risk interact in the prediction of individuals' diagnostic status: With increasing genetic risk, the working-memory related structural predominance of auditory-association areas relative to auditory-sensory areas classifies participants with dyslexia versus control participants. Focusing on phonological deficits in dyslexia, our findings suggest endophenotypical changes in the left posterior temporal cortex could comprise novel pathomechanisms for verbal working memory-related processes translating TNFRSF1B genotype into the dyslexia phenotype. PMID

  19. Structural insights into differences in drug-binding selectivity between two forms of human alpha1-acid glycoprotein genetic variants, the A and F1*S forms.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Koji; Ono, Tomomi; Nakamura, Teruya; Fukunaga, Naoko; Izumi, Miyoko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Ayaka; Maruyama, Toru; Yamagata, Yuriko; Curry, Stephen; Otagiri, Masaki

    2011-04-22

    Human α(1)-acid glycoprotein (hAGP) in serum functions as a carrier of basic drugs. In most individuals, hAGP exists as a mixture of two genetic variants, the F1*S and A variants, which bind drugs with different selectivities. We prepared a mutant of the A variant, C149R, and showed that its drug-binding properties were indistinguishable from those of the wild type. In this study, we determined the crystal structures of this mutant hAGP alone and complexed with disopyramide (DSP), amitriptyline (AMT), and the nonspecific drug chlorpromazine (CPZ). The crystal structures revealed that the drug-binding pocket on the A variant is located within an eight-stranded β-barrel, similar to that found in the F1*S variant and other lipocalin family proteins. However, the binding region of the A variant is narrower than that of the F1*S variant. In the crystal structures of complexes with DSP and AMT, the two aromatic rings of each drug interact with Phe-49 and Phe-112 at the bottom of the binding pocket. Although the structure of CPZ is similar to those of DSP and AMT, its fused aromatic ring system, which is extended in length by the addition of a chlorine atom, appears to dictate an alternative mode of binding, which explains its nonselective binding to the F1*S and A variant hAGPs. Modeling experiments based on the co-crystal structures suggest that, in complexes of DSP, AMT, or CPZ with the F1*S variant, Phe-114 sterically hinders interactions with DSP and AMT, but not CPZ. PMID:21349832

  20. A functional variant that affects exon-skipping and protein expression of SP140 as genetic mechanism predisposing to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, Fuencisla; Potenciano, Victor; Fedetz, Maria; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Abad-Grau, María del Mar; Karaky, Mohamad; Barrionuevo, Cristina; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Ruiz-Peña, Juan Luis; García-Sánchez, María Isabel; Lucas, Miguel; Fernández, Óscar; Leyva, Laura; Otaegui, David; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Olascoaga, Javier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Villar, Luisa María; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Malhotra, Sunny; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Saiz, Albert; Blanco, Yolanda; Arroyo, Rafael; Varadé, Jezabel; Urcelay, Elena; Alcina, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Several variants in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) at the SP140 locus have been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), Crohn's disease (CD) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To determine the causal polymorphism, we have integrated high-density data sets of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), using GEUVADIS RNA sequences and 1000 Genomes genotypes, with MS-risk variants of the high-density Immunochip array performed by the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetic Consortium (IMSGC). The variants most associated with MS were also correlated with a decreased expression of the full-length RNA isoform of SP140 and an increase of an isoform lacking exon 7. By exon splicing assay, we have demonstrated that the rs28445040 variant was the causal factor for skipping of exon 7. Western blots of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from MS patients showed a significant allele-dependent reduction of the SP140 protein expression. To confirm the association of this functional variant with MS and to compare it with the best-associated variant previously reported by GWAS (rs10201872), a case-control study including 4384 MS patients and 3197 controls was performed. Both variants, in strong LD (r(2) = 0.93), were found similarly associated with MS [P-values, odds ratios: 1.9E-9, OR = 1.35 (1.22-1.49) and 4.9E-10, OR = 1.37 (1.24-1.51), respectively]. In conclusion, our data uncover the causal variant for the SP140 locus and the molecular mechanism associated with MS risk. In addition, this study and others previously reported strongly suggest that this functional variant may be shared with other immune-mediated diseases as CD and CLL. PMID:26152201

  1. No evidence for shared genetic basis of common variants in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goris, An; van Setten, Jessica; Diekstra, Frank; Ripke, Stephan; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; van Es, Michael; Andersen, Peter M.; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Hardiman, Orla; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Shatunov, Aleksey; Leigh, Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Mora, Gabriele; Ophoff, Roel A.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Van Damme, Philip; Compston, Alastair; Robberecht, Wim; Dubois, Bénédicte; van den Berg, Leonard H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Veldink, Jan H.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying common variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. From these studies, it has emerged that there is substantial overlap in susceptibility loci between diseases. In line with those findings, we hypothesized that shared genetic pathways may exist between multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While both diseases may have inflammatory and neurodegenerative features, epidemiological studies have indicated an increased co-occurrence within individuals and families. To this purpose, we combined genome-wide data from 4088 MS patients, 3762 ALS patients and 12 030 healthy control individuals in whom 5 440 446 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were successfully genotyped or imputed. We tested these SNPs for the excess association shared between MS and ALS and also explored whether polygenic models of SNPs below genome-wide significance could explain some of the observed trait variance between diseases. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of SNPs as well as polygenic analyses fails to provide evidence in favor of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between MS and ALS. Hence, our findings do not support a shared genetic background of common risk variants in MS and ALS. PMID:24234648

  2. Impact of GPCRs in clinical medicine: genetic variants and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Paul A.; Tang, Chih-Min; Hahntow, Ines; Michel, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary By virtue of their large number, widespread distribution and important roles in cell physiology and biochemistry, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) play multiple important roles in clinical medicine. Here, we focus on 3 areas that subsume much of the recent work in this aspect of GPCR biology: 1) Monogenic diseases of GPCR; 2) Genetic variants of GPCR; and 3) Clinically useful pharmacological agonists and antagonists of GPCR. Diseases involving mutations of GPCR are rare, occurring in <1/1000 people, but disorders in which antibodies are directed against GPCR are more common. Genetic variants, especially single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), show substantial heterogeneity in frequency among different GPCRs but have not been evaluated for some GPCR. Many therapeutic agonists and antagonists target GPCR and show inter-subject variability in terms of efficacy and toxicity. For most of those agents, it remains an open question whether genetic variation in primary sequence of the GPCR is an important contributor to such inter-subject variability, although this is an active area of investigation. PMID:17081496

  3. Cortisol reactivity to stress among youth: stability over time and genetic variants for stress sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hankin, Benjamin L; Badanes, Lisa S; Smolen, Andrew; Young, Jami F

    2015-02-01

    Stress sensitivity may be one process that can explain why some genetically at-risk individuals are more susceptible to some types of stress-reactive psychopathologies. Dysregulation of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis, including cortisol reactivity to challenge, represents a key aspect of stress sensitivity. However, the degree of stability over time among youth, especially differential stability as a function of particular genetic variants, has not been investigated. A general community sample of children and adolescents (mean age = 11.4; 56% girls) provided a DNA sample and completed 2 separate laboratory stress challenges, across an 18-month follow-up (N = 224 at Time 1; N = 194 at Time 2), with repeated measures of salivary cortisol. Results showed that test-retest stability for several indices of cortisol reactivity across the laboratory challenge visits were significant and of moderate magnitude for the whole sample. Moreover, gene variants of several biologically plausible systems relevant for stress sensitivity (especially 5-HTTLPR and CRHR1) demonstrated differential stability of cortisol reactivity over 18-months, such that carriers of genotypes conferring enhanced environmental susceptibility exhibited greater stability of cortisol levels over time for some LHPA axis indices. Findings suggest that LHPA axis dysregulation may exhibit some trait-like aspects underlying stress sensitivity in youth, especially for those who carry genes related to greater genetic susceptibility to environmental stress. PMID:25688432

  4. Counseling Challenges with Variants of Uncertain Significance and Incidental Findings in Prenatal Genetic Screening and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Westerfield, Lauren; Darilek, Sandra; van den Veyver, Ignatia B.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal genetic screening and testing provides prospective parents information about the health of their fetus. It is offered to find or address an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities or other genetic conditions in the fetus or to identify the cause of fetal structural abnormalities detected by prenatal imaging. Genome-wide tests, such as the already widely-used chromosomal microarray analysis and emerging diagnostic whole exome and whole genome sequencing, have improved the ability to detect clinically significant findings, but have also increased the chance of detecting incidental findings and variants of uncertain significance. There is an extensive ongoing discussion about optimal strategies for diagnostic laboratories to report such findings and for providers to communicate them with patients. While consensus opinions and guidelines are beginning to appear, they often exclude the prenatal setting, due to its unique set of challenging considerations. These include more limited knowledge of the impact of genetic variants when prospectively detected in an ongoing pregnancy, the absence or limitations of detecting clinically recognizable phenotypes at the time of testing and the different decision-making processes that will ensue from testing. In this review, we examine these challenges within the medical ethical framework unique to prenatal care. PMID:26237491

  5. Constrained Score Statistics Identify Genetic Variants Interacting with Multiple Risk Factors in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Dai, James Y; Tapsoba, Jean de Dieu; Buas, Matthew F; Risch, Harvey A; Vaughan, Thomas L

    2016-08-01

    Few gene-environment interactions (G × E) have been discovered in cancer epidemiology thus far, in part due to the large number of possible G × E to be investigated and inherent low statistical power of traditional analytic methods for discovering G × E. We consider simultaneously testing for interactions between several related exposures and a genetic variant in a genome-wide study. To improve power, constrained testing strategies are proposed for multivariate gene-environment interactions at two levels: interactions that have the same direction (one-sided or bidirectional hypotheses) or are proportional to respective exposure main effects (a variant of Tukey's one-degree test). Score statistics were developed to expedite the genome-wide computation. We conducted extensive simulations to evaluate validity and power performance of the proposed statistics, applied them to the genetic and environmental exposure data for esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett's esophagus from the Barretts Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON), and discovered three loci simultaneously interacting with gastresophageal reflux, obesity, and tobacco smoking with genome-wide significance. These findings deepen understanding of the genetic and environmental architecture of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27486777

  6. Genetic risk variants in the CDKN2A/B, RTEL1 and EGFR genes are associated with somatic biomarkers in glioma.

    PubMed

    Ghasimi, Soma; Wibom, Carl; Dahlin, Anna M; Brännström, Thomas; Golovleva, Irina; Andersson, Ulrika; Melin, Beatrice

    2016-05-01

    During the last years, genome wide association studies have discovered common germline genetic variants associated with specific glioma subtypes. We aimed to study the association between these germline risk variants and tumor phenotypes, including copy number aberrations and protein expression. A total of 91 glioma patients were included. Thirteen well known genetic risk variants in TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, PHLDB1, TP53, and RTEL1 were selected for investigation of possible correlations with the glioma somatic markers: EGFR amplification, 1p/19q codeletion and protein expression of p53, Ki-67, and mutated IDH1. The CDKN2A/B risk variant, rs4977756, and the CDKN2B risk variant, rs1412829 were inversely associated (p = 0.049 and p = 0.002, respectively) with absence of a mutated IDH1, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele showed no or low expression of mutated IDH1. The RTEL1 risk variant, rs6010620 was associated (p = 0.013) with not having 1p/19q codeletion, i.e., the majority of patients homozygous for the risk allele did not show 1p/19q codeletion. In addition, the EGFR risk variant rs17172430 and the CDKN2B risk variant rs1412829, both showed a trend for association (p = 0.055 and p = 0.051, respectively) with increased EGFR copy number, i.e., the majority of patients homozygote for the risk alleles showed chromosomal gain or amplification of EGFR. Our findings indicate that CDKN2A/B risk genotypes are associated with primary glioblastoma without IDH mutation, and that there is an inverse association between RTEL1 risk genotypes and 1p/19q codeletion, suggesting that these genetic variants have a molecular impact on the genesis of high graded brain tumors. Further experimental studies are needed to delineate the functional mechanism of the association between genotype and somatic genetic aberrations. PMID:26839018

  7. Interrogating causal pathways linking genetic variants, small molecule metabolites, and circulating lipids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Emerging technologies based on mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance enable the monitoring of hundreds of small metabolites from tissues or body fluids. Profiling of metabolites can help elucidate causal pathways linking established genetic variants to known disease risk factors such as blood lipid traits. Methods We applied statistical methodology to dissect causal relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms, metabolite concentrations, and serum lipid traits, focusing on 95 genetic loci reproducibly associated with the four main serum lipids (total-, low-density lipoprotein-, and high-density lipoprotein- cholesterol and triglycerides). The dataset used included 2,973 individuals from two independent population-based cohorts with data for 151 small molecule metabolites and four main serum lipids. Three statistical approaches, namely conditional analysis, Mendelian randomization, and structural equation modeling, were compared to investigate causal relationship at sets of a single nucleotide polymorphism, a metabolite, and a lipid trait associated with one another. Results A subset of three lipid-associated loci (FADS1, GCKR, and LPA) have a statistically significant association with at least one main lipid and one metabolite concentration in our data, defining a total of 38 cross-associated sets of a single nucleotide polymorphism, a metabolite and a lipid trait. Structural equation modeling provided sufficient discrimination to indicate that the association of a single nucleotide polymorphism with a lipid trait was mediated through a metabolite at 15 of the 38 sets, and involving variants at the FADS1 and GCKR loci. Conclusions These data provide a framework for evaluating the causal role of components of the metabolome (or other intermediate factors) in mediating the association between established genetic variants and diseases or traits. PMID:24678845

  8. Detection of Clinically Relevant Genetic Variants in Autism Spectrum Disorder by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Jin, Xin; Wang, Mingbang; Chen, Nong; Wu, Xueli; Ju, Jia; Mei, Junpu; Shi, Yujian; He, Mingze; Wang, Guangbiao; Liang, Jieqin; Wang, Zhe; Cao, Dandan; Carter, Melissa T.; Chrysler, Christina; Drmic, Irene E.; Howe, Jennifer L.; Lau, Lynette; Marshall, Christian R.; Merico, Daniele; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann; Uddin, Mohammed; Walker, Susan; Luo, Jun; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Ring, Robert H.; Wang, Jian; Lajonchere, Clara; Wang, Jun; Shih, Andy; Szatmari, Peter; Yang, Huanming; Dawson, Geraldine; Li, Yingrui; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) demonstrates high heritability and familial clustering, yet the genetic causes remain only partially understood as a result of extensive clinical and genomic heterogeneity. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) shows promise as a tool for identifying ASD risk genes as well as unreported mutations in known loci, but an assessment of its full utility in an ASD group has not been performed. We used WGS to examine 32 families with ASD to detect de novo or rare inherited genetic variants predicted to be deleterious (loss-of-function and damaging missense mutations). Among ASD probands, we identified deleterious de novo mutations in six of 32 (19%) families and X-linked or autosomal inherited alterations in ten of 32 (31%) families (some had combinations of mutations). The proportion of families identified with such putative mutations was larger than has been previously reported; this yield was in part due to the comprehensive and uniform coverage afforded by WGS. Deleterious variants were found in four unrecognized, nine known, and eight candidate ASD risk genes. Examples include CAPRIN1 and AFF2 (both linked to FMR1, which is involved in fragile X syndrome), VIP (involved in social-cognitive deficits), and other genes such as SCN2A and KCNQ2 (linked to epilepsy), NRXN1, and CHD7, which causes ASD-associated CHARGE syndrome. Taken together, these results suggest that WGS and thorough bioinformatic analyses for de novo and rare inherited mutations will improve the detection of genetic variants likely to be associated with ASD or its accompanying clinical symptoms. PMID:23849776

  9. Effect of genetic variants associated with plasma homocysteine levels on stroke risk

    PubMed Central

    Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Malik, Rainer; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Pare, Guillaume; Psaty, Bruce M.; Fornage, Myriam; Hasan, Nazeeha; Rinne, Paul E.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Markus, Hugh S; Rosand, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Kittner, Steven J.; Meschia, James F.; van Meurs, Joyce BJ; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Worrall, Bradford B.; Dichgans, Martin; Sharma, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevated homocysteine (tHcy) levels are known to be associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke (IS). Given that both tHcy and IS are heritable traits, we investigated a potential genetic relationship between homocysteine levels and stroke risk by assessing 18 polymorphisms previously associated with tHcy levels for their association with IS and its subtypes. Methods Previous meta-analysis results from an international stroke collaborative network, METASTROKE, were utilized to assess association of the 18 tHcy associated SNPs in 12,389 IS cases and 62,004 controls. We also investigated the associations in regions located within 50kb from the 18 tHcy related SNPs, and the association of a genetic risk score including the 18 SNPs. Results One SNP located in the RASIP1 gene and a cluster of three SNPs located at and near SLC17A3 were significantly associated with IS (P<0.0003) after correcting for multiple testing. For stroke subtypes, the sentinel SNP located upstream of MUT was significantly associated with SVD (small vessel disease) (P=0.0022), while one SNP located in MTHFR was significantly associated with LVD (large vessel disease) (P=0.00019). A genetic risk score including the 18 SNPs did not show significant association with IS or its subtypes. Conclusions This study found several potential associations with IS and its subtypes: an association of an MUT variant with SVD, an MTHFR variant with LVD, and associations of RASIP1 and SLC17A3 variants with overall IS. PMID:24846872

  10. FTO genetic variants, dietary intake and body mass index: insights from 177 330 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qibin; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Downer, Mary K.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Smith, Caren E.; Sluijs, Ivonne; Sonestedt, Emily; Chu, Audrey Y.; Renström, Frida; Lin, Xiaochen; Ängquist, Lars H.; Huang, Jinyan; Liu, Zhonghua; Li, Yanping; Asif Ali, Muhammad; Xu, Min; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Chen, Peng; Daimon, Makoto; Eriksson, Johan; Perola, Markus; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Heppe, Denise H.M.; Holloway, John W.; Houston, Denise K.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kim, Yu-Mi; Laaksonen, Maarit A.; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Lee, Nanette R.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Lu, Wei; Luben, Robert N.; Manichaikul, Ani; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Monda, Keri L.; Ngwa, Julius S.; Perusse, Louis; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Wen, Wanqing; Wojczynski, Mary K; Zhu, Jingwen; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bouchard, Claude; Cai, Qiuyin; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forouhi, Nita G.; Hansen, Torben; Christiansen, Lene; Hofman, Albert; Johansson, Ingegerd; Jørgensen, Torben; Karasawa, Shigeru; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kristiansson, Kati; Li, Huaixing; Lin, Xu; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt K.; Long, Jirong; Mikkilä, Vera; Mozaffarian, Dariush; North, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Raitakari, Olli; Rissanen, Harri; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Franco, Oscar H.; Shyong Tai, E.; Ou Shu, Xiao; Siscovick, David S.; Toft, Ulla; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Zheng, Wei; Ridker, Paul M.; Kang, Jae H.; Liang, Liming; Jensen, Majken K.; Curhan, Gary C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Hunter, David J.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Uusitupa, Matti; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Rankinen, Tuomo; Orho-Melander, Marju; Wang, Tao; Chasman, Daniel I.; Franks, Paul W.; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Hu, Frank B.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Qi, Lu

    2014-01-01

    FTO is the strongest known genetic susceptibility locus for obesity. Experimental studies in animals suggest the potential roles of FTO in regulating food intake. The interactive relation among FTO variants, dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) is complex and results from previous often small-scale studies in humans are highly inconsistent. We performed large-scale analyses based on data from 177 330 adults (154 439 Whites, 5776 African Americans and 17 115 Asians) from 40 studies to examine: (i) the association between the FTO-rs9939609 variant (or a proxy single-nucleotide polymorphism) and total energy and macronutrient intake and (ii) the interaction between the FTO variant and dietary intake on BMI. The minor allele (A-allele) of the FTO-rs9939609 variant was associated with higher BMI in Whites (effect per allele = 0.34 [0.31, 0.37] kg/m2, P = 1.9 × 10−105), and all participants (0.30 [0.30, 0.35] kg/m2, P = 3.6 × 10−107). The BMI-increasing allele of the FTO variant showed a significant association with higher dietary protein intake (effect per allele = 0.08 [0.06, 0.10] %, P = 2.4 × 10−16), and relative weak associations with lower total energy intake (−6.4 [−10.1, −2.6] kcal/day, P = 0.001) and lower dietary carbohydrate intake (−0.07 [−0.11, −0.02] %, P = 0.004). The associations with protein (P = 7.5 × 10−9) and total energy (P = 0.002) were attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for BMI. We did not find significant interactions between the FTO variant and dietary intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrate or fat on BMI. Our findings suggest a positive association between the BMI-increasing allele of FTO variant and higher dietary protein intake and offer insight into potential link between FTO, dietary protein intake and adiposity. PMID:25104851

  11. FTO genetic variants, dietary intake and body mass index: insights from 177,330 individuals.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qibin; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Downer, Mary K; Tanaka, Toshiko; Smith, Caren E; Sluijs, Ivonne; Sonestedt, Emily; Chu, Audrey Y; Renström, Frida; Lin, Xiaochen; Ängquist, Lars H; Huang, Jinyan; Liu, Zhonghua; Li, Yanping; Asif Ali, Muhammad; Xu, Min; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Boer, Jolanda M A; Chen, Peng; Daimon, Makoto; Eriksson, Johan; Perola, Markus; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Heppe, Denise H M; Holloway, John W; Houston, Denise K; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kim, Yu-Mi; Laaksonen, Maarit A; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Lee, Nanette R; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Lu, Wei; Luben, Robert N; Manichaikul, Ani; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Monda, Keri L; Ngwa, Julius S; Perusse, Louis; van Rooij, Frank J A; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Wen, Wanqing; Wojczynski, Mary K; Zhu, Jingwen; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bouchard, Claude; Cai, Qiuyin; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forouhi, Nita G; Hansen, Torben; Christiansen, Lene; Hofman, Albert; Johansson, Ingegerd; Jørgensen, Torben; Karasawa, Shigeru; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kristiansson, Kati; Li, Huaixing; Lin, Xu; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt K; Long, Jirong; Mikkilä, Vera; Mozaffarian, Dariush; North, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Raitakari, Olli; Rissanen, Harri; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Uitterlinden, André G; Zillikens, M Carola; Franco, Oscar H; Shyong Tai, E; Ou Shu, Xiao; Siscovick, David S; Toft, Ulla; Verschuren, W M Monique; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Zheng, Wei; Ridker, Paul M; Kang, Jae H; Liang, Liming; Jensen, Majken K; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Hunter, David J; Mohlke, Karen L; Uusitupa, Matti; Cupples, L Adrienne; Rankinen, Tuomo; Orho-Melander, Marju; Wang, Tao; Chasman, Daniel I; Franks, Paul W; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Hu, Frank B; Loos, Ruth J F; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Qi, Lu

    2014-12-20

    FTO is the strongest known genetic susceptibility locus for obesity. Experimental studies in animals suggest the potential roles of FTO in regulating food intake. The interactive relation among FTO variants, dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) is complex and results from previous often small-scale studies in humans are highly inconsistent. We performed large-scale analyses based on data from 177,330 adults (154 439 Whites, 5776 African Americans and 17 115 Asians) from 40 studies to examine: (i) the association between the FTO-rs9939609 variant (or a proxy single-nucleotide polymorphism) and total energy and macronutrient intake and (ii) the interaction between the FTO variant and dietary intake on BMI. The minor allele (A-allele) of the FTO-rs9939609 variant was associated with higher BMI in Whites (effect per allele = 0.34 [0.31, 0.37] kg/m(2), P = 1.9 × 10(-105)), and all participants (0.30 [0.30, 0.35] kg/m(2), P = 3.6 × 10(-107)). The BMI-increasing allele of the FTO variant showed a significant association with higher dietary protein intake (effect per allele = 0.08 [0.06, 0.10] %, P = 2.4 × 10(-16)), and relative weak associations with lower total energy intake (-6.4 [-10.1, -2.6] kcal/day, P = 0.001) and lower dietary carbohydrate intake (-0.07 [-0.11, -0.02] %, P = 0.004). The associations with protein (P = 7.5 × 10(-9)) and total energy (P = 0.002) were attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for BMI. We did not find significant interactions between the FTO variant and dietary intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrate or fat on BMI. Our findings suggest a positive association between the BMI-increasing allele of FTO variant and higher dietary protein intake and offer insight into potential link between FTO, dietary protein intake and adiposity. PMID:25104851

  12. Meta-analysis of interaction between dietary magnesium intake and genetic risk variants on diabetes phenotypes in the charge consortium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about whether genetic variation modifies the effect of magnesium (Mg) intake on two important diabetes risk factors: fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI). We examined interactions between dietary Mg and genetic variants associated with glucose (16 SNPs), insulin (2 SNPs), or Mg home...

  13. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH): first genome-wide search positions trait-determining variants acting additively in the proximal promoter

    PubMed Central

    Mustapic, Maja; Maihofer, Adam X.; Mahata, Manjula; Chen, Yuqing; Baker, Dewleen G.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) is the biosynthetic enzyme catalyzing formation of norepinephrine. Changes in DBH expression or activity have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric disorders. Genetic determination of DBH enzymatic activity and its secretion are only incompletely understood. We began with a genome-wide association search for loci contributing to DBH activity in human plasma. Initially, in a population sample of European ancestry, we identified the proximal DBH promoter as a region harboring three common trait-determining variants (top hit rs1611115, P = 7.2 × 10−51). We confirmed their effects on transcription and showed that the three variants each acted additively on gene expression. Results were replicated in a population sample of Native American descent (top hit rs1611115, P = 4.1 × 10−15). Jointly, DBH variants accounted for 57% of DBH trait variation. We further identified a genome-wide significant SNP at the LOC338797 locus on chromosome 12 as trans-quantitative trait locus (QTL) (rs4255618, P = 4.62 × 10−8). Conditional analyses on DBH identified a third genomic region contributing to DBH variation: a likely cis-QTL adjacent to DBH in SARDH (rs7040170, P = 1.31 × 10−14) on chromosome 9q. We conclude that three common SNPs in the DBH promoter act additively to control phenotypic variation in DBH levels, and that two additional novel loci (SARDH and LOC338797) may also contribute to the expression of this catecholamine biosynthetic trait. Identification of DBH variants with strong effects makes it possible to take advantage of Mendelian randomization approaches to test causal effects of this intermediate trait on disease. PMID:24986918

  14. Habitual sleep duration is associated with BMI and macronutrient intake and may be modified by CLOCK genetic variants12345

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E; Tanaka, Toshiko; Cade, Brian E; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Richardson, Kris; Saxena, Richa; Scheer, Frank AJL; Kovanen, Leena; Bartz, Traci M; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Mikkilä, Vera; Partonen, Timo; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Lahti, Jari; Hernandez, Dena G; Toft, Ulla; Johnson, W Craig; Kanoni, Stavroula; Raitakari, Olli T; Perola, Markus; Psaty, Bruce M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Grarup, Niels; Highland, Heather M; Rallidis, Loukianos; Kähönen, Mika; Havulinna, Aki S; Siscovick, David S; Räikkönen, Katri; Jørgensen, Torben; Rotter, Jerome I; Deloukas, Panos; Viikari, Jorma SA; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Linneberg, Allan; Seppälä, Ilkka; Hansen, Torben; Salomaa, Veikko; Gharib, Sina A; Eriksson, Johan G; Bandinelli, Stefania; Pedersen, Oluf; Rich, Stephen S; Dedoussis, George; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2015-01-01

    Background: Short sleep duration has been associated with greater risks of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Also, common genetic variants in the human Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) show associations with ghrelin and total energy intake. Objectives: We examined associations between habitual sleep duration, body mass index (BMI), and macronutrient intake and assessed whether CLOCK variants modify these associations. Design: We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations of sleep duration and BMI and macronutrient intake as percentages of total energy as well as interactions with CLOCK variants from 9 cohort studies including up to 14,906 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium. Results: We observed a significant association between sleep duration and lower BMI (β ± SE = 0.16 ± 0.04, P < 0.0001) in the overall sample; however, associations between sleep duration and relative macronutrient intake were evident in age- and sex-stratified analyses only. We observed a significant association between sleep duration and lower saturated fatty acid intake in younger (aged 20–64 y) adults (men: 0.11 ± 0.06%, P = 0.03; women: 0.10 ± 0.05%, P = 0.04) and with lower carbohydrate (−0.31 ± 0.12%, P < 0.01), higher total fat (0.18 ± 0.09%, P = 0.05), and higher PUFA (0.05 ± 0.02%, P = 0.02) intakes in older (aged 65–80 y) women. In addition, the following 2 nominally significant interactions were observed: between sleep duration and rs12649507 on PUFA intake and between sleep duration and rs6858749 on protein intake. Conclusions: Our results indicate that longer habitual sleep duration is associated with lower BMI and age- and sex-specific favorable dietary behaviors. Differences in the relative intake of specific macronutrients associated with short sleep duration could, at least in part, explain

  15. Genetic Variants in Nicotine Addiction and Alcohol Metabolism Genes, Oral Cancer Risk and the Propensity to Smoke and Drink Alcohol: A Replication Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Devasena; Chabrier, Amélie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and alcohol metabolism genes have been associated with propensity to smoke tobacco and drink alcohol, respectively, and also implicated in genetic susceptibility to head and neck cancer. In addition to smoking and alcohol, tobacco chewing is an important oral cancer risk factor in India. It is not known if these genetic variants influence propensity or oral cancer susceptibility in the context of this distinct etiology. Methods We examined 639 oral and pharyngeal cancer cases and 791 controls from two case-control studies conducted in India. We investigated six variants known to influence nicotine addiction or alcohol metabolism, including rs16969968 (CHRNA5), rs578776 (CHRNA3), rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs698 (ADH1C), rs1573496 (ADH7), and rs4767364 (ALDH2). Results The CHRN variants were associated with the number of chewing events per day, including in those who chewed tobacco but never smoked (P =  0.003, P =  0.01 for rs16969968 and rs578776 respectively). Presence of the variant allele contributed to approximately 13% difference in chewing frequency compared to non-carriers. While no association was observed between rs16969968 and oral cancer risk (OR =  1.01, 95% CI =  0.83– 1.22), rs578776 was modestly associated with a 16% decreased risk of oral cancer (OR =  0.84, 95% CI =  0.72– 0.98). There was little evidence for association between polymorphisms in genes encoding alcohol metabolism and oral cancer in this population. Conclusion The association between rs16969968 and number of chewing events implies that the effect on smoking propensity conferred by this gene variant extends to the use of smokeless tobacco. PMID:24505444

  16. Investigation and Functional Characterization of Rare Genetic Variants in the Adipose Triglyceride Lipase in a Large Healthy Working Population

    PubMed Central

    Coassin, Stefan; Schweiger, Martina; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Lamina, Claudia; Haun, Margot; Erhart, Gertraud; Paulweber, Bernhard; Rahman, Yusof; Olpin, Simon; Wolinski, Heimo; Cornaciu, Irina; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Kronenberg, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated a strong influence of rare genetic variants on several lipid-related traits. However, their impact on free fatty acid (FFA) plasma concentrations, as well as the role of rare variants in a general population, has not yet been thoroughly addressed. The adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is encoded by the PNPLA2 gene and catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis. It represents a prominent candidate gene affecting FFA concentrations. We therefore screened the full genomic region of ATGL for mutations in 1,473 randomly selected individuals from the SAPHIR (Salzburg Atherosclerosis Prevention program in subjects at High Individual Risk) Study using a combined Ecotilling and sequencing approach and functionally investigated all detected protein variants by in-vitro studies. We observed 55 novel mostly rare genetic variants in this general population sample. Biochemical evaluation of all non-synonymous variants demonstrated the presence of several mutated but mostly still functional ATGL alleles with largely varying residual lipolytic activity. About one-quarter (3 out of 13) of the investigated variants presented a marked decrease or total loss of catalytic function. Genetic association studies using both continuous and dichotomous approaches showed a shift towards lower plasma FFA concentrations for rare variant carriers and an accumulation of variants in the lower 10%-quantile of the FFA distribution. However, the generally rather small effects suggest either only a secondary role of rare ATGL variants on the FFA levels in the SAPHIR population or a recessive action of ATGL variants. In contrast to these rather small effects, we describe here also the first patient with “neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy” (NLSDM) with a point mutation in the catalytic dyad, but otherwise intact protein. PMID:21170305

  17. Genetic variants in TNFα, TGFB1, PTGS1 and PTGS2 genes are associated with diisocyanate-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yucesoy, Berran; Kashon, Michael L.; Johnson, Victor J.; Lummus, Zana L.; Fluharty, Kara; Gautrin, Denyse; Cartier, André; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Sastre, Joaquin; Quirce, Santiago; Tarlo, Susan M.; Cruz, Maria-Jesus; Munoz, Xavier; Luster, Michael I.; Bernstein, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Diisocyanates are the most common cause of occupational asthma, but risk factors are not well defined. A case-control study was conducted to investigate whether genetic variants in inflammatory response genes (TNFα, IL1α, IL1β, IL1RN, IL10, TGFB1, ADAM33, ALOX-5, PTGS1, PTGS2 and NAG-1/GDF15) are associated with increased susceptibility to diisocyanate asthma (DA). These genes were selected based on their role in asthmatic inflammatory processes and previously reported associations with asthma phenotypes. The main study population consisted of 237 Caucasian French Canadians from among a larger sample of 280 diisocyanate-exposed workers in two groups: workers with specific inhalation challenge (SIC) confirmed DA (DA+, n = 95) and asymptomatic exposed workers (AW, n = 142). Genotyping was performed on genomic DNA, using a 5′ nuclease PCR assay. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables of age, smoking status and duration of exposure, the PTGS1 rs5788 and TGFB1 rs1800469 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) showed a protective effect under a dominant model (OR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.17, 0.89 and OR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.18, 0.74 respectively) while the TNFα rs1800629 SNP was associated with an increased risk of DA (OR = 2.08; 95% CI = 1.03, 4.17). Additionally, the PTGS2 rs20417 variant showed an association with increased risk of DA in a recessive genetic model (OR = 6.40; 95% CI = 1.06, 38.75).These results suggest that genetic variations in TNFα, TGFB1, PTGS1 and PTGS2 genes contribute to DA susceptibility. PMID:25721048

  18. Genetic variant in CXCL13 gene is associated with susceptibility to intrauterine infection of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhihua; Lin, Xiaofang; Li, Tongyang; Zhou, Aifen; Yang, Mei; Hu, Dan; Feng, Li; Peng, Songxu; Fan, Linlin; Tu, Si; Bin Zhang; Du, Yukai

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which accounts for the majority of mother-to-child transmission, is one of the main reasons for the failure of combined immunoprophylaxis against the transmission. Recent studies have identified that genetic background might influence the susceptibility to intrauterine infection of HBV. We conducted this study to investigate the associations between 10 genetic variants in 9 genes (SLC10A1, HLA-DP, HLA-C, CXCR5, CXCL13, TLR3, TLR4, TLR9 and UBE2L3) of mothers and their neonates and HBV intrauterine infection. A significantly decreased risk of HBV intrauterine transmission were found among mothers who carried the rs355687 CT genotypes in CXCL13 gene compared to those with CC genotypes (OR = 0.25, 95% CI, 0.08-0.82, P = 0.022); and a marginally significantly decreased risk was also observed under the dominant model (OR = 0.34, 95% CI, 0.11-1.01, P = 0.052). Besides, neonatal rs3130542 in HLA-C gene was found to be marginally significantly associated with decreased risk of HBV intrauterine infection under the additive model (OR = 0.55, 95% CI, 0.29-1.04, P = 0.064). However, we found no evidence of associations between the remaining 8 SNPs and risk of HBV intrauterine infection among mothers and their neonates. In conclusion, this study suggested that genetic variant in CXCL13 gene was associated with susceptibility to intrauterine infection of HBV. PMID:27212637

  19. Genetic variant in CXCL13 gene is associated with susceptibility to intrauterine infection of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhihua; Lin, Xiaofang; Li, Tongyang; Zhou, Aifen; Yang, Mei; Hu, Dan; Feng, Li; Peng, Songxu; Fan, Linlin; Tu, Si; Bin Zhang; Du, Yukai

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which accounts for the majority of mother-to-child transmission, is one of the main reasons for the failure of combined immunoprophylaxis against the transmission. Recent studies have identified that genetic background might influence the susceptibility to intrauterine infection of HBV. We conducted this study to investigate the associations between 10 genetic variants in 9 genes (SLC10A1, HLA-DP, HLA-C, CXCR5, CXCL13, TLR3, TLR4, TLR9 and UBE2L3) of mothers and their neonates and HBV intrauterine infection. A significantly decreased risk of HBV intrauterine transmission were found among mothers who carried the rs355687 CT genotypes in CXCL13 gene compared to those with CC genotypes (OR = 0.25, 95% CI, 0.08–0.82, P = 0.022); and a marginally significantly decreased risk was also observed under the dominant model (OR = 0.34, 95% CI, 0.11–1.01, P = 0.052). Besides, neonatal rs3130542 in HLA-C gene was found to be marginally significantly associated with decreased risk of HBV intrauterine infection under the additive model (OR = 0.55, 95% CI, 0.29–1.04, P = 0.064). However, we found no evidence of associations between the remaining 8 SNPs and risk of HBV intrauterine infection among mothers and their neonates. In conclusion, this study suggested that genetic variant in CXCL13 gene was associated with susceptibility to intrauterine infection of HBV. PMID:27212637

  20. Genetic Variants of TPCN2 Associated with Type 2 Diabetes Risk in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Fan, Xiaofang; Zhang, Ning; Zheng, Hui; Song, Yuping; Shen, Chunfang; Shen, Jiayi; Ren, Fengdong; Yang, Jialin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether TPCN2 genetic variants are associated with type 2 diabetes and to elucidate which variants in TPCN2 confer diabetes susceptibility in the Chinese population. Research Design and Methods The sample population included 384 patients with type 2 diabetes and 1468 controls. Anthropometric parameters, glycemic and lipid profiles and insulin resistance were measured. We selected 6 TPCN2 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs35264875, rs267603153, rs267603154, rs3829241, rs1551305, and rs3750965). Genotypes were determined using a Sequenom MassARRAY SNP genotyping system. Results Ultimately, we genotyped 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs3750965, rs3829241, and rs1551305) in all individuals. There was a 5.1% higher prevalence of the rs1551305 variant allele in type 2 diabetes individuals (A) compared with wild-type homozygous individuals (G). The AA genotype of rs1551305 was associated with a higher diabetes risk (p<0.05). The distributions of rs3829241 and rs3750965 polymorphisms were not significantly different between the two groups. HOMA-%B of subjects harboring the AA genotype of rs1551305 decreased by 14.87% relative to the GG genotype. Conclusions TPCN2 plays a role in metabolic regulation, and the rs1551305 single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes risk. Future work will begin to unravel the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26918892

  1. Toll-like receptor genetic variants are associated with Gram-negative infections in VLBW infants

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Venkatesh; Mulrooney, Neil P.; Garland, Jeffery S.; He, Jie; Patel, Aloka L.; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hines, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes alter susceptibility to bacterial infections and modulate WBC counts during infections in very low birth-weight infants (birth weight <1500g, VLBW). STUDY DESIGN VLBW infants recruited in a multi-center study were genotyped for 9 functional TLR SNPs and associations between SNPs and infection rates examined. WBC counts obtained during infections were compared among infants with and without SNPs. RESULTS In our cohort (n=408), 90 infants developed bacterial infections. Presence of TLR4 (rs4986790 & 4986791) variants were associated with Gram-negative infections. Female infants heterozygous for the X-linked IRAK1 (rs1059703) SNP had less Gram-negative infections. In regression models controlling for confounders, the TLR4 (rs4986790) SNP was associated with increased Gram-negative infections. The TLR5 (rs5744105) variant was associated with elevated WBC counts during infections. CONCLUSION TLR genetic variants can contribute to increased risk of bacterial infections and altered immune responses in VLBW infants. PMID:23867959

  2. OCT1 genetic variants influence the pharmacokinetics of morphine in children

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Chidambaran, Vidya; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Ngamprasertwong, Pornswan; Olbrecht, Vanessa; Esslinger, Hope R; Vinks, Alexander A; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Aim Large interindividual variability in morphine disposition could contribute to unpredictable variability in morphine analgesia and adverse events. Caucasian children have more adverse effects and slower morphine clearance than African–American children. To study variations in intravenous morphine pharmacokinetics in children, we examined the influence of genetic polymorphisms in OCT1 Methods In 146 children undergoing adenotonsillectomy, 146 concentration–time profiles (2–4 measurements per patient) were available. Population pharmacokinetic ana lysis characterized the profiles in NONMEM® and tested OCT1 variants as covariates. Results Allometrically scaled post hoc Bayesian morphine clearance in homozygotes of loss-of-function OCT1 variants (n = 9, OCT1*2–*5/*2–*5 was significantly lower (20%) than in wild-type (n = 85, OCT1*1/*1) and heterozygotes (n = 52, OCT1*1/*2–*5; p < 0.05). Conclusion Besides bodyweight, OCT1 genotypes play a significant role in intravenous morphine pharmacokinetics. Relatively high allelic frequencies of defective OCT1 variants among Caucasians may explain their lower morphine clearance and possibly higher frequencies of adverse events compared with African–American children. PMID:23859569

  3. Association of Ficolin-2 Serum Levels and FCN2 Genetic Variants with Indian Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Sundaravadivel, Pandarisamy; Tong, Hoang Van; Meyer, Christian G.; Jalli, Reshma D.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), one of the neglected tropical diseases, is endemic in the Indian subcontinent. Ficolins are circulating serum proteins of the lectin complement system and involved in innate immunity. Methods We have estimated ficolin-2 serum levels and analyzed the functional variants of the encoding gene FCN2 in 218 cases of VL and in 225 controls from an endemic region of India. Results Elevated levels of serum ficolin-2 were observed in VL cases compared to the controls (adjusted P<0.0001). The genetic analysis revealed that the FCN2 structural variant +6359 C>T (p.T236M) was associated with VL (OR=2.2, 95% CI=1.23-7.25, P=0.008) and with high ficolin-2 serum levels. We also found that the FCN2*AAAC haplotype occurred more frequently among healthy controls when compared to cases (OR=0.59, 95%CI=0.37-0.94, P=0.023). Conclusions Our findings indicate that the FCN2 variant +6359C>T is associated with the occurrence of VL and that ficolin-2 serum levels are elevated in Leishmania infections. PMID:25965808

  4. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  5. Genetic Variants in Cyclooxygenase- 2 Contribute to Post-treatment Pain among Endodontic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Elizabeth; Nackley, Andrea G.; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Khan, Asma A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a well-established analgesic efficacy for inflammatory pain. These drugs exert their effect by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and are commonly used for the management of pain following endodontic treatment. There are two distinct isoforms of COX: COX-1, which is constitutively expressed; and COX-2, which is primarily induced by inflammation. Previous studies have shown that functional human genetic variants of the COX-2 gene may explain individual variations in acute pain. The present study extends this work by examining the potential contribution of the two COX isoforms to pain after endodontic treatment. Methods Ninety-four patients treated by endodontic residents at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry were enrolled into a prospective cohort study. Data on potential predictors of post-treatment pain was collected and all patients submitted saliva samples for genetic analysis. Non-surgical root canal therapy was performed and participants recorded pain levels for five days following. Results In this study, 63% of patients experienced at least mild pain after root canal therapy and 24% experienced moderate to severe pain. Presence of pretreatment pain was correlated with higher post-treatment pain (p=0.01). Elevated heart rate (p=0.02) and higher diastolic blood pressure (p=0.024) were also correlated with decreased post-treatment pain. Finally, we identified genetic variants in COX-2 (haplotype composed of rs2383515 G, rs5277 G, rs5275 T, and rs2206593 A) associated with post-treatment pain following endodontic treatment (p= 0.025). Conclusion Understanding the genetic basis of pain following endodontic treatment will advance its prevention and management. PMID:26081267

  6. Genetic Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identify Variants Associated with Five Novel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Jinks, Robert N.; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Cassidy, Ryan P.; Fiorentini, Christopher J.; Heiken, Kory F.; Lawrence, Johnny J.; Mahoney, Molly H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nair, Devika T.; Politi, Kristin A.; Worcester, Kimberly N.; Setton, Roni A.; DiPiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A.; Eastman, James T.; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L.; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean = 4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean = 79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data. PMID:22279524

  7. Association Analysis of Genetic Variants with Type 2 Diabetes in a Mongolian Population in China

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Haihua; Liu, Haiping; Suyalatu, Suyalatu; Guo, Xiaosen; Chu, Shandan; Chen, Ying; Lan, Tianming; Borjigin, Burenbatu; Orlov, Yuriy L.; Posukh, Olga L.; Yang, Xiuqin; Guilan, Guilan; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Wu, Qizhu; Narisu, Narisu

    2015-01-01

    The large scale genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified approximately 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) conferring susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, most of these loci have not been replicated in diverse populations and much genetic heterogeneity has been observed across ethnic groups. We tested 28 SNPs previously found to be associated with T2D by GWAS in a Mongolian sample of Northern China (497 diagnosed with T2D and 469 controls) for association with T2D and diabetes related quantitative traits. We replicated T2D association of 11 SNPs, namely, rs7578326 (IRS1), rs1531343 (HMGA2), rs8042680 (PRC1), rs7578597 (THADA), rs1333051 (CDKN2), rs6723108 (TMEM163), rs163182 and rs2237897 (KCNQ1), rs1387153 (MTNR1B), rs243021 (BCL11A), and rs10229583 (PAX4) in our sample. Further, we showed that risk allele of the strongest T2D associated SNP in our sample, rs757832 (IRS1), is associated with increased level of TG. We observed substantial difference of T2D risk allele frequency between the Mongolian sample and the 1000G Caucasian sample for a few SNPs, including rs6723108 (TMEM163) whose risk allele reaches near fixation in the Mongolian sample. Further study of genetic architecture of these variants in susceptibility of T2D is needed to understand the role of these variants in heterogeneous populations. PMID:26290879

  8. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; et al

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore » factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.« less

  9. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; Ziebell, Angela L.; Klapste, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Skyba, Oleksandr; Unda, Faride; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Douglas, Carl; Mansfield, Shawn; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Evans, Luke M.; Czarnecki, Olaf; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  10. Effects of genetic variants previously associated with fasting glucose and insulin in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Florez, Jose C; Jablonski, Kathleen A; McAteer, Jarred B; Franks, Paul W; Mason, Clinton C; Mather, Kieren; Horton, Edward; Goldberg, Ronald; Dabelea, Dana; Kahn, Steven E; Arakaki, Richard F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Knowler, William C

    2012-01-01

    Common genetic variants have been recently associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in white populations. Whether these associations replicate in pre-diabetes is not known. We extended these findings to the Diabetes Prevention Program, a clinical trial in which participants at high risk for diabetes were randomized to placebo, lifestyle modification or metformin for diabetes prevention. We genotyped previously reported polymorphisms (or their proxies) in/near G6PC2, MTNR1B, GCK, DGKB, GCKR, ADCY5, MADD, CRY2, ADRA2A, FADS1, PROX1, SLC2A2, GLIS3, C2CD4B, IGF1, and IRS1 in 3,548 Diabetes Prevention Program participants. We analyzed variants for association with baseline glycemic traits, incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle intervention. We replicated associations with fasting glucose at MTNR1B (P<0.001), G6PC2 (P = 0.002) and GCKR (P = 0.001). We noted impaired β-cell function in carriers of glucose-raising alleles at MTNR1B (P<0.001), and an increase in the insulinogenic index for the glucose-raising allele at G6PC2 (P<0.001). The association of MTNR1B with fasting glucose and impaired β-cell function persisted at 1 year despite adjustment for the baseline trait, indicating a sustained deleterious effect at this locus. We also replicated the association of MADD with fasting proinsulin levels (P<0.001). We detected no significant impact of these variants on diabetes incidence or interaction with preventive interventions. The association of several polymorphisms with quantitative glycemic traits is replicated in a cohort of high-risk persons. These variants do not have a detectable impact on diabetes incidence or response to metformin or lifestyle modification in the Diabetes Prevention Program. PMID:22984506

  11. Investigating the Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to the Risk and Pathogenesis of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hamshere, Marian; Holmans, Peter; Langley, Kate; Zaharieva, Irina; Hawi, Ziarah; Kent, Lindsey; Gill, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael J.; O'Donovan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A major motivation for seeking disease-associated genetic variation is to identify novel risk processes. Although rare copy number variants (CNVs) appear to contribute to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), common risk variants (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) have not yet been detected using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This raises the concern as to whether future larger-scale, adequately powered GWAS will be worthwhile. The authors undertook a GWAS of ADHD and examined whether associated SNPs, including those below conventional levels of significance, influenced the same biological pathways affected by CNVs. Method: The authors analyzed genome-wide SNP frequencies in 727 children with ADHD and 5,081 comparison subjects. The gene sets that were enriched in a pathway analysis of the GWAS data (the top 5% of SNPs) were tested for an excess of genes spanned by large, rare CNVs in the children with ADHD. Results: No SNP achieved genome-wide significance levels. As previously reported in a subsample of the present study, large, rare CNVs were significantly more common in case subjects than comparison subjects. Thirteen biological pathways enriched for SNP association significantly overlapped with those enriched for rare CNVs. These included cholesterol-related and CNS development pathways. At the level of individual genes, CHRNA7, which encodes a nicotinic receptor subunit previously implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, was affected by six large duplications in case subjects (none in comparison subjects), and SNPs in the gene had a gene-wide p value of 0.0002 for association in the GWAS. Conclusions: Both common and rare genetic variants appear to be relevant to ADHD and index-shared biological pathways. PMID:22420046

  12. Intramuscular fat content and genetic variants at fatty acid-binding protein loci in Austrian pigs.

    PubMed

    Nechtelberger, D; Pires, V; Söolknet, J; Stur; Brem, G; Mueller, M; Mueller, S

    2001-11-01

    Intramuscular fat is an important meat quality trait in pig production. Previously, genetic variants of the heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and the adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) gene were suggested to be associated with intramuscular fat content. The objective of this investigation was to study these associations in the three most important Austrian breeding populations (Piétrain, Large White, and Landrace). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the H-FABP gene revealed a new MspI polymorphic site and genetic variation in all three breeds. Microsatellite analysis of the A-FABP locus showed up to nine different microsatellite alleles segregating. In Austrian breeds, no significant influence of the A-FABP and H-FABP gene polymorphisms on intramuscular fat could be detected. We also evaluated possible associations between the genetic variations at the H-FABP and A-FABP loci and other growth and carcass traits (average daily gain, feed conversion ratio, lean meat content, pH values, meat color, and drip loss). With regard to the extent of the effects, these genetic markers cannot be recommended for selection on growth and carcass traits in Austrian breeding populations. PMID:11768107

  13. CNV-based genome wide association study reveals additional variants contributing to meat quality in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality is important both to the meat processing industry and consumers’ purchasing attitudes. Copy number variation (CNV) is a burgeoning kind of variant that may influence meat quality. Herein, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed between CNVs and meat quality traits in swine....

  14. Genetic Association Analysis Reveals Differences in the Contribution of NOD2 Variants to the Clinical Phenotypes of Orofacial Granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Mentzer, Alexander; Nayee, Shalini; Omar, Yasmin; Hullah, Esther; Taylor, Kirstin; Goel, Rishi; Bye, Hannah; Shembesh, Tarik; Elliott, Timothy R.; Campbell, Helen; Patel, Pritash; Nolan, Anita; Mansfield, John; Challacombe, Stephen; Escudier, Michael; Mathew, Christopher G.; Sanderson, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a rare, inflammatory disorder of the mouth, in which some patients also have intestinal Crohn's disease (CD). The etiology remains largely unknown, although there is a high prevalence of atopy, and oral granulomas are also seen in other immune disorders particularly CD and sarcoidosis. We investigated whether genetic variants associated with an increased risk of CD, sarcoidosis, or atopy were also associated with susceptibility to OFG. Methods: Patients were stratified clinically as isolated oral manifestations (OFG only) or concurrent intestinal CD (OFG+CD). We genotyped 201 patients and 1023 healthy controls for risk variants in NOD2, IRGM, IL23R, ATG16L1 (CD), BTNL2 (sarcoidosis), and FLG (atopy). The coding regions of the NOD2 gene were screened for rare, potentially pathogenic variants in OFG. Results: A combined analysis of 3 CD-risk variants in NOD2 showed no association with any OFG subgroup. NOD2 p.L1007insC was associated with OFG+CD (P = 0.023) and IL23R p.R381Q with all OFG (P = 0.031). The sarcoidosis risk variant rs2076530 in BTNL2 was associated with all OFG (P = 0.013). We identified 7 rare missense NOD2 alleles in 8 individuals with OFG, 4 OFG-only patients and 4 patients with OFG+CD. There was a significant enrichment of NOD2 variants in the OFG+CD group compared to the OFG-only group (P = 0.008, common variants; P = 0.04, all common and rare variants). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that genetic variants in NOD2 are only associated with OFG in patients with concurrent intestinal disease. A genome-wide association scan is needed to fully define the genetic architecture of OFG. PMID:27306066

  15. Pathogenicity of novel ABCD1 variants: The need for biochemical testing in the era of advanced genetics.

    PubMed

    Schackmann, Martin J A; Ofman, Rob; van Geel, Björn M; Dijkstra, Inge M E; van Engelen, Klaartje; Wanders, Ronald J A; Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by mutations in ABCD1 and characterized by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) accumulation. In male patients, an increased plasma VLCFA levels in combination with a pathogenic mutation in ABCD1 confirms the diagnosis. Recent studies have shown that many women with ALD also develop myelopathy. Correct diagnosis is important for management including genetic counseling. Diagnosis in women can only be confirmed when VLCFA levels are elevated or when a known pathogenic ABCD1 mutation is identified. However, in 15-20% of women with ALD VLCFA plasma levels are not elevated. Demonstration that a novel sequence variant is pathogenic can be a challenge when VLCFA levels are in the normal range. Here we report two women with a clinical presentation compatible with ALD, an ABCD1 variation (p.Arg17His and p.Ser358Pro) of unknown significance, but with normal VLCFA levels. We developed a diagnostic test that is based on generating clonal cell lines that express only one of the two alleles. Subsequent biochemical studies enabled us to show that the two sequence variants were not pathogenic, thereby excluding the diagnosis ALD in these women. We conclude that the clonal approach is an important addition to the existing diagnostic array. PMID:27067449

  16. Analysis of the genetic association between IL27 variants and coronary artery disease in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qian; Nie, Shaofang; Li, Sihui; Liao, Yuhua; Zhang, Hongsong; Zha, Lingfeng; Wang, Fan; Tang, Tingting; Xia, Ni; Xu, Chengqi; Wang, Pengyun; Xie, Tian; Xie, Jiangjiao; Lu, Qiulun; Li, Qingxian; Qian, Jin; Li, Bin; Wu, Gang; Wu, Yanxia; Yang, Yan; Wang, Qing K.; Tu, Xin; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is an important cytokine in inflammatory diseases, including coronary artery disease (CAD). To explore the precise role of IL-27 in CAD, we investigated the genetic association between IL27 and CAD in the GeneID Chinese Han population. A two-stage case control association analysis was performed for 3075 CAD cases and 2802 controls. Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust the traditional risk factors for CAD. Results showed that a promoter variant, rs153109, tended to be marginally associated with CAD in the discovery population (Padj = 0.028, OR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.03–1.58). However, this association was not replicated in the validation stage (Padj = 0.559, OR = 1.04, 95%CI: 0.90–1.21). In addition, when we classified the combined population into two subgroups according to the age at disease onset or disease state, we again obtained no significant associations. Finally, we estimated the severity of coronary stenosis using the Gensini Scoring system and determined that the rs153109 genotypes were still not associated with the Gensini scores of the CAD patients. In conclusion, our study failed to find an association between common variants in the functional region of IL27 and CAD in a Chinese Han population, which indicated that IL-27 might only be an inflammatory marker during the development of CAD. PMID:27174010

  17. Search for Genetic Markers and Functional Variants Involved in the Development of Opiate and Cocaine Addiction, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yuferov, Vadim; Levran, Orna; Proudnikov, Dmitri; Nielsen, David A.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Addiction to opiates and illicit use of psychostimulants is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that, if left untreated, can cause major medical, social and economic problems. This article reviews recent progress in studies of association of gene variants with vulnerability to develop opiate and cocaine addictions, focusing primarily on genes of the opioid and monoaminergic systems. In addition, we provide the first evidence of a cis-acting polymorphism and a functional haplotype in the PDYN gene, of significantly higher DNA methylation rate of the OPRM1 gene in the lymphocytes of heroin addicts, and significant differences in genotype frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms of the P-glycoprotein gene (ABCB1) between “higher” and “lower” methadone doses in methadone-maintained patients. In genome-wide and multi-gene association studies, we have found association of a number of new genes and new variants of known genes with heroin addiction. Finally, we have described the development and application of a novel technique: molecular haplotyping for studies in genetics of drug addiction. PMID:20201854

  18. Sixty-five common genetic variants and prediction of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Talmud, Philippa J; Cooper, Jackie A; Morris, Richard W; Dudbridge, Frank; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; White, Jon; McLachlan, Stela; Zabaneh, Delilah; Wong, Andrew; Ong, Ken K; Gaunt, Tom; Holmes, Michael V; Lawlor, Debbie A; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Wannamethee, S Goya; Strachan, Mark W J; Kumari, Meena; Whittaker, John C; Drenos, Fotios; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon D; Price, Jacqueline F; Humphries, Steve E

    2015-05-01

    We developed a 65 type 2 diabetes (T2D) variant-weighted gene score to examine the impact on T2D risk assessment in a U.K.-based consortium of prospective studies, with subjects initially free from T2D (N = 13,294; 37.3% women; mean age 58.5 [38-99] years). We compared the performance of the gene score with the phenotypically derived Framingham Offspring Study T2D risk model and then the two in combination. Over the median 10 years of follow-up, 804 participants developed T2D. The odds ratio for T2D (top vs. bottom quintiles of gene score) was 2.70 (95% CI 2.12-3.43). With a 10% false-positive rate, the genetic score alone detected 19.9% incident cases, the Framingham risk model 30.7%, and together 37.3%. The respective area under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.60 (95% CI 0.58-0.62), 0.75 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.77), and 0.76 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78). The combined risk score net reclassification improvement (NRI) was 8.1% (5.0 to 11.2; P = 3.31 × 10(-7)). While BMI stratification into tertiles influenced the NRI (BMI ≤24.5 kg/m(2), 27.6% [95% CI 17.7-37.5], P = 4.82 × 10(-8); 24.5-27.5 kg/m(2), 11.6% [95% CI 5.8-17.4], P = 9.88 × 10(-5); >27.5 kg/m(2), 2.6% [95% CI -1.4 to 6.6], P = 0.20), age categories did not. The addition of the gene score to a phenotypic risk model leads to a potentially clinically important improvement in discrimination of incident T2D. PMID:25475436

  19. Genetic variants and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Bao, Wei; Rong, Ying; Yang, Huixia; Bowers, Katherine; Yeung, Edwina; Kiely, Michele

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several studies have examined associations between genetic variants and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, inferences from these studies were often hindered by limited statistical power and conflicting results. We aimed to systematically review and quantitatively summarize the association of commonly studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with GDM risk and to identify important gaps that remain for consideration in future studies. METHODS Genetic association studies of GDM published through 1 October 2012 were searched using the HuGE Navigator and PubMed databases. A SNP was included if the SNP–GDM associations were assessed in three or more independent studies. Two reviewers independently evaluated the eligibility for inclusion and extracted the data. The allele-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random effects models accounting for heterogeneity. RESULTS Overall, 29 eligible articles capturing associations of 12 SNPs from 10 genes were included for the systematic review. The minor alleles of rs7903146 (TCF7L2), rs12255372 (TCF7L2), rs1799884 (−30G/A, GCK), rs5219 (E23K, KCNJ11), rs7754840 (CDKAL1), rs4402960 (IGF2BP2), rs10830963 (MTNR1B), rs1387153 (MTNR1B) and rs1801278 (Gly972Arg, IRS1) were significantly associated with a higher risk of GDM. Among them, genetic variants in TCF7L2 showed the strongest association with GDM risk, with ORs (95% CIs) of 1.44 (1.29–1.60, P < 0.001) per T allele of rs7903146 and 1.46 (1.15–1.84, P = 0.002) per T allele of rs12255372. CONCLUSIONS In this systematic review, we found significant associations of GDM risk with nine SNPs in seven genes, most of which have been related to the regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:23690305

  20. Mitochondrial DNA variant at HVI region as a candidate of genetic markers of type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumilar, Gun Gun; Purnamasari, Yunita; Setiadi, Rahmat

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is maternally inherited. mtDNA mutations which can contribute to the excess of maternal inheritance of type 2 diabetes. Due to the high mutation rate, one of the areas in the mtDNA that is often associated with the disease is the hypervariable region I (HVI). Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the genetic variants of human mtDNA HVI that related to the type 2 diabetes in four samples that were taken from four generations in one lineage. Steps being taken include the lyses of hair follicles, amplification of mtDNA HVI fragment using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), detection of PCR products through agarose gel electrophoresis technique, the measurement of the concentration of mtDNA using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, determination of the nucleotide sequence via direct sequencing method and analysis of the sequencing results using SeqMan DNASTAR program. Based on the comparison between nucleotide sequence of samples and revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS) obtained six same mutations that these are C16147T, T16189C, C16193del, T16127C, A16235G, and A16293C. After comparing the data obtained to the secondary data from Mitomap and NCBI, it were found that two mutations, T16189C and T16217C, become candidates as genetic markers of type 2 diabetes even the mutations were found also in the generations of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The results of this study are expected to give contribution to the collection of human mtDNA database of genetic variants that associated to metabolic diseases, so that in the future it can be utilized in various fields, especially in medicine.

  1. Association of genetic variants with coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke in a longitudinal population-based genetic epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, YOSHIJI; MATSUI, KOTA; TAKEUCHI, ICHIRO; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies identified nine genes and chromosomal region 3q28 as susceptibility loci for myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or chronic kidney disease by genome-wide or candidate gene association studies. As coronary artery disease (CAD) and ischemic stroke may share genetic architecture, certain genetic variants may confer susceptibility to the two diseases. The present study examined the association of 13 polymorphisms at these 10 loci with the prevalence of CAD or ischemic stroke in community-dwelling individuals, with the aim of identifying genetic variants that confer susceptibility to the two conditions. Study subjects (170 with CAD, 117 with ischemic stroke and 5,718 controls) were recruited to the Inabe Health and Longevity Study, a longitudinal genetic epidemiological study of atherosclerotic, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The subjects were recruited from individuals who visited for an annual health checkup and they were followed up each year (mean follow-up period, 5 years). Longitudinal analysis with a generalized estimating equation, and with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia and the serum concentration of creatinine, revealed that rs2074380 (G→A) and rs2074381 (A→G) of the α-kinase 1 (ALPK1) gene and rs8089 (T→G) of the thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) gene were significantly (P<2×10−16) associated with the prevalence of CAD, with the AA genotype of rs2074380 and GG genotypes of rs2074381 and rs8089 being protective against this condition. Similar analysis revealed that rs9846911 (A→G) at chromosome 3q28, rs2074381 of ALPK1, rs8089 of THBS2 and rs6046 (G→A) of the coagulation factor VII gene were significantly (P<2×10−16) associated with the prevalence of ischemic stroke, with the GG genotypes of rs9846911, rs2074381 and rs8089 and the AA genotype of rs6046 being protective against this condition. ALPK1 and THBS2 may thus be

  2. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  3. Genetic and functional analysis of CHEK2 (CHK2) variants in multiethnic cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Daphne W.; Kim, Sang H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schiripo, Taryn A.; Harris, Patricia L.; Haserlat, Sara M.; Wahrer, Doke C.R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Daly, Mary B.; Niendorf, Kristin B.; Smith, Matthew R.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Marchand, Loic Le; Henderson, Brian E.; Altshuler, David; Haber, Daniel A.; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2011-01-01

    The CHEK2-1100delC mutation is recurrent in the population and is a moderate risk factor for breast cancer. To identify additional CHEK2 mutations potentially contributing to breast cancer susceptibility, we sequenced 248 cases with early-onset disease; functionally characterized new variants and conducted a population-based case–control analysis to evaluate their contribution to breast cancer risk. We identified 1 additional null mutation and 5 missense variants in the germline of cancer patients. In vitro, the CHEK2-H143Y variant resulted in gross protein destabilization, while others had variable suppression of in vitro kinase activity using BRCA1 as a substrate. The germline CHEK2-1100delC mutation was present among 8/1,646 (0.5%) sporadic, 2/400 (0.5%) early-onset and 3/302 (1%) familial breast cancer cases, but undetectable amongst 2,105 multiethnic controls, including 633 from the US. CHEK2-positive breast cancer families also carried a deleterious BRCA1 mutation. 1100delC appears to be the only recurrent CHEK2 mutation associated with a potentially significant contribution to breast cancer risk in the general population. Another recurrent mutation with attenuated in vitro function, CHEK2-P85L, is not associated with increased breast cancer susceptibility, but exhibits a striking difference in frequency across populations with different ancestral histories. These observations illustrate the importance of genotyping ethnically diverse groups when assessing the impact of low-penetrance susceptibility alleles on population risk. Our findings highlight the notion that clinical testing for rare missense mutations within CHEK2 may have limited value in predicting breast cancer risk, but that testing for the 1100delC variant may be valuable in phenotypically- and geographically-selected populations. PMID:17721994

  4. Stratifying Type 2 Diabetes Cases by BMI Identifies Genetic Risk Variants in LAMA1 and Enrichment for Risk Variants in Lean Compared to Obese Cases

    PubMed Central

    Perry, John R. B.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Yengo, Loïc; Amin, Najaf; Dupuis, Josée; Ganser, Martha; Grallert, Harald; Navarro, Pau; Li, Man; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Scott, Robert A.; Almgren, Peter; Arking, Dan E.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bergman, Richard N.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori; Burtt, Noël P.; Campbell, Harry; Charpentier, Guillaume; Collins, Francis S.; Gieger, Christian; Green, Todd; Hadjadj, Samy; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Herder, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Johnson, Andrew D.; Kottgen, Anna; Kraft, Peter; Labrune, Yann; Langenberg, Claudia; Manning, Alisa K.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Oostra, Ben; Pankow, James; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, William; Roden, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Rybin, Denis; Scott, Laura J.; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sladek, Rob; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vivequin, Sidonie; Weedon, Michael N.; Wright, Alan F.; Hu, Frank B.; Illig, Thomas; Kao, Linda; Meigs, James B.; Wilson, James F.; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia; Altschuler, David; Morris, Andrew D.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Froguel, Philippe; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Groop, Leif

    2012-01-01

    additional risk variants and that lean cases may have a stronger genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes. PMID:22693455

  5. Stratifying type 2 diabetes cases by BMI identifies genetic risk variants in LAMA1 and enrichment for risk variants in lean compared to obese cases.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Voight, Benjamin F; Yengo, Loïc; Amin, Najaf; Dupuis, Josée; Ganser, Martha; Grallert, Harald; Navarro, Pau; Li, Man; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Scott, Robert A; Almgren, Peter; Arking, Dan E; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bergman, Richard N; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori; Burtt, Noël P; Campbell, Harry; Charpentier, Guillaume; Collins, Francis S; Gieger, Christian; Green, Todd; Hadjadj, Samy; Hattersley, Andrew T; Herder, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Johnson, Andrew D; Kottgen, Anna; Kraft, Peter; Labrune, Yann; Langenberg, Claudia; Manning, Alisa K; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew P; Oostra, Ben; Pankow, James; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, William; Roden, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Rybin, Denis; Scott, Laura J; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sladek, Rob; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Vivequin, Sidonie; Weedon, Michael N; Wright, Alan F; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Kao, Linda; Meigs, James B; Wilson, James F; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia; Altschuler, David; Morris, Andrew D; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Froguel, Philippe; Palmer, Colin N A; Wareham, Nicholas J; Groop, Leif; Frayling, Timothy M; Cauchi, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    additional risk variants and that lean cases may have a stronger genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes. PMID:22693455

  6. The Association Between Genetic Variants in the Dopaminergic System and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lizhuo; Bao, Yijun; He, Songbai; Wang, Gang; Guan, Yanlei; Ma, Dexuan; Wang, Pengfei; Huang, Xiaolong; Tao, Shanwei; Zhang, Dewei; Liu, Qiwen; Wang, Yunjie; Yang, Jingyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex mental disorder and can severely interfere with the normal life of the affected people. Previous studies have examined the association of PTSD with genetic variants in multiple dopaminergic genes with inconsistent results. To perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analysis to examine whether genetic variants in the dopaminergic system is associated with PTSD. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE. The studies included subjects who had been screened for the presence of PTSD; the studies provided data for genetic variants of genes involved in the dopaminergic system; the outcomes of interest included diagnosis status of PTSD; and the studies were case–control studies. Odds ratio was used as a measure of association. We used random-effects model in all the meta-analyses. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I2, and publication bias was evaluated using Egger test. Findings from meta-analyses were confirmed using random-effects meta-analyses under the framework of generalized linear model (GLM). A total of 19 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. We found that rs1800497 in DRD2 was significantly associated with PTSD (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.15–3.33; P = 0.014). The 3′-UTR variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) in SLC6A3 also showed significant association with PTSD (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.12–2.35; P = 0.010), but there was no association of rs4680 in COMT with PTSD (P = 0.595). Sample size is limited for some studies; type and severity of traumatic events varied across studies; we could not control for potential confounding factors, such as age at traumatic events and gender; and we could not examine gene–environment interaction due to lack of data. We found that rs1800497 in DRD2 and the VNTR in SLC6A3 showed significant association with PTSD. Future studies controlling for confounding factors, with large

  7. Evidence for several independent genetic variants affecting lipoprotein (a) cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wensheng; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Keping; Wang, Hong; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Still, Christopher D.; Chu, Xin; Yang, Rongze; Parihar, Ankita; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pollin, Toni I.; Angles-Cano, Eduardo; Quon, Michael J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Fu, Mao

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related events that is under strong genetic control (heritability = 0.68–0.98). However, causal mutations and functional validation of biological pathways modulating Lp(a) metabolism are lacking. We performed a genome-wide association scan to identify genetic variants associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels in the Old Order Amish. We confirmed a previously known locus on chromosome 6q25-26 and found Lp(a) levels also to be significantly associated with a SNP near the APOA5–APOA4–APOC3–APOA1 gene cluster on chromosome 11q23 linked in the Amish to the APOC3 R19X null mutation. On 6q locus, we detected associations of Lp(a)-cholesterol with 118 common variants (P = 5 × 10−8 to 3.91 × 10−19) spanning a ∼5.3 Mb region that included the LPA gene. To further elucidate variation within LPA, we sequenced LPA and identified two variants most strongly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol, rs3798220 (P = 1.07 × 10−14) and rs10455872 (P = 1.85 × 10−12). We also measured copy numbers of kringle IV-2 (KIV-2) in LPA using qPCR. KIV-2 numbers were significantly associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol (P = 2.28 × 10−9). Conditional analyses revealed that rs3798220 and rs10455872 were associated with Lp(a)-cholesterol levels independent of each other and KIV-2 copy number. Furthermore, we determined for the first time that levels of LPA mRNA were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of rs10455872 (P = 0.0001) and were not different between carriers and non-carriers of rs3798220. Protein levels of apo(a) were higher in the carriers than non-carriers of both rs10455872 and rs3798220. In summary, we identified multiple independent genetic determinants for Lp(a)-cholesterol. These findings provide new insights into Lp(a) regulation. PMID:25575512

  8. Genetic Variants in the FADS Gene: Implications for Dietary Recommendations for Fatty Acid Intake.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Rasika A; Pani, Vrindarani; Chilton, Floyd H

    2014-06-01

    Unequivocally, genetic variants within the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) cluster are determinants of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) levels in circulation, cells and tissues. A recent series of papers have addressed these associations in the context of ancestry; evidence clearly supports that the associations are robust to ethnicity. However ∼80% of African Americans carry two copies of the alleles associated with increased levels of arachidonic acid, compared to only ∼45% of European Americans raising important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions induced by a modern western diet are differentially driving the risk of diseases of inflammation in diverse populations, and are these interactions leading to health disparities. We highlight an important aspect thus far missing in the debate regarding dietary recommendations; we content that current evidence from genetics strongly suggest that an individual's, or at the very least the population from which an individual is sampled, genetic architecture must be factored into dietary recommendations currently in place. PMID:24977108

  9. Pain modality- and sex-specific effects of COMT genetic functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Belfer, Inna; Segall, Samantha K.; Lariviere, William R.; Smith, Shad B.; Dai, Feng; Slade, Gary G.; Rashid, Naim U.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Campbell, Claudia; Edwards, Robert; Liu, Qian; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamine neurotransmitters involved in a number of physiological functions including pain perception. Both human and mouse COMT genes possess functional polymorphisms contributing to inter-individual variability in pain phenotypes such as sensitivity to noxious stimuli, severity of clinical pain and response to pain treatment. In this study, we found that the effects of Comt functional variation in mice are modality-specific. Spontaneous inflammatory nociception and thermal nociception behaviors were correlated the most with the presence of the B2 SINE transposon insertion residing in the 3’UTR mRNA region. Similarly, in humans, COMT functional haplotypes were associated with thermal pain perception and with capsaicin-induced pain. Furthermore, COMT genetic variations contributed to pain behaviors in mice and pain ratings in humans in a sex-specific manner. The ancestral Comt variant, without a B2 SINE insertion, was more strongly associated with sensitivity to capsaicin in female versus male mice. In humans, the haplotype coding for low COMT activity increased capsaicin-induced pain perception in women, but not men. These findings reemphasize the fundamental contribution of COMT to pain processes, and provide a fine-grained resolution of this contribution at the genetic level that can be used to guide future studies in the area of pain genetics. PMID:23701723

  10. Whole-exome sequencing to identify genetic risk variants underlying inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Marcin M; Blighe, Kevin; Lotta, Luca A; Pappalardo, Emanuela; Garagiola, Isabella; Mancini, Ilaria; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Fasulo, Maria Rosaria; Santagostino, Elena; Peyvandi, Flora

    2016-06-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is the most problematic and costly complication of FVIII replacement therapy that affects up to 30% of previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A. The development of inhibitors is a multifactorial complication involving environmental and genetic factors. Among the latter, F8 gene mutations, ethnicity, family history of inhibitors, and polymorphisms affecting genes involved in the immune response have been previously investigated. To identify novel genetic elements underling the risk of inhibitor development in patients with severe hemophilia A, we applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) and data analysis in a selected group of 26 Italian patients with (n = 17) and without (n = 9) inhibitors. WES revealed several rare, damaging variants in immunoregulatory genes as novel candidate mutations. A case-control association analysis using Cochran-Armitage and Fisher's exact statistical tests identified 1364 statistically significant variants. Hierarchical clustering of these genetic variants showed 2 distinct patterns of homozygous variants with a protective or harmful role in inhibitor development. When looking solely at coding variants, a total of 28 nonsynonymous variants were identified and replicated in 53 inhibitor-positive and 174 inhibitor-negative Italian severe hemophilia A patients using a TaqMan genotyping assay. The genotyping results revealed 10 variants showing estimated odds ratios in the same direction as in the discovery phase and confirmed the association of the rs3754689 missense variant (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.36-0.94; P = .028) in a highly conserved haplotype region surrounding the LCT locus on chromosome 2q21 with inhibitor development. PMID:27060170

  11. Simulation of Finnish population history, guided by empirical genetic data, to assess power of rare-variant tests in Finland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sophie R; Agarwala, Vineeta; Flannick, Jason; Chiang, Charleston W K; Altshuler, David; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2014-05-01

    Finnish samples have been extensively utilized in studying single-gene disorders, where the founder effect has clearly aided in discovery, and more recently in genome-wide association studies of complex traits, where the founder effect has had less obvious impacts. As the field starts to explore rare variants' contribution to polygenic traits, it is of great importance to characterize and confirm the Finnish founder effect in sequencing data and to assess its implications for rare-variant association studies. Here, we employ forward simulation, guided by empirical deep resequencing data, to model the genetic architecture of quantitative polygenic traits in both the general European and the Finnish populations simultaneously. We demonstrate that power of rare-variant association tests is higher in the Finnish population, especially when variants' phenotypic effects are tightly coupled with fitness effects and therefore reflect a greater contribution of rarer variants. SKAT-O, variable-threshold tests, and single-variant tests are more powerful than other rare-variant methods in the Finnish population across a range of genetic models. We also compare the relative power and efficiency of exome array genotyping to those of high-coverage exome sequencing. At a fixed cost, less expensive genotyping strategies have far greater power than sequencing; in a fixed number of samples, however, genotyping arrays miss a substantial portion of genetic signals detected in sequencing, even in the Finnish founder population. As genetic studies probe sequence variation at greater depth in more diverse populations, our simulation approach provides a framework for evaluating various study designs for gene discovery. PMID:24768551

  12. Mathematical model for aldol addition catalyzed by two D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolases variants overexpressed in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sudar, Martina; Findrik, Zvjezdana; Vasić-Rački, Durđa; Clapés, Pere; Lozano, Carles

    2013-09-10

    Two D-fructose-6-phosphate aldolase variants namely, single variant FSA A129S and double variant FSA A129S/A165G, were used as catalysts in the aldol addition of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) to N-Cbz-3-aminopropanal. Mathematical model for reaction catalyzed by both enzymes, consisting of kinetic and mass balance equations, was developed. Kinetic parameters were estimated from the experimental data gathered by using the initial reaction rate method. The model was validated in the batch and continuously operated ultrafiltration membrane reactor (UFMR). The same type of kinetic model could be applied for both enzymes. The operational stability of the aldolases was assessed by measuring enzyme activity during the experiments. FSA A129S/A165G had better operational stability in the batch reactor (half-life time 26.7 h) in comparison to FSA A129S (half-life time 5.78 h). Both variants were unstable in the continuously operated UFMR in which half-life times were 1.99 and 3.64 h for FSA A129S and FSA A129S/A165G, respectively. PMID:23876482

  13. Genetic variants in chromatin-remodeling pathway associated with lung cancer risk in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Geng, Liguo; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Yuzhuo; Cheng, Yang; Liu, Jia; Shen, Wei; Li, Zhihua; Zhang, Jiahui; Wang, Cheng; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng

    2016-08-10

    Chromatin remodeling complexes utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have essential roles in transcriptional modulation. Increasing evidences indicate that these complexes directly interact with numerous proteins and regulate the formation of cancer. However, few studies reported the association of polymorphisms in chromatin remodeling genes and lung cancer. We hypothesized that variants in critical genes of chromatin remodeling pathway might contribute to the susceptibility of lung cancer. To validate this hypothesis, we systematically screened 40 polymorphisms in six key chromatin remodeling genes (SMARCA5, SMARCC2, SMARCD2, ARID1A, NR3C1 and SATB1) and evaluated them with a case-control study including 1341 cases and 1982 controls. Logistic regression revealed that four variants in NR3C1 and SATB1 were significantly associated with lung cancer risk after false discovery rate (FDR) correction [For NR3C1, rs9324921: odds ratio (OR)=1.23, P for FDR=0.029; rs12521436: OR=0.85, P for FDR=0.040; rs4912913: OR=1.17, P for FDR=0.040; For SATB1, rs6808523: OR=1.33, P for FDR=0.040]. Combing analysis presented a significant allele-dosage tendency for the number of risk alleles and lung cancer risk (Ptrend<0.001). Moreover, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis revealed that these two genes were differently expressed between lung tumor and adjacent normal tissues in the database of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (P=0.009 for rs6808523). These findings suggested that genetic variants in key chromatin remodeling genes may contribute to lung cancer risk in Chinese population. Further large and well-designed studies are warranted to validate our results. PMID:27179949

  14. Mitochondrial genetic variants identified to be associated with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Flaquer, A; Baumbach, C; Ladwig, K-H; Kriebel, J; Waldenberger, M; Grallert, H; Baumert, J; Meitinger, T; Kruse, J; Peters, A; Emeny, R; Strauch, K

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that mitochondrial dysfunctions are increasingly recognized as key components in stress-related mental disorders, very little is known about the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mitochondrial variants. To identify susceptibility mitochondrial genes for PTSD, we analyzed a total number of 978 mitochondrial single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) in a sample of 1238 individuals participating in the KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) study. Participants were classified with 'no PTSD', 'partial PTSD' or 'full PTSD' by applying the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale and the Impact of Event Scale. To assess PTSD-mtSNP association while taking heteroplasmy into account, we used the raw signal intensity values measured on the microarray and applied linear regression. Significant associations were obtained between full versus no PTSD and two mtSNPs; mt8414C->T (β=-0.954±0.06, Padjusted=0.037) located in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase subunit 8 (MT-ATP8) and mt12501G->A (β=-1.782±0.40, Padjusted=0.015) located in the NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 (MT-ND5). Heteroplasmy for the two variants towards a larger number of the respective minor alleles increases the risk of having PTSD. NADH dehydrogenase and ATP synthase are both linked to the regulation of reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the important role of the mitochondrial genome among the factors that contribute to the risk of PTSD. Mitochondrial genetic variants may be more important than has previously been assumed, leading to further insights regarding effects of existing medications, or even to the development of innovative treatments. As this is the first mitochondrial genome-wide association study for PTSDs, further analyses are needed to follow up on the present findings. PMID:25756807

  15. Mitochondrial genetic variants identified to be associated with posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, A; Baumbach, C; Ladwig, K-H; Kriebel, J; Waldenberger, M; Grallert, H; Baumert, J; Meitinger, T; Kruse, J; Peters, A; Emeny, R; Strauch, K

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that mitochondrial dysfunctions are increasingly recognized as key components in stress-related mental disorders, very little is known about the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mitochondrial variants. To identify susceptibility mitochondrial genes for PTSD, we analyzed a total number of 978 mitochondrial single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) in a sample of 1238 individuals participating in the KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) study. Participants were classified with ‘no PTSD', ‘partial PTSD' or ‘full PTSD' by applying the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale and the Impact of Event Scale. To assess PTSD–mtSNP association while taking heteroplasmy into account, we used the raw signal intensity values measured on the microarray and applied linear regression. Significant associations were obtained between full versus no PTSD and two mtSNPs; mt8414C→T (β=−0.954±0.06, Padjusted=0.037) located in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase subunit 8 (MT-ATP8) and mt12501G→A (β=−1.782±0.40, Padjusted=0.015) located in the NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 (MT-ND5). Heteroplasmy for the two variants towards a larger number of the respective minor alleles increases the risk of having PTSD. NADH dehydrogenase and ATP synthase are both linked to the regulation of reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the important role of the mitochondrial genome among the factors that contribute to the risk of PTSD. Mitochondrial genetic variants may be more important than has previously been assumed, leading to further insights regarding effects of existing medications, or even to the development of innovative treatments. As this is the first mitochondrial genome-wide association study for PTSDs, further analyses are needed to follow up on the present findings. PMID:25756807

  16. Association Between MTHFR Genetic Variants and Multiple Sclerosis in a Southern Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin; Ehyakonandeh, Hesam; Nikseresht, Alireza; Kamali, Eskandar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating neuro- inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Genetic predisposition has long been suspected in the etiology of this disease. The association between MTHFR polymorphisms and MS has been ivestigated in different ethnic groups. We investigated the association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C missense variants and MS in 180 patients and 231 age- and gender-matched healthy controls in a Southern Iranian population. The mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR) and PCR-RFLP methods were used to genotype MTHFR at position 677 and 1298, respectively. Compared with controls, we observed a strong association between two MTHFR variants and the risk of developing MS. Subjects carrying 677T allele (CT and TT genotypes) had increased susceptibility to MS as compared to those carrying CC genotype (odds ratio (OR) for CT= 2.9, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)= 1.88-4.49; OR for TT= 6.23, 95% CI= 3.08-12.59). The variant 1298AC genotype also increased the risk for MS among our study population (OR= 2.14, 95% CI= 1.37-3.34). Combined genotype analysis for two MTHFR SNPs revealed that compared to the wild type genotypes (677CC/1298AA), 3 genotypes including TT/AC, CT/AC, and TT/AA were significantly at increased risk for MS development (OR= 13.9, 5.3, and 4.9, respectively). Our results suggest a possible gene dose- dependent association between MTHFR mutrant alleles and the risk of MS development. PMID:26261797

  17. Association Between MTHFR Genetic Variants and Multiple Sclerosis in a Southern Iranian Population.

    PubMed

    Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin; Ehyakonandeh, Hesam; Nikseresht, Alireza; Kamali, Eskandar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating neuro- inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Genetic predisposition has long been suspected in the etiology of this disease. The association between MTHFR polymorphisms and MS has been ivestigated in different ethnic groups. We investigated the association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C missense variants and MS in 180 patients and 231 age- and gender-matched healthy controls in a Southern Iranian population. The mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR) and PCR-RFLP methods were used to genotype MTHFR at position 677 and 1298, respectively. Compared with controls, we observed a strong association between two MTHFR variants and the risk of developing MS. Subjects carrying 677T allele (CT and TT genotypes) had increased susceptibility to MS as compared to those carrying CC genotype (odds ratio (OR) for CT= 2.9, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)= 1.88-4.49; OR for TT= 6.23, 95% CI= 3.08-12.59). The variant 1298AC genotype also increased the risk for MS among our study population (OR= 2.14, 95% CI= 1.37-3.34). Combined genotype analysis for two MTHFR SNPs revealed that compared to the wild type genotypes (677CC/1298AA), 3 genotypes including TT/AC, CT/AC, and TT/AA were significantly at increased risk for MS development (OR= 13.9, 5.3, and 4.9, respectively). Our results suggest a possible gene dose- dependent association between MTHFR mutrant alleles and the risk of MS development. PMID:26261797

  18. Genetic variants in leptin: Determinants of obesity and leptin levels in South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Shruti; Salman, Mohammed; Siddalingaiah, Lokesh B; Lakshmi, GL; Xaviour, D; Sreenath, Jwalapuram

    2014-01-01

    The revelation of leptin action mechanisms has led to various attempts to establish the association of polymorphisms in the leptin gene with obesity-related phenotypes. But, outcomes have been contradicting, which made the information on the role of the leptin gene in regulating the mechanism of pathophysiology of obesity inexplicable. Moreover, none of the studies are known to have similar implications on the Indian population. To address such contradictions, our study aims to evaluate the association of leptin gene polymorphism with obesity and leptin levels in a South Indian Population. A total of 304 cases (BMI≥27.5) and 309 controls (BMI≤23) from local inhabitants of Mysore, Karnataka were recruited for the study. The leptin gene variants rs7799039, rs2167270 and rs4731426 independently, as well as in 4 haplotype combinations, were found to be significantly associated with the risk of obesity. An increasing trend in BMI and leptin levels was observed with every addition of A and C minor alleles of exonic variant (rs2167270) and intronic variant (rs4731426) respectively. However, only AA genotype of SNP rs7799039 was positively associated with BMI. None of the SNPs were associated with fat percentage and waist to hip ratio. On a whole, this data suggests that the common polymorphisms in the leptin gene are strong predictors of obesity and leptin levels in South Indians. PMID:26167411

  19. Genetic variants of lncRNA HOTAIR contribute to the risk of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Zhongting; Zhao, Jiali; Liang, Yong; Pan, Wei; Liu, Xingxiang; Zheng, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in adolescents and young adults. However, the essential mechanisms underlying osteosarcomagenesis remain obscure. The HOTAIR, a well-known long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), is involved in pathogenesis and progress of multiple tumors. To reveal the potential role of lncRNA HOTAIR in OS carcinogenesis, we conducted a two-stage, case-control study among Chinese population with 900 OS cases and 900 controls to evaluated associations of its genetic variants with OS risk. We found that C allele of rs7958904 was associated with a significantly decreased OS risk when compared with G allele (OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.67-0.90; P = 6.77×10-4). Functional analyses on HOTAIR Expression showed that the expression level of HOTAIR in OS tissues was significantly higher than that in corresponding normal tissues, and subjects with the rs7958904 CC genotype had significantly lower HOTAIR RNA levels than those of other genotypes. This should be the first study to examine the association between HOTAIR variants and OS risk. PMID:26967389

  20. Influence of GRIK4 genetic variants on the electroconvulsive therapy response.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandra; Congiu, Chiara; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Bortolomasi, Marco; Bonvicini, Cristian; Abate, Maria; Sartori, Riccardo; Gainelli, Giulio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-07-28

    Several lines of evidence have shown the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the function of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In particular, patients with treatment resistant depression (TRD) and chronic depression have lower levels of glutamate/glutamine than controls, and ECT can reverse this deficit. Genetic factors might contribute to modulating the mechanisms underlying ECT. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between three polymorphisms (rs1954787, rs4936554 and rs11218030) of the glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 4 (GRIK4) gene and responsiveness to ECT treatment in a sample of one hundred individuals, TRD or depressive Bipolar Disorder patients resistant to pharmacological treatments. The results revealed that GRIK4 variants were significantly associated with the response to ECT. In particular, we found that patients carrying the G allele of the GRIK4 rs11218030 had a significantly poorer response to ECT (p=2.71×10(-4)), showing five times the risk of relapse after ECT compared to the AA homozygotes. Analogously, patients carrying the GG rs1954787 genotype and rs4936554A allele carriers presented a double risk of lack of response after ECT (p=0.013 and p=0.040, respectively). In conclusion, the current study provides new evidence, indicating that some GRIK4 variants modulate the response to ECT in patients with depression resistant to treatment, suggesting a role for kainate receptor modulation. PMID:27222927

  1. APOL1 genetic variants in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HIV-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Jeffrey B; Nelson, George W; Sampath, Karmini; Johnson, Randall C; Genovese, Giulio; An, Ping; Friedman, David; Briggs, William; Dart, Richard; Korbet, Stephen; Mokrzycki, Michele H; Kimmel, Paul L; Limou, Sophie; Ahuja, Tejinder S; Berns, Jeffrey S; Fryc, Justyna; Simon, Eric E; Smith, Michael C; Trachtman, Howard; Michel, Donna M; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Vlahov, David; Pollak, Martin; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2011-11-01

    Trypanolytic variants in APOL1, which encodes apolipoprotein L1, associate with kidney disease in African Americans, but whether APOL1-associated glomerular disease has a distinct clinical phenotype is unknown. Here we determined APOL1 genotypes for 271 African American cases, 168 European American cases, and 939 control subjects. In a recessive model, APOL1 variants conferred seventeenfold higher odds (95% CI 11 to 26) for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and twenty-nine-fold higher odds (95% CI 13 to 68) for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). FSGS associated with two APOL1 risk alleles associated with earlier age of onset (P = 0.01) and faster progression to ESRD (P < 0.01) but similar sensitivity to steroids compared with other subjects. Individuals with two APOL1 risk alleles have an estimated 4% lifetime risk for developing FSGS, and untreated HIV-infected individuals have a 50% risk for developing HIVAN. The effect of carrying two APOL1 risk alleles explains 18% of FSGS and 35% of HIVAN; alternatively, eliminating this effect would reduce FSGS and HIVAN by 67%. A survey of world populations indicated that the APOL1 kidney risk alleles are present only on African chromosomes. In summary, African Americans carrying two APOL1 risk alleles have a greatly increased risk for glomerular disease, and APOL1-associated FSGS occurs earlier and progresses to ESRD more rapidly. These data add to the evidence base required to determine whether genetic testing for APOL1 has a use in clinical practice. PMID:21997394

  2. APOL1 Genetic Variants in Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and HIV-Associated Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, George W.; Sampath, Karmini; Johnson, Randall C.; Genovese, Giulio; An, Ping; Friedman, David; Briggs, William; Dart, Richard; Korbet, Stephen; Mokrzycki, Michele H.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Limou, Sophie; Ahuja, Tejinder S.; Berns, Jeffrey S.; Fryc, Justyna; Simon, Eric E.; Smith, Michael C.; Trachtman, Howard; Michel, Donna M.; Schelling, Jeffrey R.; Vlahov, David; Pollak, Martin; Winkler, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanolytic variants in APOL1, which encodes apolipoprotein L1, associate with kidney disease in African Americans, but whether APOL1-associated glomerular disease has a distinct clinical phenotype is unknown. Here we determined APOL1 genotypes for 271 African American cases, 168 European American cases, and 939 control subjects. In a recessive model, APOL1 variants conferred seventeenfold higher odds (95% CI 11 to 26) for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and twenty-nine-fold higher odds (95% CI 13 to 68) for HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). FSGS associated with two APOL1 risk alleles associated with earlier age of onset (P = 0.01) and faster progression to ESRD (P < 0.01) but similar sensitivity to steroids compared with other subjects. Individuals with two APOL1 risk alleles have an estimated 4% lifetime risk for developing FSGS, and untreated HIV-infected individuals have a 50% risk for developing HIVAN. The effect of carrying two APOL1 risk alleles explains 18% of FSGS and 35% of HIVAN; alternatively, eliminating this effect would reduce FSGS and HIVAN by 67%. A survey of world populations indicated that the APOL1 kidney risk alleles are present only on African chromosomes. In summary, African Americans carrying two APOL1 risk alleles have a greatly increased risk for glomerular disease, and APOL1-associated FSGS occurs earlier and progresses to ESRD more rapidly. These data add to the evidence base required to determine whether genetic testing for APOL1 has a use in clinical practice. PMID:21997394

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in very important pharmacogenomic (VIP) variants in the Tibetan population.

    PubMed

    Jin, T B; Xun, X J; Shi, X G; Yuan, D Y; Feng, T; Geng, T T; Kang, L L

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of very important pharmacogenomic (VIP) variants are important for personalized medicine. However, these have not been extensively studied in the Tibetan population. In this study, 82 VIP variants were detected in the Tibetan and Han (HAN) populations from northwestern China. Subsequently, we compared the differences between the Tibetan population and ten populations, including the HAN, Japanese in Tokyo (JPT), Mexican ancestry in Los Angeles (MEX), Toscans in Italy (TSI), African ancestry in Southwest USA (ASW), Luhya in California Webuye, Kenya (LWK), Gujarati Indians in Houston, Texas (GIH), Maasai in Kinyawa, Kenya (MKK), Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI), and Utah residents with Northern and Western European ancestry from the CEPH collection (CEU). Using the χ(2) test, we identified differences in the frequency distribution of 4, 4, 7, 10, 11, 11, 13, 15, 19, and 20 loci in the Tibetan population, compared to the HAN, JPT, MEX, TSI, ASW, LWK, GIH, MKK, YRI, and CEU populations, respectively [P < 0.05/(82*10)]. rs2115819, rs9934438, and rs689466, located in the ALOX5 (arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase), VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex, subunit 1) and PTGS2 (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2) genes, respectively, in the Tibetan population were different from those in most of the populations. Our results complement the information provided by the database of pharmacogenomics on Tibetan people, and provide an avenue for personalized treatment in the Tibetan population. PMID:26505400

  4. Analysis of genetic variants of dyslexia candidate genes KIAA0319 and DCDC2 in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Shyamala K; Siddaiah, Anand; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2013-08-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a heritable, complex genetic disorder associated with impairment in reading and writing skills despite having normal intellectual ability and appropriate educational opportunities. Chromosome 6p23-21.3 at DYX2 locus has showed the most consistent evidence of linkage for DD and two susceptible genes KIAA0319 and DCDC2 for DD at DYX2 locus showed significant association. Specific candidate gene-association studies have identified variants, risk haplotypes and microsatellites of KIAA0319 and DCDC2 correlated with wide range of reading-related traits. In this study, we used a case-control approach for analyzing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KIAA0319 and DCDC2. Our study demonstrated the association of DD with SNP rs4504469 of KIAA0319 and not with any SNPs of DCDC2. PMID:23677054

  5. SORL1 genetic variants and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang-Hao; Westerteicher, Christine; Wang, Xin-Hui; Kratzer, Martina; Tsolakidou, Amalia; Jiang, Meizi; Grimmer, Timo; Laws, Simon M; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Bujo, Hideaki; Kurz, Alexander; Perneczky, Robert

    2012-09-01

    The neuronal sortilin-related receptor with A-type repeats (SORL1, also called LR11 or sorLA) is involved in amyloidogenesis, and the SORL1 gene is a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated AD-related CSF biomarkers for associations with SORL1 genetic variants in 105 German patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. The homozygous CC-allele of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 4 was associated with increased Tau concentrations in AD, and the minor alleles of SNP8, SNP9, and SNP10 and the haplotype CGT of these SNPs were associated with increased SORL1 concentrations in MCI. SNP22 and SNP23, and the haplotypes TCT of SNP19-21-23, and TTC of SNP22-23-24 were correlated with decreased Ab42 levels in AD. These results strengthen the functional role of SORL1 in AD. PMID:22286501

  6. Genetics 101 for cardiologists: rare genetic variants and monogenic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Sali M K; Hegele, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic diseases have a distinctive familial inheritance that follows Mendel's laws, showing patterns like dominant, recessive, or X-linked. There are > 7000 monogenic diseases curated in databases, and together they account for up to 10% of all illnesses encountered in the emergency room or clinic. Despite the rarity of individual monogenic conditions, mapping their causative genes and mutations is important for several reasons. First, knowing the causative gene and mutation could provide actionable information for genetic counselling. Sometimes, knowing the gene and mutation allows for early diagnosis in affected families, which is important if there is an evidence-based intervention. Second, the implication of a mutant gene as being causative for a clinical phenotype provides strong evidence of the importance of the gene product in a cellular or biochemical pathway. Discovery of new molecular pathways in families with rare diseases can serve as the first step toward developing rational therapies to help not only affected families, but also patients with less extreme, nongenetic forms of the same condition. For instance, the study of rare patients with familial hypercholesterolemia helped in developing statin drugs, initially as a treatment for familial hypercholesterolemia but now a widely used therapy to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:23200093

  7. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng

  8. Genetic variants in ABCG1 are associated with survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanru; Liu, Hongliang; Ready, Neal E; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Christiani, David C; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-06-01

    Cell membrane transporters and metabolic enzymes play a crucial role in the transportation of a wide variety of substrates that maintain homeostasis in biological processes. We explored associations between genetic variants in these genes and survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by reanalyzing two datasets from published genome-wide association studies (GWASs). In the discovery by using the GWAS dataset of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, we evaluated associations of 1,245 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of four transporter families and two metabolic enzyme families with survival of 1,185 NSCLC patients. We then performed a replication analysis in the Harvard University Lung Cancer study (LCS) with 984 NSCLC patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression and false discovery rate (FDR) corrections were performed to evaluate the associations. We identified that 21 genotyped SNPs in eight gene regions were significantly associated with survival with FDR ≤ 0.1 in the discovery dataset. Subsequently, we confirmed six SNPs, which were putative functional, in ABCG1 of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family in the replication dataset. In the pooled analysis, two tagging (at r(2)  > 0.8 for linkage disequilibrium with other replicated SNPs)/functional SNPs were independently associated with survival: rs225388 G > A [adjusted hazards ratio (HR) = 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-1.20, Ptrend  = 4.6 × 10(-3)] and rs225390 A > G (adjusted HR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, Ptrend  = 3.8 × 10(-4) ). Our results indicated that genetic variants of ABCG1 may be predictors of survival of NSCLC patients. PMID:26757251

  9. Lethal autonomy: the malfunction of the informed consent mechanism within the context of prenatal diagnosis of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Dunne, C; Warren, C

    1998-01-01

    In this article, Cara Dunne and Catherine Warren challenge the current role of genetic counselors in advising expectant mothers about potential genetic defects of their fetuses. They show that genetic counselors sometimes provide one-sided negative information to women undergoing prenatal diagnosis of genetic variants. This biased information promotes abortion of what are considered "defective" fetuses. The misleading information provided by the genetic counselors and the termination of the pregnancies is akin to the eugenics movement. The authors describe the early 20th century eugenics movement, explore the origin and development of the Human Genome Project, analyze the current role of genetic counseling, and explain the importance of the informed consent process to the exercise of autonomy. Dunne and Warren conclude by offering methods by which to restructure the informed consent mechanism to offer a more balanced assessment of the risks and benefits associated with genetic disability. PMID:9807244

  10. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  11. The role of DCDC2 genetic variants and low socioeconomic status in vulnerability to attention problems.

    PubMed

    Riva, Valentina; Marino, Cecilia; Giorda, Roberto; Molteni, Massimo; Nobile, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Both genetic and socio-demographic factors influence the risk for behavioral problems in the developmental age. Genetic studies indicate that shared genetic factors partially contribute to behavioral and learning problems, in particular reading disabilities (RD). For the first time, we explore the conjoint role of DCDC2 gene, an identified RD candidate gene, and socioeconomic status (SES) upon behavioral phenotypes in a general population of Italian children. Two of the most replicated DCDC2 markers [i.e., regulatory element associated with dyslexia 1 (READ1), rs793862] were genotyped in 631 children (boys = 314; girls = 317) aged 11-14 years belonging to a community-based sample. Main and interactive effects were tested by MANOVA for each combination of DCDC2 genotypes and socioeconomic status upon emotional and behavioral phenotypes, assessed by Child Behavior Check-List/6-18. The two-way MANOVA (Bonferroni corrected p value = 0.01) revealed a trend toward significance of READ1(4) effect (F = 2.39; p = 0.016), a significant main effect of SES (F = 3.01; p = 0.003) and interactive effect of READ1(4) × SES (F = 2.65; p = 0.007) upon behavioral measures, showing higher attention problems scores among subjects 'READ1(4+) and low SES' compared to all other groups (p values range 0.00003-0.0004). ANOVAs stratified by gender confirmed main and interactive effects among girls, but not boys. Among children exposed to low socioeconomic level, READ1 genetic variant targets the worst outcome in children's attention. PMID:25012462

  12. Genetic Variants in Antioxidant Genes Are Associated With Diisocyanate-Induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yucesoy, Berran

    2012-01-01

    Diisocyanates are a common cause of occupational asthma, but risk factors are not well defined. A case-control study was conducted to investigate whether genetic variants of antioxidant defense genes, glutathione S-transferases (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTM3, GSTP1), manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2), and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) are associated with increased susceptibility to diisocyanate-induced asthma (DA). The main study population consisted of 353 Caucasian French-Canadians from among a larger sample of 410 diisocyanate-exposed workers in three groups: workers with specific inhalation challenge (SIC) confirmed DA (DA+, n = 95); symptomatic diisocyanate workers with a negative SIC (DA−, n = 116); and asymptomatic exposed workers (AW, n = 142). Genotyping was performed on genomic DNA, using a 5′-nuclease PCR assay. The SOD2 rs4880, GSTP1 rs1695, and EPHX1 rs2740171 variants were significantly associated with DA in both univariate and multivariate analyses. In the first logistic regression model comparing DA+ and DA− groups, SOD2 rs4880, GSTM1 (null), GSTP1 rs762803, and EPHX1 rs2854450 variants were associated with DA (p = 0.004, p = 0.047, p = 0.021, p <0.001, respectively). Genotype combinations GSTT1*GSTP1 rs762803, GSTM1*EPHX1 rs2854450, EPHX1 rs2740168*EPHX1 rs1051741, and GSTP1 rs762803*EPHX1 rs2740168 were also associated with DA in this model (p = 0.027, p = 0.002, p = 0.045, p = 0.044, respectively). The GSTP1 rs1695 and EPHX1 rs1051741 and rs2740171 variants showed an association with DA in the second model comparing DA+ and AW groups (p = 0.040, p = 0.019, p = 0.002, respectively). The GSTM3 rs110913*EPHX1 rs1051741 genotype combination was also associated with DA under this model (p = 0.042). The results suggest that variations in SOD2, GST, and EPHX1 genes and their interactions contribute to DA susceptibility. PMID:22610343

  13. The Value of Online Algorithms to Predict T-Cell Ligands Created by Genetic Variants.

    PubMed

    van der Lee, Dyantha I; Pont, Margot J; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Griffioen, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    -cell ligands that are created by genetic variants. PMID:27618304

  14. Genetic variants primarily associated with type 2 diabetes are related to coronary artery disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Henning; Loley, Christina; Lieb, Wolfgang; Pencina, Michael J; Nelson, Christopher P; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peloso, Gina M; Voight, Benjamin F; Reilly, Muredach P; Assimes, Themistocles L; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hengstenberg, Christian; Laaksonen, Reijo; McPherson, Ruth; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Rawal, Rajesh; Thompson, John R; König, Inke R; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk are unclear. We aimed to assess this association by studying genetic variants that have been shown to associate with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). If the association between diabetes and CAD is causal, we expected to observe an association of these variants with CAD as well. Methods and Results We studied all genetic variants currently known to be associated with T2DM at a genome-wide significant level (p<5*10−8) in CARDIoGRAM, a genome-wide data-set of CAD including 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. Out of the 44 published T2DM SNPs 10 were significantly associated with CAD in CARDIoGRAM (OR>1, p<0.05), more than expected by chance (p=5.0*10−5). Considering all 44 SNPs, the average CAD risk observed per individual T2DM risk allele was 1.0076 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9973–1.0180). Such average risk increase was significantly lower than the increase expected based on i) the published effects of the SNPs on T2DM risk and ii) the effect of T2DM on CAD risk as observed in the Framingham Heart Study, which suggested a risk of 1.067 per allele (p=7.2*10−10 vs. the observed effect). Studying two risk scores based on risk alleles of the diabetes SNPs, one score using individual level data in 9856 subjects, and the second score on average effects of reported beta-coefficients from the entire CARDIoGRAM data-set, we again observed a significant - yet smaller than expected - association with CAD. Conclusions Our data indicate that an association between type 2 diabetes related SNPs and CAD exists. However, the effects on CAD risk appear to be by far lower than what would be expected based on the effects of risk alleles on T2DM and the effect of T2DM on CAD in the epidemiological setting. PMID:26074316

  15. Association of genetic variants with hypertension in a longitudinal population-based genetic epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, YOSHIJI; MATSUI, KOTA; TAKEUCHI, ICHIRO; OGURI, MITSUTOSHI; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified 9 genes and chromosomal region 3q28 as susceptibility loci for Japanese patients with myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or chronic kidney disease by genome-wide or candidate gene association studies. In the present study, we investigated the possible association of 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at these 10 loci with the prevalence of hypertension or their association with blood pressure (BP) in community-dwelling individuals in Japan. The study subjects comprised 6,027 individuals (2,250 subjects with essential hypertension, 3,777 controls) who were recruited into the Inabe Health and Longevity Study, a longitudinal genetic epidemiological study on atherosclerotic, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The subjects were recruited from individuals who visited the Health Care Center of Inabe General Hospital for an annual health checkup, and they are followed up each year (mean follow-up period, 5 years). Longitudinal analysis with a generalized estimating equation and with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index and smoking status revealed that rs2116519 of family with sequence similarity 78, member B (FAM78B; P=0.0266), rs6929846 of butyrophilin, subfamily 2, member A1 (BTN2A1; P= 0.0013), rs146021107 of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1; P=0.0031) and rs1671021 of lethal giant larvae homolog 2 (Drosophila) (LLGL2; P=0.0372) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with the prevalence of hypertension. Longitudinal analysis with a generalized linear mixed-effect model and with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index and smoking status among individuals not taking anti-hypertensive medication revealed that rs6929846 of BTN2A1 was significantly associated with systolic (P=0.0017), diastolic (P=0.0008) and mean (P=0.0005) BP, and that rs2116519 of FAM78B, rs146021107 of PDX1 and rs1671021 of LLGL2 were significantly associated with diastolic (P=0.0495), systolic (P=0.0132), and both diastolic (P=0.0468) and mean

  16. Habitual sleep duration is associated with BMI and macronutrient intake and may be modified by CLOCK genetic variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short sleep duration has been associated with greater risks of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Also, common genetic variants in the human Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) show associations with ghrelin and total energy intake. We examined associations betw...

  17. A comprehensive study of the genetic impact of rare variants in SORL1 in European early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Verheijen, Jan; Van den Bossche, Tobi; van der Zee, Julie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Grau-Rivera, Oriol; Gelpi, Ellen; Bettens, Karolien; Mateiu, Ligia; Dillen, Lubina; Cras, Patrick; De Deyn, Peter P; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2016-08-01

    The sortilin-related receptor 1 (SORL1) gene has been associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Rare genetic variants in the SORL1 gene have also been implicated in autosomal dominant early-onset AD (EOAD). Here we report a large-scale investigation of the contribution of genetic variability in SORL1 to EOAD in a European EOAD cohort. We performed massive parallel amplicon-based re-sequencing of the full coding region of SORL1 in 1255 EOAD patients and 1938 age- and origin-matched control individuals in the context of the European Early-Onset Dementia (EOD) consortium, originating from Belgium, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Sweden, Germany, and Czech Republic. We identified six frameshift variants and two nonsense variants that were exclusively present in patients. These mutations are predicted to result in haploinsufficiency through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, which could be confirmed experimentally for SORL1 p.Gly447Argfs*22 observed in a Belgian EOAD patient. We observed a 1.5-fold enrichment of rare non-synonymous variants in patients (carrier frequency 8.8 %; SkatOMeta p value 0.0001). Of the 84 non-synonymous rare variants detected in the full patient/control cohort, 36 were only detected in patients. Our findings underscore a role of rare SORL1 variants in EOAD, but also show a non-negligible frequency of these variants in healthy individuals, necessitating the need for pathogenicity assays. Premature stop codons due to frameshift and nonsense variants, have so far exclusively been found in patients, and their predicted mode of action corresponds with evidence from in vitro functional studies of SORL1 in AD. PMID:27026413

  18. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-10-01

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  19. Genetic Variants in Novel Pathways Influence Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable trait1 influenced by multiple biological pathways and is responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (BP ≥140 mm Hg systolic [SBP] or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic [DBP])2. Even small increments in BP are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events3. This genome-wide association study of SBP and DBP, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified 16 novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate BP (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3; NPR3-C5orf23; ADM; FURIN-FES; GOSR2; GNAS-EDN3); the other 10 provide new clues to BP physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke, and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with BP in East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of BP, and suggest novel potential therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  20. Common genetic variants on 1p13.2 associate with risk of autism.

    PubMed

    Xia, K; Guo, H; Hu, Z; Xun, G; Zuo, L; Peng, Y; Wang, K; He, Y; Xiong, Z; Sun, L; Pan, Q; Long, Z; Zou, X; Li, X; Li, W; Xu, X; Lu, L; Liu, Y; Hu, Y; Tian, D; Long, L; Ou, J; Liu, Y; Li, X; Zhang, L; Pan, Y; Chen, J; Peng, H; Liu, Q; Luo, X; Su, W; Wu, L; Liang, D; Dai, H; Yan, X; Feng, Y; Tang, B; Li, J; Miedzybrodzka, Z; Xia, J; Zhang, Z; Luo, X; Zhang, X; St Clair, D; Zhao, J; Zhang, F

    2014-11-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, and known genetic variants, mostly rare, account only for a small proportion of cases. Here we report a genome-wide association study on autism using two Chinese cohorts as gene discovery (n=2150) and three data sets of European ancestry populations for replication analysis of top association signals. Meta-analysis identified three single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs936938 (P=4.49 × 10(-8)), non-synonymous rs6537835 (P=3.26 × 10(-8)) and rs1877455 (P=8.70 × 10(-8)), and related haplotypes, AMPD1-NRAS-CSDE1, TRIM33 and TRIM33-BCAS2, associated with autism; all were mapped to a previously reported linkage region (1p13.2) with autism. These genetic associations were further supported by a cis-acting regulatory effect on the gene expressions of CSDE1, NRAS and TRIM33 and by differential expression of CSDE1 and TRIM33 in the human prefrontal cortex of post-mortem brains between subjects with and those without autism. Our study suggests TRIM33 and NRAS-CSDE1 as candidate genes for autism, and may provide a novel insight into the etiology of autism. PMID:24189344

  1. Complement Receptor 1 Genetic Variants Contribute to the Susceptibility to Gastric Cancer in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Zhi; Lin, Jia; Cao, Lei; He, Bing; Han, Sugui; Zhang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    As the receptor for C3b/C4b, type 1 complement receptor (CR1/CD35) plays an important role in the regulation of complement activity and is further involved in carcinogenesis. This study aimed to elucidate the association of CR1 genetic variants with the susceptibility to gastric cancer in Chinese population. Based on the NCBI database, totally 13 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected by Haploview program and genotyped using iPlex Gold Genotyping Assay and Sequenom MassArray among 500 gastric cancer cases and 500 healthy controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression to evaluate the association of each SNP with gastric cancer. Of all selected Tag SNPs , CR1 rs9429942 T > C was found to confer to the risk of developing gastric cancer. Compared with the carriers with rs9429942 TT genotype, those with CT genotype had 88% decreased risk of developing gastric cancer with OR (95%CI) of 0.12 (0.03-0.50). Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) analysis revealed a significant three-way interaction among rs75422544 C > A, rs10494885 C > T and rs7525160 G > C in the development of gastric cancer with a maximum testing balance accuracy of 56.07% and a cross-validation consistency of 7/10 (P = 0.011). In conclusion, our findings demonstrated the genetic role of CR1 gene in the development of gastric cancer in Chinese population. PMID:26000043

  2. Genetic variants in lncRNA SRA and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rui; Wang, Kaijuan; Peng, Rui; Wang, Shuaibing; Cao, Jingjing; Wang, Peng; Song, Chunhua

    2016-04-19

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) has been identified to activate steroid receptor transcriptional activity and participate in tumor pathogenesis. This case-control study evaluated the association between two haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs) (rs10463297, rs801460) of the whole SRA sequence and breast cancer risk. We found that rs10463297 TC genotype significantly increased BC risk compared with CC genotype in both the codominant (TC vs. TT: OR=1.43, 95 % CI=1.02-2.00) and recessive (TC+CC vs. TT: OR=1.39, 95 % CI=1.01-1.92) genetic models. Both TC, TC + CC genotypes of rs10463297 and GA, AA, GA+AA genotypes of rs801460 were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER) positivity status. rs10463297 TC (2.09 ± 0.41), CC (2.42 ± 0.51) and TC + CC (2.20 ± 0.47) genotypes were associated with higher blood plasma SRA mRNA levels compared with the TT genotype (1.45 ± 0.34). Gene-reproductive interaction analysis presented a best model consisted of four factors (rs10463297, age, post-menopausal, No. of pregnancy), which could increase the BC risk with 1.58-fold (OR=1.58, 95 % CI=1.23-2.03). These findings suggest that SRA genetic variants may contribute to BC risk and have apparent interaction with reproductive factors in BC progression. PMID:26967566

  3. Association between ANKK1 (rs1800497) and LTA (rs909253) Genetic Variants and Risk of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Arwa H.; Elhawary, Nasser A.

    2015-01-01

    Limited research has assessed associations between schizophrenia and genetic variants of the ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1) and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA) genes among individuals of Middle Eastern ancestry. Here we present the first association study investigating the ANKK1 rs1800497 (T>C) and LTA rs909253 (A>G) single-nucleotide polymorphisms in an Egyptian population. Among 120 patients with DSM-IV and PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) assessments of schizophrenia and 100 healthy controls, we determined the genotypes for the polymorphisms using endonuclease digestion of amplified genomic DNA. Results confirmed previous findings from different ethnic populations, in that the rs1800497 and rs909253 polymorphisms were both associated with risk of schizophrenia. Differences between the genotypes of cases and controls were strongly significant (P = 0.0005 for rs1800497 and P = 0.001 for rs909253). The relative risk to schizophrenia was 1.2 (P = 0.01) for the C allele and 0.8 (P = 0.04) for the G allele. The CC, GG, and combined CC/AA genotypes were all more frequent in cases than in controls. These results support an association between ANKK1 and LTA genetic markers and vulnerability to schizophrenia and show the potential influence of just one copy of the mutant C or G allele in the Egyptian population. PMID:26114114

  4. Seeking genetic susceptibility variants for colorectal cancer: the EPICOLON consortium experience.

    PubMed

    Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Abulí, Anna; Muñoz, Jenifer; Bessa, Xavier; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ferro, Marta; Giráldez, María Dolores; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Jover, Rodrigo; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel

    2012-03-01

    The EPICOLON consortium was initiated in 1999 by the Gastrointestinal Oncology Group of the Spanish Gastroenterology Association. It recruited consecutive, unselected, population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and control subjects matched by age and gender without personal or familial history of cancer all over Spain with the main goal of gaining knowledge in Lynch syndrome and familial CRC. This epidemiological, prospective and multicentre study collected extensive clinical data and biological samples from ∼2000 CRC cases and 2000 controls in Phases 1 and 2 involving 25 and 14 participating hospitals, respectively. Genetic susceptibility projects in EPICOLON have included candidate-gene approaches evaluating single-nucleotide polymorphisms/genes from the historical category (linked to CRC risk by previous studies), from human syntenic CRC susceptibility regions identified in mouse, from the CRC carcinogenesis-related pathways Wnt and BMP, from regions 9q22 and 3q22 with positive linkage in CRC families, and from the mucin gene family. This consortium has also participated actively in the identification 5 of the 16 common, low-penetrance CRC genetic variants identified so far by genome-wide association studies. Finishing their own pangenomic study and performing whole-exome sequencing in selected CRC samples are among EPICOLON future research prospects. PMID:22294762

  5. Three New Genetic Loci (R1210C in CFH, Variants in COL8A1 and RAD51B) Are Independently Related to Progression to Advanced Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Johanna M.; Reynolds, Robyn; Yu, Yi; Rosner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the independent impact of new genetic variants on conversion to advanced stages of AMD, controlling for established risk factors, and to determine the contribution of genes in predictive models. Methods In this prospective longitudinal study of 2765 individuals, 777 subjects progressed to neovascular disease (NV) or geographic atrophy (GA) in either eye over 12 years. Recently reported genetic loci were assessed for their independent effects on incident advanced AMD after controlling for 6 established loci in 5 genes, and demographic, behavioral, and macular characteristics. New variants which remained significantly related to progression were then added to a final multivariate model to assess their independent effects. The contribution of genes to risk models was assessed using reclassification tables by determining risk within cross-classified quintiles for alternative models. Results Three new genetic variants were significantly related to progression: rare variant R1210C in CFH (hazard ratio (HR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–5.3, P = 0.01), and common variants in genes COL8A1 (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1–3.5, P = 0.02) and RAD51B (HR 0.8, 95% CI 0.60–0.97, P = 0.03). The area under the curve statistic (AUC) was significantly higher for the 9 gene model (.884) vs the 0 gene model (.873), P = .01. AUC’s for the 9 vs 6 gene models were not significantly different, but reclassification analyses indicated significant added information for more genes, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) for progression within 5 years per one quintile increase in risk score of 2.7, P<0.001 for the 9 vs 6 loci model, and OR 3.5, P<0.001 for the 9 vs. 0 gene model. Similar results were seen for NV and GA. Conclusions Rare variant CFH R1210C and common variants in COL8A1 and RAD51B plus six genes in previous models contribute additional predictive information for advanced AMD beyond macular and behavioral phenotypes. PMID:24498017

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies genetic variants influencing F-cell levels in sickle-cell patients.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Pallav; Purvis, Shirley; Barron-Casella, Emily; DeBaun, Michael R; Casella, James F; Arking, Dan E; Keefer, Jeffrey R

    2011-04-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level has emerged as an important prognostic factor in sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can be measured by the proportion of HbF-containing erythrocytes (F-cells). Recently, BCL11A (zinc-finger protein) was identified as a regulator of HbF, and the strongest association signals were observed either directly for rs766432 or for correlated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To identify additional independently associated genetic variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on the proportion of F-cells in individuals of African ancestry with SCD from the Silent Infarct Transfusion (SIT) Trial cohort. Our study not only confirms the association of rs766432 (P-value <3.32 × 10(-13)), but also identifies an independent novel intronic SNP, rs7606173, associated with F-cells (P-value <1.81 × 10(-15)). The F-cell variances explained independently by these two SNPs are ∼13% (rs7606173) and ∼11% (rs766432), whereas, together they explain ∼16%. Additionally, in men, we identify a novel locus on chromosome 17, glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor (GLP2R), associated with F-cell regulation (rs12103880; P-value <3.41 × 10(-8)). GLP2R encodes a G protein-coupled receptor and involved in proliferative and anti-apoptotic cellular responses. These findings highlight the importance of denser genetic screens and suggest further exploration of the BCL11A and GLP2R loci to gain additional insight into HbF/F-cell regulation. PMID:21326311

  7. Genetic characteristics of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in Chinese mainland, revealing genetic markers of classical and variant virulent parental/attenuated strains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangzhou; Ku, Xugang; Li, Zhonghua; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Ye, Shiyi; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhou, Chunling; Yao, Li; Meng, Xianrong; He, Qigai

    2016-08-15

    Since October 2010, porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) caused by variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has led great economic losses to the global pig industry, especially in China. To study the genetic characteristics of PEDV strains in Chinese mainland, a total of 603 clinical samples from nine provinces/districts of Chinese mainland from January 2014 to December 2015 were collected for RT-PCR detection and 1-1323bp of S gene of 91 isolates and ORF3 gene of 46 isolates were sequenced. The results showed that the variant PEDV were the dominant pathogens of viral diarrhea diseases in these areas. Six novel variant PEDV strains (FJAX1, FJAX2, HeNPDS1, HeNPDS2, HeNPY3, and HeNPY4) with two amino acids (aa) deletion at the 56-57 aa of S protein were identified. A total of 405 Chinese PEDV strains were subjected to phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis. The results revealed that the subgroup Va in variant PEDV group were the dominant subgroup and the spread trend of variant PEDV strains seemed to be from the southeast coastal districts to other coastal districts and interior districts. The N-terminal of S gene (1-750bp), to some extent, could represent S1 or full length S gene for phylogenetic, similarity, antigen index, hydrophilicity plot, and differentiation analyses. The 404-472bp of S gene contained the three genetic markers, i.e., "TAA" insertion at 404-405bp, "ACAGGT" deletion at 430-435bp, and "ATA" deletion at 455-457bp can be used to differentiate the classical and variant virulent parental/attenuated PEDV strains and help us to learn the infectious and genetic characteristics of PEDV strains more convenient and cheaper. This study has important implication for understanding the infectious, genetic, and evolutionary aspects of PEDV strains in Chinese mainland. PMID:27178127

  8. Additive genetic contribution to symptom dimensions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Rahel; Palmer, Rohan H C; Brick, Leslie A; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder with a complex genetic architecture. In this study, genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum-likelihood analysis (GREML) was used to investigate the extent to which variance in depression symptoms/symptom dimensions can be explained by variation in common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of individuals with MDD (N = 1,558) who participated in the National Institute of Mental Health Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. A principal components analysis of items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) obtained prior to treatment revealed 4 depression symptom components: (a) appetite, (b) core depression symptoms (e.g., depressed mood, anhedonia), (c) insomnia, and (d) anxiety. These symptom dimensions were associated with SNP-based heritability (hSNP2) estimates of 30%, 14%, 30%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicated that the genetic contribution of common SNPs to depression symptom dimensions were not uniform. Appetite and insomnia symptoms in MDD had a relatively strong genetic contribution whereas the genetic contribution was relatively small for core depression and anxiety symptoms. While in need of replication, these results suggest that future gene discovery efforts may strongly benefit from parsing depression into its constituent parts. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27124715

  9. Association between Genetic Variants and Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Populations: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khodaeian, Mehrnoosh; Enayati, Samaneh; Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Amoli, Mahsa M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetes mellitus as the most prevalent metabolic disease is a multifactorial disease which is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. In this systematic review, we assessed the association between genetic variants and diabetes/its complications in studies with Iranian populations. Methods. Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Persian web databases were systematically searched up to January 2014. The search terms were “gene,” “polymorphism,” “diabetes,” and “diabetic complications”; nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, foot ulcer, and CAD (coronary artery diseases); and Persian equivalents. Animal studies, letters to editor, and in vitro studies were excluded. Results. Out of overall 3029 eligible articles, 88 articles were included. We found significant association between CTLA-4, IL-18, VDR, TAP2, IL-12, and CD4 genes and T1DM, HNFα and MODY, haptoglobin, paraoxonase, leptin, TCF7L2, calreticulin, ERα, PPAR-γ2, CXCL5, calpain-10, IRS-1 and 2, GSTM1, KCNJ11, eNOS, VDR, INSR, ACE, apoA-I, apo E, adiponectin, PTPN1, CETP, AT1R, resistin, MMP-3, BChE K, AT2R, SUMO4, IL-10, VEGF, MTHFR, and GSTM1 with T2DM or its complications. Discussion. We found some controversial results due to heterogeneity in ethnicity and genetic background. We thought genome wide association studies on large number of samples will be helpful in identifying diabetes susceptible genes as an alternative to studying individual candidate genes in Iranian populations. PMID:26587547

  10. Common genetic variants associated with resting oxygenation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Cho, Michael H; Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Lutz, Sharon M; Castaldi, Peter J; Lomas, David A; Coxson, Harvey O; Edwards, Lisa D; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M A; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen I; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bakke, Per; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Miller, Bruce E; Gulsvik, Amund; Casaburi, Richard; Wells, J Michael; Regan, Elizabeth A; Make, Barry J; Hokanson, John E; Lange, Christoph; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxemia is a major complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that correlates with disease prognosis. Identifying genetic variants associated with oxygenation may provide clues for deciphering the heterogeneity in prognosis among patients with COPD. However, previous genetic studies have been restricted to investigating COPD candidate genes for association with hypoxemia. To report results from the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of resting oxygen saturation (as measured by pulse oximetry [Spo2]) in subjects with COPD, we performed a GWAS of Spo2 in two large, well characterized COPD populations: COPDGene, including both the non-Hispanic white (NHW) and African American (AA) groups, and Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). We identified several suggestive loci (P < 1 × 10(-5)) associated with Spo2 in COPDGene in the NHW (n = 2810) and ECLIPSE (n = 1758) groups, and two loci on chromosomes 14 and 15 in the AA group (n = 820) from COPDGene achieving a level of genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)). The chromosome 14 single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs6576132, located in an intergenic region, was nominally replicated (P < 0.05) in the NHW group from COPDGene. The chromosome 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were rare in subjects of European ancestry, so the results could not be replicated. The chromosome 15 region contains several genes, including TICRR and KIF7, and is proximal to RHCG (Rh family C glyocoprotein gene). We have identified two loci associated with resting oxygen saturation in AA subjects with COPD, and several suggestive regions in subjects of European descent with COPD. Our study highlights the importance of investigating the genetics of complex traits in different racial groups. PMID:24825563

  11. Identification and Validation of Genetic Variants that Influence Transcription Factor and Cell Signaling Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hause, Ronald J.; Stark, Amy L.; Antao, Nirav N.; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Chung, Sophie H.; Brown, Christopher D.; Wong, Shan S.; Gill, Daniel F.; Myers, Jamie L.; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-01-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression. PMID:25087611

  12. Common Genetic Variants Associated with Resting Oxygenation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; Sørheim, Inga-Cecilie; Lutz, Sharon M.; Castaldi, Peter J.; Lomas, David A.; Coxson, Harvey O.; Edwards, Lisa D.; MacNee, William; Vestbo, Jørgen; Yates, Julie C.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M. A.; Celli, Bartolome; Crim, Courtney; Rennard, Stephen I.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Bakke, Per; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Miller, Bruce E.; Gulsvik, Amund; Casaburi, Richard; Wells, J. Michael; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Lange, Christoph; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxemia is a major complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that correlates with disease prognosis. Identifying genetic variants associated with oxygenation may provide clues for deciphering the heterogeneity in prognosis among patients with COPD. However, previous genetic studies have been restricted to investigating COPD candidate genes for association with hypoxemia. To report results from the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of resting oxygen saturation (as measured by pulse oximetry [Spo2]) in subjects with COPD, we performed a GWAS of Spo2 in two large, well characterized COPD populations: COPDGene, including both the non-Hispanic white (NHW) and African American (AA) groups, and Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). We identified several suggestive loci (P < 1 × 10−5) associated with Spo2 in COPDGene in the NHW (n = 2810) and ECLIPSE (n = 1758) groups, and two loci on chromosomes 14 and 15 in the AA group (n = 820) from COPDGene achieving a level of genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). The chromosome 14 single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs6576132, located in an intergenic region, was nominally replicated (P < 0.05) in the NHW group from COPDGene. The chromosome 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were rare in subjects of European ancestry, so the results could not be replicated. The chromosome 15 region contains several genes, including TICRR and KIF7, and is proximal to RHCG (Rh family C glyocoprotein gene). We have identified two loci associated with resting oxygen saturation in AA subjects with COPD, and several suggestive regions in subjects of European descent with COPD. Our study highlights the importance of investigating the genetics of complex traits in different racial groups. PMID:24825563

  13. Literature mining of genetic variants for curation: quantifying the importance of supplementary material.

    PubMed

    Jimeno Yepes, Antonio; Verspoor, Karin

    2014-01-01

    A major focus of modern biological research is the understanding of how genomic variation relates to disease. Although there are significant ongoing efforts to capture this understanding in curated resources, much of the information remains locked in unstructured sources, in particular, the scientific literature. Thus, there have been several text mining systems developed to target extraction of mutations and other genetic variation from the literature. We have performed the first study of the use of text mining for the recovery of genetic variants curated directly from the literature. We consider two curated databases, COSMIC (Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer) and InSiGHT (International Society for Gastro-intestinal Hereditary Tumours), that contain explicit links to the source literature for each included mutation. Our analysis shows that the recall of the mutations catalogued in the databases using a text mining tool is very low, despite the well-established good performance of the tool and even when the full text of the associated article is available for processing. We demonstrate that this discrepancy can be explained by considering the supplementary material linked to the published articles, not previously considered by text mining tools. Although it is anecdotally known that supplementary material contains 'all of the information', and some researchers have speculated about the role of supplementary material (Schenck et al. Extraction of genetic mutations associated with cancer from public literature. J Health Med Inform 2012;S2:2.), our analysis substantiates the significant extent to which this material is critical. Our results highlight the need for literature mining tools to consider not only the narrative content of a publication but also the full set of material related to a publication. PMID:24520105

  14. Genetic variants in adiponectin and blood pressure responses to dietary sodium or potassium interventions: a family-based association study.

    PubMed

    Chu, C; Wang, Y; Ren, K-Y; Yan, D-Y; Guo, T-S; Zheng, W-L; Yuan, Z-Y; Mu, J-J

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that genetic factors might have an important role in blood pressure (BP) responses to dietary salt or potassium intake. The aim of this study was to assess the association of common genetic variants of the adiponectin gene with BP responses to controlled dietary sodium or potassium interventions. Subjects (n=334) from 124 families in rural areas of Northern China were recruited. After a 3-day baseline observation, participants sequentially maintained a 7-day low-sodium diet (NaCl, 3 g per day; or sodium, 51.3 mmol per day), followed by a 7-day high-sodium diet (NaCl, 18 g per day; or sodium, 307.8 mmol per day) and a 7-day high-sodium plus potassium supplementation intervention (KCl, 4.5 g per day; or potassium, 60 mmol per day). A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the adiponectin gene were selected as the study sites. After adjustment for multiple testing, the adiponectin SNP rs16861205 was significantly associated with the diastolic BP (DBP) response to low-salt intervention, and the DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to high-salt intervention (P=0.028, 0.023 and 0.027, respectively). SNP rs822394 was associated with the DBP and MAP responses to low-salt intervention and the DBP response to high-salt intervention (P=0.023, 0.030 and 0.033 respectively). Meanwhile, significant association also existed between SNP rs16861194 and the systolic BP response to potassium supplementation intervention (P=0.026). In addition, SNP rs822394 was significantly associated with basal DBP after adjustment for multiple testing (P=0.033). Our study indicated that the genetic polymorphisms in the adiponectin gene are significantly associated with BP responses to dietary sodium and potassium intake. PMID:27011258

  15. Genetic variants in adiponectin and blood pressure responses to dietary sodium or potassium interventions: a family-based association study

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C; Wang, Y; Ren, K-y; Yan, D-y; Guo, T-s; Zheng, W-l; Yuan, Z-y; Mu, J-j

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that genetic factors might have an important role in blood pressure (BP) responses to dietary salt or potassium intake. The aim of this study was to assess the association of common genetic variants of the adiponectin gene with BP responses to controlled dietary sodium or potassium interventions. Subjects (n=334) from 124 families in rural areas of Northern China were recruited. After a 3-day baseline observation, participants sequentially maintained a 7-day low-sodium diet (NaCl, 3 g per day; or sodium, 51.3 mmol per day), followed by a 7-day high-sodium diet (NaCl, 18 g per day; or sodium, 307.8 mmol per day) and a 7-day high-sodium plus potassium supplementation intervention (KCl, 4.5 g per day; or potassium, 60 mmol per day). A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the adiponectin gene were selected as the study sites. After adjustment for multiple testing, the adiponectin SNP rs16861205 was significantly associated with the diastolic BP (DBP) response to low-salt intervention, and the DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to high-salt intervention (P=0.028, 0.023 and 0.027, respectively). SNP rs822394 was associated with the DBP and MAP responses to low-salt intervention and the DBP response to high-salt intervention (P=0.023, 0.030 and 0.033 respectively). Meanwhile, significant association also existed between SNP rs16861194 and the systolic BP response to potassium supplementation intervention (P=0.026). In addition, SNP rs822394 was significantly associated with basal DBP after adjustment for multiple testing (P=0.033). Our study indicated that the genetic polymorphisms in the adiponectin gene are significantly associated with BP responses to dietary sodium and potassium intake. PMID:27011258

  16. A general approach for combining diverse rare variant association tests provides improved robustness across a wider range of genetic architectures.

    PubMed

    Greco, Brian; Hainline, Allison; Arbet, Jaron; Grinde, Kelsey; Benitez, Alejandra; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    The widespread availability of genome sequencing data made possible by way of next-generation technologies has yielded a flood of different gene-based rare variant association tests. Most of these tests have been published because they have superior power for particular genetic architectures. However, for applied researchers it is challenging to know which test to choose in practice when little is known a priori about genetic architecture. Recently, tests have been proposed which combine two particular individual tests (one burden and one variance components) to minimize power loss while improving robustness to a wider range of genetic architectures. In our analysis we propose an expansion of these approaches, yielding a general method that works for combining any number of individual tests. We demonstrate that running multiple different tests on the same data set and using a Bonferroni correction for multiple testing is never better than combining tests using our general method. We also find that using a test statistic that is highly robust to the inclusion of non-causal variants (joint-infinity) together with a previously published combined test (sequence kernel adaptive test-optimal) provides improved robustness to a wide range of genetic architectures and should be considered for use in practice. Software for this approach is supplied. We support the increased use of combined tests in practice - as well as further exploration of novel combined testing approaches using the general framework provided here - to maximize robustness of rare variant testing strategies against a wide range of genetic architectures. PMID:26508571

  17. Integrated Model of De Novo and Inherited Genetic Variants Yields Greater Power to Identify Risk Genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Sanders, Stephan J.; Liu, Li; De Rubeis, Silvia; Lim, Elaine T.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    De novo mutations affect risk for many diseases and disorders, especially those with early-onset. An example is autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four recent whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies of ASD families revealed a handful of novel risk genes, based on independent de novo loss-of-function (LoF) mutations falling in the same gene, and found that de novo LoF mutations occurred at a twofold higher rate than expected by chance. However successful these studies were, they used only a small fraction of the data, excluding other types of de novo mutations and inherited rare variants. Moreover, such analyses cannot readily incorporate data from case-control studies. An important research challenge in gene discovery, therefore, is to develop statistical methods that accommodate a broader class of rare variation. We develop methods that can incorporate WES data regarding de novo mutations, inherited variants present, and variants identified within cases and controls. TADA, for Transmission And De novo Association, integrates these data by a gene-based likelihood model involving parameters for allele frequencies and gene-specific penetrances. Inference is based on a Hierarchical Bayes strategy that borrows information across all genes to infer parameters that would be difficult to estimate for individual genes. In addition to theoretical development we validated TADA using realistic simulations mimicking rare, large-effect mutations affecting risk for ASD and show it has dramatically better power than other common methods of analysis. Thus TADA's integration of various kinds of WES data can be a highly effective means of identifying novel risk genes. Indeed, application of TADA to WES data from subjects with ASD and their families, as well as from a study of ASD subjects and controls, revealed several novel and promising ASD candidate genes with strong statistical support. PMID:23966865

  18. Identification of genetic variants associated with maize flowering time using an extremely large multi-genetic background population.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Li, Chunhui; Bradbury, Peter J; Liu, Xiaolei; Lu, Fei; Romay, Cinta M; Glaubitz, Jeffrey C; Wu, Xun; Peng, Bo; Shi, Yunsu; Song, Yanchun; Zhang, Dengfeng; Buckler, Edward S; Zhang, Zhiwu; Li, Yu; Wang, Tianyu

    2016-06-01

    Flowering time is one of the major adaptive traits in domestication of maize and an important selection criterion in breeding. To detect more maize flowering time variants we evaluated flowering time traits using an extremely large multi- genetic background population that contained more than 8000 lines under multiple Sino-United States environments. The population included two nested association mapping (NAM) panels and a natural association panel. Nearly 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used in the analyses. Through the parallel linkage analysis of the two NAM panels, both common and unique flowering time regions were detected. Genome wide, a total of 90 flowering time regions were identified. One-third of these regions were connected to traits associated with the environmental sensitivity of maize flowering time. The genome-wide association study of the three panels identified nearly 1000 flowering time-associated SNPs, mainly distributed around 220 candidate genes (within a distance of 1 Mb). Interestingly, two types of regions were significantly enriched for these associated SNPs - one was the candidate gene regions and the other was the approximately 5 kb regions away from the candidate genes. Moreover, the associated SNPs exhibited high accuracy for predicting flowering time. PMID:27012534

  19. Virus fitness differences observed between two naturally occurring isolates of Ebola virus Makona variant using a reverse genetics approach.

    PubMed

    Albariño, César G; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Kainulainen, Markus H; Whitmer, Shannon L M; Welch, Stephen R; Nichol, Stuart T

    2016-09-01

    During the large outbreak of Ebola virus disease that occurred in Western Africa from late 2013 to early 2016, several hundred Ebola virus (EBOV) genomes have been sequenced and the virus genetic drift analyzed. In a previous report, we described an efficient reverse genetics system designed to generate recombinant EBOV based on a Makona variant isolate obtained in 2014. Using this system, we characterized the replication and fitness of 2 isolates of the Makona variant. These virus isolates are nearly identical at the genetic level, but have single amino acid differences in the VP30 and L proteins. The potential effects of these differences were tested using minigenomes and recombinant viruses. The results obtained with this approach are consistent with the role of VP30 and L as components of the EBOV RNA replication machinery. Moreover, the 2 isolates exhibited clear fitness differences in competitive growth assays. PMID:27366976

  20. A Natural Genetic Variant of Granzyme B Confers Lethality to a Common Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Andoniou, Christopher E.; Sutton, Vivien R.; Wikstrom, Matthew E.; Fleming, Peter; Thia, Kevin Y. T.; Matthews, Antony Y.; Kaiserman, Dion; Schuster, Iona S.; Coudert, Jerome D.; Eldi, Preethi; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran; Bird, Phillip I.

    2014-01-01

    Many immune response genes are highly polymorphic, consistent with the selective pressure imposed by pathogens over evolutionary time, and the need to balance infection control with the risk of auto-immunity. Epidemiological and genomic studies have identified many genetic variants that confer susceptibility or resistance to pathogenic micro-organisms. While extensive polymorphism has been reported for the granzyme B (GzmB) gene, its relevance to pathogen immunity is unexplored. Here, we describe the biochemical and cytotoxic functions of a common allele of GzmB (GzmBW) common in wild mouse. While retaining ‘Asp-ase’ activity, GzmBW has substrate preferences that differ considerably from GzmBP, which is common to all inbred strains. In vitro, GzmBW preferentially cleaves recombinant Bid, whereas GzmBP activates pro-caspases directly. Recombinant GzmBW and GzmBP induced equivalent apoptosis of uninfected targets cells when delivered with perforin in vitro. Nonetheless, mice homozygous for GzmBW were unable to control murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, and succumbed as a result of excessive liver damage. Although similar numbers of anti-viral CD8 T cells were generated in both mouse strains, GzmBW-expressing CD8 T cells isolated from infected mice were unable to kill MCMV-infected targets in vitro. Our results suggest that known virally-encoded inhibitors of the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway account for the increased susceptibility of GzmBW mice to MCMV. We conclude that different natural variants of GzmB have a profound impact on the immune response to a common and authentic viral pathogen. PMID:25502180

  1. Association of cancer stem cell markers genetic variants with gallbladder cancer susceptibility, prognosis, and survival.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anu; Gupta, Annapurna; Rastogi, Neeraj; Agrawal, Sushma; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Vijay; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-02-01

    Genes important to stem cell progression have been involved in the genetics and clinical outcome of cancers. We investigated germ line variants in cancer stem cell (CSC) genes to predict susceptibility and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy treatment in gallbladder cancer (GBC) patients. In this study, we assessed the effect of SNPs in CSC genes (surface markers CD44, ALCAM, EpCAM, CD133) and (molecular markers NANOG, SOX-2, LIN-28A, ALDH1A1, OCT-4) with GBC susceptibility and prognosis. Total 610 GBC patients and 250 controls were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP, ARMS-PCR, and TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. Chemotoxicity graded 2-4 in 200 patients and tumor response was recorded in 140 patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Differences in genotype and haplotype frequency distributions were calculated by binary logistic regression. Gene-gene interaction model was analyzed by generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR). Overall survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival curve and multivariate Cox-proportional methods. ALCAM Ars1157Crs10511244 (P = 0.0035) haplotype was significantly associated with GBC susceptibility. In GMDR analysis, ALCAM rs1157G>A, EpCAM rs1126497T>C emerged as best significant interaction model with GBC susceptibility and ALDH1A1 rs13959T>G with increased risk of grade 3-4 hematological toxicity. SOX-2 rs11915160A>C, OCT-4 rs3130932T>G, and NANOG rs11055786T>C were found best gene-gene interaction model for predicting response to NACT. In both Cox-proportional and recursive partitioning ALCAM rs1157GA+AA genotype showed higher mortality and hazard ratio. ALCAM gene polymorphisms associated with GBC susceptibility and survival while OCT-4, SOX-2, and NANOG variants showed an interactive role with treatment response. PMID:26318430

  2. Characterization of equine CSN1S2 variants considering genetics, transcriptomics, and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Pawlak, Piotr; Wodas, Lukasz; Borowska, Alicja; Stachowiak, Anna; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Mackowski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Currently, research interest is increasing in horse milk composition and its effect on human health. Despite previously published studies describing the presence of intra- and interbreed variability of equine milk components, no investigations have focused on the genetic background of this variation. Among horse caseins and the genes encoding them, least is known about the structure and expression of the α-S2 casein gene, CSN1S2. Herein, based on direct sequencing of the equine CSN1S2 coding sequence, we describe the presence of 51-bp insertion-deletion (in/del) polymorphism, which significantly changes the protein sequence (lack or presence of 17-amino acid serine-rich peptide). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the observed in/del polymorphism spanned exactly 2 exons; therefore, we hypothesized that we were observing different CSN1S2 splicing isoforms. However, further investigation indicated that the detected sequence variation was caused by a large (1.3-kb) deletion in the genomic DNA. We found that the polymorphic forms (A, longer; B, shorter; KP658381 and KP658382 GenBank records, respectively) were unevenly distributed among different horse breeds (the highest frequency of variant B was observed in coldblood horses and Haflingers). We propose that the analyzed polymorphism is associated with CSN1S2 expression level (the highest expression was recorded for individuals carrying the BB genotype), which was much more pronounced for milk CSN1S2 protein content than for relative transcript abundance (measured in milk somatic cells). Our results provide insight into the equine CSN1S2 structure and lay a foundation for further functional analyses regarding, for example, allergenicity or physiochemical properties of the observed CSN1S2 variants. PMID:26709185

  3. Genetic variants in the mTOR pathway and breast cancer risk in African American women.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Liu, Song; Hu, Qiang; Yao, Song; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Bandera, Elisa V; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen; Troester, Melissa A; Haiman, Christopher A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Olshan, Andrew F; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis. However, there has been no large-scale investigation of genetic variants in the mTOR pathway and breast cancer risk. We examined 28847 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 61 mTOR pathway genes in the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk consortium of 3663 cases [1983 estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and 1098 ER-negative (ER-)] and 4687 controls. Gene-level analyses were conducted using the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) test for 10773 SNPs that were not highly correlated (r (2) < 0.8), and SNP-level analyses were conducted with logistic regression. Among genes that were prioritized (nominal P < 0.05, ARTP tests), associations were observed for intronic SNPs TSC2 rs181088346 [odds ratio (OR) of each copy of variant allele = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.65-0.88 for all breast cancer] and BRAF rs114729114 (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.24-1.91 for all breast cancer and OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.50-2.76 for ER- tumors). For ER- tumors, intronic SNPs PGF rs11542848 (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.15-1.66) and rs61759375 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.14-1.57) and MAPK3 rs78564187 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.11-1.43) were associated with increased risk. These SNPs were significant at a gene-wide level (Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05). The variant allele of RPS6KB2 rs35363135, a synonymous coding SNP, was more likely to be observed in ER- than ER+ tumors (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05-1.31, gene-wide Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.06). In conclusion, specific mTOR pathway genes are potentially important to breast cancer risk and to the ER negativity in African American women. PMID:26577839

  4. Genetic variants of ApoE and ApoER2 differentially modulate endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Konaniah, Eddy S.; Herz, Joachim; Gerard, Robert D.; Jung, Eunjeong; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Ahmed, Mohamed; Hui, David Y.; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    It is poorly understood why there is greater cardiovascular disease risk associated with the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE) allele vs. apoE3, and also greater risk with the LRP8/apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) variant ApoER2-R952Q. Little is known about the function of the apoE–ApoER2 tandem outside of the central nervous system. We now report that in endothelial cells apoE3 binding to ApoER2 stimulates endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and endothelial cell migration, and it also attenuates monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion. However, apoE4 does not stimulate eNOS or endothelial cell migration or dampen cell adhesion, and alternatively it selectively antagonizes apoE3/ApoER2 actions. The contrasting endothelial actions of apoE4 vs. apoE3 require the N-terminal to C-terminal interaction in apoE4 that distinguishes it structurally from apoE3. Reconstitution experiments further reveal that ApoER2-R952Q is a loss-of-function variant of the receptor in endothelium. Carotid artery reendothelialization is decreased in ApoER2−/− mice, and whereas adenoviral-driven apoE3 expression in wild-type mice has no effect, apoE4 impairs reendothelialization. Moreover, in a model of neointima formation invoked by carotid artery endothelial denudation, ApoER2−/− mice display exaggerated neointima development. Thus, the apoE3/ApoER2 tandem promotes endothelial NO production, endothelial repair, and endothelial anti-inflammatory properties, and it prevents neointima formation. In contrast, apoE4 and ApoER2-R952Q display dominant-negative action and loss of function, respectively. Thus, genetic variants of apoE and ApoER2 impact cardiovascular health by differentially modulating endothelial function. PMID:25197062

  5. A large scale analysis of genetic variants within putative miRNA binding sites in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stegeman, Shane; Amankwah, Ernest; Klein, Kerenaftali; O’Mara, Tracy A.; Kim, Donghwa; Lin, Hui-Yi; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Sellers, Thomas A.; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Doug; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Travis, Ruth C.; Neal, David; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Blot, William J.; Thibodeau, Stephen; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Kaneva, Radka; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Consortium, PRACTICAL; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Clements, Judith A.; Park, Jong Y.; Batra, Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common malignancy among men worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 100 risk variants for prostate cancer, which can explain ~33% of the familial risk of the disease. We hypothesized that a comprehensive analysis of genetic variations found within the 3′ UTR of genes predicted to affect miRNA binding (miRSNPs) can identify additional prostate cancer risk variants. We investigated the association between 2,169 miRSNPs and prostate cancer risk in a large-scale analysis of 22,301 cases and 22,320 controls of European ancestry from 23 participating studies. Twenty-two miRSNPs were associated (p<2.3×10−5) with risk of prostate cancer, 10 of which were within the 7 genes previously not mapped by GWASs. Further, using miRNA mimics and reporter gene assays, we showed that miR-3162-5p has specific affinity for the KLK3 rs1058205 miRSNP T-allele whilst miR-370 has greater affinity for the VAMP8 rs1010 miRSNP A-allele, validating their functional role. Significance Findings from this large association study suggest that a focus on miRSNPs, including functional evaluation, can identify candidate risk loci below currently accepted statistical levels of genome-wide significance. Studies of miRNAs and their interactions with SNPs could provide further insights into the mechanisms of prostate cancer risk. PMID:25691096

  6. Genetic Variants in MicroRNAs and Their Binding Sites Are Associated with the Risk of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Mohsen; Darweesh, Sirwan K L; de Looper, Hans W J; van Luijn, Marvin M; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Arfan; Franco, Oscar H; Erkeland, Stefan J; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that serve as key regulators of gene expression. They have been shown to be involved in a wide range of biological processes including neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic variants in miRNAs or miRNA-binding sites on their target genes could affect miRNA function and contribute to disease risk. Here, we investigated the association of miRNA-related genetic variants with Parkinson disease (PD) using data from the largest GWAS on PD. Of 243 miRNA variants, we identified rs897984:T>C in miR-4519 (P value = 1.3×10(-5) and OR = 0.93) and rs11651671:A>G in miR-548at-5p (P value = 1.1×10(-6) and OR = 1.09) to be associated with PD. We showed that the variant's mutant alleles change the secondary structure and decrease expression level of their related miRNAs. Subsequently, we highlighted target genes that might mediate the effects of miR-4519 and miR-548at-5p on PD. Among them, we experimentally showed that NSF is a direct target of miR-4519. Furthermore, among 48,844 miRNA-binding site variants, we found 32 variants (within 13 genes) that are associated with PD. Four of the host genes, CTSB, STX1B, IGSF9B, and HSD3B7, had not previously been reported to be associated with PD. We provide evidence supporting the potential impact of the identified miRNA-binding site variants on miRNA-mediated regulation of their host genes. PMID:26670097

  7. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Read, Timothy; Richmond, Phillip A.; Dowell, Robin D.

    2016-01-01

    Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s) that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant. PMID:26751950

  8. Early onset of moyamoya syndrome in a Down syndrome patient with the genetic variant RNF213 p.R4810K.

    PubMed

    Chong, Pin Fee; Ogata, Reina; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Koizumi, Akio; Kira, Ryutaro

    2015-09-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is a unique progressive occlusive cerebrovascular disease that predisposes affected patients to stroke. We describe the case of a 2-year-old girl presenting with early onset of moyamoya syndrome with concurrent Down syndrome. Genetic testing revealed a heterozygous missense variant of RNF213. RNF213 was recently identified as the first susceptibility gene for moyamoya disease in patients with no known associated risk factors. The reported median age at the onset of idiopathic moyamoya disease with a heterozygous RNF213 risk variant is 7 years, while, the average age at onset of moyamoya syndrome in Down syndrome is 7-16 years. Down syndrome and RNF213 variant contribute to the development of moyamoya vasculopathy in different ways. Although the underlying mechanism is not fully understood, an additive effect was observed with the early-onset seen in this patient. Little is known about the potential association between RNF213 and moyamoya syndrome. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that the RNF213 risk variant has a modifier effect in steno-occlusive vasculopathy, even in medical conditions known to be associated with moyamoya syndrome. PMID:25547042

  9. Rare Variants in the Epithelial Cadherin Gene Underlying the Genetic Etiology of Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luciano Abreu; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Melo, Soraia; Malcher, Carolina; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; Figueiredo, Joana; Alvizi, Lucas; Kobayashi, Gerson Shigeru; Naslavsky, Michel Satya; Alonso, Nivaldo; Felix, Temis Maria; Zatz, Mayana; Seruca, Raquel; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-11-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial cleft (NSOFC) is a complex disease of still unclear genetic etiology. To investigate the contribution of rare epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene variants to NSOFC, we target sequenced 221 probands. Candidate variants were evaluated via in vitro, in silico, or segregation analyses. Three probably pathogenic variants (c.760G>A [p.Asp254Asn], c.1023T>G [p.Tyr341*], and c.2351G>A [p.Arg784His]) segregated according to autosomal dominant inheritance in four nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) families (Lod score: 5.8 at θ = 0; 47% penetrance). A fourth possibly pathogenic variant (c.387+5G>A) was also found, but further functional analyses are needed (overall prevalence of CDH1 candidate variants: 2%; 15.4% among familial cases). CDH1 mutational burden was higher among probands from familial cases when compared to that of controls (P = 0.002). We concluded that CDH1 contributes to NSCL/P with mainly rare, moderately penetrant variants, and CDH1 haploinsufficiency is the likely etiological mechanism. PMID:26123647

  10. Common Genetic Variants of the Human Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Gene (CYP21A2) Are Related to Differences in Circulating Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Doleschall, Márton; Szabó, Julianna Anna; Pázmándi, Júlia; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Koncz, Klára; Farkas, Henriette; Tóth, Miklós; Igaz, Péter; Gláz, Edit; Prohászka, Zoltán; Korbonits, Márta; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Systematic evaluation of the potential relationship between the common genetic variants of CYP21A2 and hormone levels. Methods The relationships of CYP21A2 intron 2 polymorphisms and haplotypes with diverse baseline and stimulated blood hormone levels were studied in 106 subjects with non-functioning adrenal incidentaloma (NFAI). The rationale for using NFAI subjects is dual: i) their baseline hormone profiles do not differ from those of healthy subjects and ii) hormone levels after stimulation tests are available. Results The carriers (N = 27) of a well-defined CYP21A2 haplotype cluster (c5) had significantly elevated levels of cortisol (p = 0.0110), and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (p = 0.0001) after ACTH stimulation, and 11-deoxycortisol after metyrapone administration (p = 0.0017), but the hormone values were in normal ranges. In addition, the carriers (N = 33) of the C allele of the rs6462 polymorphism had a higher baseline aldosterone level (p = 0.0006). The prevalence of these genetic variants of CYP21A2 did not differ between NFAI and healthy subjects. Conclusions The common CYP21A2 variants presumably exert the same effect on hormone levels in the healthy and disease-affected populations. Therefore, they may contribute to complex diseases such as some cardiovascular diseases, and may influence the genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) including the individual need for hormone substitution. PMID:25210767

  11. Genetic analysis of porcine respiratory coronavirus, an attenuated variant of transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Wesley, R D; Woods, R D; Cheung, A K

    1991-01-01

    The genome and transcriptional pattern of a newly identified respiratory variant of transmissible gastroenteritis virus were analyzed and compared with those of classical enterotropic transmissible gastroenteritis virus. The transcriptional patterns of the two viruses indicated that differences occurred in RNAs 1 and 2(S) and that RNA 3 was absent in the porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) variant. The smaller RNA 2(S) of PRCV was due to a 681-nucleotide (nt) deletion after base 62 of the PRCV peplomer or spike (S) gene. The PRCV S gene still retained information for the 16-amino-acid signal peptide and the first 6 amino acid residues at the N terminus of the mature S protein, but the adjacent 227 residues were deleted. Two additional deletions (3 and 5 nt) were detected in the PRCV genome downstream of the S gene. The 3-nt deletion occurred in a noncoding region; however, the 5-nt deletion shortened the potential open reading frame A polypeptide from 72 to 53 amino acid residues. Significantly, a C-to-T substitution was detected in the last base position of the transcription recognition sequence upstream of open reading frame A, which rendered RNA 3 nondetectable in PRCV-infected cell cultures. Images PMID:1851885

  12. Genetic variant coding for iron regulatory protein HFE contributes to hypertension, the TAMRISK study.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Kirsi M; Nikkari, Seppo T; Kunnas, Tarja A

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for body homeostasis, but iron overload may lead to metabolic abnormalities and thus increase the risk for atherosclerosis and many other diseases. Major histocompatibility complex class I-like transmembrane protein (HFE) is involved in body iron metabolism. The gene coding for HFE has 3 well-known polymorphic sites of which H63D (rs1799945, C > G) has recently been associated with hypertension in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) study. In the present study, we wanted to clarify whether the genetic variant associates with hypertension in a Finnish cohort consisting of 50-year-old men and women. The study included 399 hypertensive cases and 751 controls from the Tampere adult population cardiovascular risk study (TAMRISK) cohort. Genotyping of polymorphisms was done by polymerase chain reaction using DNAs extracted from buccal swabs. We found that individuals with the mutated form of the H63D polymorphic site (G-allele) had a 1.4-fold risk (P = 0.037, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.89) for hypertension at the age of 50 years compared with the CC genotype carriers. When obese subjects (body mass index > 30 kg/m²) were analyzed in their own group, the risk for hypertension was even stronger (odds ratio 4.15, P < 0.001, 95% CI 1.98-8.68). We also noticed that the blood pressure (BP) readings were higher in those with the minor G-allele when compared to ones having a normal genotype already at the age of 35 years. Means of systolic/diastolic BPs were 127/81 mm Hg for CC and 131/83 mm Hg for CG + GG groups (P < 0.001 for systolic and P = 0.005 for diastolic pressure). In conclusion, HFE genetic variant H63D was associated with essential hypertension in Finnish subjects from the TAMRISK cohort confirming a previous GWAS study. The effect of this SNP on BP was also confirmed from a longitudinal study. PMID:25634189

  13. Phenotypic integration of skeletal traits during growth buffers genetic variants affecting the slenderness of femora in inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Karl J.; Hu, Bin; Tommasini, Steven M.; Courtland, Hayden-William; Price, Christopher; Cordova, Matthew; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2009-01-01

    Compensatory interactions among adult skeletal traits are critical for establishing strength but complicate the search for fracture susceptibility genes by allowing many genetic variants to exist in a population without loss of function. A better understanding of how these interactions arise during growth will provide new insight into genotype-phenotype relationships and the biological controls that establish skeletal strength. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variants affecting growth in width relative to growth in length (slenderness) are coordinated with movement of the inner bone surface and matrix mineralization to match stiffness with weight-bearing loads during postnatal growth. Midshaft femoral morphology and tissue-mineral density were quantified at ages of 1 day and at 4, 8, and 16 weeks for a panel of 20 female AXB/BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains. Path Analyses revealed significant compensatory interactions among outer-surface expansion rate, inner-surface expansion rate, and tissue-mineral density during postnatal growth, indicating that genetic variants affecting bone slenderness were buffered mechanically by the precise regulation of bone surface movements and matrix mineralization. Importantly, the covariation between morphology and mineralization resulted from a heritable constraint limiting the amount of tissue that could be used to construct a functional femur. The functional interactions during growth explained 56-99% of the variability in adult traits and mechanical properties. These functional interactions provide quantitative expectations of how genetic or environmental variants affecting one trait should be compensated by changes in other traits. Variants that impair this process or that cannot be fully compensated are expected to alter skeletal growth leading to underdesigned (weak) or overdesigned (bulky) structures. PMID:19082857

  14. Phenome-wide association studies demonstrating pleiotropy of genetic variants within FTO with and without adjustment for body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Robert M.; Field, Julie R.; Bradford, Yuki; Shaffer, Christian M.; Carroll, Robert J.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Bastarache, Lisa; Edwards, Todd L.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Lin, Simon; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Crane, Paul K.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Crawford, Dana C.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Carrell, David S.; Crosslin, David R.; Ledbetter, David H.; Carey, David J.; Tromp, Gerard; Williams, Marc S.; Larson, Eric B.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Peissig, Peggy L.; Brilliant, Murray H.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Chute, Christopher G.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Bottinger, Erwin; Chisholm, Rex; Smith, Maureen E.; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2014-01-01

    Phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS) have demonstrated utility in validating genetic associations derived from traditional genetic studies as well as identifying novel genetic associations. Here we used an electronic health record (EHR)-based PheWAS to explore pleiotropy of genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO), some of which have been previously associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). We used a population of 10,487 individuals of European ancestry with genome-wide genotyping from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network and another population of 13,711 individuals of European ancestry from the BioVU DNA biobank at Vanderbilt genotyped using Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. A meta-analysis of the two study populations replicated the well-described associations between FTO variants and obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.11–1.24, p = 2.10 × 10−9) and FTO variants and T2D (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.08–1.21, p = 2.34 × 10−6). The meta-analysis also demonstrated that FTO variant rs8050136 was significantly associated with sleep apnea (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.07–1.22, p = 3.33 × 10−5); however, the association was attenuated after adjustment for body mass index (BMI). Novel phenotype associations with obesity-associated FTO variants included fibrocystic breast disease (rs9941349, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.74–0.91, p = 5.41 × 10−5) and trends toward associations with non-alcoholic liver disease and gram-positive bacterial infections. FTO variants not associated with obesity demonstrated other potential disease associations including non-inflammatory disorders of the cervix and chronic periodontitis. These results suggest that genetic variants in FTO may have pleiotropic associations, some of which are not mediated by obesity. PMID:25177340

  15. Genetic and non-genetic influences during pregnancy on infant global and site specific DNA methylation: role for folate gene variants and vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jill A; Groom, Alexandra; Potter, Catherine; Coneyworth, Lisa J; Ford, Dianne; Mathers, John C; Relton, Caroline L

    2012-01-01

    Inter-individual variation in patterns of DNA methylation at birth can be explained by the influence of environmental, genetic and stochastic factors. This study investigates the genetic and non-genetic determinants of variation in DNA methylation in human infants. Given its central role in provision of methyl groups for DNA methylation, this study focuses on aspects of folate metabolism. Global (LUMA) and gene specific (IGF2, ZNT5, IGFBP3) DNA methylation were quantified in 430 infants by Pyrosequencing®. Seven polymorphisms in 6 genes (MTHFR, MTRR, FOLH1, CβS, RFC1, SHMT) involved in folate absorption and metabolism were analysed in DNA from both infants and mothers. Red blood cell folate and serum vitamin B(12) concentrations were measured as indices of vitamin status. Relationships between DNA methylation patterns and several covariates viz. sex, gestation length, maternal and infant red cell folate, maternal and infant serum vitamin B(12), maternal age, smoking and genotype were tested. Length of gestation correlated positively with IGF2 methylation (rho = 0.11, p = 0.032) and inversely with ZNT5 methylation (rho = -0.13, p = 0.017). Methylation of the IGFBP3 locus correlated inversely with infant vitamin B(12) concentration (rho = -0.16, p = 0.007), whilst global DNA methylation correlated inversely with maternal vitamin B(12) concentrations (rho = 0.18, p = 0.044). Analysis of common genetic variants in folate pathway genes highlighted several associations including infant MTRR 66G>A genotype with DNA methylation (χ(2) = 8.82, p = 0.003) and maternal MTHFR 677C>T genotype with IGF2 methylation (χ(2) = 2.77, p = 0.006). These data support the hypothesis that both environmental and genetic factors involved in one-carbon metabolism influence DNA methylation in infants. Specifically, the findings highlight the importance of vitamin B(12) status, infant MTRR genotype and maternal MTHFR genotype, all of which may influence the supply of methyl groups for DNA

  16. Spectrum and Classification of ATP7B Variants in a Large Cohort of Chinese Patients with Wilson's Disease Guides Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Ni, Wang; Chen, Wan-Jin; Wan, Bo; Zhao, Gui-Xian; Shi, Zhu-Qing; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Ning; Yu, Long; Xu, Jian-Feng; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism caused by ATP7B pathogenic mutations. The symptoms of WD can be effectively prevented if the affected individuals are identified and intervened early. However, clinical utility of this molecular analysis is challenging due to hundreds of variants with various clinical effects in the gene. Here, we aim to describe the spectrum of ATP7B variants and assess their clinical effects in the Han Chinese population. Methods: The ATP7B gene was directly sequenced in 632 unrelated WD patients and 503 unrelated healthy individuals. The effects of identified variants were classified according to the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) standards and guidelines. Different frequency of variants observed in both cases and controls were tested using Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Results: We detected 161 non-synonymous variants in these 632 WD patients, 58 of which were novel. Among these variants, 78, 64, 8, 4, and 7 were classified as 'pathogenic variants', 'likely pathogenic variants', 'variants with uncertain significance', 'likely benign variants', and 'benign variants', respectively. Ninety percent (569/632) of these WD patients can be genetically diagnosed with two or more 'pathogenic' or 'likely pathogenic' variants. The 14 most common disease-causing variants were found at least once in 94% (537/569) of genetically diagnosed patients. Conclusions: These data expand the spectrum of ATP7B variants and facilitate effective screening for ATP7B variants for early diagnosis of WD and development of individualized treatment regimens. PMID:27022412

  17. Autosomal Minor Histocompatibility Antigens: How Genetic Variants Create Diversity in Immune Targets

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Marieke; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can be a curative treatment for hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, the desired anti-tumor or graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect is often accompanied with undesired side effects against healthy tissues known as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). After HLA-matched alloSCT, GvL and GvHD are both mediated by donor-derived T-cells recognizing polymorphic peptides presented by HLA surface molecules on patient cells. These polymorphic peptides or minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) are produced by genetic differences between patient and donor. Since polymorphic peptides may be useful targets to manipulate the balance between GvL and GvHD, the dominant repertoire of MiHA needs to be discovered. In this review, the diversity of autosomal MiHA characterized thus far as well as the various molecular mechanisms by which genetic variants create immune targets and the role of cryptic transcripts and proteins as antigen sources are described. The tissue distribution of MiHA as important factor in GvL and GvHD is considered as well as possibilities how hematopoietic MiHA can be used for immunotherapy to augment GvL after alloSCT. Although more MiHA are still needed for comprehensive understanding of the biology of GvL and GvHD and manipulation by immunotherapy, this review shows insight into the composition and kinetics of in vivo immune responses with respect to specificity, diversity, and frequency of specific T-cells and surface expression of HLA–peptide complexes and other (accessory) molecules on the target cell. A complex interplay between these factors and their environment ultimately determines the spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by immune responses after alloSCT. PMID:27014279

  18. Identification of Common Genetic Variants Influencing Spontaneous Dizygotic Twinning and Female Fertility.

    PubMed

    Mbarek, Hamdi; Steinberg, Stacy; Nyholt, Dale R; Gordon, Scott D; Miller, Michael B; McRae, Allan F; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Day, Felix R; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J; Davies, Gareth E; Martin, Hilary C; Penninx, Brenda W; Jansen, Rick; McAloney, Kerrie; Vink, Jacqueline M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Plomin, Robert; Spector, Tim D; Magnusson, Patrik K; Reversade, Bruno; Harris, R Alan; Aagaard, Kjersti; Kristjansson, Ragnar P; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Iacono, William G; Lambalk, Cornelis B; Montgomery, Grant W; McGue, Matt; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Martin, Nicholas G; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kari; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning occurs in 1%-4% of women, with familial clustering and unknown physiological pathways and genetic origin. DZ twinning might index increased fertility and has distinct health implications for mother and child. We performed a GWAS in 1,980 mothers of spontaneous DZ twins and 12,953 control subjects. Findings were replicated in a large Icelandic cohort and tested for association across a broad range of fertility traits in women. Two SNPs were identified (rs11031006 near FSHB, p = 1.54 × 10(-9), and rs17293443 in SMAD3, p = 1.57 × 10(-8)) and replicated (p = 3 × 10(-3) and p = 1.44 × 10(-4), respectively). Based on ∼90,000 births in Iceland, the risk of a mother delivering twins increased by 18% for each copy of allele rs11031006-G and 9% for rs17293443-C. A higher polygenic risk score (PRS) for DZ twinning, calculated based on the results of the DZ twinning GWAS, was significantly associated with DZ twinning in Iceland (p = 0.001). A higher PRS was also associated with having children (p = 0.01), greater lifetime parity (p = 0.03), and earlier age at first child (p = 0.02). Allele rs11031006-G was associated with higher serum FSH levels, earlier age at menarche, earlier age at first child, higher lifetime parity, lower PCOS risk, and earlier age at menopause. Conversely, rs17293443-C was associated with later age at last child. We identified robust genetic risk variants for DZ twinning: one near FSHB and a second within SMAD3, the product of which plays an important role in gonadal responsiveness to FSH. These loci contribute to crucial aspects of reproductive capacity and health. PMID:27132594

  19. Genetic Variants Influencing Joint Damage in Mexican Americans and European Americans With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arya, Rector; Del Rincon, Inmaculada; Farook, Vidya S; Restrepo, Jose F; Winnier, Diedre A; Fourcaudot, Marcel J; Battafarano, Daniel F; de Almeida, Marcio; Kumar, Satish; Curran, Joanne E; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Escalante, Agustin

    2015-12-01

    Joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is heritable, but knowledge on specific genetic determinants of joint damage in RA is limited. We have used the Immunochip array to examine whether genetic variants influence variation in joint damage in a cohort of Mexican Americans (MA) and European Americans (EA) with RA. We studied 720 MA and 424 EA patients with RA. Joint damage was quantified using a radiograph of both hands and wrists, scored using Sharp's technique. We conducted association analyses with the transformed Sharp score and the Immunochip single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data using PLINK. In MAs, 15 SNPs from chromosomes 1, 5, 9, 17 and 22 associated with joint damage yielded strong p-values (p < 1 × 10(-4) ). The strongest association with joint damage was observed with rs7216796, an intronic SNP located in the MAP3K14 gene, on chromosome 17 (β ± SE = -0.25 ± 0.05, p = 6.23 × 10(-6) ). In EAs, 28 SNPs from chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 9, and 21 showed associations with joint damage (p-value < 1 × 10(-4) ). The best association was observed on chromosome 9 with rs59902911 (β ± SE = 0.86 ± 0.17, p = 1.01 × 10(-6) ), a synonymous SNP within the CARD9 gene. We also observed suggestive evidence for some loci influencing joint damage in MAs and EAs. We identified two novel independent loci (MAP3K14 and CARD9) strongly associated with joint damage in MAs and EAs and a few shared loci showing suggestive evidence for association. PMID:26498133

  20. Genetic schizophrenia risk variants jointly modulate total brain and white matter volume

    PubMed Central

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, AF; Bakker, Steven C.; van Haren, Neeltje E.M.; Derks, Eske M.; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Boos, Heleen B.M.; Cahn, Wiepke; Hulshoff Pol, HE; Ripke, Stephan; Ophoff, Roel A.; Kahn, RS

    2012-01-01

    Background Thousands of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are weakly associated with schizophrenia. It is likely that subsets of disease-associated SNPs are associated with distinct heritable disease-associated phenotypes. Therefore, we examined the shared genetic susceptibility modulating schizophrenia and brain volume. Methods Odds ratios for genome-wide SNP data were calculated in the sample collected by the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium (8,690 schizophrenia patients and 11,831 controls, excluding subjects from the present study). These were used to calculate individual polygenic schizophrenia (“risk”) scores (PSSs) in an independent sample of 152 schizophrenia patients and 142 healthy controls with available structural MRI scans. Results In the entire group, the PSS was significantly associated with total brain volume (R2=0.048, p=1.6×10−4) and white matter volume (R2=0.051, p=8.6×10−5) equally in patients and controls. The number of (independent) SNPs that substantially influenced both disease risk and white matter (n=2,020) was much smaller than the entire set of SNPs that modulated disease status (n=14,751). From the set of 2,020 SNPs, a group of 186 SNPs showed most evidence for association with white matter volume and an explorative functional analysis showed that these SNPs were located in genes with neuronal functions. Conclusions These results indicate that a relatively small subset of schizophrenia genetic risk variants is related to the (normal) development of white matter. This in turn suggests that disruptions in white matter growth increase the susceptibility to develop schizophrenia. PMID:23039932

  1. Genetic Variants in EPAS1 Contribute to Adaptation to High-Altitude Hypoxia in Sherpas

    PubMed Central

    Basnyat, Buddha; Ito, Michiko; Kobayashi, Nobumitsu; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Keishi; Ota, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Sherpas comprise a population of Tibetan ancestry in the Himalayan region that is renowned for its mountaineering prowess. The very small amount of available genetic information for Sherpas is insufficient to explain their physiological ability to adapt to high-altitude hypoxia. Recent genetic evidence has indicated that natural selection on the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1) gene was occurred in the Tibetan population during their occupation in the Tibetan Plateau for millennia. Tibetan-specific variations in EPAS1 may regulate the physiological responses to high-altitude hypoxia via a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor pathway. We examined three significant tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs13419896, rs4953354, and rs4953388) in the EPAS1 gene in Sherpas, and compared these variants with Tibetan highlanders on the Tibetan Plateau as well as with non-Sherpa lowlanders. We found that Sherpas and Tibetans on the Tibetan Plateau exhibit similar patterns in three EPAS1 significant tag SNPs, but these patterns are the reverse of those in non-Sherpa lowlanders. The three SNPs were in strong linkage in Sherpas, but in weak linkage in non-Sherpas. Importantly, the haplotype structured by the Sherpa-dominant alleles was present in Sherpas but rarely present in non-Sherpas. Surprisingly, the average level of serum erythropoietin in Sherpas at 3440 m was equal to that in non-Sherpas at 1300 m, indicating a resistant response of erythropoietin to high-altitude hypoxia in Sherpas. These observations strongly suggest that EPAS1 is under selection for adaptation to the high-altitude life of Tibetan populations, including Sherpas. Understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia tolerance in Tibetans is expected to provide lights to the therapeutic solutions of some hypoxia-related human diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:23227185

  2. Genetic Variants in MARCO Are Associated with the Susceptibility to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Mai-Juan; Wang, Hai-Bing; Li, Hao; Yang, Jun-Hai; Yan, Yan; Xie, Lan-Pin; Qi, Ying-Cheng; Li, Jun-Lian; Chen, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to tuberculosis is not only determined by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, but also by the genetic component of the host. Macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO) is essential components required for toll like receptor-signaling in macrophage response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which may contribute to tuberculosis risk. Principal Findings To specifically investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MARCO gene are associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in Chinese Han population. By selecting tagging SNPs in MARCO gene, 17 tag SNPs were identified and genotyped in 923 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 1033 healthy control subjects using a hospital based case-control association study. Single-point and haplotype analysis revealed an association in intron and exon region of MARCO gene. One SNP (rs17009726) was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis, where the carriers of the G allele had a 1.65 fold (95% CI = 1.32–2.05, pcorrected = 9.27E–5) increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis. Haplotype analysis revealed that haplotype GC containing G allele of 17009726 and haplotype TGCC (rs17795618T/A, rs1371562G/T, rs6761637T/C, rs2011839C/T) were also associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (pcorrected = 0.0001 and 0.029, respectively). Conclusions Our study suggested that genetic variants in MARCO gene were associated with pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Chinese Han population, and the findings emphasize the importance of MARCO mediated immune responses in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:21886847

  3. Genetic variants in lncRNA SRA and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rui; Wang, Kaijuan; Peng, Rui; Wang, Shuaibing; Cao, Jingjing; Wang, Peng; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) has been identified to activate steroid receptor transcriptional activity and participate in tumor pathogenesis. This case-control study evaluated the association between two haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs) (rs10463297, rs801460) of the whole SRA sequence and breast cancer risk. We found that rs10463297 TC genotype significantly increased BC risk compared with CC genotype in both the codominant (TC vs. TT: OR=1.43, 95 % CI=1.02–2.00) and recessive (TC+CC vs. TT: OR=1.39, 95 % CI=1.01–1.92) genetic models. Both TC, TC + CC genotypes of rs10463297 and GA, AA, GA+AA genotypes of rs801460 were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER) positivity status. rs10463297 TC (2.09 ± 0.41), CC (2.42 ± 0.51) and TC + CC (2.20 ± 0.47) genotypes were associated with higher blood plasma SRA mRNA levels compared with the TT genotype(1.45 ± 0.34). Gene–reproductive interaction analysis presented a best model consisted of four factors (rs10463297, age, post-menopausal, No. of pregnancy), which could increase the BC risk with 1.58-fold (OR=1.58, 95 % CI=1.23–2.03). These findings suggest that SRA genetic variants may contribute to BC risk and have apparent interaction with reproductive factors in BC progression. PMID:26967566

  4. Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Deborah J; Plagnol, Vincent; Walker, Neil M; Cooper, Jason D; Downes, Kate; Yang, Jennie HM; Howson, Joanna MM; Stevens, Helen; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; Heap, Graham A.; Dubois, Patrick C.; Clayton, David G.; Hunt, Karen A; van Heel, David A; Todd, John A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The inflammatory disorders type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease co-segregate in populations, suggesting a common genetic origin. Both are associated with the HLA class II genes on chromosome 6p21, and the present paper tested whether non-HLA loci are shared. METHODS We evaluated eight celiac disease risk loci in T1D by genotyping and statistical analyses of 8,064 T1D cases, 9,339 controls and 2,519 families. We also investigated 18 T1D loci in 2,560 celiac disease cases and 9,339 controls. RESULTS Three celiac disease loci, listed as chromosome/candidate gene: 1q31/RGS1, 2q12/IL18RAP and 6q25/TAGAP, were associated with T1D (P < 10−4). The 3p21/CCR5 32 base pair insertion/deletion variant was newly identified as a T1D locus (P = 1.81 × 10−8), and was also associated with celiac disease, as were 18p11/PTPN2 and 2q33/CTLA4, bringing the total loci shared to seven, including 12q24/SH2B3. The 2q12/IL18RAP and 6q25/TAGAP allele associations were in the opposite direction in T1D as compared to celiac disease. Distinct effects included 11p15/INS, 10p15/IL2RA and 1q13/PTPN22 in T1D and 3q25/IL12A and 3q28/LPP in celiac disease. CONCLUSIONS Genetic susceptibility to T1D and celiac disease shares common alleles. These data suggest that common biological mechanisms, such as autoimmunity related tissue damage and intolerance to dietary antigens may be a feature of T1D. PMID:19073967

  5. Autosomal Minor Histocompatibility Antigens: How Genetic Variants Create Diversity in Immune Targets.

    PubMed

    Griffioen, Marieke; van Bergen, Cornelis A M; Falkenburg, J H Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can be a curative treatment for hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, the desired anti-tumor or graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect is often accompanied with undesired side effects against healthy tissues known as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). After HLA-matched alloSCT, GvL and GvHD are both mediated by donor-derived T-cells recognizing polymorphic peptides presented by HLA surface molecules on patient cells. These polymorphic peptides or minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) are produced by genetic differences between patient and donor. Since polymorphic peptides may be useful targets to manipulate the balance between GvL and GvHD, the dominant repertoire of MiHA needs to be discovered. In this review, the diversity of autosomal MiHA characterized thus far as well as the various molecular mechanisms by which genetic variants create immune targets and the role of cryptic transcripts and proteins as antigen sources are described. The tissue distribution of MiHA as important factor in GvL and GvHD is considered as well as possibilities how hematopoietic MiHA can be used for immunotherapy to augment GvL after alloSCT. Although more MiHA are still needed for comprehensive understanding of the biology of GvL and GvHD and manipulation by immunotherapy, this review shows insight into the composition and kinetics of in vivo immune responses with respect to specificity, diversity, and frequency of specific T-cells and surface expression of HLA-peptide complexes and other (accessory) molecules on the target cell. A complex interplay between these factors and their environment ultimately determines the spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by immune responses after alloSCT. PMID:27014279

  6. Genetic variants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Cui, Long; Tam, Wing Hung; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) share common genetic polymorphisms. We conducted meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of all available variants and determined the effects of confounding and experimental components on the genetic association of GDM. Any case-controlled or cohort studies with genotype distribution compared GDM cases with controls were included. In total, 28 articles including 8,204 cases and 15,221 controls for 6 polymorphisms were studied. rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1) were significantly associated with the increased GDM risk. The association of rs4402960(IGF2BP2) and rs1800629(TNF-α) was significant only when the studies with control allele frequency deviation and publication bias were excluded. Further subgroup analysis showed the risk alleles of rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significantly associated with the GDM risk only in Asian, but not in Caucasian population. The OGTT test using 100 g, but not 75 g; and genotype detection by other assays, but not Taqman method, were also significantly associated with increased GDM risk in rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2). Overall GDM was associated with rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1), but only rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significant in Asian populations. While rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2) were significantly affected by OGTT protocol and genotyping methods. PMID:27468700

  7. Pleiotropy and pathway analyses of genetic variants associated with both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, LA; Pankow, James S; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Tang, Weihong; Prizment, Anna; Couper, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Epidemiological evidence shows that diabetes is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. The objective of this study was to identify genes that may contribute to both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer outcomes and the biological pathways these diseases may share. Methods: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study is a population-based prospective cohort study in four U.S. communities that included a baseline examination in 1987-89 and three follow-up exams at three year intervals. Participants were 45-64 years old at baseline. We conducted a genomewide association (GWA) study of incident type 2 diabetes in males, summarized variation across genetic loci into a polygenic risk score, and determined if that diabetes risk score was also associated with incident prostate cancer in the same study population. Secondarily we conducted a separate GWA study of prostate cancer, performed a pathway analysis of both type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer, and qualitatively determined if any of the biochemical pathways identified were shared between the two outcomes. Results: We found that the polygenic risk score for type 2 diabetes was not statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer. The pathway analysis also found no overlap between pathways associated with type 2 diabetes and prostate cancer. However, it did find that the growth hormone signaling pathway was statistically significantly associated with type 2 diabetes (p=0.0001). Conclusion: The inability of this study to find an association between type 2 diabetes polygenic risk scores with prostate cancer or biological pathways in common suggests that shared genetic variants may not contribute significantly to explaining shared etiology. PMID:23565322

  8. Sleeping Beauty transposase structure allows rational design of hyperactive variants for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Franka; Wiedemann, Lisa; Zuliani, Cecilia; Querques, Irma; Sebe, Attila; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is a prominent Tc1/mariner superfamily DNA transposon that provides a popular genome engineering tool in a broad range of organisms. It is mobilized by a transposase enzyme that catalyses DNA cleavage and integration at short specific sequences at the transposon ends. To facilitate SB's applications, here we determine the crystal structure of the transposase catalytic domain and use it to model the SB transposase/transposon end/target DNA complex. Together with biochemical and cell-based transposition assays, our structure reveals mechanistic insights into SB transposition and rationalizes previous hyperactive transposase mutations. Moreover, our data enables us to design two additional hyperactive transposase variants. Our work provides a useful resource and proof-of-concept for structure-based engineering of tailored SB transposases. PMID:27025571

  9. Sleeping Beauty transposase structure allows rational design of hyperactive variants for genetic engineering

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Franka; Wiedemann, Lisa; Zuliani, Cecilia; Querques, Irma; Sebe, Attila; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is a prominent Tc1/mariner superfamily DNA transposon that provides a popular genome engineering tool in a broad range of organisms. It is mobilized by a transposase enzyme that catalyses DNA cleavage and integration at short specific sequences at the transposon ends. To facilitate SB's applications, here we determine the crystal structure of the transposase catalytic domain and use it to model the SB transposase/transposon end/target DNA complex. Together with biochemical and cell-based transposition assays, our structure reveals mechanistic insights into SB transposition and rationalizes previous hyperactive transposase mutations. Moreover, our data enables us to design two additional hyperactive transposase variants. Our work provides a useful resource and proof-of-concept for structure-based engineering of tailored SB transposases. PMID:27025571

  10. CRY1 and CRY2 genetic variants in seasonality: A longitudinal and cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kovanen, Leena; Donner, Kati; Kaunisto, Mari; Partonen, Timo

    2016-08-30

    Cryptochromes are key components of the circadian clocks that generate and maintain seasonal variations. The aim of our study was to analyze the associations of CRY1 and CRY2 genetic variants with the problematicity of seasonal variations, and whether the problematicity of seasonal variations changed during the follow-up of 11 years. Altogether 21 CRY1 and 16 CRY2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and analyzed in 5910 individuals from a Finnish nationwide population-based sample who had filled in the self-report on the seasonal variations in mood and behavior in the year 2000. In the year 2011, 3356 of these individuals filled in the same self-report on the seasonal variations in mood and behavior. Regression models were used to test whether any of the SNPs associated with the problematicity of seasonal variations or with a change in the problematicity from 2000 to 2011. In the longitudinal analysis, CRY2 SNP rs61884508 was protective from worsening of problematicity of seasonal variations. In the cross-sectional analysis, CRY2 SNP rs72902437 showed evidence of association with problematicity of seasonal variations, as did SNP rs1554338 (in the MAPK8IP1 and downstream of CRY2). PMID:27267441

  11. Anti-candidal activity of genetically engineered histatin variants with multiple functional domains.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, Frank G; Helmerhorst, Eva J; Lendenmann, Urs; Offner, Gwynneth D

    2012-01-01

    The human bodily defense system includes a wide variety of innate antimicrobial proteins. Histatins are small molecular weight proteins produced by the human salivary glands that exhibit antifungal and antibacterial activities. While evolutionarily old salivary proteins such as mucins and proline-rich proteins contain large regions of tandem repeats, relatively young proteins like histatins do not contain such repeated domains. Anticipating that domain duplications have a functional advantage, we genetically engineered variants of histatin 3 with one, two, three, or four copies of the functional domain by PCR and splice overlap. The resulting proteins, designated reHst3 1-mer, reHist3 2-mer, reHis3 3-mer and reHist3 4-mer, exhibited molecular weights of 4,062, 5,919, 7,777, and 9,634 Da, respectively. The biological activities of these constructs were evaluated in fungicidal assays toward Candida albicans blastoconidia and germinated cells. The antifungal activities per mole of protein increased concomitantly with the number of functional domains present. This increase, however, was higher than could be anticipated from the molar concentration of functional domains present in the constructs. The demonstrated increase in antifungal activity may provide an evolutionary explanation why such domain multiplication is a frequent event in human salivary proteins. PMID:23251551

  12. Common genetic variants on 5p14.1 associate with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Ma, Deqiong; Bucan, Maja; Glessner, Joseph T.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Salyakina, Daria; Imielinski, Marcin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi; Rappaport, Eric; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette; Korvatska, Olena; Piven, Joseph; Sonnenblick, Lisa I.; Retuerto, Ana I. Alvarez; Herman, Edward I.; Dong, Hongmei; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian; Ozonoff, Sally; Klin, Ami; Owley, Thomas; Sweeney, John A.; Brune, Camille W.; Cantor, Rita M.; Bernier, Raphael; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; McMahon, William M.; Miller, Judith; State, Matthew W.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Coon, Hilary; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Nurnberger, John I.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Cook, Edwin H.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Dawson, Geraldine; Grant, Struan F. A.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)—two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules—revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 × 10−8, odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 × 10−8 to 2.1 × 10−10. Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs. PMID:19404256

  13. Genetic Variants of PTPN2 Gene in Chinese Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Li, Jiamei; Chen, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Xiao; Zhu, Weiwei; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported the association of PTPN2 gene with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in many populations but not in the Chinese Han population. Therefore, the goal of our study was to replicate the reported association between 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs478582 and rs2542151) in the PTPN2 gene and T1DM in Chinese Han children. Material/Methods This case-control study included 141 Chinese Han children with T1DM and 282 healthy controls. Genetic variants of rs478582 and rs2542151 in PTPN2 gene were performed by PCR amplification followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Results No difference was observed in association of rs478582 in The PTPN2 gene and T1DM. The distribution of allele frequency of rs2542151 differed significantly between T1DM patients and healthy controls (OR, 0.6; 95%CI: 0.44 to 0.95; and P=0.024). Dominant model of rs254215 also was associated with T1DM (OR, 0.6; 95%CI: 0.40 to 0.96; and P=0.032). Younger age at onset in G carriers appeared to increase the risk for T1DM (P=0.030). Conclusions The findings suggested that rs2542151 SNP in The PTPN2 gene was associated with T1DM in Chinese Han children. Further studies with larger sample sizes involving gene-gene interactions are urgently needed. PMID:26344020

  14. The influence of genetic variants on striatal dopamine transporter and D2 receptor binding after TBI.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Amy K; Scanlon, Joelle M; Becker, Carl R; Ritter, Anne C; Niyonkuru, Christian; Dixon, Clifton E; Conley, Yvette P; Price, Julie C

    2014-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission influences cognition and recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We explored whether functional genetic variants affecting the DA transporter (DAT) and D2 receptor (DRD2) impacted in vivo dopaminergic binding with positron emission tomography (PET) using [(11)C]βCFT and [(11)C]raclopride. We examined subjects with moderate/severe TBI (N=12) ∼1 year post injury and similarly matched healthy controls (N=13). The variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism within the DAT gene and the TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism near the DRD2 gene were assessed. TBI subjects had age-adjusted DAT-binding reductions in the caudate, putamen, and ventral striatum, and modestly increased D2 binding in ventral striatum versus controls. Despite small sample sizes, multivariate analysis showed lower caudate and putamen DAT binding among DAT 9-allele carriers and DRD2 A2/A2 homozygotes with TBI versus controls with the same genotype. Among TBI subjects, 9-allele carriers had lower caudate and putamen binding than 10/10 homozygotes. This PET study suggests a hypodopaminergic environment and altered DRD2 autoreceptor DAT interactions that may influence DA transmission after TBI. Future work will relate these findings to cognitive performance; future studies are required to determine how DRD2/DAT1 genotype and DA-ligand binding are associated with neurostimulant response and TBI recovery. PMID:24849661

  15. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P.

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:25938495

  16. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D; Lee, James J; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Michael B; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L; Hansell, Narelle K; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H; Starr, John M; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G; Verhulst, Frank C; Ward, Mary E; Wright, Margaret J; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

    2014-09-23

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated SNPs. Second, using independent samples (n = 24,189), we measure the association of these education-associated SNPs with cognitive performance. Three SNPs (rs1487441, rs7923609, and rs2721173) are significantly associated with cognitive performance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In an independent sample of older Americans (n = 8,652), we also show that a polygenic score derived from the education-associated SNPs is associated with memory and absence of dementia. Convergent evidence from a set of bioinformatics analyses implicates four specific genes (KNCMA1, NRXN1, POU2F3, and SCRT). All of these genes are associated with a particular neurotransmitter pathway involved in synaptic plasticity, the main cellular mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:25201988

  17. Associations between genetic variants in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) gene and blood serum IGF1 concentration in Hanwoo cattle.

    PubMed

    Chung, H Y; Choi, Y J; Park, H N; Davis, M E

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the associations between genetic variants in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) gene and blood serum IGF1 concentration in Hanwoo cattle. Polymerase chain reaction primers were based on GenBank accession No. AF404761 and amplified approximately 533-bp segments. Newly identified sequences were submitted to GenBank (accession No. DQ267493). Sequence analysis revealed that genetic variants were located at a nucleotide position 323 for the nucleotide substitution C/A that was first reported in this study and positions 326-349 for a repeat motif (CA10-11). The allele frequencies of g.323C>A were 0.264 (C) and 0.736 (A) without significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Frequencies of the repeat motif CA(10) and CA(11) were 0.604 and 0.396, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that the genetic variation g.323C>A was significantly associated with blood serum IGF1 concentrations with significant additive genetic effects, whereas no associations were found for the repeat motif. IGF1 concentrations were positively (r = 0.453) and negatively (r = -0.445) correlated with weights in the growing stages (16-21 months) and late fattening stages (22-30 months), respectively. The results of the present study and future genotypic data for Hanwoo beef cattle based on the robust genetic variation of IGF1 will provide critical information for genetic improvement and will have a large impact on commercial markets. PMID:25966067

  18. A Discounted Cash Flow variant to detect the optimal amount of additional burdens in Public-Private Partnership transactions.

    PubMed

    Copiello, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The Discounted Cash Flow method is a long since well-known tool to assess the feasibility of investment projects, as the background which shapes a broad range of techniques, from the Cost-Benefit Analysis up to the Life-Cycle Cost Analysis. Its rationale lies in the comparison of deferred values, only once they have been discounted back to the present. The DCF variant proposed here fits into a specific application field. It is well-suited to the evaluations required in order to structure equitable transactions under the umbrella of Public-Private Partnership. •The discount rate relies upon the concept of expected return on equity, instead than on those of weighted average cost of capital, although the latter is the most common reference within the scope of real estate investment valuation.•Given a feasible project, whose Net Present Value is more than satisfactory, we aim to identify the amount of the additional burdens that could be charged to the project, under the condition of keeping the same economically viable.•The DCF variant essentially deals with an optimization problem, which can be solved by means of simple one-shot equations, derived from financial mathematics, or through iterative calculations if additional constraints must be considered. PMID:27054095

  19. A Discounted Cash Flow variant to detect the optimal amount of additional burdens in Public-Private Partnership transactions

    PubMed Central

    Copiello, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The Discounted Cash Flow method is a long since well-known tool to assess the feasibility of investment projects, as the background which shapes a broad range of techniques, from the Cost-Benefit Analysis up to the Life-Cycle Cost Analysis. Its rationale lies in the comparison of deferred values, only once they have been discounted back to the present. The DCF variant proposed here fits into a specific application field. It is well-suited to the evaluations required in order to structure equitable transactions under the umbrella of Public-Private Partnership. • The discount rate relies upon the concept of expected return on equity, instead than on those of weighted average cost of capital, although the latter is the most common reference within the scope of real estate investment valuation. • Given a feasible project, whose Net Present Value is more than satisfactory, we aim to identify the amount of the additional burdens that could be charged to the project, under the condition of keeping the same economically viable. • The DCF variant essentially deals with an optimization problem, which can be solved by means of simple one-shot equations, derived from financial mathematics, or through iterative calculations if additional constraints must be considered. PMID:27054095

  20. Possibility of a sex-specific role for a genetic variant in FRMPD4 in schizophrenia, but not cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Matosin, Natalie; Green, Melissa J; Andrews, Jessica L; Newell, Kelly A; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter disturbances responsible for cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia are hypothesized to originate with alterations in postsynaptic scaffold proteins. We have recently reported that protein levels of FRMPD4, a multiscaffolding protein that modulates both Homer1 and postsynaptic density protein 95 activity, is altered in the schizophrenia postmortem brain, in regions involved in cognition. Here, we set out to investigate whether genetic variation in FRMPD4 is associated with cognitive function in people with schizophrenia. We selected and examined a novel single nucleotide polymorphism, rs5979717 (positioned in the noncoding 3' untranslated region of FRMPD4 and potentially influencing protein expression), for its association with schizophrenia and nine measures of cognitive function, using age-matched and sex-matched samples from 268 schizophrenia cases and 268 healthy controls. Brain samples from 20 schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls were additionally genotyped to study the influence of this variant on protein expression of FRMPD4. Allelic distribution of rs5979717 was associated with schizophrenia in females (χ=4.52, P=0.030). No effects of rs5979717 were observed on cognitive performance, nor an influence of rs5979717 genotypes on the expression of FRMPD4 proteins in postmortem brain samples. These data provide initial support for a sex-specific role for common variation in rs5979717 in schizophrenia, which now warrants further investigation. PMID:26555035

  1. A systematic review on screening for Fabry disease: prevalence of individuals with genetic variants of unknown significance.

    PubMed

    van der Tol, L; Smid, B E; Poorthuis, B J H M; Biegstraaten, M; Deprez, R H Lekanne; Linthorst, G E; Hollak, C E M

    2014-01-01

    Screening for Fabry disease (FD) reveals a high prevalence of individuals with α-galactosidase A (GLA) genetic variants of unknown significance (GVUS). These individuals often do not express characteristic features of FD. A systematic review on FD screening studies was performed to interpret the significance of GLA gene variants and to calculate the prevalence of definite classical and uncertain cases. We searched PubMed and Embase for screening studies on FD. We collected data on screening methods, clinical, biochemical and genetic assessments. The pooled prevalence of identified subjects and those with a definite diagnosis of classical FD were calculated. As criteria for a definite diagnosis, we used the presence of a GLA variant, absent or near-absent leukocyte enzyme activity and characteristic features of FD. Fifty-one studies were selected, 45 in high-risk and 6 in newborn populations. The most often used screening method was an enzyme activity assay. Cut-off values comprised 10-55% of the mean reference value for men and up to 80% for women. Prevalence of GLA variants in newborns was 0.04%. In high-risk populations the overall prevalence of individuals with GLA variants was 0.62%, while the prevalence of a definite diagnosis of FD was 0.12%. The majority of identified individuals in high-risk and newborn populations harbour GVUS or neutral variants in the GLA gene. To determine the pathogenicity of a GVUS in an individual, improved diagnostic criteria are needed. We propose a diagnostic algorithm to approach the individual with an uncertain diagnosis. PMID:23922385

  2. Substrate-specific modulation of CYP3A4 activity by genetic variants of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR)

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vishal; Choi, Ji Ha; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Miller, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives CYP3A4 receives electrons from P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to metabolize about 50% of clinically used drugs. There is substantial inter-individual variation in CYP3A4 catalytic activity that is not explained by CYP3A4 genetic variants. CYP3A4 is flexible and distensible, permitting it to accommodate substrates varying in shape and size. To elucidate mechanisms of variability in CYP3A4 catalysis, we examined the effects of genetic variants of POR, and explored the possibility that substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4 differentially affect the ability of POR variants to support catalysis. Methods We expressed human CYP3A4 and four POR variants (Q153R, A287P, R457H, A503V) in bacteria, reconstituted them in vitro and measured the Michaelis constant and maximum velocity with testosterone, midazolam, quinidine and erythromycin as substrates. Results POR A287P and R457H had low activity with all substrates; Q153R had 76–94% of wild type (WT) activity with midazolam and erythromycin, but 129–150% activity with testosterone and quinidine. The A503V polymorphism reduced CYP3A4 activity to 61–77% of wild type with testosterone and midazolam, but had nearly wild type activity with quinidine and erythromycin. Conclusion POR variants affect CYP3A4 activities. The impact of a POR variant on catalysis by CYP3A4 is substrate-specific, probably due to substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4. PMID:20697309

  3. Genetic Variants in IL6R and ADAM19 are Associated with COPD Severity in a Mexican Mestizo Population.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rubio, Gloria; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Camarena, Ángel; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; Morales-Mandujano, Fabiola; Hernández-Zenteno, Rafael De Jesús; Flores-Trujillo, Fernando; Sánchez-Romero, Candelaria; Velázquez-Montero, Alejandra; Espinosa de Los Monteros, Carlos; Sansores, Raúl H; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Our objective is to identify the genetic variants associated with COPD risk and its severity in Mexican Mestizo population. We evaluated 1285 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of candidate genes in 299 smokers with COPD (COPD-S) and 531 smokers without COPD (SWOC) using an Illumina GoldenGate genotyping microarray. In addition, 251 ancestry informative markers were included. Allele A of rs2545771 in CYP2F2P is associated with a lower risk of COPD (p = 4.02E-10, odds ratio [OR] = 0.104, confidence interval [CI] 95% 0.05-0.18). When the COPD group was stratified by severity according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD; levels III + IV vs. I + II), 3 SNPs (rs4329505 and rs4845626 in interleukin 6 receptor [IL6R] and rs1422794 in a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 19 [ADAM19]) were associated with a lower risk of suffering the most severe stages of the disease. rs2819096 in the surfactant protein D (SFTPD) gene was associated with a higher risk of COPD GOLD III + IV (p = 7.79E-03, OR = 1.80, CI 95% 1.16-2.79). Finally, the haplotype in IL6R was associated with a lower risk of suffering from more severe COPD, whereas the haplotype in ADAM19 was associated with a higher risk (p = 7.40E-03, OR = 2.83, CI 95% 1.20-6.86) of suffering from the severe stages of the disease. Our data suggest that there are alleles and haplotypes in the IL6R, ADAM19, and SFTPD genes associated with different severity stages of COPD; in CYP2F2P, rs25455771 is associated with a lower risk of COPD. PMID:27078193

  4. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity. PMID:19594364

  5. Genetic analysis of long-lived families reveals novel variants influencing high density-lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Straka, Robert; Kammerer, Candace M.; Lee, Joseph H.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) have an inverse relationship to the risks of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and have also been associated with longevity. We sought to identify novel loci for HDL that could potentially provide new insights into biological regulation of HDL metabolism in healthy-longevous subjects. We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) scan on HDL using a mixed model approach to account for family structure using kinship coefficients. A total of 4114 subjects of European descent (480 families) were genotyped at ~2.3 million SNPs and ~38 million SNPs were imputed using the 1000 Genome Cosmopolitan reference panel in MACH. We identified novel variants near-NLRP1 (17p13) associated with an increase of HDL levels at genome-wide significant level (p < 5.0E-08). Additionally, several CETP (16q21) and ZNF259-APOA5-A4-C3-A1 (11q23.3) variants associated with HDL were found, replicating those previously reported in the literature. A possible regulatory variant upstream of NLRP1 that is associated with HDL in these elderly Long Life Family Study (LLFS) subjects may also contribute to their longevity and health. Our NLRP1 intergenic SNPs show a potential regulatory function in Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE); however, it is not clear whether they regulate NLRP1 or other more remote gene. NLRP1 plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis, and its inflammasome is critical for mediating innate immune responses. Nlrp1a (a mouse ortholog of human NLRP1) interacts with SREBP-1a (17p11) which has a fundamental role in lipid concentration and composition, and is involved in innate immune response in macrophages. The NLRP1 region is conserved in mammals, but also has evolved adaptively showing signals of positive selection in European populations that might confer an advantage. NLRP1 intergenic SNPs have also been associated with immunity/inflammasome disorders which highlights the biological

  6. Impact of 3’UTR genetic variants in PCSK9 and LDLR genes on plasma lipid traits and response to atorvastatin in Brazilian subjects: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Tomás; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Cerda, Álvaro; Dorea, Egidio L; Pinto, Gelba A; Gusukuma, Maria C; Bertolami, Marcelo C; Salazar, Luis A; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypercholesterolemia is a complex trait, resulting from a genetic interaction with lifestyle habits. Polymorphisms are a major source of genetic heterogeneity, and variations in 2 key cholesterol homeostasis genes; low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9), lead to dyslipidemia. So, we investigated the relation of 2 variants located in the 3’-UTR (3’-untranslated region) of LDLR (rs14158, G>A) and PCSK9 (rs17111557, C>T) with lipid profile and atorvastatin response. Methods: SNP influence on lipid profile was assessed in hypercholesterolemic patients (HC; n = 89) using atorvastatin (10 mg/day/4 weeks) and in normolipidemic subjects (NL; n = 171). Genotyping was completed through real-time PCR using TaqMan assays. Results: rs14158 G allele was higher in HC than in NL group (P = 0.043). NL subjects carrying the T allele of the PCSK9 variant had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) than C allele carriers (P = 0.009). There was no association between LDLR and PCSK9 SNPs and atorvastatin response. Additionally, the PCSK9 variant creates a microRNA interaction site, which could implicate an epigenetic mechanism in PCSK9-dependent HDL-C regulation. Conclusions: The rs14158 SNP contributes to hypercholesterolemia. Also, a putative microRNA regulation may influence HDL-C variability observed in rs17111557 carriers. Cholesterol-lowering response to atorvastatin is not influenced by LDLR and PCSK9 variants. PMID:26131194

  7. A Population Based Study of the Genetic Association between Catecholamine Gene Variants and Spontaneous Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A.; Cummins, Tarrant D. R.; Riese, Harriëtte; van Roon, Arie M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Bellgrove, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The catecholamines dopamine and noradrenaline have been implicated in spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in reaction time, which are associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and subclinical attentional problems. The molecular genetic substrates of these behavioral phenotypes, which reflect frequency ranges of intrinsic neuronal oscillations (Slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; Slow-5: 0.010-0.027 Hz), have not yet been investigated. In this study, we performed regression analyses with an additive model to examine associations between low-frequency fluctuations in reaction time during a sustained attention task and genetic markers across 23 autosomal catecholamine genes in a large young adult population cohort (n = 964), which yielded greater than 80% power to detect a small effect size (f2 = 0.02) and 100% power to detect a small/medium effect size (f2 = 0.15). At significance levels corrected for multiple comparisons, none of the gene variants were associated with the magnitude of low-frequency fluctuations. Given the study’s strong statistical power and dense coverage of the catecholamine genes, this either indicates that associations between low-frequency fluctuation measures and catecholamine gene variants are absent or that they are of very small effect size. Nominally significant associations were observed between variations in the alpha-2A adrenergic receptor gene (ADRA2A) and the Slow-5 band. This is in line with previous reports of an association between ADRA2A gene variants and general reaction time variability during response selection tasks, but the specific association of these gene variants and low-frequency fluctuations requires further confirmation. Pharmacological challenge studies could in the future provide convergent evidence for the noradrenergic modulation of both general and time sensitive measures of intra-individual variability in reaction time. PMID:25978426

  8. Association of Wnt signaling pathway genetic variants in gallbladder cancer susceptibility and survival.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anu; Gupta, Annapurna; Yadav, Saurabh; Rastogi, Neeraj; Agrawal, Sushma; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Vijay; Misra, Sanjeev; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-06-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract with adverse prognosis and poor survival. Wnt signaling plays an important role in embryonic development and regeneration of tissues in all the species. Deregulation of expression and mutations in this pathway may lead to disease state such as cancer. In this study, we assessed the association of common germline variants of Wnt pathway genes (SFRP2, SFRP4, DKK2, DKK3, WISP3, APC, β-catenin, AXIN-2, GLI-1) to evaluate their contribution in predisposition to GBC and treatment outcomes. The study included 564 GBC patients and 250 controls. Out of 564, 200 patients were followed up for treatment response and survival. Tumor response (RECIST 1.1) was recorded in 116 patients undergoing non-adjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox-proportional hazard regression. Single locus analysis showed significant association of SFRP4 rs1802073G > T [p value = 0.0001], DKK2 rs17037102C > T [p value = 0.0001], DKK3 rs3206824C > T [p value = 0.012], APC rs4595552 A/T [p value = 0.021], APC rs11954856G > T [p value = 0.047], AXIN-2 rs4791171C > T [p value = 0.001], β-catenin rs4135385A > G [p value = 0.031], and GLI-1 rs222826C > G [p value = 0.001] with increased risk of GBC. Gene-gene interaction using GMDR analysis predicted APC rs11954856 and AXIN2 rs4791171 as significant in conferring GBC susceptibility. Cox-proportional hazard model showed GLI-1 rs2228226 CG/GG and AXIN-2 rs4791171 TT genotype higher hazard ratio. In recursive partitioning, AXIN-2 rs4791171 TT genotype showed higher mortality and hazard. Most of studied genetic variants influence GBC susceptibility. APC rs11954856, GLI-1 rs2228226, and AXIN-2 rs4791171 were found to be associated with poor survival in advanced GBC patients. PMID:26715268

  9. Genetic Variants Associated With Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Hartnett, M. Elizabeth; Morrison, Margaux A.; Smith, Silvia; Yanovitch, Tammy L.; Young, Terri L.; Colaizy, Tarah; Momany, Allison; Dagle, John; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Clark, Erin A. S.; Page, Grier; Murray, Jeff; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Cotten, C. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine genetic variants associated with severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in a candidate gene cohort study of US preterm infants. Methods. Preterm infants in the discovery cohort were enrolled through the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network, and those in the replication cohort were from the University of Iowa. All infants were phenotyped for ROP severity. Because of differences in the durations of enrollment between cohorts, severe ROP was defined as threshold disease in the discovery cohort and as threshold disease or type 1 ROP in the replication cohort. Whole genome amplified DNA from stored blood spot samples from the Neonatal Research Network biorepository was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate platform for candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involving angiogenic, developmental, inflammatory, and oxidative pathways. Three analyses were performed to determine significant epidemiologic variables and SNPs associated with levels of ROP severity. Analyses controlled for multiple comparisons, ancestral eigenvalues, family relatedness, and significant epidemiologic variables. Single nucleotide polymorphisms significantly associated with ROP severity from the discovery cohort were analyzed in the replication cohort and in meta-analysis. Results. Eight hundred seventeen infants in the discovery cohort and 543 in the replication cohort were analyzed. Severe ROP occurred in 126 infants in the discovery and in 14 in the replication cohort. In both cohorts, ventilation days and seizure occurrence were associated with severe ROP. After controlling for significant factors and multiple comparisons, two intronic SNPs in the gene BDNF (rs7934165 and rs2049046, P < 3.1 × 10−5) were associated with severe ROP in the discovery cohort and were not associated with severe ROP in the replication cohort. However, when the cohorts were analyzed together in an exploratory

  10. Genetic variants and cell-free hemoglobin processing in sickle cell nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Santosh L.; Zhang, Xu; Shah, Binal; Kanias, Tamir; Gudehithlu, Krishnamurthy P.; Kittles, Rick; Machado, Roberto F.; Arruda, Jose A.L.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Singh, Ashok K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis and hemoglobinuria are associated with sickle cell nephropathy. ApoL1 is involved in cell-free hemoglobin scavenging through association with haptoglobin-related protein. APOL1 G1/G2 variants are the strongest genetic predictors of kidney disease in the general African-American population. A single report associated APOL1 G1/G2 with sickle cell nephropathy. In 221 patients with sickle cell disease at the University of Illinois at Chicago, we replicated the finding of an association of APOL1 G1/G2 with proteinuria, specifically with urine albumin concentration (β=1.1, P=0.003), observed an even stronger association with hemoglobinuria (OR=2.5, P=4.3×10−6), and also replicated the finding of an association with hemoglobinuria in 487 patients from the Walk-Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle cell Disease with Sildenafil Therapy study (OR=2.6, P=0.003). In 25 University of Illinois sickle cell disease patients, concentrations of urine kidney injury molecule-1 correlated with urine cell-free hemoglobin concentrations (r=0.59, P=0.002). Exposing human proximal tubular cells to increasing cell-free hemoglobin led to increasing concentrations of supernatant kidney injury molecule-1 (P=0.01), reduced viability (P=0.01) and induction of HMOX1 and SOD2. HMOX1 rs743811 associated with chronic kidney disease stage (OR=3.0, P=0.0001) in the University of Illinois cohort and end-stage renal disease (OR=10.0, P=0.0003) in the Walk-Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension and Sickle cell Disease with Sildenafil Therapy cohort. Longer HMOX1 GT-tandem repeats (>25) were associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate in the University of Illinois cohort (P=0.01). Our findings point to an association of APOL1 G1/G2 with kidney disease in sickle cell disease, possibly through increased risk of hemoglobinuria, and associations of HMOX1 variants with kidney disease, possibly through reduced protection of the kidney from hemoglobin

  11. Genetic Epidemiology of Mitochondrial Pathogenic Variants Causing Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in a Large Cohort of South Indian Hearing Impaired Individuals.

    PubMed

    Subathra, Mahalingam; Ramesh, Arabandi; Selvakumari, Mathiyalagan; Karthikeyen, N P; Srisailapathy, C R Srikumari

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in the generation of metabolic energy in the form of ATP. Tissues and organs that are highly dependent on aerobic metabolism are involved in mitochondrial disorders including nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL). Seven pathogenic variants leading to NSHL have so far been reported on two mitochondrial genes: MT-RNR1 encoding 12SrRNA and MT-TS1 encoding tRNA for Ser((UCN)) . We screened 729 prelingual NSHL subjects to determine the prevalence of MT-RNR1 variants at position m.961, m.1555A>G and m.1494C>T, and MT-TS1 m.7445A>G, m.7472insC m.7510T>C and m.7511T>C variants. Mitochondrial pathogenic variants were found in eight probands (1.1%). Five of them were found to have the m.1555A>G variant, two others had m.7472insC and one proband had m.7444G>A. The extended relatives of these probands showed variable degrees of hearing loss and age at onset. This study shows that mitochondrial pathogenic alleles contribute to about 1% prelingual hearing loss. This study will henceforth provide the reference for the prevalence of mitochondrial pathogenic alleles in the South Indian population, which to date has not been estimated. The m.1555A>G variant is a primary predisposing genetic factor for the development of hearing loss. Our study strongly suggests that mitochondrial genotyping should be considered for all hearing impaired individuals and particularly in families where transmission is compatible with maternal inheritance, after ruling out the most common variants. PMID:27530448

  12. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F.; Carino, C.

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the