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Sample records for additional genome sequences

  1. Genome Sequences of Five Additional Brevibacillus laterosporus Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Bryan D.; Berg, Jordan A.; Graves, Kiel A.; Ward, Andy T.; Hilton, Jared A.; Wake, Braden N.; Grose, Julianne H.; Breakwell, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacillus laterosporus has been isolated from many different environments, including beehives, and produces compounds that are toxic to many organisms. Five B. laterosporus phages have been isolated previously. Here, we announce five additional phages that infect this bacterium, including the first B. laterosporus siphoviruses to be discovered. PMID:26494658

  2. A sea urchin genome project: sequence scan, virtual map, and additional resources.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R A; Mahairas, G; Rast, J P; Martinez, P; Biondi, T R; Swartzell, S; Wallace, J C; Poustka, A J; Livingston, B T; Wray, G A; Ettensohn, C A; Lehrach, H; Britten, R J; Davidson, E H; Hood, L

    2000-08-15

    Results of a first-stage Sea Urchin Genome Project are summarized here. The species chosen was Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a research model of major importance in developmental and molecular biology. A virtual map of the genome was constructed by sequencing the ends of 76,020 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) recombinants (average length, 125 kb). The BAC-end sequence tag connectors (STCs) occur an average of 10 kb apart, and, together with restriction digest patterns recorded for the same BAC clones, they provide immediate access to contigs of several hundred kilobases surrounding any gene of interest. The STCs survey >5% of the genome and provide the estimate that this genome contains approximately 27,350 protein-coding genes. The frequency distribution and canonical sequences of all middle and highly repetitive sequence families in the genome were obtained from the STCs as well. The 500-kb Hox gene complex of this species is being sequenced in its entirety. In addition, arrayed cDNA libraries of >10(5) clones each were constructed from every major stage of embryogenesis, several individual cell types, and adult tissues and are available to the community. The accumulated STC data and an expanding expressed sequence tag database (at present including >12, 000 sequences) have been reported to GenBank and are accessible on public web sites.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  4. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  5. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  6. Mitochondrial genome sequence and gene order of Sipunculus nudus give additional support for an inclusion of Sipuncula into Annelida

    PubMed Central

    Mwinyi, Adina; Meyer, Achim; Bleidorn, Christoph; Lieb, Bernhard; Bartolomaeus, Thomas; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomes are a valuable source of data for analysing phylogenetic relationships. Besides sequence information, mitochondrial gene order may add phylogenetically useful information, too. Sipuncula are unsegmented marine worms, traditionally placed in their own phylum. Recent molecular and morphological findings suggest a close affinity to the segmented Annelida. Results The first complete mitochondrial genome of a member of Sipuncula, Sipunculus nudus, is presented. All 37 genes characteristic for metazoan mtDNA were detected and are encoded on the same strand. The mitochondrial gene order (protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes) resembles that of annelids, but shows several derivations so far found only in Sipuncula. Sequence based phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes results in significant bootstrap support for Annelida sensu lato, combining Annelida together with Sipuncula, Echiura, Pogonophora and Myzostomida. Conclusion The mitochondrial sequence data support a close relationship of Annelida and Sipuncula. Also the most parsimonious explanation of changes in gene order favours a derivation from the annelid gene order. These results complement findings from recent phylogenetic analyses of nuclear encoded genes as well as a report of a segmental neural patterning in Sipuncula. PMID:19149868

  7. SINGLE CELL GENOME SEQUENCING

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing of single cells has become a powerful approach for studying uncultivated microorganisms that represent 90–99 % of all environmental microbes. Single cell sequencing enables not only the identification of microbes but also linking of functions to species, a feat not achievable by metagenomic techniques. Moreover, it allows the analysis of low abundance species that may be missed in community-based analyses. It has also proved very useful in complementing metagenomics in the assembly and binning of single genomes. With the advent of drastically cheaper and higher throughput sequencing technologies, it is expected that single cell sequencing will become a standard tool in studying the genome and transcriptome of microbial communities. PMID:22154471

  8. Genome sequencing conference II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Genome Sequencing Conference 2 was held September 30 to October 30, 1990. 26 speaker abstracts and 33 poster presentations were included in the program report. New and improved methods for DNA sequencing and genetic mapping were presented. Many of the papers were concerned with accuracy and speed of acquisition of data with computers and automation playing an increasing role. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  9. Additional Routes to Staphylococcus aureus Daptomycin Resistance as Revealed by Comparative Genome Sequencing, Transcriptional Profiling, and Phenotypic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Rubio, Aileen; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K.; Silverman, Jared A.; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Daptomycin is an extensively used anti-staphylococcal agent due to the rise in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but the mechanism(s) of resistance is poorly understood. Comparative genome sequencing, transcriptomics, ultrastructure, and cell envelope studies were carried out on two relatively higher level (4 and 8 µg/ml−1) laboratory-derived daptomycin-resistant strains (strains CB1541 and CB1540 respectively) compared to their parent strain (CB1118; MW2). Several mutations were found in the strains. Both strains had the same mutations in the two-component system genes walK and agrA. In strain CB1540 mutations were also detected in the ribose phosphate pyrophosphokinase (prs) and polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase genes (pnpA), a hypothetical protein gene, and in an intergenic region. In strain CB1541 there were mutations in clpP, an ATP-dependent protease, and two different hypothetical protein genes. The strain CB1540 transcriptome was characterized by upregulation of cap (capsule) operon genes, genes involved in the accumulation of the compatible solute glycine betaine, ure genes of the urease operon, and mscL encoding a mechanosensitive chanel. Downregulated genes included smpB, femAB and femH involved in the formation of the pentaglycine interpeptide bridge, genes involved in protein synthesis and fermentation, and spa encoding protein A. Genes altered in their expression common to both transcriptomes included some involved in glycine betaine accumulation, mscL, ure genes, femH, spa and smpB. However, the CB1541 transcriptome was further characterized by upregulation of various heat shock chaperone and protease genes, consistent with a mutation in clpP, and lytM and sceD. Both strains showed slow growth, and strongly decreased autolytic activity that appeared to be mainly due to decreased autolysin production. In contrast to previous common findings, we did not find any mutations in phospholipid biosynthesis genes, and it appears there

  10. Detection and removal of PCR duplicates in population genomic ddRAD studies by addition of a degenerate base region (DBR) in sequencing adapters.

    PubMed

    Schweyen, Hannah; Rozenberg, Andrey; Leese, Florian

    2014-10-01

    Restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD) has emerged as a powerful marker system for studying genome-wide DNA polymorphisms using next-generation sequencing. A recent technical facilitation of RAD is double-digest RAD (ddRAD), which utilizes two restriction enzymes for library preparation. The more flexible and balanced ddRAD allows analysis of genomic loci in hundreds of individuals. However, in contrast to paired-end sequencing of traditional RAD libraries, PCR duplicates cannot be detected with ddRAD. This is a concern because duplicates can contribute substantially to read coverage data and erroneously inflate the proportion of homozygous loci (allele dropout). Allele dropout can bias population genetic parameter inference and complicate the detection of outlier loci under selection. Here we outline a simple and straightforward approach to detecting PCR duplicates from ddRAD libraries. Our approach introduces a degenerate base region (DBR, 12,288 unique combinations) in the sequencing adapter. We demonstrate the high efficiency and low rate of false positives in simulations. In addition, a pilot study was performed to test this approach on six aquatic invertebrates, sequenced on a HiSeq 2500 sequencer. The reads of the ddRAD libraries consisted of 33.48% PCR duplicates distributed on 19.40% of the loci. A disproportionate number of PCR duplicates were detected in only 4.66% of the loci. While this should not be a concern for general parameter inference, outlier loci detection in particular would be improved by the DBR technique. Given the easy and straightforward application of the technique in other RAD protocols as well, we suggest that DBR regions should generally be included in PCR-based RAD studies.

  11. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S.; Brettin, T.; Brockman, Fred J.; D'haeseleer, Patrik; Martinez, Antonio D.; Miller, R. M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald; Bennett, Joan W.; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steve; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Barbara G.; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E.

    2008-09-30

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  12. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The British Mycological Society.

  13. Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher Warren; Baker, Scott; Thykaer, Jette; Adney, William S; Brettin, Tom; Brockman, Fred; Dhaeseleer, Patrick; Martinez, A diego; Miller, R michael; Rokhsar, Daniel; Torok, Tamas; Tuskan, Gerald A; Bennett, Joan; Berka, Randy; Briggs, Steven; Heitman, Joseph; Rizvi, L; Taylor, John; Turgeon, Gillian; Werner-Washburne, Maggie; Himmel, Michael

    2008-01-01

    To date, the number of ongoing filamentous fungal genome sequencing projects is almost tenfold fewer than those of bacterial and archaeal genome projects. The fungi chosen for sequencing represent narrow kingdom diversity; most are pathogens or models. We advocate an ambitious, forward-looking phylogenetic-based genome sequencing program, designed to capture metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into alternative bioenergy sources, bioremediation, and fungal-environment interactions.

  14. Atypical regions in large genomic DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S. |; McPeek, M.S.; Speed, T.P.

    1994-07-19

    Large genomic DNA sequences contain regions with distinctive patterns of sequence organization. The authors describe a method using logarithms of probabilities based on seventh-order Markov chains to rapidly identify genomic sequences that do not resemble models of genome organization built from compilations of octanucleotide usage. Data bases have been constructed from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA sequences of >1000 nt and human sequences of >10,000 nt. Atypical genes and clusters of genes have been located in bacteriophage, yeast, and primate DNA sequences. The authors consider criteria for statistical significance of the results, offer possible explanations for the observed variation in genome organization, and give additional applications of these methods in DNA sequence analysis.

  15. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    PubMed

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  16. Genome sequence of Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present the whole genome sequence and annotation of the Coxiella burnetii strain Namibia. This strain was isolated from an aborting goat in 1991 in Windhoek, Namibia. The plasmid type QpRS was confirmed in our work. Further genomic typing placed the strain into a unique genomic group. The genome sequence is 2,101,438 bp long and contains 1,979 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes, including one rRNA operon. To overcome the poor yield from cell culture systems, an additional DNA enrichment with whole genome amplification (WGA) methods was applied. We describe a bioinformatics pipeline for improved genome assembly including several filters with a special focus on WGA characteristics. PMID:25593636

  17. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2

  18. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2

  19. Using comparative genomics to reorder the human genome sequence into a virtual sheep genome

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kirkness, Ewen F; Nefedov, Mikhail; McWilliam, Sean; Ratnakumar, Abhirami; Barris, Wes; Zhao, Shaying; Shetty, Jyoti; Maddox, Jillian F; O'Grady, Margaret; Nicholas, Frank; Crawford, Allan M; Smith, Tim; de Jong, Pieter J; McEwan, John; Oddy, V Hutton; Cockett, Noelle E

    2007-01-01

    Background Is it possible to construct an accurate and detailed subgene-level map of a genome using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences, a sparse marker map, and the sequences of other genomes? Results A sheep BAC library, CHORI-243, was constructed and the BAC end sequences were determined and mapped with high sensitivity and low specificity onto the frameworks of the human, dog, and cow genomes. To maximize genome coverage, the coordinates of all BAC end sequence hits to the cow and dog genomes were also converted to the equivalent human genome coordinates. The 84,624 sheep BACs (about 5.4-fold genome coverage) with paired ends in the correct orientation (tail-to-tail) and spacing, combined with information from sheep BAC comparative genome contigs (CGCs) built separately on the dog and cow genomes, were used to construct 1,172 sheep BAC-CGCs, covering 91.2% of the human genome. Clustered non-tail-to-tail and outsize BACs located close to the ends of many BAC-CGCs linked BAC-CGCs covering about 70% of the genome to at least one other BAC-CGC on the same chromosome. Using the BAC-CGCs, the intrachromosomal and interchromosomal BAC-CGC linkage information, human/cow and vertebrate synteny, and the sheep marker map, a virtual sheep genome was constructed. To identify BACs potentially located in gaps between BAC-CGCs, an additional set of 55,668 sheep BACs were positioned on the sheep genome with lower confidence. A coordinate conversion process allowed us to transfer human genes and other genome features to the virtual sheep genome to display on a sheep genome browser. Conclusion We demonstrate that limited sequencing of BACs combined with positioning on a well assembled genome and integrating locations from other less well assembled genomes can yield extensive, detailed subgene-level maps of mammalian genomes, for which genomic resources are currently limited. PMID:17663790

  20. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; McDonald, Michael; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154) isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp) and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp) that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively). The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease. PMID:27213534

  1. Genome Sequence of Spizellomyces punctatus

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Carsten; Lang, B. Franz; Chen, Zehua; Gujja, Sharvari; Shea, Terrance; Zeng, Qiandong; Young, Sarah; Nusbaum, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Spizellomyces punctatus is a basally branching chytrid fungus that is found in the Chytridiomycota phylum. Spizellomyces species are common in soil and of importance in terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we report the genome sequence of S. punctatus, which will facilitate the study of this group of early diverging fungi. PMID:27540072

  2. Genome Sequence of Spizellomyces punctatus.

    PubMed

    Russ, Carsten; Lang, B Franz; Chen, Zehua; Gujja, Sharvari; Shea, Terrance; Zeng, Qiandong; Young, Sarah; Cuomo, Christina A; Nusbaum, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Spizellomyces punctatus is a basally branching chytrid fungus that is found in the Chytridiomycota phylum. Spizellomyces species are common in soil and of importance in terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we report the genome sequence of S. punctatus, which will facilitate the study of this group of early diverging fungi. PMID:27540072

  3. Genome sequences of eight morphologically diverse Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Buechlein, Aaron; Hemmerich, Chris; Brun, Yves V

    2011-09-01

    The Alphaproteobacteria comprise morphologically diverse bacteria, including many species of stalked bacteria. Here we announce the genome sequences of eight alphaproteobacteria, including the first genome sequences of species belonging to the genera Asticcacaulis, Hirschia, Hyphomicrobium, and Rhodomicrobium. PMID:21705585

  4. Genome Sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei NCTC 13392

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Stone, Joshua K.; Gelhaus, H. Carl; Warren, Richard L.; Cruttwell, Caroline J.; Funnell, Simon G.; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei NCTC 13392. This isolate has been distributed as K96243, but distinct genomic differences have been identified. The genomic sequence of this isolate will provide the genomic context for previously conducted functional studies. PMID:23704173

  5. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Bina, Elizabeth A; Brahme, Indraneel S; Hill, Amy B; Himmelstein, Philip H; Hunsicker, Sara M; Ish, Amanda R; Le, Tinh S; Martin, Mary M; Moscinski, Catherine N; Shetty, Sameer A; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-06-18

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages.

  6. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo

    PubMed Central

    Bina, Elizabeth A.; Brahme, Indraneel S.; Hill, Amy B.; Himmelstein, Philip H.; Hunsicker, Sara M.; Ish, Amanda R.; Le, Tinh S.; Martin, Mary M.; Moscinski, Catherine N.; Shetty, Sameer A.; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B.; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Bowman, Charles A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages. PMID:26089415

  7. Sequencing crop genomes: approaches and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genome sequencing methodology parrallels the sequencing of the human genome. The first projects were slow and very expensive. BAC by BAC approaches were utilized first and whole-genome shotgun sequencing rapidly replaced that approach. So called 'next generation' technologies such as short rea...

  8. Mapping and sequencing the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  9. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  10. Optimizing cancer genome sequencing and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Malachi; Miller, Christopher A.; Griffith, Obi L.; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L.; Ramu, Avinash; Walker, Jason R.; Dang, Ha X.; Trani, Lee; Larson, David E.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Austin, Rachel E.; Magrini, Vincent; McGrath, Sean D.; Ly, Amy; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cordes, Matthew G.; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Maher, Christopher A.; Ding, Li; Klco, Jeffery M.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumors are typically sequenced to depths of 75–100× (exome) or 30–50× (whole genome). We demonstrate that current sequencing paradigms are inadequate for tumors that are impure, aneuploid or clonally heterogeneous. To reassess optimal sequencing strategies, we performed ultra-deep (up to ~312×) whole genome sequencing (WGS) and exome capture (up to ~433×) of a primary acute myeloid leukemia, its subsequent relapse, and a matched normal skin sample. We tested multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms and validated ~200,000 putative SNVs by sequencing them to depths of ~1,000×. Additional targeted sequencing provided over 10,000× coverage and ddPCR assays provided up to ~250,000× sampling of selected sites. We evaluated the effects of different library generation approaches, depth of sequencing, and analysis strategies on the ability to effectively characterize a complex tumor. This dataset, representing the most comprehensively sequenced tumor described to date, will serve as an invaluable community resource (dbGaP accession id phs000159). PMID:26645048

  11. Twenty years of bacterial genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Loman, Nicholas J; Pallen, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Twenty years ago, the publication of the first bacterial genome sequence, from Haemophilus influenzae, shook the world of bacteriology. In this Timeline, we review the first two decades of bacterial genome sequencing, which have been marked by three revolutions: whole-genome shotgun sequencing, high-throughput sequencing and single-molecule long-read sequencing. We summarize the social history of sequencing and its impact on our understanding of the biology, diversity and evolution of bacteria, while also highlighting spin-offs and translational impact in the clinic. We look forward to a 'sequencing singularity', where sequencing becomes the method of choice for as-yet unthinkable applications in bacteriology and beyond.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diarrheagenic Morganella morganii Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pallavi; Mosci, Rebekah; Rudrik, James T.

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the whole-genome draft sequence of a diarrheagenic Morganella morganii isolate from a patient in Michigan, USA. This genome represents an important addition to the limited number of pathogenic M. morganii genomes available. PMID:26450735

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diarrheagenic Morganella morganii Isolate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pallavi; Mosci, Rebekah; Rudrik, James T; Manning, Shannon D

    2015-10-08

    This is a report of the whole-genome draft sequence of a diarrheagenic Morganella morganii isolate from a patient in Michigan, USA. This genome represents an important addition to the limited number of pathogenic M. morganii genomes available.

  14. Translational genomics for plant breeding with the genome sequence explosion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Jeong, Haneul; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2016-04-01

    The use of next-generation sequencers and advanced genotyping technologies has propelled the field of plant genomics in model crops and plants and enhanced the discovery of hidden bridges between genotypes and phenotypes. The newly generated reference sequences of unstudied minor plants can be annotated by the knowledge of model plants via translational genomics approaches. Here, we reviewed the strategies of translational genomics and suggested perspectives on the current databases of genomic resources and the database structures of translated information on the new genome. As a draft picture of phenotypic annotation, translational genomics on newly sequenced plants will provide valuable assistance for breeders and researchers who are interested in genetic studies.

  15. Sequencing Intractable DNA to Close Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled intractable resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such difficult regions in the non-contiguous finished Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. These developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences with VISTA

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dubchak, Inna

    VISTA is a comprehensive suite of programs and databases developed by and hosted at the Genomics Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They provide information and tools designed to facilitate comparative analysis of genomic sequences. Users have two ways to interact with the suite of applications at the VISTA portal. They can submit their own sequences and alignments for analysis (VISTA servers) or examine pre-computed whole-genome alignments of different species. A key menu option is the Enhancer Browser and Database at http://enhancer.lbl.gov/. The VISTA Enhancer Browser is a central resource for experimentally validated human noncoding fragments with gene enhancer activity as assessed in transgenic mice. Most of these noncoding elements were selected for testing based on their extreme conservation with other vertebrates. The results of this enhancer screen are provided through this publicly available website. The browser also features relevant results by external contributors and a large collection of additional genome-wide conserved noncoding elements which are candidate enhancer sequences. The LBL developers invite external groups to submit computational predictions of developmental enhancers. As of 10/19/2009 the database contains information on 1109 in vivo tested elements - 508 elements with enhancer activity.

  17. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  18. Next-generation sequencing strategies for characterizing the turkey genome.

    PubMed

    Dalloul, Rami A; Zimin, Aleksey V; Settlage, Robert E; Kim, Sungwon; Reed, Kent M

    2014-02-01

    The turkey genome sequencing project was initiated in 2008 and has relied primarily on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Our first efforts used a synergistic combination of 2 NGS platforms (Roche/454 and Illumina GAII), detailed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) maps, and unique assembly tools to sequence and assemble the genome of the domesticated turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Since the first release in 2010, efforts to improve the genome assembly, gene annotation, and genomic analyses continue. The initial assembly build (2.01) represented about 89% of the genome sequence with 17X coverage depth (931 Mb). Sequence contigs were assigned to 30 of the 40 chromosomes with approximately 10% of the assembled sequence corresponding to unassigned chromosomes (ChrUn). The sequence has been refined through both genome-wide and area-focused sequencing, including shotgun and paired-end sequencing, and targeted sequencing of chromosomal regions with low or incomplete coverage. These additional efforts have improved the sequence assembly resulting in 2 subsequent genome builds of higher genome coverage (25X/Build3.0 and 30X/Build4.0) with a current sequence totaling 1,010 Mb. Further, BAC with end sequences assigned to the Z/W and MG18 (MHC) chromosomes, ChrUn, or not placed in the previous build were isolated, deeply sequenced (Hi-Seq), and incorporated into the latest build (5.0). To aid in the annotation and to generate a gene expression atlas of major tissues, a comprehensive set of RNA samples was collected at various developmental stages of female and male turkeys. Transcriptome sequencing data (using Illumina Hi-Seq) will provide information to enhance the final assembly and ultimately improve sequence annotation. The most current sequence covers more than 95% of the turkey genome and should yield a much improved gene level of annotation, making it a valuable resource for studying genetic variations underlying economically important traits in poultry.

  19. SP8 Sequencing Extinct Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Poinar, H.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, which hold clues to the evolution of various animal and hominid taxa, are comparatively weak molecules from other cellular debris, and thus evolutionary biologists are in essence time trapped. Fortunately, DNA and protein fragments do exist in fossil remains beyond what theoretical experimentation would suggest. Sequestering of DNA molecules in humic or Maillard-like complexes likely represents a rich source of DNA molecules from the past, which have yet to be tapped. These molecules were impossible to acquire due to the selective nature of the polymerase chain reaction. Recently, however, rapid parallel pyrosequencing techniques, such as those used in metagenomics-based research, which, in theory, allow for the identification of all short nucleotide sequences in a sample in a non-selective approach, have the potential to allow the identification of all nucleic acids in a sample, and thus represent the way forward for ancient DNA. In theory, this new technology will allow the completion of genomes of extinct animals, plants, and microbes. I will discuss the benefits and pitfalls of this metagenomics approach to ancient DNA, highlighting our recent efforts underway to sequence the wooly mammoth genome as well as other fossil remains.

  20. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Eudes GV; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel TJ; Carneiro, Adriana R; Le Loir, Yves; Baumbach, Jan; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting in an exponential increase in draft (partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome and annotation will not be undertaken. It is important to know what is lost when we settle for a draft genome and to determine the “scientific value” of a newly sequenced genome. This review addresses the expected impact of newly sequenced genomes on antibacterial discovery and vaccinology. Also, it discusses the factors that could be leading to the increase in the number of draft deposits and the consequent loss of relevant biological information. PMID:24921006

  1. Accurate and comprehensive sequencing of personal genomes.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Subramanian S; Parker, Stephen C J; Abaan, Hatice Ozel; Fajardo, Karin V Fuentes; Margulies, Elliott H

    2011-09-01

    As whole-genome sequencing becomes commoditized and we begin to sequence and analyze personal genomes for clinical and diagnostic purposes, it is necessary to understand what constitutes a complete sequencing experiment for determining genotypes and detecting single-nucleotide variants. Here, we show that the current recommendation of ∼30× coverage is not adequate to produce genotype calls across a large fraction of the genome with acceptably low error rates. Our results are based on analyses of a clinical sample sequenced on two related Illumina platforms, GAII(x) and HiSeq 2000, to a very high depth (126×). We used these data to establish genotype-calling filters that dramatically increase accuracy. We also empirically determined how the callable portion of the genome varies as a function of the amount of sequence data used. These results help provide a "sequencing guide" for future whole-genome sequencing decisions and metrics by which coverage statistics should be reported.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Candidatus Ruthia magnifica.

    PubMed

    Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G; Woyke, Tanja; Auchtung, Thomas A; Dilly, Geoffrey F; Dutton, Rachel J; Fisher, Meredith C; Fontanez, Kristina M; Lau, Evan; Stewart, Frank J; Richardson, Paul M; Barry, Kerrie W; Saunders, Elizabeth; Detter, John C; Wu, Dongying; Eisen, Jonathan A; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2010-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent clam Calyptogena magnifica (Bivalvia: Mollusca) is a member of the Vesicomyidae. Species within this family form symbioses with chemosynthetic Gammaproteobacteria. They exist in environments such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps and have a rudimentary gut and feeding groove, indicating a large dependence on their endosymbionts for nutrition. The C. magnifica symbiont, Candidatus Ruthia magnifica, was the first intracellular sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiont to have its genome sequenced (Newton et al. 2007). Here we expand upon the original report and provide additional details complying with the emerging MIGS/MIMS standards. The complete genome exposed the genetic blueprint of the metabolic capabilities of the symbiont. Genes which were predicted to encode the proteins required for all the metabolic pathways typical of free-living chemoautotrophs were detected in the symbiont genome. These include major pathways including carbon fixation, sulfur oxidation, nitrogen assimilation, as well as amino acid and cofactor/vitamin biosynthesis. This genome sequence is invaluable in the study of these enigmatic associations and provides insights into the origin and evolution of autotrophic endosymbiosis.

  3. The fungal genome initiative and lessons learned from genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Birren, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    The sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enabled systematic genome-wide experimental approaches, demonstrating the power of having the complete genome of an organism. The rapid impact of these methods on research in yeast mobilized an effort to expand genomic resources for other fungi. The "fungal genome initiative" represents an organized genome sequencing effort to promote comparative and evolutionary studies across the fungal kingdom. Through such an approach, scientists can not only better understand specific organisms but also illuminate the shared and unique aspects of fungal biology that underlie the importance of fungi in biomedical research, health, food production, and industry. To date, assembled genomes for over 100 fungi are available in public databases, and many more sequencing projects are underway. Here, we discuss both examples of findings from comparative analysis of fungal sequences, with a specific emphasis on yeast genomes, and on the analytical approaches taken to mine fungal genomes. New sequencing methods are accelerating comparative studies of fungi by reducing the cost and difficulty of sequencing. This has driven more common use of sequencing applications, such as to study genome-wide variation in populations or to deeply profile RNA transcripts. These and further technological innovations will continue to be piloted in yeasts and other fungi, and will expand the applications of sequencing to study fungal biology. PMID:20946837

  4. Whole-Genome Sequences of Thirteen Isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer S. E.; Dunn J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Casjens, S. R.; Qiu, W.-G.; Mongodin, E. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2011-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a causative agent of Lyme disease in North America and Eurasia. The first complete genome sequence of B. burgdorferi strain 31, available for more than a decade, has assisted research on the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Because a single genome sequence is not sufficient to understand the relationship between genotypic and geographic variation and disease phenotype, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 13 additional B. burgdorferi isolates that span the range of natural variation. These sequences should allow improved understanding of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for novel detection, diagnosis, and prevention strategies.

  5. The Genome Sequencing Center at NCGR

    SciTech Connect

    Schilkey, Faye

    2010-06-02

    Faye Schilkey from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses NCGR's research, sequencing and analysis experience on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  6. Reconstruction of ancestral genomic sequences using likelihood.

    PubMed

    Elias, Isaac; Tuller, Tamir

    2007-03-01

    A challenging task in computational biology is the reconstruction of genomic sequences of extinct ancestors, given the phylogenetic tree and the sequences at the leafs. This task is best solved by calculating the most likely estimate of the ancestral sequences, along with the most likely edge lengths. We deal with this problem and also the variant in which the phylogenetic tree in addition to the ancestral sequences need to be estimated. The latter problem is known to be NP-hard, while the computational complexity of the former is unknown. Currently, all algorithms for solving these problems are heuristics without performance guarantees. The biological importance of these problems calls for developing better algorithms with guarantees of finding either optimal or approximate solutions. We develop approximation, fix parameter tractable (FPT), and fast heuristic algorithms for two variants of the problem; when the phylogenetic tree is known and when it is unknown. The approximation algorithm guarantees a solution with a log-likelihood ratio of 2 relative to the optimal solution. The FPT has a running time which is polynomial in the length of the sequences and exponential in the number of taxa. This makes it useful for calculating the optimal solution for small trees. Moreover, we combine the approximation algorithm and the FPT into an algorithm with arbitrary good approximation guarantee (PTAS). We tested our algorithms on both synthetic and biological data. In particular, we used the FPT for computing the most likely ancestral mitochondrial genomes of hominidae (the great apes), thereby answering an interesting biological question. Moreover, we show how the approximation algorithms find good solutions for reconstructing the ancestral genomes for a set of lentiviruses (relatives of HIV). Supplementary material of this work is available at www.nada.kth.se/~isaac/publications/aml/aml.html.

  7. Whole genome and transcriptome sequencing of a B3 thymoma.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Iacopo; Rajan, Arun; Pham, Trung; Voeller, Donna; Davis, Sean; Gao, James; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Molecular pathology of thymomas is poorly understood. Genomic aberrations are frequently identified in tumors but no extensive sequencing has been reported in thymomas. Here we present the first comprehensive view of a B3 thymoma at whole genome and transcriptome levels. A 55-year-old Caucasian female underwent complete resection of a stage IVA B3 thymoma. RNA and DNA were extracted from a snap frozen tumor sample with a fraction of cancer cells over 80%. We performed array comparative genomic hybridization using Agilent platform, transcriptome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina) and whole genome sequencing using Complete Genomics Inc platform. Whole genome sequencing determined, in tumor and normal, the sequence of both alleles in more than 95% of the reference genome (NCBI Build 37). Copy number (CN) aberrations were comparable with those previously described for B3 thymomas, with CN gain of chromosome 1q, 5, 7 and X and CN loss of 3p, 6, 11q42.2-qter and q13. One translocation t(11;X) was identified by whole genome sequencing and confirmed by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Ten single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and 2 insertion/deletions (INDELs) were identified; these mutations resulted in non-synonymous amino acid changes or affected splicing sites. The lack of common cancer-associated mutations in this patient suggests that thymomas may evolve through mechanisms distinctive from other tumor types, and supports the rationale for additional high-throughput sequencing screens to better understand the somatic genetic architecture of thymoma.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium massiliense

    PubMed Central

    Raiol, Tainá; Ribeiro, Guilherme Menegói; Maranhão, Andréa Queiroz; Bocca, Anamélia Lorenzetti; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense is a rapidly growing bacterium associated with opportunistic infections. The genome of a representative isolate (strain GO 06) recovered from wound samples from patients who underwent arthroscopic or laparoscopic surgery was sequenced. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first announcement of the complete genome sequence of an M. massiliense strain. PMID:22965084

  9. Towards a reference pecan genome sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cost of generating DNA sequence data has declined dramatically over the previous 15 years as a result of the Human Genome Project and the potential applications of genome sequencing for human medicine. This cost reduction has generated renewed interest among crop breeding scientists in applying...

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Daniel A.; Guerrero Bustamante, Carlos A.; Garlena, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612, also known by the strain designations ATCC 25594, NRRL B-16283, and NBRC 100016. The genome sequence reveals it to be free of prophage and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), and it is an effective host for the isolation and characterization of Gordonia bacteriophages. PMID:27688316

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612.

    PubMed

    Russell, Daniel A; Guerrero Bustamante, Carlos A; Garlena, Rebecca A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Gordonia terrae 3612, also known by the strain designations ATCC 25594, NRRL B-16283, and NBRC 100016. The genome sequence reveals it to be free of prophage and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), and it is an effective host for the isolation and characterization of Gordonia bacteriophages. PMID:27688316

  12. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Phage Yvonnetastic

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Anshika; Carlton, Meghan L.; Kane, Meghan T.; Panchal, Niyati J.; Pham, Yvonne C.; Reynolds, Zachary J.; Sapienza, Michael S.; German, Brian A.; McDonnell, Jill E.; Schafer, Claire E.; Yu, Victor J.; Furbee, Emily C.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Montgomery, Matthew T.; Garlena, Rebecca A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia bacteriophage Yvonnetastic was isolated from soil in Pittsburgh, PA, using Gordonia terrae 3612 as a host. Yvonnetastic has siphoviral morphology and a genome of 98,136 bp, with 198 predicted protein-coding genes and five tRNA genes. Yvonnetastic does not share substantial sequence similarity with other sequenced bacteriophage genomes. PMID:27389265

  13. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Phage Yvonnetastic.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Bandyopadhyay, Anshika; Carlton, Meghan L; Kane, Meghan T; Panchal, Niyati J; Pham, Yvonne C; Reynolds, Zachary J; Sapienza, Michael S; German, Brian A; McDonnell, Jill E; Schafer, Claire E; Yu, Victor J; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia bacteriophage Yvonnetastic was isolated from soil in Pittsburgh, PA, using Gordonia terrae 3612 as a host. Yvonnetastic has siphoviral morphology and a genome of 98,136 bp, with 198 predicted protein-coding genes and five tRNA genes. Yvonnetastic does not share substantial sequence similarity with other sequenced bacteriophage genomes. PMID:27389265

  14. Sequencing and annotation of mitochondrial genomes from individual parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Jex, Aaron R; Littlewood, D Timothy; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genomics has significant implications in a range of fundamental areas of parasitology, including evolution, systematics, and population genetics as well as explorations of mt biochemistry, physiology, and function. Mt genomes also provide a rich source of markers to aid molecular epidemiological and ecological studies of key parasites. However, there is still a paucity of information on mt genomes for many metazoan organisms, particularly parasitic helminths, which has often related to challenges linked to sequencing from tiny amounts of material. The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has paved the way for low cost, high-throughput mt genomic research, but there have been obstacles, particularly in relation to post-sequencing assembly and analyses of large datasets. In this chapter, we describe protocols for the efficient amplification and sequencing of mt genomes from small portions of individual helminths, and highlight the utility of NGS platforms to expedite mt genomics. In addition, we recommend approaches for manual or semi-automated bioinformatic annotation and analyses to overcome the bioinformatic "bottleneck" to research in this area. Taken together, these approaches have demonstrated applicability to a range of parasites and provide prospects for using complete mt genomic sequence datasets for large-scale molecular systematic and epidemiological studies. In addition, these methods have broader utility and might be readily adapted to a range of other medium-sized molecular regions (i.e., 10-100 kb), including large genomic operons, and other organellar (e.g., plastid) and viral genomes.

  15. Human genome sequencing in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R; Gibbs, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Following the "finished," euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges.

  16. Deep sequencing of 10,000 human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Levi C. T.; Biggs, William H.; di Iulio, Julia; Wong, Emily H. M.; Fabani, Martin M.; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Shah, Naisha; Xie, Chao; Brewerton, Suzanne C.; Bulsara, Nadeem; Garner, Chad; Metzker, Gary; Sandoval, Efren; Perkins, Brad A.; Och, Franz J.; Turpaz, Yaron; Venter, J. Craig

    2016-01-01

    We report on the sequencing of 10,545 human genomes at 30×–40× coverage with an emphasis on quality metrics and novel variant and sequence discovery. We find that 84% of an individual human genome can be sequenced confidently. This high-confidence region includes 91.5% of exon sequence and 95.2% of known pathogenic variant positions. We present the distribution of over 150 million single-nucleotide variants in the coding and noncoding genome. Each newly sequenced genome contributes an average of 8,579 novel variants. In addition, each genome carries on average 0.7 Mb of sequence that is not found in the main build of the hg38 reference genome. The density of this catalog of variation allowed us to construct high-resolution profiles that define genomic sites that are highly intolerant of genetic variation. These results indicate that the data generated by deep genome sequencing is of the quality necessary for clinical use. PMID:27702888

  17. Complete genome sequence of Thermomonospora curvata type strain (B9)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata Henssen 1957 is the type species of the genus Thermomonospora. This genus is of interest because members of this clade are sources of new antibiotics, enzymes, and products with pharmacological activity. In addition, members of this genus participate in the active degradation of cellulose. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Thermomonosporaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5,639,016 bp long genome with its 4,985 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. The genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianhua; Tizard, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Although several new avian bornaviruses have recently been described, information on their evolution, virulence, and sequence are often limited. Here we report the complete genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5 (PaBV-5) isolated from a case of proventricular dilatation disease in a Palm cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus). The complete genome consists of 8842 nucleotides with distinct 5' and 3' end sequences. This virus shares nucleotide sequence identities of 69-74 % with other bornaviruses in the genomic regions excluding the 5' and 3' terminal sequences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic regions demonstrated this new isolate is an isolated branch within the clade that includes the aquatic bird bornaviruses and the passerine bornaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analyses and its low nucleotide sequence identities with other bornavirus, we support the proposal that PaBV-5 be assigned to a new bornavirus species:- Psittaciform 2 bornavirus.

  19. The genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianhua; Tizard, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Although several new avian bornaviruses have recently been described, information on their evolution, virulence, and sequence are often limited. Here we report the complete genome sequence of parrot bornavirus 5 (PaBV-5) isolated from a case of proventricular dilatation disease in a Palm cockatoo (Probosciger aterrimus). The complete genome consists of 8842 nucleotides with distinct 5' and 3' end sequences. This virus shares nucleotide sequence identities of 69-74 % with other bornaviruses in the genomic regions excluding the 5' and 3' terminal sequences. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic regions demonstrated this new isolate is an isolated branch within the clade that includes the aquatic bird bornaviruses and the passerine bornaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analyses and its low nucleotide sequence identities with other bornavirus, we support the proposal that PaBV-5 be assigned to a new bornavirus species:- Psittaciform 2 bornavirus. PMID:26403158

  20. Genome Sequences of Five B1 Subcluster Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Barrus, E. Zane; Benedict, Alex B.; Brighton, Alicia K.; Fisher, Joshua N. B.; Gardner, Adam V.; Kartchner, Brittany J.; Ladle, Kara C.; Lunt, Bryce L.; Merrill, Bryan D.; Morrell, John D.; Burnett, Sandra H.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages infect members of the Mycobacterium genus in the phylum Actinobacteria and exhibit remarkable diversity. Genome analysis groups the thousands of known mycobacteriophages into clusters, of which the B1 subcluster is currently the third most populous. We report the complete genome sequences of five additional members of the B1 subcluster. PMID:24285667

  1. Genome sequences of five b1 subcluster mycobacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Breakwell, Donald P; Barrus, E Zane; Benedict, Alex B; Brighton, Alicia K; Fisher, Joshua N B; Gardner, Adam V; Kartchner, Brittany J; Ladle, Kara C; Lunt, Bryce L; Merrill, Bryan D; Morrell, John D; Burnett, Sandra H; Grose, Julianne H

    2013-11-27

    Mycobacteriophages infect members of the Mycobacterium genus in the phylum Actinobacteria and exhibit remarkable diversity. Genome analysis groups the thousands of known mycobacteriophages into clusters, of which the B1 subcluster is currently the third most populous. We report the complete genome sequences of five additional members of the B1 subcluster.

  2. Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    J. Craig Venter and C. Thomas Caskey co-chaired Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV held at Hilton Head, South Carolina from September 26--30, 1992. Venter opened the conference by noting that approximately 400 researchers from 16 nations were present four times as many participants as at Genome Sequencing Conference I in 1989. Venter also introduced the Data Fair, a new component of the conference allowing exchange and on-site computer analysis of unpublished sequence data.

  3. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  4. The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster.

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-24

    The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the {approximately}120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes {approximately}13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.

  5. Marsupial Genome Sequences: Providing Insight into Evolution and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Janine E.

    2012-01-01

    Marsupials (metatherians), with their position in vertebrate phylogeny and their unique biological features, have been studied for many years by a dedicated group of researchers, but it has only been since the sequencing of the first marsupial genome that their value has been more widely recognised. We now have genome sequences for three distantly related marsupial species (the grey short-tailed opossum, the tammar wallaby, and Tasmanian devil), with the promise of many more genomes to be sequenced in the near future, making this a particularly exciting time in marsupial genomics. The emergence of a transmissible cancer, which is obliterating the Tasmanian devil population, has increased the importance of obtaining and analysing marsupial genome sequence for understanding such diseases as well as for conservation efforts. In addition, these genome sequences have facilitated studies aimed at answering questions regarding gene and genome evolution and provided insight into the evolution of epigenetic mechanisms. Here I highlight the major advances in our understanding of evolution and disease, facilitated by marsupial genome projects, and speculate on the future contributions to be made by such sequences. PMID:24278712

  6. Data structures and compression algorithms for genomic sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Marty C.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Baldi, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The continuing exponential accumulation of full genome data, including full diploid human genomes, creates new challenges not only for understanding genomic structure, function and evolution, but also for the storage, navigation and privacy of genomic data. Here, we develop data structures and algorithms for the efficient storage of genomic and other sequence data that may also facilitate querying and protecting the data. Results: The general idea is to encode only the differences between a genome sequence and a reference sequence, using absolute or relative coordinates for the location of the differences. These locations and the corresponding differential variants can be encoded into binary strings using various entropy coding methods, from fixed codes such as Golomb and Elias codes, to variables codes, such as Huffman codes. We demonstrate the approach and various tradeoffs using highly variables human mitochondrial genome sequences as a testbed. With only a partial level of optimization, 3615 genome sequences occupying 56 MB in GenBank are compressed down to only 167 KB, achieving a 345-fold compression rate, using the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence as the reference sequence. Using the consensus sequence as the reference sequence, the data can be stored using only 133 KB, corresponding to a 433-fold level of compression, roughly a 23% improvement. Extensions to nuclear genomes and high-throughput sequencing data are discussed. Availability: Data are publicly available from GenBank, the HapMap web site, and the MITOMAP database. Supplementary materials with additional results, statistics, and software implementations are available from http://mammag.web.uci.edu/bin/view/Mitowiki/ProjectDNACompression. Contact: pfbaldi@ics.uci.edu PMID:19447783

  7. Sequencing the genome of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The International Collaboration to Sequence the Atlantic Salmon Genome (ICSASG) will produce a genome sequence that identifies and physically maps all genes in the Atlantic salmon genome and acts as a reference sequence for other salmonids. PMID:20887641

  8. Genome sequencing: a systematic review of health economic evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recently the sequencing of the human genome has become a major biological and clinical research field. However, the public health impact of this new technology with focus on the financial effect is not yet to be foreseen. To provide an overview of the current health economic evidence for genome sequencing, we conducted a thorough systematic review of the literature from 17 databases. In addition, we conducted a hand search. Starting with 5 520 records we ultimately included five full-text publications and one internet source, all focused on cost calculations. The results were very heterogeneous and, therefore, difficult to compare. Furthermore, because the methodology of the publications was quite poor, the reliability and validity of the results were questionable. The real costs for the whole sequencing workflow, including data management and analysis, remain unknown. Overall, our review indicates that the current health economic evidence for genome sequencing is quite poor. Therefore, we listed aspects that needed to be considered when conducting health economic analyses of genome sequencing. Thereby, specifics regarding the overall aim, technology, population, indication, comparator, alternatives after sequencing, outcomes, probabilities, and costs with respect to genome sequencing are discussed. For further research, at the outset, a comprehensive cost calculation of genome sequencing is needed, because all further health economic studies rely on valid cost data. The results will serve as an input parameter for budget-impact analyses or cost-effectiveness analyses. PMID:24330507

  9. Painting the rye genome with genome-specific sequences.

    PubMed

    González-García, Miriam; Cuacos, María; González-Sánchez, Mónica; Puertas, María J; Vega, Juan M

    2011-07-01

    We used rye-specific repetitive DNA sequences in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to paint the rye genome and to identify rye DNA in a wheat background. A 592 bp fragment from the rye-specific dispersed repetitive family R173 (named UCM600) was cloned and used as a FISH probe. UCM600 is dispersed over the seven rye chromosomes, being absent from the pericentromeric and subtelomeric regions. A similar pattern of distribution was also observed on the rye B chromosomes, but with weaker signals. The FISH hybridization patterns using UCM600 as probe were comparable with those obtained with the genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) procedure. There were, however, sharper signals and less background with FISH. UCM600 was combined with the rye-specific sequences Bilby and pSc200 to obtain a more complete painting. With these probes, the rye chromosomes were labeled with distinctive patterns; thus, allowing the rye cultivar 'Imperial' to be karyotyped. It was also possible to distinguish rye chromosomes in triticale and alien rye chromatin in wheat-rye addition and translocation lines. The distribution of UCM600 was similar in cultivated rye and in the wild Secale species Secale vavilovii Grossh., Secale sylvestre Host, and Secale africanum Stapf. Thus, UCM600 can be used to detect Secale DNA introgressed from wild species in a wheat background.

  10. Sequencing and Analysis of Neanderthal Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, James P.; Coop, Graham; Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Smith, Doug; Krause, Johannes; Alessi, Joe; Chen, Feng; Platt, Darren; Pääbo, Svante; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Our knowledge of Neanderthals is based on a limited number of remains and artifacts from which we must make inferences about their biology, behavior, and relationship to ourselves. Here, we describe the characterization of these extinct hominids from a new perspective, based on the development of a Neanderthal metagenomic library and its high-throughput sequencing and analysis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the 65,250 base pairs of hominid sequence so far identified in the library are of Neanderthal origin, the strongest being the ascertainment of sequence identities between Neanderthal and chimpanzee at sites where the human genomic sequence is different. These results enabled us to calculate the human-Neanderthal divergence time based on multiple randomly distributed autosomal loci. Our analyses suggest that on average the Neanderthal genomic sequence we obtained and the reference human genome sequence share a most recent common ancestor ~706,000 years ago, and that the human and Neanderthal ancestral populations split ~370,000 years ago, before the emergence of anatomically modern humans. Our finding that the Neanderthal and human genomes are at least 99.5% identical led us to develop and successfully implement a targeted method for recovering specific ancient DNA sequences from metagenomic libraries. This initial analysis of the Neanderthal genome advances our understanding of the evolutionary relationship of Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis and signifies the dawn of Neanderthal genomics. PMID:17110569

  11. Microbial species delineation using whole genome sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatics, Kostas; Pati, Amrita; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos

    2014-10-20

    Species assignments in prokaryotes use a manual, poly-phasic approach utilizing both phenotypic traits and sequence information of phylogenetic marker genes. With thousands of genomes being sequenced every year, an automated, uniform and scalable approach exploiting the rich genomic information in whole genome sequences is desired, at least for the initial assignment of species to an organism. We have evaluated pairwise genome-wide Average Nucleotide Identity (gANI) values and alignment fractions (AFs) for nearly 13,000 genomes using our fast implementation of the computation, identifying robust and widely applicable hard cut-offs for species assignments based on AF and gANI. Using these cutoffs, we generated stable species-level clusters of organisms, which enabled the identification of several species mis-assignments and facilitated the assignment of species for organisms without species definitions.

  12. Genome Sequence of Serratia plymuthica V4

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, S.; Van der Auwera, G.; Almeida, C.; Vieira, M. J.; Vlamakis, H.

    2014-01-01

    Serratia spp. are gammaproteobacteria and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain V4, which produces the siderophore serratiochelin and antimicrobial compounds. PMID:24831138

  13. ICDS database: interrupted CoDing sequences in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Perrodou, Emmanuel; Deshayes, Caroline; Muller, Jean; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Ripp, Raymond; Poch, Olivier; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Odile

    2006-01-01

    Unrecognized frameshifts, in-frame stop codons and sequencing errors lead to Interrupted CoDing Sequence (ICDS) that can seriously affect all subsequent steps of functional characterization, from in silico analysis to high-throughput proteomic projects. Here, we describe the Interrupted CoDing Sequence database containing ICDS detected by a similarity-based approach in 80 complete prokaryotic genomes. ICDS can be retrieved by species browsing or similarity searches via a web interface (http://www-bio3d-igbmc.u-strasbg.fr/ICDS/). The definition of each interrupted gene is provided as well as the ICDS genomic localization with the surrounding sequence. Furthermore, to facilitate the experimental characterization of ICDS, we propose optimized primers for re-sequencing purposes. The database will be regularly updated with additional data from ongoing sequenced genomes. Our strategy has been validated by three independent tests: (i) ICDS prediction on a benchmark of artificially created frameshifts, (ii) comparison of predicted ICDS and results obtained from the comparison of the two genomic sequences of Bacillus licheniformis strain ATCC 14580 and (iii) re-sequencing of 25 predicted ICDS of the recently sequenced genome of Mycobacterium smegmatis. This allows us to estimate the specificity and sensitivity (95 and 82%, respectively) of our program and the efficiency of primer determination.

  14. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    SciTech Connect

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  15. From sequence mapping to genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    The development of "next-generation" high-throughput sequencing technologies has made it possible for many labs to undertake sequencing-based research projects that were unthinkable just a few years ago. Although the scientific applications are diverse, e.g., new genome projects, gene expression analysis, genome-wide functional screens, or epigenetics-the sequence data are usually processed in one of two ways: sequence reads are either mapped to an existing reference sequence, or they are built into a new sequence ("de novo assembly"). In this chapter, we first discuss some limitations of the mapping process and how these may be overcome through local sequence assembly. We then introduce the concept of de novo assembly and describe essential assembly improvement procedures such as scaffolding, contig ordering, gap closure, error evaluation, gene annotation transfer and ab initio gene annotation. The results are high-quality draft assemblies that will facilitate informative downstream analyses.

  16. Complete genome sequence of arracacha mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Orílio, Anelise F; Lucinda, Natalia; Dusi, André N; Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice K

    2013-01-01

    Arracacha mottle virus (AMoV) is the only potyvirus reported to infect arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) in Brazil. Here, the complete genome sequence of an isolate of AMoV was determined to be 9,630 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly-A tail, and encoding a polyprotein of 3,135 amino acids and a putative P3N-PIPO protein. Its genomic organization is typical of a member of the genus Potyvirus, containing all conserved motifs. Its full genome sequence shared 56.2 % nucleotide identity with sunflower chlorotic mottle virus and verbena virus Y, the most closely related viruses.

  17. Sequence resources at the Candida Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Martha B; Costanzo, Maria C; Skrzypek, Marek S; Shah, Prachi; Binkley, Gail; Lane, Christopher; Miyasato, Stuart R; Sherlock, Gavin

    2007-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD, http://www.candidagenome.org/) contains a curated collection of genomic information and community resources for researchers who are interested in the molecular biology of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. With the recent release of a new assembly of the C.albicans genome, Assembly 20, C.albicans genomics has entered a new era. Although the C.albicans genome assembly continues to undergo refinement, multiple assemblies and gene nomenclatures will remain in widespread use by the research community. CGD has now taken on the responsibility of maintaining the most up-to-date version of the genome sequence by providing the data from this new assembly alongside the data from the previous assemblies, as well as any future corrections and refinements. In this database update, we describe the sequence information available for C.albicans, the sequence information contained in CGD, and the tools for sequence retrieval, analysis and comparison that CGD provides. CGD is freely accessible at http://www.candidagenome.org/ and CGD curators may be contacted by email at candida-curator@genome.stanford.edu.

  18. Whole-genome sequencing for comparative genomics and de novo genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Benjak, Andrej; Sala, Claudia; Hartkoorn, Ruben C

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies for whole-genome sequencing of mycobacteria are rapidly becoming an attractive alternative to more traditional sequencing methods. In particular this technology is proving useful for genome-wide identification of mutations in mycobacteria (comparative genomics) as well as for de novo assembly of whole genomes. Next-generation sequencing however generates a vast quantity of data that can only be transformed into a usable and comprehensible form using bioinformatics. Here we describe the methodology one would use to prepare libraries for whole-genome sequencing, and the basic bioinformatics to identify mutations in a genome following Illumina HiSeq or MiSeq sequencing, as well as de novo genome assembly following sequencing using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio).

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Tombunodavirus UC1

    PubMed Central

    DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of tombunodavirus UC1 assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. This virus shares hallmarks of members of the Tombusviridae and the nodavirus-like Plasmopara halstedii and Sclerophthora macrospora viruses. PMID:26139709

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Tombunodavirus UC1.

    PubMed

    Greninger, Alexander L; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of tombunodavirus UC1 assembled from metagenomic sequencing of organisms in San Francisco wastewater. This virus shares hallmarks of members of the Tombusviridae and the nodavirus-like Plasmopara halstedii and Sclerophthora macrospora viruses. PMID:26139709

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Goose Dicistrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of goose dicistrovirus assembled from the filtered feces of a Canadian goose from South Lake Union in Seattle, Washington. The 9.1-kb dicistronic RNA virus falls within the family Dicistroviridae; however, it shares <33% translated amino acid sequence within the nonstructural open reading frame (ORF) from aparavirus or cripavirus. PMID:26941149

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of 63 Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. The current collection of sequenced mycobacteriophages—all isolated on a single host strain, Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155, reveals substantial genetic diversity. The complete genome sequences of 63 newly isolated mycobacteriophages expand the resolution of our understanding of phage diversity. PMID:24285655

  3. Global Alignment System for Large Genomic Sequencing

    2002-03-01

    AVID is a global alignment system tailored for the alignment of large genomic sequences up to megabases in length. Features include the possibility of one sequence being in draft form, fast alignment, robustness and accuracy. The method is an anchor based alignment using maximal matches derived from suffix trees.

  4. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain 189

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 189 is a potent inhibitor of the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the complete, finished sequence of the 6.8-Mbp genome of this strain, consisting of a single contiguous molecule. Strain 189 is closely related to previously sequenced strains of P. chlororaphis. PMID:27340063

  5. Sequencing error correction without a reference genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Next (second) generation sequencing is an increasingly important tool for many areas of molecular biology, however, care must be taken when interpreting its output. Even a low error rate can cause a large number of errors due to the high number of nucleotides being sequenced. Identifying sequencing errors from true biological variants is a challenging task. For organisms without a reference genome this difficulty is even more challenging. Results We have developed a method for the correction of sequencing errors in data from the Illumina Solexa sequencing platforms. It does not require a reference genome and is of relevance for microRNA studies, unsequenced genomes, variant detection in ultra-deep sequencing and even for RNA-Seq studies of organisms with sequenced genomes where RNA editing is being considered. Conclusions The derived error model is novel in that it allows different error probabilities for each position along the read, in conjunction with different error rates depending on the particular nucleotides involved in the substitution, and does not force these effects to behave in a multiplicative manner. The model provides error rates which capture the complex effects and interactions of the three main known causes of sequencing error associated with the Illumina platforms. PMID:24350580

  6. Coelacanth genome sequence reveals the evolutionary history of vertebrate genes.

    PubMed

    Noonan, James P; Grimwood, Jane; Danke, Joshua; Schmutz, Jeremy; Dickson, Mark; Amemiya, Chris T; Myers, Richard M

    2004-12-01

    The coelacanth is one of the nearest living relatives of tetrapods. However, a teleost species such as zebrafish or Fugu is typically used as the outgroup in current tetrapod comparative sequence analyses. Such studies are complicated by the fact that teleost genomes have undergone a whole-genome duplication event, as well as individual gene-duplication events. Here, we demonstrate the value of coelacanth genome sequence by complete sequencing and analysis of the protocadherin gene cluster of the Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis. We found that coelacanth has 49 protocadherin cluster genes organized in the same three ordered subclusters, alpha, beta, and gamma, as the 54 protocadherin cluster genes in human. In contrast, whole-genome and tandem duplications have generated two zebrafish protocadherin clusters comprised of at least 97 genes. Additionally, zebrafish protocadherins are far more prone to homogenizing gene conversion events than coelacanth protocadherins, suggesting that recombination- and duplication-driven plasticity may be a feature of teleost genomes. Our results indicate that coelacanth provides the ideal outgroup sequence against which tetrapod genomes can be measured. We therefore present L. menadoensis as a candidate for whole-genome sequencing.

  7. Computational Genomics: From Genome Sequence To Global Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao

    2000-03-01

    As various genome projects are shifting to the post-sequencing phase, it becomes a big challenge to analyze the sequence data and extract biological information using computational tools. In the past, computational genomics has mainly focused on finding new genes and mapping out their biological functions. With the rapid accumulation of experimental data on genome-wide gene activities, it is now possible to understand how genes are regulated on a genomic scale. A major mechanism for gene regulation is to control the level of transcription, which is achieved by regulatory proteins that bind to short DNA sequences - the regulatory elements. We have developed a new approach to identifying regulatory elements in genomes. The approach formalizes how one would proceed to decipher a ``text'' consisting of a long string of letters written in an unknown language that did not delineate words. The algorithm is based on a statistical mechanics model in which the sequence is segmented probabilistically into ``words'' and a ``dictionary'' of ``words'' is built concurrently. For the control regions in the yeast genome, we built a ``dictionary'' of about one thousand words which includes many known as well as putative regulatory elements. I will discuss how we can use this dictionary to search for genes that are likely to be regulated in a similar fashion and to analyze gene expression data generated from DNA micro-array experiments.

  8. Draft genome sequence of adzuki bean, Vigna angularis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jae; Satyawan, Dani; Shim, Sangrea; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Hwang, Won Joo; Kim, Sue K; Lestari, Puji; Laosatit, Kularb; Kim, Kil Hyun; Ha, Tae Joung; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Kim, Moon Young; Ko, Jong-Min; Gwag, Jae-Gyun; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lee, Yeong-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Varshney, Rajeev K; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2015-01-28

    Adzuki bean (Vigna angularis var. angularis) is a dietary legume crop in East Asia. The presumed progenitor (Vigna angularis var. nipponensis) is widely found in East Asia, suggesting speciation and domestication in these temperate climate regions. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of adzuki bean. The genome assembly covers 75% of the estimated genome and was mapped to 11 pseudo-chromosomes. Gene prediction revealed 26,857 high confidence protein-coding genes evidenced by RNAseq of different tissues. Comparative gene expression analysis with V. radiata showed that the tissue specificity of orthologous genes was highly conserved. Additional re-sequencing of wild adzuki bean, V. angularis var. nipponensis, and V. nepalensis, was performed to analyze the variations between cultivated and wild adzuki bean. The determined divergence time of adzuki bean and the wild species predated archaeology-based domestication time. The present genome assembly will accelerate the genomics-assisted breeding of adzuki bean.

  9. Draft genome sequence of adzuki bean, Vigna angularis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jae; Satyawan, Dani; Shim, Sangrea; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Hwang, Won Joo; Kim, Sue K; Lestari, Puji; Laosatit, Kularb; Kim, Kil Hyun; Ha, Tae Joung; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Kim, Moon Young; Ko, Jong-Min; Gwag, Jae-Gyun; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lee, Yeong-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Varshney, Rajeev K; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Adzuki bean (Vigna angularis var. angularis) is a dietary legume crop in East Asia. The presumed progenitor (Vigna angularis var. nipponensis) is widely found in East Asia, suggesting speciation and domestication in these temperate climate regions. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of adzuki bean. The genome assembly covers 75% of the estimated genome and was mapped to 11 pseudo-chromosomes. Gene prediction revealed 26,857 high confidence protein-coding genes evidenced by RNAseq of different tissues. Comparative gene expression analysis with V. radiata showed that the tissue specificity of orthologous genes was highly conserved. Additional re-sequencing of wild adzuki bean, V. angularis var. nipponensis, and V. nepalensis, was performed to analyze the variations between cultivated and wild adzuki bean. The determined divergence time of adzuki bean and the wild species predated archaeology-based domestication time. The present genome assembly will accelerate the genomics-assisted breeding of adzuki bean. PMID:25626881

  10. Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2009-08-03

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

  11. Legume genomics: understanding biology through DNA and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Jamie A.; Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The legume family (Leguminosae) consists of approx. 17 000 species. A few of these species, including, but not limited to, Phaseolus vulgaris, Cicer arietinum and Cajanus cajan, are important dietary components, providing protein for approx. 300 million people worldwide. Additional species, including soybean (Glycine max) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), are important crops utilized mainly in animal feed. In addition, legumes are important contributors to biological nitrogen, forming symbiotic relationships with rhizobia to fix atmospheric N2 and providing up to 30 % of available nitrogen for the next season of crops. The application of high-throughput genomic technologies including genome sequencing projects, genome re-sequencing (DNA-seq) and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) by the legume research community has provided major insights into genome evolution, genomic architecture and domestication. Scope and Conclusions This review presents an overview of the current state of legume genomics and explores the role that next-generation sequencing technologies play in advancing legume genomics. The adoption of next-generation sequencing and implementation of associated bioinformatic tools has allowed researchers to turn each species of interest into their own model organism. To illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing, an in-depth overview of the transcriptomes of both soybean and white lupin (Lupinus albus) is provided. The soybean transcriptome focuses on analysing seed development in two near-isogenic lines, examining the role of transporters, oil biosynthesis and nitrogen utilization. The white lupin transcriptome analysis examines how phosphate deficiency alters gene expression patterns, inducing the formation of cluster roots. Such studies illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in elucidating the gene networks underlying biological processes. PMID:24769535

  12. Toward Complete Bacterial Genome Sequencing Through the Combined Use of Multiple Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Dae-Hee; Ryu, Choong-Min; Park, Seung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PacBio's long-read sequencing technologies can be successfully used for a complete bacterial genome assembly using recently developed non-hybrid assemblers in the absence of secondgeneration, high-quality short reads. However, standardized procedures that take into account multiple pre-existing second-generation sequencing platforms are scarce. In addition to Illumina HiSeq and Ion Torrent PGM-based genome sequencing results derived from previous studies, we generated further sequencing data, including from the PacBio RS II platform, and applied various bioinformatics tools to obtain complete genome assemblies for five bacterial strains. Our approach revealed that the hierarchical genome assembly process (HGAP) non-hybrid assembler resulted in nearly complete assemblies at a moderate coverage of ~75x, but that different versions produced non-compatible results requiring post processing. The other two platforms further improved the PacBio assembly through scaffolding and a final error correction.

  13. Sequencing and comparative analyses of the genomes of zoysiagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kosugi, Shunichi; Nakayama, Shinobu; Ono, Akiko; Watanabe, Akiko; Hashiguchi, Masatsugu; Gondo, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Genki; Muguerza, Melody; Shimizu, Katsuya; Sawamura, Noriko; Inoue, Takayasu; Shigeki, Yuichi; Ohno, Naoki; Tabata, Satoshi; Akashi, Ryo; Sato, Shusei

    2016-01-01

    Zoysia is a warm-season turfgrass, which comprises 11 allotetraploid species (2n = 4x = 40), each possessing different morphological and physiological traits. To characterize the genetic systems of Zoysia plants and to analyse their structural and functional differences in individual species and accessions, we sequenced the genomes of Zoysia species using HiSeq and MiSeq platforms. As a reference sequence of Zoysia species, we generated a high-quality draft sequence of the genome of Z. japonica accession ‘Nagirizaki’ (334 Mb) in which 59,271 protein-coding genes were predicted. In parallel, draft genome sequences of Z. matrella ‘Wakaba’ and Z. pacifica ‘Zanpa’ were also generated for comparative analyses. To investigate the genetic diversity among the Zoysia species, genome sequence reads of three additional accessions, Z. japonica ‘Kyoto’, Z. japonica ‘Miyagi’ and Z. matrella ‘Chiba Fair Green’, were accumulated, and aligned against the reference genome of ‘Nagirizaki’ along with those from ‘Wakaba’ and ‘Zanpa’. As a result, we detected 7,424,163 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 852,488 short indels among these species. The information obtained in this study will be valuable for basic studies on zoysiagrass evolution and genetics as well as for the breeding of zoysiagrasses, and is made available in the ‘Zoysia Genome Database’ at http://zoysia.kazusa.or.jp. PMID:26975196

  14. Sequencing and comparative analyses of the genomes of zoysiagrasses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kosugi, Shunichi; Nakayama, Shinobu; Ono, Akiko; Watanabe, Akiko; Hashiguchi, Masatsugu; Gondo, Takahiro; Ishigaki, Genki; Muguerza, Melody; Shimizu, Katsuya; Sawamura, Noriko; Inoue, Takayasu; Shigeki, Yuichi; Ohno, Naoki; Tabata, Satoshi; Akashi, Ryo; Sato, Shusei

    2016-04-01

    Zoysiais a warm-season turfgrass, which comprises 11 allotetraploid species (2n= 4x= 40), each possessing different morphological and physiological traits. To characterize the genetic systems of Zoysia plants and to analyse their structural and functional differences in individual species and accessions, we sequenced the genomes of Zoysia species using HiSeq and MiSeq platforms. As a reference sequence of Zoysia species, we generated a high-quality draft sequence of the genome of Z. japonica accession 'Nagirizaki' (334 Mb) in which 59,271 protein-coding genes were predicted. In parallel, draft genome sequences of Z. matrella 'Wakaba' and Z. pacifica 'Zanpa' were also generated for comparative analyses. To investigate the genetic diversity among the Zoysia species, genome sequence reads of three additional accessions, Z. japonica'Kyoto', Z. japonica'Miyagi' and Z. matrella'Chiba Fair Green', were accumulated, and aligned against the reference genome of 'Nagirizaki' along with those from 'Wakaba' and 'Zanpa'. As a result, we detected 7,424,163 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 852,488 short indels among these species. The information obtained in this study will be valuable for basic studies on zoysiagrass evolution and genetics as well as for the breeding of zoysiagrasses, and is made available in the 'Zoysia Genome Database' at http://zoysia.kazusa.or.jp.

  15. Accelerating Genome Sequencing 100X with FPGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Strenski, Dave

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two Cray XD1 systems with Virtex-II Pro 50 and Virtex-4 LX160 FPGAs was evaluated using the FASTA computational biology program for human genome (DNA and protein) sequence comparisons. FPGA speedups of 50X (Virtex-II Pro 50) and 100X (Virtex-4 LX160) over a 2.2 GHz Opteron were obtained. FPGA coding issues for human genome data are described.

  16. Microbial species delineation using whole genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Neha J.; Mukherjee, Supratim; Ivanova, Natalia; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Pati, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Increased sequencing of microbial genomes has revealed that prevailing prokaryotic species assignments can be inconsistent with whole genome information for a significant number of species. The long-standing need for a systematic and scalable species assignment technique can be met by the genome-wide Average Nucleotide Identity (gANI) metric, which is widely acknowledged as a robust measure of genomic relatedness. In this work, we demonstrate that the combination of gANI and the alignment fraction (AF) between two genomes accurately reflects their genomic relatedness. We introduce an efficient implementation of AF,gANI and discuss its successful application to 86.5M genome pairs between 13,151 prokaryotic genomes assigned to 3032 species. Subsequently, by comparing the genome clusters obtained from complete linkage clustering of these pairs to existing taxonomy, we observed that nearly 18% of all prokaryotic species suffer from anomalies in species definition. Our results can be used to explore central questions such as whether microorganisms form a continuum of genetic diversity or distinct species represented by distinct genetic signatures. We propose that this precise and objective AF,gANI-based species definition: the MiSI (Microbial Species Identifier) method, be used to address previous inconsistencies in species classification and as the primary guide for new taxonomic species assignment, supplemented by the traditional polyphasic approach, as required. PMID:26150420

  17. Whole-Genome Sequencing in Outbreak Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Stephen D.; Riley, Margaret F.; Petri, William A.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In addition to the ever-present concern of medical professionals about epidemics of infectious diseases, the relative ease of access and low cost of obtaining, producing, and disseminating pathogenic organisms or biological toxins mean that bioterrorism activity should also be considered when facing a disease outbreak. Utilization of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in outbreak analysis facilitates the rapid and accurate identification of virulence factors of the pathogen and can be used to identify the path of disease transmission within a population and provide information on the probable source. Molecular tools such as WGS are being refined and advanced at a rapid pace to provide robust and higher-resolution methods for identifying, comparing, and classifying pathogenic organisms. If these methods of pathogen characterization are properly applied, they will enable an improved public health response whether a disease outbreak was initiated by natural events or by accidental or deliberate human activity. The current application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to microbial WGS and microbial forensics is reviewed. PMID:25876885

  18. Whole-genome sequencing in outbreak analysis.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Turner, Stephen D; Riley, Margaret F; Petri, William A; Hewlett, Erik L

    2015-07-01

    In addition to the ever-present concern of medical professionals about epidemics of infectious diseases, the relative ease of access and low cost of obtaining, producing, and disseminating pathogenic organisms or biological toxins mean that bioterrorism activity should also be considered when facing a disease outbreak. Utilization of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in outbreak analysis facilitates the rapid and accurate identification of virulence factors of the pathogen and can be used to identify the path of disease transmission within a population and provide information on the probable source. Molecular tools such as WGS are being refined and advanced at a rapid pace to provide robust and higher-resolution methods for identifying, comparing, and classifying pathogenic organisms. If these methods of pathogen characterization are properly applied, they will enable an improved public health response whether a disease outbreak was initiated by natural events or by accidental or deliberate human activity. The current application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to microbial WGS and microbial forensics is reviewed. PMID:25876885

  19. Genome Walking by Next Generation Sequencing Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Costanza, Alessandra; Fanizza, Immacolata; Placido, Antonio; Ceci, Luigi R.

    2012-01-01

    Genome Walking (GW) comprises a number of PCR-based methods for the identification of nucleotide sequences flanking known regions. The different methods have been used for several purposes: from de novo sequencing, useful for the identification of unknown regions, to the characterization of insertion sites for viruses and transposons. In the latter cases Genome Walking methods have been recently boosted by coupling to Next Generation Sequencing technologies. This review will focus on the development of several protocols for the application of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies to GW, which have been developed in the course of analysis of insertional libraries. These analyses find broad application in protocols for functional genomics and gene therapy. Thanks to the application of NGS technologies, the original vision of GW as a procedure for walking along an unknown genome is now changing into the possibility of observing the parallel marching of hundreds of thousands of primers across the borders of inserted DNA molecules in host genomes. PMID:24832505

  20. Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Joseph A; Budiman, Muhammad A; Nunberg, Andrew; Citek, Robert W; Robbins, Dan; Jones, Joshua; Flick, Elizabeth; Rholfing, Theresa; Fries, Jason; Bradford, Kourtney; McMenamy, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Holeman, Heather; Roe, Bruce A; Wiley, Graham; Korf, Ian F; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Lakey, Nathan; McCombie, W Richard; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Martienssen, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

  1. Sorghum Genome Sequencing by Methylation Filtration

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:15660154

  2. Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Joseph A; Budiman, Muhammad A; Nunberg, Andrew; Citek, Robert W; Robbins, Dan; Jones, Joshua; Flick, Elizabeth; Rholfing, Theresa; Fries, Jason; Bradford, Kourtney; McMenamy, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Holeman, Heather; Roe, Bruce A; Wiley, Graham; Korf, Ian F; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Lakey, Nathan; McCombie, W Richard; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Martienssen, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:15660154

  3. Initial sequence and comparative analysis of the cat genome

    PubMed Central

    Pontius, Joan U.; Mullikin, James C.; Smith, Douglas R.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Gnerre, Sante; Clamp, Michele; Chang, Jean; Stephens, Robert; Neelam, Beena; Volfovsky, Natalia; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Agarwala, Richa; Narfström, Kristina; Murphy, William J.; Giger, Urs; Roca, Alfred L.; Antunes, Agostinho; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Yuhki, Naoya; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Johnson, Warren E.; Bourque, Guillaume; Tesler, Glenn; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The genome sequence (1.9-fold coverage) of an inbred Abyssinian domestic cat was assembled, mapped, and annotated with a comparative approach that involved cross-reference to annotated genome assemblies of six mammals (human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, and cow). The results resolved chromosomal positions for 663,480 contigs, 20,285 putative feline gene orthologs, and 133,499 conserved sequence blocks (CSBs). Additional annotated features include repetitive elements, endogenous retroviral sequences, nuclear mitochondrial (numt) sequences, micro-RNAs, and evolutionary breakpoints that suggest historic balancing of translocation and inversion incidences in distinct mammalian lineages. Large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), deletion insertion polymorphisms (DIPs), and short tandem repeats (STRs), suitable for linkage or association studies were characterized in the context of long stretches of chromosome homozygosity. In spite of the light coverage capturing ∼65% of euchromatin sequence from the cat genome, these comparative insights shed new light on the tempo and mode of gene/genome evolution in mammals, promise several research applications for the cat, and also illustrate that a comparative approach using more deeply covered mammals provides an informative, preliminary annotation of a light (1.9-fold) coverage mammal genome sequence. PMID:17975172

  4. Multilocus sequence typing of total-genome-sequenced bacteria.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mette V; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon; Friis, Carsten; Hasman, Henrik; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jelsbak, Lars; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Ussery, David W; Aarestrup, Frank M; Lund, Ole

    2012-04-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from the MLST databases are downloaded monthly, and the best-matching MLST alleles of the specified MLST scheme are found using a BLAST-based ranking method. The sequence type is then determined by the combination of alleles identified. The method was tested on preassembled genomes from 336 isolates covering 56 MLST schemes, on short sequence reads from 387 isolates covering 10 schemes, and on a small test set of short sequence reads from 29 isolates for which the sequence type had been determined by traditional methods. The method presented here enables investigators to determine the sequence types of their isolates on the basis of WGS data. This method is publicly available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MLST. PMID:22238442

  5. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon; Friis, Carsten; Hasman, Henrik; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Jelsbak, Lars; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Ussery, David W.; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the “gold standard” of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from the MLST databases are downloaded monthly, and the best-matching MLST alleles of the specified MLST scheme are found using a BLAST-based ranking method. The sequence type is then determined by the combination of alleles identified. The method was tested on preassembled genomes from 336 isolates covering 56 MLST schemes, on short sequence reads from 387 isolates covering 10 schemes, and on a small test set of short sequence reads from 29 isolates for which the sequence type had been determined by traditional methods. The method presented here enables investigators to determine the sequence types of their isolates on the basis of WGS data. This method is publicly available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/MLST. PMID:22238442

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulatus.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaojing; Xu, Jun; Smith, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe the budgie's mitochondrial genome sequence, a resource that can facilitate this parrot's use as a model organism as well as for determining its phylogenetic relatedness to other parrots/Psittaciformes. The estimated total length of the sequence was 18,193 bp. In addition to the to the 13 protein and tRNA and rRNA coding regions, the sequence also includes a duplicated hypervariable region, a feature unique to only a few birds. The two hypervariable regions shared a sequence identity of about 86%. PMID:24660934

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio toranzoniae Strain CECT 7225T.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Aide; Gibas, Cynthia J; Romalde, Jesus L

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio toranzoniae(CECT 7225(T)) was isolated from healthy reared carpet shell clams in Galicia (Northwest Spain). In addition, this species has been recently identified as a potential pathogen of red conger eel in Chile. The draft genome sequence has 4.5 Mbp, a G+C content of 43.9%, and >3,800 protein-coding genes. PMID:27034502

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio toranzoniae Strain CECT 7225T

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Aide; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio toranzoniae (CECT 7225T) was isolated from healthy reared carpet shell clams in Galicia (Northwest Spain). In addition, this species has been recently identified as a potential pathogen of red conger eel in Chile. The draft genome sequence has 4.5 Mbp, a G+C content of 43.9%, and >3,800 protein-coding genes. PMID:27034502

  9. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Phage Emalyn

    PubMed Central

    Guido, Madeline J.; Iyengar, Pragnya; Nigra, Jonathan T.; Serbin, Matthew B.; Kasturiarachi, Naomi S.; Pressimone, Catherine A.; Schiebel, Johnathon G.; Furbee, Emily C.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Montgomery, Matthew T.; Garlena, Rebecca A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2016-01-01

    Emalyn is a newly isolated bacteriophage of Gordonia terrae 3612 and has a double-stranded DNA genome 43,982 bp long with 67 predicted protein-encoding genes, 32 of which we can assign putative functions. Emalyn has a prolate capsid and has extensive nucleotide similarity with several previously sequenced phages. PMID:27516499

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of 61 Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages—viruses of mycobacteria—provide insights into viral diversity and evolution as well as numerous tools for genetic dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we report the complete genome sequences of 61 mycobacteriophages newly isolated from environmental samples using Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 that expand our understanding of phage diversity. PMID:27389257

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of 61 Mycobacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages-viruses of mycobacteria-provide insights into viral diversity and evolution as well as numerous tools for genetic dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Here we report the complete genome sequences of 61 mycobacteriophages newly isolated from environmental samples using Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 that expand our understanding of phage diversity. PMID:27389257

  12. Draft genome sequence of Virgibacillus halodenitrificans 1806.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Han-Seung; Pan, Jae-Gu; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2012-11-01

    Virgibacillus halodenitrificans 1806 is an endospore-forming halophilic bacterium isolated from salterns in Korea. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of V. halodenitrificans 1806, which may reveal the molecular basis of osmoadaptation and insights into carbon and anaerobic metabolism in moderate halophiles. PMID:23105070

  13. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Phage Emalyn.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Guido, Madeline J; Iyengar, Pragnya; Nigra, Jonathan T; Serbin, Matthew B; Kasturiarachi, Naomi S; Pressimone, Catherine A; Schiebel, Johnathon G; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Emalyn is a newly isolated bacteriophage of Gordonia terrae 3612 and has a double-stranded DNA genome 43,982 bp long with 67 predicted protein-encoding genes, 32 of which we can assign putative functions. Emalyn has a prolate capsid and has extensive nucleotide similarity with several previously sequenced phages. PMID:27516499

  14. Repeated sequences in bacterial chromosomes and plasmids: a glimpse from sequenced genomes.

    PubMed

    Romero, D; Martínez-Salazar, J; Ortiz, E; Rodríguez, C; Valencia-Morales, E

    1999-01-01

    To gain insight into the extent of exact DNA repeats in sequenced bacterial genomes and their plasmids, we analyzed the collection of completely sequenced bacterial genomes available at GenBank using the program Miropeats. This program draws graphical representations of exact DNA repeats in whole genomes. In this work, we present maps showing the extent and type (inverted or direct) of exact DNA repeats longer than 300 bp for the whole collection. These repeats may participate in a variety of events relevant for bacterial genome plasticity, such as amplifications, deletions, inversions, and translocations (via homologous recombination), as well as transposition. Additionally, we review recent data showing that high-frequency architectural variations in genomic structure occur at both the interspecies and interstrain levels.

  15. Genome Sequencing of Multiple Isolates Highlights Subtelomeric Genomic Diversity within Fusarium fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Chiara, Matteo; Fanelli, Francesca; Mulè, Giuseppina; Logrieco, Antonio F; Pesole, Graziano; Leslie, John F; Horner, David S; Toomajian, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Comparisons of draft genome sequences of three geographically distinct isolates of Fusarium fujikuroi with two recently published genome sequences from the same species suggest diverse profiles of secondary metabolite production within F. fujikuroi. Species- and lineage-specific genes, many of which appear to exhibit expression profiles that are consistent with roles in host-pathogen interactions and adaptation to environmental changes, are concentrated in subtelomeric regions. These genomic compartments also exhibit distinct gene densities and compositional characteristics with respect to other genomic partitions, and likely play a role in the generation of molecular diversity. Our data provide additional evidence that gene duplication, divergence, and differential loss play important roles in F. fujikuroi genome evolution and suggest that hundreds of lineage-specific genes might have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer.

  16. Gambling on a shortcut to genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1991-06-21

    Almost from the start of the Human Genome Project, a debate has been raging over whether to sequence the entire human genome, all 3 billion bases, or just the genes - a mere 2% or 3% of the genome, and by far the most interesting part. In England, Sydney Brenner convinced the Medical Research Council (MRC) to start with the expressed genes, or complementary DNAs. But the US stance has been that the entire sequence is essential if we are to understand the blueprint of man. Craig Venter of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke says that focusing on the expressed genes may be even more useful than expected. His strategy involves randomly selecting clones from cDNA libraries which theoretically contain all the genes that are switched on at a particular time in a particular tissue. Then the researchers sequence just a short stretch of each clone, about 400 to 500 bases, to create can expressed sequence tag or EST. The sequences of these ESTs are then stored in a database. Using that information, other researchers can then recreate that EST by using polymerase chain reaction techniques.

  17. Agaricus bisporus genome sequence: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Richard W; Challen, Michael P; Burton, Kerry S

    2013-06-01

    The genomes of two isolates of Agaricus bisporus have been sequenced recently. This soil-inhabiting fungus has a wide geographical distribution in nature and it is also cultivated in an industrialized indoor process ($4.7bn annual worldwide value) to produce edible mushrooms. Previously this lignocellulosic fungus has resisted precise econutritional classification, i.e. into white- or brown-rot decomposers. The generation of the genome sequence and transcriptomic analyses has revealed a new classification, 'humicolous', for species adapted to grow in humic-rich, partially decomposed leaf material. The Agaricus biporus genomes contain a collection of polysaccharide and lignin-degrading genes and more interestingly an expanded number of genes (relative to other lignocellulosic fungi) that enhance degradation of lignin derivatives, i.e. heme-thiolate peroxidases and β-etherases. A motif that is hypothesized to be a promoter element in the humicolous adaptation suite is present in a large number of genes specifically up-regulated when the mycelium is grown on humic-rich substrate. The genome sequence of A. bisporus offers a platform to explore fungal biology in carbon-rich soil environments and terrestrial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.

  18. Vibrio cholerae phage K139: complete genome sequence and comparative genomics of related phages.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Dagmar; Blass, Julia; Evers, Stefan; Reidl, Joachim

    2002-12-01

    In this report, we characterize the complete genome sequence of the temperate phage K139, which morphologically belongs to the Myoviridae phage family (P2 and 186). The prophage genome consists of 33,106 bp, and the overall GC content is 48.9%. Forty-four open reading frames were identified. Homology analysis and motif search were used to assign possible functions for the genes, revealing a close relationship to P2-like phages. By Southern blot screening of a Vibrio cholerae strain collection, two highly K139-related phage sequences were detected in non-O1, non-O139 strains. Combinatorial PCR analysis revealed almost identical genome organizations. One region of variable gene content was identified and sequenced. Additionally, the tail fiber genes were analyzed, leading to the identification of putative host-specific sequence variations. Furthermore, a K139-encoded Dam methyltransferase was characterized.

  19. Mitochondrial genome sequences and comparative genomics ofPhytophthora ramorum and P. sojae

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Frank N.; Douda, Bensasson; Tyler, Brett M.; Boore,Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The complete sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of theoomycetes of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae were determined during thecourse of their complete nuclear genome sequencing (Tyler, et al. 2006).Both are circular, with sizes of 39,314 bp for P. ramorum and 42,975 bpfor P. sojae. Each contains a total of 37 identifiable protein-encodinggenes, 25 or 26 tRNAs (P. sojae and P. ramorum, respectively)specifying19 amino acids, and a variable number of ORFs (7 for P. ramorum and 12for P. sojae) which are potentially additional functional genes.Non-coding regions comprise approximately 11.5 percent and 18.4 percentof the genomes of P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively. Relative to P.sojae, there is an inverted repeat of 1,150 bp in P. ramorum thatincludes an unassigned unique ORF, a tRNA gene, and adjacent non-codingsequences, but otherwise the gene order in both species is identical.Comparisons of these genomes with published sequences of the P. infestansmitochondrial genome reveals a number of similarities, but the gene orderin P. infestans differs in two adjacent locations due to inversions.Sequence alignments of the three genomes indicated sequence conservationranging from 75 to 85 percent and that specific regions were morevariable than others.

  20. Quantifying Next Generation Sequencing Sample Pre-Processing Bias in HIV-1 Complete Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, Bram; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Baele, Guy; van Wijngaerden, Eric; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; van Laethem, Kristel; Lemey, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analyses play a central role in infectious disease research. Massively parallelized "mechanical cloning" and sequencing technologies were quickly adopted by HIV researchers in order to broaden the understanding of the clinical importance of minor drug-resistant variants. These efforts have, however, remained largely limited to small genomic regions. The growing need to monitor multiple genome regions for drug resistance testing, as well as the obvious benefit for studying evolutionary and epidemic processes makes complete genome sequencing an important goal in viral research. In addition, a major drawback for NGS applications to RNA viruses is the need for large quantities of input DNA. Here, we use a generic overlapping amplicon-based near full-genome amplification protocol to compare low-input enzymatic fragmentation (Nextera™) with conventional mechanical shearing for Roche 454 sequencing. We find that the fragmentation method has only a modest impact on the characterization of the population composition and that for reliable results, the variation introduced at all steps of the procedure--from nucleic acid extraction to sequencing--should be taken into account, a finding that is also relevant for NGS technologies that are now more commonly used. Furthermore, by applying our protocol to deep sequence a number of pre-therapy plasma and PBMC samples, we illustrate the potential benefits of a near complete genome sequencing approach in routine genotyping. PMID:26751471

  1. Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of the Brown Alga Undaria pinnatifida

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Guoliang; Chi, Shan; Liu, Cui; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we fully sequenced the circular plastid genome of a brown alga, Undaria pinnatifida. The genome is 130,383 base pairs (bp) in size; it contains a large single-copy (LSC, 76,598 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 42,977 bp), separated by two inverted repeats (IRa and IRb: 5,404 bp). The genome contains 139 protein-coding, 28 tRNA, and 6 rRNA genes; none of these genes contains introns. Organization and gene contents of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome were similar to those of Saccharina japonica. There is a co-linear relationship between the plastid genome of U. pinnatifida and that of three previously sequenced large brown algal species. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 taxa based on 23 plastid protein-coding genes grouped all plastids into a red or green lineage. In the large brown algae branch, U. pinnatifida and S. japonica formed a sister clade with much closer relationship to Ectocarpus siliculosus than to Fucus vesiculosus. For the first time, the start codon ATT was identified in the plastid genome of large brown algae, in the atpA gene of U. pinnatifida. In addition, we found a gene-length change induced by a 3-bp repetitive DNA in ycf35 and ilvB genes of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome. PMID:26426800

  2. Defining Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, Patrick

    2009-05-27

    Patrick Chain of the DOE Joint Genome Institute gives a talk on behalf of the International Genome Sequencing Standards Consortium on the need for intermediate genome classifications between "draft" and "finished"

  3. Whole-genome sequencing in bacteriology: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Dark, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Over the last ten years, genome sequencing capabilities have expanded exponentially. There have been tremendous advances in sequencing technology, DNA sample preparation, genome assembly, and data analysis. This has led to advances in a number of facets of bacterial genomics, including metagenomics, clinical medicine, bacterial archaeology, and bacterial evolution. This review examines the strengths and weaknesses of techniques in bacterial genome sequencing, upcoming technologies, and assembly techniques, as well as highlighting recent studies that highlight new applications for bacterial genomics. PMID:24143115

  4. Whole-genome sequencing in bacteriology: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Dark, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Over the last ten years, genome sequencing capabilities have expanded exponentially. There have been tremendous advances in sequencing technology, DNA sample preparation, genome assembly, and data analysis. This has led to advances in a number of facets of bacterial genomics, including metagenomics, clinical medicine, bacterial archaeology, and bacterial evolution. This review examines the strengths and weaknesses of techniques in bacterial genome sequencing, upcoming technologies, and assembly techniques, as well as highlighting recent studies that highlight new applications for bacterial genomics.

  5. Draft genome sequence of Actinomyces massiliensis strain 4401292T.

    PubMed

    Roux, Véronique; Robert, Catherine; Gimenez, Grégory; Gharbi, Reem; Raoult, Didier

    2012-09-01

    A draft genome sequence of Actinomyces massiliensis, an anaerobic bacterium isolated from a patient's blood culture, is described here. CRISPR-associated proteins, insertion sequences, and toxin-antitoxin loci were found on the genome.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  7. Whole Genome Sequencing: Cracking the Genetic Code for Foodborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Whole Genome Sequencing: Cracking the Genetic Code for Foodborne Illness ... Bacteria that cause disease have millions of different genomes, or sequences of genetic code, each as unique ...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Giuseppe; Torrents, Eduard; Luquin, Marina; Comas, Iñaki; Julián, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  9. Genome Sequence of Psychrobacter cibarius Strain W1.

    PubMed

    Raghupathi, Prem K; Herschend, Jakob; Røder, Henriette L; Sørensen, Søren J; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Psychrobacter cibarius strain W1, which was isolated at a slaughterhouse in Denmark. The 3.63-Mb genome sequence was assembled into 241 contigs. PMID:27231353

  10. Whole genomic DNA sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of Arthrospira platensis: high genome plasticity and genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Teng; Qin, Song; Hu, Yongwu; Song, Zhijian; Ying, Jianchao; Li, Peizhen; Dong, Wei; Zhao, Fangqing; Yang, Huanming; Bao, Qiyu

    2016-01-01

    Arthrospira platensis is a multi-cellular and filamentous non-N2-fixing cyanobacterium that is capable of performing oxygenic photosynthesis. In this study, we determined the nearly complete genome sequence of A. platensis YZ. A. platensis YZ genome is a single, circular chromosome of 6.62 Mb in size. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses revealed that A. platensis YZ was more closely related to A. platensis NIES-39 than Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 and A. platensis C1. Broad gene gains were identified between A. platensis YZ and three other Arthrospira speices, some of which have been previously demonstrated that can be laterally transferred among different species, such as restriction-modification systems-coding genes. Moreover, unprecedented extensive chromosomal rearrangements among different strains were observed. The chromosomal rearrangements, particularly the chromosomal inversions, were analysed and estimated to be closely related to palindromes that involved long inverted repeat sequences and the extensively distributed type IIR restriction enzyme in the Arthrospira genome. In addition, species from genus Arthrospira unanimously contained the highest rate of repetitive sequence compared with the other species of order Oscillatoriales, suggested that sequence duplication significantly contributed to Arthrospira genome phylogeny. These results provided in-depth views into the genomic phylogeny and structural variation of A. platensis, as well as provide a valuable resource for functional genomics studies. PMID:27330141

  11. Whole genomic DNA sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of Arthrospira platensis: high genome plasticity and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Teng; Qin, Song; Hu, Yongwu; Song, Zhijian; Ying, Jianchao; Li, Peizhen; Dong, Wei; Zhao, Fangqing; Yang, Huanming; Bao, Qiyu

    2016-08-01

    Arthrospira platensis is a multi-cellular and filamentous non-N2-fixing cyanobacterium that is capable of performing oxygenic photosynthesis. In this study, we determined the nearly complete genome sequence of A. platensis YZ. A. platensis YZ genome is a single, circular chromosome of 6.62 Mb in size. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses revealed that A. platensis YZ was more closely related to A. platensis NIES-39 than Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 and A. platensis C1. Broad gene gains were identified between A. platensis YZ and three other Arthrospira speices, some of which have been previously demonstrated that can be laterally transferred among different species, such as restriction-modification systems-coding genes. Moreover, unprecedented extensive chromosomal rearrangements among different strains were observed. The chromosomal rearrangements, particularly the chromosomal inversions, were analysed and estimated to be closely related to palindromes that involved long inverted repeat sequences and the extensively distributed type IIR restriction enzyme in the Arthrospira genome. In addition, species from genus Arthrospira unanimously contained the highest rate of repetitive sequence compared with the other species of order Oscillatoriales, suggested that sequence duplication significantly contributed to Arthrospira genome phylogeny. These results provided in-depth views into the genomic phylogeny and structural variation of A. platensis, as well as provide a valuable resource for functional genomics studies. PMID:27330141

  12. Whole genomic DNA sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of Arthrospira platensis: high genome plasticity and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Teng; Qin, Song; Hu, Yongwu; Song, Zhijian; Ying, Jianchao; Li, Peizhen; Dong, Wei; Zhao, Fangqing; Yang, Huanming; Bao, Qiyu

    2016-08-01

    Arthrospira platensis is a multi-cellular and filamentous non-N2-fixing cyanobacterium that is capable of performing oxygenic photosynthesis. In this study, we determined the nearly complete genome sequence of A. platensis YZ. A. platensis YZ genome is a single, circular chromosome of 6.62 Mb in size. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses revealed that A. platensis YZ was more closely related to A. platensis NIES-39 than Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 and A. platensis C1. Broad gene gains were identified between A. platensis YZ and three other Arthrospira speices, some of which have been previously demonstrated that can be laterally transferred among different species, such as restriction-modification systems-coding genes. Moreover, unprecedented extensive chromosomal rearrangements among different strains were observed. The chromosomal rearrangements, particularly the chromosomal inversions, were analysed and estimated to be closely related to palindromes that involved long inverted repeat sequences and the extensively distributed type IIR restriction enzyme in the Arthrospira genome. In addition, species from genus Arthrospira unanimously contained the highest rate of repetitive sequence compared with the other species of order Oscillatoriales, suggested that sequence duplication significantly contributed to Arthrospira genome phylogeny. These results provided in-depth views into the genomic phylogeny and structural variation of A. platensis, as well as provide a valuable resource for functional genomics studies.

  13. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  14. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi. PMID:26542221

  15. Simple sequence repeats in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mrázek, Jan; Guo, Xiangxue; Shah, Apurva

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in DNA sequences are composed of tandem iterations of short oligonucleotides and may have functional and/or structural properties that distinguish them from general DNA sequences. They are variable in length because of slip-strand mutations and may also affect local structure of the DNA molecule or the encoded proteins. Long SSRs (LSSRs) are common in eukaryotes but rare in most prokaryotes. In pathogens, SSRs can enhance antigenic variance of the pathogen population in a strategy that counteracts the host immune response. We analyze representations of SSRs in >300 prokaryotic genomes and report significant differences among different prokaryotes as well as among different types of SSRs. LSSRs composed of short oligonucleotides (1–4 bp length, designated LSSR1–4) are often found in host-adapted pathogens with reduced genomes that are not known to readily survive in a natural environment outside the host. In contrast, LSSRs composed of longer oligonucleotides (5–11 bp length, designated LSSR5–11) are found mostly in nonpathogens and opportunistic pathogens with large genomes. Comparisons among SSRs of different lengths suggest that LSSR1–4 are likely maintained by selection. This is consistent with the established role of some LSSR1–4 in enhancing antigenic variance. By contrast, abundance of LSSR5–11 in some genomes may reflect the SSRs' general tendency to expand rather than their specific role in the organisms' physiology. Differences among genomes in terms of SSR representations and their possible interpretations are discussed. PMID:17485665

  16. Elucidating population histories using genomic DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Vigilant, Linda

    2009-04-01

    In 1993, Cliff Jolly suggested that rather than debating species definitions and classifications, energy would be better spent investigating multidimensional patterns of variation and gene flow among populations. Until now, however, genetic studies of wild primate populations have been limited to very small portions of the genome. Access to complete genome sequences of humans, chimpanzees, macaques, and other primates makes it possible to design studies surveying substantial amounts of DNA sequence variation at multiple genetic loci in representatives of closely related but distinct wild primate populations. Such data can be analyzed with new approaches that estimate not only when populations diverged but also the relative amounts and directions of subsequent gene flow. These analyses will reemphasize the difficulty of achieving consistent species and subspecies definitions by revealing the extent of variation in the amount and duration of gene flow accompanying population divergences. PMID:19817223

  17. Complete genome sequence of Piry vesiculovirus.

    PubMed

    de Souza, William Marciel; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Júnior, Osvaldo Reis; Tolardo, Aline Lavado; de Andrade, Amanda Araújo Serrão; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez Júnior, João Lídio; de Almeida Medeiros, Daniele Barbosa; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-08-01

    Piry virus (PIRYV) is a rhabdovirus (genus Vesiculovirus) and is described as a possible human pathogen, originally isolated from a Philander opossum trapped in Para State, Northern Brazil. This study describes the complete full coding sequence and the genetic characterization of PIRYV. The genome sequence reveals that PIRYV has a typical vesiculovirus-like organization, encoding the five genes typical of the genus. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that PIRYV is most closely related to Perinet virus and clustered in the same clade as Chandipura and Isfahan vesiculoviruses. PMID:27216928

  18. Draft genome sequence of an aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species, A. bombycis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the A. bombycis Type strain was sequenced using a Personal Genome Machine, followed by annotation of its predicted genes. The genome size for A. bombycis was found to be approximately 37 Mb and contained 12,266 genes. This announcement introduces a sequenced genome for an aflatoxigenic...

  19. The Norway spruce genome sequence and conifer genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Nystedt, Björn; Street, Nathaniel R; Wetterbom, Anna; Zuccolo, Andrea; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Scofield, Douglas G; Vezzi, Francesco; Delhomme, Nicolas; Giacomello, Stefania; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Vicedomini, Riccardo; Sahlin, Kristoffer; Sherwood, Ellen; Elfstrand, Malin; Gramzow, Lydia; Holmberg, Kristina; Hällman, Jimmie; Keech, Olivier; Klasson, Lisa; Koriabine, Maxim; Kucukoglu, Melis; Käller, Max; Luthman, Johannes; Lysholm, Fredrik; Niittylä, Totte; Olson, Ake; Rilakovic, Nemanja; Ritland, Carol; Rosselló, Josep A; Sena, Juliana; Svensson, Thomas; Talavera-López, Carlos; Theißen, Günter; Tuominen, Hannele; Vanneste, Kevin; Wu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Zerbe, Philipp; Arvestad, Lars; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Bohlmann, Joerg; Bousquet, Jean; Garcia Gil, Rosario; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; de Jong, Pieter; MacKay, John; Morgante, Michele; Ritland, Kermit; Sundberg, Björn; Thompson, Stacey Lee; Van de Peer, Yves; Andersson, Björn; Nilsson, Ove; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Lundeberg, Joakim; Jansson, Stefan

    2013-05-30

    Conifers have dominated forests for more than 200 million years and are of huge ecological and economic importance. Here we present the draft assembly of the 20-gigabase genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies), the first available for any gymnosperm. The number of well-supported genes (28,354) is similar to the >100 times smaller genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, and there is no evidence of a recent whole-genome duplication in the gymnosperm lineage. Instead, the large genome size seems to result from the slow and steady accumulation of a diverse set of long-terminal repeat transposable elements, possibly owing to the lack of an efficient elimination mechanism. Comparative sequencing of Pinus sylvestris, Abies sibirica, Juniperus communis, Taxus baccata and Gnetum gnemon reveals that the transposable element diversity is shared among extant conifers. Expression of 24-nucleotide small RNAs, previously implicated in transposable element silencing, is tissue-specific and much lower than in other plants. We further identify numerous long (>10,000 base pairs) introns, gene-like fragments, uncharacterized long non-coding RNAs and short RNAs. This opens up new genomic avenues for conifer forestry and breeding.

  20. Genome sequence of Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides KCTC 3652.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Kang, Aram; Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Aeri; Kim, Dae-Soo; Park, Hong-Seog

    2011-08-01

    We announce the genome sequence of one of the most prevalent lactic acid bacteria present during the manufacturing process of cane juice, the type strain Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides KCTC 3652 (3,244,985 bp, with a G+C content of 38.3%), which consists of 1,160 large contigs (>100 bp in size). All of the contigs were assembled by the Newbler Assembler 2.3 software program (454 Life Sciences).

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Rubrivivax gelatinosus CBS

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pingsha; Lang, Juan; Wawrousek, Karen; Yu, Jianping; Maness, Pin-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Rubrivivax gelatinosus CBS, a purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium, can grow photosynthetically using CO and N2 as the sole carbon and nitrogen nutrients, respectively. R. gelatinosus CBS is of particular interest due to its ability to metabolize CO and yield H2. We present the 5-Mb draft genome sequence of R. gelatinosus CBS with the goal of providing genetic insight into the metabolic properties of this bacterium. PMID:22628496

  2. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peter Wei-Der Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  3. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peter Wei-Der |

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  4. Sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of 1227 Felis catus cDNA sequences enriched for developmental, clinical and nutritional phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The feline genome is valuable to the veterinary and model organism genomics communities because the cat is an obligate carnivore and a model for endangered felids. The initial public release of the Felis catus genome assembly provided a framework for investigating the genomic basis of feline biology. However, the entire set of protein coding genes has not been elucidated. Results We identified and characterized 1227 protein coding feline sequences, of which 913 map to public sequences and 314 are novel. These sequences have been deposited into NCBI's genbank database and complement public genomic resources by providing additional protein coding sequences that fill in some of the gaps in the feline genome assembly. Through functional and comparative genomic analyses, we gained an understanding of the role of these sequences in feline development, nutrition and health. Specifically, we identified 104 orthologs of human genes associated with Mendelian disorders. We detected negative selection within sequences with gene ontology annotations associated with intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and muscle functions. We detected relatively less negative selection on protein sequences encoding extracellular networks, apoptotic pathways and mitochondrial gene ontology annotations. Additionally, we characterized feline cDNA sequences that have mouse orthologs associated with clinical, nutritional and developmental phenotypes. Together, this analysis provides an overview of the value of our cDNA sequences and enhances our understanding of how the feline genome is similar to, and different from other mammalian genomes. Conclusions The cDNA sequences reported here expand existing feline genomic resources by providing high-quality sequences annotated with comparative genomic information providing functional, clinical, nutritional and orthologous gene information. PMID:22257742

  5. The predictive capacity of personal genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nicholas J; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Velculescu, Victor E

    2012-05-01

    New DNA sequencing methods will soon make it possible to identify all germline variants in any individual at a reasonable cost. However, the ability of whole-genome sequencing to predict predisposition to common diseases in the general population is unknown. To estimate this predictive capacity, we use the concept of a "genometype." A specific genometype represents the genomes in the population conferring a specific level of genetic risk for a specified disease. Using this concept, we estimated the maximum capacity of whole-genome sequencing to identify individuals at clinically significant risk for 24 different diseases. Our estimates were derived from the analysis of large numbers of monozygotic twin pairs; twins of a pair share the same genometype and therefore identical genetic risk factors. Our analyses indicate that (i) for 23 of the 24 diseases, most of the individuals will receive negative test results; (ii) these negative test results will, in general, not be very informative, because the risk of developing 19 of the 24 diseases in those who test negative will still be, at minimum, 50 to 80% of that in the general population; and (iii) on the positive side, in the best-case scenario, more than 90% of tested individuals might be alerted to a clinically significant predisposition to at least one disease. These results have important implications for the valuation of genetic testing by industry, health insurance companies, public policy-makers, and consumers. PMID:22472521

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M. abscessus complex genomics. PMID:27284156

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M. abscessus complex genomics. PMID:27284156

  8. Genome Sequence of the Zoonotic Pathogen Chlamydophila psittaci▿

    PubMed Central

    Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Harris, Simon R.; Rance, Richard; West, Anthony P.; Severin, Juliette A.; Ossewaarde, Jacobus M.; Cutcliffe, Lesley T.; Skilton, Rachel J.; Marsh, Pete; Parkhill, Julian; Clarke, Ian N.; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first genome sequence of Chlamydophila psittaci, an intracellular pathogen of birds and a human zoonotic pathogen. A comparison with previously sequenced Chlamydophila genomes shows that, as in other chlamydiae, most of the genome diversity is restricted to the plasticity zone. The C. psittaci plasmid was also sequenced. PMID:21183672

  9. Low coverage sequencing of two Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are three species of elephant that exist, the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) and two species of African elephant (Loxodonta africana and Loxodonta cyclotis). The populations of all three species are dwindling, and are under threat due to factors, such as habitat destruction and ivory hunting. The species differ in many respects, including in their morphology and response to disease. The availability of elephant genome sequence data from all three elephant species will complement studies of behaviour, genetic diversity, evolution and disease resistance. Findings We present low-coverage Illumina sequence data from two Asian elephants, representing approximately 5X and 2.5X coverage respectively. Both raw and aligned data are available, using the African elephant (L. africana) genome as a reference. Conclusions The data presented here are an important addition to the available genetic and genomic information on Asian and African elephants. PMID:25053995

  10. Quantifying Next Generation Sequencing Sample Pre-Processing Bias in HIV-1 Complete Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vrancken, Bram; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Baele, Guy; van Wijngaerden, Eric; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; van Laethem, Kristel; Lemey, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analyses play a central role in infectious disease research. Massively parallelized “mechanical cloning” and sequencing technologies were quickly adopted by HIV researchers in order to broaden the understanding of the clinical importance of minor drug-resistant variants. These efforts have, however, remained largely limited to small genomic regions. The growing need to monitor multiple genome regions for drug resistance testing, as well as the obvious benefit for studying evolutionary and epidemic processes makes complete genome sequencing an important goal in viral research. In addition, a major drawback for NGS applications to RNA viruses is the need for large quantities of input DNA. Here, we use a generic overlapping amplicon-based near full-genome amplification protocol to compare low-input enzymatic fragmentation (Nextera™) with conventional mechanical shearing for Roche 454 sequencing. We find that the fragmentation method has only a modest impact on the characterization of the population composition and that for reliable results, the variation introduced at all steps of the procedure—from nucleic acid extraction to sequencing—should be taken into account, a finding that is also relevant for NGS technologies that are now more commonly used. Furthermore, by applying our protocol to deep sequence a number of pre-therapy plasma and PBMC samples, we illustrate the potential benefits of a near complete genome sequencing approach in routine genotyping. PMID:26751471

  11. Comparative Analysis of Genome Sequences Covering the Seven Cronobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Craig A.; Shih, Rita; Degoricija, Lovorka; Rico, Alain; Brzoska, Pius; Hamby, Stephen E.; Masood, Naqash; Hariri, Sumyya; Sonbol, Hana; Chuzhanova, Nadia; McClelland, Michael; Furtado, Manohar R.; Forsythe, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species of Cronobacter are widespread in the environment and are occasional food-borne pathogens associated with serious neonatal diseases, including bacteraemia, meningitis, and necrotising enterocolitis. The genus is composed of seven species: C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis, C. dublinensis, C. muytjensii, C. universalis, and C. condimenti. Clinical cases are associated with three species, C. malonaticus, C. turicensis and, in particular, with C. sakazakii multilocus sequence type 4. Thus, it is plausible that virulence determinants have evolved in certain lineages. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated high quality sequence drafts for eleven Cronobacter genomes representing the seven Cronobacter species, including an ST4 strain of C. sakazakii. Comparative analysis of these genomes together with the two publicly available genomes revealed Cronobacter has over 6,000 genes in one or more strains and over 2,000 genes shared by all Cronobacter. Considerable variation in the presence of traits such as type six secretion systems, metal resistance (tellurite, copper and silver), and adhesins were found. C. sakazakii is unique in the Cronobacter genus in encoding genes enabling the utilization of exogenous sialic acid which may have clinical significance. The C. sakazakii ST4 strain 701 contained additional genes as compared to other C. sakazakii but none of them were known specific virulence-related genes. Conclusions/Significance Genome comparison revealed that pair-wise DNA sequence identity varies between 89 and 97% in the seven Cronobacter species, and also suggested various degrees of divergence. Sets of universal core genes and accessory genes unique to each strain were identified. These gene sequences can be used for designing genus/species specific detection assays. Genes encoding adhesins, T6SS, and metal resistance genes as well as prophages are found in only subsets of genomes and have contributed considerably to the variation of

  12. It's more than stamp collecting: how genome sequencing can unify biological research.

    PubMed

    Richards, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    The availability of reference genome sequences, especially the human reference, has revolutionized the study of biology. However, while the genomes of some species have been fully sequenced, a wide range of biological problems still cannot be effectively studied for lack of genome sequence information. Here, I identify neglected areas of biology and describe how both targeted species sequencing and more broad taxonomic surveys of the tree of life can address important biological questions. I enumerate the significant benefits that would accrue from sequencing a broader range of taxa, as well as discuss the technical advances in sequencing and assembly methods that would allow for wide-ranging application of whole-genome analysis. Finally, I suggest that in addition to 'big science' survey initiatives to sequence the tree of life, a modified infrastructure-funding paradigm would better support reference genome sequence generation for research communities most in need.

  13. It’s More Than Stamp Collecting: How Genome Sequencing Can Unify Biological Research

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The availability of reference genome sequences, especially the human reference, has revolutionized the study of biology. However, whilst the genomes of some species have been fully sequenced, a wide range of biological problems still cannot be effectively studied for lack of genome sequence information. Here, I identify neglected areas of biology and describe how both targeted species sequencing and more broad taxonomic surveys of the tree of life can address important biological questions. I enumerate the significant benefits that would accrue from sequencing a broader range of taxa, as well as discuss the technical advances in sequencing and assembly methods that would allow for wide-ranging application of whole-genome analysis. Finally, I suggest that in addition to “Big Science” survey initiatives to sequence the tree of life, a modified infrastructure-funding paradigm would better support reference genome sequence generation for research communities most in need. PMID:26003218

  14. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by the use of next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pathogens. The application of next-generation sequencing will soon be sufficiently fast, accurate and cheap to be used in routine clinical microbiology practice, where it could replace many complex current techniques with a single, more efficient workflow. PMID:22868263

  15. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Didelot, Xavier; Bowden, Rory; Wilson, Daniel J; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2012-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here, we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by using next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties, such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pathogens. We predict that the application of next-generation sequencing will soon be sufficiently fast, accurate and cheap to be used in routine clinical microbiology practice, where it could replace many complex current techniques with a single, more efficient workflow.

  16. Why Assembling Plant Genome Sequences Is So Challenging

    PubMed Central

    Claros, Manuel Gonzalo; Bautista, Rocío; Guerrero-Fernández, Darío; Benzerki, Hicham; Seoane, Pedro; Fernández-Pozo, Noé

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the biological and economic importance of plants, relatively few plant species have been sequenced. Only the genome sequence of plants with relatively small genomes, most of them angiosperms, in particular eudicots, has been determined. The arrival of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed the rapid and efficient development of new genomic resources for non-model or orphan plant species. But the sequencing pace of plants is far from that of animals and microorganisms. This review focuses on the typical challenges of plant genomes that can explain why plant genomics is less developed than animal genomics. Explanations about the impact of some confounding factors emerging from the nature of plant genomes are given. As a result of these challenges and confounding factors, the correct assembly and annotation of plant genomes is hindered, genome drafts are produced, and advances in plant genomics are delayed. PMID:24832233

  17. Functional genomics of tomato in a post-genome-sequencing phase

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Koh; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Igarashi, Kaori; Yano, Kentaro; Nagasaki, Hideki; Kaminuma, Eli; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Completion of tomato genome sequencing project has broad impacts on genetic and genomic studies of tomato and Solanaceae plants. The reference genome sequence derived from Solanum lycopersicum cv ‘Heinz 1706’ serves as the firm basis for sequencing-based approaches to tomato genomics. In this article, we first present a brief summary of the genome sequencing project and a summary of the reference genome sequence. We then focus on recent progress in transcriptome sequencing and small RNA sequencing and show how the reference genome sequence makes these analyses more comprehensive than before. We discuss the potential of in-depth analysis that is based on DNA methylome sequencing and transcription start-site detection. Finally, we describe the current status of efforts to resequence S. lycopersicum cultivars to demonstrate how resequencing can allow the use of intraspecific genomic diversity for detailed phenotyping and breeding. PMID:23641177

  18. Supervised Learning for Detection of Duplicates in Genomic Sequence Databases

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Justin; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Verspoor, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Motivation First identified as an issue in 1996, duplication in biological databases introduces redundancy and even leads to inconsistency when contradictory information appears. The amount of data makes purely manual de-duplication impractical, and existing automatic systems cannot detect duplicates as precisely as can experts. Supervised learning has the potential to address such problems by building automatic systems that learn from expert curation to detect duplicates precisely and efficiently. While machine learning is a mature approach in other duplicate detection contexts, it has seen only preliminary application in genomic sequence databases. Results We developed and evaluated a supervised duplicate detection method based on an expert curated dataset of duplicates, containing over one million pairs across five organisms derived from genomic sequence databases. We selected 22 features to represent distinct attributes of the database records, and developed a binary model and a multi-class model. Both models achieve promising performance; under cross-validation, the binary model had over 90% accuracy in each of the five organisms, while the multi-class model maintains high accuracy and is more robust in generalisation. We performed an ablation study to quantify the impact of different sequence record features, finding that features derived from meta-data, sequence identity, and alignment quality impact performance most strongly. The study demonstrates machine learning can be an effective additional tool for de-duplication of genomic sequence databases. All Data are available as described in the supplementary material. PMID:27489953

  19. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Nectogale elegans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Yan, Chaochao; Tan, Zheng; Tu, Feiyun; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2014-08-01

    The elegant water shrew (Nectogale elegans) belongs to the family Soricidae, and distributes in northern South Asia, central and southern China and northern Southeast Asia. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of N. elegans was sequenced. It was determined to be 17,460 bases, and included 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and one non-coding region, which is similar to other mammalian mitochondrial genomes. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods were used to construct phylogenetic trees based on 12 heavy-strand concatenated PCGs. Phylogenetic analyses further confirmed that Crocidurinae diverged prior to Soricinae, and Sorex unguiculatus differentiated earlier than N. elegans.

  1. The complete genome of an individual by massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David A; Srinivasan, Maithreyan; Egholm, Michael; Shen, Yufeng; Chen, Lei; McGuire, Amy; He, Wen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Makhijani, Vinod; Roth, G Thomas; Gomes, Xavier; Tartaro, Karrie; Niazi, Faheem; Turcotte, Cynthia L; Irzyk, Gerard P; Lupski, James R; Chinault, Craig; Song, Xing-zhi; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Ye; Nazareth, Lynne; Qin, Xiang; Muzny, Donna M; Margulies, Marcel; Weinstock, George M; Gibbs, Richard A; Rothberg, Jonathan M

    2008-04-17

    The association of genetic variation with disease and drug response, and improvements in nucleic acid technologies, have given great optimism for the impact of 'genomic medicine'. However, the formidable size of the diploid human genome, approximately 6 gigabases, has prevented the routine application of sequencing methods to deciphering complete individual human genomes. To realize the full potential of genomics for human health, this limitation must be overcome. Here we report the DNA sequence of a diploid genome of a single individual, James D. Watson, sequenced to 7.4-fold redundancy in two months using massively parallel sequencing in picolitre-size reaction vessels. This sequence was completed in two months at approximately one-hundredth of the cost of traditional capillary electrophoresis methods. Comparison of the sequence to the reference genome led to the identification of 3.3 million single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which 10,654 cause amino-acid substitution within the coding sequence. In addition, we accurately identified small-scale (2-40,000 base pair (bp)) insertion and deletion polymorphism as well as copy number variation resulting in the large-scale gain and loss of chromosomal segments ranging from 26,000 to 1.5 million base pairs. Overall, these results agree well with recent results of sequencing of a single individual by traditional methods. However, in addition to being faster and significantly less expensive, this sequencing technology avoids the arbitrary loss of genomic sequences inherent in random shotgun sequencing by bacterial cloning because it amplifies DNA in a cell-free system. As a result, we further demonstrate the acquisition of novel human sequence, including novel genes not previously identified by traditional genomic sequencing. This is the first genome sequenced by next-generation technologies. Therefore it is a pilot for the future challenges of 'personalized genome sequencing'. PMID:18421352

  2. The complete genome of an individual by massively parallel DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David A; Srinivasan, Maithreyan; Egholm, Michael; Shen, Yufeng; Chen, Lei; McGuire, Amy; He, Wen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Makhijani, Vinod; Roth, G Thomas; Gomes, Xavier; Tartaro, Karrie; Niazi, Faheem; Turcotte, Cynthia L; Irzyk, Gerard P; Lupski, James R; Chinault, Craig; Song, Xing-zhi; Liu, Yue; Yuan, Ye; Nazareth, Lynne; Qin, Xiang; Muzny, Donna M; Margulies, Marcel; Weinstock, George M; Gibbs, Richard A; Rothberg, Jonathan M

    2008-04-17

    The association of genetic variation with disease and drug response, and improvements in nucleic acid technologies, have given great optimism for the impact of 'genomic medicine'. However, the formidable size of the diploid human genome, approximately 6 gigabases, has prevented the routine application of sequencing methods to deciphering complete individual human genomes. To realize the full potential of genomics for human health, this limitation must be overcome. Here we report the DNA sequence of a diploid genome of a single individual, James D. Watson, sequenced to 7.4-fold redundancy in two months using massively parallel sequencing in picolitre-size reaction vessels. This sequence was completed in two months at approximately one-hundredth of the cost of traditional capillary electrophoresis methods. Comparison of the sequence to the reference genome led to the identification of 3.3 million single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which 10,654 cause amino-acid substitution within the coding sequence. In addition, we accurately identified small-scale (2-40,000 base pair (bp)) insertion and deletion polymorphism as well as copy number variation resulting in the large-scale gain and loss of chromosomal segments ranging from 26,000 to 1.5 million base pairs. Overall, these results agree well with recent results of sequencing of a single individual by traditional methods. However, in addition to being faster and significantly less expensive, this sequencing technology avoids the arbitrary loss of genomic sequences inherent in random shotgun sequencing by bacterial cloning because it amplifies DNA in a cell-free system. As a result, we further demonstrate the acquisition of novel human sequence, including novel genes not previously identified by traditional genomic sequencing. This is the first genome sequenced by next-generation technologies. Therefore it is a pilot for the future challenges of 'personalized genome sequencing'.

  3. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis LD61

    PubMed Central

    Falentin, Hélène; Naquin, Delphine; Loux, Valentin; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Loubière, Pascal; Nouaille, Sébastien; Lavenier, Dominique; Le Bourgeois, Pascal; François, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hernandez, David; Even, Sergine

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is widely used in the dairy industry. We report the draft genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis LD61, an industrial and extensively studied strain. In contrast to the closely related and plasmidless strain IL1403, LD61 contains 6 plasmids, and the genome sequence provides additional information related to adaptation to the dairy environment. PMID:24435871

  4. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F.; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  5. Complete genome sequence of Tomato mosaic virus isolated from jasmine in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was first identified in jasmine in the U.S. in Florida in 1999. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a ToMV isolate from jasmine. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific diagnostic tests for ...

  6. Complete genome sequence of a Tomato mottle mosaic virus isolate from the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) was first identified in the U.S. in tomatoes in Florida in 2010. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a U.S. ToMMV isolate from 2010. The full genome sequence of this emerging virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific ...

  7. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV) was first identified in tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum), a noxious weed, in Florida in 2002. This report provides the first full genome sequence of TSAMV. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional spec...

  8. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    SciTech Connect

    Waterston, Robert H.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birney, Ewan; Rogers, Jane; Abril, Josep F.; Agarwal, Pankaj; Agarwala, Richa; Ainscough, Rachel; Alexandersson, Marina; An, Peter; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Attwood, John; Baertsch, Robert; Bailey, Jonathon; Barlow, Karen; Beck, Stephan; Berry, Eric; Birren, Bruce; Bloom, Toby; Bork, Peer; Botcherby, Marc; Bray, Nicolas; Brent, Michael R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Brown, Stephen D.; Bult, Carol; Burton, John; Butler, Jonathan; Campbell, Robert D.; Carninci, Piero; Cawley, Simon; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Church, Deanna M.; Clamp, Michele; Clee, Christopher; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, Lisa L.; Copley, Richard R.; Coulson, Alan; Couronne, Olivier; Cuff, James; Curwen, Val; Cutts, Tim; Daly, Mark; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Delehaunty, Kimberly D.; Deri, Justin; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dewey, Colin; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Diekhans, Mark; Dodge, Sheila; Dubchak, Inna; Dunn, Diane M.; Eddy, Sean R.; Elnitski, Laura; Emes, Richard D.; Eswara, Pallavi; Eyras, Eduardo; Felsenfeld, Adam; Fewell, Ginger A.; Flicek, Paul; Foley, Karen; Frankel, Wayne N.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Furey, Terrence S.; Gage, Diane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glusman, Gustavo; Gnerre, Sante; Goldman, Nick; Goodstadt, Leo; Grafham, Darren; Graves, Tina A.; Green, Eric D.; Gregory, Simon; Guigo, Roderic; Guyer, Mark; Hardison, Ross C.; Haussler, David; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hinrichs, Angela; Hlavina, Wratko; Holzer, Timothy; Hsu, Fan; Hua, Axin; Hubbard, Tim; Hunt, Adrienne; Jackson, Ian; Jaffe, David B.; Johnson, L. Steven; Jones, Matthew; Jones, Thomas A.; Joy, Ann; Kamal, Michael; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Karolchik, Donna; Kasprzyk, Arkadiusz; Kawai, Jun; Keibler, Evan; Kells, Cristyn; Kent, W. James; Kirby, Andrew; Kolbe, Diana L.; Korf, Ian; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Kulbokas III, Edward J.; Kulp, David; Landers, Tom; Leger, J.P.; Leonard, Steven; Letunic, Ivica; Levine, Rosie; et al.

    2002-12-15

    The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome and a key experimental tool for biomedical research. Here, we report the results of an international collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the two sequences. We discuss topics including the analysis of the evolutionary forces shaping the size, structure and sequence of the genomes; the conservation of large-scale synteny across most of the genomes; the much lower extent of sequence orthology covering less than half of the genomes; the proportions of the genomes under selection; the number of protein-coding genes; the expansion of gene families related to reproduction and immunity; the evolution of proteins; and the identification of intraspecies polymorphism.

  9. First Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus condimenti F-2T

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Beiwen; Hu, Xinjun; Jiang, Xiawei; Li, Ang; Yao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the draft genome sequence of S. condimenti strain F-2T (DSM 11674), a potential starter culture. The genome assembly comprised 2,616,174 bp with 34.6% GC content. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation that reports the whole-genome sequence of S. condimenti. PMID:27257207

  10. Genome sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International aphid genome consortium, IAGC, herein presents the 464 Mb draft genome assembly sequence of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This is the first published whole genome sequence from the diverse assemblage of hemimetabolous insects, providing an outgroup to the multiple published g...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Fungus Trametes hirsuta 072

    PubMed Central

    Tyazhelova, Tatiana V.; Moiseenko, Konstantin V.; Vasina, Daria V.; Mosunova, Olga V.; Fedorova, Tatiana V.; Maloshenok, Lilya G.; Landesman, Elena O.; Bruskin, Sergei A.; Psurtseva, Nadezhda V.; Slesarev, Alexei I.; Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Koroleva, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    A standard draft genome sequence of the white rot saprotrophic fungus Trametes hirsuta 072 (Basidiomycota, Polyporales) is presented. The genome sequence contains about 33.6 Mb assembled in 141 scaffolds with a G+C content of ~57.6%. The draft genome annotation predicts 14,598 putative protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs). PMID:26586872

  12. Best Practices in Insect Genome Sequencing: What Works and What Doesn’t

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Shwetha C.

    2015-01-01

    The last decade of decreasing DNA sequencing costs and proliferating sequencing services in core labs and companies has brought the de-novo genome sequencing and assembly of insect species within reach for many entomologists. However, sequence production alone is not enough to generate a high quality reference genome, and in many cases, poor planning can lead to extremely fragmented genome assemblies preventing high quality gene annotation and other desired analyses. Insect genomes can be problematic to assemble, due to combinations of high polymorphism, inability to breed for genome homozygocity, and small physical sizes limiting the quantity of DNA able to be isolated from a single individual. Recent advances in sequencing technology and assembly strategies are enabling a revolution for insect genome reference sequencing and assembly. Here we review historical and new genome sequencing and assembly strategies, with a particular focus on their application to arthropod genomes. We highlight both the need to design sequencing strategies for the requirements of the assembly software, and new long-read technologies that are enabling a return to traditional assembly approaches. Finally, we compare and contrast very cost effective short read draft genome strategies with the long read approaches that although entailing additional cost, bring a higher likelihood of success and the possibility of archival assembly qualities approaching that of finished genomes. PMID:26085980

  13. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS < 1) and that it is also able to predict tandem duplications involving non coding elements such as pseudo-genes or RNA genes. Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations. PMID:22568762

  14. Genomic Sequence Comparisons, 1987-2003 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Church

    2004-07-29

    This project was to develop new DNA sequencing and RNA and protein quantitation methods and related genome annotation tools. The project began in 1987 with the development of multiplex sequencing (published in Science in 1988), and one of the first automated sequencing methods. This lead to the first commercial genome sequence in 1994 and to the establishment of the main commercial participants (GTC then Agencourt) in the public DOE/NIH genome project. In collaboration with GTC we contributed to one of the first complete DOE genome sequences, in 1997, that of Methanobacterium thermoautotropicum, a species of great relevance to energy-rich gas production.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Barry, Kerrie; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J. Chris; Bruce, David; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, P M; Whitman, W. B.; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  17. What’s in the genome of a filamentous fungus? Analysis of the Neurospora genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Montrone, Corinna; Haase, Dirk; Mewes, H. Werner; Aign, Verena; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Fartmann, Berthold; Nyakatura, Gerald; Kempken, Frank; Maier, Josef; Schulte, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The German Neurospora Genome Project has assembled sequences from ordered cosmid and BAC clones of linkage groups II and V of the genome of Neurospora crassa in 13 and 12 contigs, respectively. Including additional sequences located on other linkage groups a total of 12 Mb were subjected to a manual gene extraction and annotation process. The genome comprises a small number of repetitive elements, a low degree of segmental duplications and very few paralogous genes. The analysis of the 3218 identified open reading frames provides a first overview of the protein equipment of a filamentous fungus. Significantly, N.crassa possesses a large variety of metabolic enzymes including a substantial number of enzymes involved in the degradation of complex substrates as well as secondary metabolism. While several of these enzymes are specific for filamentous fungi many are shared exclusively with prokaryotes. PMID:12655011

  18. Prenatal Diagnosis Innovation: Genome Sequencing of Maternal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Felix C K; Lo, Y M Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is accomplished by analysis of circulating cell-free fetal nucleic acids in maternal plasma. The advent of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has enabled NIPT of chromosomal aneuploidies with unprecedented robustness, and these tests are now widely available for clinical use. Moreover, MPS-based NIPT of subchromosomal deletions/duplications and single-gene disorders has also been achieved, and the number of applications is growing. In addition to specific fetal genetic disorders, the whole fetal genome, transcriptome, and methylome have been revealed by deep sequencing of maternal plasma. The analysis of the fetal transcriptome and methylome may yield valuable information on fetal and maternal health. With continued improvement in sequencing technology and reduction in sequencing costs, the analysis of cell-free nucleic acids would play an increasingly important role in prenatal screening, diagnosis, monitoring, and risk stratification of fetal as well as maternal conditions. PMID:26473414

  19. Whole-genome sequence-based analysis of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter N; Porcu, Eleonora; Chew, Shelby; Campbell, Purdey J; Traglia, Michela; Brown, Suzanne J; Mullin, Benjamin H; Shihab, Hashem A; Min, Josine; Walter, Klaudia; Memari, Yasin; Huang, Jie; Barnes, Michael R; Beilby, John P; Charoen, Pimphen; Danecek, Petr; Dudbridge, Frank; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Greenwood, Celia; Grundberg, Elin; Johnson, Andrew D; Hui, Jennie; Lim, Ee M; McCarthy, Shane; Muddyman, Dawn; Panicker, Vijay; Perry, John R B; Bell, Jordana T; Yuan, Wei; Relton, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Goncalo; Cucca, Francesco; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Woltersdorf, Wolfram; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Toniolo, Daniela; Dayan, Colin M; Naitza, Silvia; Walsh, John P; Spector, Tim; Davey Smith, George; Durbin, Richard; Richards, J Brent; Sanna, Serena; Soranzo, Nicole; Timpson, Nicholas J; Wilson, Scott G

    2015-01-01

    Normal thyroid function is essential for health, but its genetic architecture remains poorly understood. Here, for the heritable thyroid traits thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4), we analyse whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K project (N=2,287). Using additional whole-genome sequence and deeply imputed data sets, we report meta-analysis results for common variants (MAF≥1%) associated with TSH and FT4 (N=16,335). For TSH, we identify a novel variant in SYN2 (MAF=23.5%, P=6.15 × 10(-9)) and a new independent variant in PDE8B (MAF=10.4%, P=5.94 × 10(-14)). For FT4, we report a low-frequency variant near B4GALT6/SLC25A52 (MAF=3.2%, P=1.27 × 10(-9)) tagging a rare TTR variant (MAF=0.4%, P=2.14 × 10(-11)). All common variants explain ≥20% of the variance in TSH and FT4. Analysis of rare variants (MAF<1%) using sequence kernel association testing reveals a novel association with FT4 in NRG1. Our results demonstrate that increased coverage in whole-genome sequence association studies identifies novel variants associated with thyroid function. PMID:25743335

  20. Whole-genome sequence-based analysis of thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter N; Porcu, Eleonora; Chew, Shelby; Campbell, Purdey J; Traglia, Michela; Brown, Suzanne J; Mullin, Benjamin H; Shihab, Hashem A; Min, Josine; Walter, Klaudia; Memari, Yasin; Huang, Jie; Barnes, Michael R; Beilby, John P; Charoen, Pimphen; Danecek, Petr; Dudbridge, Frank; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Greenwood, Celia; Grundberg, Elin; Johnson, Andrew D; Hui, Jennie; Lim, Ee M; McCarthy, Shane; Muddyman, Dawn; Panicker, Vijay; Perry, John R B; Bell, Jordana T; Yuan, Wei; Relton, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Goncalo; Cucca, Francesco; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Woltersdorf, Wolfram; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Toniolo, Daniela; Dayan, Colin M; Naitza, Silvia; Walsh, John P; Spector, Tim; Davey Smith, George; Durbin, Richard; Richards, J Brent; Sanna, Serena; Soranzo, Nicole; Timpson, Nicholas J; Wilson, Scott G

    2015-03-06

    Normal thyroid function is essential for health, but its genetic architecture remains poorly understood. Here, for the heritable thyroid traits thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4), we analyse whole-genome sequence data from the UK10K project (N=2,287). Using additional whole-genome sequence and deeply imputed data sets, we report meta-analysis results for common variants (MAF≥1%) associated with TSH and FT4 (N=16,335). For TSH, we identify a novel variant in SYN2 (MAF=23.5%, P=6.15 × 10(-9)) and a new independent variant in PDE8B (MAF=10.4%, P=5.94 × 10(-14)). For FT4, we report a low-frequency variant near B4GALT6/SLC25A52 (MAF=3.2%, P=1.27 × 10(-9)) tagging a rare TTR variant (MAF=0.4%, P=2.14 × 10(-11)). All common variants explain ≥20% of the variance in TSH and FT4. Analysis of rare variants (MAF<1%) using sequence kernel association testing reveals a novel association with FT4 in NRG1. Our results demonstrate that increased coverage in whole-genome sequence association studies identifies novel variants associated with thyroid function.

  1. Rapid whole genome sequencing and precision neonatology.

    PubMed

    Petrikin, Joshua E; Willig, Laurel K; Smith, Laurie D; Kingsmore, Stephen F

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, genetic testing has been too slow or perceived to be impractical to initial management of the critically ill neonate. Technological advances have led to the ability to sequence and interpret the entire genome of a neonate in as little as 26 h. As the cost and speed of testing decreases, the utility of whole genome sequencing (WGS) of neonates for acute and latent genetic illness increases. Analyzing the entire genome allows for concomitant evaluation of the currently identified 5588 single gene diseases. When applied to a select population of ill infants in a level IV neonatal intensive care unit, WGS yielded a diagnosis of a causative genetic disease in 57% of patients. These diagnoses may lead to clinical management changes ranging from transition to palliative care for uniformly lethal conditions for alteration or initiation of medical or surgical therapy to improve outcomes in others. Thus, institution of 2-day WGS at time of acute presentation opens the possibility of early implementation of precision medicine. This implementation may create opportunities for early interventional, frequently novel or off-label therapies that may alter disease trajectory in infants with what would otherwise be fatal disease. Widespread deployment of rapid WGS and precision medicine will raise ethical issues pertaining to interpretation of variants of unknown significance, discovery of incidental findings related to adult onset conditions and carrier status, and implementation of medical therapies for which little is known in terms of risks and benefits. Despite these challenges, precision neonatology has significant potential both to decrease infant mortality related to genetic diseases with onset in newborns and to facilitate parental decision making regarding transition to palliative care.

  2. Rapid whole genome sequencing and precision neonatology.

    PubMed

    Petrikin, Joshua E; Willig, Laurel K; Smith, Laurie D; Kingsmore, Stephen F

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, genetic testing has been too slow or perceived to be impractical to initial management of the critically ill neonate. Technological advances have led to the ability to sequence and interpret the entire genome of a neonate in as little as 26 h. As the cost and speed of testing decreases, the utility of whole genome sequencing (WGS) of neonates for acute and latent genetic illness increases. Analyzing the entire genome allows for concomitant evaluation of the currently identified 5588 single gene diseases. When applied to a select population of ill infants in a level IV neonatal intensive care unit, WGS yielded a diagnosis of a causative genetic disease in 57% of patients. These diagnoses may lead to clinical management changes ranging from transition to palliative care for uniformly lethal conditions for alteration or initiation of medical or surgical therapy to improve outcomes in others. Thus, institution of 2-day WGS at time of acute presentation opens the possibility of early implementation of precision medicine. This implementation may create opportunities for early interventional, frequently novel or off-label therapies that may alter disease trajectory in infants with what would otherwise be fatal disease. Widespread deployment of rapid WGS and precision medicine will raise ethical issues pertaining to interpretation of variants of unknown significance, discovery of incidental findings related to adult onset conditions and carrier status, and implementation of medical therapies for which little is known in terms of risks and benefits. Despite these challenges, precision neonatology has significant potential both to decrease infant mortality related to genetic diseases with onset in newborns and to facilitate parental decision making regarding transition to palliative care. PMID:26521050

  3. Complete Genomic Sequence of Duck Flavivirus from China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Liu, Chunguo; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaojun; Yin, Xiuchen; Chen, Yuhuan

    2012-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence of the Chinese duck flavivirus TA strain. This work is the first to document the complete genomic sequence of this previously unknown duck flavivirus strain. The sequence will help further relevant epidemiological studies and extend our general knowledge of flaviviruses. PMID:22354941

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Lunyo.

    PubMed

    Lumley, Sarah; Horton, Daniel L; Marston, Denise A; Johnson, Nicholas; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2016-04-14

    Using next-generation sequencing technologies, the first complete genome sequence of Rift Valley fever virus strain Lunyo is reported here. Originally reported as an attenuated antigenic variant strain from Uganda, genomic sequence analysis shows that Lunyo clusters together with other Ugandan isolates.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Lunyo

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Daniel L.; Marston, Denise A.; Johnson, Nicholas; Ellis, Richard J.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Using next-generation sequencing technologies, the first complete genome sequence of Rift Valley fever virus strain Lunyo is reported here. Originally reported as an attenuated antigenic variant strain from Uganda, genomic sequence analysis shows that Lunyo clusters together with other Ugandan isolates. PMID:27081121

  6. First Complete Genome Sequence of Cherry virus A

    PubMed Central

    Koinuma, Hiroaki; Nijo, Takamichi; Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Keima, Takuya; Okano, Yukari; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The 5′-terminal genomic sequence of Cherry virus A (CVA) has long been unknown. We determined the first complete genome sequence of an apricot isolate of CVA (7,434 nucleotides [nt]). The 5′-untranslated region was 107 nt in length, which was 53 nt longer than those of known CVA sequences. PMID:27284130

  7. Genome Sequence of Stachybotrys chartarum Strain 51-11.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Doris A; Dean, Timothy R; Kim, Jean; Levy, Josh

    2015-01-01

    The Stachybotrys chartarum strain 51-11 genome was sequenced by shotgun sequencing utilizing Illumina HiSeq 2000 and PacBio technologies. Since S. chartarum has been implicated as having health impacts within water-damaged buildings, any information extracted from the genomic sequence data relating to toxins or the metabolism of the fungus might be useful.

  8. Next Generation Sequencing at the University of Chicago Genomics Core

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Pieter

    2013-04-24

    The University of Chicago Genomics Core provides University of Chicago investigators (and external clients) access to State-of-the-Art genomics capabilities: next generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing / genotyping and micro-arrays (gene expression, genotyping, and methylation). The current presentation will highlight our capabilities in the area of ultra-high throughput sequencing analysis.

  9. First Complete Genome Sequence of Cherry virus A.

    PubMed

    Koinuma, Hiroaki; Nijo, Takamichi; Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Keima, Takuya; Okano, Yukari; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    The 5'-terminal genomic sequence of Cherry virus A (CVA) has long been unknown. We determined the first complete genome sequence of an apricot isolate of CVA (7,434 nucleotides [nt]). The 5'-untranslated region was 107 nt in length, which was 53 nt longer than those of known CVA sequences. PMID:27284130

  10. Current challenges in de novo plant genome sequencing and assembly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing is now affordable, but assembling plant genomes de novo remains challenging. We assess the state of the art of assembly and review the best practices for the community. PMID:22546054

  11. Complete genome sequence of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum type strain (11018T)

    SciTech Connect

    Yasawong, Montri; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Vulcanisaeta distributa Itoh et al. 2002 belongs to the family Thermoproteaceae in the phylum Crenarchaeota. The genus Vulcanisaeta is characterized by a global distribution in hot and acidic springs. This is the first genome sequence from a member of the genus Vulcanisaeta and seventh genome sequence in the family Thermoproteaceae. The 2,374,137 bp long genome with its 2,544 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Klebsiella variicola Plant Isolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Barrios, Humberto; Rodríguez-Medina, Nadia; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa Elena; Garza-Ramos, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    Three endophytic Klebsiella variicola isolates-T29A, 3, and 6A2, obtained from sugar cane stem, maize shoots, and banana leaves, respectively-were used for whole-genome sequencing. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of circular chromosomes and plasmids. The genomes contain plant colonization and cellulases genes. This study will help toward understanding the genomic basis of K. variicola interaction with plant hosts. PMID:26358599

  13. Integration of new alternative reference strain genome sequences into the Saccharomyces genome database

    PubMed Central

    Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dalusag, Kyla; Demeter, Janos; Engel, Stacia; Hellerstedt, Sage T.; Karra, Kalpana; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Nash, Robert S.; Paskov, Kelley; Sheppard, Travis; Skrzypek, Marek; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith; Michael Cherry, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. To provide a wider scope of genetic and phenotypic variation in yeast, the genome sequences and their corresponding annotations from 11 alternative S. cerevisiae reference strains have been integrated into SGD. Genomic and protein sequence information for genes from these strains are now available on the Sequence and Protein tab of the corresponding Locus Summary pages. We illustrate how these genome sequences can be utilized to aid our understanding of strain-specific functional and phenotypic differences. Database URL: www.yeastgenome.org PMID:27252399

  14. Genome Analysis of the Domestic Dog (Korean Jindo) by Massively Parallel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Dae-Soo; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Yoon, Byoung-Ha; Kang, Aram; Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Jong-Joo; Ha, Ji-Hong; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kim, Aeri; Kim, Min-Young; Park, Kun-Hyang; Lee, Kang Seon; Park, Hong-Seog

    2012-01-01

    Although pioneering sequencing projects have shed light on the boxer and poodle genomes, a number of challenges need to be met before the sequencing and annotation of the dog genome can be considered complete. Here, we present the DNA sequence of the Jindo dog genome, sequenced to 45-fold average coverage using Illumina massively parallel sequencing technology. A comparison of the sequence to the reference boxer genome led to the identification of 4 675 437 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, including 3 346 058 novel SNPs), 71 642 indels and 8131 structural variations. Of these, 339 non-synonymous SNPs and 3 indels are located within coding sequences (CDS). In particular, 3 non-synonymous SNPs and a 26-bp deletion occur in the TCOF1 locus, implying that the difference observed in cranial facial morphology between Jindo and boxer dogs might be influenced by those variations. Through the annotation of the Jindo olfactory receptor gene family, we found 2 unique olfactory receptor genes and 236 olfactory receptor genes harbouring non-synonymous homozygous SNPs that are likely to affect smelling capability. In addition, we determined the DNA sequence of the Jindo dog mitochondrial genome and identified Jindo dog-specific mtDNA genotypes. This Jindo genome data upgrade our understanding of dog genomic architecture and will be a very valuable resource for investigating not only dog genetics and genomics but also human and dog disease genetics and comparative genomics. PMID:22474061

  15. Genome analysis of the domestic dog (Korean Jindo) by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Dae-Soo; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Yoon, Byoung-Ha; Kang, Aram; Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Jong-Joo; Ha, Ji-Hong; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kim, Aeri; Kim, Min-Young; Park, Kun-Hyang; Lee, Kang Seon; Park, Hong-Seog

    2012-06-01

    Although pioneering sequencing projects have shed light on the boxer and poodle genomes, a number of challenges need to be met before the sequencing and annotation of the dog genome can be considered complete. Here, we present the DNA sequence of the Jindo dog genome, sequenced to 45-fold average coverage using Illumina massively parallel sequencing technology. A comparison of the sequence to the reference boxer genome led to the identification of 4 675 437 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, including 3 346 058 novel SNPs), 71 642 indels and 8131 structural variations. Of these, 339 non-synonymous SNPs and 3 indels are located within coding sequences (CDS). In particular, 3 non-synonymous SNPs and a 26-bp deletion occur in the TCOF1 locus, implying that the difference observed in cranial facial morphology between Jindo and boxer dogs might be influenced by those variations. Through the annotation of the Jindo olfactory receptor gene family, we found 2 unique olfactory receptor genes and 236 olfactory receptor genes harbouring non-synonymous homozygous SNPs that are likely to affect smelling capability. In addition, we determined the DNA sequence of the Jindo dog mitochondrial genome and identified Jindo dog-specific mtDNA genotypes. This Jindo genome data upgrade our understanding of dog genomic architecture and will be a very valuable resource for investigating not only dog genetics and genomics but also human and dog disease genetics and comparative genomics.

  16. Comparative DNA Sequence Analysis of Wheat and Rice Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sorrells, Mark E.; La Rota, Mauricio; Bermudez-Kandianis, Catherine E.; Greene, Robert A.; Kantety, Ramesh; Munkvold, Jesse D.; Miftahudin; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Ma, Xuefeng; Gustafson, Perry J.; Qi, Lili L.; Echalier, Benjamin; Gill, Bikram S.; Matthews, David E.; Lazo, Gerard R.; Chao, Shiaoman; Anderson, Olin D.; Edwards, Hugh; Linkiewicz, Anna M.; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Akhunov, Eduard D.; Dvorak, Jan; Zhang, Deshui; Nguyen, Henry T.; Peng, Junhua; Lapitan, Nora L.V.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Jose L.; Anderson, James A.; Hossain, Khwaja; Kalavacharla, Venu; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Choi, Dong-Woog; Close, Timothy J.; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Gill, Kulvinder S.; Steber, Camille; Walker-Simmons, Mary K.; McGuire, Patrick E.; Qualset, Calvin O.

    2003-01-01

    The use of DNA sequence-based comparative genomics for evolutionary studies and for transferring information from model species to crop species has revolutionized molecular genetics and crop improvement strategies. This study compared 4485 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that were physically mapped in wheat chromosome bins, to the public rice genome sequence data from 2251 ordered BAC/PAC clones using BLAST. A rice genome view of homologous wheat genome locations based on comparative sequence analysis revealed numerous chromosomal rearrangements that will significantly complicate the use of rice as a model for cross-species transfer of information in nonconserved regions. PMID:12902377

  17. Whole-genome sequencing and intensive analysis of the undomesticated soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. and Zucc.) genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Sunghoon; Van, Kyujung; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Jeong, Soon-Chun; Choi, Ik-Young; Kim, Dae-Soo; Lee, Yong-Seok; Park, Daeui; Ma, Jianxin; Kim, Woo-Yeon; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Kyung-A; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Kil Hyun; Shin, Jin Hee; Jang, Young Eun; Kim, Kyung Do; Liu, Wei Xian; Chaisan, Tanapon; Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Yeong-Ho; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A; Bhak, Jong; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2010-12-21

    The genome of soybean (Glycine max), a commercially important crop, has recently been sequenced and is one of six crop species to have been sequenced. Here we report the genome sequence of G. soja, the undomesticated ancestor of G. max (in particular, G. soja var. IT182932). The 48.8-Gb Illumina Genome Analyzer (Illumina-GA) short DNA reads were aligned to the G. max reference genome and a consensus was determined for G. soja. This consensus sequence spanned 915.4 Mb, representing a coverage of 97.65% of the G. max published genome sequence and an average mapping depth of 43-fold. The nucleotide sequence of the G. soja genome, which contains 2.5 Mb of substituted bases and 406 kb of small insertions/deletions relative to G. max, is ∼0.31% different from that of G. max. In addition to the mapped 915.4-Mb consensus sequence, 32.4 Mb of large deletions and 8.3 Mb of novel sequence contigs in the G. soja genome were also detected. Nucleotide variants of G. soja versus G. max confirmed by Roche Genome Sequencer FLX sequencing showed a 99.99% concordance in single-nucleotide polymorphism and a 98.82% agreement in insertion/deletion calls on Illumina-GA reads. Data presented in this study suggest that the G. soja/G. max complex may be at least 0.27 million y old, appearing before the relatively recent event of domestication (6,000∼9,000 y ago). This suggests that soybean domestication is complicated and that more in-depth study of population genetics is needed. In any case, genome comparison of domesticated and undomesticated forms of soybean can facilitate its improvement.

  18. Genomic Resources for Water Yam (Dioscorea alata L.): Analyses of EST-Sequences, De Novo Sequencing and GBS Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Saski, Christopher A.; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Scheffler, Brian E.; Asiedu, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The reducing cost and rapid progress in next-generation sequencing techniques coupled with high performance computational approaches have resulted in large-scale discovery of advanced genomic resources in several model and non-model plant species. Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is a major food and cash crop in many countries but research efforts have been limited to understand the genetics and generate genomic information for the crop. The availability of a large number of genomic resources including genome-wide molecular markers will accelerate the breeding efforts and application of genomic selection in yams. In the present study, several methods including expressed sequence tags (EST)-sequencing, de novo sequencing, and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) profiles on two yam (Dioscorea alata L.) genotypes (TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310) was performed to generate genomic resources for use in its improvement programs. This includes a comprehensive set of EST-SSRs, genomic SSRs, whole genome SNPs, and reduced representation SNPs. A total of 1,152 EST-SSRs were developed from >40,000 EST-sequences generated from the two genotypes. A set of 388 EST-SSRs were validated as polymorphic showing a polymorphism rate of 34% when tested on two diverse parents targeted for anthracnose disease. In addition, approximately 40X de novo whole genome sequence coverage was generated for each of the two genotypes, and a total of 18,584 and 15,952 genomic SSRs were identified for TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310, respectively. A custom made pipeline resulted in the selection of 573 genomic SSRs common across the two genotypes, of which only eight failed, 478 being polymorphic and 62 monomorphic indicating a polymorphic rate of 83.5%. Additionally, 288,505 high quality SNPs were also identified between these two genotypes. Genotyping by sequencing reads on these two genotypes also revealed 36,790 overlapping SNP positions that are distributed throughout the genome. Our efforts in using different approaches

  19. Genomic Resources for Water Yam (Dioscorea alata L.): Analyses of EST-Sequences, De Novo Sequencing and GBS Libraries.

    PubMed

    Saski, Christopher A; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Scheffler, Brian E; Asiedu, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The reducing cost and rapid progress in next-generation sequencing techniques coupled with high performance computational approaches have resulted in large-scale discovery of advanced genomic resources in several model and non-model plant species. Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is a major food and cash crop in many countries but research efforts have been limited to understand the genetics and generate genomic information for the crop. The availability of a large number of genomic resources including genome-wide molecular markers will accelerate the breeding efforts and application of genomic selection in yams. In the present study, several methods including expressed sequence tags (EST)-sequencing, de novo sequencing, and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) profiles on two yam (Dioscorea alata L.) genotypes (TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310) was performed to generate genomic resources for use in its improvement programs. This includes a comprehensive set of EST-SSRs, genomic SSRs, whole genome SNPs, and reduced representation SNPs. A total of 1,152 EST-SSRs were developed from >40,000 EST-sequences generated from the two genotypes. A set of 388 EST-SSRs were validated as polymorphic showing a polymorphism rate of 34% when tested on two diverse parents targeted for anthracnose disease. In addition, approximately 40X de novo whole genome sequence coverage was generated for each of the two genotypes, and a total of 18,584 and 15,952 genomic SSRs were identified for TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310, respectively. A custom made pipeline resulted in the selection of 573 genomic SSRs common across the two genotypes, of which only eight failed, 478 being polymorphic and 62 monomorphic indicating a polymorphic rate of 83.5%. Additionally, 288,505 high quality SNPs were also identified between these two genotypes. Genotyping by sequencing reads on these two genotypes also revealed 36,790 overlapping SNP positions that are distributed throughout the genome. Our efforts in using different approaches

  20. Genomic Resources for Water Yam (Dioscorea alata L.): Analyses of EST-Sequences, De Novo Sequencing and GBS Libraries.

    PubMed

    Saski, Christopher A; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Scheffler, Brian E; Asiedu, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The reducing cost and rapid progress in next-generation sequencing techniques coupled with high performance computational approaches have resulted in large-scale discovery of advanced genomic resources in several model and non-model plant species. Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is a major food and cash crop in many countries but research efforts have been limited to understand the genetics and generate genomic information for the crop. The availability of a large number of genomic resources including genome-wide molecular markers will accelerate the breeding efforts and application of genomic selection in yams. In the present study, several methods including expressed sequence tags (EST)-sequencing, de novo sequencing, and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) profiles on two yam (Dioscorea alata L.) genotypes (TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310) was performed to generate genomic resources for use in its improvement programs. This includes a comprehensive set of EST-SSRs, genomic SSRs, whole genome SNPs, and reduced representation SNPs. A total of 1,152 EST-SSRs were developed from >40,000 EST-sequences generated from the two genotypes. A set of 388 EST-SSRs were validated as polymorphic showing a polymorphism rate of 34% when tested on two diverse parents targeted for anthracnose disease. In addition, approximately 40X de novo whole genome sequence coverage was generated for each of the two genotypes, and a total of 18,584 and 15,952 genomic SSRs were identified for TDa 95/00328 and TDa 95-310, respectively. A custom made pipeline resulted in the selection of 573 genomic SSRs common across the two genotypes, of which only eight failed, 478 being polymorphic and 62 monomorphic indicating a polymorphic rate of 83.5%. Additionally, 288,505 high quality SNPs were also identified between these two genotypes. Genotyping by sequencing reads on these two genotypes also revealed 36,790 overlapping SNP positions that are distributed throughout the genome. Our efforts in using different approaches

  1. Selection to sequence: opportunities in fungal genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.

    2009-12-01

    Selection is a biological force, causing genotypic and phenotypic change over time. Whether environmental or human induced, selective pressures shape the genotypes and the phenotypes of organisms both in nature and in the laboratory. In nature, selective pressure is highly dynamic and the sum of the environment and other organisms. In the laboratory, selection is used in genetic studies and industrial strain development programs to isolate mutants affecting biological processes of interest to researchers. Selective pressures are important considerations for fungal biology. In the laboratory a number of fungi are used as experimental systems to study a wide range of biological processes and in nature fungi are important pathogens of plants and animals and play key roles in carbon and nitrogen cycling. The continued development of high throughput sequencing technologies makes it possible to characterize at the genomic level, the effect of selective pressures both in the lab and in nature for filamentous fungi as well as other organisms.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Borrelia afzelii K78 and Comparative Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Wolfgang; Bunikis, Ignas; Weber-Lehman, Jacqueline; Comstedt, Pär; Kutschan-Bunikis, Sabrina; Stanek, Gerold; Huber, Jutta; Meinke, Andreas; Bergström, Sven; Lundberg, Urban

    2015-01-01

    The main Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe and Asia are Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi and B. bavariensis. This is in contrast to the United States, where infections are exclusively caused by B. burgdorferi. Until to date the genome sequences of four B. afzelii strains, of which only two include the numerous plasmids, are available. In order to further assess the genetic diversity of B. afzelii, the most common species in Europe, responsible for the large variety of clinical manifestations of Lyme borreliosis, we have determined the full genome sequence of the B. afzelii strain K78, a clinical isolate from Austria. The K78 genome contains a linear chromosome (905,949 bp) and 13 plasmids (8 linear and 5 circular) together presenting 1,309 open reading frames of which 496 are located on plasmids. With the exception of lp28-8, all linear replicons in their full length including their telomeres have been sequenced. The comparison with the genomes of the four other B. afzelii strains, ACA-1, PKo, HLJ01 and Tom3107, as well as the one of B. burgdorferi strain B31, confirmed a high degree of conservation within the linear chromosome of B. afzelii, whereas plasmid encoded genes showed a much larger diversity. Since some plasmids present in B. burgdorferi are missing in the B. afzelii genomes, the corresponding virulence factors of B. burgdorferi are found in B. afzelii on other unrelated plasmids. In addition, we have identified a species specific region in the circular plasmid, cp26, which could be used for species determination. Different non-coding RNAs have been located on the B. afzelii K78 genome, which have not previously been annotated in any of the published Borrelia genomes. PMID:25798594

  3. Global Genomic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus 6 Based on 724 Isolates and 190 Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Mateja M.; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Burt, Felicity J.; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E.; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Giri, Adriana A.; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N. M.; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y.; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L.; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. IMPORTANCE This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV

  4. The genome sequence of Caenorhabditis briggsae: a platform for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lincoln D; Bao, Zhirong; Blasiar, Darin; Blumenthal, Thomas; Brent, Michael R; Chen, Nansheng; Chinwalla, Asif; Clarke, Laura; Clee, Chris; Coghlan, Avril; Coulson, Alan; D'Eustachio, Peter; Fitch, David H A; Fulton, Lucinda A; Fulton, Robert E; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Harris, Todd W; Hillier, LaDeana W; Kamath, Ravi; Kuwabara, Patricia E; Mardis, Elaine R; Marra, Marco A; Miner, Tracie L; Minx, Patrick; Mullikin, James C; Plumb, Robert W; Rogers, Jane; Schein, Jacqueline E; Sohrmann, Marc; Spieth, John; Stajich, Jason E; Wei, C; Willey, David; Wilson, Richard K; Durbin, Richard; Waterston, Robert H

    2003-11-01

    The soil nematodes Caenorhabditis briggsae and Caenorhabditis elegans diverged from a common ancestor roughly 100 million years ago and yet are almost indistinguishable by eye. They have the same chromosome number and genome sizes, and they occupy the same ecological niche. To explore the basis for this striking conservation of structure and function, we have sequenced the C. briggsae genome to a high-quality draft stage and compared it to the finished C. elegans sequence. We predict approximately 19,500 protein-coding genes in the C. briggsae genome, roughly the same as in C. elegans. Of these, 12,200 have clear C. elegans orthologs, a further 6,500 have one or more clearly detectable C. elegans homologs, and approximately 800 C. briggsae genes have no detectable matches in C. elegans. Almost all of the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) known are shared between the two species. The two genomes exhibit extensive colinearity, and the rate of divergence appears to be higher in the chromosomal arms than in the centers. Operons, a distinctive feature of C. elegans, are highly conserved in C. briggsae, with the arrangement of genes being preserved in 96% of cases. The difference in size between the C. briggsae (estimated at approximately 104 Mbp) and C. elegans (100.3 Mbp) genomes is almost entirely due to repetitive sequence, which accounts for 22.4% of the C. briggsae genome in contrast to 16.5% of the C. elegans genome. Few, if any, repeat families are shared, suggesting that most were acquired after the two species diverged or are undergoing rapid evolution. Coclustering the C. elegans and C. briggsae proteins reveals 2,169 protein families of two or more members. Most of these are shared between the two species, but some appear to be expanding or contracting, and there seem to be as many as several hundred novel C. briggsae gene families. The C. briggsae draft sequence will greatly improve the annotation of the C. elegans genome. Based on similarity to C. briggsae, we found

  5. The reference genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: then and now.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Dietrich, Fred S; Fisk, Dianna G; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C; Dwight, Selina S; Hitz, Benjamin C; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J Michael

    2014-03-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called "S288C 2010," was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  6. Sequencing and annotated analysis of an Estonian human genome.

    PubMed

    Lilleoja, Rutt; Sarapik, Aili; Reimann, Ene; Reemann, Paula; Jaakma, Ülle; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev

    2012-02-01

    In present study we describe the sequencing and annotated analysis of the individual genome of Estonian. Using SOLID technology we generated 2,449,441,916 of 50-bp reads. The Bioscope version 1.3 was used for mapping and pairing of reads to the NCBI human genome reference (build 36, hg18). Bioscope enables also the annotation of the results of variant (tertiary) analysis. The average mapping of reads was 75.5% with total coverage of 107.72 Gb. resulting in mean fold coverage of 34.6. We found 3,482,975 SNPs out of which 352,492 were novel. 21,222 SNPs were in coding region: 10,649 were synonymous SNPs, 10,360 were nonsynonymous missense SNPs, 155 were nonsynonymous nonsense SNPs and 58 were nonsynonymous frameshifts. We identified 219 CNVs with total base pair coverage of 37,326,300 bp and 87,451 large insertion/deletion polymorphisms covering 10,152,256 bp of the genome. In addition, we found 285,864 small size insertion/deletion polymorphisms out of which 133,969 were novel. Finally, we identified 53 inversions, 19 overlapped genes and 2 overlapped exons. Interestingly, we found the region in chromosome 6 to be enriched with the coding SNPs and CNVs. This study confirms previous findings, that our genomes are more complex and variable as thought before. Therefore, sequencing of the personal genomes followed by annotation would improve the analysis of heritability of phenotypes and our understandings on the functions of genome.

  7. A taste of pineapple evolution through genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-12-01

    The genome sequence assembly of the highly heterozygous Ananas comosus and its varieties is an impressive technical achievement. The sequence opens the door to a greater understanding of pineapple morphology and evolution. PMID:26620110

  8. A taste of pineapple evolution through genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2015-12-01

    The genome sequence assembly of the highly heterozygous Ananas comosus and its varieties is an impressive technical achievement. The sequence opens the door to a greater understanding of pineapple morphology and evolution.

  9. Applications of Genomic Sequencing in Pediatric CNS Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bavle, Abhishek A; Lin, Frank Y; Parsons, D Williams

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in genome-scale sequencing methods have resulted in a significant increase in our understanding of the biology of human cancers. When applied to pediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumors, these remarkable technological breakthroughs have facilitated the molecular characterization of multiple tumor types, provided new insights into the genetic basis of these cancers, and prompted innovative strategies that are changing the management paradigm in pediatric neuro-oncology. Genomic tests have begun to affect medical decision making in a number of ways, from delineating histopathologically similar tumor types into distinct molecular subgroups that correlate with clinical characteristics, to guiding the addition of novel therapeutic agents for patients with high-risk or poor-prognosis tumors, or alternatively, reducing treatment intensity for those with a favorable prognosis. Genomic sequencing has also had a significant impact on translational research strategies in pediatric CNS tumors, resulting in wide-ranging applications that have the potential to direct the rational preclinical screening of novel therapeutic agents, shed light on tumor heterogeneity and evolution, and highlight differences (or similarities) between pediatric and adult CNS tumors. Finally, in addition to allowing the identification of somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, the analysis of patient-matched constitutional (germline) DNA has facilitated the detection of pathogenic germline alterations in cancer genes in patients with CNS tumors, with critical implications for genetic counseling and tumor surveillance strategies for children with familial predisposition syndromes. As our understanding of the molecular landscape of pediatric CNS tumors continues to advance, innovative applications of genomic sequencing hold significant promise for further improving the care of children with these cancers. PMID:27188671

  10. Insights from twenty years of bacterial genome sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jun, Se Ran; Nookaew, Intawat; Leuze, Michael Rex; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Lund, Ole; Kora, Guruprasad H; Wassenaar, Trudy; Poudel, Suresh; Ussery, David W

    2015-01-01

    Since the first two complete bacterial genome sequences were published in 1995, the science of bacteria has dramatically changed. Using third-generation DNA sequencing, it is possible to completely sequence a bacterial genome in a few hours and identify some types of methylation sites along the genome as well. Sequencing of bacterial genome sequences is now a standard procedure, and the information from tens of thousands of bacterial genomes has had a major impact on our views of the bacterial world. In this review, we explore a series of questions to highlight some insights that comparative genomics has produced. To date, there are genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. However, the distribution is quite skewed towards a few phyla that contain model organisms. But the breadth is continuing to improve, with projects dedicated to filling in less characterized taxonomic groups. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system provides bacteria with immunity against viruses, which outnumber bacteria by tenfold. How fast can we go? Second-generation sequencing has produced a large number of draft genomes (close to 90 % of bacterial genomes in GenBank are currently not complete); third-generation sequencing can potentially produce a finished genome in a few hours, and at the same time provide methlylation sites along the entire chromosome. The diversity of bacterial communities is extensive as is evident from the genome sequences available from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. Genome sequencing can help in classifying an organism, and in the case where multiple genomes of the same species are available, it is possible to calculate the pan- and core genomes; comparison of more than 2000 Escherichia coli genomes finds an E. coli core genome of about 3100 gene families and a total of about 89,000 different gene families. Why do we care about bacterial genome

  11. Whole-genome sequencing reveals oncogenic mutations in mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Laura Y; Jia, Peilin; Baerenwald, Devin A; Duszynski, Robert J; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Zic, John A; Zwerner, Jeffrey P; Hucks, Donald; Dave, Utpal; Zhao, Zhongming; Eischen, Christine M

    2015-07-23

    The pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is unknown. Although genetic alterations have been identified, none are considered consistently causative in MF. To identify potential drivers of MF, we performed whole-genome sequencing of MF tumors and matched normal skin. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing of MF samples and exome sequencing of CTCL cell lines were also performed. Multiple mutations were identified that affected the same pathways, including epigenetic, cell-fate regulation, and cytokine signaling, in MF tumors and CTCL cell lines. Specifically, interleukin-2 signaling pathway mutations, including activating Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) mutations, were detected. Treatment with a JAK3 inhibitor significantly reduced CTCL cell survival. Additionally, the mutation data identified 2 other potential contributing factors to MF, ultraviolet light, and a polymorphism in the tumor suppressor p53 (TP53). Therefore, genetic alterations in specific pathways in MF were identified that may be viable, effective new targets for treatment.

  12. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D; Torroja, Carlos F; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T; Guerra-Assunção, José A; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F; Laird, Gavin K; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Elliot, David; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Begum, Sharmin; Mortimore, Beverley; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Lloyd, Christine; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James D; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Lanz, Christa; Raddatz, Günter; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Schuster, Stephan C; Carter, Nigel P; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M J; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J; Zon, Leonard I; Postlethwait, John H; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J P; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L

    2013-04-25

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination.

  13. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D.; Torroja, Carlos F.; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E.; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T.; Guerra-Assunção, José A.; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F.; Laird, Gavin K.; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M.; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Carter, Nigel P.; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M. J.; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J.; Zon, Leonard I.; Postlethwait, John H.; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function1,2. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease3–5. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes6, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination. PMID:23594743

  14. Genome Project Standards in a New Era of Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    GSC Consortia; HMP Jumpstart Consortia; Chain, P. S. G.; Grafham, D. V.; Fulton, R. S.; FitzGerald, M. G.; Hostetler, J.; Muzny, D.; Detter, J. C.; Ali, J.; Birren, B.; Bruce, D. C.; Buhay, C.; Cole, J. R.; Ding, Y.; Dugan, S.; Field, D.; Garrity, G. M.; Gibbs, R.; Graves, T.; Han, C. S.; Harrison, S. H.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Khouri, H. M.; Kodira, C. D.; Kolker, E.; Kyrpides, N. C.; Lang, D.; Lapidus, A.; Malfatti, S. A.; Markowitz, V.; Metha, T.; Nelson, K. E.; Parkhill, J.; Pitluck, S.; Qin, X.; Read, T. D.; Schmutz, J.; Sozhamannan, S.; Strausberg, R.; Sutton, G.; Thomson, N. R.; Tiedje, J. M.; Weinstock, G.; Wollam, A.

    2009-06-01

    For over a decade, genome 43 sequences have adhered to only two standards that are relied on for purposes of sequence analysis by interested third parties (1, 2). However, ongoing developments in revolutionary sequencing technologies have resulted in a redefinition of traditional whole genome sequencing that requires a careful reevaluation of such standards. With commercially available 454 pyrosequencing (followed by Illumina, SOLiD, and now Helicos), there has been an explosion of genomes sequenced under the moniker 'draft', however these can be very poor quality genomes (due to inherent errors in the sequencing technologies, and the inability of assembly programs to fully address these errors). Further, one can only infer that such draft genomes may be of poor quality by navigating through the databases to find the number and type of reads deposited in sequence trace repositories (and not all genomes have this available), or to identify the number of contigs or genome fragments deposited to the database. The difficulty in assessing the quality of such deposited genomes has created some havoc for genome analysis pipelines and contributed to many wasted hours of (mis)interpretation. These same novel sequencing technologies have also brought an exponential leap in raw sequencing capability, and at greatly reduced prices that have further skewed the time- and cost-ratios of draft data generation versus the painstaking process of improving and finishing a genome. The resulting effect is an ever-widening gap between drafted and finished genomes that only promises to continue (Figure 1), hence there is an urgent need to distinguish good and poor datasets. The sequencing institutes in the authorship, along with the NIH's Human Microbiome Project Jumpstart Consortium (3), strongly believe that a new set of standards is required for genome sequences. The following represents a set of six community-defined categories of genome sequence standards that better reflect the

  15. Megabase sequencing of human genome by ordered-shotgun-sequencing (OSS) strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ellson Y.

    1997-05-01

    So far we have used OSS strategy to sequence over 2 megabases DNA in large-insert clones from regions of human X chromosomes with different characteristic levels of GC content. The method starts by randomly fragmenting a BAC, YAC or PAC to 8-12 kb pieces and subcloning those into lambda phage. Insert-ends of these clones are sequenced and overlapped to create a partial map. Complete sequencing is then done on a minimal tiling path of selected subclones, recursively focusing on those at the edges of contigs to facilitate mergers of clones across the entire target. To reduce manual labor, PCR processes have been adapted to prepare sequencing templates throughout the entire operation. The streamlined process can thus lend itself to further automation. The OSS approach is suitable for large- scale genomic sequencing, providing considerable flexibility in the choice of subclones or regions for more or less intensive sequencing. For example, subclones containing contaminating host cell DNA or cloning vector can be recognized and ignored with minimal sequencing effort; regions overlapping a neighboring clone already sequenced need not be redone; and segments containing tandem repeats or long repetitive sequences can be spotted early on and targeted for additional attention.

  16. Genome Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeats in Cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whole genome sequence of the cucumber cultivar Gy14 was recently sequenced at 15× coverage with the Roche 454 Titanium technology. The microsatellite DNA sequences (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) in the assembled scaffolds were computationally explored and characterized. A total of 112,073 SSRs ...

  17. Genome-wide BAC-end sequencing of Cucumis melo using two BAC libraries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although melon (Cucumis melo L.) is an economically important fruit crop, no genome-wide sequence information is openly available at the current time. We therefore sequenced BAC-ends representing a total of 33,024 clones, half of them from a previously described melon BAC library generated with restriction endonucleases and the remainder from a new random-shear BAC library. Results We generated a total of 47,140 high-quality BAC-end sequences (BES), 91.7% of which were paired-BES. Both libraries were assembled independently and then cross-assembled to obtain a final set of 33,372 non-redundant, high-quality sequences. These were grouped into 6,411 contigs (4.5 Mb) and 26,961 non-assembled BES (14.4 Mb), representing ~4.2% of the melon genome. The sequences were used to screen genomic databases, identifying 7,198 simple sequence repeats (corresponding to one microsatellite every 2.6 kb) and 2,484 additional repeats of which 95.9% represented transposable elements. The sequences were also used to screen expressed sequence tag (EST) databases, revealing 11,372 BES that were homologous to ESTs. This suggests that ~30% of the melon genome consists of coding DNA. We observed regions of microsynteny between melon paired-BES and six other dicotyledonous plant genomes. Conclusion The analysis of nearly 50,000 BES from two complementary genomic libraries covered ~4.2% of the melon genome, providing insight into properties such as microsatellite and transposable element distribution, and the percentage of coding DNA. The observed synteny between melon paired-BES and six other plant genomes showed that useful comparative genomic data can be derived through large scale BAC-end sequencing by anchoring a small proportion of the melon genome to other sequenced genomes. PMID:21054843

  18. Finishing The Euchromatic Sequence Of The Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel; Pennacchio, Len

    2004-09-07

    The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process.The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers {approx}99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of {approx}1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number,birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.

  19. Validation of rice genome sequence by optical mapping

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shiguo; Bechner, Michael C; Place, Michael; Churas, Chris P; Pape, Louise; Leong, Sally A; Runnheim, Rod; Forrest, Dan K; Goldstein, Steve; Livny, Miron; Schwartz, David C

    2007-01-01

    Background Rice feeds much of the world, and possesses the simplest genome analyzed to date within the grass family, making it an economically relevant model system for other cereal crops. Although the rice genome is sequenced, validation and gap closing efforts require purely independent means for accurate finishing of sequence build data. Results To facilitate ongoing sequencing finishing and validation efforts, we have constructed a whole-genome SwaI optical restriction map of the rice genome. The physical map consists of 14 contigs, covering 12 chromosomes, with a total genome size of 382.17 Mb; this value is about 11% smaller than original estimates. 9 of the 14 optical map contigs are without gaps, covering chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 10, and 12 in their entirety – including centromeres and telomeres. Alignments between optical and in silico restriction maps constructed from IRGSP (International Rice Genome Sequencing Project) and TIGR (The Institute for Genomic Research) genome sequence sources are comprehensive and informative, evidenced by map coverage across virtually all published gaps, discovery of new ones, and characterization of sequence misassemblies; all totalling ~14 Mb. Furthermore, since optical maps are ordered restriction maps, identified discordances are pinpointed on a reliable physical scaffold providing an independent resource for closure of gaps and rectification of misassemblies. Conclusion Analysis of sequence and optical mapping data effectively validates genome sequence assemblies constructed from large, repeat-rich genomes. Given this conclusion we envision new applications of such single molecule analysis that will merge advantages offered by high-resolution optical maps with inexpensive, but short sequence reads generated by emerging sequencing platforms. Lastly, map construction techniques presented here points the way to new types of comparative genome analysis that would focus on discernment of structural differences

  20. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae strain LMG 859.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Midha, Samriti; Ranjan, Manish; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar; Patil, Prabhu B

    2012-05-01

    We report the 4.94-Mb genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. punicae strain LMG 859, the causal agent of bacterial leaf blight disease in pomegranate. The draft genome will aid in comparative genomics, epidemiological studies, and quarantine of this devastating phytopathogen. PMID:22493202

  1. Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): complete nucleotide mitochondrial genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Parma, Pietro; Erra-Pujada, Marta; Feligini, Maria; Greppi, Gianfranco; Enne, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we report the whole sequence of the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) mitochondrial genome. The water buffalo mt molecule is 16.355 base pair length and shows a genome organization similar to those reported for other mitochondrial genome. These new data provide an useful tool for many research area, i.e. evolutionary study and identification of food origin.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Bacteriophage Eldridge

    PubMed Central

    Reveille, Alexandra M.; Eldridge, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the complete genome sequence of the unique bacteriophage Eldridge, isolated from soil using Bacillus megaterium as the host organism, was determined. Eldridge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 242 genes and is unique when compared to phage sequences in GenBank. PMID:27103735

  3. The carrot genome sequence brings colors out of the dark.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-05-27

    The genome sequence of carrot (Daucus carota L.) is the first completed for an Apiaceae species, furthering knowledge of the evolution of the important euasterid II clade. Analyzing the whole-genome sequence allowed for the identification of a gene that may regulate the accumulation of carotenoids in the root. PMID:27230684

  4. Genome sequencing and annotation of Cellulomonas sp. HZM.

    PubMed

    Chua, Patric; Har, Zi Mei; Austin, Christopher M; Yule, Catherine M; Dykes, Gary A; Lee, Sui Mae

    2015-09-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Cellulomonas sp. HZM, isolated from a tropical peat swamp forest. The draft genome size is 3,559,280 bp with a G + C content of 73% and contains 3 rRNA sequences (single copies of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA).

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Raoultella planticola, Isolated from River Water.

    PubMed

    Jothikumar, Narayanan; Kahler, Amy; Strockbine, Nancy; Gladney, Lori; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-10-16

    We isolated Raoultella planticola from a river water sample, which was phenotypically indistinguishable from Escherichia coli on MI agar. The genome sequence of R. planticola was determined to gain information about its metabolic functions contributing to its false positive appearance of E. coli on MI agar. We report the first whole genome sequence of Raoultella planticola.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Clinical Isolate of Enterobacter asburiae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Yan; Li, Li; Jin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Enterobacter asburiae strain ENIPBJ-CG1, isolated from a bone marrow transplant patient. The size of the genome sequence is approximately 4.65 Mb, with a G+C content of 55.76%, and it is predicted to contain 4,790 protein-coding genes. PMID:27284137

  7. Nearly Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain NIZO2877

    PubMed Central

    Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.; Joncour, Pauline; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Siezen, Roland; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a versatile bacterial species that is isolated mostly from foods. Here, we present the first genome sequence of L. plantarum strain NIZO2877 isolated from a hot dog in Vietnam. Its two contigs represent a nearly complete genome sequence. PMID:26607887

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Neurospora crassa Strain FGSC 73

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Scott E.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Simmons, Blake A.; McCluskey, Kevin

    2015-04-02

    We report the elucidation of the complete genome of the Neurospora crassa (Shear and Dodge) strain FGSC 73, a mat-a, trp-3 mutant strain. The genome sequence around the idiotypic mating type locus represents the only publicly available sequence for a mat-a strain. 40.42 Megabases are assembled into 358 scaffolds carrying 11,978 gene models.

  9. De Novo Genome Sequence of Yersinia aleksiciae Y159T

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    We report here on the genome sequence of Yersinia aleksiciae Y159T, isolated in Finland in 1981. The genome has a size of 4 Mb, a G+C content of 49%, and is predicted to contain 3,423 coding sequences. PMID:26383649

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Mark; McNair, Katelyn; Zogaj, Xhavit; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a Gram-negative intracellular fish pathogen that has a significant impact on the salmon industry. Here, we report the genome sequence of P. salmonis strain LF-89. This is the first draft genome sequence of P. salmonis, and it reveals interesting attributes, including flagellar genes, despite this bacterium being considered nonmotile. PMID:24201203

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum ATCC 14181

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum ATCC 14181, a Gram-negative, hemolytic, O2 serotype marine bacterium that causes mortality in mariculture species. The availability of this genome sequence will add to our knowledge of diversity and virulence mechanisms of Vibrio anguillarum as well as other pathogenic Vibrio spp.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Mitsunori; Nakanaga, Kazue; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Kazumi, Yuko; Mitarai, Satoshi; Ishii, Norihisa; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense produces mycolactone and causes Buruli ulcer. Here, we report the complete sequence of its genome, which comprises a 5.9-Mb chromosome and a 166-kb plasmid (pShT-P). The sequence will represent the essential data for future phylogenetic and comparative genome studies of mycolactone-producing mycobacteria. PMID:27688344

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mitsunori; Nakanaga, Kazue; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Kazumi, Yuko; Mitarai, Satoshi; Ishii, Norihisa; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans subsp. shinshuense produces mycolactone and causes Buruli ulcer. Here, we report the complete sequence of its genome, which comprises a 5.9-Mb chromosome and a 166-kb plasmid (pShT-P). The sequence will represent the essential data for future phylogenetic and comparative genome studies of mycolactone-producing mycobacteria. PMID:27688344

  14. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of “Cohnella kolymensis” B-2846

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Ekaterina B.; Ariskina, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of “Cohnella kolymensis” strain B-2846 was derived using IonTorrent sequencing technology. The size of the assembly and G+C content were in agreement with those of other species of this genus. Characterization of the genome of a novel species of Cohnella will assist in bacterial systematics. PMID:26769947

  16. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence. PMID:11237011

  17. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Heum; Kim, Sewhan; Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Soojin; Um, Youngsoon; Oh, Min-Kyu; Kim, Young-Rok; Lee, Jinwon; Yang, Kap-Seok

    2012-05-01

    This is the first complete genome sequence of the Enterobacter aerogenes species. Here we present the genome sequence of E. aerogenes KCTC 2190, which contains 5,280,350 bp with a G + C content of 54.8 mol%, 4,912 protein-coding genes, and 109 structural RNAs.

  18. Complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’ (Laf), strain ptsapsy, was obtained by an Illumina HiSeq 2000. The Laf genome comprises 1,192,232 nucleotides, 34.5% GC content, 1,141 predicted coding sequences, 44 tRNAs, 3 complete copies of ribosomal RNA genes (16S, 23S and 5S) ...

  19. Selection of sequence variants to improve dairy cattle genomic predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic prediction reliabilities improved when adding selected sequence variants from run 5 of the 1,000 bull genomes project. High density (HD) imputed genotypes for 26,970 progeny tested Holstein bulls were combined with sequence variants for 444 Holstein animals. The first test included 481,904 c...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang Heum; Kim, Sewhan; Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Soojin; Um, Youngsoon; Oh, Min-Kyu; Kim, Young-Rok; Lee, Jinwon

    2012-01-01

    This is the first complete genome sequence of the Enterobacter aerogenes species. Here we present the genome sequence of E. aerogenes KCTC 2190, which contains 5,280,350 bp with a G + C content of 54.8 mol%, 4,912 protein-coding genes, and 109 structural RNAs. PMID:22493190

  1. Genome sequencing and annotation of Cellulomonas sp. HZM

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Patric; Har, Zi Mei; Austin, Christopher M.; Yule, Catherine M.; Dykes, Gary A.; Lee, Sui Mae

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Cellulomonas sp. HZM, isolated from a tropical peat swamp forest. The draft genome size is 3,559,280 bp with a G + C content of 73% and contains 3 rRNA sequences (single copies of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA). PMID:26484221

  2. Unexpected cross-species contamination in genome sequencing projects

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samier; Wood, Derrick E.

    2014-01-01

    The raw data from a genome sequencing project sometimes contains DNA from contaminating organisms, which may be introduced during sample collection or sequence preparation. In some instances, these contaminants remain in the sequence even after assembly and deposition of the genome into public databases. As a result, searches of these databases may yield erroneous and confusing results. We used efficient microbiome analysis software to scan the draft assembly of domestic cow, Bos taurus, and identify 173 small contigs that appeared to derive from microbial contaminants. In the course of verifying these findings, we discovered that one genome, Neisseria gonorrhoeae TCDC-NG08107, although putatively a complete genome, contained multiple sequences that actually derived from the cow and sheep genomes. Our findings illustrate the need to carefully validate findings of anomalous DNA that rely on comparisons to either draft or finished genomes. PMID:25426337

  3. Ten years of bacterial genome sequencing: comparative-genomics-based discoveries.

    PubMed

    Binnewies, Tim T; Motro, Yair; Hallin, Peter F; Lund, Ole; Dunn, David; La, Tom; Hampson, David J; Bellgard, Matthew; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2006-07-01

    It has been more than 10 years since the first bacterial genome sequence was published. Hundreds of bacterial genome sequences are now available for comparative genomics, and searching a given protein against more than a thousand genomes will soon be possible. The subject of this review will address a relatively straightforward question: "What have we learned from this vast amount of new genomic data?" Perhaps one of the most important lessons has been that genetic diversity, at the level of large-scale variation amongst even genomes of the same species, is far greater than was thought. The classical textbook view of evolution relying on the relatively slow accumulation of mutational events at the level of individual bases scattered throughout the genome has changed. One of the most obvious conclusions from examining the sequences from several hundred bacterial genomes is the enormous amount of diversity--even in different genomes from the same bacterial species. This diversity is generated by a variety of mechanisms, including mobile genetic elements and bacteriophages. An examination of the 20 Escherichia coli genomes sequenced so far dramatically illustrates this, with the genome size ranging from 4.6 to 5.5 Mbp; much of the variation appears to be of phage origin. This review also addresses mobile genetic elements, including pathogenicity islands and the structure of transposable elements. There are at least 20 different methods available to compare bacterial genomes. Metagenomics offers the chance to study genomic sequences found in ecosystems, including genomes of species that are difficult to culture. It has become clear that a genome sequence represents more than just a collection of gene sequences for an organism and that information concerning the environment and growth conditions for the organism are important for interpretation of the genomic data. The newly proposed Minimal Information about a Genome Sequence standard has been developed to obtain this

  4. Ten years of bacterial genome sequencing: comparative-genomics-based discoveries.

    PubMed

    Binnewies, Tim T; Motro, Yair; Hallin, Peter F; Lund, Ole; Dunn, David; La, Tom; Hampson, David J; Bellgard, Matthew; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2006-07-01

    It has been more than 10 years since the first bacterial genome sequence was published. Hundreds of bacterial genome sequences are now available for comparative genomics, and searching a given protein against more than a thousand genomes will soon be possible. The subject of this review will address a relatively straightforward question: "What have we learned from this vast amount of new genomic data?" Perhaps one of the most important lessons has been that genetic diversity, at the level of large-scale variation amongst even genomes of the same species, is far greater than was thought. The classical textbook view of evolution relying on the relatively slow accumulation of mutational events at the level of individual bases scattered throughout the genome has changed. One of the most obvious conclusions from examining the sequences from several hundred bacterial genomes is the enormous amount of diversity--even in different genomes from the same bacterial species. This diversity is generated by a variety of mechanisms, including mobile genetic elements and bacteriophages. An examination of the 20 Escherichia coli genomes sequenced so far dramatically illustrates this, with the genome size ranging from 4.6 to 5.5 Mbp; much of the variation appears to be of phage origin. This review also addresses mobile genetic elements, including pathogenicity islands and the structure of transposable elements. There are at least 20 different methods available to compare bacterial genomes. Metagenomics offers the chance to study genomic sequences found in ecosystems, including genomes of species that are difficult to culture. It has become clear that a genome sequence represents more than just a collection of gene sequences for an organism and that information concerning the environment and growth conditions for the organism are important for interpretation of the genomic data. The newly proposed Minimal Information about a Genome Sequence standard has been developed to obtain this

  5. De novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence using RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseng; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-03-19

    The genus Endornavirus is a double-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, we report on the de novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our result demonstrates the successful application of RNA-Seq to obtain a complete viral genome sequence from the transcriptome data.

  6. De novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence using RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseng; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-01-01

    The genus Endornavirus is a double-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of hosts. In this study, we report on the de novo assembly of a bell pepper endornavirus genome sequence by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our result demonstrates the successful application of RNA-Seq to obtain a complete viral genome sequence from the transcriptome data. PMID:25792042

  7. Microbial genome sequencing using optical mapping and Illumina sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Optical mapping is a technique in which strands of genomic DNA are digested with one or more restriction enzymes, and a physical map of the genome constructed from the resulting image. In outline, genomic DNA is extracted from a pure culture, linearly arrayed on a specialized glass sli...

  8. Draft sequences of the radish (Raphanus sativus L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Li, Feng; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Zou, Zhongwei; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Tonosaki, Kaoru; Shirasawa, Sachiko; Fukushima, Aki; Yokoi, Shuji; Takahata, Yoshihito; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Ishida, Masahiko; Okamoto, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Koji; Shirasawa, Kenta; Tabata, Satoshi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L., n = 9) is one of the major vegetables in Asia. Since the genomes of Brassica and related species including radish underwent genome rearrangement, it is quite difficult to perform functional analysis based on the reported genomic sequence of Brassica rapa. Therefore, we performed genome sequencing of radish. Short reads of genomic sequences of 191.1 Gb were obtained by next-generation sequencing (NGS) for a radish inbred line, and 76,592 scaffolds of ≥ 300 bp were constructed along with the bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences. Finally, the whole draft genomic sequence of 402 Mb spanning 75.9% of the estimated genomic size and containing 61,572 predicted genes was obtained. Subsequently, 221 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and 768 PCR-RFLP markers were used together with the 746 markers produced in our previous study for the construction of a linkage map. The map was combined further with another radish linkage map constructed mainly with expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers into a high-density integrated map of 1,166 cM with 2,553 DNA markers. A total of 1,345 scaffolds were assigned to the linkage map, spanning 116.0 Mb. Bulked PCR products amplified by 2,880 primer pairs were sequenced by NGS, and SNPs in eight inbred lines were identified. PMID:24848699

  9. Draft sequences of the radish (Raphanus sativus L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Li, Feng; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Zou, Zhongwei; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Tonosaki, Kaoru; Shirasawa, Sachiko; Fukushima, Aki; Yokoi, Shuji; Takahata, Yoshihito; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Ishida, Masahiko; Okamoto, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Koji; Shirasawa, Kenta; Tabata, Satoshi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L., n = 9) is one of the major vegetables in Asia. Since the genomes of Brassica and related species including radish underwent genome rearrangement, it is quite difficult to perform functional analysis based on the reported genomic sequence of Brassica rapa. Therefore, we performed genome sequencing of radish. Short reads of genomic sequences of 191.1 Gb were obtained by next-generation sequencing (NGS) for a radish inbred line, and 76,592 scaffolds of ≥ 300 bp were constructed along with the bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences. Finally, the whole draft genomic sequence of 402 Mb spanning 75.9% of the estimated genomic size and containing 61,572 predicted genes was obtained. Subsequently, 221 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and 768 PCR-RFLP markers were used together with the 746 markers produced in our previous study for the construction of a linkage map. The map was combined further with another radish linkage map constructed mainly with expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers into a high-density integrated map of 1,166 cM with 2,553 DNA markers. A total of 1,345 scaffolds were assigned to the linkage map, spanning 116.0 Mb. Bulked PCR products amplified by 2,880 primer pairs were sequenced by NGS, and SNPs in eight inbred lines were identified.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; St. John, Franz J.; Dickstein, Ellen; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Martin, Joel; Copeland, A; Land, Miriam L; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.; Preston, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of -1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  11. Genomic sequencing and analyses of Lymantria xylina multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of the casuarina moth, Lymantria xylina Swinehoe (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), which is a very important forest pest in Taiwan, have occurred every five to 10 years. This moth has expanded its range of host plants to include more than 65 species of broadleaf trees. LyxyMNPV (L. xylina multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus) is highly virulent to the casuarina moth and has been investigated as a possible biopesticide for controlling this moth. LdMNPV-like virus has also been isolated from Lymantria xylina larvae but LyxyMNPV was more virulent than LdMNPV-like virus both in NTU-LY and IPLB-LD-652Y cell lines. To better understand LyxyMNPV, the nucleotide sequence of the LyxyMNPV DNA genome was determined and analysed. Results The genome of LyxyMNPV consists of 156,344 bases, has a G+C content of 53.4% and contains 157 putative open reading frames (ORFs). The gene content and gene order of LyxyMNPV were similar to those of LdMNPV, with 151 ORFs identified as homologous to those reported in the LdMNPV genome. Two genes (Lyxy49 and Lyxy123) were homologous to other baculoviruses, and four unique LyxyMNPV ORFs (Lyxy11, Lyxy19, Lyxy130 and Lyxy131) were identified in the LyxyMNPV genome, including a gag-like gene that was not reported in baculoviruses. LdMNPV contains 23 ORFs that are absent in LyxyMNPV. Readily identifiable homologues of the gene host range factor-1 (hrf-1), which appears to be involved in the susceptibility of L. dispar to NPV infection, were not present in LyxyMNPV. Additionally, two putative odv-e27 homologues were identified in LyxyMNPV. The LyxyMNPV genome encoded 14 bro genes compared with 16 in LdMNPV, which occupied more than 8% of the LyxyMNPV genome. Thirteen homologous regions (hrs) were identified containing 48 repeated sequences composed of 30-bp imperfect palindromes. However, they differed in the relative positions, number of repeats and orientation in the genome compared to LdMNPV. Conclusion The gene parity plot analysis

  12. Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing Combined with Optical Mapping Yields Completely Finished Fungal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Faino, Luigi; Seidl, Michael F.; Datema, Erwin; van den Berg, Grardy C. M.; Janssen, Antoine; Wittenberg, Alexander H. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have increased the scalability, speed, and resolution of genomic sequencing and, thus, have revolutionized genomic studies. However, eukaryotic genome sequencing initiatives typically yield considerably fragmented genome assemblies. Here, we assessed various state-of-the-art sequencing and assembly strategies in order to produce a contiguous and complete eukaryotic genome assembly, focusing on the filamentous fungus Verticillium dahliae. Compared with Illumina-based assemblies of the V. dahliae genome, hybrid assemblies that also include PacBio-generated long reads establish superior contiguity. Intriguingly, provided that sufficient sequence depth is reached, assemblies solely based on PacBio reads outperform hybrid assemblies and even result in fully assembled chromosomes. Furthermore, the addition of optical map data allowed us to produce a gapless and complete V. dahliae genome assembly of the expected eight chromosomes from telomere to telomere. Consequently, we can now study genomic regions that were previously not assembled or poorly assembled, including regions that are populated by repetitive sequences, such as transposons, allowing us to fully appreciate an organism’s biological complexity. Our data show that a combination of PacBio-generated long reads and optical mapping can be used to generate complete and gapless assemblies of fungal genomes. PMID:26286689

  13. The Brachypodium genome sequence: a resource for oat genomics research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat (Avena sativa) is an important cereal crop used as both an animal feed and for human consumption. Genetic and genomic research on oat is hindered because it is hexaploid and possesses a large (13 Gb) genome. Diploid Avena relatives have been employed for genetic and genomic studies, but only mod...

  14. Standards for Sequencing Viral Genomes in the Era of High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Beitzel, Brett; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Davenport, Matthew G.; Donaldson, Eric; Frieman, Matthew; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kuhn, Jens H.; O’Rear, Jules; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wentworth, David E.; Wiley, Michael R.; Yu, Guo-Yun; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Bradburne, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thanks to high-throughput sequencing technologies, genome sequencing has become a common component in nearly all aspects of viral research; thus, we are experiencing an explosion in both the number of available genome sequences and the number of institutions producing such data. However, there are currently no common standards used to convey the quality, and therefore utility, of these various genome sequences. Here, we propose five “standard” categories that encompass all stages of viral genome finishing, and we define them using simple criteria that are agnostic to the technology used for sequencing. We also provide genome finishing recommendations for various downstream applications, keeping in mind the cost-benefit trade-offs associated with different levels of finishing. Our goal is to define a common vocabulary that will allow comparison of genome quality across different research groups, sequencing platforms, and assembly techniques. PMID:24939889

  15. Standards for sequencing viral genomes in the era of high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Jason T; Beitzel, Brett; Chain, Patrick S G; Davenport, Matthew G; Donaldson, Eric F; Frieman, Matthew; Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Kuhn, Jens H; O'Rear, Jules; Sabeti, Pardis C; Wentworth, David E; Wiley, Michael R; Yu, Guo-Yun; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Bradburne, Christopher; Palacios, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to high-throughput sequencing technologies, genome sequencing has become a common component in nearly all aspects of viral research; thus, we are experiencing an explosion in both the number of available genome sequences and the number of institutions producing such data. However, there are currently no common standards used to convey the quality, and therefore utility, of these various genome sequences. Here, we propose five "standard" categories that encompass all stages of viral genome finishing, and we define them using simple criteria that are agnostic to the technology used for sequencing. We also provide genome finishing recommendations for various downstream applications, keeping in mind the cost-benefit trade-offs associated with different levels of finishing. Our goal is to define a common vocabulary that will allow comparison of genome quality across different research groups, sequencing platforms, and assembly techniques.

  16. Involvement of disperse repetitive sequences in wheat/rye genome adjustment.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Diana; Bento, Miguel; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    The union of different genomes in the same nucleus frequently results in hybrid genotypes with improved genome plasticity related to both genome remodeling events and changes in gene expression. Most modern cereal crops are polyploid species. Triticale, synthesized by the cross between wheat and rye, constitutes an excellent model to study polyploidization functional implications. We intend to attain a deeper knowledge of dispersed repetitive sequence involvement in parental genome reshuffle in triticale and in wheat-rye addition lines that have the entire wheat genome plus each rye chromosome pair. Through Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with OPH20 10-mer primer we unraveled clear alterations corresponding to the loss of specific bands from both parental genomes. Moreover, the sequential nature of those events was revealed by the increased absence of rye-origin bands in wheat-rye addition lines in comparison with triticale. Remodeled band sequencing revealed that both repetitive and coding genome domains are affected in wheat-rye hybrid genotypes. Additionally, the amplification and sequencing of pSc20H internal segments showed that the disappearance of parental bands may result from restricted sequence alterations and unraveled the involvement of wheat/rye related repetitive sequences in genome adjustment needed for hybrid plant stabilization.

  17. Mapping copy number variation by population-scale genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mills, Ryan E; Walter, Klaudia; Stewart, Chip; Handsaker, Robert E; Chen, Ken; Alkan, Can; Abyzov, Alexej; Yoon, Seungtai Chris; Ye, Kai; Cheetham, R Keira; Chinwalla, Asif; Conrad, Donald F; Fu, Yutao; Grubert, Fabian; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Iqbal, Zamin; Kang, Shuli; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Konkel, Miriam K; Korn, Joshua; Khurana, Ekta; Kural, Deniz; Lam, Hugo Y K; Leng, Jing; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Lin, Chang-Yun; Luo, Ruibang; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Nemesh, James; Peckham, Heather E; Rausch, Tobias; Scally, Aylwyn; Shi, Xinghua; Stromberg, Michael P; Stütz, Adrian M; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wu, Jiantao; Zhang, Yujun; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Batzer, Mark A; Ding, Li; Marth, Gabor T; McVean, Gil; Sebat, Jonathan; Snyder, Michael; Wang, Jun; Ye, Kenny; Eichler, Evan E; Gerstein, Mark B; Hurles, Matthew E; Lee, Charles; McCarroll, Steven A; Korbel, Jan O

    2011-02-01

    Genomic structural variants (SVs) are abundant in humans, differing from other forms of variation in extent, origin and functional impact. Despite progress in SV characterization, the nucleotide resolution architecture of most SVs remains unknown. We constructed a map of unbalanced SVs (that is, copy number variants) based on whole genome DNA sequencing data from 185 human genomes, integrating evidence from complementary SV discovery approaches with extensive experimental validations. Our map encompassed 22,025 deletions and 6,000 additional SVs, including insertions and tandem duplications. Most SVs (53%) were mapped to nucleotide resolution, which facilitated analysing their origin and functional impact. We examined numerous whole and partial gene deletions with a genotyping approach and observed a depletion of gene disruptions amongst high frequency deletions. Furthermore, we observed differences in the size spectra of SVs originating from distinct formation mechanisms, and constructed a map of SV hotspots formed by common mechanisms. Our analytical framework and SV map serves as a resource for sequencing-based association studies.

  18. Progress in understanding and sequencing the genome of Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Pyo; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Kim, Jung Sun; Yang, Tae-Jin; Park, Beom-Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2008-01-01

    Brassica rapa, which is closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana, is an important crop and a model plant for studying genome evolution via polyploidization. We report the current understanding of the genome structure of B. rapa and efforts for the whole-genome sequencing of the species. The tribe Brassicaceae, which comprises ca. 240 species, descended from a common hexaploid ancestor with a basic genome similar to that of Arabidopsis. Chromosome rearrangements, including fusions and/or fissions, resulted in the present-day "diploid" Brassica species with variation in chromosome number and phenotype. Triplicated genomic segments of B. rapa are collinear to those of A. thaliana with InDels. The genome triplication has led to an approximately 1.7-fold increase in the B. rapa gene number compared to that of A. thaliana. Repetitive DNA of B. rapa has also been extensively amplified and has diverged from that of A. thaliana. For its whole-genome sequencing, the Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP) consortium has developed suitable genomic resources and constructed genetic and physical maps. Ten chromosomes of B. rapa are being allocated to BrGSP consortium participants, and each chromosome will be sequenced by a BAC-by-BAC approach. Genome sequencing of B. rapa will offer a new perspective for plant biology and evolution in the context of polyploidization.

  19. Assessing the Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae Genome Annotations Using Genome-Wide Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Jaillon, Olivier; Dossat, Carole; Eckenberg, Ralph; Eiglmeier, Karin; Segurens, Béatrice; Aury, Jean-Marc; Roth, Charles W.; Scarpelli, Claude; Brey, Paul T.; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    We performed genome-wide sequence comparisons at the protein coding level between the genome sequences of Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Such comparisons detect evolutionarily conserved regions (ecores) that can be used for a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the available annotations of both genomes. They also provide novel candidate features for annotation. The percentage of ecores mapping outside annotations in the A. gambiae genome is about fourfold higher than in D. melanogaster. The A. gambiae genome assembly also contains a high proportion of duplicated ecores, possibly resulting from artefactual sequence duplications in the genome assembly. The occurrence of 4063 ecores in the D. melanogaster genome outside annotations suggests that some genes are not yet or only partially annotated. The present work illustrates the power of comparative genomics approaches towards an exhaustive and accurate establishment of gene models and gene catalogues in insect genomes. PMID:12840038

  20. Mapping whole genome shotgun sequence and variant calling in mammalian species without their reference genomes.

    PubMed

    Kalbfleisch, Ted; Heaton, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Genomics research in mammals has produced reference genome sequences that are essential for identifying variation associated with disease.  High quality reference genome sequences are now available for humans, model species, and economically important agricultural animals.  Comparisons between these species have provided unique insights into mammalian gene function.  However, the number of species with reference genomes is small compared to those needed for studying molecular evolutionary relationships in the tree of life.  For example, among the even-toed ungulates there are approximately 300 species whose phylogenetic relationships have been calculated in the 10k trees project.  Only six of these have reference genomes:  cattle, swine, sheep, goat, water buffalo, and bison.  Although reference sequences will eventually be developed for additional hoof stock, the resources in terms of time, money, infrastructure and expertise required to develop a quality reference genome may be unattainable for most species for at least another decade.  In this work we mapped 35 Gb of next generation sequence data of a Katahdin sheep to its own species' reference genome ( Ovis aries Oar3.1) and to that of a species that diverged 15 to 30 million years ago ( Bos taurus UMD3.1).  In total, 56% of reads covered 76% of UMD3.1 to an average depth of 6.8 reads per site, 83 million variants were identified, of which 78 million were homozygous and likely represent interspecies nucleotide differences. Excluding repeat regions and sex chromosomes, nearly 3.7 million heterozygous sites were identified in this animal vs. bovine UMD3.1, representing polymorphisms occurring in sheep.  Of these, 41% could be readily mapped to orthologous positions in ovine Oar3.1 with 80% corroborated as heterozygous.  These variant sites, identified via interspecies mapping could be used for comparative genomics, disease association studies, and ultimately to understand mammalian gene

  1. Whole-Genome sequencing and genetic variant analysis of a quarter Horse mare

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The catalog of genetic variants in the horse genome originates from a few select animals, the majority originating from the Thoroughbred mare used for the equine genome sequencing project. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs), and copy number variants (CNVs) in the genome of an individual Quarter Horse mare sequenced by next-generation sequencing. Results Using massively parallel paired-end sequencing, we generated 59.6 Gb of DNA sequence from a Quarter Horse mare resulting in an average of 24.7X sequence coverage. Reads were mapped to approximately 97% of the reference Thoroughbred genome. Unmapped reads were de novo assembled resulting in 19.1 Mb of new genomic sequence in the horse. Using a stringent filtering method, we identified 3.1 million SNPs, 193 thousand INDELs, and 282 CNVs. Genetic variants were annotated to determine their impact on gene structure and function. Additionally, we genotyped this Quarter Horse for mutations of known diseases and for variants associated with particular traits. Functional clustering analysis of genetic variants revealed that most of the genetic variation in the horse's genome was enriched in sensory perception, signal transduction, and immunity and defense pathways. Conclusions This is the first sequencing of a horse genome by next-generation sequencing and the first genomic sequence of an individual Quarter Horse mare. We have increased the catalog of genetic variants for use in equine genomics by the addition of novel SNPs, INDELs, and CNVs. The genetic variants described here will be a useful resource for future studies of genetic variation regulating performance traits and diseases in equids. PMID:22340285

  2. The sequence and analysis of a Chinese pig genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pig is an economically important food source, amounting to approximately 40% of all meat consumed worldwide. Pigs also serve as an important model organism because of their similarity to humans at the anatomical, physiological and genetic level, making them very useful for studying a variety of human diseases. A pig strain of particular interest is the miniature pig, specifically the Wuzhishan pig (WZSP), as it has been extensively inbred. Its high level of homozygosity offers increased ease for selective breeding for specific traits and a more straightforward understanding of the genetic changes that underlie its biological characteristics. WZSP also serves as a promising means for applications in surgery, tissue engineering, and xenotransplantation. Here, we report the sequencing and analysis of an inbreeding WZSP genome. Results Our results reveal some unique genomic features, including a relatively high level of homozygosity in the diploid genome, an unusual distribution of heterozygosity, an over-representation of tRNA-derived transposable elements, a small amount of porcine endogenous retrovirus, and a lack of type C retroviruses. In addition, we carried out systematic research on gene evolution, together with a detailed investigation of the counterparts of human drug target genes. Conclusion Our results provide the opportunity to more clearly define the genomic character of pig, which could enhance our ability to create more useful pig models. PMID:23587058

  3. Complete nucleotide sequence of the Cryptomeria japonica D. Don. chloroplast genome and comparative chloroplast genomics: diversified genomic structure of coniferous species

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Tomonori; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kurita, Manabu; Kondo, Teiji; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent determination of complete chloroplast (cp) genomic sequences of various plant species has enabled numerous comparative analyses as well as advances in plant and genome evolutionary studies. In angiosperms, the complete cp genome sequences of about 70 species have been determined, whereas those of only three gymnosperm species, Cycas taitungensis, Pinus thunbergii, and Pinus koraiensis have been established. The lack of information regarding the gene content and genomic structure of gymnosperm cp genomes may severely hamper further progress of plant and cp genome evolutionary studies. To address this need, we report here the complete nucleotide sequence of the cp genome of Cryptomeria japonica, the first in the Cupressaceae sensu lato of gymnosperms, and provide a comparative analysis of their gene content and genomic structure that illustrates the unique genomic features of gymnosperms. Results The C. japonica cp genome is 131,810 bp in length, with 112 single copy genes and two duplicated (trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG) genes that give a total of 116 genes. Compared to other land plant cp genomes, the C. japonica cp has lost one of the relevant large inverted repeats (IRs) found in angiosperms, fern, liverwort, and gymnosperms, such as Cycas and Gingko, and additionally has completely lost its trnR-CCG, partially lost its trnT-GGU, and shows diversification of accD. The genomic structure of the C. japonica cp genome also differs significantly from those of other plant species. For example, we estimate that a minimum of 15 inversions would be required to transform the gene organization of the Pinus thunbergii cp genome into that of C. japonica. In the C. japonica cp genome, direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences are observed at the inversion and translocation endpoints, and these sequences may be associated with the genomic rearrangements. Conclusion The observed differences in genomic structure between C. japonica and other land plants, including

  4. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: Genome Structure, Evolutionary Aspects, Gene Content and SSR Detection

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Rogalski, Marcelo; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp) genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. Methodology/Principal Findings The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR). It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU), which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi) and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara). Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. Conclusion The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of this genus. PMID

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces silvensis ATCC 53525, a Producer of Novel Hormone Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Chad W.; Li, Yongchang

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces silvensis produces nonribosomal peptides that act as antagonists of the human oxytocin and vasopressin receptors. Here, we present the genome sequence of S. silvensis ATCC 53525 and demonstrate that this organism possesses a number of additional biosynthetic gene clusters and might be a promising source for genome-guided drug discovery efforts. PMID:26893408

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Bovine Mastitis Isolate Staphylococcus agnetis CBMRN 20813338

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Foecking, Mark F.; Fry, Pamela R.; Hsieh, Hsin-Yeh; Perry, Jeanette; Stewart, George C.; Scholl, Daniel T.; Messier, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Presented here is a draft genome sequence for Staphylococcus agnetis CBMRN 20813338, isolated from a lactating dairy cow with subclinical mastitis. The genome is approximately 2,416 kb and has 35.79% G+C content. Analysis of the deduced open reading frame (ORF) set identified candidate virulence attributes in addition to potential molecular targets for species identification. PMID:25189590

  7. Using Partial Genomic Fosmid Libraries for Sequencing CompleteOrganellar Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, Joel R.; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Arumuganathan, K.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-08-26

    Organellar genome sequences provide numerous phylogenetic markers and yield insight into organellar function and molecular evolution. These genomes are much smaller in size than their nuclear counterparts; thus, their complete sequencing is much less expensive than total nuclear genome sequencing, making broader phylogenetic sampling feasible. However, for some organisms it is challenging to isolate plastid DNA for sequencing using standard methods. To overcome these difficulties, we constructed partial genomic libraries from total DNA preparations of two heterotrophic and two autotrophic angiosperm species using fosmid vectors. We then used macroarray screening to isolate clones containing large fragments of plastid DNA. A minimum tiling path of clones comprising the entire genome sequence of each plastid was selected, and these clones were shotgun-sequenced and assembled into complete genomes. Although this method worked well for both heterotrophic and autotrophic plants, nuclear genome size had a dramatic effect on the proportion of screened clones containing plastid DNA and, consequently, the overall number of clones that must be screened to ensure full plastid genome coverage. This technique makes it possible to determine complete plastid genome sequences for organisms that defy other available organellar genome sequencing methods, especially those for which limited amounts of tissue are available.

  8. Sequencing ebola and marburg viruses genomes using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hardick, Justin; Woelfel, Roman; Gardner, Warren; Ibrahim, Sofi

    2016-08-01

    Periodic outbreaks of Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers have occurred in Africa over the past four decades with case fatality rates reaching as high as 90%. The latest Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014 raised concerns that these infections can spread across continents and pose serious health risks. Early and accurate identification of the causative agents is necessary to contain outbreaks. In this report, we describe sequencing-by-hybridization (SBH) technique using high density microarrays to identify Ebola and Marburg viruses. The microarrays were designed to interrogate the sequences of entire viral genomes, and were evaluated with three species of Ebolavirus (Reston, Sudan, and Zaire), and three strains of Marburgvirus (Angola, Musoke, and Ravn). The results showed that the consensus sequences generated with four or more hybridizations had 92.1-98.9% accuracy over 95-99% of the genomes. Additionally, with SBH microarrays it was possible to distinguish between different strains of the Lake Victoria Marburgvirus. J. Med. Virol. 88:1303-1308, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Identification of novel biomass-degrading enzymes from genomic dark matter: Populating genomic sequence space with functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hailan; Froula, Jeff; Du, Changbin; Kim, Tae-Wan; Hawley, Erik R; Bauer, Stefan; Wang, Zhong; Ivanova, Nathalia; Clark, Douglas S; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    Although recent nucleotide sequencing technologies have significantly enhanced our understanding of microbial genomes, the function of ∼35% of genes identified in a genome currently remains unknown. To improve the understanding of microbial genomes and consequently of microbial processes it will be crucial to assign a function to this "genomic dark matter." Due to the urgent need for additional carbohydrate-active enzymes for improved production of transportation fuels from lignocellulosic biomass, we screened the genomes of more than 5,500 microorganisms for hypothetical proteins that are located in the proximity of already known cellulases. We identified, synthesized and expressed a total of 17 putative cellulase genes with insufficient sequence similarity to currently known cellulases to be identified as such using traditional sequence annotation techniques that rely on significant sequence similarity. The recombinant proteins of the newly identified putative cellulases were subjected to enzymatic activity assays to verify their hydrolytic activity towards cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass. Eleven (65%) of the tested enzymes had significant activity towards at least one of the substrates. This high success rate highlights that a gene context-based approach can be used to assign function to genes that are otherwise categorized as "genomic dark matter" and to identify biomass-degrading enzymes that have little sequence similarity to already known cellulases. The ability to assign function to genes that have no related sequence representatives with functional annotation will be important to enhance our understanding of microbial processes and to identify microbial proteins for a wide range of applications.

  10. Real-time, portable genome sequencing for Ebola surveillance.

    PubMed

    Quick, Joshua; Loman, Nicholas J; Duraffour, Sophie; Simpson, Jared T; Severi, Ettore; Cowley, Lauren; Bore, Joseph Akoi; Koundouno, Raymond; Dudas, Gytis; Mikhail, Amy; Ouédraogo, Nobila; Afrough, Babak; Bah, Amadou; Baum, Jonathan H J; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Boettcher, Jan Peter; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Camino-Sánchez, Álvaro; Carter, Lisa L; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Enkirch, Theresa; García-Dorival, Isabel; Hetzelt, Nicole; Hinzmann, Julia; Holm, Tobias; Kafetzopoulou, Liana Eleni; Koropogui, Michel; Kosgey, Abigael; Kuisma, Eeva; Logue, Christopher H; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Meisel, Sarah; Mertens, Marc; Michel, Janine; Ngabo, Didier; Nitzsche, Katja; Pallasch, Elisa; Patrono, Livia Victoria; Portmann, Jasmine; Repits, Johanna Gabriella; Rickett, Natasha Y; Sachse, Andreas; Singethan, Katrin; Vitoriano, Inês; Yemanaberhan, Rahel L; Zekeng, Elsa G; Racine, Trina; Bello, Alexander; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Faye, Ousmane; Faye, Oumar; Magassouba, N'Faly; Williams, Cecelia V; Amburgey, Victoria; Winona, Linda; Davis, Emily; Gerlach, Jon; Washington, Frank; Monteil, Vanessa; Jourdain, Marine; Bererd, Marion; Camara, Alimou; Somlare, Hermann; Camara, Abdoulaye; Gerard, Marianne; Bado, Guillaume; Baillet, Bernard; Delaune, Déborah; Nebie, Koumpingnin Yacouba; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Savane, Yacouba; Pallawo, Raymond Bernard; Gutierrez, Giovanna Jaramillo; Milhano, Natacha; Roger, Isabelle; Williams, Christopher J; Yattara, Facinet; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Taylor, James; Rachwal, Phillip; Turner, Daniel J; Pollakis, Georgios; Hiscox, Julian A; Matthews, David A; O'Shea, Matthew K; Johnston, Andrew McD; Wilson, Duncan; Hutley, Emma; Smit, Erasmus; Di Caro, Antonino; Wölfel, Roman; Stoecker, Kilian; Fleischmann, Erna; Gabriel, Martin; Weller, Simon A; Koivogui, Lamine; Diallo, Boubacar; Keïta, Sakoba; Rambaut, Andrew; Formenty, Pierre; Günther, Stephan; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-02-11

    The Ebola virus disease epidemic in West Africa is the largest on record, responsible for over 28,599 cases and more than 11,299 deaths. Genome sequencing in viral outbreaks is desirable to characterize the infectious agent and determine its evolutionary rate. Genome sequencing also allows the identification of signatures of host adaptation, identification and monitoring of diagnostic targets, and characterization of responses to vaccines and treatments. The Ebola virus (EBOV) genome substitution rate in the Makona strain has been estimated at between 0.87 × 10(-3) and 1.42 × 10(-3) mutations per site per year. This is equivalent to 16-27 mutations in each genome, meaning that sequences diverge rapidly enough to identify distinct sub-lineages during a prolonged epidemic. Genome sequencing provides a high-resolution view of pathogen evolution and is increasingly sought after for outbreak surveillance. Sequence data may be used to guide control measures, but only if the results are generated quickly enough to inform interventions. Genomic surveillance during the epidemic has been sporadic owing to a lack of local sequencing capacity coupled with practical difficulties transporting samples to remote sequencing facilities. To address this problem, here we devise a genomic surveillance system that utilizes a novel nanopore DNA sequencing instrument. In April 2015 this system was transported in standard airline luggage to Guinea and used for real-time genomic surveillance of the ongoing epidemic. We present sequence data and analysis of 142 EBOV samples collected during the period March to October 2015. We were able to generate results less than 24 h after receiving an Ebola-positive sample, with the sequencing process taking as little as 15-60 min. We show that real-time genomic surveillance is possible in resource-limited settings and can be established rapidly to monitor outbreaks. PMID:26840485

  11. Unraveling Additive from Nonadditive Effects Using Genomic Relationship Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Patricio R.; Resende, Marcio F. R.; Gezan, Salvador A.; Resende, Marcos Deon Vilela; de los Campos, Gustavo; Kirst, Matias; Huber, Dudley; Peter, Gary F.

    2014-01-01

    The application of quantitative genetics in plant and animal breeding has largely focused on additive models, which may also capture dominance and epistatic effects. Partitioning genetic variance into its additive and nonadditive components using pedigree-based models (P-genomic best linear unbiased predictor) (P-BLUP) is difficult with most commonly available family structures. However, the availability of dense panels of molecular markers makes possible the use of additive- and dominance-realized genomic relationships for the estimation of variance components and the prediction of genetic values (G-BLUP). We evaluated height data from a multifamily population of the tree species Pinus taeda with a systematic series of models accounting for additive, dominance, and first-order epistatic interactions (additive by additive, dominance by dominance, and additive by dominance), using either pedigree- or marker-based information. We show that, compared with the pedigree, use of realized genomic relationships in marker-based models yields a substantially more precise separation of additive and nonadditive components of genetic variance. We conclude that the marker-based relationship matrices in a model including additive and nonadditive effects performed better, improving breeding value prediction. Moreover, our results suggest that, for tree height in this population, the additive and nonadditive components of genetic variance are similar in magnitude. This novel result improves our current understanding of the genetic control and architecture of a quantitative trait and should be considered when developing breeding strategies. PMID:25324160

  12. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    SciTech Connect

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The {approx}400-Mb assembly covers {approx}80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  13. Reference genome sequence of the model plant Setaria

    SciTech Connect

    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Schmutz, Jeremy; Wang, Hao; Percifield, Ryan; Hawkins, Jennifer; Pontaroli, Ana C.; Estep, Matt; Feng, Liang; Vaughn, Justin N; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Barry, Kerrie; Lindquist, Erika; Hellsten, Uffe; Deshpande, Shweta; Wang, Xuewen; Wu, Xiaomei; Mitros, Therese; Triplett, Jimmy; Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Mauro-Herrera, Margarita; Wang, Lin; Li, Pinghua; Sharma, Manoj; Sharma, Rita; Ronald, Pamela; Panaud, Olivier; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Doust, Andrew N.; Tuskan, Gerald A; Rokhsar, Daniel; Devos, Katrien M

    2012-01-01

    We generated a high-quality reference genome sequence for foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The ~400-Mb assembly covers ~80% of the genome and >95% of the gene space. The assembly was anchored to a 992-locus genetic map and was annotated by comparison with >1.3 million expressed sequence tag reads. We produced more than 580 million RNA-Seq reads to facilitate expression analyses. We also sequenced Setaria viridis, the ancestral wild relative of S. italica, and identified regions of differential single-nucleotide polymorphism density, distribution of transposable elements, small RNA content, chromosomal rearrangement and segregation distortion. The genus Setaria includes natural and cultivated species that demonstrate a wide capacity for adaptation. The genetic basis of this adaptation was investigated by comparing five sequenced grass genomes. We also used the diploid Setaria genome to evaluate the ongoing genome assembly of a related polyploid, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

  14. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Gao, Huanhuan; Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Pang, Xiaohui; Yao, Hui; Sun, Chao; Li, Xian'en; Li, Chuyuan; Liu, Juyan; Xu, Haibin; Chen, Shilin

    2013-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal plant with great economic and medicinal value. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza, the first sequenced member of the Lamiaceae family, is reported here. The genome is 151,328 bp in length and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 82,695 bp) and small (SSC, 17,555 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,539 bp). It contains 114 unique genes, including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNAs and four rRNAs. The genome structure, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to the typical angiosperm cp genomes. Four forward, three inverted and seven tandem repeats were detected in the Salvia miltiorrhiza cp genome. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis among the 30 asterid cp genomes revealed that most SSRs are AT-rich, which contribute to the overall AT richness of these cp genomes. Additionally, fewer SSRs are distributed in the protein-coding sequences compared to the non-coding regions, indicating an uneven distribution of SSRs within the cp genomes. Entire cp genome comparison of Salvia miltiorrhiza and three other Lamiales cp genomes showed a high degree of sequence similarity and a relatively high divergence of intergenic spacers. Sequence divergence analysis discovered the ten most divergent and ten most conserved genes as well as their length variation, which will be helpful for phylogenetic studies in asterids. Our analysis also supports that both regional and functional constraints affect gene sequence evolution. Further, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between Salvia miltiorrhiza and Sesamum indicum. The complete cp genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza reported in this paper will facilitate population, phylogenetic and cp genetic engineering studies of this medicinal plant.

  15. Cryptococcus gattii in the Age of Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wieland

    2015-11-17

    Cryptococcus gattii, the sister species of Cryptococcus neoformans, is an emerging pathogen which gained importance in connection with the ongoing cryptococcosis outbreak on Vancouver Island. Many molecular studies have divided this species into for major lineages: VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV. This commentary summarizes the whole-genome sequencing (WGS) studies that have been carried out with this species, re-emphasizing the phylogenetic relationships, showing chromosomal rearrangements between those four groups, and identifying VGII as ancestral population within C. gattii. In addition, WGS specific to VGII, containing the Vancouver Island outbreak genotypes and those from the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, has placed the origin of this lineage within South America and identified specific genes responsible for either brain or lung infection. It also showed, that many genotypes are spread across a number of different continents, as has been previously shown by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In addition, it showed that recombination occurs more frequently between mitochondrial than nuclear genomes.

  16. Cryptococcus gattii in the Age of Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Wieland

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii, the sister species of Cryptococcus neoformans, is an emerging pathogen which gained importance in connection with the ongoing cryptococcosis outbreak on Vancouver Island. Many molecular studies have divided this species into for major lineages: VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV. This commentary summarizes the whole-genome sequencing (WGS) studies that have been carried out with this species, re-emphasizing the phylogenetic relationships, showing chromosomal rearrangements between those four groups, and identifying VGII as ancestral population within C. gattii. In addition, WGS specific to VGII, containing the Vancouver Island outbreak genotypes and those from the Pacific Northwest region of the United States, has placed the origin of this lineage within South America and identified specific genes responsible for either brain or lung infection. It also showed, that many genotypes are spread across a number of different continents, as has been previously shown by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In addition, it showed that recombination occurs more frequently between mitochondrial than nuclear genomes. PMID:26578680

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study of HIV Whole Genome Sequences Validated using Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Power, Robert A.; Davaniah, Siva; Derache, Anne; Wilkinson, Eduan; Tanser, Frank; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably advanced our understanding of human traits and diseases. With the increasing availability of whole genome sequences (WGS) for pathogens, it is important to establish whether GWAS of viral genomes could reveal important biological insights. Here we perform the first proof of concept viral GWAS examining drug resistance (DR), a phenotype with well understood genetics. Method We performed a GWAS of DR in a sample of 343 HIV subtype C patients failing 1st line antiretroviral treatment in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The majority and minority variants within each sequence were called using PILON, and GWAS was performed within PLINK. HIV WGS from patients failing on different antiretroviral treatments were compared to sequences derived from individuals naïve to the respective treatment. Results GWAS methodology was validated by identifying five associations on a genetic level that led to amino acid changes known to cause DR. Further, we highlighted the ability of GWAS to identify epistatic effects, identifying two replicable variants within amino acid 68 of the reverse transcriptase protein previously described as potential fitness compensatory mutations. A possible additional DR variant within amino acid 91 of the matrix region of the Gag protein was associated with tenofovir failure, highlighting GWAS’s ability to identify variants outside classical candidate genes. Our results also suggest a polygenic component to DR. Conclusions These results validate the applicability of GWAS to HIV WGS data even in relative small samples, and emphasise how high throughput sequencing can provide novel and clinically relevant insights. Further they suggested that for viruses like HIV, population structure was only minor concern compared to that seen in bacteria or parasite GWAS. Given the small genome length and reduced burden for multiple testing, this makes HIV an ideal candidate for GWAS. PMID:27677172

  18. Genome Science: A Video Tour of the Washington University Genome Sequencing Center for High School and Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Susan K.; Easter, Carla; Holmes, Andrea; Cohen, Brian; Bednarski, April E.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the human genome has ushered in a new era of biology. The technologies developed to facilitate the sequencing of the human genome are now being applied to the sequencing of other genomes. In 2004, a partnership was formed between Washington University School of Medicine Genome Sequencing Center's Outreach Program and Washington…

  19. Genome sequencing of the redbanded stink bug (Piezodorus guildinii)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assembled a partial genome sequence from the redbanded stink bug, Piezodorus guildinii from Illumina MiSeq sequencing runs. The sequence has been submitted and published under NCBI GenBank Accession Number JTEQ01000000. The BioProject and BioSample Accession numbers are PRJNA263369 and SAMN030997...

  20. Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, N; Sikorski, Johannes; Jando, Marlen; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Han, Cliff; Detter, J C; Brettin, Thomas S; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Rohde, Manfred; Lang, Elke; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of the cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Spirosoma linguale type strain (1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Lail, Kathleen; Sikorski, Johannes; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Detter, J. Chris; Schutze, Andrea; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Spirosoma linguale Migula 1894 is the type species of the genus. S. linguale is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, known for its peculiar ringlike and horseshoe-shaped cell morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete ge-nome sequence and annotation. This is only the third completed genome sequence of a member of the family Cytophagaceae. The 8,491,258 bp long genome with its eight plas-mids, 7,069 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacte-ria and Archaea project.

  4. Draft genome sequence of Enterococcus faecium strain LMG 8148.

    PubMed

    Michiels, Joran E; Van den Bergh, Bram; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium, traditionally considered a harmless gut commensal, is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen showing increasing rates of multidrug resistance. We report the draft genome sequence of E. faecium strain LMG 8148, isolated in 1968 from a human in Gothenburg, Sweden. The draft genome has a total length of 2,697,490 bp, a GC-content of 38.3 %, and 2,402 predicted protein-coding sequences. The isolation of this strain predates the emergence of E. faecium as a nosocomial pathogen. Consequently, its genome can be useful in comparative genomic studies investigating the evolution of E. faecium as a pathogen. PMID:27610213

  5. The Genomic Scrapheap Challenge; Extracting Relevant Data from Unmapped Whole Genome Sequencing Reads, Including Strain Specific Genomic Segments, in Rats

    PubMed Central

    van der Weide, Robin H.; Simonis, Marieke; Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Cuppen, Edwin; de Ligt, Joep

    2016-01-01

    Unmapped next-generation sequencing reads are typically ignored while they contain biologically relevant information. We systematically analyzed unmapped reads from whole genome sequencing of 33 inbred rat strains. High quality reads were selected and enriched for biologically relevant sequences; similarity-based analysis revealed clustering similar to previously reported phylogenetic trees. Our results demonstrate that on average 20% of all unmapped reads harbor sequences that can be used to improve reference genomes and generate hypotheses on potential genotype-phenotype relationships. Analysis pipelines would benefit from incorporating the described methods and reference genomes would benefit from inclusion of the genomic segments obtained through these efforts. PMID:27501045

  6. Genome sequencing and annotation of Aeromonas sp. HZM

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Patric; Har, Zi Mei; Austin, Christopher M.; Yule, Catherine M.; Dykes, Gary A.; Lee, Sui Mae

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain HZM, isolated from tropical peat swamp forest soil. The draft genome size is 4,451,364 bp with a G + C content of 61.7% and contains 10 rRNA sequences (eight copies of 5S rRNA genes, single copy of 16S and 23S rRNA each). The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. JEMQ00000000. PMID:26484220

  7. Complete genome sequence of Ferroglobus placidus AEDII12DO.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Iain; Risso, Carla; Holmes, Dawn; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Samuel; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Woyke, Tanja; Lovley, Derek; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2011-10-15

    Ferroglobus placidus belongs to the order Archaeoglobales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. Strain AEDII12DO is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano, Italy. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic chemolithoautotroph, but it can also use a variety of aromatic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,196,266 bp genome with its 2,567 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes was sequenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute Laboratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project. PMID:22180810

  8. Complete genome sequence of Staphylothermus hellenicus P8T

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Wirth, Reinhard; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen W.; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Pati, Amrita; Mikhailova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N

    2011-01-01

    Staphylothermus hellenicus belongs to the order Desulfurococcales within the archaeal phy- lum Crenarchaeota. Strain P8T is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shal- low hydrothermal vent system at Palaeochori Bay, Milos, Greece. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic heterotroph. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the com- plete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,580,347 bp genome with its 1,668 protein- coding and 48 RNA genes was sequenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) La- boratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

  9. Sequencing and analysis of a South Asian-Indian personal genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With over 1.3 billion people, India is estimated to contain three times more genetic diversity than does Europe. Next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the understanding of diversity by enabling whole genome sequencing at greater speed and lower cost. While genomes from people of European and Asian descent have been sequenced, only recently has a single male genome from the Indian subcontinent been published at sufficient depth and coverage. In this study we have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a South Asian Indian female (SAIF) from the Indian state of Kerala. Results We identified over 3.4 million SNPs in this genome including over 89,873 private variations. Comparison of the SAIF genome with several published personal genomes revealed that this individual shared ~50% of the SNPs with each of these genomes. Analysis of the SAIF mitochondrial genome showed that it was closely related to the U1 haplogroup which has been previously observed in Kerala. We assessed the SAIF genome for SNPs with health and disease consequences and found that the individual was at a higher risk for multiple sclerosis and a few other diseases. In analyzing SNPs that modulate drug response, we found a variation that predicts a favorable response to metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes. SNPs predictive of adverse reaction to warfarin indicated that the SAIF individual is not at risk for bleeding if treated with typical doses of warfarin. In addition, we report the presence of several additional SNPs of medical relevance. Conclusions This is the first study to report the complete whole genome sequence of a female from the state of Kerala in India. The availability of this complete genome and variants will further aid studies aimed at understanding genetic diversity, identifying clinically relevant changes and assessing disease burden in the Indian population. PMID:22938532

  10. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 and comparison with Pyrococcus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kanai, Tamotsu; Matsumi, Rie; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2005-01-01

    The genus Thermococcus, comprised of sulfur-reducing hyperthermophilic archaea, belongs to the order Thermococcales in Euryarchaeota along with the closely related genus Pyrococcus. The members of Thermococcus are ubiquitously present in natural high-temperature environments, and are therefore considered to play a major role in the ecology and metabolic activity of microbial consortia within hot-water ecosystems. To obtain insight into this important genus, we have determined and annotated the complete 2,088,737-base genome of Thermococcus kodakaraensis strain KOD1, followed by a comparison with the three complete genomes of Pyrococcus spp. A total of 2306 coding DNA sequences (CDSs) have been identified, among which half (1165 CDSs) are annotatable, whereas the functions of 41% (936 CDSs) cannot be predicted from the primary structures. The genome contains seven genes for probable transposases and four virus-related regions. Several proteins within these genetic elements show high similarities to those in Pyrococcus spp., implying the natural occurrence of horizontal gene transfer of such mobile elements among the order Thermococcales. Comparative genomics clarified that 1204 proteins, including those for information processing and basic metabolisms, are shared among T. kodakaraensis and the three Pyrococcus spp. On the other hand, among the set of 689 proteins unique to T. kodakaraensis, there are several intriguing proteins that might be responsible for the specific trait of the genus Thermococcus, such as proteins involved in additional pyruvate oxidation, nucleotide metabolisms, unique or additional metal ion transporters, improved stress response system, and a distinct restriction system. PMID:15710748

  11. Accurate whole human genome sequencing using reversible terminator chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bentley, David R; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Swerdlow, Harold P; Smith, Geoffrey P; Milton, John; Brown, Clive G; Hall, Kevin P; Evers, Dirk J; Barnes, Colin L; Bignell, Helen R; Boutell, Jonathan M; Bryant, Jason; Carter, Richard J; Keira Cheetham, R; Cox, Anthony J; Ellis, Darren J; Flatbush, Michael R; Gormley, Niall A; Humphray, Sean J; Irving, Leslie J; Karbelashvili, Mirian S; Kirk, Scott M; Li, Heng; Liu, Xiaohai; Maisinger, Klaus S; Murray, Lisa J; Obradovic, Bojan; Ost, Tobias; Parkinson, Michael L; Pratt, Mark R; Rasolonjatovo, Isabelle M J; Reed, Mark T; Rigatti, Roberto; Rodighiero, Chiara; Ross, Mark T; Sabot, Andrea; Sankar, Subramanian V; Scally, Aylwyn; Schroth, Gary P; Smith, Mark E; Smith, Vincent P; Spiridou, Anastassia; Torrance, Peta E; Tzonev, Svilen S; Vermaas, Eric H; Walter, Klaudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Lu; Alam, Mohammed D; Anastasi, Carole; Aniebo, Ify C; Bailey, David M D; Bancarz, Iain R; Banerjee, Saibal; Barbour, Selena G; Baybayan, Primo A; Benoit, Vincent A; Benson, Kevin F; Bevis, Claire; Black, Phillip J; Boodhun, Asha; Brennan, Joe S; Bridgham, John A; Brown, Rob C; Brown, Andrew A; Buermann, Dale H; Bundu, Abass A; Burrows, James C; Carter, Nigel P; Castillo, Nestor; Chiara E Catenazzi, Maria; Chang, Simon; Neil Cooley, R; Crake, Natasha R; Dada, Olubunmi O; Diakoumakos, Konstantinos D; Dominguez-Fernandez, Belen; Earnshaw, David J; Egbujor, Ugonna C; Elmore, David W; Etchin, Sergey S; Ewan, Mark R; Fedurco, Milan; Fraser, Louise J; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin V; Scott Furey, W; George, David; Gietzen, Kimberley J; Goddard, Colin P; Golda, George S; Granieri, Philip A; Green, David E; Gustafson, David L; Hansen, Nancy F; Harnish, Kevin; Haudenschild, Christian D; Heyer, Narinder I; Hims, Matthew M; Ho, Johnny T; Horgan, Adrian M; Hoschler, Katya; Hurwitz, Steve; Ivanov, Denis V; Johnson, Maria Q; James, Terena; Huw Jones, T A; Kang, Gyoung-Dong; Kerelska, Tzvetana H; Kersey, Alan D; Khrebtukova, Irina; Kindwall, Alex P; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kokko-Gonzales, Paula I; Kumar, Anil; Laurent, Marc A; Lawley, Cynthia T; Lee, Sarah E; Lee, Xavier; Liao, Arnold K; Loch, Jennifer A; Lok, Mitch; Luo, Shujun; Mammen, Radhika M; Martin, John W; McCauley, Patrick G; McNitt, Paul; Mehta, Parul; Moon, Keith W; Mullens, Joe W; Newington, Taksina; Ning, Zemin; Ling Ng, Bee; Novo, Sonia M; O'Neill, Michael J; Osborne, Mark A; Osnowski, Andrew; Ostadan, Omead; Paraschos, Lambros L; Pickering, Lea; Pike, Andrew C; Pike, Alger C; Chris Pinkard, D; Pliskin, Daniel P; Podhasky, Joe; Quijano, Victor J; Raczy, Come; Rae, Vicki H; Rawlings, Stephen R; Chiva Rodriguez, Ana; Roe, Phyllida M; Rogers, John; Rogert Bacigalupo, Maria C; Romanov, Nikolai; Romieu, Anthony; Roth, Rithy K; Rourke, Natalie J; Ruediger, Silke T; Rusman, Eli; Sanches-Kuiper, Raquel M; Schenker, Martin R; Seoane, Josefina M; Shaw, Richard J; Shiver, Mitch K; Short, Steven W; Sizto, Ning L; Sluis, Johannes P; Smith, Melanie A; Ernest Sohna Sohna, Jean; Spence, Eric J; Stevens, Kim; Sutton, Neil; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Tregidgo, Carolyn L; Turcatti, Gerardo; Vandevondele, Stephanie; Verhovsky, Yuli; Virk, Selene M; Wakelin, Suzanne; Walcott, Gregory C; Wang, Jingwen; Worsley, Graham J; Yan, Juying; Yau, Ling; Zuerlein, Mike; Rogers, Jane; Mullikin, James C; Hurles, Matthew E; McCooke, Nick J; West, John S; Oaks, Frank L; Lundberg, Peter L; Klenerman, David; Durbin, Richard; Smith, Anthony J

    2008-11-01

    DNA sequence information underpins genetic research, enabling discoveries of important biological or medical benefit. Sequencing projects have traditionally used long (400-800 base pair) reads, but the existence of reference sequences for the human and many other genomes makes it possible to develop new, fast approaches to re-sequencing, whereby shorter reads are compared to a reference to identify intraspecies genetic variation. Here we report an approach that generates several billion bases of accurate nucleotide sequence per experiment at low cost. Single molecules of DNA are attached to a flat surface, amplified in situ and used as templates for synthetic sequencing with fluorescent reversible terminator deoxyribonucleotides. Images of the surface are analysed to generate high-quality sequence. We demonstrate application of this approach to human genome sequencing on flow-sorted X chromosomes and then scale the approach to determine the genome sequence of a male Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria. We build an accurate consensus sequence from >30x average depth of paired 35-base reads. We characterize four million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and four hundred thousand structural variants, many of which were previously unknown. Our approach is effective for accurate, rapid and economical whole-genome re-sequencing and many other biomedical applications.

  12. High density linkage mapping of genomic and transcriptomic SNPs for synteny analysis and anchoring the genome sequence of chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rashmi; Jeena, Ganga; Shah, Niraj; Gupta, Shefali; Pradhan, Seema; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study presents genome-wide discovery of SNPs through next generation sequencing of the genome of Cicer reticulatum. Mapping of the C. reticulatum sequenced reads onto the draft genome assembly of C. arietinum (desi chickpea) resulted in identification of 842,104 genomic SNPs which were utilized along with an additional 36,446 genic SNPs identified from transcriptome sequences of the aforementioned varieties. Two new chickpea Oligo Pool All (OPAs) each having 3,072 SNPs were designed and utilized for SNP genotyping of 129 Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs). Using Illumina GoldenGate Technology genotyping data of 5,041 SNPs were generated and combined with the 1,673 marker data from previously published studies, to generate a high resolution linkage map. The map comprised of 6698 markers distributed on eight linkage groups spanning 1083.93 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.16 cM. Utility of the present map was demonstrated for improving the anchoring of the earlier reported draft genome sequence of desi chickpea by ~30% and that of kabuli chickpea by 18%. The genetic map reported in this study represents the most dense linkage map of chickpea , with the potential to facilitate efficient anchoring of the draft genome sequences of desi as well as kabuli chickpea varieties. PMID:26303721

  13. High density linkage mapping of genomic and transcriptomic SNPs for synteny analysis and anchoring the genome sequence of chickpea.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi; Jeena, Ganga; Shah, Niraj; Gupta, Shefali; Pradhan, Seema; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study presents genome-wide discovery of SNPs through next generation sequencing of the genome of Cicer reticulatum. Mapping of the C. reticulatum sequenced reads onto the draft genome assembly of C. arietinum (desi chickpea) resulted in identification of 842,104 genomic SNPs which were utilized along with an additional 36,446 genic SNPs identified from transcriptome sequences of the aforementioned varieties. Two new chickpea Oligo Pool All (OPAs) each having 3,072 SNPs were designed and utilized for SNP genotyping of 129 Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs). Using Illumina GoldenGate Technology genotyping data of 5,041 SNPs were generated and combined with the 1,673 marker data from previously published studies, to generate a high resolution linkage map. The map comprised of 6698 markers distributed on eight linkage groups spanning 1083.93 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.16 cM. Utility of the present map was demonstrated for improving the anchoring of the earlier reported draft genome sequence of desi chickpea by ~30% and that of kabuli chickpea by 18%. The genetic map reported in this study represents the most dense linkage map of chickpea , with the potential to facilitate efficient anchoring of the draft genome sequences of desi as well as kabuli chickpea varieties.

  14. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H J; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E; Bakker, Freek T

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more horizontal

  15. BAC-pool 454-sequencing: A rapid and efficient approach to sequence complex tetraploid cotton genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New and emerging next generation sequencing technologies have been promising in reducing sequencing costs, but not significantly for complex polyploid plant genomes such as cotton. Large and highly repetitive genome of G. hirsutum (~2.5GB) is less amenable and cost-intensive with traditional BAC-by...

  16. Genome Sequence of a Novel Iflavirus from mRNA Sequencing of the Butterfly Heliconius erato

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of a novel iflavirus strain recovered from the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. The coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the iflavirus genome was 8,895 nucleotides in length, encoding a polyprotein that was 2,965 amino acids long. PMID:24831145

  17. Real-time, portable genome sequencing for Ebola surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bore, Joseph Akoi; Koundouno, Raymond; Dudas, Gytis; Mikhail, Amy; Ouédraogo, Nobila; Afrough, Babak; Bah, Amadou; Baum, Jonathan HJ; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Boettcher, Jan-Peter; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Camino-Sanchez, Alvaro; Carter, Lisa L.; Doerrbecker, Juiliane; Enkirch, Theresa; Dorival, Isabel Graciela García; Hetzelt, Nicole; Hinzmann, Julia; Holm, Tobias; Kafetzopoulou, Liana Eleni; Koropogui, Michel; Kosgey, Abigail; Kuisma, Eeva; Logue, Christopher H; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Meisel, Sarah; Mertens, Marc; Michel, Janine; Ngabo, Didier; Nitzsche, Katja; Pallash, Elisa; Patrono, Livia Victoria; Portmann, Jasmine; Repits, Johanna Gabriella; Rickett, Natasha Yasmin; Sachse, Andrea; Singethan, Katrin; Vitoriano, Inês; Yemanaberhan, Rahel L; Zekeng, Elsa G; Trina, Racine; Bello, Alexander; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Faye, Ousmane; Faye, Oumar; Magassouba, N’Faly; Williams, Cecelia V.; Amburgey, Victoria; Winona, Linda; Davis, Emily; Gerlach, Jon; Washington, Franck; Monteil, Vanessa; Jourdain, Marine; Bererd, Marion; Camara, Alimou; Somlare, Hermann; Camara, Abdoulaye; Gerard, Marianne; Bado, Guillaume; Baillet, Bernard; Delaune, Déborah; Nebie, Koumpingnin Yacouba; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Savane, Yacouba; Pallawo, Raymond Bernard; Gutierrez, Giovanna Jaramillo; Milhano, Natacha; Roger, Isabelle; Williams, Christopher J; Yattara, Facinet; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Taylor, Jamie; Rachwal, Philip; Turner, Daniel; Pollakis, Georgios; Hiscox, Julian A.; Matthews, David A.; O’Shea, Matthew K.; Johnston, Andrew McD; Wilson, Duncan; Hutley, Emma; Smit, Erasmus; Di Caro, Antonino; Woelfel, Roman; Stoecker, Kilian; Fleischmann, Erna; Gabriel, Martin; Weller, Simon A.; Koivogui, Lamine; Diallo, Boubacar; Keita, Sakoba; Rambaut, Andrew; Formenty, Pierre; Gunther, Stephan; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa is the largest on record, responsible for >28,599 cases and >11,299 deaths 1. Genome sequencing in viral outbreaks is desirable in order to characterize the infectious agent to determine its evolutionary rate, signatures of host adaptation, identification and monitoring of diagnostic targets and responses to vaccines and treatments. The Ebola virus genome (EBOV) substitution rate in the Makona strain has been estimated at between 0.87 × 10−3 to 1.42 × 10−3 mutations per site per year. This is equivalent to 16 to 27 mutations in each genome, meaning that sequences diverge rapidly enough to identify distinct sub-lineages during a prolonged epidemic 2-7. Genome sequencing provides a high-resolution view of pathogen evolution and is increasingly sought-after for outbreak surveillance. Sequence data may be used to guide control measures, but only if the results are generated quickly enough to inform interventions 8. Genomic surveillance during the epidemic has been sporadic due to a lack of local sequencing capacity coupled with practical difficulties transporting samples to remote sequencing facilities 9. In order to address this problem, we devised a genomic surveillance system that utilizes a novel nanopore DNA sequencing instrument. In April 2015 this system was transported in standard airline luggage to Guinea and used for real-time genomic surveillance of the ongoing epidemic. Here we present sequence data and analysis of 142 Ebola virus (EBOV) samples collected during the period March to October 2015. We were able to generate results in less than 24 hours after receiving an Ebola positive sample, with the sequencing process taking as little as 15-60 minutes. We show that real-time genomic surveillance is possible in resource-limited settings and can be established rapidly to monitor outbreaks. PMID:26840485

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacter aceti Strain 1023, a Vinegar Factory Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Hung, John E.; Mill, Christopher P.; Clifton, Sandra W.; Magrini, Vincent; Bhide, Ketaki; Francois, Julie A.; Ransome, Aaron E.; Fulton, Lucinda; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Wilson, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    The genome sequence of Acetobacter aceti 1023, an acetic acid bacterium adapted to traditional vinegar fermentation, comprises 3.0 Mb (chromosome plus plasmids). A. aceti 1023 is closely related to the cocoa fermenter Acetobacter pasteurianus 386B but possesses many additional insertion sequence elements. PMID:24903876

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacter aceti Strain 1023, a Vinegar Factory Isolate.

    PubMed

    Hung, John E; Mill, Christopher P; Clifton, Sandra W; Magrini, Vincent; Bhide, Ketaki; Francois, Julie A; Ransome, Aaron E; Fulton, Lucinda; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Wilson, Richard K; Kappock, T Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The genome sequence of Acetobacter aceti 1023, an acetic acid bacterium adapted to traditional vinegar fermentation, comprises 3.0 Mb (chromosome plus plasmids). A. aceti 1023 is closely related to the cocoa fermenter Acetobacter pasteurianus 386B but possesses many additional insertion sequence elements.

  20. Sequencing of chloroplast genome using whole cellular DNA and solexa sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Feng; Ramchiary, Nirala; Choi, Su Ryun; Lim, Yong Pyo; Wang, Xiao-Wu

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of the chloroplast (cp) genome using traditional sequencing methods has been difficult because of its size (>120 kb) and the complicated procedures required to prepare templates. To explore the feasibility of sequencing the cp genome using DNA extracted from whole cells and Solexa sequencing technology, we sequenced whole cellular DNA isolated from leaves of three Brassicarapa accessions with one lane per accession. In total, 246, 362, and 361 Mb sequence data were generated for the three accessions Chiifu-401-42, Z16, and FT, respectively. Micro-reads were assembled by reference-guided assembly using the cpDNA sequences of B. rapa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Nicotiana tabacum. We achieved coverage of more than 99.96% of the cp genome in the three tested accessions using the B. rapa sequence as the reference. When A. thaliana or N. tabacum sequences were used as references, 99.7-99.8 or 95.5-99.7% of the B. rapa cp genome was covered, respectively. These results demonstrated that sequencing of whole cellular DNA isolated from young leaves using the Illumina Genome Analyzer is an efficient method for high-throughput sequencing of cp genome.

  1. Genome sequence of cultivated Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum TM-1) provides insights into genome evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and genomic analyses of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) are difficult because it has a complex allotetraploid (AADD; 2n = 4x = 52) genome. Here we sequenced, assembled and analyzed the world's most important cultivated cotton genome with 246.2 gigabase (Gb) clean data obtained using whol...

  2. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla L.; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rudiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Kalluri, Udaya C; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2010-01-01

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its potential as an important model system for developing new energy and food crops.

  4. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant species with useful aromatic oils in family Rutaceae, was generated in this study by de novo assembly with whole-genome sequence data. The chloroplast genome was 158 154 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 27 644 bp, separated by large single copy and small single copy of 85 340 bp and 17 526 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome harbored 112 genes consisting of 78 protein-coding genes 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequences with those of known relatives revealed that Z. piperitum is most closely related to the Citrus species. PMID:26260183

  5. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304688

  6. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134).

    PubMed

    Abt, Birte; Foster, Brian; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Sun, Hui; Pukall, Rüdiger; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-07-29

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome

    DOE PAGES

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; George, Reed A.; Svirskas, Robert; et al

    2015-01-14

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy andmore » middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. In conclusion, further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads.« less

  8. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Roger A; Carlson, Joseph W; Wan, Kenneth H; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E; Booth, Benjamin W; Pfeiffer, Barret D; George, Reed A; Svirskas, Robert; Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Damia, Elisabetta; Messina, Giovanni; Méndez-Lago, María; de Pablos, Beatriz; Demakova, Olga V; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Marra, Marco; Carvalho, A Bernardo; Dimitri, Patrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Zhimulev, Igor F; Rubin, Gerald M; Karpen, Gary H; Celniker, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy and middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. Further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads.

  9. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; George, Reed A.; Svirskas, Robert; Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Damia, Elisabetta; Messina, Giovanni; Méndez-Lago, María; de Pablos, Beatriz; Demakova, Olga V.; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N.; Boldyreva, Lidiya V.; Marra, Marco; Carvalho, A. Bernardo; Dimitri, Patrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy and middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. Further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads. PMID:25589440

  10. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Roger A; Carlson, Joseph W; Wan, Kenneth H; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E; Booth, Benjamin W; Pfeiffer, Barret D; George, Reed A; Svirskas, Robert; Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Damia, Elisabetta; Messina, Giovanni; Méndez-Lago, María; de Pablos, Beatriz; Demakova, Olga V; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Marra, Marco; Carvalho, A Bernardo; Dimitri, Patrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Zhimulev, Igor F; Rubin, Gerald M; Karpen, Gary H; Celniker, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy and middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. Further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads. PMID:25589440

  11. Genome sequence of Roseivirga sp. strain D-25 and its potential applications from the genomic aspect.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, Chitra; Thevarajoo, Suganthi; Ee, Robson; Chan, Kok-Gan; Bennett, Joseph P; Goh, Kian Mau; Chong, Chun Shiong

    2016-08-01

    Roseivirga sp. strain D-25 is an aerobic marine bacterium isolated from seawater collected from Desaru beach, Malaysia. To date, the genus Roseivirga consists of only four species with no genome sequence reported. Here, we present the genome sequence of Roseivirga sp. strain D-25 (=KCTC 42709=DSM 101709), with a genome size of approximately 4.08Mbp and G+C content of 39.18%. Genome sequence analysis of strain D-25 revealed the presence of genes related to petroleum hydrocarbon degradation, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene detoxification, heavy metals bioremediation and production of carotenoids, which shed light on the potential application of this strain. PMID:27107724

  12. Sequence, genomic structure, and chromosomal assignment of human DOC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Albertsen, H.M.; Williams, B.; Smith, S.A.

    1996-04-15

    DOC-2 is a human gene originally identified as a 767-bp cDNA fragment isolated from normal ovarian epithelial cells by differential display against ovarian carcinoma cells. We have now determined the complete cDNA sequence of the 3.2-kb DOC-2 transcript and localized the gene to chromosome 5. A 12.5-kb genomic fragment at the 5{prime}-end of DOC-2 has also been sequenced, revealing the intron-exon structure of the first eight exons (788 bases) of the DOC-2 gene. Translation of the DOC-2 cDNA predicts a hydrophobic protein of 770 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 82.5 kDa. Comparison of the DNA and amino acid sequences of DOC-2 to publicly accessible sequence data-bases revealed 83% identity to p96, a murine-responsive phosphoprotein. In addition, about 45% identity was observed between the first 140 N-terminal residues of DOC-2 and the Caenorhabditas elegans M110.5 and Drosophila melanoaster Dab genes. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Sequence of the Genome of Salmonella Bacteriophage P22

    PubMed Central

    Byl, Carolyn Vander; Kropinski, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    The sequence of the nonredundant region of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium temperate, serotype-converting bacteriophage P22 has been completed. The genome is 41,724 bp with an overall moles percent GC content of 47.1%. Numerous examples of potential integration host factor and C1-binding sites were identified in the sequence. In addition, five potential rho-independent terminators were discovered. Sixty-five genes were identified and annotated. While many of these had been described previously, we have added several new ones, including the genes involved in serotype conversion and late control. Two of the serotype conversion gene products show considerable sequence relatedness to GtrA and -B from Shigella phages SfII, SfV, and SfX. We have cloned the serotype-converting cassette (gtrABC) and demonstrated that it results in Salmonella serovar Typhimurium LT2 cells which express antigen O1. Many of the putative proteins show sequence relatedness to proteins from a great variety of other phages, supporting the hypothesis that this phage has evolved through the recombinational exchange of genetic information with other viruses. PMID:11053393

  14. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  15. Molecular evolution of herpesviruses: genomic and protein sequence comparisons.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Mocarski, E S; Schachtel, G A

    1994-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction of herpesvirus evolution is generally founded on amino acid sequence comparisons of specific proteins. These are relevant to the evolution of the specific gene (or set of genes), but the resulting phylogeny may vary depending on the particular sequence chosen for analysis (or comparison). In the first part of this report, we compare 13 herpesvirus genomes by using a new multidimensional methodology based on distance measures and partial orderings of dinucleotide relative abundances. The sequences were analyzed with respect to (i) genomic compositional extremes; (ii) total distances within and between genomes; (iii) partial orderings among genomes relative to a set of sequence standards; (iv) concordance correlations of genome distances; and (v) consistency with the alpha-, beta-, gammaherpesvirus classification. Distance assessments within individual herpesvirus genomes show each to be quite homogeneous relative to the comparisons between genomes. The gammaherpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpesvirus saimiri, and bovine herpesvirus 4 are both diverse and separate from other herpesvirus classes, whereas alpha- and betaherpesviruses overlap. The analysis revealed that the most central genome (closest to a consensus herpesvirus genome and most individual herpesvirus sequences of different classes) is that of human herpesvirus 6, suggesting that this genome is closest to a progenitor herpesvirus. The shorter DNA distances among alphaherpesviruses supports the hypothesis that the alpha class is of relatively recent ancestry. In our collection, equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV1) stands out as the most central alphaherpesvirus, suggesting it may approximate an ancestral alphaherpesvirus. Among all herpesviruses, the EBV genome is closest to human sequences. In the DNA partial orderings, the chicken sequence collection is invariably as close as or closer to all herpesvirus sequences than the human sequence collection is, which may imply that

  16. Complete genome sequence of Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180T

    PubMed Central

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Zigann, Renate; Bruce, David; Chang, Yun-juan; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Land, Miriam; Munk, A. Christine; Tapia, Roxanne; Dahl, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Allochromatium vinosum formerly Chromatium vinosum is a mesophilic purple sulfur bacterium belonging to the family Chromatiaceae in the bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria. The genus Allochromatium contains currently five species. All members were isolated from freshwater, brackish water or marine habitats and are predominately obligate phototrophs. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the Chromatiaceae within the purple sulfur bacteria thriving in globally occurring habitats. The 3,669,074 bp genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes was sequenced within the Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program. PMID:22675582

  17. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis Isolated from Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are major contaminants of mammalian cell cultures. Here, the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis recovered from Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells is reported. PMID:27738034

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Mycobacterium chimaera Respiratory Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Roycroft, Emma; Raftery, Philomena; Mok, Simone; Fitzgibbon, Margaret; Rogers, Thomas R

    2015-12-03

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in both pulmonary and cardiovascular infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from human respiratory specimens.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Gammaproteobacterial Methanotrophs Isolated from Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, James D.; Hirayama, Hisako; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Dunfield, Peter F.; Knief, Claudia; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Khmelenina, Valentina N.; Trotsenko, Yuri A.; Murrell, J. Colin; Semrau, Jeremy D.; Svenning, Mette M.; Stein, Lisa Y.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Bringel, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of Methylobacter marinus A45, Methylobacter sp. strain BBA5.1, and Methylomarinum vadi IT-4 were obtained. These aerobic methanotrophs are typical members of coastal and hydrothermal vent marine ecosystems. PMID:26798114

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Paecilomyces hepiali, Isolated from Cordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Wang, Wenting; Wang, Linping; Pang, Fang; Guo, Lanping; Song, Lai; Liu, Guiming; Feng, Chengqiang

    2016-01-01

    Paecilomyces hepiali is an endoparasitic fungus that commonly exists in the natural Cordyceps sinensis Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. hepiali, which will facilitate the exploitation of medicinal compounds produced by the fungus. PMID:27389266

  1. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, T.; Blagodatskikh, K.; Varlamov, D.; Sochivko, D.; Larionova, E.; Andreevskaya, S.; Andrievskaya, I.; Chernousova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae. The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  2. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate.

    PubMed

    Ustinova, V; Smirnova, T; Blagodatskikh, K; Varlamov, D; Sochivko, D; Larionova, E; Andreevskaya, S; Andrievskaya, I; Chernousova, L

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  3. Genome sequence of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare ATCC 49512

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare is a Gram-negative, rod shaped, motile, and highly prevalent fish pathogen causing columnaris disease in freshwater fish worldwide. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of F. columnare strain ATCC 49512. ...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Han, Cliff S.; Held, Brittany; Land, Miriam L.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65 is a gammaproteobacterium isolated from a drinking water source in Lille, France. Here we report the complete genome sequence of Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65, the type strain of R. aquatilis. PMID:22582378

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Paecilomyces hepiali, Isolated from Cordyceps sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi; Wang, Wenting; Wang, Linping; Pang, Fang; Guo, Lanping; Song, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Paecilomyces hepiali is an endoparasitic fungus that commonly exists in the natural Cordyceps sinensis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. hepiali, which will facilitate the exploitation of medicinal compounds produced by the fungus. PMID:27389266

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain IPLA 88

    PubMed Central

    Ladero, Victor; Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Redruello, Begoña; del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Martin, M. Cruz; Fernández, María

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a 3.2-Mbp draft assembly for the genome of Lactobacillus plantarum IPLA 88. The sequence of this sourdough isolate provides insight into the adaptation of this versatile species to different environments. PMID:23887921

  7. Genome Sequence of the Immunomodulatory Strain Bifidobacterium bifidum LMG 13195

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Ventura, Marco; Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we report the genome sequences of Bifidobacterium bifidum strain LMG13195. Results from our research group show that this strain is able to interact with human immune cells, generating functional regulatory T cells. PMID:23209243

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Robert J; Bruce, David; Detter, J C; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Held, Brittany; Land, Miriam L; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Sobeckya, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65 is a gammaproteobacterium isolated from a drinking water source in Lille, France. Here we report the complete genome sequence of Rahnella aquatilis CIP 78.65, the type strain of R. aquatilis.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus casei W56

    PubMed Central

    Hochwind, Kerstin; Weinmaier, Thomas; Schmid, Michael; van Hemert, Saskia; Hartmann, Anton; Rattei, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We announce the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei W56 in one contig. This strain shows immunomodulatory and probiotic properties. The strain is also an ingredient of commercially available probiotic products. PMID:23144392

  10. Draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei W56.

    PubMed

    Hochwind, Kerstin; Weinmaier, Thomas; Schmid, Michael; van Hemert, Saskia; Hartmann, Anton; Rattei, Thomas; Rothballer, Michael

    2012-12-01

    We announce the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei W56 in one contig. This strain shows immunomodulatory and probiotic properties. The strain is also an ingredient of commercially available probiotic products. PMID:23144392

  11. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:25252813

  12. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus.

  13. Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-07-15

    Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

  14. DNA Data Bank of Japan at work on genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Y; Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Miyazaki, S; Sugawara, H; Gojobori, T

    1998-01-01

    We at the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) (http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) have recently begun receiving, processing and releasing EST and genome sequence data submitted by various Japanese genome projects. The data include those for human, Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, nematode, Synechocystis sp. and Escherichia coli. Since the quantity of data is very large, we organized teams to conduct preliminary discussions with project teams about data submission and handling for release to the public. We also developed a mass submission tool to cope with a large quantity of data. In addition, to provide genome data on WWW, we developed a genome information system using Java. This system (http://mol.genes.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/) can in theory be used for any genome sequence data. These activities will facilitate processing of large quantities of EST and genome data. PMID:9399792

  15. Complete genome sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of functionally diverse Lysinibacillus sphaericus III(3)7.

    PubMed

    Rey, Andrés; Silva-Quintero, Laura; Dussán, Jenny

    2016-09-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus III(3)7 is a native Colombian strain, the first one isolated from soil samples. This strain has shown high levels of pathogenic activity against Culex quinquefaciatus larvae in laboratory assays compared to other members of the same species. Using Pacific Biosciences sequencing technology we sequenced, annotated (de novo) and described the genome of strain III(3)7, achieving a complete genome sequence status. We then performed a comparative analysis between the newly sequenced genome and the ones previously reported for Colombian isolates L. sphaericus OT4b.31, CBAM5 and OT4b.25, with the inclusion of L. sphaericus C3-41 that has been used as a reference genome for most of previous genome sequencing projects. We concluded that L. sphaericus III(3)7 is highly similar with strain OT4b.25 and shares high levels of synteny with isolates CBAM5 and C3-41. PMID:27419068

  16. RNA sequence and transcriptional properties of the 3' end of the Newcastle disease virus genome

    SciTech Connect

    Kurilla, M.G.; Stone, H.O.; Keene, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    The 3' end of the genomic RNA of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been sequenced and the leader RNA defined. Using hybridization to a 3'-end-labeled genome, leader RNA species from in vitro transcription reactions and from infected cell extracts were found to be 47 and 53 nucleotides long. In addition, the start site of the 3'-proximal mRNA was determined by sequence analysis of in vitro (beta-32P)GTP-labeled transcription products. The genomic sequence extending beyond the leader region demonstrated an open reading frame for at least 42 amino acids and probably represents the amino terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (NP). The terminal 8 nucleotides of the NDV genome were identical to those of measles virus and Sendai virus while the sequence of the distal half of the leader region was more similar to that of vesicular stomatitis virus. These data argue for strong evolutionary relatedness between the paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus groups.

  17. Whole-exome sequencing and whole genome re-sequencing for prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rong; Ruan, Yan; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome re-sequencing (WGS) in the prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia (ACH). Methods: Eleven highly suspected with ACH or hypochondroplasia (HCH) fetuses and their parents were enrolled in this study. Routine prenatal examinations were carried out in all pregnant women. WGS was performed for the detection of copy number variation (CNV). WES was conducted to determine the mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene in one special family with rickets and dwarfism. Moreover, all subjects were performed Sanger sequencing for the screening of high frequent mutation sites in FGFR3 gene. Results: For ultrasound (US) examination, short femur was noted in all fetuses with FL less than 4SD and 2SD in 8 cases and one case compared with those of normal gestational weeks, respectively. CNV abnormality was identified in 5 cases, including heterozygous deletion in 4 cases and heterozygous duplication in one case. Among these variation, one case was acknowledged to be pathogenic, one case was identified as genomic polymorphism, while the pathogenicity remained unknown in other 3 cases. For the exome and Sanger sequencing, heterozygous mutation p.Tyr278Cys (833A>G) was noted in the fetus and husband of the special family, while homozygous c.1959+19G>A mutation was identified in another case. Conclusion: Multiple sequencing technologies may provide an additional diagnostic tool and facilitates genetic counseling in the patients with ACH. Further improvement of gene sequencing should be done in the prenatal diagnosis for the mutant screening in other genes. PMID:26770560

  18. Return of Results from Genomic Sequencing: A Policy Discussion of Secondary Findings for Cancer Predisposition.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly J; Gehlert, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology now allow for the rapid genome-wide identification of inherited and acquired genetic variants including those that have been identified as pathogenic alleles for a number of diseases including cancer. Whole genome and exome sequencing are increasingly becoming a part of both clinical practice and research studies. In 2013 the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommended that results of pathogenic genetic variants in 56 genes, nearly half of which comprise cancer genes (including BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, MLH1, MLH2, MSH6, PMS2, and APC),be returned to patients who have their genome sequenced independent of the purpose for the test. This recommendation has been highly controversial for several reasons, particularly the recommendation that individuals be returned secondary findings of disease causing variants for adult onset conditions regardless of age and without consideration of patient preferences. In addition, the policy regarding returning results of secondary findings from genomic sequencing studies in research settings is currently unclear. In response to these emerging ethical issues, the Washington University Brown School in St. Louis, MO, United Stateshosted a policy forum entitled "First do no harm: Genetic privacy in the age of genomic sequencing" on February 25(th), 2014. The forum included a panel of experts to discuss their views on ethical issues related to return of results in both the clinical and research settings. In this report, we highlight key issues related to return of results from genome sequencing tests that emerged during the forum.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus cereus bacteriophage PBC1.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Kim, Minsik; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-06-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous, spore-forming bacterium associated with food poisoning cases. To develop an efficient biocontrol agent against B. cereus, we isolated lytic phage PBC1 and sequenced its genome. PBC1 showed a very low degree of homology to previously reported phages, implying that it is novel. Here we report the complete genome sequence of PBC1 and describe major findings from our analysis.

  20. Draft genome sequence of Therminicola potens strain JR

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne-Bailey, K.G.; Wrighton, K.C.; Melnyk, R.A.; Agbo, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Coates, J.D.

    2010-07-01

    'Thermincola potens' strain JR is one of the first Gram-positive dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) for which there is a complete genome sequence. Consistent with the physiology of this organism, preliminary annotation revealed an abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes that are putatively associated with the periplasm and cell surface in a Gram-positive bacterium. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain JR.

  1. Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens F113

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Barret, Matthieu; Morrisey, John P.; Germaine, Kieran; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Sánchez-Contreras, María; Moynihan, Jennifer A.; Giddens, Stephen R.; Coppoolse, Eric R.; Muriel, Candela; Stiekema, Willem J.; Rainey, Paul B.; Dowling, David; O'Gara, Fergal; Martín, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that has biocontrol activity against fungal plant pathogens and is a model for rhizosphere colonization. Here, we present its complete genome sequence, which shows that besides a core genome very similar to those of other strains sequenced within this species, F113 possesses a wide array of genes encoding specialized functions for thriving in the rhizosphere and interacting with eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22328765

  2. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Grassa, Christopher J; Ebert, Daniel P; Kane, Nolan C; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2016-01-01

    This is the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for sunflower and the first complete mitochondrial genome for any member of Asteraceae, the largest plant family, which includes over 23,000 named species. The master circle is 300,945-bp long and includes 27 protein-coding sequences, 18 tRNAs, and the 26S, 5S, and 18S rRNAs. PMID:27635002

  3. Draft genome sequence of Gluconobacter thailandicus NBRC 3257

    PubMed Central

    Matsutani, Minenosuke; Yakushi, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Gluconobacter thailandicus strain NBRC 3257, isolated from downy cherry (Prunus tomentosa), is a strict aerobic rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium. Here, we report the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence and annotation. The draft genome sequence is composed of 107 contigs for 3,446,046 bp with 56.17% G+C content and contains 3,360 protein-coding genes and 54 RNA genes. PMID:25197448

  4. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Daniel P.; Kane, Nolan C.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for sunflower and the first complete mitochondrial genome for any member of Asteraceae, the largest plant family, which includes over 23,000 named species. The master circle is 300,945-bp long and includes 27 protein-coding sequences, 18 tRNAs, and the 26S, 5S, and 18S rRNAs. PMID:27635002

  5. A computational genomics pipeline for prokaryotic sequencing projects

    PubMed Central

    Kislyuk, Andrey O.; Katz, Lee S.; Agrawal, Sonia; Hagen, Matthew S.; Conley, Andrew B.; Jayaraman, Pushkala; Nelakuditi, Viswateja; Humphrey, Jay C.; Sammons, Scott A.; Govil, Dhwani; Mair, Raydel D.; Tatti, Kathleen M.; Tondella, Maria L.; Harcourt, Brian H.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Jordan, I. King

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: New sequencing technologies have accelerated research on prokaryotic genomes and have made genome sequencing operations outside major genome sequencing centers routine. However, no off-the-shelf solution exists for the combined assembly, gene prediction, genome annotation and data presentation necessary to interpret sequencing data. The resulting requirement to invest significant resources into custom informatics support for genome sequencing projects remains a major impediment to the accessibility of high-throughput sequence data. Results: We present a self-contained, automated high-throughput open source genome sequencing and computational genomics pipeline suitable for prokaryotic sequencing projects. The pipeline has been used at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the analysis of Neisseria meningitidis and Bordetella bronchiseptica genomes. The pipeline is capable of enhanced or manually assisted reference-based assembly using multiple assemblers and modes; gene predictor combining; and functional annotation of genes and gene products. Because every component of the pipeline is executed on a local machine with no need to access resources over the Internet, the pipeline is suitable for projects of a sensitive nature. Annotation of virulence-related features makes the pipeline particularly useful for projects working with pathogenic prokaryotes. Availability and implementation: The pipeline is licensed under the open-source GNU General Public License and available at the Georgia Tech Neisseria Base (http://nbase.biology.gatech.edu/). The pipeline is implemented with a combination of Perl, Bourne Shell and MySQL and is compatible with Linux and other Unix systems. Contact: king.jordan@biology.gatech.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20519285

  6. Complete genome sequence of pronghorn virus, a pestivirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of Pronghorn virus, a member of the Pestivirus genus of the Flaviviridae, was determined. The virus, originally isolated from a pronghorn antelope, had a genome of 12,287 nucleotides with a single open reading frame of 11,694 bases encoding 3898 amino acids....

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Pronghorn Virus, a Pestivirus

    PubMed Central

    Ridpath, Julia F.; Fischer, Nicole; Grundhoff, Adam; Postel, Alexander; Becher, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of pronghorn virus, a member of the Pestivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae, was determined here. The virus, originally isolated from a pronghorn antelope, has a genome of 12,273 nucleotides, with a single open reading frame of 11,694 bases encoding 3,897 amino acids. PMID:24926058

  8. Complete genome sequence of pronghorn virus, a pestivirus.

    PubMed

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F; Fischer, Nicole; Grundhoff, Adam; Postel, Alexander; Becher, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of pronghorn virus, a member of the Pestivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae, was determined here. The virus, originally isolated from a pronghorn antelope, has a genome of 12,273 nucleotides, with a single open reading frame of 11,694 bases encoding 3,897 amino acids. PMID:24926058

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Jessica L.; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterial Siphovirus KBS2A.

    PubMed

    Ponsero, Alise J; Chen, Feng; Lennon, Jay T; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    We present the genome of a cyanosiphovirus (KBS2A) that infects a marine Synechococcus sp. (strain WH7803). Unique to this genome, relative to other sequenced cyanosiphoviruses, is the absence of elements associated with integration into the host chromosome, suggesting this virus may not be able to establish a lysogenic relationship. PMID:23969045

  11. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Strain SC01 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Falong; Tang, Cheng; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Huanrong; Yue, Hua

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is associated with chronic nonprogressive pneumonia in both sheep and goats. Studies concerning its molecular pathogenesis, genetic analysis, and vaccine development have been hindered due to limited genomic information. Here, we announce the first complete genome sequence of this organism. PMID:21742877

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus Virulent Strain 544

    PubMed Central

    Singh, D. K.; Kumar, Ashok; Tiwari, A. K.; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S.; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence and annotation of Brucella abortus virulent strain 544. The genome of this strain is 3,289,405 bp long, with 57.2% G+C content. A total of 3,259 protein-coding genes and 60 RNA genes were predicted. PMID:25953161

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus Virulent Strain 544.

    PubMed

    Singh, D K; Kumar, Ashok; Tiwari, A K; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2015-05-07

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence and annotation of Brucella abortus virulent strain 544. The genome of this strain is 3,289,405 bp long, with 57.2% G+C content. A total of 3,259 protein-coding genes and 60 RNA genes were predicted.

  14. Genome sequence of the cultivated cotton Gossypium arboreum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is one of the most economically important natural fiber crops in the world, and the complex tetraploid nature of its genome (AADD, 2n = 52) makes genetic, genomic and functional analyses extremely challenging. Here we sequenced and assembled 98.3% of the 1.7-gigabase G. arboreum (AA, 2n = 26...

  15. Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Glass Sponge Oopsacas minuta

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Rocher, Caroline; Le Bivic, André

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Mediterranean glass sponge Oopsacas minuta. This 19-kb mitochondrial genome has 24 noncoding genes (22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs) and 14 protein-encoding genes coding for 11 subunits of respiratory chain complexes and 3 ATP synthase subunits. PMID:26227597

  16. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Pezizomycete Pyronema confluens

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the ascomycete Pyronema confluens has been sequenced. The circular genome has a size of 191 kb and contains 48 protein-coding genes, 26 tRNA genes, and two rRNA genes. Of the protein-coding genes, 14 encode conserved mitochondrial proteins, and 31 encode predicted homing endonuclease genes. PMID:27174271

  17. Draft genome sequence of the silver pomfret fish, Pampus argenteus.

    PubMed

    AlMomin, Sabah; Kumar, Vinod; Al-Amad, Sami; Al-Hussaini, Mohsen; Dashti, Talal; Al-Enezi, Khaznah; Akbar, Abrar

    2016-01-01

    Silver pomfret, Pampus argenteus, is a fish species from coastal waters. Despite its high commercial value, this edible fish has not been sequenced. Hence, its genetic and genomic studies have been limited. We report the first draft genome sequence of the silver pomfret obtained using a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology. We assembled 38.7 Gb of nucleotides into scaffolds of 350 Mb with N50 of about 1.5 kb, using high quality paired end reads. These scaffolds represent 63.7% of the estimated silver pomfret genome length. The newly sequenced and assembled genome has 11.06% repetitive DNA regions, and this percentage is comparable to that of the tilapia genome. The genome analysis predicted 16 322 genes. About 91% of these genes showed homology with known proteins. Many gene clusters were annotated to protein and fatty-acid metabolism pathways that may be important in the context of the meat texture and immune system developmental processes. The reference genome can pave the way for the identification of many other genomic features that could improve breeding and population-management strategies, and it can also help characterize the genetic diversity of P. argenteus.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Campylobacter gracilis ATCC 33236T

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human oral pathogen Campylobacter gracilis has been isolated from periodontal and endodontal infections, and also from non-oral head, neck or lung infections. This study describes the whole-genome sequence of the human periodontal isolate ATCC 33236T (=FDC 1084), which is the first closed genome...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages. PMID:27540049

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. PMID:27563032

  1. First Complete Genome Sequence of Felis catus Gammaherpesvirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin S.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Chain, Patrick; Lo, Chien-Chi; Kronmiller, Brent; Bracha, Shay; Avery, Anne C.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced the complete genome of Felis catus gammaherpesvirus 1 (FcaGHV1) from lymph node DNA of an infected cat. The genome includes a 121,556-nucleotide unique region with 87 predicted open reading frames (61 gammaherpesvirus conserved and 26 unique) flanked by multiple copies of a 966-nucleotide terminal repeat. PMID:26543105

  2. Complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeromonas hydrophila occurs in freshwater environments and infects fish and mammals. In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06, which was isolated from diseased goldfish and is being used for comparative genomic studies with A. hydrophila strains causing ba...

  3. Draft genome sequence of Phomopsis longicolla MSPL 10-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis longicolla T.W. Hobbs is the primary cause of Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. We report the de novo assembled draft genome sequence of P. longicolla isolate MSPL10-6 with a 54.8-fold depth of coverage. The resulting draft genome was estimated to be approximately 64 Mb in size with an over...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Shitikov, Egor A.; Malakhova, Maja V.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Ilina, Elena N.; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V.; Ignatyev, Georgy M.; Vinokurova, Nataliya V.; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of M. bovis strain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. PMID:27563032

  6. The tomato genome sequence provides insight into fleshy fruit evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the inbred tomato cultivar ‘Heinz 1706’ was sequenced and assembled using a combination of Sanger and “next generation” technologies. The predicted genome size is ~900 Mb, consistent with prior estimates, of which 760 Mb were assembled in 91 scaffolds aligned to the 12 tomato chromosom...

  7. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Phagomixotrophic Green Alga Cymbomonas tetramitiformis

    PubMed Central

    Paasch, Amber E.; Graham, Linda E.; Kim, Eunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Cymbomonas tetramitiformis strain PLY262, which is a prasinophycean green alga that retains a phagomixotrophic mode of nutrition. The genome is 84,524 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37%, and contains 3 rRNAs, 26 tRNAs, and 76 protein-coding genes. PMID:27313295

  8. Genomic sequence for the aflatoxigenic filamentous fungus Aspergillus nomius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the A. nomius type strain was sequenced using a personal genome machine. Annotation of the genes was undertaken, followed by gene ontology and an investigation into the number of secondary metabolite clusters. Comparative studies with other Aspergillus species involved shared/unique ge...

  9. Salmonella serotype determination utilizing high-throughput genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaokang; Yin, Yanlong; Jones, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Dinsmore, Blake A; Fitzgerald, Collette; Fields, Patricia I; Deng, Xiangyu

    2015-05-01

    Serotyping forms the basis of national and international surveillance networks for Salmonella, one of the most prevalent foodborne pathogens worldwide (1-3). Public health microbiology is currently being transformed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS), which opens the door to serotype determination using WGS data. SeqSero (www.denglab.info/SeqSero) is a novel Web-based tool for determining Salmonella serotypes using high-throughput genome sequencing data. SeqSero is based on curated databases of Salmonella serotype determinants (rfb gene cluster, fliC and fljB alleles) and is predicted to determine serotype rapidly and accurately for nearly the full spectrum of Salmonella serotypes (more than 2,300 serotypes), from both raw sequencing reads and genome assemblies. The performance of SeqSero was evaluated by testing (i) raw reads from genomes of 308 Salmonella isolates of known serotype; (ii) raw reads from genomes of 3,306 Salmonella isolates sequenced and made publicly available by GenomeTrakr, a U.S. national monitoring network operated by the Food and Drug Administration; and (iii) 354 other publicly available draft or complete Salmonella genomes. We also demonstrated Salmonella serotype determination from raw sequencing reads of fecal metagenomes from mice orally infected with this pathogen. SeqSero can help to maintain the well-established utility of Salmonella serotyping when integrated into a platform of WGS-based pathogen subtyping and characterization.

  10. Rediscovery by Whole Genome Sequencing: Classical Mutations and Genome Polymorphisms in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Kevin; Wiest, Aric E.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Baker, Scott E.

    2011-06-02

    Classical forward genetics has been foundational to modern biology, and has been the paradigm for characterizing the role of genes in shaping phenotypes for decades. In recent years, reverse genetics has been used to identify the functions of genes, via the intentional introduction of variation and subsequent evaluation in physiological, molecular, and even population contexts. These approaches are complementary and whole genome analysis serves as a bridge between the two. We report in this article the whole genome sequencing of eighteen classical mutant strains of Neurospora crassa and the putative identification of the mutations associated with corresponding mutant phenotypes. Although some strains carry multiple unique nonsynonymous, nonsense, or frameshift mutations, the combined power of limiting the scope of the search based on genetic markers and of using a comparative analysis among the eighteen genomes provides strong support for the association between mutation and phenotype. For ten of the mutants, the mutant phenotype is recapitulated in classical or gene deletion mutants in Neurospora or other filamentous fungi. From thirteen to 137 nonsense mutations are present in each strain and indel sizes are shown to be highly skewed in gene coding sequence. Significant additional genetic variation was found in the eighteen mutant strains, and this variability defines multiple alleles of many genes. These alleles may be useful in further genetic and molecular analysis of known and yet-to-be-discovered functions and they invite new interpretations of molecular and genetic interactions in classical mutant strains.

  11. Genomic View of Bipolar Disorder Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Genetic Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Benjamin; Craig, David; Kember, Rachel L.; Liu, Wencheng; Lindquist, Ingrid; Nasser, Sara; Brown, Christopher; Egeland, Janice A.; Paul, Steven M.; Bućan, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders. PMID:24625924

  12. Genomic distribution of simple sequence repeats in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Pyo; Piao, Zhong Yun; Kang, Tae Wook; Batley, Jacqueline; Yang, Tae-Jin; Hur, Yoon-Kang; Bhak, Jong; Park, Beom-Seok; Edwards, David; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2007-06-30

    Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) represent short tandem duplications found within all eukaryotic organisms. To examine the distribution of SSRs in the genome of Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis, SSRs from different genomic regions representing 17.7 Mb of genomic sequence were surveyed. SSRs appear more abundant in non-coding regions (86.6%) than in coding regions (13.4%). Comparison of SSR densities in different genomic regions demonstrated that SSR density was greatest within the 5'-flanking regions of the predicted genes. The proportion of different repeat motifs varied between genomic regions, with trinucleotide SSRs more prevalent in predicted coding regions, reflecting the codon structure in these regions. SSRs were also preferentially associated with gene-rich regions, with peri-centromeric heterochromatin SSRs mostly associated with retrotransposons. These results indicate that the distribution of SSRs in the genome is non-random. Comparison of SSR abundance between B. rapa and the closely related species Arabidopsis thaliana suggests a greater abundance of SSRs in B. rapa, which may be due to the proposed genome triplication. Our results provide a comprehensive view of SSR genomic distribution and evolution in Brassica for comparison with the sequenced genomes of A. thaliana and Oryza sativa.

  13. Dissection of the octoploid strawberry genome by deep sequencing of the genomes of Fragaria species.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kosugi, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Kohara, Mistuyo; Watanabe, Akiko; Kishida, Yoshie; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Komaki, Akiko; Yanagi, Tomohiro; Guoxin, Qin; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Kuhara, Satoru; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko N

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) is octoploid and shows allogamous behaviour. The present study aims at dissecting this octoploid genome through comparison with its wild relatives, F. iinumae, F. nipponica, F. nubicola, and F. orientalis by de novo whole-genome sequencing on an Illumina and Roche 454 platforms. The total length of the assembled Illumina genome sequences obtained was 698 Mb for F. x ananassa, and ∼200 Mb each for the four wild species. Subsequently, a virtual reference genome termed FANhybrid_r1.2 was constructed by integrating the sequences of the four homoeologous subgenomes of F. x ananassa, from which heterozygous regions in the Roche 454 and Illumina genome sequences were eliminated. The total length of FANhybrid_r1.2 thus created was 173.2 Mb with the N50 length of 5137 bp. The Illumina-assembled genome sequences of F. x ananassa and the four wild species were then mapped onto the reference genome, along with the previously published F. vesca genome sequence to establish the subgenomic structure of F. x ananassa. The strategy adopted in this study has turned out to be successful in dissecting the genome of octoploid F. x ananassa and appears promising when applied to the analysis of other polyploid plant species. PMID:24282021

  14. UFO: a web server for ultra-fast functional profiling of whole genome protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Meinicke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional profiling is a key technique to characterize and compare the functional potential of entire genomes. The estimation of profiles according to an assignment of sequences to functional categories is a computationally expensive task because it requires the comparison of all protein sequences from a genome with a usually large database of annotated sequences or sequence families. Description Based on machine learning techniques for Pfam domain detection, the UFO web server for ultra-fast functional profiling allows researchers to process large protein sequence collections instantaneously. Besides the frequencies of Pfam and GO categories, the user also obtains the sequence specific assignments to Pfam domain families. In addition, a comparison with existing genomes provides dissimilarity scores with respect to 821 reference proteomes. Considering the underlying UFO domain detection, the results on 206 test genomes indicate a high sensitivity of the approach. In comparison with current state-of-the-art HMMs, the runtime measurements show a considerable speed up in the range of four orders of magnitude. For an average size prokaryotic genome, the computation of a functional profile together with its comparison typically requires about 10 seconds of processing time. Conclusion For the first time the UFO web server makes it possible to get a quick overview on the functional inventory of newly sequenced organisms. The genome scale comparison with a large number of precomputed profiles allows a first guess about functionally related organisms. The service is freely available and does not require user registration or specification of a valid email address. PMID:19725959

  15. Resequencing of the common marmoset genome improves genome assemblies and gene-coding sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kengo; Kuroki, Yoko; Kumita, Wakako; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kawai, Jun; Iriki, Atsushi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    The first draft of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) genome was published by the Marmoset Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium. The draft was based on whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the current assembly version is Callithrix_jacches-3.2.1, but there still exist 187,214 undetermined gap regions and supercontigs and relatively short contigs that are unmapped to chromosomes in the draft genome. We performed resequencing and assembly of the genome of common marmoset by deep sequencing with high-throughput sequencing technology. Several different sequence runs using Illumina sequencing platforms were executed, and 181 Gbp of high-quality bases including mate-pairs with long insert lengths of 3, 8, 20, and 40 Kbp were obtained, that is, approximately 60× coverage. The resequencing significantly improved the MGSAC draft genome sequence. The N50 of the contigs, which is a statistical measure used to evaluate assembly quality, doubled. As a result, 51% of the contigs (total length: 299 Mbp) that were unmapped to chromosomes in the MGSAC draft were merged with chromosomal contigs, and the improved genome sequence helped to detect 5,288 new genes that are homologous to human cDNAs and the gaps in 5,187 transcripts of the Ensembl gene annotations were completely filled. PMID:26586576

  16. Resequencing of the common marmoset genome improves genome assemblies and gene-coding sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kengo; Kuroki, Yoko; Kumita, Wakako; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kawai, Jun; Iriki, Atsushi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-11-20

    The first draft of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) genome was published by the Marmoset Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium. The draft was based on whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the current assembly version is Callithrix_jacches-3.2.1, but there still exist 187,214 undetermined gap regions and supercontigs and relatively short contigs that are unmapped to chromosomes in the draft genome. We performed resequencing and assembly of the genome of common marmoset by deep sequencing with high-throughput sequencing technology. Several different sequence runs using Illumina sequencing platforms were executed, and 181 Gbp of high-quality bases including mate-pairs with long insert lengths of 3, 8, 20, and 40 Kbp were obtained, that is, approximately 60× coverage. The resequencing significantly improved the MGSAC draft genome sequence. The N50 of the contigs, which is a statistical measure used to evaluate assembly quality, doubled. As a result, 51% of the contigs (total length: 299 Mbp) that were unmapped to chromosomes in the MGSAC draft were merged with chromosomal contigs, and the improved genome sequence helped to detect 5,288 new genes that are homologous to human cDNAs and the gaps in 5,187 transcripts of the Ensembl gene annotations were completely filled.

  17. Accessing complex crop genomes with next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline; Snowdon, Rod J

    2013-01-01

    Many important crop species have genomes originating from ancestral or recent polyploidisation events. Multiple homoeologous gene copies, chromosomal rearrangements and amplification of repetitive DNA within large and complex crop genomes can considerably complicate genome analysis and gene discovery by conventional, forward genetics approaches. On the other hand, ongoing technological advances in molecular genetics and genomics today offer unprecedented opportunities to analyse and access even more recalcitrant genomes. In this review, we describe next-generation sequencing and data analysis techniques that vastly improve our ability to dissect and mine genomes for causal genes underlying key traits and allelic variation of interest to breeders. We focus primarily on wheat and oilseed rape, two leading examples of major polyploid crop genomes whose size or complexity present different, significant challenges. In both cases, the latest DNA sequencing technologies, applied using quite different approaches, have enabled considerable progress towards unravelling the respective genomes. Our ability to discover the extent and distribution of genetic diversity in crop gene pools, and its relationship to yield and quality-related traits, is swiftly gathering momentum as DNA sequencing and the bioinformatic tools to deal with growing quantities of genomic data continue to develop. In the coming decade, genomic and transcriptomic sequencing, discovery and high-throughput screening of single nucleotide polymorphisms, presence-absence variations and other structural chromosomal variants in diverse germplasm collections will give detailed insight into the origins, domestication and available trait-relevant variation of polyploid crops, in the process facilitating novel approaches and possibilities for genomics-assisted breeding.

  18. Simultaneous Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing with Short Overlapping Amplicons Suitable for Degraded DNA Using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine

    PubMed Central

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; Ralf, Arwin; van Oven, Mannis; Kupiec, Tomasz; Chang, Joseph; Lagacé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whole mitochondrial (mt) genome analysis enables a considerable increase in analysis throughput, and improves the discriminatory power to the maximum possible phylogenetic resolution. Most established protocols on the different massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms, however, invariably involve the PCR amplification of large fragments, typically several kilobases in size, which may fail due to mtDNA fragmentation in the available degraded materials. We introduce a MPS tiling approach for simultaneous whole human mt genome sequencing using 161 short overlapping amplicons (average 200 bp) with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. We illustrate the performance of this new method by sequencing 20 DNA samples belonging to different worldwide mtDNA haplogroups. Additional quality control, particularly regarding the potential detection of nuclear insertions of mtDNA (NUMTs), was performed by comparative MPS analysis using the conventional long‐range amplification method. Preliminary sensitivity testing revealed that detailed haplogroup inference was feasible with 100 pg genomic input DNA. Complete mt genome coverage was achieved from DNA samples experimentally degraded down to genomic fragment sizes of about 220 bp, and up to 90% coverage from naturally degraded samples. Overall, we introduce a new approach for whole mt genome MPS analysis from degraded and nondegraded materials relevant to resolve and infer maternal genetic ancestry at complete resolution in anthropological, evolutionary, medical, and forensic applications. PMID:26387877

  19. Simultaneous Whole Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing with Short Overlapping Amplicons Suitable for Degraded DNA Using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; Ralf, Arwin; van Oven, Mannis; Kupiec, Tomasz; Chang, Joseph; Lagacé, Robert; Kayser, Manfred

    2015-12-01

    Whole mitochondrial (mt) genome analysis enables a considerable increase in analysis throughput, and improves the discriminatory power to the maximum possible phylogenetic resolution. Most established protocols on the different massively parallel sequencing (MPS) platforms, however, invariably involve the PCR amplification of large fragments, typically several kilobases in size, which may fail due to mtDNA fragmentation in the available degraded materials. We introduce a MPS tiling approach for simultaneous whole human mt genome sequencing using 161 short overlapping amplicons (average 200 bp) with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. We illustrate the performance of this new method by sequencing 20 DNA samples belonging to different worldwide mtDNA haplogroups. Additional quality control, particularly regarding the potential detection of nuclear insertions of mtDNA (NUMTs), was performed by comparative MPS analysis using the conventional long-range amplification method. Preliminary sensitivity testing revealed that detailed haplogroup inference was feasible with 100 pg genomic input DNA. Complete mt genome coverage was achieved from DNA samples experimentally degraded down to genomic fragment sizes of about 220 bp, and up to 90% coverage from naturally degraded samples. Overall, we introduce a new approach for whole mt genome MPS analysis from degraded and nondegraded materials relevant to resolve and infer maternal genetic ancestry at complete resolution in anthropological, evolutionary, medical, and forensic applications.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Finlay, Roger D.; Alstrom, Sadhna; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Bruce, David; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, J. Chris; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Hogberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    A plant associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest due to its plant growth promoting and plant pathogen inhibiting ability. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled 'Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens'.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Aoluguya reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Ju, Yan; Liu, Huamiao; Rong, Min; Yang, Yifeng; Wei, Haijun; Shao, Yuanchen; Chen, Xiumin; Xing, Xiumei

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondria genome of the reindeer, Rangifer tarandus, was determined by accurate polymerase chain reaction. The entire genome is 16,357 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a D-loop region, all of which are arranged in a typical vertebrate manner. The overall base composition of the reindeer's mitochondrial genome is 33.7% of A, 23.1% of C, 30.1% of T and 13.2%of G. A termination associated sequence and several conserved central sequence block domains were discovered within the control region.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Ferroglobus placidus AEDII12DO

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Risso, Carla; Holmes, Dawn; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Woyke, Tanja; Lovley, Derek; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N

    2011-01-01

    Ferroglobus placidus belongs to the order Archaeoglobales within the archaeal phylum Euryar- chaeota. Strain AEDII12DO is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano, Italy. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic chemoli- thoautotroph, but it can also use a variety of aromatic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the complete genome sequence and anno- tation. The 2,196,266 bp genome with its 2,567 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute Laboratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, Roger D.; Alström, Sadhna; Goodwin, Lynne; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Bruce, David; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, John C.; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Högberg, Nils

    2012-01-01

    A plant-associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest because it promotes plant growth and inhibits plant pathogens. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens”. PMID:22768360

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Aoluguya reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Ju, Yan; Liu, Huamiao; Rong, Min; Yang, Yifeng; Wei, Haijun; Shao, Yuanchen; Chen, Xiumin; Xing, Xiumei

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondria genome of the reindeer, Rangifer tarandus, was determined by accurate polymerase chain reaction. The entire genome is 16,357 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a D-loop region, all of which are arranged in a typical vertebrate manner. The overall base composition of the reindeer's mitochondrial genome is 33.7% of A, 23.1% of C, 30.1% of T and 13.2%of G. A termination associated sequence and several conserved central sequence block domains were discovered within the control region. PMID:25469816

  5. Corruption of genomic databases with anomalous sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Lamperti, E D; Kittelberger, J M; Smith, T F; Villa-Komaroff, L

    1992-01-01

    We describe evidence that DNA sequences from vectors used for cloning and sequencing have been incorporated accidentally into eukaryotic entries in the GenBank database. These incorporations were not restricted to one type of vector or to a single mechanism. Many minor instances may have been the result of simple editing errors, but some entries contained large blocks of vector sequence that had been incorporated by contamination or other accidents during cloning. Some cases involved unusual rearrangements and areas of vector distant from the normal insertion sites. Matches to vector were found in 0.23% of 20,000 sequences analyzed in GenBank Release 63. Although the possibility of anomalous sequence incorporation has been recognized since the inception of GenBank and should be easy to avoid, recent evidence suggests that this problem is increasing more quickly than the database itself. The presence of anomalous sequence may have serious consequences for the interpretation and use of database entries, and will have an impact on issues of database management. The incorporated vector fragments described here may also be useful for a crude estimate of the fidelity of sequence information in the database. In alignments with well-defined ends, the matching sequences showed 96.8% identity to vector; when poorer matches with arbitrary limits were included, the aggregate identity to vector sequence was 94.8%. PMID:1614861

  6. Corruption of genomic databases with anomalous sequence.

    PubMed

    Lamperti, E D; Kittelberger, J M; Smith, T F; Villa-Komaroff, L

    1992-06-11

    We describe evidence that DNA sequences from vectors used for cloning and sequencing have been incorporated accidentally into eukaryotic entries in the GenBank database. These incorporations were not restricted to one type of vector or to a single mechanism. Many minor instances may have been the result of simple editing errors, but some entries contained large blocks of vector sequence that had been incorporated by contamination or other accidents during cloning. Some cases involved unusual rearrangements and areas of vector distant from the normal insertion sites. Matches to vector were found in 0.23% of 20,000 sequences analyzed in GenBank Release 63. Although the possibility of anomalous sequence incorporation has been recognized since the inception of GenBank and should be easy to avoid, recent evidence suggests that this problem is increasing more quickly than the database itself. The presence of anomalous sequence may have serious consequences for the interpretation and use of database entries, and will have an impact on issues of database management. The incorporated vector fragments described here may also be useful for a crude estimate of the fidelity of sequence information in the database. In alignments with well-defined ends, the matching sequences showed 96.8% identity to vector; when poorer matches with arbitrary limits were included, the aggregate identity to vector sequence was 94.8%.

  7. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  8. Defining and Evaluating a Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for Whole-Genome Sequence-Based Typing of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Pietzka, Ariane; Prior, Karola; Bletz, Stefan; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Allerberger, Franz; Harmsen, Dag; Mellmann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has emerged today as an ultimate typing tool to characterize Listeria monocytogenes outbreaks. However, data analysis and interlaboratory comparability of WGS data are still challenging for most public health laboratories. Therefore, we have developed and evaluated a new L. monocytogenes typing scheme based on genome-wide gene-by-gene comparisons (core genome multilocus the sequence typing [cgMLST]) to allow for a unique typing nomenclature. Initially, we determined the breadth of the L. monocytogenes population based on MLST data with a Bayesian approach. Based on the genome sequence data of representative isolates for the whole population, cgMLST target genes were defined and reappraised with 67 L. monocytogenes isolates from two outbreaks and serotype reference strains. The Bayesian population analysis generated five L. monocytogenes groups. Using all available NCBI RefSeq genomes (n = 36) and six additionally sequenced strains, all genetic groups were covered. Pairwise comparisons of these 42 genome sequences resulted in 1,701 cgMLST targets present in all 42 genomes with 100% overlap and ≥90% sequence similarity. Overall, ≥99.1% of the cgMLST targets were present in 67 outbreak and serotype reference strains, underlining the representativeness of the cgMLST scheme. Moreover, cgMLST enabled clustering of outbreak isolates with ≤10 alleles difference and unambiguous separation from unrelated outgroup isolates. In conclusion, the novel cgMLST scheme not only improves outbreak investigations but also enables, due to the availability of the automatically curated cgMLST nomenclature, interlaboratory exchange of data that are crucial, especially for rapid responses during transsectorial outbreaks. PMID:26135865

  9. Defining and Evaluating a Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for Whole-Genome Sequence-Based Typing of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Ruppitsch, Werner; Pietzka, Ariane; Prior, Karola; Bletz, Stefan; Fernandez, Haizpea Lasa; Allerberger, Franz; Harmsen, Dag; Mellmann, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has emerged today as an ultimate typing tool to characterize Listeria monocytogenes outbreaks. However, data analysis and interlaboratory comparability of WGS data are still challenging for most public health laboratories. Therefore, we have developed and evaluated a new L. monocytogenes typing scheme based on genome-wide gene-by-gene comparisons (core genome multilocus the sequence typing [cgMLST]) to allow for a unique typing nomenclature. Initially, we determined the breadth of the L. monocytogenes population based on MLST data with a Bayesian approach. Based on the genome sequence data of representative isolates for the whole population, cgMLST target genes were defined and reappraised with 67 L. monocytogenes isolates from two outbreaks and serotype reference strains. The Bayesian population analysis generated five L. monocytogenes groups. Using all available NCBI RefSeq genomes (n = 36) and six additionally sequenced strains, all genetic groups were covered. Pairwise comparisons of these 42 genome sequences resulted in 1,701 cgMLST targets present in all 42 genomes with 100% overlap and ≥90% sequence similarity. Overall, ≥99.1% of the cgMLST targets were present in 67 outbreak and serotype reference strains, underlining the representativeness of the cgMLST scheme. Moreover, cgMLST enabled clustering of outbreak isolates with ≤10 alleles difference and unambiguous separation from unrelated outgroup isolates. In conclusion, the novel cgMLST scheme not only improves outbreak investigations but also enables, due to the availability of the automatically curated cgMLST nomenclature, interlaboratory exchange of data that are crucial, especially for rapid responses during transsectorial outbreaks. PMID:26135865

  10. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Tonje; Rødland, Einar A; Lagesen, Karin; Seeberg, Erling; Rognes, Torbjørn; Tønjum, Tone

    2004-01-01

    Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within coding regions are the DNA uptake sequences (DUS) required for natural genetic transformation. More importantly, we found a significantly higher density of DUS within genes involved in DNA repair, recombination, restriction-modification and replication than in any other annotated gene group in these organisms. Pasteurella multocida also displayed high frequencies of a putative DUS identical to that previously identified in H.influenzae and with a skewed distribution towards genome maintenance genes, indicating that this bacterium might be transformation competent under certain conditions. These results imply that the high frequency of DUS in genome maintenance genes is conserved among phylogenetically divergent species and thus are of significant biological importance. Increased DUS density is expected to enhance DNA uptake and the over-representation of DUS in genome maintenance genes might reflect facilitated recovery of genome preserving functions. For example, transient and beneficial increase in genome instability can be allowed during pathogenesis simply through loss of antimutator genes, since these DUS-containing sequences will be preferentially recovered. Furthermore, uptake of such genes could provide a mechanism for facilitated recovery from DNA damage after genotoxic stress. PMID:14960717

  11. Emerging knowledge from genome sequencing of crop species.

    PubMed

    Barabaschi, Delfina; Guerra, Davide; Lacrima, Katia; Laino, Paolo; Michelotti, Vania; Urso, Simona; Valè, Giampiero; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Extensive insights into the genome composition, organization, and evolution have been gained from the plant genome sequencing and annotation ongoing projects. The analysis of crop genomes provided surprising evidences with important implications in plant origin and evolution: genome duplication, ancestral re-arrangements and unexpected polyploidization events opened new doors to address fundamental questions related to species proliferation, adaptation, and functional modulations. Detailed paleogenomic analysis led to many speculation on how chromosomes have been shaped over time in terms of gene content and order. The completion of the genome sequences of several major crops, prompted to a detailed identification and annotation of transposable elements: new hypothesis related to their composition, chromosomal distribution, insertion models, amplification rate, and evolution patterns are coming up. Availability of full genome sequence of several crop species as well as from many accessions within species is providing new keys for biodiversity exploitation and interpretation. Re-sequencing is enabling high-throughput genotyping to identify a wealth of SNP and afterward to produce haplotype maps necessary to accurately associate molecular variation to phenotype. Conservation genomics is emerging as a powerful tool to explain adaptation, genetic drift, natural selection, hybridization and to estimate genetic variation, fitness and population's viability. PMID:21822975

  12. Sequencing of a new target genome: the Pediculus humanus humanus (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae) genome project.

    PubMed

    Pittendrigh, B R; Clark, J M; Johnston, J S; Lee, S H; Romero-Severson, J; Dasch, G A

    2006-11-01

    The human body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus (L.), and the human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis, belong to the hemimetabolous order Phthiraptera. The body louse is the primary vector that transmits the bacterial agents of louse-borne relapsing fever, trench fever, and epidemic typhus. The genomes of the bacterial causative agents of several of these aforementioned diseases have been sequenced. Thus, determining the body louse genome will enhance studies of host-vector-pathogen interactions. Although not important as a major disease vector, head lice are of major social concern. Resistance to traditional pesticides used to control head and body lice have developed. It is imperative that new molecular targets be discovered for the development of novel compounds to control these insects. No complete genome sequence exists for a hemimetabolous insect species primarily because hemimetabolous insects often have large (2000 Mb) to very large (up to 16,300 Mb) genomes. Fortuitously, we determined that the human body louse has one of the smallest genome sizes known in insects, suggesting it may be a suitable choice as a minimal hemimetabolous genome in which many genes have been eliminated during its adaptation to human parasitism. Because many louse species infest birds and mammals, the body louse genome-sequencing project will facilitate studies of their comparative genomics. A 6-8X coverage of the body louse genome, plus sequenced expressed sequence tags, should provide the entomological, evolutionary biology, medical, and public health communities with useful genetic information.

  13. Widespread mitovirus sequences in plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Benjamin E.; Yerramsetty, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of the evolution of RNA viruses has been aided recently by the discovery of copies of fragments or complete genomes of non-retroviral RNA viruses (Non-retroviral Endogenous RNA Viral Elements, or NERVEs) in many eukaryotic nuclear genomes. Among the most prominent NERVEs are partial copies of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) of the mitoviruses in plant mitochondrial genomes. Mitoviruses are in the family Narnaviridae, which are the simplest viruses, encoding only a single protein (the RdRP) in their unencapsidated viral plus strand. Narnaviruses are known only in fungi, and the origin of plant mitochondrial mitovirus NERVEs appears to be horizontal transfer from plant pathogenic fungi. At least one mitochondrial mitovirus NERVE, but not its nuclear copy, is expressed. PMID:25870770

  14. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  15. Complete genome sequence of equine herpesvirus type 9.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Hideto; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Souichi

    2012-12-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 9 (EHV-9), which we isolated from a case of epizootic encephalitis in a herd of Thomson's gazelles (Gazella thomsoni) in 1993, has been known to cause fatal encephalitis in Thomson's gazelle, giraffe, and polar bear in natural infections. Our previous report indicated that EHV-9 was similar to the equine pathogen equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), which mainly causes abortion, respiratory infection, and equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. We determined the genome sequence of EHV-9. The genome has a length of 148,371 bp and all 80 of the open reading frames (ORFs) found in the genome of EHV-1. The nucleotide sequences of the ORFs in EHV-9 were 86 to 95% identical to those in EHV-1. The whole genome sequence should help to reveal the neuropathogenicity of EHV-9. PMID:23166237

  16. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Ivanova, N; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Sproer, Cathrin; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the sole and type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. S. moniliformis, a Gram-negative, non-motile and pleomorphic bacterium, is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the third sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Comparison of mitochondrial genome sequences of pangolins (Mammalia, Pholidota).

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced for three species of pangolins, Manis javanica, Phataginus tricuspis, and Smutsia temminckii, and comparisons were made with two other species, Manis pentadactyla and Phataginus tetradactyla. The genome of Manidae contains the 37 genes found in a typical mammalian genome, and the structure of the control region is highly conserved among species. In Manis, the overall base composition differs from that found in African genera. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the genera Manis, Phataginus, and Smutsia, as well as the basal division between Maninae and Smutsiinae. Comparisons with GenBank sequences reveal that the reference genomes of M. pentadactyla and P. tetradactyla (accession numbers NC_016008 and NC_004027) were sequenced from misidentified taxa, and that a new species of tree pangolin should be described in Gabon. PMID:25746396

  18. Comparison of mitochondrial genome sequences of pangolins (Mammalia, Pholidota).

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced for three species of pangolins, Manis javanica, Phataginus tricuspis, and Smutsia temminckii, and comparisons were made with two other species, Manis pentadactyla and Phataginus tetradactyla. The genome of Manidae contains the 37 genes found in a typical mammalian genome, and the structure of the control region is highly conserved among species. In Manis, the overall base composition differs from that found in African genera. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the genera Manis, Phataginus, and Smutsia, as well as the basal division between Maninae and Smutsiinae. Comparisons with GenBank sequences reveal that the reference genomes of M. pentadactyla and P. tetradactyla (accession numbers NC_016008 and NC_004027) were sequenced from misidentified taxa, and that a new species of tree pangolin should be described in Gabon.

  19. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J P; Hill, Christopher M; Kronenberg, Zev N; Munson, Katherine M; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-04-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome.

  20. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J. P.; Hill, Christopher M.; Kronenberg, Zev N.; Munson, Katherine M.; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K.; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome. PMID:27034376

  1. Long-read sequence assembly of the gorilla genome.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David; Huddleston, John; Chaisson, Mark J P; Hill, Christopher M; Kronenberg, Zev N; Munson, Katherine M; Malig, Maika; Raja, Archana; Fiddes, Ian; Hillier, LaDeana W; Dunn, Christopher; Baker, Carl; Armstrong, Joel; Diekhans, Mark; Paten, Benedict; Shendure, Jay; Wilson, Richard K; Haussler, David; Chin, Chen-Shan; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-04-01

    Accurate sequence and assembly of genomes is a critical first step for studies of genetic variation. We generated a high-quality assembly of the gorilla genome using single-molecule, real-time sequence technology and a string graph de novo assembly algorithm. The new assembly improves contiguity by two to three orders of magnitude with respect to previously released assemblies, recovering 87% of missing reference exons and incomplete gene models. Although regions of large, high-identity segmental duplications remain largely unresolved, this comprehensive assembly provides new biological insight into genetic diversity, structural variation, gene loss, and representation of repeat structures within the gorilla genome. The approach provides a path forward for the routine assembly of mammalian genomes at a level approaching that of the current quality of the human genome. PMID:27034376

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated from Semen

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Victoria; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Dowall, Stuart D.; Pullan, Steven T.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogenic flavivirus currently circulating in numerous countries in South America, the Caribbean, and the Western Pacific Region. Using an unbiased metagenomic sequencing approach, we report here the first complete genome sequence of ZIKV isolated from a clinical semen sample. PMID:27738033

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Agent Bacillus cereus UW85

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Gabriel L.; Holt, Jonathan; Rasko, David A.; Thomas, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 was isolated from a root of a field-grown alfalfa plant from Arlington, WI, and identified for its ability to suppress damping off, a disease caused by Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. medicaginis on alfalfa. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cereus UW85, obtained by a combination of Sanger and Illumina sequencing. PMID:27587823

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Alfalfa latent virus

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jonathan; Postnikova, Olga A.

    2015-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of the Alfalfa latent carlavirus (ALV) was obtained by primer walking and Illumina RNA sequencing. The virus differs substantially from the Czech ALV isolate and the Pea streak virus isolate from Wisconsin. The absence of a clear nucleic acid-binding protein indicates ALV divergence from other carlaviruses. PMID:25883281

  5. Complete Genomic Sequence of Issyk-Kul Virus

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Denise A.; Ellis, Richard J.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Hewson, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Issyk-Kul virus (ISKV) is an ungrouped virus tentatively assigned to the Bunyaviridae family and is associated with an acute febrile illness in several central Asian countries. Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we report here the full-genome sequence for this novel unclassified arboviral pathogen circulating in central Asia. PMID:26139711

  6. Complete Genomic Sequence of Issyk-Kul Virus.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Barry; Marston, Denise A; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2015-07-02

    Issyk-Kul virus (ISKV) is an ungrouped virus tentatively assigned to the Bunyaviridae family and is associated with an acute febrile illness in several central Asian countries. Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we report here the full-genome sequence for this novel unclassified arboviral pathogen circulating in central Asia.

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Mandrillus leucophaeus and Papio ursinus Cytomegaloviruses.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Earl Linwood; Sherrod, Carly J; Texier, Jordan R; Conrad, Tom M; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of Mandrillus leucophaeus and Papio ursinus cytomegaloviruses were determined. An isolate from a drill monkey, OCOM6-2, and an isolate from a chacma baboon, OCOM4-52, were subjected to pyrosequencing and assembled. Comparative alignment of published primate cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) showed variable sequence conservation between species.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Agent Bacillus cereus UW85.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Gabriel L; Holt, Jonathan; Ravel, Jacques; Rasko, David A; Thomas, Michael G; Handelsman, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 was isolated from a root of a field-grown alfalfa plant from Arlington, WI, and identified for its ability to suppress damping off, a disease caused by Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. medicaginis on alfalfa. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cereus UW85, obtained by a combination of Sanger and Illumina sequencing. PMID:27587823

  9. Genome sequence of Stachybotrys chartarum Strain 51-11

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stachybotrys chartarum strain 51-11 genome was sequenced by shotgun sequencing utilizing Illumina Hiseq 2000 and PacBio long read technology. Since Stachybotrys chartarum has been implicated in health impacts within water-damaged buildings, any information extracted from the geno...

  10. Sequencing the Genome of the Heirloom Watermelon Cultivar Charleston Gray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the watermelon cultivar Charleston Gray, a major heirloom which has been used in breeding programs of many watermelon cultivars, was sequenced. Our strategy involved a hybrid approach using the Illumina and 454/Titanium next-generation sequencing technologies. For Illumina, shotgun g...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas sp. Strain EERV15

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Elham; Barrantes, Israel; Vandermaesen, Johanna; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Boon, Nico; Springael, Dirk; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain EERV15 isolated from sand filter. The organism most closely related to Aeromonas sp. EERV15 is Aeromonas veronii B565, with an average 83% amino acid sequence similarity of putatively encoded protein open reading frames. PMID:27540061

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus ZJ-T.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yiqin; Chen, Chang; Zhao, Zhe; Huang, Xiaochun; Yang, Yiying; Ding, Xiongqi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium which is normally distributed in the coastal and estuarine environments. It has been suggested to be an opportunistic pathogen to both marine animals and humans, Here, the completed genome sequence of V. alginolyticus ZJ-T was determined by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. PMID:27587824

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas sp. Strain EERV15.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Elham; Barrantes, Israel; Vandermaesen, Johanna; Geffers, Robert; Jarek, Michael; Boon, Nico; Springael, Dirk; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas sp. strain EERV15 isolated from sand filter. The organism most closely related to Aeromonas sp. EERV15 is Aeromonas veronii B565, with an average 83% amino acid sequence similarity of putatively encoded protein open reading frames. PMID:27540061

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Rapidly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of 17 rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, including 16 Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains and one M. immunogenum strain. These sequences add value to studies of the genetic diversity of rapidly growing NTM strains recovered from human specimens. PMID:27660787

  15. Genome Sequences of Five Nonvirulent Listeria monocytogenes Serovar 4 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Loessner, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete genome sequences of five nonpathogenic Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4 strains: WSLC 1018 (4e), 1019 (4c), 1020 (4a), 1033 (4d), and 1047 (4d). These sequences may help to uncover genes involved in the synthesis of the serovar antigens—phenotypic determinants of virulence deemed clinically relevant. PMID:27034489

  16. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain UCMA 3037

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Saima; Tareb, Raouf; Bernardeau, Marion; Vaisse, Melissa; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Celine; Rechenmann, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid of the strain Lactobacillus plantarum UCMA 3037, isolated from raw milk camembert cheese in our laboratory, was sequenced. We present its draft genome sequence with the aim of studying its functional properties and relationship to the cheese ecosystem. PMID:23704179

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Agent Bacillus cereus UW85.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Gabriel L; Holt, Jonathan; Ravel, Jacques; Rasko, David A; Thomas, Michael G; Handelsman, Jo

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus UW85 was isolated from a root of a field-grown alfalfa plant from Arlington, WI, and identified for its ability to suppress damping off, a disease caused by Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. medicaginis on alfalfa. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cereus UW85, obtained by a combination of Sanger and Illumina sequencing.

  18. Genome Sequence of a Mycoplasma meleagridis Field Strain

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Luigi; Catania, Salvatore; Pourquier, Philippe; Rosati, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma meleagridis is a major cause of disease and economic loss in turkeys. Here, we report the genome sequence of an M. meleagridis field strain, which enlarges the knowledge about this bacterium and helps the identification of possible coding sequences for drug resistance genes and specific antigens. PMID:26941131

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Rapidly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of 17 rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, including 16 Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains and one M. immunogenum strain. These sequences add value to studies of the genetic diversity of rapidly growing NTM strains recovered from human specimens. PMID:27660787

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus ZJ-T.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yiqin; Chen, Chang; Zhao, Zhe; Huang, Xiaochun; Yang, Yiying; Ding, Xiongqi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium which is normally distributed in the coastal and estuarine environments. It has been suggested to be an opportunistic pathogen to both marine animals and humans, Here, the completed genome sequence of V. alginolyticus ZJ-T was determined by Illumina high-throughput sequencing.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Eric; Massé, Cynthia; Charest, Hugues; Bernard, Kathryn; Côté, Jean-Charles; Tremblay, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans strains isolated from two different patients: one from a blood sample and the other from a scar exudate following surgery. Although these two strains harbor the diphtheria toxin gene tox, no full prophage sequences were found in the flanking regions. PMID:26112794

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus ZJ-T

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yiqin; Zhao, Zhe; Huang, Xiaochun; Yang, Yiying; Ding, Xiongqi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium which is normally distributed in the coastal and estuarine environments. It has been suggested to be an opportunistic pathogen to both marine animals and humans, Here, the completed genome sequence of V. alginolyticus ZJ-T was determined by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. PMID:27587824

  3. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  4. Genome Sequence of Thermofilum pendens Reveals an Exceptional Loss of Biosynthetic Pathways without Genome Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Rodriquez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, I.; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke; Elkins, James G; Mavromatis, K; Lykidis, A; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Detter, J C; Zhulin, Igor B; Olsen, Gary; Whitman, W. B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching member of class Thermoproteales of Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first Crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have transporters of the phosphotransferase system. T. pendens is known to require an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than any other free-living organism. In addition to heterotrophy, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein from a new subfamily. Predicted highly expressed proteins include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins, suggesting that defense against viruses is a high priority.

  5. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  6. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 Genome Revisited: Sequence Update and Re-Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Victor G.; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Montazari, Saied; Checinska, Aleksandra; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus strain SAFR-032 is a non-pathogenic spore-forming bacterium exhibiting an anomalously high persistence in bactericidal environments. In its dormant state, it is capable of withstanding doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation or hydrogen peroxide, which are lethal for the vast majority of microorganisms. This unusual resistance profile has made SAFR-032 a reference strain for studies of bacterial spore resistance. The complete genome sequence of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was published in 2007 early in the genomics era. Since then, the SAFR-032 strain has frequently been used as a source of genetic/genomic information that was regarded as representative of the entire B. pumilus species group. Recently, our ongoing studies of conservation of gene distribution patterns in the complete genomes of various B. pumilus strains revealed indications of misassembly in the B. pumilus SAFR-032 genome. Synteny-driven local genome resequencing confirmed that the original SAFR-032 sequence contained assembly errors associated with long sequence repeats. The genome sequence was corrected according to the new findings. In addition, a significantly improved annotation is now available. Gene orders were compared and portions of the genome arrangement were found to be similar in a wide spectrum of Bacillus strains. PMID:27351589

  7. Modeling genome coverage in single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Single-cell DNA sequencing is necessary for examining genetic variation at the cellular level, which remains hidden in bulk sequencing experiments. But because they begin with such small amounts of starting material, the amount of information that is obtained from single-cell sequencing experiment is highly sensitive to the choice of protocol employed and variability in library preparation. In particular, the fraction of the genome represented in single-cell sequencing libraries exhibits extreme variability due to quantitative biases in amplification and loss of genetic material. Results: We propose a method to predict the genome coverage of a deep sequencing experiment using information from an initial shallow sequencing experiment mapped to a reference genome. The observed coverage statistics are used in a non-parametric empirical Bayes Poisson model to estimate the gain in coverage from deeper sequencing. This approach allows researchers to know statistical features of deep sequencing experiments without actually sequencing deeply, providing a basis for optimizing and comparing single-cell sequencing protocols or screening libraries. Availability and implementation: The method is available as part of the preseq software package. Source code is available at http://smithlabresearch.org/preseq. Contact: andrewds@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary material is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25107873

  8. Whole-genome sequencing reveals oncogenic mutations in mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    McGirt, Laura Y.; Jia, Peilin; Baerenwald, Devin A.; Duszynski, Robert J.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Zic, John A.; Zwerner, Jeffrey P.; Hucks, Donald; Dave, Utpal; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is unknown. Although genetic alterations have been identified, none are considered consistently causative in MF. To identify potential drivers of MF, we performed whole-genome sequencing of MF tumors and matched normal skin. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing of MF samples and exome sequencing of CTCL cell lines were also performed. Multiple mutations were identified that affected the same pathways, including epigenetic, cell-fate regulation, and cytokine signaling, in MF tumors and CTCL cell lines. Specifically, interleukin-2 signaling pathway mutations, including activating Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) mutations, were detected. Treatment with a JAK3 inhibitor significantly reduced CTCL cell survival. Additionally, the mutation data identified 2 other potential contributing factors to MF, ultraviolet light, and a polymorphism in the tumor suppressor p53 (TP53). Therefore, genetic alterations in specific pathways in MF were identified that may be viable, effective new targets for treatment. PMID:26082451

  9. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurispirillum indicum strain S5T

    SciTech Connect

    Bini, Elisabetta; Rauschenbach, Ines; Narasingarao, Priya; Starovoytov, Valentin; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Land, Miriam L; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Held, Brittany; Tapia, Roxanne; Copeland, A; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Haggblom, Max

    2011-01-01

    Desulfurispirillum indicum strain S5T is a strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from river se- diment in Chennai, India. D. indicum belongs to the deep branching phylum of Chrysioge- netes, which currently only includes three other cultured species. Strain S5T is the type strain of the species and it is capable of growth using selenate, selenite, arsenate, nitrate or nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. The 2,928,377 bp genome encodes 2,619 proteins and 49 RNA genes, and the information gained from its sequence will be relevant to the elucidation of mi- crobially-mediated transformations of arsenic and selenium, in addition to deepening our knowledge of the underrepresented phylum of Chrysiogenetes.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S.; Zhong, Jinshun; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Ana-baena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40 C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S; Zhong, Jinshun; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-06-15

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Anabaena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40(°) C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence. PMID:25197444

  12. Complete genome sequence of southern tomato virus identified from China using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, southern tomato virus (STV), on tomatoes in China, was elucidated using small RNAs deep sequencing. The identified STV_CN12 shares 99% sequence identity to other isolates from Mexico, France, Spain, and U.S. This is the first report ...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Sequence Type 1407, a Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, A.; Ciammaruconi, A.; Carannante, A.; Neri, A.; Fazio, C.; Fortunato, A.; Palozzi, A. M.; Vacca, P.; Fillo, S.; Lista, F.

    2015-01-01

    Gonorrhea may become untreatable due to the spread of resistant or multidrug-resistant strains. Cefixime-resistant gonococci belonging to sequence type 1407 have been described worldwide. We report the genome sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain G2891, a multidrug-resistant isolate of sequence type 1407, collected in Italy in 2013. PMID:26272575

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Southern tomato virus Identified in China Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Zheng, Yi; Li, Rugang; Sun, Shu-E; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Southern tomato virus (STV), a double-stranded RNA virus that affects tomato in China, was determined using small RNA deep sequencing. This Chinese isolate shares 99% sequence identity to other isolates from Mexico, France, Spain, and the United States. This is the first report of STV infecting tomatoes in Asia. PMID:26494671

  15. Sequence analysis of the genome of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.).

    PubMed

    Yagi, Masafumi; Kosugi, Shunichi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Ohmiya, Akemi; Tanase, Koji; Harada, Taro; Kishimoto, Kyutaro; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Ichimura, Kazuo; Onozaki, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Miyahara, Taira; Nishizaki, Yuzo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Noriko; Suzuki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Shusei; Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Akiko; Nakayama, Shinobu; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Tabata, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    The whole-genome sequence of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) cv. 'Francesco' was determined using a combination of different new-generation multiplex sequencing platforms. The total length of the non-redundant sequences was 568,887,315 bp, consisting of 45,088 scaffolds, which covered 91% of the 622 Mb carnation genome estimated by k-mer analysis. The N50 values of contigs and scaffolds were 16,644 bp and 60,737 bp, respectively, and the longest scaffold was 1,287,144 bp. The average GC content of the contig sequences was 36%. A total of 1050, 13, 92 and 143 genes for tRNAs, rRNAs, snoRNA and miRNA, respectively, were identified in the assembled genomic sequences. For protein-encoding genes, 43 266 complete and partial gene structures excluding those in transposable elements were deduced. Gene coverage was ∼ 98%, as deduced from the coverage of the core eukaryotic genes. Intensive characterization of the assigned carnation genes and comparison with those of other plant species revealed characteristic features of the carnation genome. The results of this study will serve as a valuable resource for fundamental and applied research of carnation, especially for breeding new carnation varieties. Further information on the genomic sequences is available at http://carnation.kazusa.or.jp.

  16. Combining Two Technologies for Full Genome Sequencing of Human

    PubMed Central

    Skryabin, K.G.; Mazur, A.M.; Boulygina, E.S.; Tsygankova, S.V.; Nedoluzhko, A.V.; Rastorguev, S.M.; Matveev, V.B.; Chekanov, N.N.; D.A., Goranskaya; Teslyuk, A.B.; Gruzdeva, N.M.; Velikhov, V.E.; Zaridze, D.G.; Kovalchuk, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    At present, the new technologies of DNA sequencing are rapidly developing allowing quick and efficient characterisation of organisms at the level of the genome structure. In this study, the whole genome sequencing of a human (Russian man) was performed using two technologies currently present on the market - Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection (SOLiD™) (Applied Biosystems) and sequencing technologies of molecular clusters using fluorescently labeled precursors (Illumina). The total number of generated data resulted in 108.3 billion base pairs (60.2 billion from Illumina technology and 48.1 billion from SOLiD technology). Statistics performed on reads generated by GAII and SOLiD showed that they covered 75% and 96% of the genome respectively. Short polymorphic regions were detected with comparable accuracy however, the absolute amount of them revealed by SOLiD was several times less than by GAII. Optimal algorithm for using the latest methods of sequencing was established for the analysis of individual human genomes. The study is the first Russian effort towards whole human genome sequencing. PMID:22649622

  17. Combining two technologies for full genome sequencing of human.

    PubMed

    Skryabin, K G; Prokhortchouk, E B; Mazur, A M; Boulygina, E S; Tsygankova, S V; Nedoluzhko, A V; Rastorguev, S M; Matveev, V B; Chekanov, N N; D A, Goranskaya; Teslyuk, A B; Gruzdeva, N M; Velikhov, V E; Zaridze, D G; Kovalchuk, M V

    2009-10-01

    At present, the new technologies of DNA sequencing are rapidly developing allowing quick and efficient characterisation of organisms at the level of the genome structure. In this study, the whole genome sequencing of a human (Russian man) was performed using two technologies currently present on the market - Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection (SOLiD™) (Applied Biosystems) and sequencing technologies of molecular clusters using fluorescently labeled precursors (Illumina). The total number of generated data resulted in 108.3 billion base pairs (60.2 billion from Illumina technology and 48.1 billion from SOLiD technology). Statistics performed on reads generated by GAII and SOLiD showed that they covered 75% and 96% of the genome respectively. Short polymorphic regions were detected with comparable accuracy however, the absolute amount of them revealed by SOLiD was several times less than by GAII. Optimal algorithm for using the latest methods of sequencing was established for the analysis of individual human genomes. The study is the first Russian effort towards whole human genome sequencing.

  18. Genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Kazuharu; Yoshida, Yuki; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Tardigrades are ubiquitous microscopic animals that play an important role in the study of metazoan phylogeny. Most terrestrial tardigrades can withstand extreme environments by entering an ametabolic desiccated state termed anhydrobiosis. Due to their small size and the non-axenic nature of laboratory cultures, molecular studies of tardigrades are prone to contamination. To minimize the possibility of microbial contaminations and to obtain high-quality genomic information, we have developed an ultra-low input library sequencing protocol to enable the genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual. Here, we describe the details of our sequencing data and the ultra-low input library preparation methodologies. PMID:27529330

  19. Genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kazuharu; Yoshida, Yuki; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-08-16

    Tardigrades are ubiquitous microscopic animals that play an important role in the study of metazoan phylogeny. Most terrestrial tardigrades can withstand extreme environments by entering an ametabolic desiccated state termed anhydrobiosis. Due to their small size and the non-axenic nature of laboratory cultures, molecular studies of tardigrades are prone to contamination. To minimize the possibility of microbial contaminations and to obtain high-quality genomic information, we have developed an ultra-low input library sequencing protocol to enable the genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual. Here, we describe the details of our sequencing data and the ultra-low input library preparation methodologies.

  20. Genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kazuharu; Yoshida, Yuki; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Tardigrades are ubiquitous microscopic animals that play an important role in the study of metazoan phylogeny. Most terrestrial tardigrades can withstand extreme environments by entering an ametabolic desiccated state termed anhydrobiosis. Due to their small size and the non-axenic nature of laboratory cultures, molecular studies of tardigrades are prone to contamination. To minimize the possibility of microbial contaminations and to obtain high-quality genomic information, we have developed an ultra-low input library sequencing protocol to enable the genome sequencing of a single tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini individual. Here, we describe the details of our sequencing data and the ultra-low input library preparation methodologies. PMID:27529330

  1. Genome sequence-independent identification of RNA editing sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Xiao, Xinshu

    2015-04-01

    RNA editing generates post-transcriptional sequence changes that can be deduced from RNA-seq data, but detection typically requires matched genomic sequence or multiple related expression data sets. We developed the GIREMI tool (genome-independent identification of RNA editing by mutual information; https://www.ibp.ucla.edu/research/xiao/GIREMI.html) to predict adenosine-to-inosine editing accurately and sensitively from a single RNA-seq data set of modest sequencing depth. Using GIREMI on existing data, we observed tissue-specific and evolutionary patterns in editing sites in the human population.

  2. A physical map of the papaya genome with integrated genetic map and genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Papaya is a major fruit crop in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide and has primitive sex chromosomes controlling sex determination in this trioecious species. The papaya genome was recently sequenced because of its agricultural importance, unique biological features, and successful application of transgenic papaya for resistance to papaya ringspot virus. As a part of the genome sequencing project, we constructed a BAC-based physical map using a high information-content fingerprinting approach to assist whole genome shotgun sequence assembly. Results The physical map consists of 963 contigs, representing 9.4× genome equivalents, and was integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence using BAC end sequences and a sequence-tagged high-density genetic map. The estimated genome coverage of the physical map is about 95.8%, while 72.4% of the genome was aligned to the genetic map. A total of 1,181 high quality overgo (overlapping oligonucleotide) probes representing conserved sequences in Arabidopsis and genetically mapped loci in Brassica were anchored on the physical map, which provides a foundation for comparative genomics in the Brassicales. The integrated genetic and physical map aligned with the genome sequence revealed recombination hotspots as well as regions suppressed for recombination across the genome, particularly on the recently evolved sex chromosomes. Suppression of recombination spread to the adjacent region of the male specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY), and recombination rates were recovered gradually and then exceeded the genome average. Recombination hotspots were observed at about 10 Mb away on both sides of the MSY, showing 7-fold increase compared with the genome wide average, demonstrating the dynamics of recombination of the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A BAC-based physical map of papaya was constructed and integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence. The integrated map facilitated the draft genome assembly

  3. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Bacteriophage Lucky10.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Brown, Aleks K; Fisher, Daniel J; Okwiya, Nicholas H; Savage, Kaitlyn A; German, Brian A; McDonnell, Jill E; Schafer, Claire E; Yu, Victor J; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-01-01

    Lucky10 is a newly isolated phage of Gordonia terrae 3612 that was recovered from a soil sample in Pittsburgh, PA. Lucky10 has siphoviral morphology and a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of 42,979 bp, with 70 predicted protein-coding genes. Lucky10 shows little similarity to previously reported Gordonia phages. PMID:27365346

  4. Genome Sequence of Gordonia Bacteriophage Lucky10

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aleks K.; Fisher, Daniel J.; Okwiya, Nicholas H.; Savage, Kaitlyn A.; German, Brian A.; McDonnell, Jill E.; Schafer, Claire E.; Yu, Victor J.; Furbee, Emily C.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Montgomery, Matthew T.; Garlena, Rebecca A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2016-01-01

    Lucky10 is a newly isolated phage of Gordonia terrae 3612 that was recovered from a soil sample in Pittsburgh, PA. Lucky10 has siphoviral morphology and a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of 42,979 bp, with 70 predicted protein-coding genes. Lucky10 shows little similarity to previously reported Gordonia phages. PMID:27365346

  5. Genomic sequencing in clinical practice: applications, challenges, and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Krier, Joel B.; Kalia, Sarah S.; Green, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of massively parallel sequencing (or next-generation sequencing) has facilitated a rapid implementation of genomic sequencing in clinical medicine. Genomic sequencing (GS) is now an essential tool for evaluating rare disorders, identifying therapeutic targets in neoplasms, and screening for prenatal aneuploidy. Emerging applications, such as GS for preconception carrier screening and predisposition screening in healthy individuals, are being explored in research settings and utilized by members of the public eager to incorporate genomic information into their health management. The rapid pace of adoption has created challenges for all stakeholders in clinical GS, from standardizing variant interpretation approaches in clinical molecular laboratories to ensuring that nongeneticist clinicians are prepared for new types of clinical information. Clinical GS faces a pivotal moment, as the vast potential of new quantities and types of data enable further clinical innovation and complicated implementation questions continue to be resolved. PMID:27757064

  6. Sequence-based physical mapping of complex genomes by whole genome profiling.

    PubMed

    van Oeveren, Jan; de Ruiter, Marjo; Jesse, Taco; van der Poel, Hein; Tang, Jifeng; Yalcin, Feyruz; Janssen, Antoine; Volpin, Hanne; Stormo, Keith E; Bogden, Robert; van Eijk, Michiel J T; Prins, Marcel

    2011-04-01

    We present whole genome profiling (WGP), a novel next-generation sequencing-based physical mapping technology for construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs of complex genomes, using Arabidopsis thaliana as an example. WGP leverages short read sequences derived from restriction fragments of two-dimensionally pooled BAC clones to generate sequence tags. These sequence tags are assigned to individual BAC clones, followed by assembly of BAC contigs based on shared regions containing identical sequence tags. Following in silico analysis of WGP sequence tags and simulation of a map of Arabidopsis chromosome 4 and maize, a WGP map of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia was constructed de novo using a six-genome equivalent BAC library. Validation of the WGP map using the Columbia reference sequence confirmed that 350 BAC contigs (98%) were assembled correctly, spanning 97% of the 102-Mb calculated genome coverage. We demonstrate that WGP maps can also be generated for more complex plant genomes and will serve as excellent scaffolds to anchor genetic linkage maps and integrate whole genome sequence data.

  7. Spectral entropy criteria for structural segmentation in genomic DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.; Lobzin, V. V.

    2004-07-01

    The spectral entropy is calculated with Fourier structure factors and characterizes the level of structural ordering in a sequence of symbols. It may efficiently be applied to the assessment and reconstruction of the modular structure in genomic DNA sequences. We present the relevant spectral entropy criteria for the local and non-local structural segmentation in DNA sequences. The results are illustrated with the model examples and analysis of intervening exon-intron segments in the protein-coding regions.

  8. Complete genome sequences of three strains of coxsackievirus a7.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Koskinen, Satu; Karelehto, Eveliina; Sittig, Eleonora; Roivainen, Merja; Hyypiä, Timo; Susi, Petri

    2013-04-11

    Genomes of three strains (Parker, USSR, and 275/58) of coxsackievirus A7 (CV-A7) were amplified by the long reverse transcription (RT)-PCR method and sequenced. While the sequences of Parker and USSR were identical, the similarities of 275/58 to the CV-A7 reference sequence, accession no. AY421765, were 82.6% and 96.2% for nucleotides and amino acids, respectively.

  9. Sequencing and de novo draft assemblies of a fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reference genome.

    PubMed

    Burns, Frank R; Cogburn, Amarin L; Ankley, Gerald T; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Waits, Eric; Chang, Yun-Juan; Llaca, Victor; Deschamps, Stephane D; Jackson, Raymond E; Hoke, Robert Alan

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide the foundation for development of genome-scale resources for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), an important model organism widely used in both aquatic toxicology research and regulatory testing. The authors report on the first sequencing and 2 draft assemblies for the reference genome of this species. Approximately 120× sequence coverage was achieved via Illumina sequencing of a combination of paired-end, mate-pair, and fosmid libraries. Evaluation and comparison of these assemblies demonstrate that they are of sufficient quality to be useful for genome-enabled studies, with 418 of 458 (91%) conserved eukaryotic genes mapping to at least 1 of the assemblies. In addition to its immediate utility, the present work provides a strong foundation on which to build further refinements of a reference genome for the fathead minnow.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Kribbella flavida type strain (IFO 14399T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pukall, Rudiger; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; LaButti, Kurt; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    The genus Kribbella consists of 15 species, with Kribbella flavida (Park et al. 1999) as the type species. The name Kribbella was formed from the acronym of the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, KRIBB. Strains of the various Kribbella species were originally isolated from soil, potato, alum slate mine, patinas of catacombs or from horse racecourses. Here we describe the features of K. flavida together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. In addition to the 5.3 Mbp genome of Nocardioides sp. JS614, this is only the second completed genome sequence of the family Nocardioidaceae. The 7,579,488 bp long genome with its 7,086 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes and is part of the Genomic Encyc-lopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. The Diploid Genome Sequence of an Individual Human

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Samuel; Sutton, Granger; Ng, Pauline C; Feuk, Lars; Halpern, Aaron L; Walenz, Brian P; Axelrod, Nelson; Huang, Jiaqi; Kirkness, Ewen F; Denisov, Gennady; Lin, Yuan; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Pang, Andy Wing Chun; Shago, Mary; Stockwell, Timothy B; Tsiamouri, Alexia; Bafna, Vineet; Bansal, Vikas; Kravitz, Saul A; Busam, Dana A; Beeson, Karen Y; McIntosh, Tina C; Remington, Karin A; Abril, Josep F; Gill, John; Borman, Jon; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Frazier, Marvin E; Scherer, Stephen W; Strausberg, Robert L; Venter, J. Craig

    2007-01-01

    Presented here is a genome sequence of an individual human. It was produced from ∼32 million random DNA fragments, sequenced by Sanger dideoxy technology and assembled into 4,528 scaffolds, comprising 2,810 million bases (Mb) of contiguous sequence with approximately 7.5-fold coverage for any given region. We developed a modified version of the Celera assembler to facilitate the identification and comparison of alternate alleles within this individual diploid genome. Comparison of this genome and the National Center for Biotechnology Information human reference assembly revealed more than 4.1 million DNA variants, encompassing 12.3 Mb. These variants (of which 1,288,319 were novel) included 3,213,401 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 53,823 block substitutions (2–206 bp), 292,102 heterozygous insertion/deletion events (indels)(1–571 bp), 559,473 homozygous indels (1–82,711 bp), 90 inversions, as well as numerous segmental duplications and copy number variation regions. Non-SNP DNA variation accounts for 22% of all events identified in the donor, however they involve 74% of all variant bases. This suggests an important role for non-SNP genetic alterations in defining the diploid genome structure. Moreover, 44% of genes were heterozygous for one or more variants. Using a novel haplotype assembly strategy, we were able to span 1.5 Gb of genome sequence in segments >200 kb, providing further precision to the diploid nature of the genome. These data depict a definitive molecular portrait of a diploid human genome that provides a starting point for future genome comparisons and enables an era of individualized genomic information. PMID:17803354

  12. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1-3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution.

  13. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1–3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution. PMID:26630570

  14. Genome Sequencing Fishes out Longevity Genes.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Murphy, Coleen T

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the molecular basis underlying aging is critical if we are to fully understand how and why we age-and possibly how to delay the aging process. Up until now, most longevity pathways were discovered in invertebrates because of their short lifespans and availability of genetic tools. Now, Reichwald et al. and Valenzano et al. independently provide a reference genome for the short-lived African turquoise killifish, establishing its role as a vertebrate system for aging research. PMID:26638067

  15. Genome Sequencing Fishes out Longevity Genes.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Murphy, Coleen T

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the molecular basis underlying aging is critical if we are to fully understand how and why we age-and possibly how to delay the aging process. Up until now, most longevity pathways were discovered in invertebrates because of their short lifespans and availability of genetic tools. Now, Reichwald et al. and Valenzano et al. independently provide a reference genome for the short-lived African turquoise killifish, establishing its role as a vertebrate system for aging research.

  16. Sequencing the nuclear genome of the extinct woolly mammoth.

    PubMed

    Miller, Webb; Drautz, Daniela I; Ratan, Aakrosh; Pusey, Barbara; Qi, Ji; Lesk, Arthur M; Tomsho, Lynn P; Packard, Michael D; Zhao, Fangqing; Sher, Andrei; Tikhonov, Alexei; Raney, Brian; Patterson, Nick; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S; Knight, James R; Irzyk, Gerard P; Fredrikson, Karin M; Harkins, Timothy T; Sheridan, Sharon; Pringle, Tom; Schuster, Stephan C

    2008-11-20

    In 1994, two independent groups extracted DNA from several Pleistocene epoch mammoths and noted differences among individual specimens. Subsequently, DNA sequences have been published for a number of extinct species. However, such ancient DNA is often fragmented and damaged, and studies to date have typically focused on short mitochondrial sequences, never yielding more than a fraction of a per cent of any nuclear genome. Here we describe 4.17 billion bases (Gb) of sequence from several mammoth specimens, 3.3 billion (80%) of which are from the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) genome and thus comprise an extensive set of genome-wide sequence from an extinct species. Our data support earlier reports that elephantid genomes exceed 4 Gb. The estimated divergence rate between mammoth and African elephant is half of that between human and chimpanzee. The observed number of nucleotide differences between two particular mammoths was approximately one-eighth of that between one of them and the African elephant, corresponding to a separation between the mammoths of 1.5-2.0 Myr. The estimated probability that orthologous elephant and mammoth amino acids differ is 0.002, corresponding to about one residue per protein. Differences were discovered between mammoth and African elephant in amino-acid positions that are otherwise invariant over several billion years of combined mammalian evolution. This study shows that nuclear genome sequencing of extinct species can reveal population differences not evident from the fossil record, and perhaps even discover genetic factors that affect extinction.

  17. Sequencing the nuclear genome of the extinct woolly mammoth.

    PubMed

    Miller, Webb; Drautz, Daniela I; Ratan, Aakrosh; Pusey, Barbara; Qi, Ji; Lesk, Arthur M; Tomsho, Lynn P; Packard, Michael D; Zhao, Fangqing; Sher, Andrei; Tikhonov, Alexei; Raney, Brian; Patterson, Nick; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S; Knight, James R; Irzyk, Gerard P; Fredrikson, Karin M; Harkins, Timothy T; Sheridan, Sharon; Pringle, Tom; Schuster, Stephan C

    2008-11-20

    In 1994, two independent groups extracted DNA from several Pleistocene epoch mammoths and noted differences among individual specimens. Subsequently, DNA sequences have been published for a number of extinct species. However, such ancient DNA is often fragmented and damaged, and studies to date have typically focused on short mitochondrial sequences, never yielding more than a fraction of a per cent of any nuclear genome. Here we describe 4.17 billion bases (Gb) of sequence from several mammoth specimens, 3.3 billion (80%) of which are from the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) genome and thus comprise an extensive set of genome-wide sequence from an extinct species. Our data support earlier reports that elephantid genomes exceed 4 Gb. The estimated divergence rate between mammoth and African elephant is half of that between human and chimpanzee. The observed number of nucleotide differences between two particular mammoths was approximately one-eighth of that between one of them and the African elephant, corresponding to a separation between the mammoths of 1.5-2.0 Myr. The estimated probability that orthologous elephant and mammoth amino acids differ is 0.002, corresponding to about one residue per protein. Differences were discovered between mammoth and African elephant in amino-acid positions that are otherwise invariant over several billion years of combined mammalian evolution. This study shows that nuclear genome sequencing of extinct species can reveal population differences not evident from the fossil record, and perhaps even discover genetic factors that affect extinction. PMID:19020620

  18. Complete genomic sequence analysis of norovirus isolated from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Jung, Gyoo Seung; Lee, Chan Hee

    2012-10-01

    The complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the RNA genome of a recently isolated norovirus (NoV) from Korea, designated Hu/GII-4/CBNU2/2007/KR (CBNU2), were determined and characterized by phylogenetic comparison with several genetically diverse NoV sequences. The RNA genome of CBNU2 is 7,560 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly (A) tract. It includes three open reading frames (ORFs): ORF1, which encodes the nonstructural polyprotein (5-5,104); ORF2, which encodes VP1 (5,085-6,707); and ORF3, which encodes VP2 (6,707-7,513). ORF2-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that CBNU2 belonged to the GII.4 genotype, the most prevalent genotype, and formed a cluster with NoVs isolated from Asian regions, between 2006 and 2008. Comparative analysis with the consensus sequence of 207 completely sequenced NoV genomes showed 47 mismatched nucleotides: 26 in ORF1, 14 in ORF2, and 7 in ORF3, resulting in 8 amino acid changes: 3 in ORF1, 2 in ORF2, and 3 in ORF3. Phylogenetic analysis with full genome ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3 nucleotide sequences obtained from CBNU2 and each of the other representative NoV genomes suggested that CBNU2 had not undergone recombination with any of the other NoVs. A SimPlot analysis further supported this finding.

  19. Information recovery from low coverage whole-genome bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Libertini, Emanuele; Heath, Simon C; Hamoudi, Rifat A; Gut, Marta; Ziller, Michael J; Czyz, Agata; Ruotti, Victor; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Frontini, Mattia; Ouwehand, Willem H; Meissner, Alexander; Gut, Ivo G; Beck, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The cost of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) remains a bottleneck for many studies and it is therefore imperative to extract as much information as possible from a given dataset. This is particularly important because even at the recommend 30X coverage for reference methylomes, up to 50% of high-resolution features such as differentially methylated positions (DMPs) cannot be called with current methods as determined by saturation analysis. To address this limitation, we have developed a tool that dynamically segments WGBS methylomes into blocks of comethylation (COMETs) from which lost information can be recovered in the form of differentially methylated COMETs (DMCs). Using this tool, we demonstrate recovery of ∼30% of the lost DMP information content as DMCs even at very low (5X) coverage. This constitutes twice the amount that can be recovered using an existing method based on differentially methylated regions (DMRs). In addition, we explored the relationship between COMETs and haplotypes in lymphoblastoid cell lines of African and European origin. Using best fit analysis, we show COMETs to be correlated in a population-specific manner, suggesting that this type of dynamic segmentation may be useful for integrated (epi)genome-wide association studies in the future. PMID:27346250

  20. Information recovery from low coverage whole-genome bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Libertini, Emanuele; Heath, Simon C.; Hamoudi, Rifat A.; Gut, Marta; Ziller, Michael J.; Czyz, Agata; Ruotti, Victor; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Frontini, Mattia; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Meissner, Alexander; Gut, Ivo G.; Beck, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The cost of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) remains a bottleneck for many studies and it is therefore imperative to extract as much information as possible from a given dataset. This is particularly important because even at the recommend 30X coverage for reference methylomes, up to 50% of high-resolution features such as differentially methylated positions (DMPs) cannot be called with current methods as determined by saturation analysis. To address this limitation, we have developed a tool that dynamically segments WGBS methylomes into blocks of comethylation (COMETs) from which lost information can be recovered in the form of differentially methylated COMETs (DMCs). Using this tool, we demonstrate recovery of ∼30% of the lost DMP information content as DMCs even at very low (5X) coverage. This constitutes twice the amount that can be recovered using an existing method based on differentially methylated regions (DMRs). In addition, we explored the relationship between COMETs and haplotypes in lymphoblastoid cell lines of African and European origin. Using best fit analysis, we show COMETs to be correlated in a population-specific manner, suggesting that this type of dynamic segmentation may be useful for integrated (epi)genome-wide association studies in the future. PMID:27346250

  1. Information recovery from low coverage whole-genome bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Libertini, Emanuele; Heath, Simon C; Hamoudi, Rifat A; Gut, Marta; Ziller, Michael J; Czyz, Agata; Ruotti, Victor; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Frontini, Mattia; Ouwehand, Willem H; Meissner, Alexander; Gut, Ivo G; Beck, Stephan

    2016-06-27

    The cost of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) remains a bottleneck for many studies and it is therefore imperative to extract as much information as possible from a given dataset. This is particularly important because even at the recommend 30X coverage for reference methylomes, up to 50% of high-resolution features such as differentially methylated positions (DMPs) cannot be called with current methods as determined by saturation analysis. To address this limitation, we have developed a tool that dynamically segments WGBS methylomes into blocks of comethylation (COMETs) from which lost information can be recovered in the form of differentially methylated COMETs (DMCs). Using this tool, we demonstrate recovery of ∼30% of the lost DMP information content as DMCs even at very low (5X) coverage. This constitutes twice the amount that can be recovered using an existing method based on differentially methylated regions (DMRs). In addition, we explored the relationship between COMETs and haplotypes in lymphoblastoid cell lines of African and European origin. Using best fit analysis, we show COMETs to be correlated in a population-specific manner, suggesting that this type of dynamic segmentation may be useful for integrated (epi)genome-wide association studies in the future.

  2. Genome nucleotide composition shapes variation in simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiangjun; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2011-02-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are a common component of genomes but vary greatly across species in their abundance. We tested the hypothesis that this variation is due in part to AT/GC content of genomes, with genomes biased toward either high AT or high CG generating more short random repeats that are long enough to enhance expansion through slippage during replication. To test this hypothesis, we identified repeats with perfect tandem iterations of 1-6 bp from 25 protists with complete or near-complete genome sequences. As expected, the density and the frequency are highly related to genome AT content, with excellent fits to quadratic regressions with minima near a 50% AT content and rising toward both extremes. Within species, the same trends hold, except the limited variation in AT content within each species places each mainly on the descending (GC rich), middle, or ascending (AT rich) part of the curve. The base usages of repeat motifs are also significantly correlated with genome nucleotide compositions: Percentages of AT-rich motifs rise with the increase of genome AT content but vice versa for GC-rich subgroups. Amino acid homopolymer repeats also show the expected quadratic relationship, with higher abundance in species with AT content biased in either direction. Our results show that genome nucleotide composition explains up to half of the variance in the abundance and motif constitution of SSRs.

  3. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  4. The Illumina-solexa sequencing protocol for bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenfei; Cheng, Lei; Wang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Based on reversible dye-terminators technology, the Illumina-solexa sequencing platform enables rapid sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS) of large DNA stretches spanning entire genomes, with the latest instruments capable of producing hundreds of gigabases of data in a single sequencing run. Illumina's NGS instruments powerfully combine the flexibility of single reads with short- and long-insert paired-end reads, and enable a wide range of DNA sequencing applications. Here, we describe the paired-end library preparation with an average insert size of 470 bp, 2 kbp, and 6 kbp, together with the DNA cluster generation and sequencing procedure of E. coli O104:H4 genome on Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform.

  5. GENSTYLE: exploration and analysis of DNA sequences with genomic signature.

    PubMed

    Fertil, Bernard; Massin, Matthieu; Lespinats, Sylvain; Devic, Caroline; Dumee, Philippe; Giron, Alain

    2005-07-01

    GENSTYLE (http://Genstyle.imed.jussieu.fr) is a workspace designed for the characterization and classification of nucleotide sequences. Based on the genomic signature paradigm, GENSTYLE focuses on oligonucleotide frequencies in DNA sequences. Users can select sequences of interest in the GENSTYLE companion database, where the whole set of GenBank sequences is grouped per species, or upload their own sequences to work with. Tools for the exploration and analysis of signatures allow (i) identification of the origin of DNA segments (detection of rare species or species for which technical problems prevent fast characterization, such as micro-organisms with slow growth), (ii) analysis of the homogeneity of a genome and isolation of areas with novel functionality (horizontal transfers for example)--and (iii) molecular phylogeny and taxonomy.

  6. Genomic RNA sequence of feline coronavirus strain FCoV C1Je

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Charlotte; Siddell, Stuart G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the first genomic RNA sequence of a field strain feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral RNA was isolated at post mortem from the jejunum and liver of a cat with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). A consensus sequence of the jejunum-derived genomic RNA (FCoV C1Je) was determined from overlapping cDNA fragments produced by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification. RT-PCR products were sequenced by a reiterative sequencing strategy and the genomic RNA termini were determined using a rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR strategy. The FCoV C1Je genome was found to be 29,255 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail. Comparison of the FCoV C1Je genomic RNA sequence with that of the laboratory strain FCoV FIP virus (FIPV) 79-1146 showed that both viruses have a similar genome organisation and predictions made for the open reading frames and cis-acting elements of the FIPV 79-1146 genome hold true for FCoV C1Je. In addition, the sequence of the 3′-proximal third of the liver derived genomic RNA (FCoV C1Li), which encompasses the structural and accessory protein genes of the virus, was also determined. Comparisons of the enteric (jejunum) and non-enteric (liver) derived viral RNA sequences revealed 100% nucleotide identity, a finding that questions the well accepted ‘internal mutation theory’ of FIPV pathogenicity. PMID:17363313

  7. Deep Sequencing of Norovirus Genomes Defines Evolutionary Patterns in an Urban Tropical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, Matthew; Petrova, Velislava; Phan, My V. T.; Rabaa, Maia A.; Watson, Simon J.; Ong, Swee Hoe; Baker, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Norovirus is a highly transmissible infectious agent that causes epidemic gastroenteritis in susceptible children and adults. Norovirus infections can be severe and can be initiated from an exceptionally small number of viral particles. Detailed genome sequence data are useful for tracking norovirus transmission and evolution. To address this need, we have developed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method that generates entire genome sequences from small amounts of clinical specimens. This novel approach employs an algorithm for reverse transcription and PCR amplification primer design using all of the publically available norovirus sequence data. Deep sequencing and de novo assembly were used to generate norovirus genomes from a large set of diarrheal patients attending three hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, over a 2.5-year period. Positive-selection analysis and direct examination of protein changes in the virus over time identified codons in the regions encoding proteins VP1, p48 (NS1-2), and p22 (NS4) under positive selection and expands the known targets of norovirus evolutionary pressure. IMPORTANCE The high transmissibility and rapid evolutionary rate of norovirus, combined with a short-lived host immune responses, are thought to be the reasons why the virus causes the majority of pediatric viral diarrhea cases. The evolutionary patterns of this RNA virus have been described in detail for only a portion of the virus genome and never for a virus from a detailed urban tropical setting. We provide a detailed sequence description of the noroviruses circulating in three Ho Chi Minh City hospitals over a 2.5-year period. This study identified patterns of virus change in known sites of host immune response and identified three additional regions of the virus genome under selection that were not previously recognized. In addition, the method described here provides a robust full-genome sequencing platform for community-based virus surveillance. PMID

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, Strain Cuniculi A: The Loss of Infectivity to Humans Is Associated with Genome Decay

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Zobaníková, Marie; Strouhal, Michal; Čejková, Darina; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Pospíšilová, Petra; Norris, Steven J.; Albert, Tom; Qin, Xiang; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Buhay, Christian; Muzny, Donna M.; Chen, Lei; Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi is the causative agent of rabbit venereal spirochetosis. It is not infectious to humans, although its genome structure is very closely related to other pathogenic Treponema species including Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis. In this study, the genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A, was determined by a combination of several high-throughput sequencing strategies. Whereas the overall size (1,133,390 bp), arrangement, and gene content of the Cuniculi A genome closely resembled those of the T. pallidum genome, the T. paraluiscuniculi genome contained a markedly higher number of pseudogenes and gene fragments (51). In addition to pseudogenes, 33 divergent genes were also found in the T. paraluiscuniculi genome. A set of 32 (out of 84) affected genes encoded proteins of known or predicted function in the Nichols genome. These proteins included virulence factors, gene regulators and components of DNA repair and recombination. The majority (52 or 61.9%) of the Cuniculi A pseudogenes and divergent genes were of unknown function. Our results indicate that T. paraluiscuniculi has evolved from a T. pallidum-like ancestor and adapted to a specialized host-associated niche (rabbits) during loss of infectivity to humans. The genes that are inactivated or altered in T. paraluiscuniculi are candidates for virulence factors important in the infectivity and pathogenesis of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:21655244

  9. 959 Nematode Genomes: a semantic wiki for coordinating sequencing projects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sujai; Schiffer, Philipp H; Blaxter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing has been democratized by second-generation technologies, and even small labs can sequence metazoan genomes now. In this article, we describe '959 Nematode Genomes'--a community-curated semantic wiki to coordinate the sequencing efforts of individual labs to collectively sequence 959 genomes spanning the phylum Nematoda. The main goal of the wiki is to track sequencing projects that have been proposed, are in progress, or have been completed. Wiki pages for species and strains are linked to pages for people and organizations, using machine- and human-readable metadata that users can query to see the status of their favourite worm. The site is based on the same platform that runs Wikipedia, with semantic extensions that allow the underlying taxonomy and data storage models to be maintained and updated with ease compared with a conventional database-driven web site. The wiki also provides a way to track and share preliminary data if those data are not polished enough to be submitted to the official sequence repositories. In just over a year, this wiki has already fostered new international collaborations and attracted newcomers to the enthusiastic community of nematode genomicists. www.nematodegenomes.org.

  10. 959 Nematode Genomes: a semantic wiki for coordinating sequencing projects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sujai; Schiffer, Philipp H; Blaxter, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing has been democratized by second-generation technologies, and even small labs can sequence metazoan genomes now. In this article, we describe '959 Nematode Genomes'--a community-curated semantic wiki to coordinate the sequencing efforts of individual labs to collectively sequence 959 genomes spanning the phylum Nematoda. The main goal of the wiki is to track sequencing projects that have been proposed, are in progress, or have been completed. Wiki pages for species and strains are linked to pages for people and organizations, using machine- and human-readable metadata that users can query to see the status of their favourite worm. The site is based on the same platform that runs Wikipedia, with semantic extensions that allow the underlying taxonomy and data storage models to be maintained and updated with ease compared with a conventional database-driven web site. The wiki also provides a way to track and share preliminary data if those data are not polished enough to be submitted to the official sequence repositories. In just over a year, this wiki has already fostered new international collaborations and attracted newcomers to the enthusiastic community of nematode genomicists. www.nematodegenomes.org. PMID:22058131

  11. Complete genome sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus, a potyvirus, occurring in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lucinda, N; da Rocha, W B; Inoue-Nagata, A K; Nagata, T

    2012-07-01

    The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, was determined. The sequence was 9745 nucleotides long, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail. The genome contained a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3085 amino acids, which contained the typically conserved motifs found in members of the genus Potyvirus and an additional P3-PIPO (pretty interesting potyvirus ORF). In a pairwise comparison with other potyvirus sequences, the full genome of PepYMV shared a maximum of 63.84 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mottle virus (PepMoV), followed by verbena virus Y (VVY, 62.11 %), potato virus Y (PVY, 62.07 %) and Peru tomato mosaic virus (PTV, 62.00 %). Based upon a phylogenetic analysis, PepYMV was most closely related to PepMoV and PTV, within the PVY subgroup cluster, like most potyviruses isolated in solanaceous hosts in South America.

  12. Gene identification in prokaryotic genomes, phages, metagenomes, and EST sequences with GeneMarkS suite.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Mark; Lomsadze, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This unit describes how to use several gene-finding programs from the GeneMark line developed for finding protein-coding ORFs in genomic DNA of prokaryotic species, in genomic DNA of eukaryotic species with intronless genes, in genomes of viruses and phages, and in prokaryotic metagenomic sequences, as well as in EST sequences with spliced-out introns. These bioinformatics tools were demonstrated to have state-of-the-art accuracy, and have been frequently used for gene annotation in novel nucleotide sequences. An additional advantage of these sequence-analysis tools is that the problem of algorithm parameterization is solved automatically, with parameters estimated by iterative self-training (unsupervised training). PMID:24510847

  13. Complete genome sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius type strain (104-IAT)

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chain, Patrick; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Wahrenburg, Claudia; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (Darland and Brock 1971) is the type species of the larger of the two genera in the bacillal family ‘Alicyclobacillaceae’. A. acidocaldarius is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, but may also be associated with food and fruit spoilage. Due to its acidophilic nature, several enzymes from this species have since long been subjected to detailed molecular and biochemical studies. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family ‘Alicyclobacillaceae’. The 3,205,686 bp long genome (chromosome and three plasmids) with its 3,153 protein-coding and 82 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304673

  14. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the ge-nus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobia-ceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomi-crobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsu, C. H.; Barabote, Ravi; Thompson, Sue; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, T.; Han, Cliff F.; Beasley, Federico; Chen, Weimin; Konopka, Allan; Xie, Gary

    2013-09-30

    Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is a species in the genus Arthrobacter Conn and Dimmick 1947, in the family Micrococcaceae and class Actinobacteria. A number of Arthrobacter genome sequences have been completed because of their important role in soil, especially bioremediation. This isolate is of special interest because it is tolerant to multiple metals and it is extremely resistant to elevated concentrations of chromate. The genome consists of a 4,698,945 bp circular chromosome and three plasmids (96,488, 115,507, and 159,536 bp, a total of 5,070,478 bp), coding 4,536 proteins of which 1,257 are without known function. This genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Meiothermus ruber type strain (21T)

    SciTech Connect

    Tindall, Brian; Sikorski, Johannes; Lucas, Susan; Goltsman, Eugene; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Fahnrich, Regine; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2010-01-01

    Meiothermus ruber (Loginova et al. 1984) Nobre et al. 1996 is the type species of the genus Meiothermus. This thermophilic genus is of special interest, as its members can be affiliated to either low-temperature or high-temperature groups. The temperature related split is in accordance with the chemotaxonomic feature of the polar lipids. M. ruber is a representative of the low-temperature group. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Meiothermus and only the third genome sequence to be published from a member of the family Thermaceae. The 3,097,457 bp long genome with its 3,052 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis type strain (CIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacter nitrofigilis (McClung et al. 1983) Vandamme et al. 1991 is the type species of the genus Arcobacter in the epsilonproteobacterial family Campylobacteraceae. The species was first described in 1983 as Campylobacter nitrofigilis [1] after its detection as a free-living, nitrogen-fixing Campylobacter species associated with Spartina alterniflora Loisel. roots [2]. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its lifestyle as a symbiotic organism in a marine environment in contrast to many other Arcobacter species which are associated with warm-blooded animals and tend to be pathogenic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a type stain of the genus Arcobacter. The 3,192,235 bp genome with its 3,154 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Genome rearrangements caused by interstitial telomeric sequences in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Aksenova, Anna Y.; Greenwell, Patricia W.; Dominska, Margaret; Shishkin, Alexander A.; Kim, Jane C.; Petes, Thomas D.; Mirkin, Sergei M.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs) are present in many eukaryotic genomes and are linked to genome instabilities and disease in humans. The mechanisms responsible for ITS-mediated genome instability are not understood in molecular detail. Here, we use a model Saccharomyces cerevisiae system to characterize genome instability mediated by yeast telomeric (Ytel) repeats embedded within an intron of a reporter gene inside a yeast chromosome. We observed a very high rate of small insertions and deletions within the repeats. We also found frequent gross chromosome rearrangements, including deletions, duplications, inversions, translocations, and formation of acentric minichromosomes. The inversions are a unique class of chromosome rearrangement involving an interaction between the ITS and the true telomere of the chromosome. Because we previously found that Ytel repeats cause strong replication fork stalling, we suggest that formation of double-stranded DNA breaks within the Ytel sequences might be responsible for these gross chromosome rearrangements. PMID:24191060

  19. Whole genome sequencing in clinical and public health microbiology.

    PubMed

    Kwong, J C; McCallum, N; Sintchenko, V; Howden, B P

    2015-04-01

    Genomics and whole genome sequencing (WGS) have the capacity to greatly enhance knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases and clinical microbiology.The growth and availability of bench-top WGS analysers has facilitated the feasibility of genomics in clinical and public health microbiology.Given current resource and infrastructure limitations, WGS is most applicable to use in public health laboratories, reference laboratories, and hospital infection control-affiliated laboratories.As WGS represents the pinnacle for strain characterisation and epidemiological analyses, it is likely to replace traditional typing methods, resistance gene detection and other sequence-based investigations (e.g., 16S rDNA PCR) in the near future.Although genomic technologies are rapidly evolving, widespread implementation in clinical and public health microbiology laboratories is limited by the need for effective semi-automated pipelines, standardised quality control and data interpretation, bioinformatics expertise, and infrastructure.

  20. Draft genome sequence of the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hevea brasiliensis, a member of the Euphorbiaceae family, is the major commercial source of natural rubber (NR). NR is a latex polymer with high elasticity, flexibility, and resilience that has played a critical role in the world economy since 1876. Results Here, we report the draft genome sequence of H. brasiliensis. The assembly spans ~1.1 Gb of the estimated 2.15 Gb haploid genome. Overall, ~78% of the genome was identified as repetitive DNA. Gene prediction shows 68,955 gene models, of which 12.7% are unique to Hevea. Most of the key genes associated with rubber biosynthesis, rubberwood formation, disease resistance, and allergenicity have been identified. Conclusions The knowledge gained from this genome sequence will aid in the future development of high-yielding clones to keep up with the ever increasing need for natural rubber. PMID:23375136

  1. Complete genome sequence of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius type strain (104-IAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Sikorski, Johannes; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, A; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, N; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Chertkov, Olga; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Tom; Detter, J C; Wahrenburg, Claudia; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2010-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (Darland and Brock 1971) is the type species of the larger of the two genera in the bacillal family Alicyclobacillaceae . A. acidocaldarius is a free-living and non-pathogenic organism, but may also be associated with food and fruit spoilage. Due to its acidophilic nature, several enzymes from this species have since long been subjected to detailed molecular and biochemical studies. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Alicyclobacillaceae . The 3,205,686 bp long genome (chromosome and three plasmids) with its 3,153 protein-coding and 82 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Whole genome sequencing in clinical and public health microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, J. C.; McCallum, N.; Sintchenko, V.; Howden, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    SummaryGenomics and whole genome sequencing (WGS) have the capacity to greatly enhance knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases and clinical microbiology. The growth and availability of bench-top WGS analysers has facilitated the feasibility of genomics in clinical and public health microbiology. Given current resource and infrastructure limitations, WGS is most applicable to use in public health laboratories, reference laboratories, and hospital infection control-affiliated laboratories. As WGS represents the pinnacle for strain characterisation and epidemiological analyses, it is likely to replace traditional typing methods, resistance gene detection and other sequence-based investigations (e.g., 16S rDNA PCR) in the near future. Although genomic technologies are rapidly evolving, widespread implementation in clinical and public health microbiology laboratories is limited by the need for effective semi-automated pipelines, standardised quality control and data interpretation, bioinformatics expertise, and infrastructure. PMID:25730631

  3. Plasmodium knowlesi genome sequences from clinical isolates reveal extensive genomic dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Miguel M; Ahmed, Md Atique; Millar, Scott B; Sanderson, Theo; Otto, Thomas D; Lu, Woon Chan; Krishna, Sanjeev; Rayner, Julian C; Cox-Singh, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a newly described zoonosis that causes malaria in the human population that can be severe and fatal. The study of P. knowlesi parasites from human clinical isolates is relatively new and, in order to obtain maximum information from patient sample collections, we explored the possibility of generating P. knowlesi genome sequences from archived clinical isolates. Our patient sample collection consisted of frozen whole blood samples that contained excessive human DNA contamination and, in that form, were not suitable for parasite genome sequencing. We developed a method to reduce the amount of human DNA in the thawed blood samples in preparation for high throughput parasite genome sequencing using Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq sequencing platforms. Seven of fifteen samples processed had sufficiently pure P. knowlesi DNA for whole genome sequencing. The reads were mapped to the P. knowlesi H strain reference genome and an average mapping of 90% was obtained. Genes with low coverage were removed leaving 4623 genes for subsequent analyses. Previously we identified a DNA sequence dimorphism on a small fragment of the P. knowlesi normocyte binding protein xa gene on chromosome 14. We used the genome data to assemble full-length Pknbpxa sequences and discovered that the dimorphism extended along the gene. An in-house algorithm was developed to detect SNP sites co-associating with the dimorphism. More than half of the P. knowlesi genome was dimorphic, involving genes on all chromosomes and suggesting that two distinct types of P. knowlesi infect the human population in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. We use P. knowlesi clinical samples to demonstrate that Plasmodium DNA from archived patient samples can produce high quality genome data. We show that analyses, of even small numbers of difficult clinical malaria isolates, can generate comprehensive genomic information that will improve our understanding of malaria parasite diversity and pathobiology.

  4. Microdiversity of extracellular enzyme genes among sequenced prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Amy E; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between prokaryotic traits and phylogeny is important for predicting and modeling ecological processes. Microbial extracellular enzymes have a pivotal role in nutrient cycling and the decomposition of organic matter, yet little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding these enzymes. In this study, we analyzed 3058 annotated prokaryotic genomes to determine which taxa have the genetic potential to produce alkaline phosphatase, chitinase and β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase enzymes. We then evaluated the relationship between the genetic potential for enzyme production and 16S rRNA phylogeny using the consenTRAIT algorithm, which calculated the phylogenetic depth and corresponding 16S rRNA sequence identity of clades of potential enzyme producers. Nearly half (49.2%) of the genomes analyzed were found to be capable of extracellular enzyme production, and these were non-randomly distributed across most prokaryotic phyla. On average, clades of potential enzyme-producing organisms had a maximum phylogenetic depth of 0.008004–0.009780, though individual clades varied broadly in both size and depth. These values correspond to a minimum 16S rRNA sequence identity of 98.04–98.40%. The distribution pattern we found is an indication of microdiversity, the occurrence of ecologically or physiologically distinct populations within phylogenetically related groups. Additionally, we found positive correlations among the genes encoding different extracellular enzymes. Our results suggest that the capacity to produce extracellular enzymes varies at relatively fine-scale phylogenetic resolution. This variation is consistent with other traits that require a small number of genes and provides insight into the relationship between taxonomy and traits that may be useful for predicting ecological function. PMID:23303371

  5. Complete coding sequences of the rabbitpox virus genome.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Chen, N; Roper, R L; Feng, Z; Hunter, A; Danila, M; Lefkowitz, E J; Buller, R M L; Upton, C

    2005-11-01

    Rabbitpox virus (RPXV) is highly virulent for rabbits and it has long been suspected to be a close relative of vaccinia virus. To explore these questions, the complete coding region of the rabbitpox virus genome was sequenced to permit comparison with sequenced strains of vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses. The genome of RPXV strain Utrecht (RPXV-UTR) is 197 731 nucleotides long, excluding the terminal hairpin structures at each end of the genome. The RPXV-UTR genome has 66.5 % A + T content, 184 putative functional genes and 12 fragmented ORF regions that are intact in other orthopoxviruses. The sequence of the RPXV-UTR genome reveals that two RPXV-UTR genes have orthologues in variola virus (VARV; the causative agent of smallpox), but not in vaccinia virus (VACV) strains. These genes are a zinc RING finger protein gene (RPXV-UTR-008) and an ankyrin repeat family protein gene (RPXV-UTR-180). A third gene, encoding a chemokine-binding protein (RPXV-UTR-001/184), is complete in VARV but functional only in some VACV strains. Examination of the evolutionary relationship between RPXV and other orthopoxviruses was carried out using the central 143 kb DNA sequence conserved among all completely sequenced orthopoxviruses and also the protein sequences of 49 gene products present in all completely sequenced chordopoxviruses. The results of these analyses both confirm that RPXV-UTR is most closely related to VACV and suggest that RPXV has not evolved directly from any of the sequenced VACV strains, since RPXV contains a 719 bp region not previously identified in any VACV.

  6. A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Michael FitzGerald on "A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    FitzGerald, Michael [Broad Institute

    2016-07-12

    Michael FitzGerald on "A rapid whole genome sequencing and analysis system supporting genomic epidemiology" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  8. Genome-Wide SNP Calling Using Next Generation Sequencing Data in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Oh, Sang-Keun; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Lee, Bo-Mi; Jo, Sung-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is a model plant for genome research in Solanaceae, as well as for studying crop breeding. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a valuable resource in genetic research and breeding. However, to do discovery of genome-wide SNPs, most methods require expensive high-depth sequencing. Here, we describe a method for SNP calling using a modified version of SAMtools that improved its sensitivity. We analyzed 90 Gb of raw sequence data from next-generation sequencing of two resequencing and seven transcriptome data sets from several tomato accessions. Our study identified 4,812,432 non-redundant SNPs. Moreover, the workflow of SNP calling was improved by aligning the reference genome with its own raw data. Using this approach, 131,785 SNPs were discovered from transcriptome data of seven accessions. In addition, 4,680,647 SNPs were identified from the genome of S. pimpinellifolium, which are 60 times more than 71,637 of the PI212816 transcriptome. SNP distribution was compared between the whole genome and transcriptome of S. pimpinellifolium. Moreover, we surveyed the location of SNPs within genic and intergenic regions. Our results indicated that the sufficient genome-wide SNP markers and very sensitive SNP calling method allow for application of marker assisted breeding and genome-wide association studies. PMID:24552708

  9. Complete Arabis alpina chloroplast genome sequence and insight into its polymorphism☆

    PubMed Central

    Melodelima, Christelle; Lobréaux, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The alpine plant Arabis alpina (alpine rock-cress) is a thoroughly studied species in the fields of perennial plant flowering regulation, phylogeography, and adaptation to harsh alpine climatic conditions. We report the complete A. alpina chloroplast genome sequence obtained through de novo assembly of Illumina paired-end reads produced by total DNA sequencing. The A. alpina cp circular genome is 152,866 bp in length and built of two inverted repeats of 26,933 bp separated by unique regions: a large single copy of 82,338 bp and a small single copy of 17,938 bp. The genome contains 131 genes, some of them being duplicated in the inverted repeats. Seventy-nine unique protein-coding genes were annotated, together with 29 tRNA genes and 4 ribosomal RNA genes. Sequencing and mapping of 23 additional A. alpina DNA samples enabled to gain insight into the intraspecies polymorphism of the sequenced cp genome. Genetic variability among genomes was detected as 44 indels, most of them being located in noncoding regions, and 130 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 37 of them corresponding to mutations in coding regions. A. alpina chloroplast genome sequence will be helpful in population studies or investigations of chloroplast functions of this alpine plant species. PMID:25606376

  10. Genome Sequence of Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 55737.

    PubMed

    Luna-Flores, Carlos H; Nielsen, Lars K; Marcellin, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acidipropionici produces propionic acid as its main fermentation product. Traditionally derived from fossil fuels, environmental and sustainable issues have revived the interest in producing propionic acid using biological resources. Here, we present the closed sequence of Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 55737, an efficient propionic acid producer. PMID:27198010

  11. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus endophyticus 2102.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sang-Jae; Kim, Sun Hong; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Han-Seung; Jeong, Haeyoung; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2012-10-01

    Bacillus endophyticus 2102 is an endospore-forming, plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium isolated from a hypersaline pond in South Korea. Here we present the draft sequence of B. endophyticus 2102, which is of interest because of its potential use in the industrial production of algaecides and bioplastics and for the treatment of industrial textile effluents. PMID:23012284

  12. Genome sequence of the model medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shilin; Xu, Jiang; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Yingjie; Nelson, David R.; Zhou, Shiguo; Li, Chunfang; Wang, Lizhi; Guo, Xu; Sun, Yongzhen; Luo, Hongmei; Li, Ying; Song, Jingyuan; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Qian, Jun; Li, Jianqin; Luo, Xiang; Shi, Linchun; He, Liu; Xiang, Li; Xu, Xiaolan; Niu, Yunyun; Li, Qiushi; Han, Mira V.; Yan, Haixia; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Haimei; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Mingzhu; Schwartz, David C.; Sun, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a widely used medicinal macrofungus in traditional Chinese medicine that creates a diverse set of bioactive compounds. Here we report its 43.3-Mb genome, encoding 16,113 predicted genes, obtained using next-generation sequencing and optical mapping approaches. The sequence analysis reveals an impressive array of genes encoding cytochrome P450s (CYPs), transporters and regulatory proteins that cooperate in secondary metabolism. The genome also encodes one of the richest sets of wood degradation enzymes among all of the sequenced basidiomycetes. In all, 24 physical CYP gene clusters are identified. Moreover, 78 CYP genes are coexpressed with lanosterol synthase, and 16 of these show high similarity to fungal CYPs that specifically hydroxylate testosterone, suggesting their possible roles in triterpenoid biosynthesis. The elucidation of the G. lucidum genome makes this organism a potential model system for the study of secondary metabolic pathways and their regulation in medicinal fungi. PMID:22735441

  13. The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Blattner, F R; Plunkett, G; Bloch, C A; Perna, N T; Burland, V; Riley, M; Collado-Vides, J; Glasner, J D; Rode, C K; Mayhew, G F; Gregor, J; Davis, N W; Kirkpatrick, H A; Goeden, M A; Rose, D J; Mau, B; Shao, Y

    1997-09-01

    The 4,639,221-base pair sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 is presented. Of 4288 protein-coding genes annotated, 38 percent have no attributed function. Comparison with five other sequenced microbes reveals ubiquitous as well as narrowly distributed gene families; many families of similar genes within E. coli are also evident. The largest family of paralogous proteins contains 80 ABC transporters. The genome as a whole is strikingly organized with respect to the local direction of replication; guanines, oligonucleotides possibly related to replication and recombination, and most genes are so oriented. The genome also contains insertion sequence (IS) elements, phage remnants, and many other patches of unusual composition indicating genome plasticity through horizontal transfer. PMID:9278503

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Daweishan Mini chicken.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming-Li; Ding, Su-Ping; Ye, Shao-Hui; Wang, Chun-Guang; He, Bao-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Li

    2016-01-01

    Daweishan Mini chicken is a valuable chicken breed in China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken using PCR amplification, sequencing and assembling has been obtained for the first time. The total length of the mitochondrial genome was 16,785 bp, with the base composition of 30.26% A, 23.73% T, 32.51% C, 13.51% G. It contained 37 genes (2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes) and a major non-coding control region (D-loop region). The protein start codons are ATG, except for COX1 that begins with GTG. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken provides an important data set for further investigation on the phylogenetic relationships within Gallus gallus.

  15. Draft genome sequence of Fusicladium effusum, cause of pecan scab.

    PubMed

    Bock, Clive H; Chen, Chunxian; Yu, Fahong; Stevenson, Katherine L; Wood, Bruce W

    2016-01-01

    Pecan scab, caused by the plant pathogenic fungus Fusicladium effusum, is the most destructive disease of pecan, an important specialty crop cultivated in several regions of the world. Only a few members of the family Venturiaceae (in which the pathogen resides) have been reported sequenced. We report the first draft genome sequence (40.6 Mb) of an isolate F. effusum collected from a pecan tree (cv. Desirable) in central Georgia, in the US. The genome sequence described will be a useful resource for research of the biology and ecology of the pathogen, coevolution with the pecan host, characterization of genes of interest, and development of markers for studies of genetic diversity, genotyping and phylogenetic analysis. The annotation of the genome is described and a phylogenetic analysis is presented. PMID:27274782

  16. Complete genome sequence of Croceibacter atlanticus HTCC2559T.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Myung; Kang, Ilnam; Ferriera, Steve; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Here we announce the complete genome sequence of Croceibacter atlanticus HTCC2559(T), which was isolated by high-throughput dilution-to-extinction culturing from the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series station in the Western Sargasso Sea. Strain HTCC2559(T) contained genes for carotenoid biosynthesis, flavonoid biosynthesis, and several macromolecule-degrading enzymes. The genome confirmed physiological observations of cultivated Croceibacter atlanticus strain HTCC2559(T), which identified it as an obligate chemoheterotroph. PMID:20639333

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae YH43

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain YH43, isolated from sweet potato. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 5,520,319 bp in length. It carries 8 copies of rRNA operons, 86 tRNA genes, 5,154 protein-coding genes, and the nif gene cluster for nitrogen fixation. PMID:27081127

  18. Draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus mali KCTC 3596.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Kang, Aram; Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Kim, Dae-Soo; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Aeri; Park, Hong-Seog

    2011-09-01

    We announce the draft genome sequence of the type strain Lactobacillus mali KCTC 3596 (2,652,969 bp, with a G+C content of 36.0%), which is one of the most prevalent lactic acid bacteria present during the manufacturing process of apple juice. The genome consists of 122 large contigs (>100 bp). All of the contigs were assembled by Newbler Assembler 2.3 (454 Life Science).

  19. Genome sequencing, annotation of Citrobacter freundii strain GTC 09479.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kazuyuki; Kumar, Shailesh; Takeo, Masahiro; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2014-12-01

    We report the 4.9-Mb genome sequence of Citrobacter freundii strain GTC 09479, isolated from urine sample collected during the year 1983 at Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. This draft genome consist of 4,899,578 bp with 51.62% G + C, 4,574 predicted CDSs, 72 tRNAs and 10 rRNAs.

  20. The power of EST sequence data: Relation to Acyrthosiphon pisum genome annotation and functional genomics initiatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes important to aphid biology, survival and reproduction were successfully identified by use of a genomics approach. We created and described the Sequencing, compilation, and annotation of the approxiamtely 525Mb nuclear genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, which represents an important ...