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Sample records for additional geodetic vlbi

  1. VLBI2010 PROOF-OF-CONCEPT GEODETIC VLBI SYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, C.; Niell, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) plays an important role in establishing the Terrestrial Reference Frame, measuring the Earth-orientation parameters (EOP), and understanding the properties of the Inner Core, among other geophysical phenomena. To enhance the science obtained from geodetic VLBI, NASA is funding the development of a new broadband geodetic VLBI microwave (2-12 GHz) system by the MIT Haystack Observatory, in cooperation with personnel from HTSI, NVI, and GSFC. This broadband system is intended to replace the operational S/X-band system currently deployed in the global geodetic VLBI network. The broadband capability of the new feed and receiver and the sustained data recording rate (up to 4 Gbps per band) supported by the digital back-end and Mark5C recorder will a) allow the use of relatively small (~12m) but fast slewing antennas to reduce the error due to atmosphere delay fluctuations and b) provide flexibility in frequency coverage to reduce sensitivity to external radio frequency interference, an increasing problem. A demonstration system has been implemented by installing the proof-of-concept feed, receiver, and data acquisition system on the single baseline composed of the 18m antenna in Westford MA and the 5m MV3 antenna at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt MD. In our contribution we will describe the new geodetic VLBI system and discuss recent results. Future challenges and advances that will be needed in both hardware and software to achieve the required precision of the geodetic observables will also be presented.

  2. Korea Geodetic VLBI Station, Sejong

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donghyun, Baek; Sangoh, Yi; Hongjong, Oh; Sangchul, Han

    2013-01-01

    The Sejong VLBI station officially joined the IVS as a new Network Station in 2012. This report summarizes the activities of the Sejong station during 2012. The following are the activities at the station: 1) VLBI test observations were carried out with the Tsukuba 34-m antenna of the GSI in Japan. As a result, the Sejong antenna needs to improve its efficiency, which is currently in progress, 2) A survey to connect the VLBI reference point to GNSS and ground marks was conducted, and 3) To see the indirect effects of RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) at this place, we checked the omni-direction (AZ 0? to 360?, EL fixed at 7?) for RFI influence.

  3. Studies of Error Sources in Geodetic VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Niell, A. E.; Corey, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    Achieving the goal of millimeter uncertainty in three dimensional geodetic positioning on a global scale requires significant improvement in the precision and accuracy of both random and systematic error sources. For this investigation we proposed to study errors due to instrumentation in Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) and due to the atmosphere. After the inception of this work we expanded the scope to include assessment of error sources in GPS measurements, especially as they affect the vertical component of site position and the measurement of water vapor in the atmosphere. The atmosphere correction 'improvements described below are of benefit to both GPS and VLBI.

  4. Radio source stability and geodetic VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattano, César; Lambert, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The observation of the Earth's rotation by VLBI is conditioned by the celestial reference frame that should be as stable as possible. The selection of the most stable sources therefore constitutes a major step in the construction of a celestial reference frame since their stability prevents time deformation of the axes with time. The assessment of astrometric stability, i.e., the time stability the radiocenter location as detected by the VLBI, is one of the methods that were used in previous ICRF realizations (works of M. Feissel-Vernier and ICRF2). We think the same method should be addressed for the construction of the ICRF3. We analyzed the radio source time series obtained from the analysis of the data from the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program of the IVS. We used several utils based on basic statistics and more advanced methods (Allan variance) in order to provide a preliminary classification of sources.

  5. The AuScope geodetic VLBI array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Reid, P. B.; McCulloch, P. M.; Baynes, B. E.; Dickey, J. M.; Shabala, S. S.; Watson, C. S.; Titov, O.; Ruddick, R.; Twilley, R.; Reynolds, C.; Tingay, S. J.; Shield, P.; Adada, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Morgan, J. S.; Bignall, H. E.

    2013-06-01

    The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12-m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia, will enable the improved measurement of intraplate deformation across the Australian tectonic plate. In this paper, we present a description of this new infrastructure and present some initial results, including telescope performance measurements and positions of the telescopes in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. We show that this array is already capable of achieving centimetre precision over typical long-baselines and that network and reference source systematic effects must be further improved to reach the ambitious goals of VLBI2010.

  6. Comparison of AuScope VLBI and GPS geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, Lucia; Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Lovell, James

    2015-04-01

    The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array consists of three telescopes on Australian territory, each of them co-located with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking stations. The high cadence VLBI observing program gives baselines and station coordinates of good quality, with baseline length repeatabilities (WRMS) of a few millimetres for the Australian baselines. In this contribution we present the latest VLBI results of regional and global experiments and compare them to baselines and site coordinates derived from GNSS data. For a thorough comparison, we use similar models for both, the VLBI and the GNSS data processing. Investigations of common tropospheric parameters and clock terms, as well as validations against the local ties as determined in the 2014 local surveys will supplement this study. Additional insight into the topic of technique specific errors is expected from the analysis of dedicated experiments with the two co-located telescopes at Hobart, the 26m legacy antenna and the new 12m dish.

  7. Geodetic measurements with a mobile VLBI system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niell, A. E.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.; Macdoran, P. F.; Morabito, D. D.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    The Project ARIES 9 meter transportable antenna was used as one element of very long baseline interferometer (VLBI) to begin monitoring locations of six sites in California relative to large diameter fixed antennas at the NASA Deep Space Network, Goldstone, California, and at the Caltech Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, California. An accuracy of about 6 cm in the horizontal components was demonstrated by comparison with measurements of the National Geodetic Survey. The root of mean square scatter of the lengths of the baselines between any pair of antennas was about 3 cm except for the Goldstone-JPL (Pasadena) baseline. In the period August 1974 to August 1977 the length of this baseline increased by 15 + or - 5 cm as JPL moved westward relative to Goldstone at the rate of 6 + or - 2 cm/year. The baseline lengths were unaffected by the uncertainties of UT1, polar motion, and tropospheric water vapor, which are the limitations to present three dimensional vector accuracies.

  8. Using geodetic VLBI to test Standard-Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, Aurélien; Lambert, Sébastien; Le Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The modeling of the relativistic delay in geodetic techniques is primordial to get accurate geodetic products. And geodetic techniques can also be used to measure the relativistic delay and get constraints on parameters describing the relativity theory. The effective field theory framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME) has been developed in order to systematically parametrize hypothetical violations of Lorentz symmetry (in the Standard Model and in the gravitational sector). In terms of light deflexion by a massive body like the Sun, one can expect a dependence in the elongation angle different from GR. In this communication, we use geodetic VLBI observations of quasars made in the frame of the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program to constrain the first SME coefficient. Our results do not show any deviation from GR and they improve current constraints on both GR and SME parameters.

  9. Estimability of geodetic parameters from space VLBI observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Jozsef

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of space very long base interferometry (VLBI) observables for geodesy and geodynamics is investigated. A brief review of space VLBI systems from the point of view of potential geodetic application is given. A selected notational convention is used to jointly treat the VLBI observables of different types of baselines within a combined ground/space VLBI network. The basic equations of the space VLBI observables appropriate for convariance analysis are derived and included. The corresponding equations for the ground-to-ground baseline VLBI observables are also given for a comparison. The simplified expression of the mathematical models for both space VLBI observables (time delay and delay rate) include the ground station coordinates, the satellite orbital elements, the earth rotation parameters, the radio source coordinates, and clock parameters. The observation equations with these parameters were examined in order to determine which of them are separable or nonseparable. Singularity problems arising from coordinate system definition and critical configuration are studied. Linear dependencies between partials are analytically derived. The mathematical models for ground-space baseline VLBI observables were tested with simulation data in the frame of some numerical experiments. Singularity due to datum defect is confirmed.

  10. Australian geodetic VLBI network (AuScope): present and future.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    The Australian geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array (AuScope) consisting of three new 12-meter radio telescopes in Australia (Hobart, Katherine and Yarragadee), and a correlation facility in Perth that started operations in 2011. The daily positions of the AuScope array are estimated with a precision of a few mm, whereas their daily estimates vary within a range of 20-30 mm on the annual scale. This VLBI network also provides a substantial contribution to the improvement of the Celestial Reference Frame in the southern hemisphere. The plans for extension of the network in collaboration with the New Zealand and South Africa VLBI stations during 2015-2020 are discussed in this presentation.

  11. Measuring Crustal Deformation in Europe by High Precision Geodetic VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Nothnagel, A.; Vennebusch, M.

    2002-06-01

    At the western tip of the Eurasian plate, the European continent is besieged by thrusting and receding neighbour plates causing deformations and ruptures of the Earth's crust evidenced by earthquakes and volcanic outbursts. Measuring the extent and progress of crustal deformation has become one of the primary tasks of geodesists and geophysicists. Realizing that Europe enjoys one of the densest networks of radio telescopes especially equipped for high precision, geodetic VLBI has provided the incentive to organise a campaign of regular geodetic VLBI observations in the European network of fixed radio telescopes. The measurements have been carried out since the late eighties at an average rate of six sessions per year. From these data, site coordinates, baseline length changes and station velocity vectors have been derived with steadily increasing accuracy. The overall picture of the observed present-day site motions emulates quite well the pattern of tectonic motions inferred from the geotectonic setting of central Europe and the western Mediterranean. Interesting details are emerging for horizontal motions of the three stations in Italy, which are strongly affected by the complex interactions between the different tectonic regimes in this area. The accuracy of the vertical components is also improving with increasing length of the observational record, allowing to detect significant trends among the relative vertical motions of the sites. The geodetic VLBI network operations have received supportive funding by the European Union under the 2nd and 4th Framework Programmes.

  12. Tidal Love and Shida numbers estimated by geodetic VLBI.

    PubMed

    Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Johannes; Schuh, Harald

    2013-10-01

    Frequency-dependent Love and Shida numbers, which characterize the Earth response to the tidal forces, were estimated in a global adjustment of all suitable geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions from 1984.0 to 2011.0. Several solutions were carried out to determine the Love and Shida numbers for the tidal constituents at periods in the diurnal band and in the long-period band in addition to values of the Love and Shida numbers common for all tides of degree two. Adding up all twelve diurnal tidal waves that were estimated, the total differences in displacement with respect to the theoretical conventional values of the Love and Shida numbers calculated from an Earth model reach 1.73 ± 0.29 mm in radial direction and 1.15 ± 0.15 mm in the transverse plane. The difference in the radial deformation following from the estimates of the zonal Love numbers is largest for the semi-annual tide Ssa with 1.07 ± 0.19 mm.

  13. The State and Development Direction of the Geodetic VLBI Station in Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Hyunhee; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kim, Tuhwan; Oh, Hongjong; Yi, Sangoh

    2010-01-01

    A permanent geodetic VLBI station with a 22-m diameter antenna will be newly constructed in Korea by the National Geographic Information Institute (NGII) under the project Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG) that aims at maintaining the Korean geodetic datum accurately on the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). KVG can receive 2, 8, 22, and 43 GHz bands simultaneously in order to conduct geodetic and astronomical VLBI observations with Korea astronomical VLBI stations along with geodetic observations with IVS stations. This simultaneous four-band receiving capability is a unique feature of the KVG system. The KVG has started officially in October 2008. A new geodetic VLBI station will be constructed at Sejong city (about 120 km south of Seoul and about 20 km north-northwest of Daejeon) and construction of all systems will be completed in 2011.

  14. Geodetic VLBI Observations with the Hat Creek Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, D. B.; NASA/Gsfc Geodetic VLBI Group

    1993-05-01

    Geodetic VLBI observations made with the Hat Creek 85' antenna were important contributions to the NASA Crustal Dynamics Program (CDP). Among other things, the CDP studied motions of the Earth's crustal plates and deformation in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault in California. The 85' antenna was one of the three fundamental anchor points in California east of the San Andreas fault that were used from 1983 to 1991 to determine the motions at various mobile VLBI sites along the San Andreas and to determine the Pacific plate motions at Vandenberg Air Force Base and Ft. Ord (California) and Kauai (Hawaii). The Hat Creek site itself was found to be moving 10.6 +/- 0.4 (one sigma ) mm/yr to the WNW (PA 305deg ) with respect to a ``stable" eastern North America. Hat Creek is located near the western edge of the Northern Basin and Range province. Its motion is thought to be a combination of WNW extension across the Basin and Range, and a small component of NW elastic deformation due to the interaction between the North American and Pacific plates. Geodetic VLBI measurements from Hat Creek to the nearby Quincy and the more distant Ely (Nevada) and Platteville (Colorado) mobile sites were the key measurements in defining the extension rate for the Northern Basin and Range as 8 +/- 2 mm/yr (PA ~ 300deg ). Hat Creek was also the anchor point for measuring a 5 cm northward seismic displacement at the Ft. Ord mobile site due to the Loma Prieta earthquake. We will show the motion of California and Pacific basin sites for which Hat Creek contributed important data.

  15. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell.

    PubMed

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-07-30

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  16. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate. PMID:26263991

  17. Study of Ionosphere Total Electron Content for the Broadband Geodetic VLBI Fringe Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulero Hernandez, C. A.; Beaudoin, C. J.; Coster, A. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Niell, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The radio telescopes used for Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) receive signals from distant astronomical objects to provide a measure of the Earth's shape and variable rotation. However, the propagation of these signals through the Earth's ionosphere and any other plasma between the radio source and the telescope introduces a systematic error in the geodetic observable. This dispersive delay has become more critical in light of the accuracy goals set forth in the VLBI2010 specifications for the VLBI Geodetic Observing System (VGOS) which are 1mm for position and 0.1 mm/yr for stability. In order to achieve such geodetic accuracy, this error must be accurately removed. In this work we present an investigation of the accuracy of the dispersive component of delay as determined by the broadband geodetic VLBI technique. We will describe the features and implementation of a frequency-dependent forward model of this dispersive delay for VLBI. The application of this model yields an estimate of the combined ionospheric and extraterrestrial differential total electron content (TEC) using a nonlinear parametric search. We assess the quality of this VLBI-based differential TEC estimate by comparing it with differential TEC values obtained using GPS receivers near VLBI antennas.

  18. Height bias and scale effect induced by antenna gravitational deformations in geodetic VLBI data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Petrov, Leonid; Negusini, Monia

    2011-01-01

    The impact of signal path variations (SPVs) caused by antenna gravitational deformations on geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) results is evaluated for the first time. Elevation-dependent models of SPV for Medicina and Noto (Italy) telescopes were derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods to account for gravitational deformations. After applying these models in geodetic VLBI data analysis, estimates of the antenna reference point positions are shifted upward by 8.9 and 6.7 mm, respectively. The impact on other parameters is negligible. To simulate the impact of antenna gravitational deformations on the entire VLBI network, lacking measurements for other telescopes, we rescaled the SPV models of Medicina and Noto for other antennas according to their size. The effects of the simulations are changes in VLBI heights in the range [-3, 73] mm and a net scale increase of 0.3-0.8 ppb. The height bias is larger than random errors of VLBI position estimates, implying the possibility of significant scale distortions related to antenna gravitational deformations. This demonstrates the need to precisely measure gravitational deformations of other VLBI telescopes, to derive their precise SPV models and to apply them in routine geodetic data analysis.

  19. Effects of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake on VLBI Geodetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, D. S.; Kurihara, S.; Behrend, D.

    2011-12-01

    The VLBI antenna TSUKUB32 at Tsukuba, Japan regularly observes in 24-hour observing sessions once per week with the R1 operational network and on additional days with other networks on a more irregular basis. Further, the antenna is an endpoint of the single-baseline, 1-hour Intensive sessions observed on the weekends for determination of UT1. TSUKUB32 returned to normal operational observing 25 days after the earthquake. The antenna is 160 km west and 240 km south of the epicenter (about the same distance west of the plate subduction boundary). We looked at the transient behavior of the TSUKUB32 position time series following the earthquake and found that significant deformation is continuing. The eastward rate as of July 2011, 4 months after the earthquake, is 20 cm/yr greater than the long-term rate prior to the earthquake. The VLBI series agrees with the corresponding JPL GPS series (M. B. Heflin, http://sideshow.jpl.nasa.gov/mbh/series.html, 2011) measured by the co-located GPS antenna TSUK. The coseismic UEN displacement at Tsukuba was approximately (-90 mm, 550 mm, 50 mm). We examined the effect of the variation of TSUKUB32 position on EOP estimates and specifically how best to correct its position for estimation of UT1 in the Intensive experiments. For this purpose and to provide operational UT1, the IVS scheduled a series of weekend Intensive sessions observing on the Kokee-Wettzell baseline immediately before each of the two Tsukuba-Wettzell Intensive sessions. Comparisons between UT1 estimates from these pairs of sessions were used in validating a model for the post-seismic displacement of TSUKUB32.

  20. Crustal motion results derived from observations in the European geodetic VLBI network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Rüdiger; Gueguen, Erwan; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Nothnagel, Axel; Campbell, James

    2000-10-01

    Geodetic VLBI observations have been performed with the European geodetic VLBI network since early 1990 on a regular basis. The purpose of these observations is to determine crustal motion in Europe and to establish a stable reference frame for other space geodetic techniques. Over the years the size of the network and the number of participating stations has steadily increased. Today, the network extends from the island of Sicily in the south to the island of Spitsbergen/Svalbard in the north and from the Iberian peninsula in the west to the Crimean peninsula in the east. The area covered by the network is affected by two main geodynamic processes which are post-glacial rebound effects in the northern part, and the evolution of the Alps-Apennines orogenic systems in the southern part. With nearly 10 years of VLBI observations the determination of crustal motion in Europe is carried out with high accuracy. Baseline measurements are achieved with an accuracy of a few parts per billion. We compare the evolution of baseline lengths and topocentric station displacements with geophysical models. Strain rates in Europe on a large scale are determined from the results of the VLBI analysis.

  1. Application of Geodetic VLBI Data to Obtaining Long-Term Light Curves for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kijima, Masachika

    2010-01-01

    The long-term light curve is important to research on binary black holes and disk instability in AGNs. The light curves have been drawn mainly using single dish data provided by the University of Michigan Radio Observatory and the Metsahovi Radio Observatory. Hence, thus far, we have to research on limited sources. I attempt to draw light curves using VLBI data for those sources that have not been monitored by any observatories with single dish. I developed software, analyzed all geodetic VLBI data available at the IVS Data Centers, and drew the light curves at 8 GHz. In this report, I show the tentative results for two AGNs. I compared two light curves of 4C39.25, which were drawn based on single dish data and on VLBI data. I confirmed that the two light curves were consistent. Furthermore, I succeeded in drawing the light curve of 0454-234 with VLBI data, which has not been monitored by any observatory with single dish. In this report, I suggest that the geodetic VLBI archive data is useful to obtain the long-term light curves at radio bands for astrophysics.

  2. Crustal dynamics project data analysis, 1988: VLBI geodetic results, 1979 - 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Ryan, J. W.; Caprette, D.

    1989-01-01

    The results obtained by the Goddard VLBI (very long base interferometry) Data Analysis Team from the analysis of 712 Mark 3 VLBI geodetic data sets acquired from fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1987 are reported. A large solution, GLB401, was used to obtain earth rotation parameters and site velocities. A second large solution, GLB405, was used to obtain baseline evolutions. Radio source positions were estimated globally while nutation offsets were estimated from each data set. Site positions are tabulated on a yearly basis from 1979 through 1988. The results include 55 sites and 270 baselines.

  3. Creation of a global geodetic network using Mark III VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo; Clark, Thomas A.; Ryan, James W.

    1986-01-01

    The positions of 15 permanent VLBI stations have been determined using Mark III with one-sigma uncertainties of less than 5 cm except for three stations in the Pacific. 46070 delay/delay rate observations acquired by the Crustal Dynamics Project and Polaris/IRIS from 1980-84 were included in a least squares solution to estimate the station positions, 44 radio source positions, and earth orientation parameters.

  4. First geodetic VLBI sessions with the Chinese Deep Space Stations Jiamusi and Kashi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dezhen; Dong, Guangliang; Wang, Guangli; Li, Haitao; Jiang, Wu

    2016-11-01

    The first three 24-h S/X dual-band geodetic VLBI sessions using two new Chinese Deep Space Stations (CDSSs), Jiamusi and Kashi, and four Chinese VLBI Stations (CVSs), Beijing, Kunming, Seshan, and Urumqi were conducted with the goal of improving the two CDSSs' positions, which were previously known to a few decimeters. Due to the limited frequency ranges of Jiamusi and Kashi, different but compatible frequencies for bandwidth synthesis were set at the CDSS and CVS stations. This paper presents the scheduling, correlation and fringe fit, and geodetic analysis of the observations. Final estimates of the station positions are obtained from the global solution using 5365 international VLBI sessions from August 3, 1979 through September 29, 2015. Position estimates for Jiamusi are accurate to 23, 35, and 41 mm in the X, Y, and Z directions, respectively, and for Kashi are accurate to 10, 20, and 16 mm. Precisions of the two CDSSs' positions are improved by a factor of 5-10 over previous values, which fully satisfies the requirements of the experiments and makes the first step towards the foundation and maintenance of the time-space reference frame based on the Chinese Deep Space Network (CDSN).

  5. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  6. The first geodetic VLBI experiment at 22 GHz between Japan and Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, H.; Kurihara, N.; Grueff, G.; Ambrosini, R.

    1994-02-01

    Geodetic very long base interferometry (VLBI) experiments are usually conducted at S and X bands. Significant advantages could be gained making observations at a higher frequency band like, for example, the 22 GHz (K band), where many radioastronomical observatories have suitable receivers. In order to check the feasibility and reliability of this new configuration, we organized a VLBI experiment, on February 1991, between the Kashima 34 m antenna in Japan and the Medicina 32 m radiotelescope in Italy. A new phase calibration system, suitable for operation at K band and developed at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), was used at that time with both antennas. This phase calibrator utilizes an 'up-conversion' method which can be modified to operate at any other receiving frequency band. From this experiment we obtained correlated amplitudes, delays and delay rates for 152 observations of 31 radio sources. The rms residuals have been found to be 100 ps for delay, and 74 fs/s for delay rate. These values are comparable to present S/X solutions in spite of the fact that, for technical reasons, we have not been able to implement all the possible improvements associated with the K band operation. To overcome the problem of a larger coherence loss due to higher atmospheric instabilities at K band, we have devised a method to compute the correlated amplitudes which accounts for this effect.

  7. NASA Space Geodesy Program: GSFC data analysis, 1992. Crustal Dynamics Project VLBI geodetic results, 1979 - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. W.; Ma, C.; Caprette, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing 1648 Mark 3 data sets acquired from fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1991, and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. Two large solutions were used to obtain Earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, radio source positions, site positions, site velocities, and baseline evolution. Site positions are tabulated on a yearly basis for 1979 to 1995, inclusive. Site velocities are presented in both geocentric Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. Baseline evolution is plotted for 200 baselines, and individual length determinations are presented for an additional 356 baselines. This report includes 155 quasar radio sources, 96 fixed stations and mobile sites, and 556 baselines.

  8. Crustal dynamics project data analysis, 1987. Volume 1: Fixed station VLBI geodetic results, 1979-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. W.; Ma, C.

    1987-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing Mark III data sets from fixed observatories through the end of 1986 and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. All full-day data from POLARIS/IRIS are included. The mobile VLBI sites at Platteville (Colorado), Penticton (British Columbia), and Yellowknife (Northwest Territories) are also included since these occupations bear on the study of plate stability. Two large solutions, GLB121 and GLB122, were used to obtain Earth rotation parameters and baseline evolutions, respectively. Radio source positions were estimated globally while nutation offsets were estimated from each data set. The results include 25 sites and 108 baselines.

  9. Crustal dynamics project data analysis, 1987. Volume 2: Mobile VLBI geodetic results, 1982-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Ryan, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing 101 Mark III data sets acquired from mobile observing sites through the end of 1986 and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. The fixed VLBI observations at Hat Creek, Ft. Davis, Mojave, and OVRO are included as they participate heavily in the mobile schedules. One large solution GLB171 was used to obtain baseline length and transverse evolutions. Radio source positions were estimated globally, while nutation offsets were estimated from each data set. The results include 28 mobile sites.

  10. The catalog of sources for geodetic VLBI from experiments which Kashima station participated in.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.

    Kashima station participated in many VLBI experiments such as CDP network experiments, JPL network experiments, Japan-Australia-Hawaii experiments and domestic experiments in Japan. Many sources have been observed in these experiments. The correlation amplitude both on a long (several thousand km) and short baseline (several 10 km), source positions and the resolution of the source structure have been obtained. The source positions define a celestial reference frame for the astrometry.

  11. Co-location of Space Geodetic Instruments at the "Quasar" VLBI Network Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, A.; Ipatov, A.; Gayazov, I.; Shargorodsky, V.; Smolentsev, S.; Mitryaev, V.; Diyakov, A.; Olifirov, V.; Rahimov, I.

    2012-12-01

    This paper discusses the current status of creating the co-location stations at the observatories of the Russian VLBI network "Quasar". Satellite Laser Ranging systems "Sazhen-TM" manufactured by Research-and-Production Corporation "Precision Systems and Instruments" were installed at all observatories of the network in 2011. The main technical characteristics of the SLR system and the co-location of high-precision observational instruments at the observatories are presented in this paper.

  12. Crustal dynamics project data analysis, 1991: VLBI geodetic results, 1979 - 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Ryan, J. W.; Caprette, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing 1412 Mark II data sets acquired from fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1990 and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. Three large solutions were used to obtain Earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, global source positions, site velocities, and baseline evolution. Site positions are tabulated on a yearly basis from 1979 through 1992. Site velocities are presented in both geocentric Cartesian coordinates and topocentric coordinates. Baseline evolution is plotted for 175 baselines. Rates are computed for earth rotation and nutation parameters. Included are 104 sources, 88 fixed stations and mobile sites, and 688 baselines.

  13. NASA Space Geodesy Program: GSFC data analysis, 1993. VLBI geodetic results 1979 - 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo; Ryan, James W.; Caprette, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    The Goddard VLBI group reports the results of analyzing Mark 3 data sets acquired from 110 fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1992 and available to the Space Geodesy Program. Two large solutions were used to obtain site positions, site velocities, baseline evolution for 474 baselines, earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, and radio source positions. Site velocities are presented in both geocentric Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. Baseline evolution is plotted for the 89 baselines that were observed in 1992 and positions at 1988.0 are presented for all fixed stations and mobile sites. Positions are also presented for quasar radio sources used in the solutions.

  14. Tsukuba VLBI Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The K5/VSSP software correlator (Figure 1), located in Tsukuba, Japan, is operated by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). It is fully dedicated to processing the geodetic VLBI sessions of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry. All of the weekend IVS Intensives (INT2) and the Japanese domestic VLBI observations organized by GSI were processed at the Tsukuba VLBI Correlator.

  15. VLBI data, acquisition, environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    During this quadrennium, very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data acquisition and system development has focused on improving the accuracy of the system sufficiently to allow the determination of reliable estimates of height variations. Associated with this aim has been improvements in the determinations of horizontal velocity fields, monitoring water vapor delay using interferometric methods, and improvements to Earth rotation measurements. The primary aims of the improvements to height measurement accuracy have been to directly measure the contemporary magnitudes of post glacial rebound, and to determine a height reference system for measuring global sea level rise. High frequency Earth rotation studies have been carried out to better define the transformation parameters from an inertial coordinate system to an Earth fixed one, and to better understand the coupling between the components of the atmosphere-ocean-solid Earth system. Two major VLBI campaigns were carried out in support of these studies: (1) Epoch-92 in July 1992 and (2) Cont-94 in January 1994. Each of these campaigns lasted approximately two weeks and involved multiple VLBI networks operating simultaneously in addition to other space geodetic systems operating during these periods. Two major compilations of the VLBI results (and results from other space geodetic systems) have been published during this quadrennium.

  16. The First Experiment with VLBI-GPS Hybrid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Younghee; Kondo, Tetsuro; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Sekido, Mamoru; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sasao, Tetsuo; Cho, Jungho; Kim, Tuhwan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce our GPS-VLBI hybrid system and show the results of the first experiment which is now under way. In this hybrid system, GPS signals are captured by a normal GPS antenna, down-converted to IF signals, and then sampled by the VLBI sampler VSSP32 developed by NICT. The sampled GPS data are recorded and correlated in the same way as VLBI observation data. The correlator outputs are the group delay and the delay rate. Since the whole system uses the same frequency standard, many sources of systematic errors are common between the VLBI system and the GPS system. In this hybrid system, the GPS antenna can be regarded as an additional VLBI antenna having multiple beams towards GPS satellites. Therefore, we expect that this approach will provide enough data to improve zenith delay estimates and geodetic results.

  17. VLBI: A Fascinating Technique for Geodesy and Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuh, H.; Behrend, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1970s Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) has proven to be a primary space-geodetic technique by determining precise coordinates on the Earth, by monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and by deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. VLBI provides an important linkage to astronomy through, for instance, the determination of very precise coordinates of extragalactic radio sources. Additionally, it contributes to determining parameters of relativistic and cosmological models. After a short review of the history of geodetic VLBI and a summary of recent results, this paper describes future perspectives of this fascinating technique. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), as a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU), is well on its way to fully defining a next generation VLBI system, called VLBI2010. The goals of the new system are to achieve on scales up to the size of the Earth an accuracy of 1 mm in position and of 0.1 mm/year in velocity. Continuous observations shall be carried out 24 h per day 7 days per week in the future with initial results to be delivered within 24 h after taking the data. Special sessions, e.g. for monitoring the Earth rotation parameters, will provide the results in near real-time. These goals require a completely new technical and conceptual design of VLBI measurements. Based on extensive simulation studies, strategies have been developed by the IVS to significantly improve its product accuracy through the use of a network of small (approx 12 m) fast-slewing antennas. A new method for generating high precision delay measurements as well as improved methods for handling biases related to radio source structure, system electronics, and deformations of the antenna structures has been developed. Furthermore, as of January 2012, the construction of ten new VLBI2010 sites has been funded, with

  18. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan

    1999-01-01

    The GSFC VLBI group, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, is a part of the NASA Space Geodesy Program. Since its inception in the mid 1970's, this group has been involved with and been a leader in most aspects of geodetic and astrometric VLBI. Current major activities include coordination of the international geodetic observing program; coordination and analysis of the CORE program; VLBI technique development; and all types of data processing, analysis, and research activities.

  19. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2014 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baver, Karen D. (Editor); Behrend, Dirk (Editor); Armstrong, Kyla L. (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    IVS is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: 1. To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. 2. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. 3. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  20. VLBI Correlators in Kashima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Kashima Space Technology Center (KSTC) is making use of two kinds of software correlators, the multi-channel K5/VSSP software correlator and the fast wide-band correlator 'GICO3,' for geodetic and R&D VLBI experiments. Overview of the activity and future plans are described in this paper.

  1. New VLBI2010 scheduling strategies and implications on the terrestrial reference frames.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Böhm, Johannes; Nilsson, Tobias; Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Sigrid; Schuh, Harald

    In connection with the work for the next generation VLBI2010 Global Observing System (VGOS) of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry, a new scheduling package (Vie_Sched) has been developed at the Vienna University of Technology as a part of the Vienna VLBI Software. In addition to the classical station-based approach it is equipped with a new scheduling strategy based on the radio sources to be observed. We introduce different configurations of source-based scheduling options and investigate the implications on present and future VLBI2010 geodetic schedules. By comparison to existing VLBI schedules of the continuous campaign CONT11, we find that the source-based approach with two sources has a performance similar to the station-based approach in terms of number of observations, sky coverage, and geodetic parameters. For an artificial 16 station VLBI2010 network, the source-based approach with four sources provides an improved distribution of source observations on the celestial sphere. Monte Carlo simulations yield slightly better repeatabilities of station coordinates with the source-based approach with two sources or four sources than the classical strategy. The new VLBI scheduling software with its alternative scheduling strategy offers a promising option with respect to applications of the VGOS.

  2. New test of general relativity - Measurement of de Sitter geodetic precession rate for lunar perigee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, Bruno; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Bender, Peter L.

    1987-01-01

    According to general relativity, the calculated rate of motion of lunar perigee should include a contribution of 19.2 msec/yr from geodetic precession. It is shown that existing analyses of lunar-laser-ranging data confirm the general-relativistic rate for geodetic precession with respect to the planetary dynamical frame. In addition, the comparison of earth-rotation results from lunar laser ranging and from VLBI shows that the relative drift of the planetary dynamical frame and the extragalactic VLBI reference frame is small. The estimated accuracy is about 10 percent.

  3. VLBI2020: From Reality to Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titov, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The individual apparent motions of distant radio sources are believed to be caused by the effect of intrinsic structure variations of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, some cosmological models of the expanded Universe predict that systematic astrometric proper motions of distant quasars do not vanish as the radial distance from the observer to the quasar grows. These systematic effects can even increase with the distance, making it possible to measure them with high-precision astrometric techniques like VLBI. The Galactocentric acceleration of the Solar System barycenter may cause a secular aberration drift with a magnitude of 4 uas/yr. The Solar System motion relative to the cosmic microwave background produces an additional dipole effect, proportional to red shift. We analyzed geodetic VLBI data spanning from 1979 until 2009 to estimate the vector spherical harmonics in the expansion of the vector field of the proper motion of 687 radio sources. The dipole and quadrupole vector spherical harmonics were estimated with an accuracy of 1-5 as/yr. We have shown that over the next decade the geodetic VLBI may approach the level of accuracy on which the cosmological models of the Universe could be tested. Hence, it is important to organize a dedicated observational program to increase the number of measured proper motions to 3000.

  4. VLBI2010: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrachenko, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The first concrete actions toward a next generation system for geodetic VLBI began in 2003 when the IVS initiated Working Group 3 to investigate requirements for a new system. The working group set out ambitious performance goals and sketched out initial recommendations for the system. Starting in 2006, developments continued under the leadership of the VLBI2010 Committee (V2C) in two main areas: Monte Carlo simulators were developed to evaluate proposed system changes according to their impact on IVS final products, and a proof-of-concept effort sponsored by NASA was initiated to develop next generation systems and verify the concepts behind VLBI2010. In 2009, the V2C produced a progress report that summarized the conclusions of the Monte Carlo work and outlined recommendations for the next generation system in terms of systems, analysis, operations, and network configuration. At the time of writing: two complete VLBI2010 signal paths have been completed and data is being produced; a number of VLBI2010 antenna projects are under way; and a VLBI2010 Project Executive Group (V2PEG) has been initiated to provide strategic leadership.

  5. The Impact of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) on VLBI2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrachenko, William

    2010-01-01

    A significant motivation for the development of a next generation system for geodetic VLBI was to address growing problems related to RFI. In this regard, the broadband 2-14 GHz frequency range proposed for VLBI2010 has advantages and disadvantages. It has the advantage of flexible allocation of band frequencies and hence the ability to avoid areas of the spectrum where RFI is worst. However, the receiver is at the same time vulnerable to saturation from RFI anywhere in the full 2-14 GHz range. The impacts of RFI on the VLBI2010 analog signal path, the sampler, and the digital signal processing are discussed. In addition, a number of specific RFI examples in the 2-14 GHz range are presented.

  6. VLBI2010: The Astro-Geo Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcas, Richard

    2010-01-01

    VLBI2010 holds out promise for greatly increased precision in measuring geodetic and Earth rotation parameters. As a by-product there will be a wealth of interesting new astronomical data. At the same time, astronomical knowledge may be needed to disentangle the astronomical and geodetic contributions to the measured delays and phases. This presentation explores this astro-geo link.

  7. Global reference frame: Intercomparison of results (SLR, VLBI and GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo; Watkins, Michael M.; Heflin, M.

    1994-01-01

    The terrestrial reference frame (TRF) is realized by a set of positions and velocities derived from a combination of the three space geodetic techniques, SLR, VLBI and GPS. The standard International TRF is constructed by the International Earth Rotation Service in such a way that it is stable with time and the addition of new data. An adopted model for overall plate motion, NUVEL-1 NNR, defines the conceptual reference frame in which all the plates are moving. In addition to the measurements made between reference points within the space geodetic instruments, it is essential to have accurate, documented eccentricity measurements from the instrument reference points to ground monuments. Proper local surveys between the set of ground monuments at a site are also critical for the use of the space geodetic results. Eccentricities and local surveys are, in fact, the most common and vexing sources of error in the use of the TRF for such activities as collocation and intercomparison.

  8. VLBI Data Longevity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2003-01-01

    The current cache of S/X-band geodetic/astrometric VLBI data accumulated since 1979 is approx.4.2 million observations and is increasing by approx.300,000 observations per year. The long time interval and access to all such VLBI data for re-analysis have contributed to their usefulness for the terrestrial and celestial reference frames, Earth orientation parameters, tidal and nontidal loading, and troposphere. While data access and integrity have been maintained through the Mark III data base system as storage devices and media have evolved, past transitions have been major projects. A new format and retention concept to ensure eternal archiving and access should make use of self-documentation, generalized media, network connectivity and multiple redundancy. Similarly permanent organizations or sequences of organizations are also necessary.

  9. VLBI real-time analysis by Kalman Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbon, Maria; Soja, Benedikt; Nilson, Tobias; Heinkelmann, Robert; Liu, Li; Lu, Ciuxian; Xu, Minghui; Raposo-Pulido, Virginia; Mora-Diaz, Julian; Schuh, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is one of the primary space geodetic techniques. It provides the full set of Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) and is unique for observing long term Universal Time (UT1) and precession/nutation. Currently the VLBI products are delivered with a delay of about two weeks from the moment of the observation. However, the need for near-real time estimates of the parameters is increasing, e.g. for satellite based navigation and positioning or for enabling precise tracking of interplanetary spacecraft. The goal is thus to reduce the time span between observation and the final result to less than one day. This can be archived by replacing the classical least squares method with an adaptive Kalman filter. We have developed a Kalman filter for VLBI data analysis. This method has the advantage that it is simultaneously possible to estimate stationary parameters, e.g. station positions, and to model the highly variable stochastic behavior of non-stationary parameters like clocks or atmospheric parameters. The filter is able to perform without any human interaction, making it a completely autonomous tool. In this work we describe the filter and discuss its application for EOP determination and prediction. We discuss the implementation of the stochastic models to statistically account for unpredictable changes in EOP. Furthermore, additional data like results from other techniques can be included to improve the performance. For example, atmospheric angular momentum calculated from numerical weather models can be introduced to supplement the short-term prediction of UT1 and polar motion. This Kalman filter will be extended and embedded in the newly developed Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) as a completely autonomous tool enabling the VLBI analysis in near real-time and providing all the parameters of interest with the highest possible accuracy.

  10. The extension of the parametrization of the radio source coordinates in geodetic VLBI and its impact on the time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbon, Maria; Heinkelmann, Robert; Mora-Diaz, Julian; Xu, Minghui; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-09-01

    The radio sources within the most recent celestial reference frame (CRF) catalog ICRF2 are represented by a single, time-invariant coordinate pair. The datum sources were chosen mainly according to certain statistical properties of their position time series. Yet, such statistics are not applicable unconditionally, and also ambiguous. However, ignoring systematics in the source positions of the datum sources inevitably leads to a degradation of the quality of the frame and, therefore, also of the derived quantities such as the Earth orientation parameters. One possible approach to overcome these deficiencies is to extend the parametrization of the source positions, similarly to what is done for the station positions. We decided to use the multivariate adaptive regression splines algorithm to parametrize the source coordinates. It allows a great deal of automation, by combining recursive partitioning and spline fitting in an optimal way. The algorithm finds the ideal knot positions for the splines and, thus, the best number of polynomial pieces to fit the data autonomously. With that we can correct the ICRF2 a priori coordinates for our analysis and eliminate the systematics in the position estimates. This allows us to introduce also special handling sources into the datum definition, leading to on average 30 % more sources in the datum. We find that not only the CPO can be improved by more than 10 % due to the improved geometry, but also the station positions, especially in the early years of VLBI, can benefit greatly.

  11. New VLBI Infrastructure for Earth Rotation Monitoring at Wettzell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Torben; Nothnagel, Axel; Neidhardt, Alexander; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Hugentobler, Urs; Kutterer, Hansjörg; Ihde, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a key technology for precise monitoring of Earth's rotation. VLBI is the only space geodetic technique that allows for the determination of the absolute orientation of the Earth's rotation axis in space (nutation) and the absolute rotation angle of the Earth's body (UT1). VLBI is used to realize the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and contributes to the realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). In order to further improve accuracy, latency and availability of VLBI observations the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) developed the VLBI2010 concept aiming at more observations, larger bandwidth, and near-real time correlation. The implementation of the concept would allow for an uninterrupted high-accuracy monitoring of Earth's rotation. The Geodetic Observatory Wettzell is operated by the German Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG) together with Technische Universität Müchen (TUM) in the context of the Research Group Satellite Geodesy (FGS), a consortium of BKG, TUM, German Geodetic Research Institute (DFGI) and University of Bonn, Germany. The Wettzell observatory is on its way to operate a radio telescope triple: The 20 m radio telescope has been involved into geodetic VLBI observations since 1983. Recently two new 13.2 m VLBI telescopes were installed - the TWIN telescope - which adhere to the VLBI2010 concept and which will be part of VGOS, the newly developed VLBI Global Observing System of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). Currently the high-frequency electronics, broadband receivers and feed horns, are being integrated and first operation is expected this year. The two telescopes allow for novel observation strategies, also in conjunction with the existing 20 m telescope. The upcoming new VLBI infrastructure will lead to more accurate, continuous and short-latency monitoring of the rotation of the Earth in

  12. The Mark III VLBI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Levine, J. I.; Nesman, E. F.; Webber, J. C.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Geodetic measurements have errors in centimeter range. Collection of three reports describes both equipment and results of some measurements taken with Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system. Has demonstrated high accuracy over short baselines, where phase-delay measurements used. Advanced hardware, called Mark III A, developed to improve system performance and efficiency. Original Mark III hardware and III A subsystem upgrades developed as part of NASA Crustal Dynamics Project at Haystack Observatory.

  13. Atmospheric gradients from GNSS, VLBI, and DORIS analyses and from Numerical Weather Models during CONT14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Dick, Galina; Nilsson, Tobias; Soja, Benedikt; Wickert, Jens; Zus, Florian; Schuh, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Observations from space-geodetic techniques are nowadays increasingly used to derive atmospheric information for various commercial and scientific applications. A prominent example is the operational use of GNSS data to improve global and regional weather forecasts, which was started in 2006. Atmosphere gradients describe the azimuthal asymmetry of zenith delays. Estimates of geodetic and other parameters significantly improve when atmosphere gradients are determined in addition. Here we assess the capability of several space geodetic techniques (GNSS, VLBI, DORIS) to determine atmosphere gradients of refractivity. For this purpose we implement and compare various strategies for gradient estimation, such as different values for the temporal resolution and the corresponding parameter constraints. Applying least squares estimation the gradients are usually deterministically modelled as constants or piece-wise linear functions. In our study we compare this approach with a stochastic approach modelling atmosphere gradients as random walk processes and applying a Kalman Filter for parameter estimation. The gradients, derived from space geodetic techniques are verified by comparison with those derived from Numerical Weather Models (NWM). These model data were generated using raytracing calculations based on European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyses with different spatial resolutions. The investigation of the differences between the ECMWF and NCEP gradients hereby in addition allow for an empirical assessment of the quality of model gradients and how suitable the NWM data are for verification. CONT14 (2014-05-06 until 2014-05-20) is the youngest two week long continuous VLBI campaign carried out by IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry). It presents the state-of-the-art VLBI performance in terms of number of stations and number of observations and presents thus an

  14. A Feasibility Study of Space VLBI for Geodesy and Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Madhav Narayan

    1992-01-01

    Space Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is an extension of the ground based VLBI to the space. With the launching of two or more Space VLBI satellites in the future, Space VLBI observations will be available for astrometric, geodetic and geodynamic applications. This new technique holds potential for various important applications including monitoring Earth rotation and interconnection of the reference frames used in geodesy and geodynamics. The aim of this feasibility study has been to investigate the possibility of precise estimation of geodetic parameters, with emphasis on the Earth rotation parameters (ERP's), from Space VLBI observations. A brief description of the Space VLBI technique, it's possible applications, and the Space VLBI missions being planned has been given. Estimability analysis to investigate the estimability of geodetic parameters from Space VLBI observations has been carried out and a simplified mathematical model is derived in terms of estimable parameters. Results of sensitivity analysis carried out to study the sensitivity of the Space VLBI observables to the geodetic parameters of interest, including the number of these parameters and random errors in their a priori values, have been presented. Some of the dominant systematic effects including atmospheric refraction, solar radiation pressure and relativistic effects have also been investigated. Simulation studies have been carried out to study the influence of these systematic effects and a priori information on the estimation of the Earth rotation parameters. The results from the simulation studies indicate that it may be possible to use the Space VLBI technique for monitoring Earth rotation and polar motion, only if the orbital systematic effects can be modeled to a high degree of accuracy (or the satellites can be tracked, with high accuracy, independently), and precise a priori information on station coordinates from other sources is used. A brief description of the Space VLBI

  15. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  16. Advanced relativistic VLBI model for geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soffel, Michael; Kopeikin, Sergei; Han, Wen-Biao

    2016-10-01

    Our present relativistic part of the geodetic VLBI model for Earthbound antennas is a consensus model which is considered as a standard for processing high-precision VLBI observations. It was created as a compromise between a variety of relativistic VLBI models proposed by different authors as documented in the IERS Conventions 2010. The accuracy of the consensus model is in the picosecond range for the group delay but this is not sufficient for current geodetic purposes. This paper provides a fully documented derivation of a new relativistic model having an accuracy substantially higher than one picosecond and based upon a well accepted formalism of relativistic celestial mechanics, astrometry and geodesy. Our new model fully confirms the consensus model at the picosecond level and in several respects goes to a great extent beyond it. More specifically, terms related to the acceleration of the geocenter are considered and kept in the model, the gravitational time-delay due to a massive body (planet, Sun, etc.) with arbitrary mass and spin-multipole moments is derived taking into account the motion of the body, and a new formalism for the time-delay problem of radio sources located at finite distance from VLBI stations is presented. Thus, the paper presents a substantially elaborated theoretical justification of the consensus model and its significant extension that allows researchers to make concrete estimates of the magnitude of residual terms of this model for any conceivable configuration of the source of light, massive bodies, and VLBI stations. The largest terms in the relativistic time delay which can affect the current VLBI observations are from the quadrupole and the angular momentum of the gravitating bodies that are known from the literature. These terms should be included in the new geodetic VLBI model for improving its consistency.

  17. VLBI measurement of the secular aberration drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Lambert, S. B.; Gontier, A.-M.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: While analyzing decades of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data, we detected the secular aberration drift of the extragalatic radio source proper motions caused by the rotation of the Solar System barycenter around the Galactic center. Our results agree with the predicted estimate to be 4-6 micro arcseconds per year (μas/yr) towards α = 266° and δ = -29°. In addition, we tried to detect the quadrupole systematics of the velocity field. Methods: The analysis method consisted of three steps. First, we analyzed geodetic and astrometric VLBI data to produce radio source coordinate time series. Second, we fitted proper motions of 555 sources with long observational histories over the period 1990-2010 to their respective coordinate time series. Finally, we fitted vector spherical harmonic components of degrees 1 and 2 to the proper motion field. Results: Within the error bars, the magnitude and the direction of the dipole component agree with predictions. The dipole vector has an amplitude of 6.4 ± 1.5 μas/yr and is directed towards equatorial coordinates α = 263° and δ = -20°. The quadrupole component has not been detected. The primordial gravitational wave density, integrated over a range of frequencies less than 10-9 Hz, has a limit of 0.0042h-2 where h is the normalized Hubble constant is H0/(100 km s-1). We dedicate this work to the memory of Anne-Marie Gontier, our colleague and personal friend, and a widely recognized specialist of VLBI. She passed away shortly after this paper was submitted.Proper motion data is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/529/A91

  18. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2004 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrend, Dirk (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Combination Studies using the Cont02 Campaign. Coordinating Center report. Analysis coordinator report. Network coordinator report. IVS Technology coordinator report. Algonquin Radio observatory. Fortaleza Station report for 2004. Gilmore Creek Geophysical Observatory. Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical observatory. Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO). Hbart, Mt Pleasant, station report for 2004. Kashima 34m Radio Telescope. Kashima and Koganei 11-m VLBI Stations. Kokee Park Geophysical Observatory. Matera GGS VLBI Station. The Medicina Station status report. Report of the Mizusawa 10m Telescope. Noto Station Activity. NYAL Ny-Alesund 20 metre Antenna. German Antarctic receiving Station (GARS) O'higgins. The IVS network station Onsala space Observatory. Sheshan VLBI Station report for 2004. 10 Years of Geodetic Experiments at the Simeiz VLBI Station. Svetloe RAdio Astronomical Observatory. JARE Syowa Station 11-m Antenna, Antarctica. Geodetic Observatory TIGO in Concepcion. Tsukuba 32-m VLBI Station. Nanshan VLBI Station Report. Westford Antenna. Fundamental-station Wettzell 20m Radiotelescope. Observatorio Astroonomico Nacional Yebes. Yellowknife Observatory. The Bonn Geodetic VLBI Operation Center. CORE Operation Center Report. U.S. Naval Observatory Operation Center. The Bonn Astro/Geo Mark IV Correlator.

  19. The Role of VLBI in the TRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; MacMillan, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    The international VLBI network is a major contributor to the TRF by virtue of its 25-year data set and unique access to the celestial reference frame in which Earth orientation is defined. The TRF and EOP results are suboptimal, however, because of non-ideal station spatial distribution (arising from the vagaries of national interests and capabilities over the years), irregular temporal resolution (related to operational funding and other station activities), and heterogeneous equipment. Better modeling related to thermal, structural and tilt effects of the large VLBI antennas is needed to eliminate non-geodetic signatures and systematic biases. Modeling of the troposphere must always be improved and unified with other microwave techniques. The VLBI community is beginning the design of a new geodetic VLBI station to be deployed in an uniform, optimized global network including such features as small antenna size, much faster slewing, wide RF bandwidth, higher recording rates and data transmission via high-speed fiber along with automated correlation and analysis. Simulations of this enhanced VLBI capability for the TRF will be presented.

  20. Testing impact of the strategy of VLBI data analysis on the estimation of Earth Orientation Parameters and station coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgosz, Agata; Tercjak, Monika; Brzeziński, Aleksander

    2016-06-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is the only space geodetic technique capable to realise the Celestial Reference Frame and tie it with the Terrestrial Reference Frame. It is also the only technique, which measures all the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) on a regular basis, thus the role of VLBI in determination of the universal time, nutation and polar motion and station coordinates is invaluable. Although geodetic VLBI has been providing observations for more than 30 years, there are no clear guidelines how to deal with the stations or baselines having significantly bigger post-fit residuals than the other ones. In our work we compare the common weighting strategy, using squared formal errors, with strategies involving exclusion or down-weighting of stations or baselines. For that purpose we apply the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS with necessary additional procedures. In our analysis we focus on statistical indicators that might be the criterion of excluding or down-weighting the inferior stations or baselines, as well as on the influence of adopted strategy on the EOP and station coordinates estimation. Our analysis shows that in about 99% of 24-hour VLBI sessions there is no need to exclude any data as the down-weighting procedure is sufficiently efficient. Although results presented here do not clearly indicate the best algorithm, they show strengths and weaknesses of the applied methods and point some limitations of automatic analysis of VLBI data. Moreover, it is also shown that the influence of the adopted weighting strategy is not always clearly reflected in the results of analysis.

  1. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2000 Annual Report of the International Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2000 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period March 1, 1999, through December 31, 2000. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2000.

  2. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2003 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2003 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the calendar year 2003, our fifih year of existence. The reports describe changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. Many thanks to all IVS components who contributed to this Annual Report. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2OO3

  3. VLBI and GPS-based Time-Transfer Using CONT08 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieck, Carsten; Haas, Ruediger; Jaldehag, Kenneth; Jahansson, Jan

    2010-01-01

    One important prerequisite for geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is the use of frequency standards with excellent short term stability. This makes VLBI stations, which are often co-located with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiving stations, interesting for studies of time- and frequency-transfer techniques. We present an assessment of VLBI time-transfer based on the data of the two week long consecutive IVS CONT08 VLBI campaign by using GPS Carrier Phase (GPSCP). CONT08 was a 15 day long campaign in August 2008 that involved eleven VLBI stations on five continents. For CONT08 we estimated the worst case VLBI frequency link stability between the stations of Onsala and Wettzell to 1e-15 at one day. Comparisons with GPSCP confirm the VLBI results. We also identify time-transfer related challenges of the VLBI technique as used today.

  4. The RAEGE VLBI2010 radiotelescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sust, Eberhard; López Fernández, José Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The goal of the RAEGE (Red Atlantica Estaciones Geodinamicas Espaciales) project is the establishment of a Spanish-Portuguese network of geodynamical and spatial geodesy stations by the installation and operation of four fundamental geodetic / astronomical stations provided with radio telescopes located at - Yebes, close to Madrid / Spain - Tenerife, Canary Islands / Spain - Santa Maria, Azores Islands / Portugal. VLBI 2010 radiotelescopes are belonging to a new generation of radiotelescopes suitable for high precision geodetical earth observation and measurements, that shall allow to built up a high precision global reference system. The design of the radiotelescopes has been finished by MT Mechatronics in summer 2011 and currently three radiotelescopes are being manufactured. The first one is scheduled for installation in summer 2012 at Yebes Observatory close to Madrid.

  5. Centimeter repeatability of the VLBI estimates of European baselines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rius, Antonio; Zarraoa, Nestor; Sardon, Esther; Ma, Chopo

    1992-01-01

    In the last three years, the European Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Network has grown to a total of six fixed antennas placed in Germany, Italy, Spain and Sweden, all equipped with the standard geodetic VLBI instrumentation and data recording systems. During this period of time, several experiments have been carried out using this interferometer providing data of very high quality due to the excellent sensitivity and performance of the European stations. The purpose of this paper is to study the consistency of the VLBI geodetic results on the European baselines with respect to the different degrees of freedom in the analysis procedure. Used to complete this study were both real and simulated data sets, two different software packages (OCCAM 3.0 and CALC 7.4/SOLVE), and a variety of data analysis strategies.

  6. U.S. Naval Observatory VLBI Analysis Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    VLBA and were scheduled in a geodetic mode optimized for the Mauna Kea to St. Croix baseline with the remaining three antennas (Hancock, Los Alamos...standard series for comparison. in 2010. This series will include only three stations- Mauna Kea , Los Alamos, and Pie Town-and will test the effects...USNO VLBI Analysis Center United States Naval Observatory u.s. Naval Observatory VLBI Analysis Center David A. Boboltz, Alan L. Fey, Nicole Geiger

  7. The future of VLBI observatories in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Jordan, J. F.; Burke, B. F.; Doxsey, R.; Morgan, S. H.; Roberts, D. H.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1983-01-01

    The angular resolution of radio maps made by earth-based VLBI observations can be exceeded by placing at least one element of a VLBI array into earth orbit. A VLBI observatory in space can offer the additional advantages of increased sky coverage, higher density sampling of Fourier components, and rapid mapping of objects whose structure changes in less than a day. This paper explores the future of this technique.

  8. Stability of VLBI, SLR, DORIS, and GPS positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feissel-Vernier, M.; de Viron, O.; Le Bail, K.

    2007-12-01

    The residual signal in VLBI, SLR, DORIS and GPS station motion, after a linear trend and seasonal components have been removed, is analysed to investigate site-specific and technique-specific error spectra. The study concentrates on 60 sites with dense observation history by two or more space geodetic techniques. The solutions analysed are single-analysis center solutions currently available. The GPS data are taken from the IGS files. Statistical methods include the Allan variance analysis and the three-cornered hat algorithm. The site-specific noise level is found to be in the range 0.5-3.5 mm in either horizontal direction and 1-4.5 mm in height for most sites. The distribution of site-specific noise type includes both white noise and flicker noise. White noise is predominant in the East direction. Both types of noise are found in the North direction, with no particular geographical clustering.Technique-specific noise characteristics are estimated in several ways, leading to a white noise diagnostic for VLBI and SLR in all three local directions. DORIS has also white noise in the horizontal directions, whereas GPS has a flicker noise spectrum. The vertical noise spectrum is indecisive for both DORIS and GPS. The three-dimensional noise levels for the one-year sampling time are 1.7 mm for VLBI, 2.5 mm for SLR, 5.2 mm for DORIS, and 4.1 mm for GPS. For GPS, the long-term analysis homogeneity has a strong influence. In the case of a test solution reanalysed in a fully consistent way, the noise level drops to the VLBI level in horizontal and to the SLR level in vertical. The three-dimensional noise level for a one-year sampling time decreases to 1.8 mm. In addition, the percentage of stations with flicker noise drops to only about 20% of the network.

  9. The Impact of the AuScope VLBI Observations and the Regional AUSTRAL Sessions on the TRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, L.; Lovell, J.; McCallum, J.; Boehm, J.; Shabala, S.; Mayer, D.; Sun, J.; Titov, O.; Weston, S.; Quick, J.; Rastorgueva-Foi, E.

    2014-12-01

    The AuScope VLBI array was built with the purpose to improve the terrestrial (TRF) and celestial reference frames in the southern hemisphere. Since 2010 the three 12-m antennas in Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) heavily contribute to the global VLBI observations coordinated by the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry. In 2011, the AUSTRAL VLBI program was started, with more than 40 sessions being observed so far. In the AUSTRALs, the three AuScope antennas observe together with the new 15-m dish in Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) and the 12-m antenna in Warkworth (New Zealand). Recently, the planned observations have been expanded again, with 50 additional sessions scheduled until mid-2015, along with 3 continuous campaigns covering 15 days each. All AUSTRALs are recorded with an increased data rate of 1 Gbps, allowing to compensate for the reduced sensitivity of the generally smaller dish size. We evaluate the positive impact of the AuScope VLBI program on the global TRF. This is due to the increased number of observations and the improved homogeneity of the global VLBI network. All data collected within this intense observing program is analysed and geodetic results are presented. This includes time series of baseline lengths and station coordinates of the contributing stations. We compare the results obtained within the regional AUSTRAL sessions with the ones of the classical global VLBI networks and identify superiorities and shortcomings of both. The high number of sessions gives high accuracies and good repeatabilities of the determined parameters. Additionally, remaining variations of baseline lengths can be identified and are compared against by default un-modelled station motions due to hydrology and atmosphere loading. Finally, we give an outlook on future plans for the AuScope antennas and the AUSTRAL observing program: on future operations, expected improvements through hardware

  10. VLBI TRF determination via Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Benedikt; Karbon, Maria; Nilsson, Tobias; Glaser, Susanne; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald

    2015-04-01

    The determination of station positions is one of the primary tasks for space geodetic techniques. Station coordinate offsets are usually determined with respect to a linear coordinate model after removing elastic displacements caused by mass redistributions within the Earth's system. In operational VLBI analysis, the coordinate offsets are estimated in a least-squares adjustment as a constant over the duration of a 24-hour VLBI experiment. Terrestrial reference frames (TRF) are usually derived by adjusting the normal equations that contain the 24-hour constant offsets in order to estimate a linear model, possibly including breaks, for the station positions. We have created a VLBI TRF solution without the assumption of negligible subdaily motion and of linear behavior on longer time scales by applying a Kalman filter. As a preparation for the upcoming VLBI Global Observing System (VGOS), which aims for continuous observations that are available in real-time, a Kalman filter has been implemented into the VLBI software VieVS@GFZ. In addition to the real-time capability, the filter offers the possibility of stochastically modeling the parameters of interest. For station coordinates, changes in a subdaily time frame occur, for instance, from un- or mismodeled geophysical effects. The models for tidal and non-tidal ocean, atmosphere, and hydrology loading are known to have deficiencies and inconsistencies which propagate into the estimated station coordinates. The stochastic model of the Kalman filter can be adapted to take these subdaily effects into account. Comparing the resulting station coordinate time series with daily values from a least squares fit, we have investigated to what extent and in which regions the loading models currently have deficiencies. Due to the high correlation between station height and tropospheric delays, it is possible that errors in one group of parameters are partly absorbed by the other group. To detect problems with correlations and to

  11. Complex demodulation in VLBI estimation of high frequency Earth rotation components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, S.; Brzeziński, A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    The spectrum of high frequency Earth rotation variations contains strong harmonic signal components mainly excited by ocean tides along with much weaker non-harmonic fluctuations driven by irregular processes like the diurnal thermal tides in the atmosphere and oceans. In order to properly investigate non-harmonic phenomena a representation in time domain is inevitable. We present a method, operating in time domain, which is easily applicable within Earth rotation estimation from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). It enables the determination of diurnal and subdiurnal variations, and is still effective with merely diurnal parameter sampling. The features of complex demodulation are used in an extended parameterization of polar motion and universal time which was implemented into a dedicated version of the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS. The functionality of the approach was evaluated by comparing amplitudes and phases of harmonic variations at tidal periods (diurnal/semidiurnal), derived from demodulated Earth rotation parameters (ERP), estimated from hourly resolved VLBI ERP time series and taken from a recently published VLBI ERP model to the terms of the conventional model for ocean tidal effects in Earth rotation recommended by the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS). The three sets of tidal terms derived from VLBI observations extensively agree among each other within the three-sigma level of the demodulation approach, which is below 6 μas for polar motion and universal time. They also coincide in terms of differences to the IERS model, where significant deviations primarily for several major tidal terms are apparent. An additional spectral analysis of the as well estimated demodulated ERP series of the ter- and quarterdiurnal frequency bands did not reveal any significant signal structure. The complex demodulation applied in VLBI parameter estimation could be demonstrated a suitable procedure for the reliable reproduction of

  12. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) earth physics. [application to radio astronomy and interferometric earth surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the Michelson/Pease stellar interferometer are discussed. An analog of the interferometer using radio waves is described. The use of a conventional hard-wired interferometer with very long base line interferometry (VLBI) is analyzed. Mathematical models are developed to analyze the VLBI techniques. A summary of VLBI geodetic experiments is tabulated. The concept and application of the astronomical radio interferometric earth surveys (ARIES) are reported. A schematic diagram of ARIES implementation is provided.

  13. Use of the VLBI delay observable for orbit determination of Earth-orbiting VLBI satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    Very long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations using a radio telescope in Earth orbit were performed first in the 1980s. Two spacecraft dedicated to VLBI are scheduled for launch in 1995; the primary scientific goals of these missions will be astrophysical in nature. This article addresses the use of space VLBI delay data for the additional purpose of improving the orbit determination of the Earth-orbiting spacecraft. In an idealized case of quasi-simultaneous observations of three radio sources in orthogonal directions, analytical expressions are found for the instantaneous spacecraft position and its error. The typical position error is at least as large as the distance corresponding to the delay measurement accuracy but can be much greater for some geometries. A number of practical considerations, such as system noise and imperfect calibrations, set bounds on the orbit-determination accuracy realistically achievable using space VLBI delay data. These effects limit the spacecraft position accuracy to at least 35 cm (and probably 3 m or more) for the first generation of dedicated space VLBI experiments. Even a 35-cm orbital accuracy would fail to provide global VLBI astrometry as accurate as ground-only VLBI. Recommended charges in future space VLBI missions are unlikely to make space VLBI competitive with ground-only VLBI in global astrometric measurements.

  14. Determination of UT1 by VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Harald; Boehm, Johannes; Englich, Sigrid; Nothnagel, Axel

    2010-11-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is the only space geodetic technique which is capable of estimating the Earth's phase of rotation, expressed as Universal Time UT1, over time scales of a few days or longer. Satellite-observing techniques like the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are suffering from the fact that Earth rotation is indistinguishable from a rotation of the satellite orbit nodes, which requires the imposition of special procedures to extract UT1 or length of day information. Whereas 24 hour VLBI network sessions are carried out at about three days per week, the hour-long one-baseline intensive sessions (‘Intensives’) are observed from Monday to Friday (INT1) on the baseline Wettzell (Germany) to Kokee Park (Hawaii, U.S.A.), and from Saturday to Sunday on the baseline Tsukuba (Japan) to Wettzell (INT2). Additionally, INT3 sessions are carried out on Mondays between Wettzell, Tsukuba, and Ny-Alesund (Norway), and ultra-rapid e-Intensives between E! urope and Japan also include the baseline Metsähovi (Finland) to Kashima (Japan). The Intensives have been set up to determine daily estimates of UT1 and to be used for UT1 predictions. Because of the short duration and the limited number of stations the observations can nowadays be e-transferred to the correlators, or to a node close to the correlator, and the estimates of UT1 are available shortly after the last observation thus allowing the results to be used for prediction purposes.

  15. Geodetic Observatory Wettzell - 20-m Radio Telescope and Twin Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidhardt, Alexander; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Schatz, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    In the year 2012, the 20-m radio telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany again contributed very successfully to the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry observing program. Technical changes, developments, improvements, and upgrades were made to increase the reliability of the entire VLBI observing system. In parallel, the new Twin radio telescope Wettzell (TTW) got the first feedhorn, while the construction of the HF-receiving and the controlling system was continued.

  16. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  17. c5++ - Multi-Technique Analysis Software for Next Generation Geodetic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Otsubo, toshimichi; Kubooka, Toshihiro; Sekido, Mamoru; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Processing of space geodetic techniques should be carried out with consistent and utmost up-todate physical models. Therefore, c5++ is being developed, which will act as a framework under which dedicated space geodetic applications can be created. Due to its nature, combination of different techniques as well as automated processing of VLBI experiments will become possible with c5++.

  18. The BKG/IGGB VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Nothnagel, Axel; Engelhardt, Gerald; Ullrich, Dieter; Artz, Thomas; Leek, Judith

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the activities of the BKG/IGGB VLBI Analysis Center, as in previous years, consisted of routine computations of Earth orientation parameter (EOP) time series and of a number of research topics in geodetic VLBI. The VLBI group at BKG continued its regular submissions of time series of tropospheric parameters and the generation of daily SINEX (Solution INdependent EXchange format) files. Quarterly updated solutions have been computed to produce terrestrial reference frame (TRF) and celestial reference frame (CRF) realizations. Routine computations of the UT1-UTC Intensive observations include all sessions of the Kokee-Wettzell and Tsukuba-Wettzell baselines and the networks Kokee-Svetloe-Wettzell and Ny-degAlesund-Tsukuba-Wettzell. The VLBI group at BKG developed a procedure to get the most probable station positions of Tsukuba after the earthquake on March 11, 2011 for the epochs of the Intensive sessions. The analysis of the Intensive sessions with station Tsukuba could be resumed in February 2012. At IGGB, the emphasis has been placed on individual research topics.

  19. GEOSAT: Combining VLBI, SLR, GPS, and DORIS at the observation level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helge Andersen, Per; Dähnn, Michael; Fausk, Ingrid; Hjelle, Geir Arne; Kirkvik, Ann-Silje; Mysen, Eirik

    2015-04-01

    GEOSAT is a multi-technique geodetic software that has been under development for about 30 years [P. H. Andersen, "Multilevel arc combination with stochastic parameters". Journal of Geodesy 01/2000; 74(7): 531 - 551]. The last couple of years the development efforts have been headed by a team at the Norwegian Mapping Authority. The GEOSAT software can be used in the analysis of space geodetic data by combining data from VLBI, SLR, GPS and DORIS at the observation level epoch by epoch. As a result technique dependent systematic errors will be visible as anomalous a posteriori residuals, and can be compensated for by introducing technique dependent empirical models. GEOSAT is based on factorized Kalman filters which allow the estimation of stochastic parameters common for several techniques. GEOSAT contributed to the IVS solution used in the upcoming ITRF. In addition to VLBI analysis the software can process SLR and GPS data, while DORIS based analysis is under development. Experiments in combining data from different techniques according to the GEOSAT philosophy are currently being done. This presentation will be a description of how GEOSAT combines data from the different techniques, while at the same time reporting the current state of the project and our plans going forward.

  20. The recent progress of Chinese VLBI Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weimin

    2015-08-01

    At present, Chinese VLBI Network (CVN) consists of 5 antennas (Seshan 25m, Urumqi 25m, Kunming 30m, Miyun 50m and Tianma 65m) and one data processing center in Shanghai Observatory, Chinese academy of sciences. It is a synthetic aperture radio telescope with the equivalent diameter up to 3000 Km. Through e-VLBI (electronic VLBI) technology, CVN is connected by the commuication network. It is a multi-purpose scientific research platform radio for geodesy, astronomy, as well as deep space exploration. In Geodesy, CVN is the component of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China. Since the year of 2006, more than 20 geodetic domestic observations have been carried out. A set of phase-referencing observations of pulsars with CVN has carried out and got preliminary results. CVN also joined the Chinese lunar exploration Project from 2007 and supported 4 Chang’E series lunar probe missions. In Chang’E-3 mission, using the in-beam VLBI observations, the relative position accuracy of Rover and Lander is up to 1 meter.In recent years, we have updated the facilities of CVN from antenna, receivers, VLBI terminals to correlator. Participation of Tianma 65m antennas increases its performance. In 2012, Shanghai correlator was accepted as the IVS correlator. After upgrade, Shanghai correlator will try to provide the data process service for IVS community from 2015. To drive the construction of the planned VGOS (VLBI2010 Global Observing System) station, at least two VOGS 13m antenna will join CVN in the near future. Construction of the first VOGS antenna in Shanghai hopes to begin this year.The new VLBI correlator and digital terminal are under development. From participation in VGOS, we plan to study the earth rotation especially of high frequency and corresponding geophysical signals, to link China’s regional reference frame to ITRF, and etc. CVN is willing to join the research corporation with IVS, EVN, VLBA and AOV (Asia- Oceania VLBI Group for Geodesy and

  1. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2011 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baver, Karen D. (Editor); Behrend, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2011 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2011 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2011.

  2. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2008 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrend, Dirk; Baver, Karen D.

    2009-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2008 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2008 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2008. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2008.

  3. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2007 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrend, D. (Editor); Baver, K. D. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2007 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the components of IVS. The 2007 Annual Report documents the work of these IVS components over the period January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2007. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2007.

  4. VLBI2010: Networks and Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrachenko, Bill; Corey, Brian; Himwich, Ed; Ma, Chopo; Malkin, Zinovy; Niell, Arthur; Shaffer, David; Vandenberg, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The Observing Strategies Sub-group of IVS's Working Group 3 has been tasked with producing a vision for the following aspects of geodetic VLBI: antenna-network structure and observing strategies; source strength/structure/distribution; frequency bands, RFI; and field system and scheduling. These are high level considerations that have far reaching impact since they significantly influence performance potential and also constrain requirements for a number of other \\VG3 sub-groups. The paper will present the status of the sub-group's work on these topics.

  5. Stability of VLBI, SLR, DORIS, and GPS positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feissel-Vernier, M.; de Viron, O.; Le Bail, K.

    2007-06-01

    The residual signal in VLBI, SLR, DORIS and GPS station motion, after a linear trend and seasonal components have been removed, is analysed to investigate site-specific and technique-specific error spectra. The study concentrates on 60 sites with dense observation history by two or more space geodetic techniques. Statistical methods include the Allan variance analysis and the three-cornered hat algorithm. The stability of time-series is defined by two parameters, namely the Allan deviation for a one-year sampling time (noise level) and the slope of the Allan variance graph with its spectral interpretation (noise type). The site-specific noise level is found to be in the range 0.5-3.5 mm in either horizontal direction and 1-4.5 mm in height for most sites. The distribution of site-specific noise type includes both white noise and flicker noise. White noise is predominant in the East direction. Both types of noise are found in the North direction, with no particular geographical clustering. In the Up direction, the Northern hemisphere sites seem to be split in two large geographical sectors characterised either by white noise or by flicker noise signatures. Technique-specific noise characteristics are estimated in several ways, leading to a white noise diagnostic for VLBI and SLR in all three local directions. DORIS has also white noise in the horizontal directions, whereas GPS has a flicker noise spectrum. The vertical noise spectrum is indecisive for both DORIS and GPS. The three-dimensional noise levels for the one-year sampling time are 1.7 mm for VLBI, 2.5 mm for SLR, 5.2 mm for DORIS, and 4.1 mm for GPS. For GPS, the long-term analysis homogeneity has a strong influence. In the case of a test solution reanalysed in a fully consistent way, the noise level drops to the VLBI level in horizontal and to the SLR level in vertical. The three-dimensional noise level for a one-year sampling time decreases to 1.8 mm. In addition, the percentage of stations with flicker

  6. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  7. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  8. Geodetic measurement of deformation in California. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne Marie

    1988-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements made in the western U.S. since 1979 as part of the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project provide discrete samples of the temporal and spatial deformation field. The interpretation of the VLBI-derived rates of deformation requires an examination of geologic information and more densely sampled ground-based geodetic data. In the first two of three related studies embodying this thesis triangulation and trilateration data measured on two regional networks are processed, one in the central Mojave Desert and one in the Coast Ranges east of the San Andreas fault. At the spatial scales spanned by these local geodetic networks, auxiliary geologic and geophysical data have been utilized to examine the relation between measured incremental strain and the accommodation of strain seen in local geological structures, strain release in earthquakes, and principal stress directions inferred from in situ measurements. In the third study, VLBI data from stations distributed across the Pacific - North American plate boundary zone in the western United States are processed. The VLBI data have been used to constrain the integrated rate of deformation across portions of the continental plate boundary in California and to provide a tectonic framework to interpret regional geodetic and geologic studies.

  9. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements made in the western U.S. since 1979 provide discrete samples of the temporal and spatial deformation field. The interpretation of the VLBI derived rates of deformation requires an examination of geologic information and more densely sampled ground based geodetic data. Triangulation and trilateration data measured on two regional networks, one in the central Mojave Desert and one in the Coast Ranges east of the San Andreas fault, were processed. At the spatial scales spanned by these local geodetic networks, auxiliary geologic and geophysical data were utilized to examine the relation between measured incremental strain and the accommodation of strain seen in local geologic structures, strain release in earthquakes, and principal stress directions inferred from in situ measurements. VLBI data was also processed from stations distributed across the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone in the western U.S. The VLBI data were used to constrain the integrated rate of deformation across portions of the continental plate boundary in California and to provide a tectonic framework to interpret regional geodetic and geologic studies.

  10. Sensitivity evaluation of two VLBI2010 candidate feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, C.; Whittier, B.

    2011-07-01

    The VLBI2010 effort will usher in a new generation of geodetic VLBI observing systems possessing far more bandwidth than their predecessors. As such, MIT Haystack Observatory has been actively involved in the evaluation of broadband microwave feeds for the new Patriot 12m antenna installed at the Goddard Geophysical Astronomical Observatory in Greenbelt MD, USA. In our contribution to the meeting, we will present sensitivity measurements of the Patriot 12m antenna as fed by the Chalmers University of Technology design (i.e. the Eleven antenna) as well as a new California Institute of Technology design (i.e. the quadridge feed horn - QRFH) both of which have been realized in hardware prototypes and are considered to be contending feeds for VLBI2010.

  11. Comparison Campaign of VLBI Data Analysis Software - First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, Lucia; Bohm, Johannes; Schuh, Harald

    2010-01-01

    During the development of the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at Vienna University of Technology, a special comparison setup was developed with the goal of easily finding links between deviations of results achieved with different software packages and certain parameters of the observation. The object of comparison is the computed time delay, a value calculated for each observation including all relevant models and corrections that need to be applied in geodetic VLBI analysis. Besides investigating the effects of the various models on the total delay, results of comparisons between VieVS and Occam 6.1 are shown. Using the same methods, a Comparison Campaign of VLBI data analysis software called DeDeCC is about to be launched within the IVS soon.

  12. Haystack Observatory VLBI Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Mike; Cappallo, Roger; Corey, Brian; Dudevoir, Kevin; Niell, Arthur; Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Haystack Correlator during 2012. Highlights include finding a solution to the DiFX InfiniBand timeout problem and other DiFX software development, conducting a DBE comparison test following the First International VLBI Technology Workshop, conducting a Mark IV and DiFX correlator comparison, more broadband delay experiments, more u- VLBI Galactic Center observations, and conversion of RDV session processing to the Mark IV/HOPS path. Non-real-time e-VLBI transfers and engineering support of other correlators continued.

  13. Systematic Effects in Earth Orientation Parameters Determined by VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, H.; Heinkelmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is the only technique that directly connects on the observation level the realizations of ITRS and ICRS in terms of their orientation. Many applications in spacecraft navigation, fundamental astronomy, astrometry and geosciences depend on the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) determined by VLBI. Currently, under the IAG/IAU Joint Working Group on the Theory of Earth Rotation, activities are supported to advance the theory of Earth rotation. Some components of Earth Rotation, such as the free modes like the Free Core Nutation (FCN) are not predictable but rely entirely on the observation through VLBI. In our presentation we investigate the EOP when alternating various VLBI analysis options such as correction models, a priori parameters, and other choices with the aim to detect and quantify possible systematic effects. Our approach is purely empirical: we alternate certain analysis options and assess the differences with respect to the reference solution that adheres to the IERS Conventions (2010) and applies the standard parameterization. For demonstration we analyze the regular International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) sessions IVS-R1 and IVS-R4.The IAG flagship component GGOS (Global Geodetic Observing System) aims to provide the EOP with an accuracy of 1 mm on the Earth surface (about 30 microarcseconds). This accuracy target will be applied as a limit to interpret the significance of the differences obtained in our comparisons.

  14. Identifying optimal tag-along station locations for improving VLBI Intensive sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareinen, Niko; Klopotek, Grzegorz; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2017-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a unique space-geodetic technique capable of direct observation of the Earth's phase of rotation, namely Universal Time (UT1). The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) conducts daily 1-h Intensive VLBI sessions to determine rapid variations in the difference between UT1 and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The main objective of the Intensive sessions is to provide timely UT1-UTC estimates. These estimates are especially crucial for Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The monitoring of rapid variations in Earth rotation also provides insight into various geophysical phenomena. There is an ongoing effort to improve the quality of the UT1-UTC estimates from single-baseline Intensive sessions to realise the expected accuracy and to bring them to a better agreement with the 24-h VLBI sessions. In this paper, we investigate the possibility to improve the Intensives by including a third station in tag-along mode to these regularly observed sessions. The impact of the additional station is studied via extensive simulations using the c5++ analysis software. The location of the station is varied within a predetermined grid. Based on actual Intensive session schedules, a set of simulated observations are generated for the two original stations and each grid point. These simulated data are used to estimate UT1-UTC for every Intensive session scheduled during the year 2014 on the Kokee-Wettzell and Tsukuba-Wettzell baselines, with the addition of a third station. We find that in tag-along mode when a third station is added to the schedule we can identify areas where the UT1-UTC estimates are improved up to 67% w.r.t. the original single-baseline network. There are multiple operational VLBI stations in these areas, which could with little effort be included in a tag-along mode to the currently scheduled Intensive sessions, thus providing the possibility to improve the UT1-UTC estimates by extending the

  15. Designing a new Geodetic Research Data Management System for the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzer, Glend Lorraine

    2015-08-01

    The Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) participates in astronomic, astrometric and geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations using both 26- and 15-m diameter radio telescopes. Geodetic data from a Satellite Laser Ranger (SLR), Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), Met4 weather stations and a new seismic vault network must be stored at HartRAO and made available to the scientific community. Some data are e-transferred to correlators, analysis centres and space geodesy data providers, while some data are processed locally to produce basic data products. The new South African co-located seismology network of seismic and GNSS instrumentation will generate large volumes of raw data to be stored and archived at HartRAO. The current data storage systems are distributed and outdated, and management systems currently being used will also not be able to handle the additional large volumes of data. This necessitates the design and implementation of a new, modern research data management system which combines all the datasets into one database, as well as cater for current and future data volume requirements. The librarian’s expertise and knowledge will be used in the design and implementation of the new HartRAO Geodetic Research Data Management System (GRDMS). The librarian’s role and involvement in the design and implementation of the new GRDMS are presented here. Progress to date will also be discussed.

  16. Design of VLBI Array in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, E. A.; Abraham, Z.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Estudiamos la localizaci6n 6ptima de estaciones de \\ ras' en territorlo brasileno. Con una red VLBI de estaciones reales y ficti- cias simulamos observaciones. Se usan los datos generados de estps ex- perimentos para obtener Ia distribuci6n de brillo de radiofuentes fic- ticias por medlo de tecaicas de mapeo bIbrido. Se concluye que l mejor localizaci6n de estacionee'VLBI futuras, tomando en cuenta las estacio- nes de EUA y de Europa, se encuentra en el Norte-Noreste de razll. El analisis de los datos se hizo con los programas de CALTECH, los cuales estan instalados en una computadora VAX del Departamento de Astronomla del Instituto Astron6mico y Geoflsico de la Universidad de Sa"'o Paulo. ABSTRACT: In this work we study the optimum localization for future VLBI stations in the Brazilian territory. With a VLBI network of real and fictitious stations we make simulations of observations. The data generated in these experiments are used to obtain brightness distribution of a fictitious radio source by the hybrid mapping techniques. We conclude that the best localization of a future VLBI station taking into account the addition of US and European Stations, is roughly in North-Northeast sites in Brazil. The analysis of the data is made with the software of CALTECH, which is installed in the VAX computer of the Astronomy Department of Instituto e Geofisico - USP. Key `{` : INSTRUMENTS - INTERFEROMETRY

  17. VLBI Technology Development at SHAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiuzhong; Shu, Fengchun; Xiang, Ying; Zhu, Renjie; Xu, Zhijun; Chen, Zhong; Zheng, Weimin; Luo, Jintao; Wu, Yajun

    2010-01-01

    VLBI technology development made significant progress at SHAO in the last few years. The development status of the Chinese DBBC, the software and FPGA-based correlators, and the new VLBI antenna, as well as VLBI applications are summarized in this paper.

  18. The International Global Network of Geodetic Fiducial Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBrecque, John

    2004-01-01

    Scientific need and technological opportunity require that we move toward implementing a global network of geodetic fiducial stations which feature co-located SLR, VLBI, GNSS, and DORIS instrumentation. Earth science of the next decade will require more accurate global change measurements of sea level topography, sea level change, polar ice mass balance, hydrological and atmospheric mass flux. and topographic deformation, real time mm scale navigation and precision time transfer on a global scale. These scientific requirements have been translated into a goal of mm scale annual stability for the terrestrial reference frame, earth orientation parameters, as well as the orbit and clock determinations tbr the GNSS systems. To meet these challenges, the four geodetic observing systems must be more tightly integrated in technology, location, and analysis. NASA strongly supports the objectives of the IGGOS initiative vis NASA's National Geodetic Observatory and INDIGO programs. The Global networks of GNSS, SLR. and VLBI observatories are for the most part poorly suited for these new demands. These important geodetic networks have evolved with little planning yet these systems are providing essential measurements to a wide swath of society. New signal structures in the GPS and the developing Galileo GNSS will soon require replacement of the GNSS receivers. The SLR network is poorly distributed globally, requires labor intensive observations and analysis, and for the most part relies upon antiquated technology. The VLBI observatories utilize large radio telescopes in remote regions that are poorly distributed globally. Co-location of these networks is sparse and co-location errors contribute significantly to the observing error spectrum. Increasing use of the S and X band by commercial and other government services will also contribute to increased observational errors. The time is upon us for an international effort to develop an optimized global geodetic fiducial network

  19. Supernova research with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, Norbert; Bietenholz, Michael F.

    2016-06-01

    Core-collapse supernovae have been monitored with VLBI from shortly after the explosion to many years thereafter. Radio emission is produced as the ejecta hit the stellar wind left over from the dyingstar. Images show the details of the interaction as the shock front expands into the circumstellar medium. Measurements of the velocity and deceleration of the expansion provide information on both the ejecta and the circumstellar medium. VLBI observations can also search for the stellar remnant of the explosion, a neutron star or a black hole. Combining the transverse expansion rate with the radial expansion rate from optical spectra allows a geometric determination of the distance to the host galaxy. We will present results from recent VLBI observations, focus on their interpretations, and show updated movies of supernovae from soon after their explosion to the present.

  20. Comparison of VTEC from ground-based space geodetic techniques based on ray-traced mapping factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Alizadeh, M. Mahdi; Schuh, Harald; Deng, Zhiguo; Zus, Florian; Etemadfard, M. Hossein

    2016-07-01

    For the derivation of vertical total electron content (VTEC) from slant total electron content (STEC), usually a standard approach is used based on mapping functions that assume a single-layer model of the ionosphere (e.g. IERS Conventions 2010). In our study we test the standard approach against a recently developed alternative which is based on station specific ray-traced mapping factors. For the evaluation of this new mapping concept, we compute VTEC at selected Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) stations using the dispersive delays and the corresponding formal errors obtained by observing extra-galactic radio sources at two radio frequencies in S- and X-bands by the permanent geodetic/astrometric program organized by the IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry). Additionally, by applying synchronous sampling and a consistent analysis configuration, we determine VTEC at Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) antennas using GPS (Global Positioning System) and/or GLONASS (Globalnaja nawigazionnaja sputnikowaja Sistema) observations provided by the IGS (International GNSS Service) that are operated in the vicinity of the VLBI antennas. We compare the VTEC time series obtained by the individual techniques over a period of about twenty years and describe their characteristics qualitatively and statistically. The length of the time series allows us to assess the long-term climatology of ionospheric VTEC during the last twenty years.

  1. Height biases and scale variations in VLBI networks due to antenna gravitational deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanza, Claudio; Sarti, Pierguido; Petrov, Leonid; Negusini, Monia

    2010-05-01

    The impact of signal path variations (SPVs) caused by antenna gravity deformations on geodetic VLBI results is evaluated for the first time. Elevation-dependent models of SPV for Medicina and Noto (Italy) telescopes were derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods to account for gravitational deformations. After applying these models, estimates of the antenna reference point (ARP) positions are shifted upward by 8.9 mm and 6.7 mm, respectively. The impact on other parameters is negligible. To infer the impact of antenna gravity deformations on the entire VLBI network, lacking measurements for other telescopes, we rescaled the SPV models of Medicina and Noto for other antennas according to their size. The effects are changes in VLBI heights in the range [-3,73] mm and a significant net scale increase of 0.3 - 0.8 ppb. This demonstrates the need to include SPV models in routine VLBI data analysis.

  2. VLBI2010 Feed Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrachenko, Bill

    2013-01-01

    VLBI2010 requires a feed that simultaneously has high efficiency over the full 2.2-14 GHz frequency range. The simultaneity requirement implies that the feed must operate at high efficiency over the full frequency range without the need to adjust its focal position to account for frequency dependent phase centre variations. Two feeds meet this specification: The Eleven Feed developed at Chalmers University. (For more information, contact Miroslav Pantaleev, miroslav.pantaleev@chalmers.se. The Eleven Feed, integrated with LNA's in a cryogenic receiver, is available as a product from Omnisys Instruments, info@omnisys.se). The Quadruple Ridged Flared Horn (QRFH) developed at the California Institute of Technology. (For more information please contact Ahmed Akgiray, aakgiray@ieee.org or Sander Weinreb, sweinreb@caltech.edu) Although not VLBI2010 compliant, two triband S/X/Ka feeds are also being developed for the commissioning of VLBI2010 antennas, for S/X observations during the VLBI2010 transition period, and to support X/Ka CRF observations. The two feeds are: The Twin Telescopes Wettzell (TTW) triband feed developed by Mirad Microwave. (For more information please contact Gerhard Kronschnabl, Gerhard.Kronschnabl@bkg.bund.de) The RAEGE (Spain) triband feed developed at Yebes Observatory. (For more information please contact Jose Antonio Lopez Perez, ja.lopezperez@oan.es)

  3. The European VLBI network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilizzi, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The capabilities of the European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) network are summarized. The range of baseline parameters, sensitivities, and recording and other equipment available are included. Plans for upgrading the recording facilities and the use of geostationary satellites for signal transfer and clock synchronization are discussed.

  4. Towards a four technique GGOS site: VLBI - DORIS compatibility tests at Wettzell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Thomas; Didelot, Francois; Kodet, Jan; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Mähler, Swetlana; Neidhardt, Alexander; Plötz, Christian; Saunier, Jérôme; Schüler, Torben; Walter, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of a Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), co-location sites are of special importance for the evaluation and mutual control of the individual geodetic space techniques. At the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell a DORIS (Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite) beacon could complete the geodetic instrumentation consisting of three Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) telescopes, two Laser Ranging (LR) systems and a number of multi- Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations. Integrating all fourth geodetic instrumentation into one site generates new problems with Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). While the VLBI system is designed to receive very weak signals from quasars, the DORIS beacon emits strong signals in the UHF frequency band at 401.25 MHz and in the S band at 2036.25 MHz. During the observation of quasars with VLBI there is a high risk of coupling DORIS S band signals into the VLBI receiving chain generating spurious signal and, in the worst case, overloading receiving chain electronics and risking its damage. Before a DORIS beacon is operated at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, it must be ensured that it can be operated alongside the VLBI system without any risk of damage or degradation of the measurement. Field tests under different setups were performed to assess the impact of the DORIS signal on the classical geodetic VLBI 20-m and the VGOS 13-m radio telescopes. Different locations on the observatory each at a distance of more than 100 m were occupied by the DORIS antenna. It has been shown that obstacles like buildings or earth mounds attenuate the signal up to 20 dB. However the power received at the input of the Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) is still at a critical level when the radio telescope points towards the DORIS beacon. The quality of the correlated signals is not or barely affected at long baselines. At local baselines however, the DORIS emission as a common mode signal degrades

  5. VLBI observations of GNSS-satellites: from scheduling to analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, Lucia; Hellerschmied, Andreas; McCallum, Jamie; Böhm, Johannes; Lovell, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of observing satellites with the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique has been discussed for several years in the geodetic community, with observations of either existing satellites of the global navigation satellite systems or of satellites dedicated to realise a space tie. Such observations were carried out using the Australian telescopes in Hobart and Ceduna which, for the first time, integrated all the necessary steps: planning the observations (automated scheduling), correlation of the data and the generation of a series of time delay observables suitable for a subsequent geodetic analysis. We report on the development of new and the adaptation of existing routines for observing and data processing, focusing on technology development. The aim was to use methods that are routinely used in geodetic VLBI. A series of test experiments of up to six hours duration was performed, allowing to improve the observations from session to session and revealing new problems still to be solved. The newly developed procedures and programs now enable more observations. Further development assumed, this bears the prospect of being directly applied to the observation of dedicated space-tie satellites.

  6. Measurement of the solar gravitational deflection of radio waves using geodetic very-long-baseline interferometry data, 1979-1999.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, S S; Davis, J L; Lebach, D E; Gregory, J S

    2004-03-26

    We used very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) to measure the deflection by the Sun of radio waves emanating from distant compact radio sources. This bending is characterized in the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism by gamma, which is unity in general relativity. Using a large geodetic VLBI data set, we obtained gamma=0.9998(3)+/-0.0004(5) (estimated standard error). We found no systematic biases from our analysis of subgroups of data.

  7. Mobile VLBI and GPS measurement of vertical crustal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroger, P. M.; Davidson, J. M.; Gardner, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Mobile Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) and Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic measurements have many error sources in common. Calibration of the effects of water vapor on signal transmission through the atmosphere, however, remains the primary limitation to the accuracy of vertical crustal motion measurements made by either technique. The two primary methods of water vapor calibration currently in use for mobile VLBI baseline measurements were evaluated: radiometric measurements of the sky brightness near the 22 GHz emission line of free water molecules and surface meteorological measurements used as input to an atmospheric model. Based upon a limited set of 9 baselines, it is shown that calibrating VLBI data with water vapor radiometer measurements provides a significantly better fit to the theoretical decay model than calibrating the same data with surface meteorological measurements. The effect of estimating a systematic error in the surface meteorological calibration is shown to improve the consistency of the vertical baseline components obtained by the two calibration methods. A detailed error model for the vertical baseline components obtained indicates current mobile VLBI technology should allow accuracies of order 3 cm with WVR calibration and 10 cm when surface meteorological calibration is used.

  8. 11th European VLBI Network Symposium & Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) at the University of Bordeaux (France), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 11th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and EVN Users Meeting on October 9-12, 2012. The Symposium was held at the "Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Bordeaux", located in the "Palais de la Bourse", in the center of Bordeaux. The conference highlighted the latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, space VLBI and e-VLBI. All fields of astrophysics were concerned - stellar, galactic and extragalactic - as well as astrometry and planetary science. Presentations addressing synergy between (e-)VLBI and other new or planned radio facilities (ALMA, LOFAR, e-MERLIN,...) or instruments at other wavelengths (Fermi, CTA, Gaia,...) were also an integral part of the program. The scientific program was organized in 11 sessions including 71 oral presentations, with an additional 43 posters available for viewing during the entire length of the conference. An EVN Users Meeting was also held during one of the evening to foster interaction between the EVN users and the EVN organization. The symposium was attended by a total of 122 delegates originating from 47 institutes world-wide, sharing new VLBI science and innovations while also building links with other communities. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 283393 (RadioNet3).

  9. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2012 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baver, Karen D.; Behrend, Dirk; Armstrong, Kyla L.

    2013-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2012 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2012 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the calendar year 2012, our fourteenth year of existence. The reports describe changes, activities, and progress ofthe IVS. Many thanks to all IVS components who contributed to this Annual Report. With the exception of the first section and parts of the last section (described below), the contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site athttp:ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2012

  10. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: 1999 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 1999 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry -IVS. The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic community who constitute the components of IVS. The 1999 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the year ending March 1, 1999, the official inauguration date of IVS. As the newest of the space technique services, IVS decided to publish this Annual Report as a reference to our organization and its components. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS website at: http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/pub/arl999. The IVS 1999 Annual Report will be a valuable reference for information about IVS and its components. This Annual Report will serve as a baseline from which we can measure the anticipated progress of IVS in coming years.

  11. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2013 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baver, Karen D.; Behrend, Dirk; Armstrong, Kyla L.

    2014-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2013 Annual Report of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2013 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the calendar year 2013, our fifteenth year of existence. The reports describe changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. Many thanks to all IVS components who contributed to this Annual Report. With the exception of the first section and the last section, the contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2013.

  12. Tsukuba 32-m VLBI Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawabata, Ryoji; Kurihara, Shinobu; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Jiro; Tanabe, Tadashi; Mukai, Yasuko; Nishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The Tsukuba 32-m VLBI station is operated by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan. This report summarizes activities of the Tsukuba 32-m VLBI station in 2012. More than 200 sessions were observed with the Tsukuba 32-m and other GSI antennas in accordance with the IVS Master Schedule of 2012. We have started installing the observing facilities that will be fully compliant with VLBI2010 for the first time in Japan.

  13. Combination of Vlbi, GPS and Slr Observations At The Observation Level For The Realization of Terrestrial and Celestial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, P. H.

    Forsvarets forskningsinstitutt (FFI, the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment) has during the last 17 years developed a software system called GEOSAT, for the analysis of any type of high precision space geodetic observations. A unique feature of GEOSAT is the possibility of combining any combination of different space geode- tic data at the observation level with one consistent model and one consistent strategy. This is a much better strategy than the strategy in use today where different types of observations are processed separately using analysis software developed specifically for each technique. The results from each technique are finally combined a posteriori. In practice the models implemented in the software packages differ at the 1-cm level which is almost one order of magnitude larger than the internal precision of the most precise techniques. Another advantage of the new proposed combination method is that for example VLBI and GPS can use the same tropospheric model with common parameterization. The same is the case for the Earth orientation parameters, the geo- center coordinates and other geodetic or geophysical parameters where VLBI, GPS and SLR can have a common estimate for each of the parameters. The analysis with GEOSAT is automated for the combination of VLBI, SLR and GPS observations. The data are analyzed in batches of one day where the result from each daily arc is a SRIF array (Square Root Information Filter). A large number of SRIF arrays can be combined into a multi-year solution using the CSRIFS program (Com- bination Square Root Information Filter and Smoother). Four parameter levels are available and any parameter can, at each level, either be represented as a constant or a stochastic parameter (white noise, colored noise, or random walk). The batch length (i.e. the time interval between the addition of noise to the SRIF array) can be made time- and parameter dependent. GEOSAT and CSRIFS have been applied in the analysis of selected

  14. Combined Earth orientation parameters based on homogeneous and continuous VLBI and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Daniela; Krügel, Manuela; Rothacher, Markus; Tesmer, Volker; Schmid, Ralf; Angermann, Detlef

    2007-06-01

    The CONT02 campaign is of great interest for studies combining very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) with other space-geodetic techniques, because of the continuously available VLBI observations over 2 weeks in October 2002 from a homogeneous network. Especially, the combination with the Global Positioning System (GPS) offers a broad spectrum of common parameters. We combined station coordinates, Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) and troposphere parameters consistently in one solution using technique- specific datum-free normal equation systems. In this paper, we focus on the analyses concerning the EOPs, whereas the comparison and combination of the troposphere parameters and station coordinates are covered in a companion paper in Journal of Geodesy. In order to demonstrate the potential of the VLBI and GPS space-geodetic techniques, we chose a sub-daily resolution for polar motion (PM) and universal time (UT). A consequence of this solution set-up is the presence of a one-to-one correlation between the nutation angles and a retrograde diurnal signal in PM. The Bernese GPS Software used for the combination provides a constraining approach to handle this singularity. Simulation studies involving both nutation offsets and rates helped to get a deeper understanding of this singularity. With a rigorous combination of UT1 UTC and length of day (LOD) from VLBI and GPS, we showed that such a combination works very well and does not suffer from the systematic effects present in the GPS-derived LOD values. By means of wavelet analyses and the formal errors of the estimates, we explain this important result. The same holds for the combination of nutation offsets and rates. The local geodetic ties between GPS and VLBI antennas play an essential role within the inter-technique combination. Several studies already revealed non-negligible discrepancies between the terrestrial measurements and the space-geodetic solutions. We demonstrate to what extent these discrepancies

  15. The Southern Hemisphere VLBI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Meier, D.L.; Louie, A.P.; Morabito, D.D.; Skjerve, L.; Slade, M.A.; Niell, A.E.; Wehrle, A.E.; Jauncey, D.L.; Tzioumis, A.K.; Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA; California Univ., Los Angeles; CSIRO, Div. of Radiophysics, Epping; Sydney Univ.; Manchester Victoria Univ., Jodrell Bank )

    1989-07-01

    Six radio telescopes were operated as the first Southern Hemisphere VLBI array in April and May 1982. Observations were made at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz. This array provided VLBI modeling and hybrid imaging of celestial radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere, high-accuracy VLBI geodesy between Southern Hemisphere sites, and subarcsecond radio astrometry of celestial sources south of declination -45 deg. The goals and implementation of the array are discussed, the methods of modeling and hybrid image production are explained, and the VLBI structure of the sources that were observed is summarized. 36 refs.

  16. Power Spectral Analysis of Simultaneous VLBI and GPS Tropospheric Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, J.; Boehm, J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations by space geodetic techniques experience refraction and signal delay due to passage through the Earth's atmosphere. For high-accuracy positioning results, data analysts must account for these effects. Since independent path delay values of sufficient accuracy are not usually available, nuisance parameters are commonly added in the geodetic analysis. The general validity of such zenith path delay (ZPD) estimates as true atmospheric measures has been confirmed by comparison of results from independent radiometric and other techniques over many years. Biases and standard deviations in the sub-cm range are normally found, which is expected to be adequate as inputs to improve the forecast performance of numerical weather models. To better understand the noise characteristics of ZPD estimates from VLBI and GPS, we have examined the power spectra of simultaneous observations during a 15-day period in October 2002. The official combined ZPD products from the technique services have been used primarily, but series from individual analysis centers have also been included. For the seven sites studied, the power-law spectral indices over sub-daily intervals are close to -8/3, consistent with fully developed Kolmogorov turbulence, and flatten over longer periods. The VLBI series, sampled hourly, show white noise at levels of 0.7 to 1.5 mm for frequencies above 5 cycles per day. The simultaneous GPS series, sampled every 2 hours, display no indication of white noise except for one receiver with poor data analysis. The spectra of VLBI-GPS differences are generally flat but show possible signs of excess noise in some spectral bands. Based on these results, estimating VLBI ZPD values more often than every few hours should be reconsidered, especially if changes would strengthen other parameters. On the other hand, GPS-based ZPD estimates should be determined more frequently, at least hourly. Considering the greater reliability of the VLBI scale and the corresponding

  17. Tidal Love and Shida numbers estimated by geodetic VLBI☆

    PubMed Central

    Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Johannes; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Frequency-dependent Love and Shida numbers, which characterize the Earth response to the tidal forces, were estimated in a global adjustment of all suitable geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions from 1984.0 to 2011.0. Several solutions were carried out to determine the Love and Shida numbers for the tidal constituents at periods in the diurnal band and in the long-period band in addition to values of the Love and Shida numbers common for all tides of degree two. Adding up all twelve diurnal tidal waves that were estimated, the total differences in displacement with respect to the theoretical conventional values of the Love and Shida numbers calculated from an Earth model reach 1.73 ± 0.29 mm in radial direction and 1.15 ± 0.15 mm in the transverse plane. The difference in the radial deformation following from the estimates of the zonal Love numbers is largest for the semi-annual tide Ssa with 1.07 ± 0.19 mm. PMID:26523082

  18. New vertical geodesy. [VLBI measurements for earthquake prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper contains a review of the theoretical difference between orthometric heights and heights labeled geometric which are determined through use of an extraterrestrial frame of reference. The theory is supplemented with examples which portray very long baseline interferometry as a measuring system that will provide estimates of vertical crustal motion which are radically improved in comparison with those obtained from analysis of repeated geodetic levelings. The example of the San Fernando earthquake of 1971 is used to show how much estimates of orthometric and geometric height change might differ. A comment by another author is appended which takes issue with some of the conclusions of this paper. In particular, an attempt is made in the comment to rebut the conclusion that geodetic leveling is less reliable than VLBI measurements for determining relative elevation change of points separated by more than 56 km.

  19. The AuScope Project and Trans-Tasman VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Jim; Dickey, John; Gulyaev, Sergei; Natusch, Tim; Titov, Oleg; Tingay, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Three 12-meter radio telescopes are being built in Australia (the AuScope project) and one in New Zealand. These facilities will be fully-equipped for undertaking S and X-band geodetic VLBI observations and correlation will take place on a software correlator (part of the AuScope project). All sites are equipped with permanent GPS receivers to provide co-location of several space geodetic techniques. The following scientific tasks of geodesy and astrometry are considered. 1. Improvement and densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the southern hemisphere; 2. Improvement of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame in the region; 3. Measurement of intraplate deformation of the Australian tectonic plate.

  20. VLBI Data Interchange Format (VDIF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan; Kettenis, Mark; Phillips, Chris; Sekido, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    One important outcome of the 7th International e-VLBI Workshop in Shanghai in June 2008 was the creation of a task force to study and recommend a universal VLBI data format that is suitable for both on-the-wire e-VLBI data transfer, as well as direct disk storage. This task force, called the VLBI Data Interchange Format (VDIF) Task Force, is the first part of a two-part effort, the second of which will address standardization of e-VLBI data-transmission-protocols. The formation of the VDIF Task Force was prompted particularly by increased e-VLBI activity and the difficulties encountered when data arrive at a correlator in different formats from various instruments in various parts of the world. The task force created a streaming packetized data format that may be used for real-time and non-realtime e-VLBI, as well as direct disk storage. The data may contain multiple channels of time-sampled data with an arbitrary number of channels, arbitrary #bits/sample up to 32, and real or complex data; data rates in excess of 100 Gbps are supported. Each data packet is completely self-identifying via a short header, and data may be decoded without reference to any external information. The VDIF task force has completed its work, and the VDIF standard was ratified at the 2009 e-VLBI workshop in Madrid.

  1. eVLBI at Wettzell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassing, Reiner; Kronschnabl, Gerhard

    Wettzell's radiotelescope is connected to 34 Mbps INTERNET connection. Since April, 2005, Wettzell is performing eVLBI observations for INT2 on a regular basis. The data is transfered to Tsukuba, and one day after the observations, the results of the correlation is produced. A gain of about 7 days is possible due to eVLBI.

  2. Modernizing the JPL VLBI Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogstad, S.; Goodhart, C. E.; Clark, J. E.; Finley, S.; Lanyi, G. E.; White, L. A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.>

    This poster will present the current capabilities of the JPL VLBI Correlator (JVC) and the general architecture of the equipment. In addition, the scientific and navigation uses of the JVC will be enumerated for background purposes. The JVC is a software correlator based on a Beowulf cluster of computers. It replaces a thirty year old correlator based on custom designed digital hardware. General comparisons between the old and new equipment will be made. The JVC makes use of a separate program, SoftC, to do the actual correlations. The JVC manages the sending of data to multiple machines in a Beowulf cluster each running SoftC in parallel on small chunks of the data. The basic architecture of SoftC will also be described.

  3. Legacy and future of Kilauea's geodetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Brown, E. D.; Miklius, A.

    2011-12-01

    Because of its extensive and detailed history of geodetic measurements, Kilauea is one of the best-studied if not also best-understood volcanic systems in the world. Hawaiian volcanoes have a long history of deformation observations. These observations range from native legends of Pele's underground travels, through initial measurements made by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, and finally to current ground-based and satellite observations. Many questions still remain, relating to Kilauea's dynamics, where geodetic measurements could offer fundamental insights. For example, new geodetic experiments could lead to a better understanding of the degree of magmatic and tectonic interaction, the geometries of faults at depth, the extent of offshore deformation, and the magmatic plumbing system. While it is possible to design many experiments to address these issues, we focus on three deformation targets where geodetic improvements, including finer sampling in space and time, could yield significant advancements toward understanding Kilauea's dynamics. First, by scrutinizing spatially-dense space-borne geodetic data for signs of upper east rift zone deformation and incorporating gravity and seismic data in a high resolution tomographic model, the hydraulic connection between Kilauea's summit and the rift zone could be imaged, which would provide insight into the pathways that transport magma out to the rift zones. Second, a combination of geodetic and seismic data could be used to determine the nature of possible relationships and interactions between the Hilina fault system and Kilauea's basal decollement. Such a study would have important implications for assessments of future earthquake and sector collapse hazards. Lastly, by adding seafloor geodetic measurements and seismic data to the current geodetic network on Kilauea, we could delimit the offshore extent of transient and episodic decollement deformation. In addition to multidisciplinary approaches, future geodetic

  4. Round-Trip System Available to Measure Path Length Variation in Korea VLBI System for Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Hongjong; Kondo, Tetsuro; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Tuhwan; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Ju, Hyunhee

    2010-01-01

    The construction project of Korea Geodetic VLBI officially started in October 2008. The construction of all systems will be completed by the end of 2011. The project was named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG), and its main purpose is to maintain the Korea Geodetic Datum. In case of the KVG system, an observation room with an H-maser frequency standard is located in a building separated from the antenna by several tens of meters. Therefore KVG system will adopt a so-called round-trip system to transmit reference signals to the antenna with reduction of the effect of path length variations. KVG s round-trip system is designed not only to use either metal or optical fiber cables, but also to measure path length variations directly. We present this unique round trip system for KVG.

  5. Global VLBI Observations of Weak Extragalactic Radio Sources: Imaging Candidates to Align the VLBI and Gaia Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Charlot, Patrick; Porcas, Richard; Garrington, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames (International Celestial Reference Frame) with the highest accuracy. In this respect, it is found that only 10% of the ICRF sources are suitable to establish this link (70 sources), either because most of the ICRF sources are not bright enough at optical wavelengths or because they show extended radio emission which precludes reaching the highest astrometric accuracy. In order to improve the situation, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of about 450 optically-bright radio sources, typically 20 times weaker than the ICRF sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent 90% detection rate. This paper reports on global VLBI observations carried out in March 2008 to image 105 from the 398 previously detected sources. All sources were successfully imaged, revealing compact VLBI structure for about half of them, which is very promising for the future.

  6. Expected Improvements in VLBI Measurements of the Earth's Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the Earth s orientation since the 1970s using space geodetic techniques have provided a continually expanding and improving data set for studies of the Earth s structure and the distribution of mass and angular momentum. The accuracy of current one-day measurements is better than 100 microarcsec for the motion of the pole with respect to the celestial and terrestrial reference frames and better than 3 microsec for the rotation around the pole. VLBI uniquely provides the three Earth orientation parameters (nutation and UTI) that relate the Earth to the extragalactic celestial reference frame. The accuracy and resolution of the VLBI Earth orientation time series can be expected to improve substantially in the near future because of refinements in the realization of the celestial reference frame, improved modeling of the troposphere and non-linear station motions, larger observing networks, optimized scheduling, deployment of disk-based Mark V recorders, full use of Mark IV capabilities, and e-VLBI. More radical future technical developments will be discussed.

  7. Reference frame-induced errors in VLBI Earth rotation determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Karbon, Maria; Liu, Li; Lu, Cuixian; Mora-Diaz, Julian A.; Nilsson, Tobias J.; Raposo-Pulido, Virginia; Soja, Benedikt; Xu, Minghui; Schuh, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Earth Rotation is defined as the transformation between the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS) and the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS). It is a three-dimensional rotation which is described by the precession/nutation Q, the Earth rotation R, and the polar motion W matrices (IERS Coventions 2010): xGCRS = QRWxITRS. The actual determination of Earth Rotation by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is based on the reference frames involved in the VLBI analysis. VLBI is the only space-geodetic technique used for the realization of the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS), which is the geocentric celestial reference system (GCRS) practically realized to evaluate the above equation. Since the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) are obtained as 'session-wise parameters', they can suffer from any inconsistencies between session-wise TRF and CRF realizations. In this paper we assess the session-wise TRF and CRF differences by determining the respective transformation parameters of the adjusted terrestrial and celestial positions on a session basis to the catalogue coordinates, given by the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2008 (ITRF2008) and the Second International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2).

  8. Subdaily Earth Rotation Models Estimated From GPS and VLBI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, P.; Tesmer, V.; MacMillan, D.; Thaller, D.; Rothacher, M.; Fritsche, M.; Rülke, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2007-12-01

    Subdaily changes in Earth rotation at diurnal and semi-diurnal periods are mainly caused by ocean tides. Smaller effects are attributed to the interaction of the atmosphere with the solid Earth. As the tidal periods are well known, models for the ocean tidal contribution to high-frequency Earth rotation variations can be estimated from space- geodetic observations. The subdaily ERP model recommended by the latest IERS conventions was derived from an ocean tide model based on satellite altimetry. Another possibility is the determination of subdaily ERP models from GPS- and/or VLBI-derived Earth rotation parameter series with subdaily resolution. Homogeneously reprocessed long-time series of subdaily ERPs computed by GFZ/TU Dresden (12 years of GPS data), DGFI and GSFC (both with 24 years of VLBI data) provide the basis for the estimation of single-technique and combined subdaily ERP models. The impact of different processing options (e.g., weighting) and different temporal resolutions (1 hour vs. 2 hours) will be evaluated by comparisons of the different models amongst each other and with the IERS model. The analysis of the GPS and VLBI residual signals after subtracting the estimated ocean tidal contribution may help to answer the question whether the remaining signals are technique-specific artifacts and systematic errors or true geophysical signals detected by both techniques.

  9. Matera CGS VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanotte, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the VLBI data analysis activities at the Space Geodesy Center (CGS), Matera, from January 2012 through December 2012, and the contributions that the CGS intends to provide for the future as an IVS Analysis Center.

  10. Astrometry VLBI in Space (AVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Reyes, George

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a proposal for a new space radio astronomy mission for astrometry using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) called Astrometry VLBI in Space (AVS). The ultimate goals of AVS are improving the accuracy of radio astrometry measurements to the microarcsecond level in one epoch of measurements and improving the accuracy of the transformation between the inertial radio and optical coordinate reference frames. This study will also assess the impact of this mission on astrophysics astrometry and geophysics.

  11. Status and plans for the future of the Vienna VLBI Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Hellerschmied, Andreas; Hofmeister, Armin; Krasna, Hana; Kwak, Younghee; Landskron, Daniel; Mayer, David; McCallum, Jamie; Plank, Lucia; Schönberger, Caroline; Shabala, Stanislav; Sun, Jing; Teke, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) is a VLBI analysis software developed and maintained at Technische Universität Wien (TU Wien) since 2008 with contributions from groups all over the world. It is used for both academic purposes in university courses as well as for providing VLBI analysis results to the geodetic community. Written in a modular structure in Matlab, VieVS offers easy access to the source code and the possibility to adapt the programs for particular purposes. The new version 2.3, released in December 2015, includes several new parameters to be estimated in the global solution, such as tidal ERP variation coefficients. The graphical user interface was slightly modified for an improved user functionality and, e.g., the possibility of deriving baseline length repeatabilities. The scheduling of satellite observations was refined, the simulator newly includes the effect of source structure which can also be corrected for in the analysis. This poster gives an overview of all VLBI-related activities in Vienna and provides an outlook to future plans concerning the Vienna VLBI Software.

  12. The impacts of source structure on geodetic parameters demonstrated by the radio source 3C371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming H.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Anderson, James M.; Mora-Diaz, Julian; Karbon, Maria; Schuh, Harald; Wang, Guang L.

    2017-01-01

    Closure quantities measured by very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations are independent of instrumental and propagation instabilities and antenna gain factors, but are sensitive to source structure. A new method is proposed to calculate a structure index based on the median values of closure quantities rather than the brightness distribution of a source. The results are comparable to structure indices based on imaging observations at other epochs and demonstrate the flexibility of deriving structure indices from exactly the same observations as used for geodetic analysis and without imaging analysis. A three-component model for the structure of source 3C371 is developed by model-fitting closure phases. It provides a real case of tracing how the structure effect identified by closure phases in the same observations as the delay observables affects the geodetic analysis, and investigating which geodetic parameters are corrupted to what extent by the structure effect. Using the resulting structure correction based on the three-component model of source 3C371, two solutions, with and without correcting the structure effect, are made. With corrections, the overall rms of this source is reduced by 1 ps, and the impacts of the structure effect introduced by this single source are up to 1.4 mm on station positions and up to 4.4 microarcseconds on Earth orientation parameters. This study is considered as a starting point for handling the source structure effect on geodetic VLBI from geodetic sessions themselves.

  13. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  14. The Automatic Calibration of Korean VLBI Network Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Jeffrey A.; Lee, Sang-Sung; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Algaba, Juan-Carlos; Yun, Youngjoo; Jung, Taehyun; Byun, Do-Young

    2016-08-01

    The calibration of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data has long been a time consuming process. The Korean VLBI Network (KVN) is a simple array consisting of three identical antennas. Because four frequencies are observed simultaneously, phase solutions can be transferred from lower frequencies to higher frequencies in order to improve phase coherence and hence sensitivity at higher frequencies. Due to the homogeneous nature of the array, the KVN is also well suited for automatic calibration. In this paper we describe the automatic calibration of single-polarisation KVN data using the KVN Pipeline and comparing the results against VLBI data that has been manually reduced. We find that the pipelined data using phase transfer produces better results than a manually reduced dataset not using the phase transfer. Additionally we compared the pipeline results with a manually reduced phase-transferred dataset and found the results to be identical.

  15. Towards an Accurate Alignment of the VLBI Frame and the Future Gaia Optical Frame: Global VLBI Imaging Observations of a Sample of Candidate Sources for this Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourda, G.; Collioud, A.; Charlot, P.; Porcas, R.; Garrington, S.

    2012-12-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames with the highest accuracy. However, the number of quasars that are bright at optical wavelengths (for the best position accuracy with Gaia), that have a compact core (to be detectable on VLBI scales), and that do not exhibit complex structures (to ensure a good astrometric quality) was found to be limited. It was then realized that the densification of the list of such objects was necessary. Therefore, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of ~450 optically- bright weak extragalactic radio sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent ~90% detection rate. The second step, dedicated to identifying the most point-like sources of the sample, by imaging their VLBI structures, was initiated in 2008. Approximately 25% of the detected targets were observed with the Global VLBI array (EVN+VLBA; Very Long Baseline Array) during a pilot imaging experiment, revealing that approximately 50% of them are point-like sources on VLBI scales. The rest of the sources were observed during three additional imaging experiments in March 2010, November 2010, and March 2011. In this paper, we present the results of these imaging campaigns and report plans for the final stage of the project, which will be dedicated to accurately measuring the VLBI position of the most point-like sources.

  16. VLBI observations of GNSS satellites on the baseline Hobart-Ceduna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellerschmied, Andreas; Böhm, Johannes; Kwak, Younghee; McCallum, Jamie; Plank, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Observations of satellites of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with the geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique open a variety of new possibilities and promote the integration of these techniques within the framework of GGOS, the Global Geodetic Observing System of the IAG. Such observations provide possibilities to directly connect the dynamic GNSS and the kinematic VLBI reference frame, which may result in improved future ITRF realizations. In our research we are trying to apply observation strategies, which are commonly used in geodetic VLBI, i.e. the main observables are group delay values derived from direct observations and the subsequent correlations of GNSS satellite signals. However, data acquisition schemes for VLBI satellite observations are still at an experimental stage. Further research is required to establish an operational process chain, similar to that applied for natural radio sources, such as quasars, which are observed generally. In 2015 we successfully carried out several experiments on the Australian baseline Ceduna-Hobart. During these sessions, with a few hours duration each, GNSS satellites (GLONASS and GPS) were observed in the L1 and L2 band along with natural radio sources for calibrations. All experiments were based on schedule files created with the satellite scheduling module in the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS). The recorded data were successfully correlated with the DiFX correlator software in combination with a suitable input model for near field targets. A preliminary analysis of the group delay measurements derived with the AIPS software suite was carried out with VieVS. Using this workflow we can achieve a measurement precision of the group delays down to a few picoseconds (5-30, depending on the satellite) over a 5 minutes track. Nevertheless, our results also show a residual signal of a few nanoseconds, which might be caused by the ionosphere or insufficient orbit modelling in the present state of

  17. Application of Raytracing Through the High Resolution Numerical Weather Model HIRLAM for the Analysis of European VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Espada, Susana; Haas, Rudiger; Colomer, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    An important limitation for the precision in the results obtained by space geodetic techniques like VLBI and GPS are tropospheric delays caused by the neutral atmosphere, see e.g. [1]. In recent years numerical weather models (NWM) have been applied to improve mapping functions which are used for tropospheric delay modeling in VLBI and GPS data analyses. In this manuscript we use raytracing to calculate slant delays and apply these to the analysis of Europe VLBI data. The raytracing is performed through the limited area numerical weather prediction (NWP) model HIRLAM. The advantages of this model are high spatial (0.2 deg. x 0.2 deg.) and high temporal resolution (in prediction mode three hours).

  18. DSN Beowulf Cluster-Based VLBI Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogstad, Stephen P.; Jongeling, Andre P.; Finley, Susan G.; White, Leslie A.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Clark, John E.; Goodhart, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) requires a broadband VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) correlator to process data routinely taken as part of the VLBI source Catalogue Maintenance and Enhancement task (CAT M&E) and the Time and Earth Motion Precision Observations task (TEMPO). The data provided by these measurements are a crucial ingredient in the formation of precision deep-space navigation models. In addition, a VLBI correlator is needed to provide support for other VLBI related activities for both internal and external customers. The JPL VLBI Correlator (JVC) was designed, developed, and delivered to the DSN as a successor to the legacy Block II Correlator. The JVC is a full-capability VLBI correlator that uses software processes running on multiple computers to cross-correlate two-antenna broadband noise data. Components of this new system (see Figure 1) consist of Linux PCs integrated into a Beowulf Cluster, an existing Mark5 data storage system, a RAID array, an existing software correlator package (SoftC) originally developed for Delta DOR Navigation processing, and various custom- developed software processes and scripts. Parallel processing on the JVC is achieved by assigning slave nodes of the Beowulf cluster to process separate scans in parallel until all scans have been processed. Due to the single stream sequential playback of the Mark5 data, some ramp-up time is required before all nodes can have access to required scan data. Core functions of each processing step are accomplished using optimized C programs. The coordination and execution of these programs across the cluster is accomplished using Pearl scripts, PostgreSQL commands, and a handful of miscellaneous system utilities. Mark5 data modules are loaded on Mark5 Data systems playback units, one per station. Data processing is started when the operator scans the Mark5 systems and runs a script that reads various configuration files and then creates an experiment-dependent status database

  19. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2000 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, N. R. (Editor); Baver, K. D. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume of reports is the 2000 Annual Report of the International Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The individual reports were contributed by VLBI groups in the international geodetic and astrometric community who constitute the permanent components of IVS. The IVS 2000 Annual Report documents the work of the IVS components for the period March 1, 1999 (the official inauguration date of IVS) through December 31, 2000. The reports document changes, activities, and progress of the IVS. The entire contents of this Annual Report also appear on the IVS web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/ar2000. This book and the web site are organized as follows: (1) The first section contains general information about IVS, a map showing the location of the components, information about the Directing Board members, and the report of the IVS Chair; (2) The second section of Special Reports contains a status report of the IVS Working Group on GPS phase center mapping, a reproduction of the resolution making IVS a Service of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), and a reprint of the VLBI Standard Interface (VSI); (3) The next seven sections hold the component reports from the Coordinators, Network Stations, Operation Centers, Correlators, Data Centers, Analysis Centers, and Technology Development Centers; and (4) The last section includes reference information about IVS: the Terms of Reference, the lists of Member and Affiliated organizations, the IVS Associate Member list, a complete list of IVS components, the list of institutions contributing to this report, and a list of acronyms. The 2000 Annual Report demonstrates the vitality of the IVS and the outstanding progress we have made during our first 22 months.

  20. VLBI for Gravity Probe B: the guide star, IM Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Lebach, D. E.; Ransom, R. R.; Ratner, M. I.; Shapiro, I. I.

    2015-11-01

    We review the radio very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the guide star, IM Peg, and three compact extragalactic reference sources, made in support of the NASA/Stanford gyroscope relativity mission, Gravity Probe B (GP-B). The main goal of the observations was the determination of the proper motion of IM Peg relative to the distant Universe. VLBI observations made between 1997 and 2005 yield a proper motion of IM Peg of -20.83 ± 0.09 mas yr-1 in α and -27.27 ± 0.09 mas yr-1 in δ in a celestial reference frame of extragalactic radio galaxies and quasars virtually identical to the International Celestial Reference Frame 2 (ICRF2). They also yield a parallax for IM Peg of 10.37 ± 0.07 mas, corresponding to a distance of 96.4 ± 0.7 pc. The uncertainties are standard errors with statistical and estimated systematic contributions added in quadrature. These results met the pre-launch requirements of the GP-B mission to not discernibly degrade the estimates of the geodetic and frame-dragging effects.

  1. Resonances in solid Earth tides from VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. S.; Kurdubov, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    This work pertains to the area of exploratory research aimed at finding very fine features of the Earth's tidal deformations at the limit of the capabilities of present-day astrogeodetic observations. Based on an analysis of almost all the available VLBI observations performed within the framework of IVS (International VLBI Service) geodetic programs in 1980-2014, we have obtained the corrections to the theoretical values of complex and frequency-dependent tidal parameters (Love/Shida numbers) for the first time. Their frequency dependence arises from the resonances attributable to the retrograde free core nutation (RFCN). Our results largely confirm a high accuracy of the theory of Earth tides presented in the modern International astrogeodetic standard, the IERS Conventions (2010). However, statistically significant corrections have been found for some harmonics of the lunisolar tide-generating potential. For example, the correction to the real part of the Love number h for the wave K 1 with a frequency of 1 cpsd has turned out to be Δ h R = -0.0142 ± 0.0006, which may be indicative of a deeper resonance than that predicted by the theory in the region of diurnal tides.

  2. A VLBI experiment using a remote atomic clock via a coherent fibre link.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Ambrosini, Roberto; Artz, Thomas; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bortolotti, Claudio; Frittelli, Matteo; Levi, Filippo; Mura, Alberto; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Nanni, Mauro; Negusini, Monia; Perini, Federico; Roma, Mauro; Stagni, Matteo; Zucco, Massimo; Calonico, Davide

    2017-02-01

    We describe a VLBI experiment in which, for the first time, the clock reference is delivered from a National Metrology Institute to a radio telescope using a coherent fibre link 550 km long. The experiment consisted of a 24-hours long geodetic campaign, performed by a network of European telescopes; in one of those (Medicina, Italy) the local clock was alternated with a signal generated from an optical comb slaved to a fibre-disseminated optical signal. The quality of the results obtained with this facility and with the local clock is similar: interferometric fringes were detected throughout the whole 24-hours period and it was possible to obtain a solution whose residuals are comparable to those obtained with the local clock. These results encourage further investigation of the ultimate VLBI performances achievable using fibre dissemination at the highest precision of state-of-the-art atomic clocks.

  3. A VLBI variance-covariance analysis interactive computer program. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Y.

    1980-01-01

    An interactive computer program (in FORTRAN) for the variance covariance analysis of VLBI experiments is presented for use in experiment planning, simulation studies and optimal design problems. The interactive mode is especially suited to these types of analyses providing ease of operation as well as savings in time and cost. The geodetic parameters include baseline vector parameters and variations in polar motion and Earth rotation. A discussion of the theroy on which the program is based provides an overview of the VLBI process emphasizing the areas of interest to geodesy. Special emphasis is placed on the problem of determining correlations between simultaneous observations from a network of stations. A model suitable for covariance analyses is presented. Suggestions towards developing optimal observation schedules are included.

  4. A VLBI experiment using a remote atomic clock via a coherent fibre link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clivati, Cecilia; Ambrosini, Roberto; Artz, Thomas; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bortolotti, Claudio; Frittelli, Matteo; Levi, Filippo; Mura, Alberto; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Nanni, Mauro; Negusini, Monia; Perini, Federico; Roma, Mauro; Stagni, Matteo; Zucco, Massimo; Calonico, Davide

    2017-02-01

    We describe a VLBI experiment in which, for the first time, the clock reference is delivered from a National Metrology Institute to a radio telescope using a coherent fibre link 550 km long. The experiment consisted of a 24-hours long geodetic campaign, performed by a network of European telescopes; in one of those (Medicina, Italy) the local clock was alternated with a signal generated from an optical comb slaved to a fibre-disseminated optical signal. The quality of the results obtained with this facility and with the local clock is similar: interferometric fringes were detected throughout the whole 24-hours period and it was possible to obtain a solution whose residuals are comparable to those obtained with the local clock. These results encourage further investigation of the ultimate VLBI performances achievable using fibre dissemination at the highest precision of state-of-the-art atomic clocks.

  5. A VLBI experiment using a remote atomic clock via a coherent fibre link

    PubMed Central

    Clivati, Cecilia; Ambrosini, Roberto; Artz, Thomas; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bortolotti, Claudio; Frittelli, Matteo; Levi, Filippo; Mura, Alberto; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Nanni, Mauro; Negusini, Monia; Perini, Federico; Roma, Mauro; Stagni, Matteo; Zucco, Massimo; Calonico, Davide

    2017-01-01

    We describe a VLBI experiment in which, for the first time, the clock reference is delivered from a National Metrology Institute to a radio telescope using a coherent fibre link 550 km long. The experiment consisted of a 24-hours long geodetic campaign, performed by a network of European telescopes; in one of those (Medicina, Italy) the local clock was alternated with a signal generated from an optical comb slaved to a fibre-disseminated optical signal. The quality of the results obtained with this facility and with the local clock is similar: interferometric fringes were detected throughout the whole 24-hours period and it was possible to obtain a solution whose residuals are comparable to those obtained with the local clock. These results encourage further investigation of the ultimate VLBI performances achievable using fibre dissemination at the highest precision of state-of-the-art atomic clocks. PMID:28145451

  6. The Software Correlator of the Chinese VLBI Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Weimin; Quan, Ying; Shu, Fengchun; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Weihua; Wang, Guangli

    2010-01-01

    The software correlator of the Chinese VLBI Network (CVN) has played an irreplaceable role in the CVN routine data processing, e.g., in the Chinese lunar exploration project. This correlator will be upgraded to process geodetic and astronomical observation data. In the future, with several new stations joining the network, CVN will carry out crustal movement observations, quick UT1 measurements, astrophysical observations, and deep space exploration activities. For the geodetic or astronomical observations, we need a wide-band 10-station correlator. For spacecraft tracking, a realtime and highly reliable correlator is essential. To meet the scientific and navigation requirements of CVN, two parallel software correlators in the multiprocessor environments are under development. A high speed, 10-station prototype correlator using the mixed Pthreads and MPI (Massage Passing Interface) parallel algorithm on a computer cluster platform is being developed. Another real-time software correlator for spacecraft tracking adopts the thread-parallel technology, and it runs on the SMP (Symmetric Multiple Processor) servers. Both correlators have the characteristic of flexible structure and scalability.

  7. JPL VLBI Analysis Center Report for 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the JPL VLBI Analysis Center for the year 2012. The highlight of the year was the successful MSL rover Mars landing, which was supported by VLBI-based navigation using our combined spacecraft, celestial reference frame, terrestrial reference frame, earth orientation, and planetary ephemeris VLBI systems. We also supported several other missions with VLBI navigation measurements. A combined NASA-ESA network was demonstrated with first Ka-band fringes to ESA's Malargue, Argentina 35 m. We achieved first fringes with our new digital back end and Mark 5C recorders.

  8. The celestial reference frame defined by VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Shaffer, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    VLBI currently produces the most accurate positions of celestial objects. From 1979 to 1987, 114 extragalactic radio sources have been observed with dual-frequency Mark III VLBI as part of the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project and the NGS POLARIS/IRIS program. The formal statistical errors of conventional celestial coordinates are as small as 0.3 milliarcseconds. The fundamental quantity measured by VLBI is the arc length between radio sources. Thus, it is suggested that VLBI be used to establish a coordinate reference frame based solely on radio positions, and that this system not necessarily be coupled to right ascension and declination.

  9. Global geodetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Claude; Pearlman, Mike; Sarti, Pierguido

    2015-01-01

    Global geodetic observatories (GGO) play an increasingly important role both for scientific and societal applications, in particular for the maintenance and evolution of the reference frame and those applications that rely on the reference frame for their viability. The International Association of Geodesy (IAG), through the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), is fully involved in coordinating the development of these systems and ensuring their quality, perenniality and accessibility. This paper reviews the current role, basic concepts, and some of the critical issues associated with the GGOs, and advocates for their expansion to enhance co-location with other observing techniques (gravity, meteorology, etc). The historical perspective starts with the MERIT campaign, followed by the creation of international services (IERS, IGS, ILRS, IVS, IDS, etc). It provides a basic definition of observing systems and observatories and the build up of the international networks and the role of co-locations in geodesy and geosciences and multi-technique processing and data products. This paper gives special attention to the critical topic of local surveys and tie vectors among co-located systems in sites; the agreement of space geodetic solutions and the tie vectors now place one of the most significant limitations on the quality of integrated data products, most notably the ITRF. This topic focuses on survey techniques, extrapolation to instrument reference points, computation techniques, systematic biases, and alignment of the individual technique reference frames into ITRF. The paper also discusses the design, layout and implementation of network infrastructure, including the role of GGOS and the benefit that would be achieved with better standardization and international governance.

  10. Comparison of GNSS (EUREF) and VLBI (EVGA) tropospheric delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Söhne, Wolfgang; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    The troposphere is the main contributor of noise and systematic errors in the analysis of space-geodetic techniques at radio frequencies, such as GNSS and VLBI. Nevertheless, if sufficiently understood, the troposphere may provide a common parameter space for the combined analysis and may thus play an important role for the International Association of Geodesy's (IAG) Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). With tropospheric parameters we denote the group of parameters associated with the modeling of the dry and wet constituents of the non-dispersive atmosphere, namely tropospheric delays and tropospheric gradients. Among those parameters, tropospheric delays have been used to measure and model atmospheric water vapor, a key parameter of the greenhouse effect and a driving factor for various climate feedback mechanisms, which is usually insufficiently observed by other meteorological techniques. Besides climate implications, the tropospheric delays provide a valuable basis for checking the consistency of individual contributions to a combined product (intra- as well as inter-technique-related). Various authors have determined and compared tropospheric delays among the space-geodetic techniques, but remaining discrepancies could not yet be completely assessed and explained. Our investigations are concerned with a closer look on the tropospheric delays obtained at European stations, which are associated with the European Reference Frame (EUREF) and the European part of the International Very Long Baseline Interferometry Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), called European VLBI Group for Geodesy and Astrometry (EVGA). Since 2012, time series of differences between the EUREF combined solution and the IVS combined solution are displayed on the EUREF Permanent Network's (EPN) webpage for nine stations at co-located sites (http://www.epncb.oma.be), covering the period from 1996 to present. Having in mind that interpolation due to different sampling rates is applied

  11. Orbit determination of highly elliptical Earth orbiters using VLBI and delta VLBI measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frauenholz, R. B.; Ellis, J.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) data acquired by the deep space network to navigate highly elliptical Earth orbiting satellites was shown. The navigation accuracy improvements achievable with VLBI and delta VLBI data types are determined for comparison with the Doppler capability. The sensitivity of the VLBI navigation accuracy to the baseline orientation relative to the orbit plane and the effects of major error sources such as gravitational harmonics and atmospheric are examined. It is found that VLBI measurements perform as well as strategies using conventional Doppler, while substantially reducing the required antenna support.

  12. Applying Kalman filtering to investigate tropospheric effects in VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Benedikt; Nilsson, Tobias; Karbon, Maria; Heinkelmann, Robert; Liu, Li; Lu, Cuixian; Andres Mora-Diaz, Julian; Raposo-Pulido, Virginia; Xu, Minghui; Schuh, Harald

    2014-05-01

    account the errors due to the atomic clocks at the stations, the troposphere, and white noise processes. The simulated data as well as actual observational data from the two-week CONT11 campaign are analyzed using the Kalman filter, focusing on the tropospheric effects. The results of the different strategies are compared with solutions applying the classical least-squares method. An advantage of the Kalman filter is the possibility of easily integrating additional external information. It is expected that by including tropospheric delays from GNSS, water vapor radiometers, or ray-traced delays from numerical weather prediction models, the accuracy of the VLBI solution could be improved.

  13. Geodetic measurement of deformation in California. Ph.D. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne

    1989-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements made in the western U.S. since 1979 as part of the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project provide discrete samples of the temporal and spatial deformation field. The interpretation of the VLBI-derived rates of deformation requires an examination of geologic information and more densely sampled ground-based geodetic data. In the first two of three related studies, triangulation and trilateration data measured on two regional networks, one in the central Mojave Desert and one in the Coast Ranges east of the San Andreas fault, have been processed. At the spatial scales spanned by these local geodetic networks, auxiliary geologic and geophysical data have been utilized to examine the relation between measured incremental strain and the accommodation of strain seen in local geological structures, strain release in earthquakes, and principal stress directions inferred from in situ measurements. In a third study, the geocentric position vectors from a set of 77 VLBI experiments beginning in October 1982 have been used to estimate the tangential rate of change of station positions in the western U.S. in a North-America-Fixed reference frame.

  14. VERA Geodetic Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jike, Takaaki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Shizugami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    This report briefly describes the geodetic activities of VERA in the year 2012. The regular geodetic observations are carried out both in K- and S/X-bands. The frequency of regular observations is three times a month-twice for the VERA internal observations in K-band. The networks of the S/X sessions are JADE of GSI and IVS-T2. The raw data of the T2 and JADE sessions are electronically transferred to the Bonn, Haystack, and GSI correlators via Internet. Gravimetric observations are carried out at the VERA stations. An SG was installed at Mizusawa and placed in the vicinity of the VERA antenna in order to monitor vertical displacement at the end of 2008, and the observations continued throughout the year. Also at the VERA-Ishigakijima station, continuous operation of the SG started in 2012. The crustal movements generated by the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku continued during 2012, and displacement of the VERA-Mizusawa position by post-seismic creeping continued.

  15. The African VLBI network project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loots, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The AVN is one of the most significant vehicles through which capacity development in Africa for SKA participation will be realized. It is a forerunner to the long baseline Phase 2 component of the mid-frequency SKA. Besides the 26m HartRAO telescope in South Africa, Ghana is expected to be the first to establish a VLBI-capable telescope through conversion of a redundant 32m telecommunications system near Accra. The most widely used receivers in the EVN are L-band and C-band (5 GHz). L-band is divided into a low band around the hydrogen (HI) line frequency of 1420 MHz, and a high band covering the hydroxyl line frequencies of 1612-1720 MHz. The high band is much more commonly used for VLBI as it provides more bandwidth. For the AVN, the methanol maser line at 6668 MHz is a key target for the initial receiver and the related 12178MHz methanol maser line also seen in star-forming regions a potential future Ku-band receiver. In the potential future band around 22GHz(K-band), water masers in star-forming regions and meg-maser galaxies at 22.235 GHz are targets, as are other radio continuum sources such as AGNs. The AVN system will include 5GHz and 6.668GHz receiver systems with recommendation to partner countries that the first upgrade should be L-band receivers. The original satellite telecommunications feed horns cover 3.8 - 6.4 GHz and should work at 5 GHz and operation at 6.668 GHz for the methanol maser is yet to be verified. The first light science will be conducted in the 6.7 GHz methanol maser band. Telescopes developed for the AVN will initially join other global networks for VLBI. When at least four VLBI-capable telescopes are operational on the continent, it will be possible to initiate stand-alone AVN VLBI. Each country where an AVN telescope becomes operational will have its own single-dish observing program. Capacity building to run an observatory includes the establishment of competent core essential observatory staff in partner countries who can train

  16. Ein eingebettetes Expertensystem zur Automatisierung der VLBI-Auswertung %t An embedded expert system for the automation of the VLBI data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwegmann, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Since its first application in the seventies geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry has become an important technique for geodesy, astronomy and geophysics. The goal of this thesis is the design and implementation of a system to automate the entire VLBI analysis procedure. On the one hand this allows to close the gap between the time of observation and the availability of results, on the other hand the few existing experts will be relieved from their routine burdens. To achieve this, knowledge-based methods from the field of research of artificial intelligence are used. An Intelligent Assistant for Data Analysis in VLBI (IADA) is developed as an embedded expert system. The term "embedded" is of particular interest, because embedding expert systems in the existing data processing environment is critical for the success of such a system. Embedding IADA in the existing analysis software by building a powerful interface guarantees the automation of the whole VLBI analysis procedure. The strong connection between the existing analysis software and the expert system developed here is an important contribution of the thesis, because generally expert systems suffer from the missing connections to the existing data processing environment.

  17. VLBI clock synchronization. [for atomic clock rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential accuracy of VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) for clock epoch and rate comparisons was demonstrated by results from long- and short-baseline experiments. It was found that atomic clocks at widely separated sites (several thousand kilometers apart) can be synchronized to within several nanoseconds from a few minutes of VLBI observations and to within one nanosecond from several hours of observations.

  18. SAI VLBI Analysis Center Report 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zharov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the SAI VLBI Analysis Center activities during 2012 and the plans for 2013. The SAI AC analyzes all IVS sessions for computations of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP) and time series of the ICRF source positions and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  19. Complex Demodulation in Monitoring Earth Rotation by VLBI: Testing the Algorithm by Analysis of Long Periodic EOP Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgosz, A.; Brzeziński, A.; Böhm, S.

    2016-12-01

    The complex demodulation (CD) algorithm is an efficient tool for extracting the diurnal and subdiurnal components of Earth rotation from the routine VLBI observations (Brzeziński, 2012). This algorithm was implemented by Böhm et al (2012b) into a dedicated version of the VLBI analysis software VieVs. The authors processed around 3700 geodetic 24-hour observing sessions in 1984.0-2010.5 and estimated simultaneously the time series of the long period components as well as diurnal, semidiurnal, terdiurnal and quarterdiurnal components of polar motion (PM) and universal time UT1. This paper describes the tests of the CD algorithm by checking consistency of the low frequency components of PM and UT1 estimated by VieVS CD and those from the IERS and IVS combined solutions. Moreover, the retrograde diurnal component of PM demodulated from VLBI observations has been compared to the celestial pole offsets series included in the IERS and IVS solutions. We found for all three components a good agreement of the results based on the CD approach and those based on the standard parameterization recommended by the IERS Conventions (IERS, 2010) and applied by the IERS and IVS. We conclude that an application of the CD parameterization in VLBI data analysis does not change those components of EOP which are included in the standard adjustment, while enabling simultaneous estimation of the high frequency components from the routine VLBI observations. Moreover, we deem that the CD algorithm can also be implemented in analysis of other space geodetic observations, like GNSS or SLR, enabling retrieval of subdiurnal signals in EOP from the past data.

  20. COLD MAGICS - Continuous Local Deformation Monitoring of an Arctic Geodetic Fundamental Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Ruediger; Bergstrand, Sten

    2010-01-01

    We describe the experience gained in a project to continuously monitor the local tie at the Geodetic Observatory Ny-Alesund. A PC-controlled robotic total station was used to monitor survey prisms that were attached to survey pillars of the local network and the monuments used for geodetic VLBI and GNSS measurements. The monitoring lasted for seven days and had a temporal resolution of six minutes. The raw angle and distance measurements show clear sinusoidal signatures with a daily period, most strongly for a four-day period with 24 hours of sunshine. The derived topocentric coordinates of the survey prisms attached to the GNSS monument and the VLBI radio telescope act as approximation for the local tie. We detect clear signatures at the mm-level. With the current approach we cannot distinguish between real motion of the prisms and potential thermal influences on the instrument used for the observations. However, the project shows that continuous local tie monitoring is feasible today and in the future can and should be used for all geodetic co-location stations.

  1. Suboceanic geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, F. N.

    1985-07-01

    This paper reviews the needs for geodetic ties among sea-floor points and between such points and others on land, as well as the environmental constraints on potential systems for making such measurements. Underwater acoustic techniques provide the best opportunities, and an essential element on which to build acoustic systems - a precision-transponder system capable of making travel-time measurements over ranges of several kilometers with an accuracy of a few microseconds - is described. Finally, three particular systems are discussed. One uses direct transmission between transponders to achieve an accuracy of 1 part in 100,000 over ranges from a few meters to about a kilometer. The second, using a larger transponder network and an intermediate vehicle, can achieve similar accuracy over ranges up to about 10 km. The third is a composite acoustic global positioning system (GPS) which should be able to achieve subdecimeter accuracy over ranges of a few hundred kilometers.

  2. Geodetic distance measuring apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.

    1980-12-01

    A geodetic distance measuring apparatus which compensates for the refractive index of the atmosphere is discussed. A mode locked laser system with a laser device and its peripheral components is utilized to derive two mutually phase locked optical wavelength signals and one phase locked microwave CW signal which respectively traverse the same distance measurement path. The optical signals are comprised of pulse type signals. Phase comparison of the two optical wavelength pulse signals is used to provide the dry air density while phase comparison of one of the optical wavelength pulse signals and the microwave CW signal issued to provide wet or water vapor density of the air. The distance to be measured corrected for the atmospheric dry air and water vapor densities in the measurement path is computed from these measurements. A time interval unit is included for measuring transit time of individual optical pulses for resolving the phase ambiguity needed with the phase measurements to give the true target distance.

  3. Efficient transformations from geodetic to UTM coordinate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Toms, R.M.

    1996-08-07

    The problem of efficiently performing transformations from geocentric to geodetic coordinates has been addressed at previous DIS (Distributed Interactive Simulation) workshops. This paper extends the work presented at the 14th DIS Workshop. As a consequence of the new algorithm for geocentric to geodetic coordinate conversion, a subsequent conversion to Universal Transverse Mercator coordinates is made considerably more efficient. No additional trigonometric or square root evaluations are required and accuracy is not degraded.

  4. Analysis of space geodetic measurements for studying the dynamics of the solid Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been an unprecedented improvement in both the accuracy and the temporal resolution of Earth rotation measurements. Determination of the position of the Earth's rotation axis both in inertial space and with respect to the crust with accuracies of about 0.3 milliarcseconds (mas) are now routine. In recent years, there has been an emphasis on the determination of short-period (daily and less) variations in Earth rotation. Two space based geodetic systems, very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and the global positioning system (GPS) have proved to be very successful in this endeavor. Results for the tidally coherent part of the subdaily Earth rotation variations determined from the analysis of VLBI data are discussed. The magnitude of other subdaily variations are also considered.

  5. Geodetic and Astrometric Measurements with Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry. Ph.D. Thesis - MIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations for the estimation of geodetic and astrometric parameters is discussed. Analytic models for the dependence of delay and delay rate on these parameters are developed and used for parameter estimation by the method of weighted least squares. Results are presented from approximately 15,000 delay and delay-rate observations, obtained in a series of nineteen VLBI experiments involving a total of five stations on two continents. The closure of baseline triangles is investigated and found to be consistent with the scatter of the various baseline-component results. Estimates are made of the wobble of the earth's pole and of the irregularities in the earth's rotation rate. Estimates are also made of the precession constant and of the vertical Love number, for which a value of 0.55 + or - 0.05 was obtained.

  6. Towards ICRF3:preparing the VLBI frame for future synergy with the Gaia frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlot, Patrick; Bourda, Géraldine

    2012-08-01

    The European space astrometric mission Gaia to be launched in 2013 will produce a QSO - based celestial reference frame with unprecedented position accuracy and sky density. By the end of the decade, two highly - accurate reference frames will thus cohabit, the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) derived from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data and the Gaia optical frame, both with individual source position accuracies below 100 microarcseconds. For consistency be tween optical and radio positions, it will be fundamental to align the two frames with the highest possible accuracy. This is important not only for continuity of celestial frames but also to exploit at best their synergies for astrophysics. The latter includes probing the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets properties and the physics of these objects by comparing the spatial location of the optical and radio emission re gions. The alignment between the VLBI and Gaia frames requires a large number of sources common to the two frames, i.e. radio - loud QSOs with position accurately known from both VLBI and Gaia. This implies that the sources must be brighter than magnitude 18 (so that their Gaia positions may be derived with the highest accuracy) and have compact VLBI structure on milliarcsecond scales (for highly - accurate VLBI positions). In this paper, we review the current source potential for this alignment based on the ICRF2 and an ongoing dedicated VLBI project aimed at finding additional weaker extragalactic radio sources for this purpose. We also stress that these sources must be monitored during the mission (especially their VLBI position stability and structure) in order to control their relevance for the alignment, and present the observations we envision to this end in the framework of the IVS and other VLBI networks.

  7. Homogenization of atmospheric pressure time series recorded at VLBI stations using a segmentation LASSO approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balidakis, Kyriakos; Heinkelmann, Robert; Lu, Cuixian; Soja, Benedikt; Karbon, Maria; Nilsson, Tobias; Glaser, Susanne; Andres Mora-Diaz, Julian; Anderson, James; Liu, Li; Raposo-Pulido, Virginia; Xu, Minghui; Schuh, Harald

    2015-04-01

    Time series of meteorological parameters recorded at VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) observatories allow us to realistically model and consequently to eliminate the atmosphere-induced effects in the VLBI products to a large extent. Nevertheless, this advantage of VLBI is not fully exploited since such information is contaminated with inconsistencies, such as uncertainties regarding the calibration and location of the meteorological sensors, outliers, missing data points, and breaks. It has been shown that such inconsistencies in meteorological data used for VLBI data analysis impose problems in the geodetic products (e.g vertical site position) and result in mistakes in geophysical interpretation. The aim of the procedure followed here is to optimally model the tropospheric delay and bending effects that are still the main sources of error in VLBI data analysis. In this study, the meteorological data recorded with sensors mounted in the vicinity of VLBI stations have been homogenized spanning the period from 1979 until today. In order to meet this objective, inhomogeneities were detected and adjusted using test results and metadata. Some of the approaches employed include Alexandersson's Standard Normal Homogeneity Test and an iterative procedure, of which the segmentation part is based on a dynamic programming algorithm and the functional part on a LASSO (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator) estimator procedure. For the provision of reference time series that are necessary to apply the aforementioned methods, ECMWF's (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-Interim reanalysis surface data were employed. Special care was taken regarding the datum definition of this model. Due to the significant height difference between the VLBI antenna's reference point and the elevation included in geopotential fields of the specific numerical weather models, a hypsometric adjustment is applied using the absolute pressure level from the WMO

  8. The "Quasar" Network Observations in e-VLBI Mode Within the Russian Domestic VLBI Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, Andrey; Ipatov, Alexander; Kaidanovsky, Michael; Bezrukov, Ilia; Mikhailov, Andrey; Salnikov, Alexander; Surkis, Igor; Skurikhina, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the Russian VLBI "Quasar" Network is to carry out astrometrical and geodynamical investigations. Since 2006 purely domestic observational programs with data processing at the IAA correlator have been carried out. To maintain these geodynamical programs e-VLBI technology is being developed and tested. This paper describes the IAA activity of developing a real-time VLBI system using high-speed digital communication links.

  9. The Tropospheric Products of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinkelmann, Robert; Schwatke, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The IVS runs two tropospheric products: The IVS tropospheric parameter rapid combination monitors the zenith wet delay (ZWD) and zenith total delay (ZTD) of the rapid turnaround sessions R1 and R4. Goal of the combination is the identification and the exclusion of outliers by comparison and the assessment of the precision of current VLBI solutions in terms of tropospheric parameters. The rapid combination is done on a weekly basis four weeks after the observation files are released on IVS Data Centers. Since tropospheric and geodetic parameters, such as vertical station components, can significantly correlate, the consistency of the ZTD can be a measure of the consistency of the corresponding TRF as well. The ZWD mainly rely on accurate atmospheric pressure data. Thus, besides estimation techniques, modeling and analyst s noise, ZWD reflects differences in the atmospheric pressure data applied to the VLBI analysis. The second product, called tropospheric parameter long-term combination, aims for an accurate determination of climatological signals, such as trends of the atmospheric water vapor observed by VLBI. Therefore, the long-term homogeneity of atmospheric pressure data plays a crucial role for this product. The paper reviews the methods applied and results achieved so far and describes the new maintenance through DGFI.

  10. Direct estimation of tidally induced Earth rotation variations observed by VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englich, S.; Heinkelmann, R.; BOHM, J.; Schuh, H.

    2009-09-01

    The subject of our study is the investigation of periodical variations induced by solid Earth tides and ocean tides in Earth rotation parameters (ERP: polar motion, UT1)observed by VLBI. There are two strategies to determine the amplitudes and phases of Earth rotation variations from observations of space geodetic techniques. The common way is to derive time series of Earth rotation parameters first and to estimate amplitudes and phases in a second step. Results obtained by this means were shown in previous studies for zonal tidal variations (Englich et al.; 2008a) and variations caused by ocean tides (Englich et al.; 2008b). The alternative method is to estimate the tidal parameters directly within the VLBI data analysis procedure together with other parameters such as station coordinates, tropospheric delays, clocks etc. The purpose of this work was the application of this direct method to a combined VLBI data analysis using the software packages OCCAM (Version 6.1, Gauss-Markov-Model) and DOGSCS (Gerstl et al.; 2001). The theoretical basis and the preparatory steps for the implementation of this approach are presented here.

  11. The NASA VLBI2010 Proof-of-Concept Demonstration and Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niell, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    The next generation geodetic VLBI instrument is being developed with a goal of 1 mm position uncertainty in twenty-four hours. We have implemented a proof-of-concept system for a possible VLBI2010 signal chain, from feed through recorder, on the Westford (Massachusetts, USA) 18-m and MV-3 (Maryland, USA) 5-m antennas. Data have been obtained in four 512 MHz bands spanning the range 3.5 to 11 GHz to investigate the sensitivity and phase delay capability of the system. Using a new phase cal design, the phases have been aligned across four bands spanning 2 GHz with an RMS deviation of approximately eight degrees. Several components of the system will be improved for the prototype version of VLBI2010, including the feed, digital backend, and recorder, and these will be installed on a 12-m antenna that has been purchased and is ready for installation at the Goddard Space Flight Center outside of Washington, D.C., USA, site of the MV-3 antenna.

  12. Determination of nutation offsets by combining VLBI/GPS-produced normal equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, Maria; Lambert, Sebastien; Dehant, Veronique; Bruyninx, Carine

    2010-05-01

    Longstanding routing operation of individual geodetic space- and ground-based techniques (like, for instance, VLBI, GNSS, LLR, etc.) revealed their strong and weak aspects. More effective use of these strengths as well as reduction of their weaknesses is possible by incorporating of the information collected by each individual technique into combined products. Such a consistent combination can be performed either by combination at the observational level or at the level of normal equations. We concentrate on the combination of normal equations gathered during VLBI/GPS-data processing. The main goal of this combination is to construct a time series of nutation offsets in the most consistent way. The objective of this presentation is to describe the developed strategy of combination and to present the current status of tits implementation. For the purpose of step-by-step validation of our procedure we use two-month-long time series of normal equations produced from VLBI and GPS observations by means of CALC/SOLVE and BERNESE v.5.0 software, respectively. Earth orientation parameter determination will, in our procedure, benefit from angle and rate observation for a unique estimation.

  13. Influence of ocean tides on the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation variations from VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, V. S.; Kurdubov, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    The International astrogeodetic standard IERS Conventions (2010) contains a model of the diurnal and semidiurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERPs), the pole coordinates and the Universal Time, arising from lunisolar tides in the world ocean. This model was constructed in the mid-1990s through a global analysis of Topex/Poseidon altimetry. The goal of this study is to try to estimate the parameters of this model by processing all the available VLBI observations on a global network of stations over the last 35 years performed within the framework of IVS (International VLBI Service) geodetic programs. The complexity of the problemlies in the fact that the sought-for corrections to the parameters of this model lie within 1 mm and, thus, are at the limit of their detectability by all currently available methods of ground-based positional measurements. This requires applying universal software packages with a high accuracy of reduction calculations and a well-developed system of controlling the simultaneous adjustment of observational data to analyze long series of VLBI observations. This study has been performed with the QUASAR software package developed at the Institute of Applied Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Although the results obtained, on the whole, confirm a high accuracy of the basic model in the IERS Conventions (2010), statistically significant corrections that allow this model to be refined have been detected for some harmonics of the ERP variations.

  14. VLBI2010 in NASA's Space Geodesy Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 20 11 NASA approved the proposal for the Space Geodesy Project (SGP). A major element is developing at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory a prototype of the next generation of integrated stations with co-located VLBI, SLR, GNSS and DORIS instruments as well as a system for monitoring the vector ties. VLBI2010 is a key component of the integrated station. The objectives ofSGP, the role of VLBI20 lOin the context of SGP, near term plans and possible future scenarios will be discussed.

  15. Consistent height transformations between geodetic and meteorologic reference systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiger, T.; Boehm, J.; Boy, J.; Foster, J. H.; Gegout, P.; Haas, R.; Ichikawa, R.; MacMillan, D. S.; Ming, S.; Niell, A. E.; Nievinski, F. G.; Nordman, M.; Salstein, D. A.; Santos, M. C.; Schindelegger, M.; van Dam, T. M.; Vedel, H.; Wickert, J.; Zus, F.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical weather models (NWMs) contain valuable information that is relevant for removing the environmental signal from geodetic data. Currently no clear documentation exists regarding how to deal with the coordinate systems when carrying out the calculations in a geodetic reference frame. A "conventional" transformation model (available also as source code) would enable geodesists to handle such data easily and allow them to use data from different meteorologic data-sets. In addition, geodetic products such as GNSS derived zenith total delays are being assimilated into NWMs. Thus, the transformations that convert the meteorological data into a geodetic reference frame should also support the use of geodetic data in meteorological models. The IAG Intercomission Committee on Theory - Special Study Group 12 "Coordinate systems in numerical weather models" has been set-up to 1) deal with the differences between geodetic and meteorologic reference systems and 2) provide consistent models for transforming between the two systems. We present the first product from this effort: a conventional height transformation that transforms between ellipsoidal heights and the various height systems used in NWMs. We will discuss the choice of the gravity model, which is crucial for such a transformation, and we will present the final model that the study group believes best describes the transformation in an unambiguous and bi-directional sense.

  16. Kashima and Koganei 11-m VLBI Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Ichikawa, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Two 11-m VLBI antennas at Kashima and Koganei are continuously operated and maintained by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). This report summarizes the status of these antennas, the staff, and the activities in 2012.

  17. Earth Rotation Parameters from DSN VLBI: 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steppe, J. A.; Oliveau, S. H.; Sovers, O. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, Earth Rotation Parameter (ERP) estimates ahve been obtained from an analysis of Deep Space Network (DSN) VLBI data that directly aligns its celestial and terrestrial reference frames with those of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS).

  18. Updated Deep Space Communications Complex VLBI Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, R.; Rogstad, S.; Goodhart, C. E.; Sigman, E.; Soriano, M.; Wang, D.; White, Leslie A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.

    JPL VLBI Data Acquisition Modernization Program has two Current Purposes with two different recording systems. One for Radio Reference Frame and Time & Earth Motion Observations - Uses MarkIV formatters and Mark5A recorders. One for Double Differential One Way Ranging for spacecraft tracking - Uses Wideband VLBI Science Receiver. We are currently working on a new modernized system to merge functions into one new hardware platform. It will replace the current MarkIV, PCFS and Mark5-A equipment. The new system will be called the JPL Deep Space Communications Complex VLBI Processor (DVP) It is based on hardware development at JPL, NRAO and Haystack. It uses a JPL designed digitizer and the CASPER ROACH board to perform digital backend processing: sampling, channelization, formatting. It uses Mark5C disk units to record data. It aims for compatibility with other VLBI centers recording equipment while conforming to JPL DSN system interface requirements.

  19. New state-of-the art geodetic observatory on the way in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opseth, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    The new state-of-the-art observatory that the Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA/Kartverket) is establishing in Ny-Aalesund, Svalbard will be a part of a global network that allows us to monitor the Earth system. In this paper we will present the value of precise measurements, the need for an infrastructure of continuously operating reference stations and software that take advantage of the infrastructure, and the value of international cooperation. NMA has a long history in operating and maintaining GNSS networks, and distributing of GNSS augmentation data. Since the first permanent GPS station was installed in 1987 we have established a network of more than 160 continuously operating reference stations (CORE) in Norway. The geodetic infrastructure, including a network of tide gauges around the Norwegian coastline, levelling and gravity measurements, allows us to establish a high-precision national network and to measure local sea-level changes of a couple of millimetres per year. NMA operates the space geodetic observatory at Ny-Aalesund, Svalbard, which now includes among others, a VLBI antenna and several GPS and GLONASS receivers. NMA is in the process of upgrading the observatory in Ny-Aalesund to a core network station within the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). This means to adapt to the VLBI2010 standard and to extend our activity to integrate Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). The construction will take five years from the start of work until the antennas are ready in 2018. Even though Norway and a few other countries are already working to upgrade their geodetic observatories, however, these efforts will not be sufficient to secure global coverage. The UN Committee of Expert on Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM) is accordingly paying growing attention to geodetic observation. Work in this committee could lead to an UN resolution on global geodetic collaboration. A UN mandate could encourage a number of other countries to make a

  20. VLBI survey at 2. 29 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Morabito, D.D.; Williams, J.G.; Faulkner, J.; Jauncey, D.L.

    1985-09-01

    VLBI observations at 2.29 GHz with fringe spacings of about 3 milliarcsec have been performed on 1398 radio sources spread over the entire sky. 917 sources were detected, including 93 percent of the identified BL Lacertae objects, 86 percent of the quasars, and 36 percent of the galaxies. The resulting catalog of compact radio sources is useful for various astrophysical studies and in the formation of VLBI celestial reference frames. 252 references.

  1. Automated ambiguity estimation for VLBI Intensive sessions using L1-norm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareinen, Niko; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2016-12-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a space-geodetic technique that is uniquely capable of direct observation of the angle of the Earth's rotation about the Celestial Intermediate Pole (CIP) axis, namely UT1. The daily estimates of the difference between UT1 and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) provided by the 1-h long VLBI Intensive sessions are essential in providing timely UT1 estimates for satellite navigation systems and orbit determination. In order to produce timely UT1 estimates, efforts have been made to completely automate the analysis of VLBI Intensive sessions. This involves the automatic processing of X- and S-band group delays. These data contain an unknown number of integer ambiguities in the observed group delays. They are introduced as a side-effect of the bandwidth synthesis technique, which is used to combine correlator results from the narrow channels that span the individual bands. In an automated analysis with the c5++ software the standard approach in resolving the ambiguities is to perform a simplified parameter estimation using a least-squares adjustment (L2-norm minimisation). We implement L1-norm as an alternative estimation method in c5++. The implemented method is used to automatically estimate the ambiguities in VLBI Intensive sessions on the Kokee-Wettzell baseline. The results are compared to an analysis set-up where the ambiguity estimation is computed using the L2-norm. For both methods three different weighting strategies for the ambiguity estimation are assessed. The results show that the L1-norm is better at automatically resolving the ambiguities than the L2-norm. The use of the L1-norm leads to a significantly higher number of good quality UT1-UTC estimates with each of the three weighting strategies. The increase in the number of sessions is approximately 5% for each weighting strategy. This is accompanied by smaller post-fit residuals in the final UT1-UTC estimation step.

  2. Results of the Huygens VLBI experiment and outlook for VLBI support for future missions to outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Avruch, I. M.; Huygens VLBI Team

    Very Long Baseline Interferomtery (VLBI), a radio astronomy technique that offers the highest angular resolution and sensitivity, has progressed rapidly over the last years. It offers now a sub-kilometre-scale accuracy of position determination for weak transmitters at the distance of up to ten AU with minimal requirements for the composition of on-board instrumentation. Being combined with other advanced tracking techniques (such as DeltaDOR and two-way Doppler measurements), it brings about a possibility to conduct a variety of planetary science experiments with unprecedented accuracy. The VLBI technique was demonstrated for the Huygens Probe during its descent in the atmosphere and on the surface of Titan. Results of this experiment - the Probe descent trajectory reconstruction and diagnostics of the parachute motion - will be presented. Similar experiments are being considered for a number of prospective planetary missions under the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 Programme. In this review presentation we will discuss the basic principles of VLBI tracking of planetary missions and major specifications for the on-board and Earth-based segments of VLBI tracking experiments. We will also describe several potential applications of this technique for various experiments in the interest of atmosphere physics, geodynamics and other planetary science disciplines. Another attractive potential of the technique links it with the general mission support as an efficient diagnostic and navigation tool. In addition, Earth-based radio astronomy arrays might be considered as a receiving element for Direct-to-Earth transmission of mission-critical information from low-power planetary mission transmitters.

  3. The current state of the creation and modernization of national geodetic and cartographic resources in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doskocz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    All official data are currently integrated and harmonized in a spatial reference system. This paper outlines a national geodetic and cartographic resources in Poland. The national geodetic and cartographic resources are an important part of the spatial information infrastructure in the European Community. They also provide reference data for other resources of Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI), including: main and detailed geodetic control networks, base maps, land and buildings registries, geodetic registries of utilities and topographic maps. This paper presents methods of producing digital map data and technical standards for field surveys, and in addition paper also presents some aspects of building Global and Regional SDI.

  4. Mobile radio interferometric geodetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Niell, A. E.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.; Morabito, D. D.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (ARIES) in a proof of concept mode is discussed. Accuracy demonstrations over a short baseline, a 180 km baseline, and a 380 km baseline are documented. Use of ARIES in the Sea Slope Experiment of the National Geodetic Survey to study the apparent differences between oceanographic and geodetic leveling determinations of the sea surface along the Pacific Coast is described. Intergration of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System and a concept called SERIES (Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) is briefly reviewed.

  5. Shuttle VLBI experiment. Technical working group summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, S. H. (Editor); Roberts, D. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The gain in interferometric resolution of extragalactic sources at radio frequencies which can be achieved by placing a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) antenna in space is quantitatively described and a VLBI demonstration experiment using a large deployable antenna, which if realized could be a very acceptable first venture for VLBI in space is discussed. A tutorial on VLBI, a summary of the technology available for the experiment, and a preliminary mission scenario are included.

  6. DSN Network e-VLBI Calibration of Earth Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Liwei Dennis; Steppe, A.; Lanyi, G.; Jacobs, C.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the calibration of the Earth's orientation by using the Deep Space Network (DSN) e Very Large Base Integration (VLBI). The topics include: 1) Background: TEMPO; 2) Background: UT1 Knowledge Error; 3) e-VLBI: WVSR TEMPO Overview; 4) e-VLBI: WVSR TEMPO Turnaround; 5) e-VLBI: WVSR TEMPO R&D Tests; and 6) WVSR TEMPO Test Conclusion.

  7. Polarimetric VLBI with the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Lu, R.; Wardle, J. F.; EHT Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope is a collaboration to observe the innermost accretion and outflow regions around supermassive black holes with an array of millimeter-wavelength telescopes. EHT observations have detected emission on scales of tens of microarcseconds around the black holes in the center of the Milky Way and M87. Non-polarimetric measurements have successfully been used to identify and model the Schwarzschild-radius-scale emission around these sources as well as to identify previously unresolvable structures in more distant AGNs and blazars, but new polarimetric data can provide additional information on the magnetic field strength and geometry in the jet launch and collimation region. Recent full-polarization VLBI observations with the EHT have detected polarized 1.3 mm emission arising on extremely small angular scales in a variety of extragalactic sources. We report on the results of these detections and detail the prospects for precision polarimetry thanks to the substantial EHT sensitivity improvements that will be realized over the next few years.

  8. US Space VLBI Proposed Outreach Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The study of how VLBI might be pursued in space began in the late 1970's, when it was realized that the size of the earth was a serious limitation to the study of compact radio sources. By going to space, achieving angular resolution at radio wavelengths that could not be obtained with VLBI systems that were limited by the size of the earth, important tests could not be made of quasar models. The technology appeared to be within reach, and an early space VLBI concept, QUASAT, emerged as a joint project, involving both US and European scientists. In 1984, a workshop was held in Gross Enzerdorf, Austria, under joint sponsorship of NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). The principal conclusion of the workshop was that a VLBI station in space, telemetering its data to ground data stations, working in connection with ground-based radio telescopes, would give the opportunity to achieve angular resolution of a few tens of micro-arc-seconds, and could develop high-quality radio maps of many classes of radio sources. The ground telemetry stations would also function as the source of a stable local oscillator for the spacecraft, which needs a highly stable frequency reference. The Deep Space Network of NASA could play a vital role in both the frequency-locking system and data acquisition. One outcome of the Gross Enzerdorf workshop was the convening, by COSPAR, of an ad hoc Committee on Space VLBI, to review and recommend procedures by which international collaboration on VLBI in space might be coordinated and promoted. In October 1985, the committee met in Budapest and recommended that the Inter-Agency Consultative Group (IACG) would be an appropriate body to coordinate VLBI activities in space. At the same time ESA convened a committee to explore the technical aspects of coordinating ground and space VLBI activities. At this stage both NASA and ESA were supporting preliminary studies of the QUASAT mission, with effective coordination between the two groups. The Soviet

  9. Postseismic Transient after the 2002 Denali Fault Earthquake from VLBI Measurements at Fairbanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacMillan, Daniel; Cohen, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The VLBI antenna (GILCREEK) at Fairbanks, Alaska observes in networks routinely twice a week with operational networks and on additional days with other networks on a more uneven basis. The Fairbanks antenna position is about 150 km north of the Denali fault and from the earthquake epicenter. We examine the transient behavior of the estimated VLBI position during the year following the earthquake to determine how the rate of change of postseismic deformation has changed. This is compared with what is seen in the GPS site position series.

  10. Global and regional kinematics with VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    1994-01-01

    Since a VLBI station cannot operate in isolation and since simultaneous operation of the entire VLBI network is impractical, it is necessary to design observing programs with periodic observing sessions using networks of 3-7 stations that, when treated together, will have the necessary interstation data and network overlaps to determine the desired rates of change. Thus, there has been a mix of global, intercontinental, transcontinental, and regional networks to make measurements ranging from plate motions to deformation over a few hundred km. Over time, even networks focusing on regional deformation using mobile VLBI included large stations removed by several thousand km to increase sensitivity, determine EOP more accurately, and provide better ties to the terrestrial reference frame (TRF). Analysis products have also evolved, beginning with baseline components, and then to full three-dimensional site velocities in a global TRF.

  11. Computational Imaging for VLBI Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Katherine L.; Johnson, Michael D.; Zoran, Daniel; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Freeman, William T.

    2016-03-01

    Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is a technique for imaging celestial radio emissions by simultaneously observing a source from telescopes distributed across Earth. The challenges in reconstructing images from fine angular resolution VLBI data are immense. The data is extremely sparse and noisy, thus requiring statistical image models such as those designed in the computer vision community. In this paper we present a novel Bayesian approach for VLBI image reconstruction. While other methods often require careful tuning and parameter selection for different types of data, our method (CHIRP) produces good results under different settings such as low SNR or extended emission. The success of our method is demonstrated on realistic synthetic experiments as well as publicly available real data. We present this problem in a way that is accessible to members of the community, and provide a dataset website (vlbiimaging.csail.mit.edu) that facilitates controlled comparisons! across algorithms.

  12. Designing the Next Generation Global Geodetic Network for GGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, Erricos C.; Kuzmicz-Cieslak, Magdalena; König, Daniel; MacMillan, Daniel S.

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. National Research Council report "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure: National Requirements for a Shared Resource" (2010) recommended that we 'make a long-term commitment to maintain the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) to ensure its continuity and stability'. It further determined that to ensure this, a network of about ~30 globally distributed "core" observatories with state of the art equipment was necessary and should be deployed over the next decade or so. The findings were based on simulation studies using conceptual networks where Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) equipment of the next generation quality were deployed and operated 24/7. Since then, GGOS—the Global Geodetic Observing System, has embarked in an international effort to organize this future network, soliciting contributions from around the world, through an open solicitation "Call for Proposals—CfP". After a critical number of proposals were received, the results were evaluated and a data base was established where the likely sites are ranked in terms of the available equipment, local environment and weather, probability of completion and the relevant date, etc. The renewal process is expected to evolve smoothly over many years, from the current (legacy) state to the next generation ("GGOS-class") equipment. In order to design the optimal distribution of the proposed sites and to determine any gaps in the final network, simulations have been called for again, only this time the site locations are identical to those listed in the compiled data base, and the equipment at each site is in accordance to what is described in the data base for each point in time. The main objective of the simulations addresses the quality of the ITRF product from a network we expect to have in place about five and ten years after the NRC report (2016/2020). A secondary but equally important simulation task is the study of trade-offs when deploying new

  13. Geosynchronous orbiter tracking by VLBI - Demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donivan, F. F., Jr.; Border, J. S.; Moultrie, B.

    1984-08-01

    Results are presented on two experiments which were designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tracking geosynchronous satellites to an accuracy of 5 meters using Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). A communications relay satellite located over the mid-Pacific was observed using baselines between California, Australia and Guam Island. Differential VLBI observations between the satellite and angularly nearby extragalactic radio sources were used to measure the position of the satellite in the plane of the sky. Post-fit residuals to the adjusted trajectory were obtained which correspond to less than 10 meters in one dimension of the satellite position.

  14. Geosynchronous orbiter tracking by VLBI - Demonstration results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donivan, F. F., Jr.; Border, J. S.; Moultrie, B.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented on two experiments which were designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tracking geosynchronous satellites to an accuracy of 5 meters using Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). A communications relay satellite located over the mid-Pacific was observed using baselines between California, Australia and Guam Island. Differential VLBI observations between the satellite and angularly nearby extragalactic radio sources were used to measure the position of the satellite in the plane of the sky. Post-fit residuals to the adjusted trajectory were obtained which correspond to less than 10 meters in one dimension of the satellite position.

  15. Space VLBI telecommunication characteristics, protection criteria, and frequency sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.; Bishop, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    A brief description of the technical characteristics of space VLBI is made, emphasizing the VLBI cross-correlation process. The signal-to-noise ratio of the cross-correlation process should be maintained as large as possible for the duration of the observation. Protection of this process from unwanted interference is a primary objective. The telecommunication radio links required in a space VLBI system are identified and characterized. Maximum bandwidths are suggested, as well as the minimum carrier frequencies required for the telemetering and the phase-transfer radio links. Planned space VLBI system models-Radioastron (Russia), VLBI Space Observatory Project (VSOP) (Japan), and the DSN orbiting VLBI subnet. (United States)--are taken as a baseline to determine the interference criteria. It is concluded that existing interference criteria for near-Earth research satellites are suitable for the protection of the space VLBI systems planned.

  16. Geodetic monitoring of tectonic deformation: Toward a strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Issues of interest and importance to society and science are presented. The problems considered are of national concern; their solutions may contribute to a better understanding of tectonic deformation and earthquake hazards. The need for additional field data, the role of geodetic measurements, the importance of both ground and space techniques, and the need for advanced instrumentation development are discussed.

  17. Analysis of Regional Deformations In Asia and North America Using Vlbi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Ma, C.; Luk, P. H.; Shum, C. K.

    Based on the NASA VLBI global solutions glb1123 (Ma, 1999) and glb2001(Ma, 2001), the vertical deformation rates (VDR) of the Kashima and Kashima34 VLBI stations in Japan were re-analysed using the rates of baseline length change from Kashima to 27 global VLBI stations, and from Kashima34 to 12 stations. The velocity vectors of the global VLBI stations were referenced to different ITRFs, i.e., ITRF96, ITRF97 and ITRF2000 for solution sensitivity studies. Using the Eulerian vectors (Sil- laed et al., 1998, Zhang et al., 1999) and based on NNR-NUVEL-1A, the correspond- ing horizontal deformation rates (HDR) of these two stations were also computed and analyzed. The VDR of Kashima34 relative to Kashima is estimated to be -4.2 +/- 0.7 mm/year, and the corresponding HDR of these two stations is 0.9 +/- 0.7 mm/year with AZ at 351.9 +/- 34.2 degrees. To validate the estimated relative deformation rates obtained above, baseline rates of the Kashima and Kashima34 stations relative to 9 common global VLBI stations, and baseline rates relative to 10 stations (9 stations plus Mojave12) have been determined to show that the similar conclusions have been reached. The 9 stations are DSS45 (Tidbinbilla, Australia), Hobert26 (Tasmania, Aus- tralia), Fairbanks (Gilmore Creek, Alaska, USA), Westford (USA), Hartebeesthoek (South Africa), Kauai (Hawaii, USA), Matera (Italy), Seshan25 (Shanghai, China), and Wettzell (Germany); and the additional station used is Mojave12 (USA). We have obtained the averaged relative VDR and HDR between the two stations separated by 300 m as -3.8 +/- 0.8 mm/year, 1.4 +/- 0.8 mm/year with AZ at 336.2 +/- 28.6 de- grees. In addition, the deformation rate of Shanghai, San Francisco, Yuma, Mojave12 and SC-VLBA station regional baselines are analyzed using a similar method and re- sults discussed. In conclusion, the rates of VLBI baseline lengths can be used to accu- rately determine the regional to fine-scale baseline deformations using existing VLBI

  18. EOP and scale from continuous VLBI observing: CONT campaigns to future VGOS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    Continuous (CONT) VLBI campaigns have been carried out about every 3 years since 2002. The basic idea of these campaigns is to acquire state-of-the-art VLBI data over a continuous time period of about 2 weeks to demonstrate the highest accuracy of which the current VLBI system is capable. In addition, these campaigns support scientific studies such as investigations of high-resolution Earth rotation, reference frame stability, and daily to sub-daily site motions. The size of the CONT networks and the observing data rate have increased steadily since 1994. Performance of these networks based on reference frame scale precision and polar motion/LOD comparison with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) earth orientation parameters (EOP) has been substantially better than the weekly operational R1 and R4 series. The precisions of CONT EOP and scale have improved by more than a factor of two since 2002. Polar motion precision based on the WRMS difference between VLBI and GNSS for the most recent CONT campaigns is at the 30 μ as level, which is comparable to that of GNSS. The CONT campaigns are a natural precursor to the planned future VLBI observing networks, which are expected to observe continuously. We compare the performance of the most recent CONT campaigns in 2011 and 2014 with the expected performance of the future VLBI global observing system network using simulations. These simulations indicate that the expected future precision of scale and EOP will be at least 3 times better than the current CONT precision.

  19. Orbit determination of Tance-1 satellite using VLBI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Hu, X. G.; Huang, C.; Jiang, D. R.

    2006-01-01

    On 30 December, 2003, China successfully launched the first satellite Tance-1 of Chinese Geospace Double Star Exploration Program, i.e. "Double Star Program (DSP)", on an improved Long March 2C launch vehicle. The Tance-1 satellite is operating at an orbit around the earth with a 550km perigee, 78000km apogee and 28.5 degree inclination.VLBI technique can track Tance-1 satellite or even far satellites such as lunar vehicles. To validate the VLBI technique in the on-going Chinese lunar exploration mission, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) organized to track the Tance-1 satellite with Chinese three VLBI stations: Shanghai, Kunming and Urumchi Orbit Determination (OD) of the Tance-1 satellite with about two days VLBI dada, and the capability of OD with VLBI data are studied. The results show that the VLBI-based orbit solutions improve the fit level over the initial orbit. The VLBI-delay-based orbit solution shows that the RMS of residuals of VLBI delay data is about 5.5m, and about 2.0cm/s for the withheld VLBI delay rate data. The VLBI-delay-rate-based orbit solution shows that the RMS of residuals of VLBI delay rate data is about 1.3cm/s, and about 29m for the withheld VLBI delay data. In the situation of orbit determination with VLBI delay and delay rate data with data sigma 5.5m and 1.3cm/s respectively, the RMS of residuals are 5.5,m and 2.0cm/s respectively. The simulation data assess the performance of the solutions. Considering the dynamic model errors of the Tance-1 satellite, the accuracy of the position is about km magnitude, and the accuracy of the velocity is about cm/s magnitude. The simulation work also show the dramatic accuracy improvement of OD with VLBI and USB combined.

  20. Estimation of nutation rates from combination of ring laser and VLBI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tercjak, M.; Böhm, J.; Brzeziński, A.; Gebauer, A.; Klügel, T.; Schreiber, U.; Schindelegger, M.

    2015-08-01

    Ring laser gyroscopes (RLG) are instruments measuring inertial rotations locally and in real-time without the need for an external reference system. They are sensitive to variations in the instantaneous rotation vector, therefore they are considered as a potential complement to space geodetic techniques for studying Earth rotation. In this work we examine the usability of ring laser observations for estimation of nutation rates. We investigate possibilities of computing those parameters from only one ring laser and we simulate the usage of several instruments. We also combine simulated RLG observations with actual Very Long Baseline Interferometry VLBI data and compare them with real Wettzell RLG data. Our results attest to the theoretical possibility of estimating nutation rates, albeit with a number of restrictive assumptions.

  1. The Mark 5C VLBI Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan; Ruszczyk, Chester; Romney, Jon; Owens, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Mark 5C disk-based VLBI data system is being developed as the third-generation Mark 5 disk-based system, increasing the sustained data-recording rate capability to 4 Gbps. It is built on the same basic platform as the Mark 5A, Mark 5B and Mark 5B+ systems and will use the same 8-disk modules as earlier Mark 5 systems, although two 8-disk modules will be necessary to support the 4 Gbps rate. Unlike its earlier brethren, which use proprietary data interfaces, the Mark 5C will accept data from a standard 10 Gigabit Ethernet connection and be compatible with the emerging VLBI Data Interchange Format (VDIF) standard. Data sources for the Mark 5C system will be based on new digital backends now being developed, specifically the RDBE in the U.S. and the dBBC in Europe, as well as others. The Mark 5C system is being planned for use with the VLBI2010 system and will also be used by NRAO as part of the VLBA sensitivity upgrade program; it will also be available to the global VLBI community from Conduant. Mark 5C system specification and development is supported by Haystack Observatory, NRAO, and Conduant Corporation. Prototype Mark 5C systems are expected in early 2010.

  2. Sheshan VLBI Station Report for 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Bo; Shen, Zhiqiang; Hong, Xiaoyu; Fan, Qingyuan

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the observing activities at the Sheshan station (SESHAN25) in 2012. It includes international VLBI observations for astrometry, geodesy, and astrophysics and domestic observations for satellite tracking. We also report on updates and on development of the facilities at the station.

  3. The New Generation Russian VLBI Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkelstein, Andrey; Ipatov, Alexander; Smolentsev, Sergey; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Fedotov, Leonid; Surkis, Igor; Ivanov, Dmitrij; Gayazov, Iskander

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a new project of the Russian VLBI Network dedicated for Universal Time determinations in quasi on-line mode. The basic principles of the network design and location of antennas are explained. Variants of constructing receiving devices, digital data acquisition system, and phase calibration system are specially considered. The frequency ranges and expected values of noise temperature are given.

  4. Earth Rotation Parameters from DSN VLBI: 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steppe, J. A.; Oliveau, S. H.; Sovers, O. J.

    1996-01-01

    A despcription of the DSN VLBI data set and of most aspects of the data analysis can be found in the IERS Technical Note 17, pp. R-19 to R-32 (see also IERS Technical Note 19, pp. R-21 to R-27). The main changes in this year's analysis form last year's are simply due to including another year's data.

  5. High-precision VLBI astrometry of radio-emitting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestrade, J.-F.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.; Phillips, R. B.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Titus, M. A.; Rioja, M. J.; Gabuzda, D. C.

    1999-04-01

    Multiple-epoch phase-referenced VLBI observations of 11 radio-emitting stars have been conducted as part of an astrometric program to link the Hipparcos optical reference frame to the radio extragalactic reference frame. We present the VLBI positions, proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes from this program in the ICRF (International Celestial Reference Frame). These astrometric parameters are absolute because they are directly measured relative to the distant quasars used as VLBI phase reference calibrators. The mean astrometric precision achieved relative to the calibrators is 0.36 milliarcsecond and the highest precision is for the RS CVn close binary sigma (2) CrB with formal uncertainties of 0.12 milliarcsecond for its relative position, 0.05 milliarcsecond for its annual proper motion and 0.10 milliarcsecond for its trigonometric parallax. In addition to the Hipparcos link, these observations have provided several new results. The distance to the nearby Tau-Auriga star forming region is 148 +/- 5 pc, determined directly through the VLBI trigonometric parallax of the Pre-Main-Sequence star HD283447 of this region. The orthogonality of the 2 orbital planes in the ternary system Algol is supported by new astrometric evidences. The proper motions of HR5110, HR1099 and IM Peg, regarded as possible guide stars for the NASA Gravity Probe B space mission, have formal precisions of 0.16, 0.31 and 0.40 milliarcsecond per year, respectively, and the mission requirement is 0.15 milliarcsecond per year. The close binary UX Ari is the only star that exhibits an acceleration larger than 3sigma and the most plausible cause is the gravitational interaction of a third body. The distances of the stars HD199178, IM Peg and AR Lac were uncertain by as much as 50% before our observations and are now 116 +/- 4, 97 +/- 6, 41.7 +/- 0.6 pc, respectively. The two X-ray binaries in our program, LSI61303 and Cyg X1, exhibit larger than expected post-fit position residuals. The

  6. Tracking of Mars Express and Venus Express spacecraft with VLBI radio telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Wagner, J.; Cimò, G.; Gurvits, L.; Duev, D.

    2010-12-01

    along the up- and down-link paths as seen from different VLBI stations through different Fresnel channels. We also demonstrated high accuracy S/C Doppler tracking with 3 EVN stations (Metsähovi, Wettzell and Yebes) during the MEX-Phobos flyby, which occurred on 2010 march 03. These multi-station observing sessions could help to better determine the Phobos gravity field and together with phase referencing provide additional geometrical constrains on the orbiter/Phobos trajectories. VEX S/C signal detection with four VLBI antennae (23/08/2010).

  7. A VLBI baseline post-adjustment approach for station velocity estimation in Eurasian continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Baseline lengths and their time-derivatives among 58 geodetic VLBI stations were fitted by using 4439 observing sessions from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). First, the velocities of eight stations in Eurasian continent were set as unknown quantities. Then, two standard global solutions from 3523 IVS sessions and 1110 sessions from database code XA, respectively, were applied prior to all-station coordinates and the non-estimated station velocities. Finally, from the relations among the coordinates, velocities, baseline length and its time-derivative, two types of baseline post-adjustment (BPA) were used to estimate the velocities of the eight stations. We discuss the data processing details, including the effect of different prior values for the stations and the optimal solution. The results suggest that the precision of the station velocities based on the proposed approach is comparable to that of the global solution of the XA sessions. The baseline structure and the prior values of the stations affect the velocity estimates. Compared to the standard method of velocity estimation, there are no external constrains and conditions used in the proposed method.

  8. Site velocities before and after the Loma Prieta and Gulf of Alaska earthquakes determined from VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    We use geodetic data from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) to determine the pre- and postseismic velocities of two sites. We then place limits on variations in interseismic strain buildup. The 1987 and 1988 Gulf of Alaska earthquakes (each Ms = 7.6) broke the Pacific plate interior. During the earthquakes the Cape Yakataga site moved 78 mm toward southwest. During the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (Ms = 7.1) the Fort Ord site moved 48 mm toward north. Baselines (a) from Fairbanks to Cape Yakataga and (b) from Mojave to Fort Ord change at nearly the same rate before and after the earthquakes. Postseismic transients, which we determine from differences between post- and preseismic rates, are minor: at Cape Yakataga the transient is 3 +/- 4 mm in a postseismic interval of 23 months, and at Fort Ord the transient is 6 +/- 5 mm in 21 months. The slip beneath the Loma Prieta rupture needed to generate the Fort Ord transient is 0.22 +/- 0.19 m, one-tenth the coseismic slip (2 m). We analyze elastic lithosphere-viscous asthenosphere models to determine that the characteristic time describing exponential decay in deep fault slip is longer than 6 years. The VLBI measurements are consistent with uniform interseismic strain buildup. They disagree with fast postseismic rates caused by an asthenosphere with very low viscosity.

  9. Single baseline GLONASS observations with VLBI: data processing and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornatore, V.; Haas, R.; Duev, D.; Pogrebenko, S.; Casey, S.; Molera Calvés, G.; Keimpema, A.

    2011-07-01

    Several tests to observe signals transmitted by GLONASS (GLObal NAvigation Satellite System) satellites have been performed using the geodetic VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) technique. The radio telescopes involved in these experiments were Medicina (Italy) and Onsala (Sweden), both equipped with L-band receivers. Observations at the stations were performed using the standard Mark4 VLBI data acquisition rack and Mark5A disk-based recorders. The goals of the observations were to develop and test the scheduling, signal acquisition and processing routines to verify the full tracking pipeline, foreseeing the cross-correlation of the recorded data on the baseline Onsala-Medicina. The natural radio source 3c286 was used as a calibrator before the starting of the satellite observation sessions. Delay models, including the tropospheric and ionospheric corrections, which are consistent for both far- and near-field sources are under development. Correlation of the calibrator signal has been performed using the DiFX software, while the satellite signals have been processed using the narrow band approach with the Metsaehovi software and analysed with a near-field delay model. Delay models both for the calibrator signals and the satellites signals, using the same geometrical, tropospheric and ionospheric models, are under investigation to make a correlation of the satellite signals possible.

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. Nutation determination by means of GNSS - Comparison with VLBI .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.; Yao, K.

    2014-12-01

    Space geodetic techniques cannot be used for a direct determination of the nutation offsets due to deficiencies in the modeling of the satellite orbits. However, as shown first by Rothacher et al. 1999 and then Weber and Rothacher (2001), GPS can be used to estimate the time derivatives of nutation quantities, similarly to what is done on a regular basis for UT1-UTC rates (or LOD) estimation. We have revisited the potential of GNSS observations for nutation estimation with the high precision currently achieved by this technique. The computations have been carried out by means of a new software, which has been developed in Matlab in the framework of K. Yao's PhD (2013), based on the GPS observations analysis strategy of CNES-GRGS GINS software, but with a few specific characteristics. The reference system for orbit computations is different from that generally used in order to minimize the influence of the a priori values of precession-nutation and UT1-UTC. The method is based on the determination of the time derivatives of the GCRS CIP coordinates (X, Y) with high temporal resolution. The observations used are 3 years of GPS measurements from 1 January 2009, obtained from a dense and globally distributed reference station network. The Xdot and Ydot time series so obtained are then analyzed in order to determine the corrections to the amplitudes of the short periodic terms of the IAU 2000 nutation model. The methodology, time series and results of this analysis are compared with those obtained from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of extragalactic radio sources.

  12. Multiwavelength VLBI observations of Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, R.-S.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Eckart, A.; König, S.; Kunneriath, D.; Witzel, G.; Witzel, A.; Zensus, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The compact radio, NIR, and X-ray source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), associated with the super massive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, has been studied with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations performed on 10 consecutive days and at mm-wavelength. Aims: Sgr A* varies in the radio through X-ray bands and occasionally shows rapid flux density outbursts. We monitor Sgr A* with VLBI, aiming at the detection of related structural variations on the submilliarcsecond scale and variations of the flux density occurring after NIR-flares. Methods: We observed Sgr A* with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 3 frequencies (22, 43, 86 GHz) on 10 consecutive days in May 2007 during a global multiwaveband campaign. From this we obtained accurate flux densities and sizes of the VLBI structure, which is partially resolved at mm-wavelength. Results: The total VLBI flux density of Sgr A* varies from day to day. The variability is correlated at the 3 observing frequencies with higher variability amplitudes appearing at the higher frequencies. For the modulation indices, we find 8.4% at 22 GHz, 9.3% at 43 GHz, and 15.5% at 86 GHz. The radio spectrum is inverted between 22 and 86 GHz, suggesting inhomogeneous synchrotron self-absorption with a turnover frequency at or above 86 GHz. The radio spectral index correlates with the flux density, which is harder (more inverted spectrum) when the source is brighter. The average source size (FWHM) does not appear to be variable over the 10-day observing interval. However, we see a tendency for the sizes of the minor axis to increase with increasing total flux, whereas the major axis remains constant. Towards higher frequencies, the position angle of the elliptical Gaussian increases, indicative of intrinsic structure, which begins to dominate the scatter broadening. At cm-wavelength, the source size varies with wavelength as λ2.12±0.12, which is interpreted as the result of interstellar scatter broadening

  13. VLBI height corrections due to gravitational deformation of antenna structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, P.; Negusini, M.; Abbondanza, C.; Petrov, L.

    2009-12-01

    From an analysis of regional European VLBI data we evaluate the impact of a VLBI signal path correction model developed to account for gravitational deformations of the antenna structures. The model was derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods applied to telescopes at Medicina and Noto in Italy. We find that the model corrections shift the derived height components of these VLBI telescopes' reference points downward by 14.5 and 12.2 mm, respectively. No other parameter estimates nor other station positions are affected. Such systematic height errors are much larger than the formal VLBI random errors and imply the possibility of significant VLBI frame scale distortions, of major concern for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) and its applications. This demonstrates the urgent need to investigate gravitational deformations in other VLBI telescopes and eventually correct them in routine data analysis.

  14. Design Aspects of the VLBI2010 System - Progress Report of the IVS VLBI2010 Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrachenko, Bill; Niell, Arthur; Behrend, Dirk; Corey, Brian; Boehm, Johannes; Chralot, Patrick; Collioud, Arnaud; Gipson, John; Haas, Ruediger; Hobiger, Thomas; Koyama, Yasuhiro; MacMillan, Dan; Malkin, Zinvoy; Nilsson, Tobias; Pany, Andrea; Tuccari, Gino; Whitney, Alan; Wresnik, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in developing the next generation VLBI system, dubbed the VLBI2010 system. The VLBI2010 Committee of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) worked on the design aspects of the new system. The report covers Monte Carlo simulations showing the impact of the new operating modes on the final products. A section on system considerations describes the implications for the VLBI2010 system parameters by considering the new modes and system-related issues such as sensitivity, antenna slew rate, delay measurement error. RF1, frequency requirements, antenna deformation, and source structure corrections_ This is followed by a description of all major subsystems and recommendations for the network, station. and antenna. Then aspects of the feed, polarization processing. calibration, digital back end, and correlator subsystems are covered. A section is dedicated to the NASA. proof-of-concept demonstration. Finally, sections tm operational considerations, on risks and fallback options, and on the next steps complete the report.

  15. Aligning VLBI and Gaia Extragalactic Celestial Reference Frames: source selection scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Charlot, Patrick; Collioud, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The European space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical celestial reference frame based on Quasi Stellar Objects. Accordingly, by 2020, two extragalactic celestial reference frames will coexist: the VLBI frame (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) in the radio domain, currently adopted by the IAU as the fundamental one, and the Gaia frame determined from direct optical observations of quasars by the satellite.For consistency between optical and radio positions of any celestial targets, it will be fundamental to align the Gaia and VLBI frames with the highest accuracy. This issue is also important in the framework of astrophysics, for example to probe properly the jets properties and the physics of the Active Galactic Nuclei.In this paper, based on the ICRF2 catalogue (International Celestial Reference Frame) and specific dedicated VLBI projects (e.g. designed to observe additional weaker extragalactic radio sources), we will discuss the selection of the VLBI-Gaia transfer sources, present our initiatives to reach this alignment, review the status of the various projects in question and draw plans for the future.

  16. Plans for an accurate alignment of the VLBI frame and the future Gaia frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourda, G.; Charlot, P.

    2012-12-01

    The European space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be fundamental to align the Gaia and VLBI frames with the highest accuracy. A proper alignment is also important in the framework of astrophysics, for example to probe properly the AGN jets properties and the physics of these objects. The VLBI-Gaia frame alignment requires quasars that are bright at optical wavelength, that have a compact radio core, and that do not exhibit complex structures. In this paper, we draw prospects for this alignment, based on the ICRF2 catalogue and an ongoing dedicated VLBI project designed to observe additional weaker extragalactic radio sources for this purpose. The list of suitable sources will have to be monitored to check the relevance of the sources for the alignment, especially in terms of position stability and structures. Accordingly, we present the observations we envision in the framework of the IVS and other VLBI networks, before and during the Gaia mission.

  17. Concepts for VLBI Station Control as Part of NEXPReS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Schönberger, M.; Alef, W.; Himwich, E.; Beaudoin, C.; Plötz, C.; Lovell, J.; Hase, H.

    2012-12-01

    In the Novel EXploration Pushing Robust e-VLBI Services-project (NEXPReS) the Technische Universität München (TUM) realizes concepts for continuous quality monitoring and station remote control in cooperation with the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn. NEXPReS is a three-year project, funded within the European Seventh Framework program. It is aimed to develop e-VLBI services for the European VLBI Network (EVN), which can also support the IVS observations (VLBI2010). Within this project, the TUM focuses on developments of an operational remote control system (e-RemoteCtrl) with authentication and authorization. It includes an appropriate role management with different remote access states for future observation strategies. To allow a flexible control of different systems in parallel, sophisticated graphical user interfaces are designed and realized. The software is currently under test in the new AuScope network, Australia/New Zealand. Additional system parameters and information are collected with a new system monitoring (SysMon) for a higher degree of automation, which is currently under preparation for standardization within the IVS Monitoring and Control Infrastructure (MCI) Collaboration Group. The whole system for monitoring and control is fully compatible with the NASA Field System and extends it.

  18. Multi-frequency imaging in VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhachev, S.

    The new technique, multi-frequency imaging ( MFI) is developed. In VLBI, Multi-Frequency Imaging (MFI) consists of multi-frequency synthesis (MFS) and multi-frequency analysis (MFA) of the VLBI data obtained from observations on various frequencies. A set of linear deconvolution MFI algorithms is described. The algorithms make it possible to obtain high quality images interpolated on any given frequency inside any given bandwidth, and to derive reliable estimates of spectral indexes for radio sources with continuum spectrum. Thus MFI approach makes it is possible not only to improve the quality and fidelity of the images and also essentially to derive the morphology of the observed radio sources. (astro-ph/0412470)

  19. Monitoring of Earth Rotation by VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma., Chopo; Macmillan, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring Earth rotation with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) has unique potential because of direct access to the Celestial Reference System (CRF and Terrestrial Reference System (TRF) and the feasibility of re-analyzing the entire data set. While formal precision of better than 0.045 mas for pole and 0.002 ms for UT 1 has been seen in the best 24-hr data, the accuracy of the Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) time series as a whole is subject to logistical, operational, analytical and conceptual constraints. The current issues related to the VLBI data set and the CORE program for greater time resolution such as analysis consistency, network jitter and reference frame stability will be discussed.

  20. Radio VLBI and the quantum interference paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-12-01

    We address here the question of interference of radio signals from astronomical sources like distant quasars, in a very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), where two (or more) distantly located radio telescopes (apertures), receive a simultaneous signal from the sky. In an equivalent optical two-slit experiment, it is generally argued that for the photons involved in the interference pattern on the screen, it is not possible, even in principle, to know which of the two slits a particular photon went through and that any procedure to ascertain this destroys the interference pattern. But in the case of the modern radio VLBI, it is a routine matter to record the phase and amplitude of the voltage outputs from the two radio antennas on a recording media separately and then do the correlation between the two recorded signals later in an off-line manner. Does this not violate the quantum interference principle? We provide a resolution of this problem here.

  1. SAND: Automated VLBI imaging and analyzing pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The Search And Non-Destroy (SAND) is a VLBI data reduction pipeline composed of a set of Python programs based on the AIPS interface provided by ObitTalk. It is designed for the massive data reduction of multi-epoch VLBI monitoring research. It can automatically investigate calibrated visibility data, search all the radio emissions above a given noise floor and do the model fitting either on the CLEANed image or directly on the uv data. It then digests the model-fitting results, intelligently identifies the multi-epoch jet component correspondence, and recognizes the linear or non-linear proper motion patterns. The outputs including CLEANed image catalogue with polarization maps, animation cube, proper motion fitting and core light curves. For uncalibrated data, a user can easily add inline modules to do the calibration and self-calibration in a batch for a specific array.

  2. Spacecraft Doppler tracking with a VLBI antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comoretto, G.; Iess, L.; Bertotti, B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Horton, T.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from Doppler-shift measurements to the Voyager-2 spacecraft at a distance of 26 AU, obtained using the 32-m VLBI antenna at Medicina (Italy) during July and August 1988. The apparatus comprises the el-az antenna, an S-X-band receiver, a hydrogen maser to generate the reference signal, a Mark III VLBI terminal, and a digital tone extractor capable of isolating a tone of known frequency from a noisy signal and giving its phase and amplitude. A signal transmitted in S-band from the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) station in Australia and retransmitted coherently in X-band by Voyager, was received 7 h 6 min later at Medicina and at the DSN station in Madrid. Sample data are presented graphically and shown to be of generally high quality; further in-depth analysis is under way.

  3. Multiband VLBI Observations of CTA102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantakyro, F. T.; Baath, L. B.; Dallacasa, D.; Jones, D. L.; Wehrle, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    The source CTA102, known to exhibit low frequency variability, has been observed at six epochs (three at lambda 32 cm, two at lambda 18 cm, and one at lambda l.3 cm) with intercontinental VLBI arrays. On the basis of the changes observed in the structure, we believe that the flux density variations at these wavelengths are due to intrinsic processes and not due to interstellar scintillation. This source exhibits behaviour suggestive of being expanding with a very high apparent transverse velocity.

  4. Comparison of VLBI TRF solutions based on Kalman filtering and recent ITRS realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Benedikt; Nilsson, Tobias; Glaser, Susanne; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Karbon, Maria; Heinkelmann, Robert; Gross, Richard; Schuh, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Compared to previous prominent global terrestrial reference frames (TRF) solutions, such as the ITRF2008 or DTRF2008, the current accuracy requirements demand among other things extended parameterization to account for various non-linear signals present in the time series of station coordinates. The next generation of TRFs, built upon geodetic data until the end of 2014, employs different approaches to tackle in particular seasonal variations and post-seismic deformations. The ITRF2014, developed at the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) Combination Center (CC) at Institut Géographique National, introduces harmonic, exponential and logarithmic functions to take into account aforementioned effects. In contrast, the ITRS realization of the IERS CC at Jet Propulsion Laboratory is based on Kalman filtering, which allows coordinate variations to be modeled in a stochastic sense besides the parameterized linear and seasonal signals. In our study, we compare these multi-technique TRFs with solutions solely based on VLBI data, including 104 radio telescopes and 4239 VLBI sessions, covering a time span of 34 years. We calculated a VLBI TRF based on the traditional least-squares adjustment of session-wise normal equations, and an ensemble of Kalman filter and smoother solutions with different parameterizations and stochastic models. In particular, we investigate the impact of different process noise levels for station coordinates, the choice of stochastic processes, e.g. random walks, and the application of time- and station-dependent noise models. For instance, we find that the estimation of seasonal signals, while important for predictions, does not affect the filtered coordinate time series when observational data is available. Furthermore, post-seismic deformations after major earthquakes require the process noise to be scaled accordingly. For instance, we detected coordinate differences of up to 5 cm immediately after the Chile 2010

  5. The East-Asian VLBI Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajima, K.; Hagiwara, Y.; An, T.; Baan, W. A.; Fujisawa, K.; Hao, L.; Jiang, W.; Jung, T.; Kawaguchi, N.; Kim, J.; Kobayashi, H.; Oh, S.-J.; Roh, D.-G.; Wang, M. Wu, Y.; Xia, B.; Zhang, M.

    2016-02-01

    The East-Asian VLBI Network (EAVN) is the international VLBI facility in East Asia and is conducted in collaboration with China, Japan, and Korea. The EAVN consists of VLBI arrays operated in each East Asian country, containing 21 radio telescopes and three correlators. The EAVN will be mainly operated at 6.7 (C-band), 8 (X-band), 22 (K-band), and 43 GHz (Q-band), although the EAVN has an ability to conduct observations at 1.6 - 129 GHz. We have conducted fringe test observations eight times to date at 8 and 22 GHz and fringes have been successfully detected at both frequencies. We have also conducted science commissioning observations of 6.7 GHz methanol masers in massive star-forming regions. The EAVN will be operational from the second half of 2017, providing complementary results with the FAST on AGNs, massive star-forming regions, and evolved stars with high angular resolution at cm- to mm-wavelengths.

  6. ATS C-2 satellite VLBI experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramasastry, J.; Rosenbaum, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    A proposal is presented to conduct a satellite VLBI experiment using the ATS C-2 spacecraft. The main objectives of the experiment are: (1) precision spacecraft position determination with the VLBI technique and comparison of the L-band interferometric technique with the L-band R and R technique from the viewpoint of operational simplicity and precision, (2) comparison of the single differential Doppler and the wideband VLBI technique for such uses as tracking, geodesy, etc., (3) derivation of real time ionospheric corrections and phase scintillation effects utilizing simultaneous two-frequency (L- and C-band) tracking of the spacecraft in both time delay and Doppler interferometry, (4) development of techniques for precise time dissemination, particularly to marine users, through wideband time-delay interferometry, (5) development of techniques to use synchronous satellites as stable platforms in space in the area of marine geodesy, (6) station location and calibration, and (7) aid to L-band navigation experiments which utilize precise spacecraft position and time in deriving the user's position.

  7. Measurements of strain at plate boundaries using space based geodetic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robaudo, Stefano; Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have used the space based geodetic techniques of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and VLBI to study strain along subduction and transform plate boundaries and have interpreted the results using a simple elastic dislocation model. Six stations located behind island arcs were analyzed as representative of subduction zones while 13 sites located on either side of the San Andreas fault were used for the transcurrent zones. The length deformation scale was then calculated for both tectonic margins by fitting the relative strain to an exponentially decreasing function of distance from the plate boundary. Results show that space-based data for the transcurrent boundary along the San Andreas fault help to define better the deformation length scale in the area while fitting nicely the elastic half-space earth model. For subduction type bonndaries the analysis indicates that there is no single scale length which uniquely describes the deformation. This is mainly due to the difference in subduction characteristics for the different areas.

  8. Southern California Permanent GPS Geodetic Array: Continuous measurements of regional crustal deformation between the 1992 Landers and 1994 Northridge earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bock, Y.; Wdowinski, S.; Fang, P.; Zhang, Jiahua; Williams, S.; Johnson, H.; Behr, J.; Genrich, J.; Dean, J.; Van Domselaar, M.; Agnew, D.; Wyatt, F.; Stark, K.; Oral, B.; Hudnut, K.; King, R.; Herring, T.; Dinardo, S.; Young, W.; Jackson, D.; Gurtner, W.

    1997-01-01

    The southern California Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) was established in 1990 across the Pacific-North America plate boundary to continuously monitor crustal deformation. We describe the development of the array and the time series of daily positions estimated for its first 10 sites in the 19-month period between the June 28, 1992 (Mw=7.3), Landers and January 17, 1994 (Mw=6.7), Northridge earthquakes. We compare displacement rates at four site locations with those reported by Feigl et al. [1993], which were derived from an independent set of Global Positioning System (GPS) and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements collected over nearly a decade prior to the Landers earthquake. The velocity differences for three sites 65-100 km from the earthquake's epicenter are of order of 3-5 mm/yr and are systematically coupled with the corresponding directions of coseismic displacement. The fourth site, 300 km from the epicenter, shows no significant velocity difference. These observations suggest large-scale postseismic deformation with a relaxation time of at least 800 days. The statistical significance of our observations is complicated by our incomplete knowledge of the noise properties of the two data sets; two possible noise models fit the PGGA data equally well as described in the companion paper by Zhang et al. [this issue]; the pre-Landers data are too sparse and heterogeneous to derive a reliable noise model. Under a fractal white noise model for the PGGA data we find that the velocity differences for all three sites are statistically different at the 99% significance level. A white noise plus flicker noise model results in significance levels of only 94%, 43%, and 88%. Additional investigations of the pre-Landers data, and analysis of longer spans of PGGA data, could have an important effect on the significance of these results and will be addressed in future work. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. 1.3 mm WAVELENGTH VLBI OF SAGITTARIUS A*: DETECTION OF TIME-VARIABLE EMISSION ON EVENT HORIZON SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Beaudoin, Christopher; Bolin, David E.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Blundell, Ray; Gurwell, Mark A.; Moran, James M.; Primiani, Rurik; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Plambeck, Richard; Chamberlin, Richard; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Honma, Mareki; Oyama, Tomoaki; Inoue, Makoto; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Lamb, James; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2011-02-01

    Sagittarius A*, the {approx}4 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} black hole candidate at the Galactic center, can be studied on Schwarzschild radius scales with (sub)millimeter wavelength very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). We report on 1.3 mm wavelength observations of Sgr A* using a VLBI array consisting of the JCMT on Mauna Kea, the Arizona Radio Observatory's Submillimeter Telescope on Mt. Graham in Arizona, and two telescopes of the CARMA array at Cedar Flat in California. Both Sgr A* and the quasar calibrator 1924-292 were observed over three consecutive nights, and both sources were clearly detected on all baselines. For the first time, we are able to extract 1.3 mm VLBI interferometer phase information on Sgr A* through measurement of closure phase on the triangle of baselines. On the third night of observing, the correlated flux density of Sgr A* on all VLBI baselines increased relative to the first two nights, providing strong evidence for time-variable change on scales of a few Schwarzschild radii. These results suggest that future VLBI observations with greater sensitivity and additional baselines will play a valuable role in determining the structure of emission near the event horizon of Sgr A*.

  10. VLBI Observations of the Radio Jet in 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, S. C.; Davis, R. J.

    The authors present a new high dynamic range map of the quasar 3C 273, made from observations with a VLBI network of 12 telescopes. This new map at 18 cm wavelength has one of the highest dynamic ranges yet achieved with VLBI, and it shows the 'jet' extending to at least 180 milliarcsec, or 330 pc from the nucleus of the quasar.

  11. Remote Control and Monitoring of VLBI Experiments by Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruztort, C. H.; Hase, H.; Zapata, O.; Pedreros, F.

    2012-12-01

    For the remote control and monitoring of VLBI operations, we developed a software optimized for smartphones. This is a new tool based on a client-server architecture with a Web interface optimized for smartphone screens and cellphone networks. The server uses variables of the Field System and its station specific parameters stored in the shared memory. The client running on the smartphone by a Web interface analyzes and visualizes the current status of the radio telescope, receiver, schedule, and recorder. In addition, it allows commands to be sent remotely to the Field System computer and displays the log entries. The user has full access to the entire operation process, which is important in emergency cases. The software also integrates a webcam interface.

  12. GPU Based Software Correlators - Perspectives for VLBI2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Kimura, Moritaka; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Oyama, Tomoaki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Caused by historical separation and driven by the requirements of the PC gaming industry, Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved to massive parallel processing systems which entered the area of non-graphic related applications. Although a single processing core on the GPU is much slower and provides less functionality than its counterpart on the CPU, the huge number of these small processing entities outperforms the classical processors when the application can be parallelized. Thus, in recent years various radio astronomical projects have started to make use of this technology either to realize the correlator on this platform or to establish the post-processing pipeline with GPUs. Therefore, the feasibility of GPUs as a choice for a VLBI correlator is being investigated, including pros and cons of this technology. Additionally, a GPU based software correlator will be reviewed with respect to energy consumption/GFlop/sec and cost/GFlop/sec.

  13. VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrelles, José M.; Gómez, José F.; Patel, Nimesh A.; Curiel, Salvador; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert

    2012-07-01

    VLBI multi-epoch water maser observations are a powerful tool to study the gas very close to the central engine responsible for the phenomena associated with the early evolution of massive protostars. In this paper we present a summary of the main observational results obtained toward the massive star-forming regions of Cepheus A and W75N. These observations revealed unexpected phenomena in the earliest stages of evolution of massive objects (e.g., non-collimated ``short-lived'' pulsed ejections in different massive protostars), and provided new insights in the study of the dynamic scenario of the formation of high-mass stars (e.g., simultaneous presence of a jet and wide-angle outflow in the massive object Cep A HW2, similar to what is observed in low-mass protostars). In addition, with these observations it has been possible to identify new, previously unseen centers of high-mass star formation through outflow activity.

  14. U. S. Naval Observatory VLBI Analysis Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    daily 1-hour duration Intensive observations were initiated using the VLBA antennas at Pie Town, NM and Mauna Kea , HI. High-speed network connections to...using the VLBA antennas at Pie Town, Nlvl and Mauna Kea , HI. IVS 2012 Annual Report 319 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...Pie Town, NM and Mauna Kea , HI. High-speed network connections to these two antennas are now routinely used for electronic transfer of VLBI data over

  15. Precise time transfer using MKIII VLBI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, K. J.; Buisson, J. A.; Lister, M. J.; Oaks, O. J.; Spencer, J. H.; Waltman, W. B.; Elgered, G.; Lundqvist, G.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Clark, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is well known that Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of precise time synchronization at subnanosecond levels. This paper deals with a demonstration of clock synchronization using the MKIII VBLI system. The results are compared with clock synchronization by traveling cesium clocks and GPS. The comparison agrees within the errors of the portable clocks (+ 5 ns) and GPS(+ or - 30 ns) systems. The MKIII technology appears to be capable of clock synchronization at subnanosecond levels and appears to be very good benchmark system against which future time synchronization systems can be evaluated.

  16. VLBI Digital-Backend Intercomparison Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan; Beaudoin, Christopher; Cappallo, Roger; Niell, Arthur; Petrachenko, Bill; Ruszczyk, Chester A.; Titus, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Issues related to digital-backend (DBE) systems can be difficult to evaluate in either local tests or actual VLBI experiments. The 2nd DBE intercomparison workshop at Haystack Observatory on 25-26 October 2012 provided a forum to explicitly address validation and interoperability issues among independent global developers of DBE equipment. This special report discusses the workshop. It identifies DBE systems that were tested at the workshop, describes the test objectives and procedures, and reports and discusses the results of the testing.

  17. GGOS-D: A German project on the integration of space geodetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, A.; Rothacher, M.; Angermann, D.; Artz, T.; Bökmann, S.; et al.

    2008-04-01

    Since September 2005 the German Ministry for Research and Education has been funding a group of scientists at GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ Potsdam), Deutsches Geod¨tisches Forschungsinstitut (DGFI a Munich), Bundesamt f¨ r Kartographie und Geod¨sie (BKG Frankfurt am Main) and Institut f¨ r Geod¨sie u a u a und Geoinformation der Universit¨t Bonn (IGGB Bonn) in a project related to the integration of space a geodetic techniques. These groups comprise experience in GPS, SLR, and VLBI observing techniques as well as in satellite altimetry, global gravity field investigations and large scale combinations. They cooperate with the aim to investigate the production of reference frames and related time series which are consistent across techniques by adapting software packages to common standards and by refining combination procedures. Since the aims of the project closely resemble the general ideas of the GGOS initiative (Global Geodetic Observing System) by the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), the group has gathered under the acronym GGOS-D.

  18. Plate Motion and Crustal Deformation Estimated with Geodetic Data from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Heflin, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    We use geodetic data taken over four years with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate: (1) motion between six major plates and (2) motion relative to these plates of ten sites in plate boundary zones. The degree of consistency between geodetic velocities and rigid plates requires the (one-dimensional) standard errors in horizontal velocities to be approx. 2 mm/yr. Each of the 15 angular velocities describing motion between plate pairs that we estimate with GPS differs insignificantly from the corresponding angular velocity in global plate motion model NUVEL-1A, which averages motion over the past 3 m.y. The motion of the Pacific plate relative to both the Eurasian and North American plates is observed to be faster than predicted by NUVEL-1A, supporting the inference from Very Long B ase- line Interferometry (VLBI) that motion of the Pacific plate has speed up over the past few m.y. The Eurasia-North America pole of rotation is estimated to be north of NUVEL-1A, consistent with the independent hypothesis that the pole has recently migrated northward across northeast Asia to near the Lena River delta. Victoria, which lies above the main thrust at the Cascadia subduction zone, moves relative to the interior of the overriding plate at 30% of the velocity of the subducting plate, reinforcing the conclusion that the thrust there is locked beneath the continental shelf and slope.

  19. Solving the polarization problem in ALMA-VLBI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti-Vidal, I.; Conway, J.; Lindqvist, M.; Roy, A. L.; Alef, W.; Zensus, A. J.

    The Atacama Large mm-submm Array (ALMA) is, by far, the most sensitive mm/submm telescope in the World. The ALMA Phasing Project (APP) will allow us to phase-up all the ALMA antennas and use them as one single VLBI station. This will be a key component of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a Global VLBI array at millimeter wavelengths. A problem in the APP is the calibration and conversion of the polarization channels. Most VLBI stations record their signals in a circular basis, but the ALMA receivers record in a linear basis. The strategy that will be followed in the phased-ALMA VLBI observations will be to correlate in a "mixed" basis (i.e., linear versus circular) and convert the visibilities to a pure circular basis after the correlation. We have developed an algorithm to perform such a polarization conversion of the VLBI visibilities. In these proceedings, we present the basics of this algorithm and discuss on the polarization conversion in the general case where single dishes (besides phased arrays) record with linear receivers in VLBI observations. We show some results of our algorithm applied to realistic simulations, as well as a test with real VLBI observations at 86 GHz between the Onsala radiotelescope (recording in linear basis) and the Effelsberg radiotelescope (recording in circular basis).

  20. Prospect of Continuous VLBI Measurement of Earth Rotation in Monitoring Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Ma, Chopo; Clark, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Large-scale mass transports in the geophysical fluids of the Earth system excite Earth's rotational variations in both length-of-day and polar motion. The excitation process is via the conservation of angular momentum. Therefore Earth rotation observations contain information about the integrated angular momentum (consisting of both the mass term and the motion term) of the geophysical fluids, which include atmosphere, hydrosphere, mantle, and the outer and inner cores. Such global information is often important and otherwise unattainable depending on the nature of the mass transport, its magnitude and time scale. The last few years have seen great advances in VLBI measurement of Earth rotation in precision and temporal resolution. These advances have opened new. areas in geophysical fluid studies, such as oceanic tidal angular momentum, atmospheric tides, Earth librations, and rapid atmospheric angular momentum fluctuations. Precision of 10 microseconds in UTI and 200 microarcseconds in polar motion can now be achieved on hourly basis. Building upon this heritage, the multi-network geodetic VLBI project, Continuous Observation of the Rotation of the Earth (CORE), promises to further these studies and to make possible studies on elusive but tell-tale geophysical processes such as oscillatory modes in the core and in the atmosphere. Currently the early phase of CORE is underway. Within a few years into the new mellinnium, the upcoming space gravity missions (such as GRACE) will measure the temporal variations in Earth's gravitational field, thus providing complementary information to that from Earth rotation study for a better understanding of global geophysical fluid processes.

  1. Comparison of ITRF2014 station coordinate input time series of DORIS, VLBI and GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza; Tanır Kayıkçı, Emine; Roggero, Marco

    2016-12-01

    In this paper station coordinate time series from three space geodesy techniques that have contributed to the realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2014 (ITRF2014) are compared. In particular the height component time series extracted from official combined intra-technique solutions submitted for ITRF2014 by DORIS, VLBI and GNSS Combination Centers have been investigated. The main goal of this study is to assess the level of agreement among these three space geodetic techniques. A novel analytic method, modeling time series as discrete-time Markov processes, is presented and applied to the compared time series. The analysis method has proven to be particularly suited to obtain quasi-cyclostationary residuals which are an important property to carry out a reliable harmonic analysis. We looked for common signatures among the three techniques. Frequencies and amplitudes of the detected signals have been reported along with their percentage of incidence. Our comparison shows that two of the estimated signals, having one-year and 14 days periods, are common to all the techniques. Different hypotheses on the nature of the signal having a period of 14 days are presented. As a final check we have compared the estimated velocities and their standard deviations (STD) for the sites that co-located the VLBI, GNSS and DORIS stations, obtaining a good agreement among the three techniques both in the horizontal (1.0 mm/yr mean STD) and in the vertical (0.7 mm/yr mean STD) component, although some sites show larger STDs, mainly due to lack of data, different data spans or noisy observations.

  2. An Overview of Geodetic Volcano Research in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Prieto, Juan F.; Brú, Guadalupe

    2015-11-01

    The Canary Islands are mostly characterized by diffuse and scattered volcanism affecting a large area, with only one active stratovolcano, the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife). More than 2 million people live and work in the 7,447 km2 of the archipelago, resulting in an average population density three times greater than the rest of Spain. This fact, together with the growth of exposure during the past 40 years, increases volcanic risk with respect previous eruptions, as witnessed during the recent 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption. Therefore, in addition to purely scientific reasons there are economic and population-security reasons for developing and maintaining an efficient volcano monitoring system. In this scenario geodetic monitoring represents an important part of the monitoring system. We describe volcano geodetic monitoring research carried out in the Canary Islands and the results obtained. We consider for each epoch the two main existing constraints: the level of volcanic activity in the archipelago, and the limitations of the techniques available at the time. Theoretical and observational aspects are considered, as well as the implications for operational volcano surveillance. Current challenges of and future perspectives in geodetic volcano monitoring in the Canaries are also presented.

  3. Extracting Independent Local Oscillatory Geophysical Signals by Geodetic Tropospheric Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botai, O. J.; Combrinck, L.; Sivakumar, V.; Schuh, H.; Bohm, J.

    2010-01-01

    Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) due to water vapor derived from space geodetic techniques and numerical weather prediction simulated-reanalysis data exhibits non-linear and non-stationary properties akin to those in the crucial geophysical signals of interest to the research community. These time series, once decomposed into additive (and stochastic) components, have information about the long term global change (the trend) and other interpretable (quasi-) periodic components such as seasonal cycles and noise. Such stochastic component(s) could be a function that exhibits at most one extremum within a data span or a monotonic function within a certain temporal span. In this contribution, we examine the use of the combined Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA): the EEMD-ICA algorithm to extract the independent local oscillatory stochastic components in the tropospheric delay derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) over six geodetic sites (HartRAO, Hobart26, Wettzell, Gilcreek, Westford, and Tsukub32). The proposed methodology allows independent geophysical processes to be extracted and assessed. Analysis of the quality index of the Independent Components (ICs) derived for each cluster of local oscillatory components (also called the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs)) for all the geodetic stations considered in the study demonstrate that they are strongly site dependent. Such strong dependency seems to suggest that the localized geophysical signals embedded in the ZTD over the geodetic sites are not correlated. Further, from the viewpoint of non-linear dynamical systems, four geophysical signals the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) index derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) anomaly from NCEP, the SIDC monthly Sun Spot Number (SSN), and the Length of Day (LoD) are linked to the extracted signal components from ZTD. Results from the synchronization

  4. The Global Geodetic Observing System: Space Geodesy Networks for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael; Pavlis, Erricos; Ma, Chopo; Altamini, Zuheir; Noll, Carey; Stowers, David

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based networks of co-located space geodetic techniques (VLBI, SLR, GNSS. and DORIS) are the basis for the development and maintenance of the International Terrestrial Reference frame (ITRF), which is our metric of reference for measurements of global change, The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) has established a task to develop a strategy to design, integrate and maintain the fundamental geodetic network and supporting infrastructure in a sustainable way to satisfy the long-term requirements for the reference frame. The GGOS goal is an origin definition at 1 mm or better and a temporal stability on the order of 0.1 mm/y, with similar numbers for the scale and orientation components. These goals are based on scientific requirements to address sea level rise with confidence, but other applications are not far behind. Recent studies including one by the US National Research Council has strongly stated the need and the urgency for the fundamental space geodesy network. Simulations are underway to examining accuracies for origin, scale and orientation of the resulting ITRF based on various network designs and system performance to determine the optimal global network to achieve this goal. To date these simulations indicate that 24 - 32 co-located stations are adequate to define the reference frame and a more dense GNSS and DORIS network will be required to distribute the reference frame to users anywhere on Earth. Stations in the new global network will require geologically stable sites with good weather, established infrastructure, and local support and personnel. GGOS wil seek groups that are interested in participation. GGOS intends to issues a Call for Participation of groups that would like to contribute in the network implementation and operation. Some examples of integrated stations currently in operation or under development will be presented. We will examine necessary conditions and challenges in

  5. Determination of tidal h Love number parameters in the diurnal band using an extensive VLBI data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Davis, J. L.; Mathews, P. M.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1994-01-01

    We use over a decade of geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data to estimate parameters in a resonance expansion of the frequency dependence of the tidal h(sub 2) Love number within the diurnal band. The resonance is associated with the retrograde free core nutation (RFCN). We obtain a value for the real part of the resonance strength of (-0.27 +/- 0.03) x 10(exp -3); a value of -0.19 x 10(exp -3) is predicted theoretically. Uncertainties in the VLBI estimates of the body tide radial displacement amplitudes are approximately 0.5 mm (1.1 mm for the K1 frequency), but they do not yield sufficiently small Love number uncertainties for placing useful constraints on the frequency of the RFCN, given the much smaller uncertainties obtained from independent analyses using nutation or gravimetric data. We also consider the imaginary part of the tidal h(sub 2) Love number. The estimated imaginary part of the resonance strength is (0.00 +/- 0.02) x 10(exp -3). The estimated imaginary part of the nonresonant component of the Love number implies a phase angle in the diurnal tidal response of the Earth of 0.7 deg +/- 0.5 deg (lag).

  6. JPL VLBI Analysis Center IVS Annual Report for 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Chris

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the JPL VLBI analysis center for the year 2004. We continue to be celestial reference frame, terrestrial reference frame, earth orientation, and spacecraft navigation work using the VLBI technique. There are several areas of our work that are undergoing active development. In 2004 we demonstrated 1 mm level troposphere calibration on an intercontinental baseline. We detected our first X/Ka (8.4/32 GHz) VLBI fringes. We began to deploy Mark 5 recorders and to interface the Mark 5 units to our software correlator. We also have actively participated in the international VLBI community through our involvement in six papers at the February IVS meeting and by collaborating on a number of projects such as densifying the S/X celestial frame creating celestial frames at K (24 GHz) and Q-bands ($# GHz)>

  7. The Earth's nutation: VLBI versus IAU 2000A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, S.; Rosat, S.; Capitaine, N.; Souchay, J.

    2014-12-01

    The nutation measured by VLBI is compared with the IAU 2000A model. The differences are modeled empirically by adjusting the free core nutation and a number of tidal terms. The signal remaining in the residuals is discussed.

  8. ostglacial rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald .

    1996-01-01

    I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan, 1995] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier, 1995].

  9. VLBI2010 Receiver Back End Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrachenko, Bill

    2013-01-01

    VLBI2010 requires a receiver back-end to convert analog RF signals from the receiver front end into channelized digital data streams to be recorded or transmitted electronically. The back end functions are typically performed in two steps: conversion of analog RF inputs into IF bands (see Table 2), and conversion of IF bands into channelized digital data streams (see Tables 1a, 1b and 1c). The latter IF systems are now completely digital and generically referred to as digital back ends (DBEs). In Table 2 two RF conversion systems are compared, and in Tables 1a, 1b, and 1c nine DBE systems are compared. Since DBE designs are advancing rapidly, the data in these tables are only guaranteed to be current near the update date of this document.

  10. Generalized Linear Multi-Frequency Imaging in VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhachev, S.; Ladygin, V.; Guirin, I.

    2004-07-01

    In VLBI, generalized Linear Multi-Frequency Imaging (MFI) consists of multi-frequency synthesis (MFS) and multi-frequency analysis (MFA) of the VLBI data obtained from observations on various frequencies. A set of linear deconvolution MFI algorithms is described. The algorithms make it possible to obtain high quality images interpolated on any given frequency inside any given bandwidth, and to derive reliable estimates of spectral indexes for radio sources with continuum spectrum.

  11. Simulation of Local Tie Accuracy on VLBI Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallio, Ulla; Poutanen, Markku

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new mathematical model to compute the centering parameters of a VLBI antenna. These include the coordinates of the reference point, axis offset, orientation, and non-perpendicularity of the axes. Using the model we simulated how precisely parameters can be computed in different cases. Based on the simulation we can give some recommendations and practices to control the accuracy and reliability of the local ties at the VLBI sites.

  12. VLBI studies of the nutations of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of six years of VLBI data has yielded corrections to the coefficients of the seven largest terms in the IAU 1980 nutation series with periods of one year or less, with accuracies approaching the truncation error of this nutation series (0.1 mas). This paper examines the methods used to extract the nutation information from the VLBI data, the calculation of the uncertanties of the resultant corrections to the nutation-series coefficients, and current research on the earth's nutations.

  13. e-VLBI detection of SN2007gr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paragi, Z.; Kouveliotou, C.; Garrett, M. A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Szomoru, A.; Argo, M.

    2007-09-01

    We observed the Type Ibc SN2007gr on 6-7 September for 12 hours (21:00-09:00 UTC) at 4.97 GHz with the the European VLBI Network (EVN) using the e- VLBI technique. Participating telescopes were Darnhall, Jodrell Bank (MkII), Medicina, Onsala, Torun and Westerbork (phased array of 14 telescopes). The aggregate bitrate was 256 Mbps, except for Darnhall which contributed with an effective data rate of 128 Mbps due to analog bandwidth restrictions.

  14. Spectral analysis of the VLBI pole path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuberi, Midhat; Smylie, Doug E.

    2009-12-01

    Modern observations of polar motion, using techniques such as Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), have reduced error levels by as much as three orders of magnitude, compared to classical astronometric methods. Here we focus on VLBI observations which are characteristically unequally spaced. We develop a very effective method of spectral analysis for unequally spaced time sequences. First, the least squares fit to the representation of the sequence by the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is calculated, weighting the observations by the inverse square of the accompanying standard error. The coefficient matrix of the normal equations of this fit is nearly singular. It is subjected to a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). In the usual application of SVD singular values are eliminated in order to improve the stability of the numerical system but no criterion is given for how many singular values to eliminate. To overcome this shortcoming, we introduce the Parseval condition which relates the mean square in the time domain to that in the frequency domain. Singular values are eliminated until Parseval's theorem is satisfied. Typically, the mean square in the frequency domain is many orders of magnitude too large. As singular values are eliminated, starting with the smallest and working upward, the mean square in the frequency domain appears to decrease monotonically until the Parseval relation is satisfied. Once the DFTs are found, spectral analysis and the estimation of confidence intervals proceed in the standard way. We perform a spectral analysis of the polar motion on 24.5 years of observations by using a Welch Overlapping Segment Analysis (WOSA) with four record segments of 14-year length with 75% overlap. Parameters of the Chandler wobble resonance are found as well as a detailed spectrum.

  15. Millimetron and Earth-Space VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhachev, S.

    2014-01-01

    The main scientific goal of the Millimetron mission operating in Space VLBI (SVLBI) mode will be the exploration of compact radio sources with extremely high angular resolution (better than one microsecond of arc). The space-ground interferometer Millimetron has an orbit around L2 point of the Earth - Sun system and allows operating with baselines up to a hundred Earth diameters. SVLBI observations will be accomplished by space and ground-based radio telescopes simultaneously. At the space telescope the received baseband signal is digitized and then transferred to the onboard memory storage (up to 100TB). The scientific and service data transfer to the ground tracking station is performed by means of both synchronization and communication radio links (1 GBps). Then the array of the scientific data is processed at the correlation center. Due to the (u,v) - plane coverage requirements for SVLBI imaging, it is necessary to propose observations at two different frequencies and two circular polarizations simultaneously with frequency switching. The total recording bandwidth (2x2x4 GHz) defines of the on-board memory size. The ground based support of the Millimetron mission in the VLBI-mode could be Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Pico Valletta (Spain), Plateau de Bure interferometer (France), SMT telescope in the US (Arizona), LMT antenna (Mexico), SMA array, (Mauna Kea, USA), as well as the Green Bank and Effelsberg 100 m telescopes (for 22 GHz observations). We will present simulation results for Millimetron-ALMA interferometer. The sensitivity estimate of the space-ground interferometer will be compared to the requirements of the scientific goals of the mission. The possibility of multi-frequency synthesis (MFS) to obtain high quality images will also be considered.

  16. The effect of the dynamic wet troposphere on VLBI measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Lanyi, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations using a statistical model of water vapor fluctuations yield the effect of the dynamic wet troposphere on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) measurements. The statistical model arises from two primary assumptions: (1) the spatial structure of refractivity fluctuations can be closely approximated by elementary (Kolmogorov) turbulence theory, and (2) temporal fluctuations are caused by spatial patterns which are moved over a site by the wind. The consequences of these assumptions are outlined for the VLBI delay and delay rate observables. For example, wet troposphere induced rms delays for Deep Space Network (DSN) VLBI at 20-deg elevation are about 3 cm of delay per observation, which is smaller, on the average, than other known error sources in the current DSN VLBI data set. At 20-deg elevation for 200-s time intervals, water vapor induces approximately 1.5 x 10 to the minus 13th power s/s in the Allan standard deviation of interferometric delay, which is a measure of the delay rate observable error. In contrast to the delay error, the delay rate measurement error is dominated by water vapor fluctuations. Water vapor induced VLBI parameter errors and correlations are calculated. For the DSN, baseline length parameter errors due to water vapor fluctuations are in the range of 3 to 5 cm. The above physical assumptions also lead to a method for including the water vapor fluctuations in the parameter estimation procedure, which is used to extract baseline and source information from the VLBI observables.

  17. Proceedings of the 6th European VLBI Network Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Eduardo; Porcas, Richard W.; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Zensus, J. Anton

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 6th Symposium of the European VLBI Network, held in Bonn on 25-28 June 2002. The initial aim of these biennial gatherings of European VLBI practitioners was to review in a timely manner new results and technical developments related to Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Now, however, interest and participation in the EVN Symposia reaches far beyond Europe, reflecting the fact that scientific research and development programs are carried out to a high degree in international and often truly global collaborations. More than 120 scientists from around the world registered for participation in the Symposium. The Symposium was hosted by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie and was held at the Gustav Stresemann Institut. In addition to the scientific sessions and poster presentations, the program included an EVN Users Meeting, an MPIfR versus Rest-of-the-World football match (highly appropriate given the competing World Cup event!), a visit to the MPIfR's 100m radio telescope in Effelsberg, and a Conference Dinner held in the nearby old walled town of Bad Müunstereifel. To maximize the usefulness of these proceedings (and possibly as a daring precedent) the Editors decided to demand the written versions of talks and posters and to complete the editorial work before the meeting, and to deliver the book to the participants at the beginning of the Symposium. We thank the authors for their cooperation in delivering publication-ready electronic manuscripts and for meeting the strict deadlines. It is highly gratifying that only a handful of the 100 presentations are not represented in this volume. The editors have made minor changes to some of the contributions in order to improve readability, and take responsibility for any errors arising from these changes. Besides the authors, many individuals have contributed to the preparation of the meeting and its proceedings. In addition to many members of the MPIfR staff, we

  18. VLBI observations of the radio quasar J2228+0110 at z = 5.95 and other field sources in multiple-phase-centre mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.-M.; Frey, S.; Gurvits, L. I.; Yang, J.; Hong, X.-Y.; Paragi, Z.; Deller, A. T.; Ivezić, Ž.

    2014-03-01

    A patch of sky in the SDSS Stripe 82 was observed at 1.6 GHz with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) using the European VLBI Network (EVN). The data were correlated at the EVN software correlator at JIVE (SFXC). There are fifteen known mJy/sub-mJy radio sources in the target field defined by the primary beam size of a typical 30-m class EVN radio telescope. The source of particular interest is a recently identified high-redshift radio quasar: J222843.54+011032.2 (J2228+0110) at redshift z = 5.95. Our aim was to investigate the milli-arcsecond (mas) scale properties of all the VLBI-detectable sources within this primary beam area with a diameter of 20'. The source J2228+0110 was detected with VLBI with a brightness temperature Tb > 108 K, supporting the active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin of its radio emission, which is conclusive evidence that the source is a radio quasar. In addition, two other target sources were also detected, one of them with no redshift information. Their brightness temperature values (Tb > 107 K) measured with VLBI suggest a non-thermal synchrotron radiation origin for their radio emission. The detection rate of 20% is broadly consistent with other wide-field VLBI experiments carried out recently. We also derived the accurate equatorial coordinates of the three detected sources using the phase-referencing technique. This experiment is an early attempt of a wide-field science project with SFXC, paving the way for the EVN to conduct a large-scale VLBI survey in the multiple-phase-centre mode.

  19. Atmospheric Delay Reduction Using KARAT for GPS Analysis and Implications for VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Hobiger, Thomas; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2010-01-01

    We have been developing a state-of-the-art tool to estimate the atmospheric path delays by raytracing through mesoscale analysis (MANAL) data, which is operationally used for numerical weather prediction by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The tools, which we have named KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)', are capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. The KARAT can estimate atmospheric slant delays by an analytical 2-D ray-propagation model by Thayer and a 3-D Eikonal solver. We compared PPP solutions using KARAT with that using the Global Mapping Function (GMF) and Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) for GPS sites of the GEONET (GPS Earth Observation Network System) operated by Geographical Survey Institute (GSI). In our comparison 57 stations of GEONET during the year of 2008 were processed. The KARAT solutions are slightly better than the solutions using VMF1 and GMF with linear gradient model for horizontal and height positions. Our results imply that KARAT is a useful tool for an efficient reduction of atmospheric path delays in radio-based space geodetic techniques such as GNSS and VLBI.

  20. Reliability and Stability of VLBI-Derived Sub-Daily EOP Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artz, Thomas; Boeckmann, Sarah; Jensen, Laura; Nothnagel, Axel; Steigenberger, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Recent investigations have shown significant shortcomings in the model which is proposed by the IERS to account for the variations in the Earth s rotation with periods around one day and less. To overcome this, an empirical model can be estimated more or less directly from the observations of space geodetic techniques. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the quality and reliability of such a model based on VLBI observations. Therefore, the impact of the estimation method and the analysis options as well as the temporal stability are investigated. It turned out that, in order to provide a realistic accuracy measure of the model coefficients, the formal errors should be inflated by a factor of three. This coincides with the noise floor and the repeatability of the model coefficients and it captures almost all of the differences that are caused by different estimation techniques. The impact of analysis options is small but significant when changing troposphere parameterization or including harmonic station position variations.

  1. National Geodetic Satellite Program, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, S. W. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    The work performed by individual contributors to the National Geodetic Satellite Program is presented. The purpose of the organization, the instruments used in obtaining the data, a description of the data itself, the theory used in processing the data, and evaluation of the results are detailed for the participating organizations.

  2. A study program for geodetic satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported on support of the GEOS-C Program, National Geodetic Satellite program, and the Earth Physics Program. The statement of work, and a description of the GEOS-C are presented along with the trip reports, and the Earth and Ocean Physics Application program.

  3. A Small-Radio-Telescope Network for VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, D. B.; Cobb, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    In the last several years, high schools, colleges, universities, and even some private amateur radio astronomers have put some 120 copies of the commercially-available Haystack Small Radio Telescope (SRT) into operation. Haystack Observatory is now working on a new version of the SRT, designed to be used in an interferometer (see paper by Vats and Rogers, this conference). We show how the new SRT, or other similar small radio telescopes, could be adapted for educational and scientific VLBI observations of continuum and OH line sources, with a relatively small additional investment. We propose that one or more large radio telescopes join a network of the small antennas, so that fringes would be readily detected between the large antenna(s) and the small antennas. An 85-foot antenna such as those at PARI or the 40-meter antenna of the Owens Valley Radio Observatory would serve nicely as a base station. Eventually, as data storage and transmission capacity continue to improve, the small antennas should be able to operate on their own. Our emphasis is on a simple, inexpensive VLBI system. The most critical item is good frequency standard. For observations at 21 or 18 cm, a rubidium standard is good enough. (Inexpensive Rb standards can be found on E-bay!) Local time at each station would come from GPS receivers which readily provide sub-microsecond timing accuracy. One-bit data sampling at rates on the order of 10 megasamples per second could be performed with a simple box interfaced to a PC via USB. Sampled data would first be recorded to the PC hard drive, and then sent on CD-ROM or DVD through the mail or by internet to a central correlation facility. Correlation and data analysis for the network would be performed on PCs as well. We suggest an observing scenario comprised of scans that are several minutes long and taken several times per hour during the apparition of a compact source. The total data for the 10-12 hours that a source is "up" for a USA network would

  4. GEODYN- ORBITAL AND GEODETIC PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbital and Geodetic Parameter Estimation program, GEODYN, possesses the capability to estimate that set of orbital elements, station positions, measurement biases, and a set of force model parameters such that the orbital tracking data from multiple arcs of multiple satellites best fits the entire set of estimation parameters. The estimation problem can be divided into two parts: the orbit prediction problem, and the parameter estimation problem. GEODYN solves these two problems by employing Cowell's method for integrating the orbit and a Bayesian least squares statistical estimation procedure for parameter estimation. GEODYN has found a wide range of applications including determination of definitive orbits, tracking instrumentation calibration, satellite operational predictions, and geodetic parameter estimation, such as the estimations for global networks of tracking stations. The orbit prediction problem may be briefly described as calculating for some later epoch the new conditions of state for the satellite, given a set of initial conditions of state for some epoch, and the disturbing forces affecting the motion of the satellite. The user is required to supply only the initial conditions of state and GEODYN will provide the forcing function and integrate the equations of motion of the satellite. Additionally, GEODYN performs time and coordinate transformations to insure the continuity of operations. Cowell's method of numerical integration is used to solve the satellite equations of motion and the variational partials for force model parameters which are to be adjusted. This method uses predictor-corrector formulas for the equations of motion and corrector formulas only for the variational partials. The parameter estimation problem is divided into three separate parts: 1) instrument measurement modeling and partial derivative computation, 2) data error correction, and 3) statistical estimation of the parameters. Since all of the measurements modeled by

  5. On the consistency of earthquake moment rates, geological fault data, and space geodetic strain: the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Steven N.

    1998-07-01

    New and dense space geodetic data can now map strain rates over continental-wide areas with a useful degree of precision. Stable strain indicators open the door for space geodesy to join with geology and seismology in formulating improved estimates of global earthquake recurrence. In this paper, 174 GPS/VLBI velocities map United States' strain rates of <0.03 to >30.0 × 10-8 yr-1 with regional uncertainties of 5 to 50 per cent. Kostrov's formula translates these strain values into regional geodetic moment rates. Two other moment rates M⊙seismic and M⊙geologic , extracted from historical earthquake and geological fault catalogues, contrast the geodetic rate. Because M⊙geologic , M⊙seismic and M⊙geodetic derive from different views of the earthquake engine, each illuminates different features. In California, the ratio of M⊙geodetic to M⊙geologic is 1.20. The near-unit ratio points to the completeness of the region's geological fault data and to the reliability of geodetic measurements there. In the Basin and Range, northwest and central United States, both M⊙geodetic and M⊙seismic greatly exceed M⊙geologic. Of possible causes, high incidences of understated and unrecognized faults probably drive the inconsistency. The ratio of M⊙seismic to M⊙geodetic is everywhere less than one. The ratio runs systematically from 70-80 per cent in the fastest straining regions to 2 per cent in the slowest. Although aseismic deformation may contribute to this shortfall, I argue that the existing seismic catalogues fail to reflect the long-term situation. Impelled by the systematic variation of seismic to geodetic moment rates and by the uniform strain drop observed in all earthquakes regardless of magnitude, I propose that the completeness of any seismic catalogue hinges on the product of observation duration and regional strain rate. Slowly straining regions require a proportionally longer period of observation. Characterized by this product, gamma

  6. First Phase Development of Korea-Japan Joint VLBI Correlator and Its Current Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Se-Jin; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    The first phase of the Korea-Japan Joint VLBI Correlator (KJJVC) development has been completed and installed to correlate the observed data from KVN (Korean VLBI Network) and VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry) in October 2009. KJJVC is able to process 16 stations, a maximum of 8 Gbps/station, and 8,192 output channels for VLBI data. The system configuration, the experimental results, and future plans are introduced in this paper.

  7. Historical Review of Astro-Geodetic Observations in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrizovic, V.; Delcev, S.; Vasilic, V.; Gucevic, J.

    2008-10-01

    Astro-geodetic determinations of vertical deflections in Serbia began during the first years of 20th century. The first field works were led by S. Bo\\vsković. After the 2nd World War, Military Geographic Institute, Department of Geodesy from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Federal Geodetic Directorate continued the determinations, needed for reductions of terrestrial geodetic measurements and the astro-geodetic geoid determination. Last years improvements of the astro-geodetic methods are carried out in the area of implementing modern measurement equipment and technologies.

  8. A VLBI Resolution of the Pleiades Distance Controversy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Carl; Reid, Mark J.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Stauffer, John R.; Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The Pleiades is the best studied open cluster in the sky. It is one of the primary open clusters used to define the 'Zero Age Main Sequence' and hence it serves as a cornerstone for programs which use main-sequence fitting to derive distances to other clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy. This role is called into question by the 'Pleiades distance controversy' - the distance to the Pleiades from the Hipparcos space astrometry mission of about 120 pc is significantly different from the distance of 133 pc derived from other techniques. In order to resolve this issue, the Very Long Baseline Array combined with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo telescopes are being used to derive a new, independent trigonometric parallax distance to the Pleiades. From four Pleiades systems we find a distance of 136.2+/-1.2 pc, the most accurate and precise distance to the cluster yet measured. In this contribution we present preliminary parallaxes for the remaining four Pleiades systems not published in Melis et al. (2014, Science 345, 1029). Additionally, binary orbit model fits and preliminary stellar masses are presented for two multiple systems in our sample with significant orbital motion observed during our VLBI monitoring.Funding for this research came from the NSF through awards No. AST-1003318 and No. AST-1313428.

  9. Tidal atmospheric and ocean loading in VLBI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) analysis, reductions for tidal atmospheric and ocean loading are commonly used according to the IERS Conventions. In this presentation we examine such loading corrections from contemporary geophysical models within routine VLBI processing and discuss the internal consistency of the applied corrections for various effects. In detail, two gravitational ocean tide models, FES2004 and the recent FES2012 atlas with a much finer horizontal resolution and an improved description of hydrodynamic processes, are employed. Moreover, the contribution of atmospheric tidal loading is also re-considered based on data taken from two providers of station displacements, Goddard Space Flight Center and the TU Wien group. Those two models differ in terms of the underlying meteorological data, which can be a reason for inconsistency of VLBI reductions and may lead to systematics in the VLBI products at tidal frequencies. We validate this assumption in terms of Earth rotation parameters, by a tidal analysis of diurnal and semi-diurnal universal time and semi-diurnal polar motion variations as determined with the Vienna VLBI Software. Applying the loading models in a consistent way still leads to unexplained residuals at about 4-5 μas in the diurnal polar motion band, thus limiting the possibility of assessing geophysical models at this particular frequency.

  10. VLBI Data Acquisition Terminal Modernization at the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Miró, C.; Rogstad, S. P.; Navarro, R.; Clark, J. E.; Naudet, C. J.; Jacobs, C. S.; Goodhart, C. E.; White, L. A.; Trinh, J. T.; Soriano, M.; Wang, D.; Sigman, E. H.; Luvalle, J. V.; Martinez, G.; Sotuela, I.; Pope, P. A.; Horiuchi, S.; Lobo, J.; Alonso, R.; Snedeker, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is replacing the aging Mark IV Data Acquisition Terminal (DAT) with a digital backend, the DSN VLBI Processor (DVP). It is based on the Wideband VLBI Science Receiver (WVSR), a custom-made open-loop digital receiver developed at JPL that is successfully supporting differential-VLBI for spacecraft navigation (DDOR) and other radio astronomy applications, e.g. Earth orientation, astrometry, and spectroscopy observations. From the WVSR the new acquisition terminal has inherited the Intermediate Frequency (IF) digitizer module, the firmware architecture, and monitor and control software. Among the new features, the DVP improves considerably the recording rate providing at least 2 Gbps with the goal of achieving 4 Gbps; uses a CASPER ROACH board for real-time Digital Signal Processing and channelization and streams the data into a Mark 5C recorder. This paper describes in detail the DVP in the context of similar digital developments (e.g., RDBE, DBBC). As the new backend will not use the standard Field System environment to perform the VLBI observations, efforts are under way to make it compatible with non-JPL correlators, providing monitor and calibration data in the appropriate format. Lately an important effort has been made in the DSN towards automation of VLBI data acquisition using the Automation Language for Managing DSN Operations (ALMO). The automation process will be adapted for the new DAT.

  11. VLBI Data Acquisition Terminal Modernization at the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Miró, C.; Rogstad, S. P.; Navarro, R.; Clark, J. E.; Naudet, C. J.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Goodhart, C. E.; White, L. A.; Trinh, J. T.; Soriano, M.; Wang, D.; Sigman, E. H.; Martinez, G.; LuValle, J. V.; Sotuela, I.; Pope, P. A.; Horiuchi, S.; Lobo, J.; ALonso, R.; Snedeker, L. G.

    2012-03-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) is replacing the aging Mark IV Data Acquisition Terminal (DAT) with a digital backend, the DSN VLBI Processor (DVP). It is based on the Wideband VLBI Science Receiver (WVSR), a custom-made open-loop digital receiver developed at JPL that is successfully supporting differential-VLBI for spacecraft navigation (DDOR) and other radio astronomy applications, e.g. Earth orientation, astrometry, and spectroscopy observations. From the WVSR the new acquisition terminal has inherited the Intermediate Frequency (IF) digitizer module, the firmware architecture, and monitor and control software. Among the new features, the DVP improves considerably the recording rate providing at least 2 Gbps with the goal of achieving 4 Gbps; uses a CASPER ROACH board for real-time Digital Signal Processing and channelization and streams the data into a Mark 5C recorder. This paper describes in detail the DVP in the context of similar digital developments (e.g., RDBE, DBBC). As the new backend will not use the standard Field System environment to perform the VLBI observations, efforts are under way to make it compatible with non-JPL correlators, providing monitor and calibration data in the appropriate format. Lately an important effort has been made in the DSN towards automation of VLBI data acquisition using the Automation Language for Managing DSN Operations (ALMO). The automation process will be adapted for the new DAT.

  12. A solution of the geodetic boundary value problem to order e3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    A solution is obtained for the geodetic boundary value problem which defines height anomalies to + or - 5 cm, if the earth were rigid. The solution takes into account the existence of the earth's topography, together with its ellipsoidal shape and atmosphere. A relation is also established between the commonly used solution of Stokes and a development correct to order e cubed. The data requirements call for a complete definition of gravity anomalies at the surface of the earth and a knowledge of elevation characteristics at all points exterior to the geoid. In addition, spherical harmonic representations must be based on geocentric rather than geodetic latitudes.

  13. Development of a New VLBI Data Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Sergei; Gipson, John M.; MacMillan, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of a new VLBI analysis software under development at NASA GSFC. The new software will replace CALC/SOLVE and many related utility programs. It will have the capabilities of the current system as well as incorporate new models and data analysis techniques. In this paper we give a conceptual overview of the new software. We formulate the main goals of the software. The software should be flexible and modular to implement models and estimation techniques that currently exist or will appear in future. On the other hand it should be reliable and possess production quality for processing standard VLBI sessions. Also, it needs to be capable of processing observations from a fully deployed network of VLBI2010 stations in a reasonable time. We describe the software development process and outline the software architecture.

  14. Observing atmospheric tides in Earth rotation parameters with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdiuk, Anastasiia; Böhm, Johannes; Schindelegger, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we assess the contribution of diurnal (S1) and semi-diurnal (S2) atmospheric tides to variations in Earth rotation by analyzing Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations. Particular emphasis is placed on the dependency of S1 and S2 estimates on varying settings in the a priori delay model. We use hourly Earth rotation parameters (ERP) of polar motion and UT1 as determined with the Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) from 25 years of VLBI observations and we adjust diurnal and semi-diurnal amplitudes to the hourly ERP estimates after disregarding the effect of high-frequency ocean tides. Prograde and retrograde polar motion coefficients are obtained for several solutions differing in processing strategies (with/without thermal deformation, time span of observations, choice of a priori ERP model and celestial pole offsets) and we compare the corresponding harmonics with those derived from atmospheric and non-tidal oceanic angular momentum estimates.

  15. VLBI Radar of the 2012 DA14 Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaeva, M. B.; Dugin, N. A.; Antipenko, A. A.; Bezrukov, D. A.; Bezrukov, V. V.; Voytyuk, V. V.; Dement'ev, A. F.; Jekabsons, N.; Klapers, M.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Nabatov, A. S.; Nesteruk, V. N.; Putillo, D.; Reznichenko, A. M.; Salerno, E.; Snegirev, S. D.; Tikhomirov, Yu. V.; Khutornoy, R. V.; Skirmante, K.; Shmeld, I.; Chagunin, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    An experiment on VLBI radar of the 2012 DA14 asteroid was carried out on February 15-16, 2011 at the time of its closest approach to the Earth. The research teams of Kharkov (Institute of Radio Astronomy of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), Evpatoria (National Space Facilities Control and Test Center), Nizhny Novgorod (Radiophysical Research Institute), Bologna (Istituto di Radioastronomia (INAF)), and Ventspils (Ventspils International Radioastronomy Center) took part in the experiment. The asteroid was irradiated by the RT-70 planetary radar (Evpatoria) at a frequency of 5 GHz. The reflected signal was received using two 32-m radio telescopes in Medicina (Italy) and Irbene (Latvia) in radiointerferometric mode. The Doppler frequency shifts in bi-static radar mode and interference frequency in VLBI mode were measured. Accuracy of the VLBI radar method for determining the radial and angular velocities of the asteroid were estimated.

  16. Parallel algorithm of VLBI software correlator under multiprocessor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weimin; Zhang, Dong

    2007-11-01

    The correlator is the key signal processing equipment of a Very Lone Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) synthetic aperture telescope. It receives the mass data collected by the VLBI observatories and produces the visibility function of the target, which can be used to spacecraft position, baseline length measurement, synthesis imaging, and other scientific applications. VLBI data correlation is a task of data intensive and computation intensive. This paper presents the algorithms of two parallel software correlators under multiprocessor environments. A near real-time correlator for spacecraft tracking adopts the pipelining and thread-parallel technology, and runs on the SMP (Symmetric Multiple Processor) servers. Another high speed prototype correlator using the mixed Pthreads and MPI (Massage Passing Interface) parallel algorithm is realized on a small Beowulf cluster platform. Both correlators have the characteristic of flexible structure, scalability, and with 10-station data correlating abilities.

  17. Universal Time Derived from VLBI, SLR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambis, D.; Essaifi, N.; Eisop, E.; Feissel, M.

    1994-09-01

    Universal Time Solution combined by IERS from individual series is mainly based on VLBI inertial techniques. Although satellite methods like SLR or GPS have reached a remarkable precision, they do not give access to a highly accurate non-rotating reference frame, which restricts the possibility of determining directly UT1 from their data processing. This is mainly due to uncertainties in the even zonal harmonics of the gravity field and in various modeis (ocean tides). We show here that it is still possible to combine the high-frequency fluctuations contained in GPS NUT1M series with the long-term variations in the VLBI Solution to derive a mixed UT1 (VLBI+GPS) Solution of great interest for its accuracy, time resolution but also for its economic advantage.

  18. Observation VLBI Session RAPL02. the Results of the Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprikov, A. A.

    Results of processing of data of a VLBI experiment titled RAPL02 are presented. These observations were made in 2011 February with 5 antennas. All 3 antennas of Petersberg's Institute of Applied Astronomy (IAA) were used in this session. These were antennae in Svetloe, in Zelenchuck, and in Badary. Additionally, a 22-m antenna in Puschino as well as a 32-m antenna in Medicina (Italy) were also included into observations. The raw data correlation was made at the software correlator of Astro Space Center. The secondary data processing was made for 3 quasars, 3C273, 3C279, and 3C286.

  19. 12th European VLBI Network Symposium and Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarchi, Andrea; Giroletti, Marcello; Feretti, Luigina

    The Istituto di Radioastronomia (IRA) di Bologna and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari (OAC), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 12th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and Users Meeting. The Conference was held from 7th to 10th of October at the Hotel Regina Margherita, in the center of Cagliari. The latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, and, in particular, e-VLBI and space-VLBI (RadioAstron) outcomes were reported. The timing of this meeting coincided with the first successful observational tests of the Sardinia Radio Telescopes within the EVN, and with a number of results from new and upgraded radio facilities around the globe, such as e-MERLIN, ALMA, and the SKA pathfinders. The symposium was attended by 133 participants from all over the world, with the Asian community represented by more than 20 colleagues. The program of the meeting consisted of 70 oral contributions (including 8 invited speakers) and 50 poster that covered a very wide range of VLBI topics both in galactic and extragalactic astrophysics (e.g., AGN, stellar evolution from birth to death, astrometry, and planetary science) as well as technological developments and future international collaborations. The scientific program also included a visit to the 64-m Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) and the EVN Users Meeting, where astronomers have provided useful feedback on various matters regarding EVN operations. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme (FP/2007-2013) under grant agreement No 283393 (RadioNet3). EDITORIAL BOARD: Andrea Tarchi, Marcello Giroletti, Luigina Feretti

  20. Geodetic precession or dragging of inertial frames

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, N. ); Shahid-Saless, B. )

    1990-08-15

    In metric theories of gravity the principle of general covariance allows one to describe phenomena by means of any convenient choice of coordinate system. In this paper it is shown that in an appropriately chosen coordinate system, geodetic precession of a gyroscope orbiting a spherically symmetric, spinning mass can be recast as a Lense-Thirring frame-dragging effect without invoking spatial curvature. The origin of this reference frame moves around the source but the frame axes point in fixed directions. The drag can be interpreted to arise from the orbital angular momentum of the source around the origin of the reference frame. In this reference frame the effects of geodetic precession and Lense-Thirring drag due to intrinsic angular momentum of the source have the same origin, namely, gravitomagnetism.

  1. Volcano deformation--Geodetic monitoring techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    This book describes the techniques used by volcanologists to successfully predict several recent volcanic eruptions by combining information from various scientific disciplines, including geodetic techniques. Many recent developments in the use of state-of-the-art and emerging techniques, including Global Positioning System and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry, mean that most books on volcanology are out of date, and this book includes chapters devoted entirely to these two techniques.

  2. Geodetic precession or dragging of inertial frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Neil; Shahid-Saless, Bahman

    1989-01-01

    In General Relativity, the Principle of General Covariance allows one to describe phenomena by means of any convenient choice of coordinate system. Here, it is shown that the geodetic precession of a gyroscope orbiting a spherically symmetric, nonrotating mass can be recast as a Lense-Thirring frame-dragging effect, in an appropriately chosen coordinate frame whose origin falls freely along with the gyroscope and whose spatial coordinate axes point in fixed directions.

  3. Global Positioning System (GPS) Geodetic Receivers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-08

    Subti.) S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERFo COVERED Global Positioning System ( GPS ) Geodetic N/A Receivers S. PERFORMING OrG. REPORT NUMBER I N/A AUTNORf*) S...i N meueaed idautfy b block nmAr) The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System ( GPS ) when fully developed will pro- vide world-wide, all weather, continuous... Global Positioning System ( GPS ) when fully developed will provide world-wide, all weather, continuous, highly accurate radio navigation support to

  4. Geodetic altitude to a triaxial ellipsoidal planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Charles C. H.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient theoretical model for determining geodetic altitudes with better than millimeter accuracy is proposed, with application to the TOPEX/Poseidon project. The triaxial ellipsoidal subsurface point of a satellite is used as the initial trial solution to achieve an efficient and simple iterative solution. It is found that the second-iteration solution is exact to an accuracy of at least 10 to the -9th km.

  5. Geodetic altitude to a triaxial ellipsoidal planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Charles C. H.

    1988-09-01

    An efficient theoretical model for determining geodetic altitudes with better than millimeter accuracy is proposed, with application to the TOPEX/Poseidon project. The triaxial ellipsoidal subsurface point of a satellite is used as the initial trial solution to achieve an efficient and simple iterative solution. It is found that the second-iteration solution is exact to an accuracy of at least 10 to the -9th km.

  6. Differences Between S/X and VLBI2010 Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hase, Hayo; Himwich, Ed; Neidhardt, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The intended VLBI2010 operation has some significant differences to the current S/X operation. The presentation focuses on the problem of extending the operation of a global VLBI network to continuous operation within the frame of the same given amount of human resources. Remote control operation is a suitable solution to minimize operational expenses. The implementation of remote control operation requires more site specific information. A concept of a distributed-centralized remote control of the operation and its implications is presented.

  7. JPL VLBI Analysis Center IVS Annual Report for 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the JPL VLBI Analysis Center for the year 2003. We continue to do celestial reference frame, terrestrial reference frame, and spacecraft navigation work using the VLBI technique. Tracking the two Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft was the highlight for the year. We continued improvements in the first sub-milliarcsecond global celestial reference frames at K-band (24 GHz) and Q-band (43 GHz). The K-band catalog more than doubled in size from 108 to 230 sources.

  8. Direct Comparison of GPS and VLBI Velocity Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Considerable effort has been made to collocate permanent GPS and VLBI sites for comparison. The global GPS solution is derived from daily measurements spanning four years while the VLBI solution is based on monthly measurements spanning more than 10 years. Current WRMS agreement of velocities is 3-5 mm/yr for horizontal rates and 6-10 mm/yr for vertical rates. Comparison of velocities is limited by the time span of GPS data. Positions agree at the level of 1-2 cm and their comparison is limited by the quality of the site ties. Best and worst agreement will be discussed along with possible sources of systematic error.

  9. e-VLBI observations of Cyg X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, V.; Paragi, Z.; Fender, R.; Spencer, R.; Garrett, M.; Rushton, A.

    2008-04-01

    We observed the X-ray binary Cyg X-3 on April 9th, 2008 for 9.5 hours, between 03:30-13:00 UT, at 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in e-VLBI mode (the data from the radio telescopes are sent over optical fibers in real-time to the correlator for processing). The radio telescopes participating in the experiment were: Cambridge, Medicina, Jodrell Bank MkII, Onsala (25 m), Torun and Westerbork (phased array).

  10. e-VLBI observations of SS 433 in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, V.; Paragi, Z.; Trushkin, S.; Soleri, P.; Fender, R.; Garrett, M.; Spencer, R.; Rushton, A.; Burgess, P.; Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Pazderski, E.; Borkowski, K.; Hammargren, R.; Lindqvist, M.; Maccaferri, G.

    2008-11-01

    We have observed the X-ray binary SS 433 on November 6, 2008 between 13:48-18:35 UT at 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network (EVN) using the e-VLBI technique. The radio telescopes participating in the experiment were: Medicina, Onsala 25m, Torun, Jodrell Bank MkII and Cambridge. The X-ray binary SS 433 is in outburst. Trushkin & Nizhelskij (ATel #1819) reported a major flare already active during the RATAN-600 observations in the 1-22 GHz band on 2008 October 28.

  11. Southern California regional earthquake probability estimated from continuous GPS geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.

    2002-12-01

    Current seismic hazard estimates are primarily based on seismic and geologic data, but geodetic measurements from large, dense arrays such as the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) can also be used to estimate earthquake probabilities and seismic hazard. Geodetically-derived earthquake probability estimates are particularly important in regions with poorly-constrained fault slip rates. In addition, they are useful because such estimates come with well-determined error bounds. Long-term planning is underway to incorporate geodetic data in the next generation of United States national seismic hazard maps, and techniques for doing so need further development. I present a new method for estimating the expected rates of earthquakes using strain rates derived from geodetic station velocities. I compute the strain rates using a new technique devised by Y. Hsu and M. Simons [Y. Hsu and M. Simons, pers. comm.], which computes the horizontal strain rate tensor ( {˙ {ɛ}}) at each node of a pre-defined regular grid, using all geodetic velocities in the data set weighted by distance and estimated uncertainty. In addition, they use a novel weighting to handle the effects of station distribution: they divide the region covered by the geodetic network into Voronoi cells using the station locations and weight each station's contribution to {˙ {ɛ}} by the area of the Voronoi cell centered at that station. I convert {˙ {ɛ}} into the equivalent seismic moment rate density (˙ {M}) using the method of \\textit{Savage and Simpson} [1997] and maximum seismogenic depths estimated from regional seismicity; ˙ {M} gives the expected rate of seismic moment release in a region, based on the geodetic strain rates. Assuming the seismicity in the given region follows a Gutenberg-Richter relationship, I convert ˙ {M} to an expected rate of earthquakes of a given magnitude. I will present results of a study applying this method to data from the SCIGN array to estimate

  12. VLBI FOR GRAVITY PROBE B. I. OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, I. I.; Lebach, D. E.; Ratner, M. I.; Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Ransom, R. R.; Lestrade, J.-F.

    2012-07-01

    We describe the NASA/Stanford gyroscope relativity mission, Gravity Probe B (GP-B), and provide an overview of the following series of six astrometric and astrophysical papers that report on our radio observations and analyses made in support of this mission. The main goal of this 8.5 year program of differential very long baseline interferometry astrometry was to determine the proper motion of the guide star of the GP-B mission, the RS CVn binary IM Pegasi (IM Peg; HR 8703). This proper motion is determined with respect to compact, extragalactic reference sources. The results are -20.833 {+-} 0.090 mas yr{sup -1} and -27.267 {+-} 0.095 mas yr{sup -1} for, respectively, the right ascension and declination, in local Cartesian coordinates, of IM Peg's proper motion, and 10.370 {+-} 0.074 mas (i.e., 96.43 {+-} 0.69 pc) for its parallax (and distance). Each quoted uncertainty is meant to represent an {approx}70% confidence interval that includes the estimated contribution from systematic error. These results are accurate enough not to discernibly degrade the GP-B estimates of its gyroscopes' relativistic precessions: the frame-dragging and geodetic effects.

  13. VLBI for Gravity Probe B. I. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Lebach, D. E.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Ransom, R. R.; Ratner, M. I.

    2012-07-01

    We describe the NASA/Stanford gyroscope relativity mission, Gravity Probe B (GP-B), and provide an overview of the following series of six astrometric and astrophysical papers that report on our radio observations and analyses made in support of this mission. The main goal of this 8.5 year program of differential very long baseline interferometry astrometry was to determine the proper motion of the guide star of the GP-B mission, the RS CVn binary IM Pegasi (IM Peg; HR 8703). This proper motion is determined with respect to compact, extragalactic reference sources. The results are -20.833 ± 0.090 mas yr-1 and -27.267 ± 0.095 mas yr-1 for, respectively, the right ascension and declination, in local Cartesian coordinates, of IM Peg's proper motion, and 10.370 ± 0.074 mas (i.e., 96.43 ± 0.69 pc) for its parallax (and distance). Each quoted uncertainty is meant to represent an ~70% confidence interval that includes the estimated contribution from systematic error. These results are accurate enough not to discernibly degrade the GP-B estimates of its gyroscopes' relativistic precessions: the frame-dragging and geodetic effects.

  14. Geodetic Constraints on Mantle Q at Periods from a Fortnight to 18.6 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, D.; Wahr, J.; Desai, S.

    2002-12-01

    Seismic observations have provided numerous constraints on the earth's spherically-averaged mantle anelasticity at periods of tens of minutes and shorter. Meanwhile, post-glacial rebound and other geodynamic studies provide information at periods of a few thousand years and longer. However, constraints at intermediate periods are scarce. Such constraints could be useful in trying to connect the seismic anelastic models with the longer-period visco-elastic behavior. Here we will describe constraints on anelasticity in this intermediate range of periods as obtained from earth tide and earth rotation observations. We discuss results from: (1) VLBI observations of the monthly and fortnightly tidal variations in rotation rate; (2) satellite laser ranging observations of the 18.6-year tidal variations in the earth's gravitational field; and (3) astrometric and geodetic observations of the 14-month Chandler Wobble period and damping. We find that these observations are consistent with a nearly frequency-independent mantle Q stretching from seismic periods all the way out to the 14-month Chandler Wobble period; but that Q appears to decrease significantly between 14-months and 18.6-years.

  15. Warkworth 12-m VLBI Station: WARK12M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weston, Stuart; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Natusch, Tim; Woodburn, Lewis; Gulyaev, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    The Warkworth 12-m radio telescope is operated by the Institute for Radio Astronomy and Space Research (IRASR) at AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand. Here we review the characteristics of the 12-m VLBI station and report on a number of activities and technical developments in 2012.

  16. Differences Between VLBI2010 and S/X Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    While the overall architecture is similar for the station hardware in current S/X systems and in the VLBI2010 systems under development, various functions are implemented differently. Some of these differences, and the reasons behind them, are described here.

  17. Pulse strobing in VLBI for observation of geostationary earth satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetskij, V. M.

    The possibility of broadband synthesis by pulse strobing for observation of slow-moving objects using standard MARK-1 VLBI processing methods is discussed. The possibility of increasing the SNR by using a special type of pulse function is indicated. A specific scheme for application of the method in satellite radiointerferometry is examined.

  18. 223 GHz VLBI observations of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, S.; Woody, D. P.; Hodges, M. W.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Emerson, D. T.; Jewell, P. R.; Lamb, J.; Perfetto, A.; Wright, M. C. H.

    1990-09-01

    In the first 1.4 mm wavelength VLBI test observations, fringes have been detected on the active nucleus of 3C 273 on a baseline from Owens Valley Radio Observatory to Kitt Peak. The observations are consistent with a source whose angular size is smaller than 0.5 mas.

  19. U.S. Naval Observatory VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Geiger, Nicole; Dieck, Chris; Hall, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the VLBI Analysis Center at the United States Naval Observatory for the 2012 calendar year. Over the course of the year, Analysis Center personnel continued analysis and timely submission of IVS-R4 databases for distribution to the IVS. During the 2012 calendar year, the USNO VLBI Analysis Center produced two VLBI global solutions designated as usn2012a and usn2012b. Earth orientation parameters (EOP) based on this solution and updated by the latest diurnal (IVS-R1 and IVS-R4) experiments were routinely submitted to the IVS. Sinex files based upon the bi-weekly 24-hour experiments were also submitted to the IVS. During the 2012 calendar year, Analysis Center personnel continued a program to use the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) operated by the NRAO for the purpose of measuring UT1-UTC. Routine daily 1-hour duration Intensive observations were initiated using the VLBA antennas at Pie Town, NM and Mauna Kea, HI. High-speed network connections to these two antennas are now routinely used for electronic transfer of VLBI data over the Internet to a USNO point of presence. A total of 270 VLBA Intensive experiments were observed and electronically transferred to and processed at USNO in 2012.

  20. About the Compatibility of DORIS and VLBI Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Il'in, Gennady; Smolentsev, Sergey; Sergeev, Roman

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the compatibility of the DORIS and VLBI observations at Badary Observatory. The DORIS beacon stands at 100-m distance from the main radio telescope dish and transmits signals on two frequencies: 2036.25 MHz and 401.25 MHz. The latter frequency is modulated to send messages containing an ID number, timing information, data from the meteorological sensors, and engineering data (e.g., power). Both frequencies affect the S/X band radio telescope receivers. The parameters of the DORIS signals were measured at the outputs of the S/X band intermediate frequency amplifier. It was found that: (1) The level of RFI, produced by the DORIS beacon, practically corresponds to the level of the system (antenna plus receiver) noise signal and does not overload the S/X band receivers. (2) The DORIS 401.25 MHz signal is out of the frequency bands recorded during standard VLBI sessions. As a result, RFI from DORIS does not affect VLBI observations. This conclusion was confirmed after data correlations of actual VLBI observations that were conducted with the DORIS beacon turned on/off.

  1. A picosecond accuracy relativistic VLBI model via Fermi normal coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahid-Saless, Bahman; Hellings, Ronald W.; Ashby, Neil

    1991-01-01

    Fermi normal coordinates are used to construct transformations relating solar system barycentric coordinates to local inertial geocentric coordinates. Relativistic corrections to terrestrial VLBI measurements are calculated, and this formalism is developed to include corrections needed for picosecond accuracy. A calculation of photon time delay which includes effects arising from the motion of gravitational sources is given.

  2. VLBI Observations of the Free Core Nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smylie, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    At core scale lengths with periods from a few hours to days, the Coriolis acceleration dominates the Lorentz force density and core modes can be considered as purely mechanical. One of the most interesting core modes is the spin-over mode, which reflects the ability of the outer core to rotate about an axis different from that of either the inner core or the shell. It has a nearly diurnal period. In the Earth frame of reference, this mode produces the nearly diurnal retrograde wobble. In the space frame of reference it is accompanied by the free core nutations. When the flattening of the boundaries of the fluid outer core and the figure-figure gravitational coupling are taken into account, as well as the deformability of the boundaries, both a retrograde free core nutation and a prograde free core nutation are found. The retrograde free core nutation was first predicted by Poincare (1910) for a completly fluid, incompressible core bounded by a rigid shell. In a variational calculation of wobble-nutation modes in realistic Earth models, Jiang (1993) found the classical retrograde free core nutation (RFCN) but discovered a prograde free core nutation (PFCN) as well. VLBI residuals in longitude and obliquity compared to the 1980 IAU nutation series, and their standard errors, were downloaded from the Goddard Space Flight Center website, for the period August 3, 1979 to March 6, 2003, giving 3343 points over a span of 8617 days. In an overlapping segment analysis, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) for each segment was found for the corresponding series of unequally spaced nutation residuals by singular value decomposition (SVD), with the number of singular values eliminated determined by the satisfaction of Parseval's theorem. Both the RFCN and the PFCN resonances were found in the resulting power spectrum. The nutation resonances were found to be in free decay, the half-life of the PFCN at 2620 days and that of the RFCN at 2229 days, with Ekman boundary layer

  3. The Acceleration of the Barycenter of Solar System Obtained from VLBI Observations and Its Impact on the ICRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    Since 1998 January 1, instead of the traditional stellar reference system, the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) has been realized by an ensemble of extragalactic radio sources that are located at hundreds of millions of light years away (if we accept their cosmological distances), so that the reference frame realized by extragalactic radio sources is assumed to be space-fixed. The acceleration of the barycenter of solar system (SSB), which is the origin of the ICRS, gives rise to a systematical variation in the directions of the observed radio sources. This phenomenon is called the secular aberration drift. As a result, the extragalactic reference frame fixed to the space provides a reference standard for detecting the secular aberration drift, and the acceleration of the barycenter with respect to the space can be determined from the observations of extragalactic radio sources. In this thesis, we aim to determine the acceleration of the SSB from astrometric and geodetic observations obtained by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), which is a technique using the telescopes globally distributed on the Earth to observe a radio source simultaneously, and with the capacity of angular positioning for compact radio sources at 10-milliarcsecond level. The method of the global solution, which allows the acceleration vector to be estimated as a global parameter in the data analysis, is developed. Through the formal error given by the solution, this method shows directly the VLBI observations' capability to constrain the acceleration of the SSB, and demonstrates the significance level of the result. In the next step, the impact of the acceleration on the ICRS is studied in order to obtain the correction of the celestial reference frame (CRF) orientation. This thesis begins with the basic background and the general frame of this work. A brief review of the realization of the CRF based on the kinematical and the dynamical methods is presented in Chapter 2

  4. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  5. Geodetic and Geodynamic Studies at Department of Geodesy and Geodetic Astronomy Wut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Aleksander; Barlik, Marcin; Andrasik, Ewa; Izdebski, Waldemar; Kruczyk, Michał; Liwosz, Tomasz; Olszak, Tomasz; Pachuta, Andrzej; Pieniak, Magdalena; Próchniewicz, Dominik; Rajner, Marcin; Szpunar, Ryszard; Tercjak, Monika; Walo, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    The article presents current issues and research work conducted in the Department of Geodesy and Geodetic Astronomy at the Faculty of Geodesy and Cartography at Warsaw University of Technology. It contains the most important directions of research in the fields of physical geodesy, satellite measurement techniques, GNSS meteorology, geodynamic studies, electronic measurement techniques and terrain information systems.

  6. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  7. Baseline mathematics and geodetics for tracking operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, R.

    1981-01-01

    Various geodetic and mapping algorithms are analyzed as they apply to radar tracking systems and tested in extended BASIC computer language for real time computer applications. Closed-form approaches to the solution of converting Earth centered coordinates to latitude, longitude, and altitude are compared with classical approximations. A simplified approach to atmospheric refractivity called gradient refraction is compared with conventional ray tracing processes. An extremely detailed set of documentation which provides the theory, derivations, and application of algorithms used in the programs is included. Validation methods are also presented for testing the accuracy of the algorithms.

  8. Ostrogradski Hamiltonian approach for geodetic brane gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto

    2010-12-07

    We present an alternative Hamiltonian description of a branelike universe immersed in a flat background spacetime. This model is named geodetic brane gravity. We set up the Regge-Teitelboim model to describe our Universe where such field theory is originally thought as a second order derivative theory. We refer to an Ostrogradski Hamiltonian formalism to prepare the system to its quantization. This approach comprize the manage of both first- and second-class constraints and the counting of degrees of freedom follows accordingly.

  9. A New Unified Approach to Determine Geocenter Motion Using Space Geodetic and GRACE Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Kusche, Jürgen; Landerer, Felix W.

    2017-03-01

    Geocenter motion between the center-of-mass of the Earth system (CM) and the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface is a critical signature of degree-1 components of global surface mass transport process that includes sea level rise, ice mass imbalance, and continental-scale hydrological change. To complement GRACE data for complete-spectrum mass transport monitoring, geocenter motion needs to be measured accurately. However, current methods of geodetic translational approach and global inversions of various combinations of geodetic deformation, simulated ocean bottom pressure, and GRACE data contain substantial biases and systematic errors. Here, we demonstrate a new and more reliable unified approach to geocenter motion determination using a recently formed satellite laser ranging based geocentric displacement time series of an expanded geodetic network of all four space geodetic techniques and GRACE gravity data. The unified approach exploits both translational and deformational signatures of the displacement data, while the addition of GRACE's near global coverage significantly reduces biases found in the translational approach and spectral aliasing errors in the inversion.

  10. Wide-Bandwidth Digital Backend System for VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, A. R.

    2007-07-01

    Modern digital electronics now allow the replacement of aging VLBI analog backend systems with fully digital systems to provide numerous benefits, including: 1) uniform, repeatable, predictable performance, 2) low cost, 3) increased flexibility, 4) easy expandability, 6) easy transportability, and 5) flexible and rapid implementation through use of modern FPGA devices. A first-generation Digital Backend (DBE) system, based on a polyphase-filter-bank approach that can process four 500 MHz-bandwidth IF signals, has been built (for <15K), tested, and exercised in real-world VLBI experiments at rates to 4 Gbps/station. Tests at 8 Gbps/station are planned. A second-generation DBE system to process four 1 GHz-bandwidth IFs is now in development in collaboration with UC Berkeley and National Radio Astronomy Observatory; the cost of this system is expected to <10K.

  11. An analysis and intercomparison of VLBI nutation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Sovers, O. J.

    Nutation estimates from long duration VLBI experiments conducted by the Deep Space Network and reduced at JPL were compared with similar estimates from the IRIS/Polaris data reduced at Harvard. The two series were found to have an rms difference of 1.6 milliarcsec or less, and both exhibited the existence of seasonal errors in the IAU 1980 nutation theory. Most of the observed seasonal discrepancies could be removed by changing the period of the free core resonance to 431.5 solar days. The VLBI data constrain the resonance damping time to be at least one decade, and possibly much longer. Any free core nutation has an amplitude of less than 1 milliarcsec. Crude estimates of the atmospheric forcing of this resonance indicate that meteorological forcing could easily explain the observed free core nutation.

  12. Implementation and Testing of VLBI Software Correlation at the USNO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fey, Alan; Ojha, Roopesh; Boboltz, Dave; Geiger, Nicole; Kingham, Kerry; Hall, David; Gaume, Ralph; Johnston, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Washington Correlator (WACO) at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) is a dedicated VLBI processor based on dedicated hardware of ASIC design. The WACO is currently over 10 years old and is nearing the end of its expected lifetime. Plans for implementation and testing of software correlation at the USNO are currently being considered. The VLBI correlation process is, by its very nature, well suited to a parallelized computing environment. Commercial off-the-shelf computer hardware has advanced in processing power to the point where software correlation is now both economically and technologically feasible. The advantages of software correlation are manifold but include flexibility, scalability, and easy adaptability to changing environments and requirements. We discuss our experience with and plans for use of software correlation at USNO with emphasis on the use of the DiFX software correlator.

  13. Using GPS and VLBI technology to maintain 14 digit synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    To facilitate the navigation of spacecraft to the outer planets, Jupiter and beyond, the JPL-NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) has implemented three ensembles of atomic clocks at widely separated locations. These clocks must be maintained, synchronized, to with a few parts in 10 to the 13th power of each other and, the entire group must be maintained, to a lesser degree, in synchronism with Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)NBS/USNO. Over the last 1 1/2 years the DSN has been using Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technology to perform these critical Frequency and Time (F&T) synchronization tasks. A year of F&T synchronization data collected from the intercomparison of 3 sets of cesium and hydrogen maser driven clock ensembles through the use of GPS and VLBI techniques are covered. Also covered, are some of the problems met and limitations of these two techniques at their present level of technology.

  14. Radio-planetary from tie from Phobos-2 VLBI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, C. E.; Iijima, B. A.; Kroger, P. M.; Folkner, W. M.; Edwards, C. D.

    1994-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to improve the knowledge of the relative orientation (the 'frame tie') of the planetary ephemeris reference frame used in deep navigation and a second reference frame that is defined by the coordinates of a set of extragalactic radio sources, VLBI observations of the Soviet Phobos-2 spacecraft and nearby (in angle) radio sources were obtained at two epochs in 1989, shortly after the spacecraft entered orbit about Mars. The frame tie is an important systematic error source affecting both interplanetary navigation and the process of improving the theory of the Earth's orientation. The data from a single Phobos-2 VLBI session measure one component of the direction vector from Earth to Mars in the frame of the extragalactic radio sources (the 'radio frame'). The radio frame has been shown to be stable and internally consistent with an accuracy of 5 nrad. The planetary ephemeris reference frame has an internal consistency of approximately 15 nrad. The planetary and radio source reference frames were aligned prior to 1989 and measurements of occulations of the radio source 3C273 by the Moon. The Phobos-2 VLBI measurements provide improvement in the accuracy of two of the three angles describing a general rotation between the planetary and radio reference frames. A complete set of measurements is not available because data acquisition was terminated prematurely by loss of spacecraft. The analysis of the two Phobos-2 VLBI data sets indicates that, in the directions of the two rotation components determined by these data, the JPL planetary ephemeris DE200 is aligned with the radio frame as adopted by the International Earth Rotation Service within an accuracy of 20-40 nrad, depending on direction. The limiting errors in the solutions for these offsets are spacecraft trajectory (20 nrad), instrumental biases (19 nrad), and dependence of quasar coordinates on observing frequency (24 nrad).

  15. Phase Calibration for the Block 1 VLBI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, M. G.; Runge, T. F.

    1983-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) in the DSN provides support for spacecraft navigation, Earth orientation measurements, and synchronization of network time and frequency standards. An improved method for calibrating instrumental phase shifts has recently been implemented as a computer program in the Block 1 system. The new calibration program, called PRECAL, performs calibrations over intervals as small as 0.4 seconds and greatly reduces the amount of computer processing required to perform phase calibration.

  16. Precise Geodetic Infrastructure: National Requirements for a Shared Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minster, J. H.; Altamimi, Z.; Blewitt, G.; Carter, W. E.; Cazenave, A. A.; Dragert, H.; Herring, T.; Larson, K. M.; Ries, J. C.; Sandwell, D. T.; Wahr, J. M.; Davis, J. L.; Feary, D. A.; Shanley, L. A.; Nrc Committee On The National RequirementsPrecision Geodetic Infrastructure

    2010-12-01

    Recognizing the growing reliance of a wide range of scientific and societal endeavors on infrastructure for precise geodesy, and recognizing geodetic infrastructure as a shared national resource, NASA, USNO, NGA (DoD), NSF, NGS (NOAA), and USGS requested the National Research Council (NRC) to provide an independent assessment of the benefits provided by geodetic observations and networks, as well as a plan for the future development and support of the infrastructure needed to meet the demand for increasingly greater precision. We recommend in this study that “The United States, to maintain leadership in industry and science, and as a matter of national security, should invest in maintaining and improving the geodetic infrastructure, through upgrades in network design and construction, modernization of current observing systems, deployment of improved multi-technique observing capabilities, and funding opportunities for research, analysis, and education in global geodesy.” Today’s precise global geodetic infrastructure is fragile, and we also recommend (1) an international cooperative effort to increase the density of the international geodetic network with a goal of reaching a network of at least 24 fundamental stations; (2) a national GNSS network constructed to scientific specifications, capable of streaming high-rate data in real-time, with no restrictions on data access; (3) continued support of international geodetic services; (4) a long-term commitment to maintain the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. The astonishing advances toward higher geodetic accuracy at increasing temporal resolution are made possible only by all components of the geodetic infrastructure working together as a coherent system. The components of the geodetic infrastructure, however, are dispersed among various departments, agencies, and organizations. The nation’s precise geodetic infrastructure has not been considered holistically before now. Nevertheless, it is a

  17. Digital Base Band Converter As Radar Vlbi Backend / Dbbc Kā Ciparošanas Sistēma Radara Vlbi Novērojumiem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccari, G.; Bezrukovs, Vl.; Nechaeva, M.

    2012-12-01

    A digital base band converter (DBBC) system has been developed by the Istituto di Radioastronomia (Noto, Italy) for increasing the sensitivity of European VLBI Network (EVN) by expanding the full observed bandwidth using numerical methods. The output data rate of this VLBI-backend is raised from 1 to 4 Gbps for each radiotelescope. All operations related to the signal processing (frequency translation, amplification, frequency generation with local oscillators, etc.) are transferred to the digital domain, which allows - in addition to well-known advantages coming from digital technologies - achieving better repeatability, precision, simplicity, etc. The maximum input band of DBBC system is 3.5 GHz, and the instantaneous bandwidth is up to 1 GHz for each radio frequency/intermediate frequency (RF/IF) out of the eight possible. This backend is a highly powerful platform for other radioastronomy applications, and a number of additional so-called personalities have been developed and used. This includes PFB (polyphase filter bank) receivers and Spectra for high resolution spectroscopy. An additional new development with the same aim - to use the DBBC system as a multi-purpose backend - is related to the bi-static radar observations including Radar VLBI. In such observations it is possible to study the population of space debris, with detection of even centimetre class fragments. A powerful transmitter is used to illuminate the sky region to be analyzed, and the echoes coming from known or unknown objects are reflected to one or more groundbased telescopes thus producing a single-dish or interferometric detection. The DBBC Radar VLBI personality is able to realize a high-resolution spectrum analysis, maintaining in the central area the echo signal at the expected frequency including the Doppler shift of frequency. For extremely weak signals a very large integration time is needed, so for this personality different input parameters are provided. The realtime information

  18. Estimation of Geodetic and Geodynamical Parameters with VieVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicakova, Hana; Bohm, Johannes; Bohm, Sigrid; Nilsson, tobias; Pany, Andrea; Plank, Lucia; Teke, Kamil; Schuh, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008 the VLBI group at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at TU Vienna has focused on the development of a new VLBI data analysis software called VieVS (Vienna VLBI Software). One part of the program, currently under development, is a unit for parameter estimation in so-called global solutions, where the connection of the single sessions is done by stacking at the normal equation level. We can determine time independent geodynamical parameters such as Love and Shida numbers of the solid Earth tides. Apart from the estimation of the constant nominal values of Love and Shida numbers for the second degree of the tidal potential, it is possible to determine frequency dependent values in the diurnal band together with the resonance frequency of Free Core Nutation. In this paper we show first results obtained from the 24-hour IVS R1 and R4 sessions.

  19. Review of Space VLBI RadioAstron studies of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, Leonid; Kovalev, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    Space VLBI offers an unrivalled resolution in studies of the AGN phenomena. Since 2011, the Russia-led SVLBI mission RadioAstron conducts observations at 92, 18, 6 and 1.3 cm with baselines an order of magnitude longer than the Earth diameter, therefore offering an order of magnitude "sharper" view at the brightest radio sources than achieved with Earth-based VLBI systems. In our presentation we will review the current status of the RadioAstron's scientific programme. Over the first 4.5 years of the in-orbit operations, the mission achieved successful VLBI detections of extragalactic continuum radio sources at all four observing bands. To date, detections on SVLBI baselines have been obtained for more than 150 AGN's at projected baselines up to 350 000 km (about 28 Earth diameters, ED). The highest resolution achieved is 14 microarcscends from 1.3 cm observations. RadioAstron is an international project; it conducts observations with up to 30 Earth-based radio telescopes located on different continents. We will review results of total intensity and polarisation imaging with extreme angular resolution of blazars and nearby active galaxies. We will also discuss typical and maximum brightness temperatures of blazar cores from the AGN Survey obtained with RadioAstron. Physical implications for the AGN jets formation, magnetic field and emission mechanism will be discussed on the basis of the results obtained to date.

  20. Search for exoplanets and brown dwarfs with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katarzyński, K.; Gawroński, M.; Goździewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The main aim of this work is to estimate possible radio GHz emission of extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs and to check if such radiation can be detected by Very Large Baseline Interferometers (VLBI). In the estimation we assume that the emission may originate in processes similar to those observed in the Jupiter system. The frequency of the radio emission that is produced in this system depends mostly on the magnetic field strength. Jupiter's magnetic field (˜9 G on average) allows for radiation from kHz frequencies up to 40 MHz. This is well below the frequency range of VLBI. However, it was demonstrated that the magnetic field strength in massive and young object may be up to two orders of magnitude higher than for Jupiter, which is especially relevant for planets around short-lived A type stars. This should extend the range of the emission up to GHz frequencies. We calculated expected flux densities of radio emission for a variety of hypothetical young planetary systems. We analysed two different emission scenarios, and found that the radiation induced by moons (process similar to Jupiter-Io interactions) appears to be less efficient than the emission generated by a stellar wind on a planetary magnetosphere. We also estimated hypothetical emission of planets and brown dwarfs located around relatively young and massive main-sequence A-type stars. Our results show that the emission produced by stellar winds could be detected by currently operating VLBI networks.

  1. Planning of an Experiment for VLBI Tracking of GNSS Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza; Hass, Ruediger; Molera, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei

    2010-01-01

    As a preparation for future possible orbit determination of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) satellites by VLBI observations an initial three-station experiment was planned and performed in January 2009. The goal was to get first experience and to verify the feasibility of using the method for accurate satellite tracking. GNSS orbits related to a satellite constellation can be expressed in the Terrestrial Reference Frame. A comparison with orbit results that might be obtained by VLBI can give valuable information on how the GNSS reference frame and the VLBI reference frame are linked. We present GNSS transmitter specifications and experimental results of the observations of some GLONASS satellites together with evaluations for the expected signal strengths at telescopes. The satellite flux densities detected on the Earth s surface are very high. The narrow bandwidth of the GNSS signal partly compensates for potential problems at the receiving stations, and signal attenuation is necessary. Attempts to correlate recorded data have been performed with different software.

  2. Navigation of the space VLBI mission-HALCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    You, Tung Han; Ellis, Jordan; Mottinger, Neil

    1998-01-01

    In February 1997, the Japanese Space Agency ISAS launched the first space VLBI satellite, HALCA, with an 8 meter diameter wire mesh antenna and radio astronomy receivers capable of observing at 1.6, 4.8, and 22 Ghz. In a 560 by 21000 km orbit with a 6 hour period and 31 degree inclination, it observes celestial radio sources in conjunction with a world wide network of ground radio telescopes as part of an international collaborative effort which includes facilities in Japan, the U.S., Canada, Australia, and Europe. JPL is providing tracking and navigation support using a dedicated subnet of 11 meter antennas as well as co-observations using the DSN 70 meter antennas. This paper describes the spacecraft dynamics model and orbit determination strategies developed to meet the stringent trajectory accuracy requirements for generating predictions for the transfer of a stable uplink frequency to the spacecraft and for determining reconstructed orbits for delivery to the NRAO VLBI correlator and the international VLBI science community.

  3. Postglacial Rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.

    1996-01-01

    Difficulty in establishing a reference frame fixed to the earth's interior complicates the measurement of the vertical (radial) motions of the surface. I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier]. The optimal translation of the geocenter is 1.7mm/year toward 36degN, 111degE when determined from the motions of 10 VLBI sites. This translation gives a better fit of observations to predictions than does the VLBI reference frame used by Ma and Ryan, but the improvement is statistically insignificant. The root mean square of differences decreases 20% to 0.73 mm/yr and the correlation coefficient increases from 0.76 to 0.87. Postglacial rebound is evident in the uplift of points in Sweden and Ontario that were beneath the ancient ice sheets of Fennoscandia and Canada, and in the subsidence of points in the northeastern U.S., Germany, and Alaska that were around the periphery of the ancient ice sheets.

  4. Slip Distribution and Seismic Moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean Earthquakes Inferred from Tsunami Waveforms and Coastal Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yushiro; Satake, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The slip distribution and seismic moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean earthquakes were estimated from tsunami and coastal geodetic data. These two earthquakes generated transoceanic tsunamis, and the waveforms were recorded around the Pacific Ocean. In addition, coseismic coastal uplift and subsidence were measured around the source areas. For the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake, inversion of the tsunami waveforms recorded at nearby coastal tide gauge and Deep Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) stations combined with coastal geodetic data suggest two asperities: a northern one beneath the coast of Constitucion and a southern one around the Arauco Peninsula. The total fault length is approximately 400 km with seismic moment of 1.7 × 1022 Nm (Mw 8.8). The offshore DART tsunami waveforms require fault slips beneath the coasts, but the exact locations are better estimated by coastal geodetic data. The 22 May 1960 earthquake produced very large, ~30 m, slip off Valdivia. Joint inversion of tsunami waveforms, at tide gauge stations in South America, with coastal geodetic and leveling data shows total fault length of ~800 km and seismic moment of 7.2 × 1022 Nm (Mw 9.2). The seismic moment estimated from tsunami or joint inversion is similar to previous estimates from geodetic data, but much smaller than the results from seismic data analysis.

  5. Integration of space geodesy: a US National Geodetic Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Neilan, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    In the interest of improving the performance and efficiency of space geodesy a diverse group in the U.S., in collaboration with IGGOS, has begun to establish a unified National Geodetic Observatory (NGO).

  6. Astronomic-Geodetic Highlights from the Soviet Union,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report is a translation of an article in the German language periodical Austrian Journal of Geodesy , written by K. Ledersteger, published in Vienna in 1959. It concerns Astronomic-Geodetic highlights in the Soviet Union.

  7. Geodetic Imaging of the Earthquake Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiaopeng

    In this dissertation I used Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) to recover crustal deformation caused by earthquake cycle processes. The studied areas span three different types of tectonic boundaries: a continental thrust earthquake (M7.9 Wenchuan, China) at the eastern margin of the Tibet plateau, a mega-thrust earthquake (M8.8 Maule, Chile) at the Chile subduction zone, and the interseismic deformation of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS). A new L-band radar onboard a Japanese satellite ALOS allows us to image high-resolution surface deformation in vegetated areas, which is not possible with older C-band radar systems. In particular, both the Wenchuan and Maule InSAR analyses involved L-band ScanSAR interferometry which had not been attempted before. I integrated a large InSAR dataset with dense GPS networks over the entire SAFS. The integration approach features combining the long-wavelength deformation from GPS with the short-wavelength deformation from InSAR through a physical model. The recovered fine-scale surface deformation leads us to better understand the underlying earthquake cycle processes. The geodetic slip inversion reveals that the fault slip of the Wenchuan earthquake is maximum near the surface and decreases with depth. The coseismic slip model of the Maule earthquake constrains the down-dip extent of the fault slip to be at 45 km depth, similar to the Moho depth. I inverted for the slip rate on 51 major faults of the SAFS using Green's functions for a 3-dimensional earthquake cycle model that includes kinematically prescribed slip events for the past earthquakes since the year 1000. A 60 km thick plate model with effective viscosity of 10 19 Pa · s is preferred based on the geodetic and geological observations. The slip rates recovered from the plate models are compared to the half-space model. The InSAR observation reveals that the creeping section of the SAFS is partially locked. This high

  8. Permanent GPS Geodetic Array in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Cecil H.; Green, Ida M.

    1998-01-01

    The southern California Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) was established in the spring of 1990 to evaluate continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements as a new too] for monitoring crustal deformation. Southern California is an ideal location because of the relatively high rate of tectonic deformation, the high probability of intense seismicity, the long history of conventional and space geodetic measurements, and the availability of a well developed infrastructure to support continuous operations. Within several months of the start of regular operations, the PGGA recorded far-field coseismic displacements induced by the June 28, 1992 (M(sub w)=7.3), Landers earthquake, the largest magnitude earthquake in California in the past 40 years and the first one to be recorded by a continuous GPS array. Only nineteen months later, on 17 January 1994, the PGGA recorded coseismic displacements for the strongest earthquake to strike the Los Angeles basin in two decades, the (M(sub e)=6.7) Northridge earthquake. At the time of the Landers earthquake, only seven continuous GPS sites were operating in southern California; by the beginning of 1994, three more sites had been added to the array. However, only a pair of sites were situated in the Los Angeles basin. The destruction caused by the Northridge earthquake spurred a fourfold increase in the number of continuous GPS sites in southern California within 2 years of this event. The PGGA is now the regional component of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN), a major ongoing densification of continuous GPS sites, with a concentration in the Los Angeles metropolitan region. Continuous GPS provides temporally dense measurements of surface displacements induced by crustal deformation processes including interseismic, coseismic, postseismic, and aseismic deformation and the potential for detecting anomalous events such as preseismic deformation and interseismic strain variations. Although strain meters

  9. MultiView High Precision VLBI Astrometry at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioja, María J.; Dodson, Richard; Orosz, Gabor; Imai, Hiroshi; Frey, Sandor

    2017-03-01

    The arrival of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will revitalize all aspects of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) astronomy at lower frequencies. In the last decade, there have been huge strides toward routinely achieving high precision VLBI astrometry at frequencies dominated by tropospheric contributions, most notably at 22 GHz, using advanced phase-referencing techniques. Nevertheless, to increase the capability for high precision astrometric measurements at low radio frequencies (<8 GHz), an effective calibration strategy of the systematic ionospheric propagation effects that is widely applicable is required. Observations at low frequencies are dominated by distinct direction-dependent ionospheric propagation errors, which place a very tight limit on the angular separation of a suitable phase-referencing calibrator. The MultiView technique holds the key to compensating for atmospheric spatial-structure errors, by using observations of multiple calibrators and two-dimensional interpolation in the visibility domain. In this paper we present the first demonstration of the power of MultiView using three calibrators, several degrees from the target, along with a comparative study of the astrometric accuracy between MultiView and phase-referencing techniques. MultiView calibration provides an order of magnitude improvement in astrometry with respect to conventional phase referencing, achieving ∼100 μas astrometry errors in a single epoch of observations, effectively reaching the thermal noise limit. MultiView will achieve its full potential with the enhanced sensitivity and multibeam capabilities of SKA and the pathfinders, which will enable simultaneous observations of the target and calibrators. Our demonstration indicates that the 10 μas goal of astrometry at ∼1.6 GHz using VLBI with SKA is feasible using the MultiView technique.

  10. Future Evolution of NASA's SLR and VLBI Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John M.; Carter, D.; Wildes, W.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the first half of this decade the NASA Space Geodesy Program is planning a major transformation of its existing (Satellite Laser Ranging) SLR network of stations and also further evolutionary changes to its network of (Very Long Base Interferometry) VLBI stations. These network changes will be made to meet the ever more demanding requirements of the earth and space science programs that these networks support while seeking through automation and electronic data communications to increase efficiency and decrease cost of operations and maintenance. The major aspects of the NASA plan will be outlined and the benefits to the scientific community will be addressed.

  11. Precise Doppler tracking from the Medicina VLBI station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosini, R.; Comoretto, G.; Iess, L.; Messeri, A.

    1992-06-01

    The first opposition test of Doppler tracking the Ulysses spacecraft from the Medicina VLBI (Very Long Base Interferometry) station (Italy) proved its capability to perform a systematic search for gravitational waves. In house and JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) data analysis showed that the target Allan variance of 3 x 10(exp -14) at 1000 s, planned for the DSN antennas was also achieved from the station. The main observation campaign during the second opposition phase will last for thirty continuous nights--from mid Feb. to mid Mar. 1992. The main hardware and software features developed for this application, together with some results of the first opposition test, are described.

  12. Theory of post-block 2 VLBI observable extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen T.

    1992-01-01

    The algorithms used in the post-Block II fringe-fitting software called 'Fit' are described. The steps needed to derive the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) charged-particle corrected group delay, phase delay rate, and phase delay (the latter without resolving cycle ambiguities) are presented beginning with the set of complex fringe phasors as a function of observation frequency and time. The set of complex phasors is obtained from the JPL/CIT Block II correlator. The output of Fit is the set of charged-particle corrected observables (along with ancillary information) in a form amenable to the software program 'Modest.'

  13. AuScope VLBI Project and Hobart 26-m Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Jim; Dickey, John; Reid, Brett; McCallum, Jamie; Shabala, Stas; Watson, Christopher; Ellingsen, Simon; Memin, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on the activities carried out at the three AuScope VLBI observatories and the Hobart 26-m antenna. In 2012 the three AuScope 12-m antennas at Hobart (Hb), Katherine (Ke), and Yarragadee (Yg) completed their first full year of operations as an array. The Hobart 26-m antenna (Ho) continued to make a contribution to IVS, providing overlap with the Hb time series. In total the AuScope antennas and the Hobart 26 m observed for 146 antenna days in 2012. In this report we also briefly highlight our research activities during 2012 and our plans for 2013.

  14. Doppler measurements of an interplanetary satellite with a VLBI antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomoretto, G.; Iess, L.; Bertotti, Bruno; Grueff, G.; Brenkle, I. B.; Horton, A.

    1989-01-01

    In preparation for the Ulysses Gravitational Wave Experiment a Doppler detector has been constructed for the Bologna VLBI antenna and tested in a differential mode with the spacecraft Voyager 2 at 25 AU. In this mode the signal was sent from the Deep Space Network station in Canberra and received at Madrid and Bologna. The correlation between the received signals allows a discrimination between local and common noise sources. The successful test was performed in August, 1988 showed that special communication procedure will have to be implemented to allow a smooth and reliable operation during the real experiment.

  15. On Similarity Transformation and Geodetic Network Distortions Based on Doppler Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leick, Alfred; Vangelder, Boudewijn H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Models used in geodesy to transform two sets of coordinates are studied and distortions in geodetic networks are investigated. Commonly used transformation models are first reviewed and most of them are interpreted. Differences between various models are discussed. Pitfalls in partial solutions are then considered. It is shown that only as many chords and/or directional elements can be used in the computation as are needed to completely determine the size or shape of the polyhedron implied in the set of Cartesian coordinates. Each additional element causes the normal matrix to be singular provided that all correlations between the chords are used. A number of tables and maps indicating distortions in the NAD 27, Precise Traverse M-R '72, AUS, and SAD 69 geodetic datums are also included. The residuals of the coordinates are scanned for systematic patterns after transforming each geodetic system to the NWL9D Doppler system. Also, an attempt is made to show scale distortions in the NAD 27.

  16. The SCEC geodetic transient detection validation exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Rowena B.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the number and size of continuously operating Global Positioning System (GPS) networks has grown substantially worldwide. A steadily increasing volume of freely available GPS measurements, combined with the application of new approaches for mining these data for signals of interest, has led to the identification of a large and diverse collection of time‐varying Earth processes. One phenomenon that has been observed is transient fault slip (also termed slow slip events or silent earthquakes) occurring over time spans of days to years (e.g., Linde et al., 1996; Hirose et al., 1999; Dragert et al., 2001; Miller et al., 2002; Kostoglodov et al., 2003; Douglas et al., 2005; Shelly et al., 2006; Ide et al., 2007; Lohman and McGuire, 2007; Schwartz and Rokosky, 2007; Szeliga et al., 2008). Such events have been widely observed in subduction zones but are also found in other tectonic settings (Linde et al., 1996; Cervelli et al., 2002; Murray and Segall, 2005; Lohman and McGuire, 2007; Montgomery‐Brown et al., 2009; Shelly, 2010; and references therein). Although retrospective study of slow‐slip events using geodetic observations is driving the formulation of new models for fault‐zone behavior and constitutive laws (e.g., Lapusta et al., 2000; Liu and Rice, 2007; Lapusta and Liu, 2009; Segall and Bradley, 2012a), much of the research on near‐real‐time detection and characterization of anomalous behaviors along fault zones has focused solely on the use of seismic tremor (e.g., Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Shelly et al., 2006; Ito et al., 2007).

  17. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  18. The VLBI time delay function for synchronous orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, B.

    1972-01-01

    The VLBI is a satellite tracking technique that to date was applied largely to the tracking of synchronous orbits. These orbits are favorable for VLBI in that the remote satellite range allows continuous viewing from widely separated stations. The primary observable, geometric time delay is the time difference for signal propagation between satellite and baseline terminals. Extraordinary accuracy in angular position data on the satellite can be obtained by observation from baselines of continental dimensions. In satellite tracking though the common objective is to derive orbital elements. A question arises as to how the baseline vector bears on the accuracy of determining the elements. Our approach to this question is to derive an analytic expression for the time delay function in terms of Kepler elements and station coordinates. The analysis, which is for simplicity based on elliptic motion, shows that the resolution for the inclination of the orbital plane depends on the magnitude of the baseline polar component and the resolution for in-plane elements depends on the magnitude of a projected equatorial baseline component.

  19. Amplitude Correction Factors of Korean VLBI Network Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Oh, Chung Sik; Kim, Hyo Ryoung; Kim, Jongsoo; Jung, Taehyun; Oh, Se-Jin; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Jung, Dong-Kyu; Yeom, Jae-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    We report results of investigation of amplitude calibration for very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations with Korean VLBI Network (KVN). Amplitude correction factors are estimated based on comparison of KVN observations at 22~GHz correlated by Daejeon hardware correlator and DiFX software correlator in Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 22~GHz by DiFX software correlator in National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). We used the observations for compact radio sources, 3C~454.3, NRAO~512, OJ 287, BL Lac, 3C 279, 1633+382, and 1510-089, which are almost unresolved for baselines in a range of 350-477~km. Visibility data of the sources obtained with similar baselines at KVN and VLBA are selected, fringe-fitted, calibrated, and compared for their amplitudes. We find that visibility amplitudes of KVN observations should be corrected by factors of 1.10 and 1.35 when correlated by DiFX and Daejeon correlators, respectively. These correction factors are attributed to the combination of two steps of 2-bit quantization in KVN observing systems and characteristics of Daejeon correlator.

  20. An accuracy assessment of Magellan Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhardt, D. B.; Kronschnabl, G. R.; Border, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) measurements of the Magellan spacecraft's angular position and velocity were made during July through September, 1989, during the spacecraft's heliocentric flight to Venus. The purpose of this data acquisition and reduction was to verify this data type for operational use before Magellan is inserted into Venus orbit, in August, 1990. The accuracy of these measurements are shown to be within 20 nanoradians in angular position, and within 5 picoradians/sec in angular velocity. The media effects and their calibrations are quantified; the wet fluctuating troposphere is the dominant source of measurement error for angular velocity. The charged particle effect is completely calibrated with S- and X-Band dual-frequency calibrations. Increasing the accuracy of the Earth platform model parameters, by using VLBI-derived tracking station locations consistent with the planetary ephemeris frame, and by including high frequency Earth tidal terms in the Earth rotation model, add a few nanoradians improvement to the angular position measurements. Angular velocity measurements were insensitive to these Earth platform modelling improvements.

  1. VLBI observations of single stars, spatial resolution and astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestalozzi, M.; Benz, A. O.; Conway, J. E.; Gudel, M.; Smith, K.

    VLBI studies can both spatially resolve single dMe stars and measure their positions at submilliarcsecond accuracy. The spatial resolution gives the brightness temperature and allows us to draw co nclusions about the nature of the emitting processes. In particular it is possib le to distinguish between thermal or non-thermal emission. The position accuracy gives better knowledge about the astrometric properties (like proper motion and parallax) especially for nearby stars. In this contribution recent results of c ontinuum VLBI observations towards two dMe stars (YZ CMi and AD Leo) at 8.4 GHz are presented. For YZ CMi an estimate of the size of the coronal emission is giv en (0.98 mas in diameter or 0.7 ±0.3 Rstar above the photosphere where Rstar refers to the photospheric radius). For AD Leo an upper limit is gi ven, i.e. the emitting region is shown to be < 0.8 Rstar. The position o f YZ CMi is found to differ by 32 mas form the Hipparcos catalogue, a discrepanc y mostly due to large errors in the listed proper motion (Pestalozzi et al. 2000 ).

  2. Plate tectonics from VLBI and SLR global data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Christopher G. A.; Robaudo, Stefano

    1992-01-01

    This study is based on data derived from fifteen years of observations of the SLR (side-looking radar) network and six years of the VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) network. In order to use all available information VLBI and SLR global data sets were combined in a least squares fashion to calculate station horizontal velocities. All significant data pertaining to a single site contribute to the station horizontal motion. The only constraint on the solution is that no vertical motion is allowed. This restriction does not greatly affect the precision of the overall solution given the fact that the expected vertical motion for most stations, even those experiencing post glacial uplift, is well under 1 cm/yr. Since the average baseline is under 4,000 km, only a small fraction of the station vertical velocity is translated into baseline rates so that the error introduced in the solution by restricting up-down station movement is minimal. As a reference, station velocities were then compared to the ones predicted by the NUVEL-1 geological model of DeMets et al. (1990). The focus of the study is on analyzing these discrepancies for global plate tectonics as well as regional tectonic settings. The method used also allows us not only to derive horizontal motion for individual stations but also to calculate Euler vectors for those plates that have enough stations located on the stable interior like North America, Pacific, Eurasia, and Australia.

  3. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Observed with VLBI and SLR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, D.; Peltier, W.; Watkins, M.

    1999-01-01

    In global geodetic solutions vertical rates of site motion are usually estimated relative to the geocenter (center of figure) of the solid earth. The velocity of the geocenter is estimated assuming that the plates are rigid, that the velocities of the plates equal those in NUVEL-1A (DeMets et al. 1990, 1994) and that the uplift, subsidence, and intraplate deformation due to glacial isostatic adjustment is negligible.

  4. Current Status of the Development of a Transportable and Compact VLBI System by NICT and GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, Atsutoshi; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kurihara, Shinobu; Miura, Yuji; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; Tanimoto, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    MARBLE (Multiple Antenna Radio-interferometer for Baseline Length Evaluation) is under development by NICT and GSI. The main part of MARBLE is a transportable VLBI system with a compact antenna. The aim of this system is to provide precise baseline length over about 10 km for calibrating baselines. The calibration baselines are used to check and validate surveying instruments such as GPS receiver and EDM (Electro-optical Distance Meter). It is necessary to examine the calibration baselines regularly to keep the quality of the validation. The VLBI technique can examine and evaluate the calibration baselines. On the other hand, the following roles are expected of a compact VLBI antenna in the VLBI2010 project. In order to achieve the challenging measurement precision of VLBI2010, it is well known that it is necessary to deal with the problem of thermal and gravitational deformation of the antenna. One promising approach may be connected-element interferometry between a compact antenna and a VLBI2010 antenna. By measuring repeatedly the baseline between the small stable antenna and the VLBI2010 antenna, the deformation of the primary antenna can be measured and the thermal and gravitational models of the primary antenna will be able to be constructed. We made two prototypes of a transportable and compact VLBI system from 2007 to 2009. We performed VLBI experiments using theses prototypes and got a baseline length between the two prototypes. The formal error of the measured baseline length was 2.7 mm. We expect that the baseline length error will be reduced by using a high-speed A/D sampler.

  5. LAGEOS geodetic analysis-SL7.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Dunn, P. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Robbins, J. W.; Torrence, M. H.; Williamson, R. G.; Pavlis, E. C.; Douglas, N. B.; Fricke, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    Laser ranging measurements to the LAGEOS satellite from 1976 through 1989 are related via geodetic and orbital theories to a variety of geodetic and geodynamic parameters. The SL7.1 analyses are explained of this data set including the estimation process for geodetic parameters such as Earth's gravitational constant (GM), those describing the Earth's elasticity properties (Love numbers), and the temporally varying geodetic parameters such as Earth's orientation (polar motion and Delta UT1) and tracking site horizontal tectonic motions. Descriptions of the reference systems, tectonic models, and adopted geodetic constants are provided; these are the framework within which the SL7.1 solution takes place. Estimates of temporal variations in non-conservative force parameters are included in these SL7.1 analyses as well as parameters describing the orbital states at monthly epochs. This information is useful in further refining models used to describe close-Earth satellite behavior. Estimates of intersite motions and individual tracking site motions computed through the network adjustment scheme are given. Tabulations of tracking site eccentricities, data summaries, estimated monthly orbital and force model parameters, polar motion, Earth rotation, and tracking station coordinate results are also provided.

  6. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of geodetic data in the vicinity of the Crustal Dynamics Program (CDP) site at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VNDN) is presented. The utility of space-geodetic data in the monitoring of transient strains associated with earthquakes in tectonically active areas like California is investigated. Particular interest is in the possibility that space-geodetic methods may be able to provide critical new data on deformations precursory to large seismic events. Although earthquake precursory phenomena are not well understood, the monitoring of small strains in the vicinity of active faults is a promising technique for studying the mechanisms that nucleate large earthquakes and, ultimately, for earthquake prediction. Space-geodetic techniques are now capable of measuring baselines of tens to hundreds of kilometers with a precision of a few parts in 108. Within the next few years, it will be possible to record and analyze large-scale strain variations with this precision continuously in real time. Thus, space-geodetic techniques may become tools for earthquake prediction. In anticipation of this capability, several questions related to the temporal and spatial scales associated with subseismic deformation transients are examined.

  7. Improving the modeling of the atmospheric delay in the data analysis of the Intensive VLBI sessions and the impact on the UT1 estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Tobias; Soja, Benedikt; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Karbon, Maria; Heinkelmann, Robert; Deng, Zhiguo; Schuh, Harald

    2017-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) Intensive sessions are typically 1-h and single-baseline VLBI sessions, specifically designed to yield low-latency estimates of UT1-UTC. In this work, we investigate what accuracy is obtained from these sessions and how it can be improved. In particular, we study the modeling of the troposphere in the data analysis. The impact of including external information on the zenith wet delays (ZWD) and tropospheric gradients from GPS or numerical weather prediction models is studied. Additionally, we test estimating tropospheric gradients in the data analysis, which is normally not done. To evaluate the results, we compared the UT1-UTC values from the Intensives to those from simultaneous 24-h VLBI session. Furthermore, we calculated length of day (LOD) estimates using the UT1-UTC values from consecutive Intensives and compared these to the LOD estimated by GPS. We find that there is not much benefit in using external ZWD; however, including external information on the gradients improves the agreement with the reference data. If gradients are estimated in the data analysis, and appropriate constraints are applied, the WRMS difference w.r.t. UT1-UTC from 24-h sessions is reduced by 5% and the WRMS difference w.r.t. the LOD from GPS by up to 12%. The best agreement between Intensives and the reference time series is obtained when using both external gradients from GPS and additionally estimating gradients in the data analysis.

  8. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry 2004 General Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the third General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astromctry IVS), held in Otlawa, Canada, February 9-11,2004. The keynote of the third GM was visions for the next decade following the main theme of "Today's Results and Tomorrow's Vision". with a recognition that the outstanding VLBI results available today are the foundation and motivation for the next generation VLBI system requirements. The goal of the meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts.

  9. Submicrosecond comparison of international clock synchronization by VLBI and the NTS satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Wardrip, S. C.; Bussion, J.; Oaks, J.; Mccaskill, T.; Warren, H.; Whitworth, G.

    1979-01-01

    The intercontinental clock synchronization capabilities of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and the Navigation Technology Satellite (NTS) were compared using both methods to synchronize the Cesium clocks at the NASA Deep Space Net complexes at Madrid, Spain and Goldstone, California. Verification of the accuracy of both systems was examined. The VLBI experiments used the Wideband VLBI Data Acquisition System developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The NTS Satellites were designed and built by the Naval Research Laboratory used with NTS Timing Receivers developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center. The two methods agreed at about the one-half microsecond level.

  10. Combining VLBI and Gamma-Ray Satellite Observations in Blazar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiik, K.; Savolainen, T.; Valtaoja, E.

    2004-10-01

    VLBI enables us to observe synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons in the innermost regions of blazars. According to the leptonic models, the same electrons pro- duce also the high-energy radiation component through inverse Compton scattering of seed photons. One demon- stration of the connection between high- and low-energy emission is the correlation found between VLBI compo- nent ejections and gamma-ray flares. VLBI can probe the physical parameters of emitting re- gions, like Lorentz factors and magnetic field direction, and can improve SED modeling by providing the spectra of individual jet components.

  11. Mercury's interior from MESSENGER geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed more than 4 years of operations in orbit about Mercury. One of the main mission goals was the determination of the interior structure of Mercury enabled by geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, rotation, and tides by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system. MLA acquired over 25 million individual measurements of Mercury's shape that are mostly limited to the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. However, the lack of laser altimetry in the southern hemisphere has been partly compensated by ˜400 occultations of spacecraft radio signals. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2. The combination of altimetry and radio measurements provides a powerful tool for the investigation of Mercury's orientation and tides, which enable a better understanding of the interior structure of the planet. The MLA measurements have been assembled into a digital elevation model (DEM) of the northern hemisphere. We then used individual altimetric measurements from the spacecraft for orbit determination, together with the radio tracking, over a continuous span of time using a batch least-squares filter. All observations were combined to recover directly the gravity field coefficients, obliquity, librations, and tides by minimizing the discrepancies between the computed observables and actual measurements. We will present the estimated 100×100 gravity field model, the obliquity, the Love number k2, and, for the first time, the tidal phase lag φ and the amplitude of the longitudinal libration from radio and altimetry data. The k2 phase provides information on Mercury's dissipation and mantle viscosity and allows a determination of the Q factor. A refinement of

  12. Precise orbit determination of a geosynchronous satellite by Delta VLBI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, T.; Kozono, S.-I.; Arimoto, Y.; Nagai, S.; Isogai, M.

    1984-07-01

    An experiment carried out to track the geosynchronous Japanese Communications Satellite for Experimental Purposes (CS) by Delta VLBI method is described. A baseline of 46 km length north-south was used, along with seven quasars as reference natural radio sources. The Delta VLBI method, the observational sensitivity of the VLBI with respect to the CS, and the experimental system are described. The errors due to system noises of the receiving systems and other sources are analyzed, and the data reduction methods and the results are presented. Differential ranges are obtained with 60 cm accuracy. Analysis of the accuracy of the orbit determination and of simulation studies demonstrates the usefulness of the Delta VLBI method for highly accurate orbit determination of a geosynchronous satellite.

  13. Submicrosecond comparison of intercontinental clock synchronization by VLBI and the NTS satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Wardrip, S. C.; Bussion, J.; Oaks, J.; Mccaskill, T.; Warren, H.; Whitworth, G.

    1979-01-01

    The intercontinental clock synchronization capabilities of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and the Navigation Technology Satellite (NTS) were compared in May 1978 by using both methods to synchronize the cesium clocks at the NASA Deep Space Net complexes at Madrid, Spain, and Goldstone, California. The VLBI experiments used the Wideband VLBI Data Acquisition System. The Navigation Technology Satellites were used with NTS Timing Receivers developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center. The two methods agreed at about the one-half microsecond level. The VLBI system also obtained long-term stability information on the HP5061A004 cesium standards by measuring delta T/T over four 3- to 4-day intervals, obtaining stability estimates of (1 + or - 1)x10 to the -13th power for the combined timing systems.

  14. Wide-Band Data Transmission System Expected in the Next Generation Space VLBI Mission: VSOP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murata, Yasuhiro; Hirabayashi, Hisashi

    2002-01-01

    Following the success of the VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP), a next generation space VLBI mission (VSOP-2) is currently being planned. We expect the data rate of more than 1 Gbps to get more sensitivity. Here we will present: (1) How to sample the data (on board), including the radiation test results which show we can have the 10 Gbps sampler LSI which can use in space; (2) Possibility of the bit rate more than 1 Gbps to downlink the VLBI data. We studied the link budget for the wide band data transmission, and discussed the various ideas which can get more than 1 Gbps; and (3) What kind of VLBI tracking station and recording system will be expected for the VSOP-2 mission? We will present the idea of using normal radio telescopes as a tracking station, and also review the possibility of recording and processing at the tracking stations and correlators.

  15. The search for reference sources for delta VLBI navigation of the Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulvestad, J. S.; Linfield, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive search was made in order to identify celestial radio sources that can be used as references for navigation of the Galileo spacecraft by means of VLBI observations. The astronomical literature was seached for potential navigation sources, and several VLBI experiments were performed to determine the suitability of those sources for navigation. The results of such work performed since mid-1983 is reported. A summary is presented of the source properties required, the procedures used to identify candidate sources, and the results of the observations of these sources. The lists of souces presented are not meant to be taken directly and used for VLBI navigation, but they do provide a means of identifying the radio sources that could be used at various positions along the Galileo trajectory. Since the reference sources nearest the critical points of Jupiter encounter and probe release are rather weak, it would be extremely beneficial to use a pair of 70-m antennas for the VLBI measurements.

  16. E-VLBI-activities at the FS Wettzell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Dassing, Reiner

    The FS-Wettzell carries out the daily-INTENSIVE observations which were required for the rapid determination of DUT1. The data volume is roughly 40 GB. So fare the data were shipped via currier services to the correlator which requires 2-3 days transportation time. The INTENSIVE time series is a real candidate for E-VLBI. It will reduce the delay due to data transport strongly. Considering the remote location of Wettzell - apart from the fast INTERNET links, considering the current high cost for a fast connection, in the next future the installation of a 34 Gbps-internet connection will be realistic. It will strongly support the data transmission on start the delay time to only a few hours. This report give an overview about the activities on the realisation of such a fast link. First attempts are reported made from the next nodal point at the University Regensburg, making use of a 155Mbps connection.

  17. Determination of intercontinental baselines and Earth orientation using VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovers, O. J.; Fanselow, J. L.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Rogstad, D. H.; Thomas, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted during the last decade to explore the capability of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) to measure the crustal and rotational motions of the Earth with accuracies at the centimeter level. The observing stations are those of NASA's Deep Space Network in California, Spain and Australia. A multiparameter fit to the observed values of delay and delay rate yields radio source positions, polar motion, universal time, the precession constant, baseline vectors, and solid Earth tides. Source positions are obtained with formal errors of the order of 0''.01. UT1-UTC and polar motion are determined at 49 epochs, with formal error estimates for the more recent data of 0.5 msec for UT1-UTC and 2 to 6 mas for polar motion. Intercontinental baseline lengths are determined with formal errors of 5 to 10 cm. The Love numbers and Earth tide phase lag agree with the commonly accepted values.

  18. Mobile VLBI deployment plans of the Crustal Dynamics Project for the western United States and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, D. W.; Vegos, C. J.

    Current plans for the Mobile VLBI program are addressed. Present mobile stations and their past activities are summarized, and past and future modes of obtaining data are compared, including the 'burst' and 'leap frog' modes. The observational campaign for Mobile VLBI is described, emphasizing the portions in Canada and Alaska. The extent to which the mobile stations are utilized and the ways in which the site visit yield may be increased are discussed.

  19. Mobile VLBI deployment plans of the Crustal Dynamics Project for the western United States and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trask, D. W.; Vegos, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Current plans for the Mobile VLBI program are addressed. Present mobile stations and their past activities are summarized, and past and future modes of obtaining data are compared, including the 'burst' and 'leap frog' modes. The observational campaign for Mobile VLBI is described, emphasizing the portions in Canada and Alaska. The extent to which the mobile stations are utilized and the ways in which the site visit yield may be increased are discussed.

  20. El Nino, La Nina and VLBI Measured LOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Thomas A.; Gipson, J. M.; Ma, C.

    1998-01-01

    VLBI is one of the most important techniques for measuring Earth orientation parameters (EOP), and is unique in its ability to make high accuracy measurements of UT1, and its time derivative, which is related to changes in the length of day, conventionally called LOD. These measurements of EOP give constraints on geophysical models of the solid-Earth, atmosphere and oceans. Changes in EOP are due either to external torques from gravitational forces, or to the exchange of angular momentum between the Earth, atmosphere and oceans. The effect of the external torques is strictly harmonic and nature, and is therefore easy to remove. We analyze an LOD time series derived from VLBI measurements with the goal of comparing this to predictions from AAM, and various ENSO indices. Previous work by ourselves and other investigators demonstrated a high degree of coherence between atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and EOP. We continue to see this. As the angular momentum of the atmosphere increases, the rate of rotation of the Earth decreases, and vice versa. The signature of the ENSO is particularly strong. At the peak of the 1982-83 El Nino increased LOD by almost 1 ms. This was subsequently followed by a reduction in LOD of 0.75 ms. At its peak, in February of 1998, the 1997-98 El Nino increased LOD by 0.8 msec. As predicted at the 1998 Spring AGU, this has been followed by an abrupt decrease in LOD which is currently -0.4 ms. At this time (August, 1998) the current ENSO continues to develop in new and unexpected ways. We plan to update our analysis with all data available prior to the Fall AGU.

  1. Free geometric adjustment of the DOC/DOD cooperative worldwide geodetic satellite (BC-4) network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, J. P.; Kumar, M.; Mueller, I. I.; Saxena, N.

    1973-01-01

    The application of observations from the ANNA satellite to solve geodetic problems is discussed. The establishment of a worldwide network of optical observing stations by the National Geodetic Survey is reported. The geodetic network is composed of 49 observing stations, more or less evenly distributed throughout the world. A method for using correlated satellite observations for the accurate recovery of ground station positions and applying the result to the adjustment of the National Geodetic Survey worldwide network was developed.

  2. A New Global Geodetic Strain Rate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, C. W.; Klein, E. C.; Blewitt, G.; Shen, Z.; Wang, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N. R.; Rabaute, A.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) effort to improve global seismic hazard models, we present a new global geodetic strain rate model. This model (GSRM v. 2) is a vast improvement on the previous model from 2004 (v. 1.2). The model is still based on a finite-element type approach and has deforming cells in between the assumed rigid plates. While v.1.2 contained ~25,000 deforming cells of 0.6° by 0.5° dimension, the new models contains >136,000 cells of 0.25° by 0.2° dimension. We redefined the geometries of the deforming zones based on the definitions of Bird (2003) and Chamot-Rooke and Rabaute (2006). We made some adjustments to the grid geometry at places where seismicity and/or GPS velocities suggested the presence of deforming areas where those previous studies did not. As a result, some plates/blocks identified by Bird (2003) we assumed to deform, and the total number of plates and blocks in GSRM v.2 is 38 (including the Bering block, which Bird (2003) did not consider). GSRM v.1.2 was based on ~5,200 GPS velocities, taken from 86 studies. The new model is based on ~17,000 GPS velocities, taken from 170 studies. The GPS velocity field consists of a 1) ~4900 velocities derived by us for CPS stations publicly available RINEX data and >3.5 years of data, 2) ~1200 velocities for China from a new analysis of all CMONOC data, and 3) velocities published in the literature or made otherwise available to us. All studies were combined into the same reference frame by a 6-parameter transformation using velocities at collocated stations. Because the goal of the project is to model the interseismic strain rate field, we model co-seismic jumps while estimating velocities, ignore periods of post-seismic deformation, and exclude time-series that reflect magmatic and anthropogenic activity. GPS velocities were used to estimate angular velocities for most of the 38 rigid plates and blocks (the rest being taken from the literature), and these were used as boundary

  3. Development of an e-VLBI Data Transport Software Suite with VDIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Moritaka; Hobiger, Thomas; Kokado, Kensuke; Nozawa, Kentarou; Kurihara, Shinobu; Shinno, Takuya; Takahashi, Fujinobu

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a software library (KVTP-lib) for VLBI data transmission over the network with the VDIF (VLBI Data Interchange Format), which is the newly proposed standard VLBI data format designed for electronic data transfer over the network. The software package keeps the application layer (VDIF frame) and the transmission layer separate, so that each layer can be developed efficiently. The real-time VLBI data transmission tool sudp-send is an application tool based on the KVTP-lib library. sudp-send captures the VLBI data stream from the VSI-H interface with the K5/VSI PC-board and writes the data to file in standard Linux file format or transmits it to the network using the simple- UDP (SUDP) protocol. Another tool, sudp-recv , receives the data stream from the network and writes the data to file in a specific VLBI format (K5/VSSP, VDIF, or Mark 5B). This software system has been implemented on the Wettzell Tsukuba baseline; evaluation before operational employment is under way.

  4. Strategies for Space-Geodetic Monitoring of Infraseismic and Subseismic Transient Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    The utility of space-geodetic data in elucidating infraseismic and subseismic phenomena is assessed. Existing seismological, geodetic, and other data to characterize the distribution of infraseismic and subseismic transients are used. Strategies for space-geodetic monitoring of infraseismic and subseismic transients along major plate boundaries are developed.

  5. A 3-D Multilateration: A Precision Geodetic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Fliegel, H. F.; Jaffe, R. M.; Muller, P. M.; Ong, K. M.; Vonroos, O. H.

    1972-01-01

    A system was designed with the capability of determining 1-cm accuracy station positions in three dimensions using pulsed laser earth satellite tracking stations coupled with strictly geometric data reduction. With this high accuracy, several crucial geodetic applications become possible, including earthquake hazards assessment, precision surveying, plate tectonics, and orbital determination.

  6. The Contribution of the Geodetic Community (WG4) to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bastos, L. C.; Bruyninx, C.; D'Agostino, N.; Dousa, J.; Ganas, A.; Lidberg, M.; Nocquet, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Infrastructure" is the Working Group of the EPOS project responsible to define and prepare the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures into a unique future consistent infrastructure that supports the European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries and from EUREF (European Reference Frame), which also ensures the inclusion and the contact with countries that formally are not part of the current phase of EPOS. In reality, the fact that Europe is formed by many countries (having different laws and policies) lacking an infrastructure similar to UNAVCO (which concentrates the effort of the local geo-science community) raises the difficulties to create a common geodetic infrastructure serving not only the entire geo-science community, but also many other areas of great social-economic impact. The benefits of the creation of such infrastructure (shared and easily accessed by all) are evident in order to optimize the existing and future geodetic resources. This presentation intends to detail the work being produced within the working group WG4 related with the definition of strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Discussed issues include the access to high-rate data in near real-time, storage and backup of historical and future data, the sustainability of the networks in order to achieve long-term stability in the observation infrastructure, seamless access to the data, open data policies, and processing tools.

  7. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.; Oshiro, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Pacific GPS Facility and the Field Robotics Laboratory at the University of Hawaii have developed an approach to significantly reduce costs below ship based methods of accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure. Our goal has been to reduce the primary barrier preventing us from acquiring the observations we need to understand geodetic processes, and the hazards they present, at subduction zones, submarine volcanoes, and subsea landslides. To this end, we have designed a payload package for one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders which incorporates an acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, meteorological sensors, processing computer, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the seafloor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data. The seafloor geodetic monument seats a sensor capable of recording pressure, temperature, and sound velocity for a deployment duration of over 5 years with an acoustic modem for communications, and an integral acoustic release for recovery and replacement of batteries. The design of the geodetic monument allows for precise repositioning of the sensor to extend the pressure record beyond a single 5+ year deployment, and includes the capability to install a mobile pressure recorder for calibration of the linear drift of the continuous pressure sensor. We will present the design of the Wave Glider payload and seafloor geodetic monument, as well as a discussion of nearshore and offshore field tests and operational procedures. An assessment of our ability to determine cm-scale vertical seafloor motions will be made by integrating the seafloor pressure measurements recovered during field testing with independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height made by the sea surface payload.

  8. Multiple Geodetic Observations for Identifying Glacial Isostatic Adjustment and the Causes of Sea-Level Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamisiea, M. E.; Williams, S. D. P.; Hughes, C. W.; Bingley, R.; Blewitt, G.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the Earth's and ocean's response to past changes in global ice extent and ocean volume, collectively termed glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), is necessary for interpreting observations of present-day sea level change. GIA has the largest effect on sea-level observations nearest the locations of the former ice sheets. Under the former loading centers, crustal uplift contributes to a local relative sea-level fall while the collapsing forebulge surrounding these centers accentuates a local sea-level rise. Some of the longest tide gauge records are in these regions. However, GIA also causes global deformation and geoid changes that introduce systematic differences between global averages of tide gauge and altimetry observations. Clearly accounting for the GIA contribution to sea-level change while identifying other present-day contributors is greatly assisted by additional geodetic measurements. Time-variable satellite gravity observations highlight the regional GIA signal, on length scales of hundreds of kilometers, while also locating water mass changes on the continents and the oceans. As the spatial density of GNSS observations has increased, it has become easier to discern the regional characteristics of crustal deformation (e.g. Blewitt et al. abstract in U009). Combined, these two observations allow for greater separation of GIA and water mass changes. More importantly for society, though, the regional crustal estimates could be combined with coastal altimetry products to create regional estimates of relative sea-level change, the observation most relevant for coastal planning. In this presentation we discuss how the various geodetic measurements complement each other and allow us to identify various components of sea level change, including GIA. We illustrate how the weakness of any individual observation component can be overcome by comparison with the other components. A sustained and global geodetic observing system is essential for

  9. Providing hydrogen maser timing stability to orbiting VLBI radio telescope observations by post-measurement compensation of linked frequency standard imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springett, James C.

    1994-01-01

    Orbiting VLBI (OVLBI) astronomical observations are based upon measurements acquired simultaneously from ground-based and earth-orbiting radio telescopes. By the mid-1990s, two orbiting VLBI observatories, Russia's Radioastron and Japan's VSOP, will augment the worldwide VLBI network, providing baselines to earth radio telescopes as large as 80,000 km. The challenge for OVLBI is to effectuate space to ground radio telescope data cross-correlation (the observation) to a level of integrity currently achieved between ground radio telescopes. VLBI radio telescopes require ultrastable frequency and timing references in order that long term observations may be made without serious cross-correlation loss due to frequency source drift and phase noise. For this reason, such instruments make use of hydrogen maser frequency standards. Unfortunately, space-qualified hydrogen maser oscillators are currently not available for use on OVLBI satellites. Thus, the necessary long-term stability needed by the orbiting radio telescope may only be obtained by microwave uplinking a ground-based hydrogen maser derived frequency to the satellite. Although the idea of uplinking the frequency standard intrinsically seems simple, there are many 'contaminations' which degrade both the long and short term stability of the transmitted reference. Factors which corrupt frequency and timing accuracy include additive radio and electronic circuit thermal noise, slow or systematic phase migration due to changes of electronic circuit temporal operating conditions (especially temperature), ionosphere and troposphere induced scintillations, residual Doppler-incited components, and microwave signal multipath propagation. What is important, though, is to realize that ultimate stability does not have to be achieved in real-time. Instead, information needed to produce a high degree of coherence in the subsequent cross-correlation operation may be derived from a two-way coherent radio link, recorded and later

  10. VLBI observations of flared optical quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tao; Cui, Yu-Zhu; Paragi, Zsolt; Frey, Sándor; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Gabányi, Krisztina É.

    2016-10-01

    A bright optical flare was detected in the high-redshift (z = 2.133) quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341 on 2014 April 13. The absolute magnitude of the object reached -30.0 during the flare, making it the brightest one (in flaring stage) among all known quasars so far. The 15-GHz flux density of CGRaBS J0809+5341 monitored in the period from 2008 to 2016 also reached its peak at the same time. To reveal any structural change possibly associated with the flare in the innermost radio structure of the quasar, we conducted a pilot very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observation of CGRaBS J0809+5341 using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 2014 November 18, about seven months after the prominent optical flare. Three epochs of follow-up KaVA (Korean VLBI Network and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry Array) observations were carried out at 22- and 43-GHz frequencies from 2015 February 25 to June 4, with the intention of exploring a possibly emerging new radio jet component associated with the optical flare. However, these high-resolution VLBI observations revealed only the milliarcsecond-scale compact "core" that was known in the quasar from earlier VLBI images, and showed no sign of any extended jet structure. Neither the size nor the flux density of the "core" changed considerably after the flare, according to our VLBI monitoring. The results suggest that any putative radio ejecta associated with the major optical and radio flare could not yet be separated from the "core" component, or the newly-born jet was short-lived.

  11. Satellite emission radio interferometric earth surveying series - GPS geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    A concept called SERIES (satellite emissions radio interferometric earth surveying) which makes use of GPS (global positioning system) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications, is described. Through the use of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and its calibration methods, 0.5 to 3 cm three dimensional baseline accuracy can be achieved over distances of 2 to 200 km respectively, with only 2 hours of on-site data acquisition. Attention is given to such areas as: the radio flux equivalent of GPS transmissions, synthesized delay precision, transmission and frequency subsystem requirements, tropospheric and ionospheric errors. Applications covered include geodesy and seismic tectonics.

  12. VLBI-derived troposphere parameters during CONT08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, R.; Böhm, J.; Bolotin, S.; Engelhardt, G.; Haas, R.; Lanotte, R.; MacMillan, D. S.; Negusini, M.; Skurikhina, E.; Titov, O.; Schuh, H.

    2011-07-01

    Time-series of zenith wet and total troposphere delays as well as north and east gradients are compared, and zenith total delays ( ZTD) are combined on the level of parameter estimates. Input data sets are provided by ten Analysis Centers (ACs) of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) for the CONT08 campaign (12-26 August 2008). The inconsistent usage of meteorological data and models, such as mapping functions, causes systematics among the ACs, and differing parameterizations and constraints add noise to the troposphere parameter estimates. The empirical standard deviation of ZTD among the ACs with regard to an unweighted mean is 4.6 mm. The ratio of the analysis noise to the observation noise assessed by the operator/software impact (OSI) model is about 2.5. These and other effects have to be accounted for to improve the intra-technique combination of VLBI-derived troposphere parameters. While the largest systematics caused by inconsistent usage of meteorological data can be avoided and the application of different mapping functions can be considered by applying empirical corrections, the noise has to be modeled in the stochastic model of intra-technique combination. The application of different stochastic models shows no significant effects on the combined parameters but results in different mean formal errors: the mean formal errors of the combined ZTD are 2.3 mm (unweighted), 4.4 mm (diagonal), 8.6 mm [variance component (VC) estimation], and 8.6 mm (operator/software impact, OSI). On the one hand, the OSI model, i.e. the inclusion of off-diagonal elements in the cofactor-matrix, considers the reapplication of observations yielding a factor of about two for mean formal errors as compared to the diagonal approach. On the other hand, the combination based on VC estimation shows large differences among the VCs and exhibits a comparable scaling of formal errors. Thus, for the combination of troposphere parameters a combination of the two

  13. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.; Oshiro, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific GPS Facility and the Field Robotics Laboratory at the University of Hawaii have developed an approach to significantly reduce the costs of accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure. Traditional ship-based methods of acquiring these measurements are often prohibitively expensive. Our goal has been to reduce the primary barrier preventing us from acquiring the observations we need to understand geodetic processes, and the hazards they present, at subduction zones, submarine volcanoes, and subsea landslides. To this end, we have designed a payload package for the University of Hawaii Wave Glider which incorporates an acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, meteorological sensors, processing computer, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider is able to interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the seafloor to maintain a near-continuous stream of ocean bottom pressure and temperature data. The Wave Glider also functions as an integral part of the seafloor geodetic observing system, recording accurate sea surface elevations and barometric pressure; direct measurements of two of the primary sources of seafloor pressure change. The seafloor geodetic monument seats a sensor capable of recording pressure, temperature, and sound velocity for a deployment duration of over 5 years with an acoustic modem for communications, and an integral acoustic release for recovery and replacement of batteries. The design of the geodetic monument allows for precise repositioning of the sensor to extend the pressure record beyond a single 5+ year deployment, and includes the capability to install a mobile pressure recorder for calibration of the linear drift of the continuous pressure sensor. We will present the results of our field tests and an assessment of our ability to determine cm-scale vertical seafloor motions by

  14. DBBC - A Flexible Environment for VLBI and Space Research: Digital Receiver and Back-end Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccari, G.; Buttaccio, S.; Nicotra, G.; Alef, W.; Keller, R.; Nalbach, M.; Wunderlich, M.

    2007-07-01

    The Digital Base Band Converter project produced a general method and a class of boards giving the possibility to build a general purpose radio system for VLBI or single-dish observational activities. Moreover it is evident as disposing of elements able to operate in a frequency range of few gigahertz, the same parts can be adopted for the direct sampling of radio frequency bands, and not only for intermediate frequency stages. Such approach suggests the realization of what can be defined a 'digital radio system', where such definition would include receivers with conversion not realized with analogue techniques, while still maintaining only amplification stages in the analogue domain in order to satisfy requirements for the analogue to digital conversion unit. This paper presents a description of the elements developed in the DBBC project, with their use in different environments, in order to realize different instruments. The flexibility of the system is then evident because an appropriate distribution and assembly of parts is able to satisfy more requirements. The description includes also the upgrade program where new elements with improvements are introduced for additional functionalities and optimization of the general performance.

  15. Contribution of X/Ka VLBI to Multi-Wavelength Celestial Frame Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Clark, J. E.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Horiuchi, S.; Sotuela, I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an update of Sotuela et al. (2011) which improves their simulated Gaia frame tie precision by approximately 10% by adding three additional VLBI observing sessions. Astrometry at X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) using NASAs Deep Space Network has detected 466 quasars with accuracies of 200-300 micro-arc seconds. A program is underway to reduce errors by a factor of 2-3. From our sample, 245 sources have optical magnitudes V less than 20 and should also be detectable by Gaia. A covariance study using existing X/Ka data and simulated Gaia uncertainties for the 345 objects yields a frame tie precision of 10-15 micro-arc seconds (1 - sigma). The characterization of wavelength dependent systematic from extended source morphology and core shift should benefit greatly from adding X/Ka-band measurements to S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) measurements thus helping to constrain astrophysical models of the wavelength dependence of positions.

  16. Correlated errors in geodetic time series: Implications for time-dependent deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, J.; Johnson, H.

    1997-01-01

    addition, the seasonal noise can be as large as 3 mm in amplitude but typically is less than 0.5 mm. Because of the presence of random-walk noise in these time series, modeling and interpretation of the geodetic data must account for this source of error. By way of example we show that estimating the time-varying strain tensor (a form of spatial averaging) from geodetic data having both random-walk and white noise error components results in seemingly significant variations in the rate of strain accumulation; spatial averaging does reduce the size of both noise components but not their relative influence on the resulting strain accumulation model. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, August 3-8, 2000: data processing, geodetic coordinates and comparison with prior geodetic surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauk, Benjamin A.; Power, John A.; Lisowski, Mike; Dzurisin, Daniel; Iwatsubo, Eugene Y.; Melbourne, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Between August 3 and 8,2000,the Alaska Volcano Observatory completed a Global Positioning System (GPS) survey at Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Augustine is a frequently active calcalkaline volcano located in the lower portion of Cook Inlet (fig. 1), with reported eruptions in 1812, 1882, 1909?, 1935, 1964, 1976, and 1986 (Miller et al., 1998). Geodetic measurements using electronic and optical surveying techniques (EDM and theodolite) were begun at Augustine Volcano in 1986. In 1988 and 1989, an island-wide trilateration network comprising 19 benchmarks was completed and measured in its entirety (Power and Iwatsubo, 1998). Partial GPS surveys of the Augustine Island geodetic network were completed in 1992 and 1995; however, neither of these surveys included all marks on the island.Additional GPS measurements of benchmarks A5 and A15 (fig. 2) were made during the summers of 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1996. The goals of the 2000 GPS survey were to:1) re-measure all existing benchmarks on Augustine Island using a homogeneous set of GPS equipment operated in a consistent manner, 2) add measurements at benchmarks on the western shore of Cook Inlet at distances of 15 to 25 km, 3) add measurements at an existing benchmark (BURR) on Augustine Island that was not previously surveyed, and 4) add additional marks in areas of the island thought to be actively deforming. The entire survey resulted in collection of GPS data at a total of 24 sites (fig. 1 and 2). In this report we describe the methods of GPS data collection and processing used at Augustine during the 2000 survey. We use this data to calculate coordinates and elevations for all 24 sites surveyed. Data from the 2000 survey is then compared toelectronic and optical measurements made in 1988 and 1989. This report also contains a general description of all marks surveyed in 2000 and photographs of all new marks established during the 2000 survey (Appendix A).

  18. Chandra HETGS and VLBI Observations of SS 433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Roberts, David H.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observations of SS 433, we found a large Doppler shift change on a time scale of 20 ks, a time much shorter than the known dynamical times. The rapid change could be related to the formation and ejection of a jet knot, as observed in VLBI observations, perhaps as a leptonic jet impinges on a disk wind and shock heats it. New data were obtained to test this model in a long continuous HETGS observation. The VLBA and Chandra HETGS data were obtained but while no radio ejections were observed during the Chandra observation, there were interesting aspects to the observations. First, although the jet emission lines were expected to vary with the usual precession period (162 days) or with the period of the nodding motion (6.6 days), we did not detect the expected Doppler shifts in over 120 ks of exposure. Furthermore, there is new evidence for jet curvature that has not been previously reported.Support for this work was provided in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) through the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) contract SV3-73016 to MIT for support of the Chandra X-Ray Center (CXC), which is operated by SAO for and on behalf of NASA under contract NAS8-03060. Support was also provided by NASA under grant GO4-15040A to MIT.

  19. Digital Front End for Wide-Band VLBI Science Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre; Sigman, Elliott; Navarro, Robert; Goodhart, Charles; Rogstad, Steve; Chandra, Kumar; Finley, Sue; Trinh, Joseph; Soriano, Melissa; White, Les; Proctor, Robert; Rayhrer, Benno

    2006-01-01

    An upgrade to the very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) science receiver (VSR) a radio receiver used in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) is currently being implemented. The current VSR samples standard DSN intermediate- frequency (IF) signals at 256 MHz and after digital down-conversion records data from up to four 16-MHz baseband channels. Currently, IF signals are limited to the 265-to-375-MHz range, and recording rates are limited to less than 80 Mbps. The new digital front end, denoted the Wideband VSR, provides improvements to enable the receiver to process wider bandwidth signals and accommodate more data channels for recording. The Wideband VSR utilizes state-of-the-art commercial analog-to-digital converter and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) integrated circuits, and fiber-optic connections in a custom architecture. It accepts IF signals from 100 to 600 MHz, sampling the signal at 1.28 GHz. The sample data are sent to a digital processing module, using a fiber-optic link for isolation. The digital processing module includes boards designed around an Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) industry-standard backplane. Digital signal processing implemented in FPGAs down-convert the data signals in up to 16 baseband channels with programmable bandwidths from 1 kHz to 16 MHz. Baseband samples are transmitted to a computer via multiple Ethernet connections allowing recording to disk at rates of up to 1 Gbps.

  20. Gamma-Ray Flares and VLBI Outbursts of Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    1997-01-01

    A model is developed for the time dependent electromagnetic--radio to gamma-ray--emission of active galactic nuclei, specifically, the blazars, based on the acceleration and creation of leptons at a propagating discontinuity or front of a self-collimated Poynting flux jet. The front corresponds to a discrete relativistic jet component as observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Equations are derived for the number, momentum, and energy of particles in the front taking into account synchrotron, synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC), and inverse-Compton processes as well as photon-photon pair production. The apparent synchrotron, SSC, and inverse Compton luminosities as functions of time are determined. Predictions of the model are compared with observations in the gamma, optical, and radio bands. The delay between the high-energy gamma-ray flare and the onset of the radio is explained by self-absorption and/or free-free absorption by external plasma. Two types of gamma-ray flares are predicted: Compton dominated or SSC dominated, depending on the initial parameters in the front. The theory is applied to the recently observed gamma-ray flare of the blazar PKS 1622-297 (Mattox et al. 1997). Approximate agreement of theoretical and observed light curves is obtained for a viewing angle θobs ~ 0.1 rad, a black hole mass M ~ 3 × 109 M⊙, and a magnetic field at the base of the jet B0 ~ 103 G.

  1. International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: General Meeting Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the second General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), held in Tsukuba, Japan, February 4-7, 2002. The contents of this volume also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/gm2002. The key-note of the second GM was prospectives for the future, in keeping with the re-organization of the IAG around the motivation of geodesy as 'an old science with a dynamic future' and noting that providing reference frames for Earth system science that are consistent over decades on the highest accuracy level will provide a challenging role for IVS. The goal of the meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts. This volume contains 72 papers and five abstracts of papers presented at the GM. The volume also includes reports about three splinter meetings held in conjunction with the GM: a mini-TOW (Technical Operations Workshop), the third IVS Analysis Workshop and a meeting of the analysis working group on geophysical modeling.

  2. Prospects for UT1 Measurements from VLBI Intensive Sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, Johannes; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Intensives are one-hour single baseline sessions to provide Universal Time (UT1) in near real-time up to a delay of three days if a site is not e-transferring the observational data. Due to the importance of UT1 estimates for the prediction of Earth orientation parameters, as well as any kind of navigation on Earth or in space, there is not only the need to improve the timeliness of the results but also their accuracy. We identify the asymmetry of the tropospheric delays as the major error source, and we provide two strategies to improve the results, in particular of those Intensives which include the station Tsukuba in Japan with its large tropospheric variation. We find an improvement when (1) using ray-traced delays from a numerical weather model, and (2) when estimating tropospheric gradients within the analysis of Intensive sessions. The improvement is shown in terms of reduction of rms of length-of-day estimates w.r.t. those derived from Global Positioning System observations

  3. Seismic and geodetic studies of the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Imperial Valley exhibits perhaps the most active current tectonism in the United States; patterns of gravitational and thermal anomalies, along with geodetic measurements, strike-slip faulting, and recent volcanism suggest that the continental crust may still be spreading (Elders et al., 1972). In recent years, the United States Geological Survey and Caltech have added new seismic stations into a dense network in the Imperial Valley to study in detail the relationship between geothermal areas and earthquakes, and to understand the tectonic processes taking place there. The purposes of this study are to: (1) examine crustal structure using recently available data on P-wave arrival times of local earthquakes; (2) examine the leveling data for evidence of tectonic subsidence or uplift; and (3) study correlations between seismicity, seismic velocity, geodetic motion, geothermal activity, and local geology to provide a more consistent picture of the tectonics of the Imperial Valley.

  4. Workshop Targets Development of Geodetic Transient Detection Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Moraleda, Jessica R.; Lohman, Rowena

    2010-02-01

    2009 SCEC Annual Meeting: Workshop on Transient Anomalous Strain Detection; Palm Springs, California, 12-13 September 2009; The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) is a community of researchers at institutions worldwide working to improve understanding of earthquakes and mitigate earthquake risk. One of SCEC's priority objectives is to “develop a geodetic network processing system that will detect anomalous strain transients.” Given the growing number of continuously recording geodetic networks consisting of hundreds of stations, an automated means for systematically searching data for transient signals, especially in near real time, is critical for network operations, hazard monitoring, and event response. The SCEC Transient Detection Test Exercise began in 2008 to foster an active community of researchers working on this problem, explore promising methods, and combine effective approaches in novel ways. A workshop was held in California to assess what has been learned thus far and discuss areas of focus as the project moves forward.

  5. Geodetic positioning using a global positioning system of satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Geodetic positioning using range, integrated Doppler, and interferometric observations from a constellation of twenty-four Global Positioning System satellites is analyzed. A summary of the proposals for geodetic positioning and baseline determination is given which includes a description of measurement techniques and comments on rank deficiency and error sources. An analysis of variance comparison of range, Doppler, and interferometric time delay to determine their relative geometric strength for baseline determination is included. An analytic examination to the effect of a priori constraints on positioning using simultaneous observations from two stations is presented. Dynamic point positioning and baseline determination using range and Doppler is examined in detail. Models for the error sources influencing dynamic positioning are developed. Included is a discussion of atomic clock stability, and range and Doppler observation error statistics based on random correlated atomic clock error are derived.

  6. Linking Oceanic Tsunamis and Geodetic Gravity Changes of Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuning; Song, Y. Tony; Gross, Richard S.

    2017-03-01

    Large earthquakes at subduction zones usually generate tsunamis and coseismic gravity changes. These two independent oceanic and geodetic signatures of earthquakes can be observed individually by modern geophysical observational networks. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment twin satellites can detect gravity changes induced by large earthquakes, while altimetry satellites and Deep-Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis buoys can observe resultant tsunamis. In this study, we introduce a method to connect the oceanic tsunami measurements with the geodetic gravity observations, and apply it to the 2004 Sumatra Mw 9.2 earthquake, the 2010 Maule Mw 8.8 earthquake and the 2011 Tohoku Mw 9.0 earthquake. Our results indicate consistent agreement between these two independent measurements. Since seafloor displacement is still the largest puzzle in assessing tsunami hazards and its formation mechanism, our study demonstrates a new approach to utilizing these two kinds of measurements for better understanding of large earthquakes and tsunamis.

  7. Cartografical And Geodetical Aspects Of The Krakus Mound In Cracow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    In this work the fate of the Krakus Mound, the oldest of all existing Krakow's mounds, has been presented. The work was carried out based on selected iconographic, cartographic and geodetic documents. Using as an example old views, panoramas of the city and maps, various functions that the Krakus Mound was fulfilling over its long history were shown. An attempt was made to document the military significance of this mound and the surrounding hills. The particular astro-geodetic importance of the Krakus Mound on the scale of the city and southern Poland region was widely discussed. The Krakus Mound also inscribed itself in the history of the use of GPS technology as well as research on the local determination of the geoid in the area of Krakow.

  8. Crowdsourced Contributions to the Nation's Geodetic Elevation Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS), a United States Department of Commerce agency, is engaged in providing the nation's fundamental positioning infrastructure - the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) - which includes the framework for latitude, longitude, and elevation determination as well as various geodetic models, tools, and data. Capitalizing on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology for improved access to the nation's precise geodetic elevation infrastructure requires use of a geoid model, which relates GNSS-derived heights (ellipsoid heights) with traditional elevations (orthometric heights). NGS is facilitating the use of crowdsourced GNSS observations collected at published elevation control stations by the professional surveying, geospatial, and scientific communities to help improve NGS' geoid modeling capability. This collocation of published elevation data and newly collected GNSS data integrates together the two height systems. This effort in turn supports enhanced access to accurate elevation information across the nation, thereby benefiting all users of geospatial data. By partnering with the public in this collaborative effort, NGS is not only helping facilitate improvements to the elevation infrastructure for all users but also empowering users of NSRS with the capability to do their own high-accuracy positioning. The educational outreach facet of this effort helps inform the public, including the scientific community, about the utility of various NGS tools, including the widely used Online Positioning User Service (OPUS). OPUS plays a key role in providing user-friendly and high accuracy access to NSRS, with optional sharing of results with NGS and the public. All who are interested in helping evolve and improve the nationwide elevation determination capability are invited to participate in this nationwide partnership and to learn more about the geodetic infrastructure which is a vital component of viable spatial data for

  9. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    A satellite laser ranging experiment conducted by NASA since 1972 has measured the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates in California. Based on these measurements, the 896-km distance between San Diego and Quincy, California, is shortening at 62 + or - 9 mm/yr. This geodetic estimate is consistent with the rate of motion between the two plates, calculated from geological data to be 53 + or - 3 mm/yr averaged over the past few million years.

  10. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    A satellite laser ranging experiment conducted by NASA since 1972 has measured the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates in California. Based on these measurements, the 896-km distance between San Diego and Quincy, California, is shortening at 62 + or - 9 mm/yr. This geodetic estimate is consistent with the rate of motion between the two plates, calculated from geological data to be 53 + or - 3 mm/yr averaged over the past few million years.

  11. A Consistent Geodetic Reference System for GPS (Global Positioning System).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-27

    reliable and accurate Operational Control System (OCS) is a prerequisite for successful Global Positioning System ( GPS ) navigation performance. The OCS...DDOR Doubly differenced (between station pair and Navstar pair) phase data GPS Global Positioning System MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology...FWft SOTR4as-2 A Consistent Geodetic Reference System for GPS A. S. LIU Systems and Computer Engineering Division Engineering Group The Aerospace

  12. Kinematics of the Southwestern Caribbean from New Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, G.; La Femina, P. C.; Tapia, A.; Camacho, E.; Chichaco, E.; Mora-Paez, H.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of the Caribbean, Cocos, Nazca, and South American plates has resulted in a complex plate boundary zone and the formation of second order tectonic blocks (e.g., the North Andean, Choco and Central America Fore Arc blocks). The Panama Region [PR], which is bounded by these plates and blocks, has been interpreted and modeled as a single tectonic block or deformed plate boundary. Previous research has defined the main boundaries: 1) The Caribbean plate subducts beneath the isthmus along the North Panama Deformed Belt, 2) The Nazca plate converges at very high obliquity with the PR and motion is assumed along a left lateral transform fault and the South Panama Deformed Belt, 3) The collision of PR with NW South America (i.e., the N. Andean and Choco blocks) has resulted in the Eastern Panama Deformed Belt, and 4) collision of the Cocos Ridge in the west is accommodated by crustal shortening, Central American Fore Arc translation and deformation across the Central Costa Rican Deformed Belt. In addition, there are several models that suggest internal deformation of this region by cross-isthmus strike-slip faults. Recent GPS observations for the PR indicates movement to the northeast relative to a stable Caribbean plate at rates of 6.9±4.0 - 7.8±4.8 mm a-1 from southern Costa Rica to eastern Panama, respectively (Kobayashi et al., 2014 and references therein). However, the GPS network did not have enough spatial density to estimate elastic strain accumulation across these faults. Recent installation and expansion of geodetic networks in southwestern Caribbean (i.e., Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia) combined with geological and geophysical observations provide a new input to investigate crustal deformation processes in this complex tectonic setting, specifically related to the PR. We use new and existing GPS data to calculate a new velocity field for the region and to investigate the kinematics of the PR, including elastic strain accumulation on the

  13. Geodetic data support trapping of ethane in Titan's polar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Rambaux, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Titan's surface is characterized by polar depressions that strongly influence interpretations of the gravity data. This study investigates several geodynamical models that can explain these depressions. For each model, the values of the three moments of inertia are computed numerically by discretizing the interior in spherical coordinates. The study shows that a Pratt model where the polar subsurface is made of ethane clathrates can explain the polar depression, the abrupt jump in altitude at about 60 degrees latitude, and the values of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. This model, proposed by Choukroun and Sotin [1], is based on the stability of ethane clathrate hydrates relative to methane clathrate hydrates. In addition to fitting the geodetic data, it explains the absence of ethane in Titan's atmosphere although ethane is the main product of the photolysis of methane. Other geophysical models based on latitudinal variations in the tidal heating production or in the heat flux at the base of the icy crust do not provide such a good match to the gravity and topographic observations. The ethane-clathrate model predicts that all the ethane produced by photolysis of methane at the present rate during the last billion years could be stored in the polar subsurface. It is consistent with the age of Titan's surface and that of Titan's atmospheric methane inferred from geological and geochemical observations by the Cassini/Huygens mission. The present study also emphasizes the role of mass anomalies on the interpretation of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. It shows that for Titan, a slow rotator, the values of the two equatorial moments of inertia (MoI) are largely affected by the polar depressions whereas the value of polar MoI is not. Therefore, as pointed out by previous calculations [2], calculating the moment of inertia (MoI) factor from the value of J2 could lead to major errors. This is not the case for our preferred Titan's model for which the negative polar

  14. National geodetic satellite program, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belgin, J.; Borrego, A.; Brooks, R. L.; Dempsey, D. J.; Fubara, N. M.; Guard, K.; Hillhouse, M.; Leitao, C. D.; Martin, C. F.; Mourad, G.

    1977-01-01

    The major accomplishments of the GEOS-B, C-band systems project is assessed. The project objectives are given, namely: (1) primary objectives that must be met for project success; (2) secondary objectives that were sufficiently important to warrant serious consideration; and (3) other objectives that were important to the project and for which additional effort would be desirable. The primary objectives are presented and discussed in detail.

  15. Proceedings of the Sixth General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrend, Dirk (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the sixth General Meeting of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), held in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, February 7-13, 2010. The contents of this volume also appear on the IVS Web site at http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/gm2010. The keynote of the sixth GM was the new perspectives of the next generation VLBI system under the theme "VLBI2010: From Vision to Reality". The goal of the meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross-section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts. This volume contains 88 papers. All papers were edited by the editors for usage of the English language, form, and minor content-related issues.

  16. DORIS data analysis at Geodetic Observatory Pecný using single-satellite and multi-satellite geodetic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpánek, Petr; Douša, Jan; Filler, Vratislav; Hugentobler, Urs

    2010-12-01

    The DORIS (Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite) data are processed in the framework of the International DORIS Service (IDS) at several analysis centers. Each analysis center follows its own processing strategy and models. This manuscript presents the results of the processing based on a development version 5.0 of the Bernese GPS Software at the Geodetic Observatory Pecný analysis center (GOP). The complete period 1993.0-2009.0 was processed applying the free-network approach in order to estimate main parameters namely station and polar motion coordinates. A significant improvement has been achieved in the estimated station coordinates and polar parameters by processing the data from the satellites equipped with the second generation of the DORIS receiver, SPOT-5 and Envisat, launched in 2002. The RMS of polar coordinates in 2003.0-2008.0 shows a decreasing trend over the entire analyzed time period. The transformation parameters between the DORIS solution and ITRF2005 were subjected to a spectral analysis, confirming the domination of the annual and semiannual periodicity. The behavior of the terrestrial reference frame scale is quite stable with a few exceptions. The analysis of a major scale shift at the end of 2004 revealed SPOT-5 and Envisat satellites as the source of the problem. However, the termination of the TOPEX/Poseidon DORIS data processing at the end of 2004 did not influence significantly the overall scale level. Another objective of the paper is a detailed analysis of relations between the value of the observation residuals and the length of the observation Doppler count interval. A simple empirical model considering the observation noise as a sum of the constant and time-dependent terms is propounded and discussed. The estimated troposphere total zenith delays are compared to the corresponding values derived from GNSS (IGS PPP products) and the source of the differences as well as their systematic behavior and

  17. A Kalman filter for combining high frequency Earth rotation parameters from VLBI and GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, T.; Karbon, M.; Schuh, H.

    2013-08-01

    We present a Kalman filter for combination of sub-diurnal Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) estimated from different techniques. We test this filter by combining ERP estimated from VLBI and GPS for the CONT08 campaign. We find that the Kalman filter works and give reasonable results. The combined solution is dominated by the GPS data since the ERP from this technique have much lower formal errors. However VLBI is important for providing the absolute value of dUT1 since GPS is only sensitive to the time derivative of dUT1, i.e. the length of day.

  18. A comparison of VLBI with the ICE-3G glacial rebound model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Thomas S.; Lambert, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    Crustal motion predicted by the ICE-3G glacial rebound model exhibits a pattern of tangential (horizontal) divergence away from the centers of uplift, which in North America and Europe are located around Hudson Bay and the Gulf of Bothnia. Tangential velocities reach peak magnitudes of 1-2 mm/yr, and must be included when predicting VLBI baseline length change rates due to postglacial rebound. Out of 18 observed VLBI baselines examined three are situated such that their predicted length rates are around their 2 sigma uncertainties or greater. It is encouraging that two of these baselines exhibit predicted length rates within 2 sigma of the observed rates.

  19. EVN e-VLBI detections of MAXI J1659-152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paragi, Z.; van der Horst, A. J.; Granot, J.; Taylor, G. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Garrett, M. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Kuulkers, E.; Gehrels, N.; Woods, P. M.

    2010-10-01

    We observed MAXI J1659-152 (Negoro et al. 2010, ATel #2873; Mangano et al. 2010, GCN #11296) following its sub-millimeter and centimeter radio detections (de Ugarte Postigo et al. 2010, GCN #11304; van der Horst et al. 2010, ATel #2874) with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in real-time e-VLBI mode on 30 September 2010, from 13:30 to 18:30 UT at 4.9 GHz. The participating telescopes were Cambridge, Effelsberg, Jodrell Bank (MkII), Hartebeesthoek, Medicina, Onsala, Torun and Westerbork sending data at a rate of ~1024 Mbps to the EVN Data Processor at JIVE.

  20. RNGCHN: a program to calculate displacement components from dislocations in an elastic half-space with applications for modeling geodetic measurements of crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, Kurt L.; Dupré, Emmeline

    1999-07-01

    The RNGCHN program calculates a single component of the displacement field due to a finite or point-source dislocation buried in an elastic half space. This formulation approximates the surface movements produced by earthquake faulting or volcanic intrusion. As such, it is appropriate for modeling crustal deformation measured by geodetic surveying techniques, such as spirit leveling, trilateration, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Global Positioning System (GPS), or especially interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Examples suggest that this model can fit simple coseismic earthquake signatures to within their measurement uncertainties. The program's input parameters include fault position, depth, length, width, strike, dip, and three components of slip. The output consists of displacement components in the form of an ASCII list or a rectangular array of binary integers. The same program also provides partial derivatives of the displacement component with respect to all 10 input parameters. The FORTRAN source code for the program is in the public domain and available as the compressed tar file rngchn.tar.Z in the directory/pub/GRGS via the Internet by anonymous ftp to spike.cst. cnes.fr. This distribution includes worked examples and a MATLAB interface.

  1. VLBI Astrometry of the Millisecond Pulsar B1937+21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Rachel J.; Ojeda, Maria Rose; Gwinn, Carl R.; Jones, Dayton L.; Davis, Michael M.

    1996-01-01

    We report the results of astrometric VLBI observations of PSR B1937+21. Observations of the pulsar and a nearby quasar were made at 1.67 GHz, using four antennas: Arecibo, the very large array, and the DSN 70 m antennas in California and Spain. We determine a position of α=19h39m38s.5611±0s.0003 and ρ=21°34'59".118±0.016 for the pulsar in the lERS extragalactic reference frame at epoch 1990.2. The accuracy of our result in right ascension is limited by systematic uncertainties in the ionospheric delay calibration, and larger-than-expected random scatter in the pulsar delays related to interstellar scintillation. The accuracy in declination is limited by the lack of a long north-south baseline in our experiment and the uncertainty of the location of the Arecibo antenna in the lERS celestial reference frame. When compared with the pulsar's timing position [Kaspi, et al., ApJ, 428, 713 (1994)] in the planetary ephemeris reference frame, our result yields a measurement of the offset of the lERS reference frame and the DE200 planetary ephemeris frame of Δα(IERS-DE200)=0.0008±0s0.0003 and Δρ(IERS-DE200)=-0.024±0.016, which is in reasonable agreement with the frame-tie rotation determined by Folkner et al. [ARA&A, 297, 279, (1994)].

  2. On Comparing Precision Orbit Solutions of Geodetic Satellites Given Several Atmospheric Density Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Preprint) AAS 15-752 ON COMPARING PRECISION ORBIT SOLUTIONS OF GEODETIC SATELLITES GIVEN SEVERAL ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY MODELS John G. Warner∗, Krysta...tool. High precision laser ranging data to geodetic satellites were used as test cases to evaluate the solution accuracy and predictive capabilities...2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE On Comparing Precision Orbit Solutions of Geodetic Satellites Given Several

  3. VLBI Analysis with the Multi-Technique Software GEOSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierulf, Halfdan Pascal; Andersen, Per-Helge; Boeckmann, Sarah; Kristiansen, Oddgeir

    2010-01-01

    GEOSAT is a multi-technique geodetic analysis software developed at Forsvarets Forsknings Institutt (Norwegian defense research establishment). The Norwegian Mapping Authority has now installed the software and has, together with Forsvarets Forsknings Institutt, adapted the software to deliver datum-free normal equation systems in SINEX format. The goal is to be accepted as an IVS Associate Analysis Center and to provide contributions to the IVS EOP combination on a routine basis. GEOSAT is based on an upper diagonal factorized Kalman filter which allows estimation of time variable parameters like the troposphere and clocks as stochastic parameters. The tropospheric delays in various directions are mapped to tropospheric zenith delay using ray-tracing. Meteorological data from ECMWF with a resolution of six hours is used to perform the ray-tracing which depends both on elevation and azimuth. Other models are following the IERS and IVS conventions. The Norwegian Mapping Authority has submitted test SINEX files produced with GEOSAT to IVS. The results have been compared with the existing IVS combined products. In this paper the outcome of these comparisons is presented.

  4. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    The high cost of acquiring geodetic data from the sea floor has limited the observations available to help us understand and model the behavior of seafloor geodetic processes. To address this problem, the Pacific GPS Facility at the University of Hawaii is developing a cost effective approach for accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure without the requirement for costly ship time. There is a recognized need to vastly increase our underwater geodetic observing capacity. Most of the largest recorded earthquakes and most devastating tsunamis are generated at subduction zones underwater. Similarly, many volcanoes are partly (e.g. Santorini) or completely (e.g. Loihi) submerged, and are not well observed and understood. Furthermore, landslide features ring many ocean basins, and huge debris deposits surround many volcanic oceanic islands. Our approach will lower the cost of collecting sea-floor geodetic data, reducing the barriers preventing us from acquiring the information we need to observe and understand these types of structures and provide a direct societal benefit in improving hazard assessment. The capability is being developed by equipping one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders with an integrated acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, processing unit, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the sea floor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data, but seafloor pressure data includes contribution from a variety of sources and on its own may not provide the accuracy required for geodetic investigations. Independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height can be used to remove these contributions from the observed sea floor pressure timeseries. We will integrate our seafloor pressure measurements with air

  5. Assessment of optimally filtered recent geodetic mean dynamic topographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegismund, F.

    2013-01-01

    AbstractRecent geoids from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the Gravity field and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer satellite mission (GOCE) contain useful short-scale information for the construction of a <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> ocean mean dynamic topography (MDT). The <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> MDT is obtained from subtracting the geoid from a mean sea surface (MSS) as measured by satellite altimetry. A gainful use of the MDT and an adequate assessment needs an optimal filtering. This is accomplished here by defining a cutoff length scale dmax for the geoid and applying a Gaussian filter with half-width radius r on the MDT. A series of MDTs (GRACE, GOCE, and combined satellite-only (GOCO) solutions) is tested, using different sets of filter parameters dmax and r. Optimal global and regional dependent filter parameters are estimated. To find optimal parameters and to assess the resulting MDTs, the geostrophic surface currents induced by the filtered <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> MDT are compared to corrected near-surface currents obtained from the Global Drifter Program (GDP). The global optimal cutoff degree and order (d/o) dmax (half-width radius r of the spatial Gaussian filter) is 160 (1.1°) for GRACE; 180 (1.1-1.2°) for 1st releases of GOCE (time- and space-wise methods) and GOCO models; and 210 (1.0 degree) for 2nd and 3rd releases of GOCE and GOCO models. The cutoff d/o is generally larger (smaller) and the filter length smaller (larger) for regions with strong, small-scale (slow, broad scale) currents. The smallest deviations from the drifter data are obtained with the GOCO03s geoid model, although deviations of other models are only slightly higher.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730012612','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730012612"><span>Refraction effects of atmosphere on <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements to celestial bodies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Joshi, C. S.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The problem is considered of obtaining accurate values of refraction corrections for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements of celestial bodies. The basic principles of optics governing the phenomenon of refraction are defined, and differential equations are derived for the refraction corrections. The corrections fall into two main categories: (1) refraction effects due to change in the direction of propagation, and (2) refraction effects mainly due to change in the velocity of propagation. The various assumptions made by earlier investigators are reviewed along with the basic principles of improved models designed by investigators of the twentieth century. The accuracy problem for various quantities is discussed, and the conclusions and recommendations are summarized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.G33A0676M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.G33A0676M"><span>Seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> reference station branched from submarine cable</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Asakawa, K.; Yokobiki, T.; Iwase, R.; Goto, T.; Sato, M.; Nagahashi, K.; Tanaka, T.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>We launched a project supported by the Japan Society for the Science Promotion as the Grants in Aid for Scientific Research. In this project, we are aiming at developing new-generation seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observation system that conquers difficulties inherent with the current system. Central idea of this project is to utilize techniques of underwater robot (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and submarine cable to make measurements in place of using the research vessels. Combination of underwater robot and submarine cable make it possible to provide permanent seafloor reference point, to conduct the observation with selecting favorable condition of sea and GPS satellite distributions, to make much more frequent observations and to enable flexible planning of observation in response to sudden <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> events. Prototype of the on-board system which should be installed on an AUV was finished. Several trials had been done with the system in the sea. The results from them showed that the new on-board system will reach to the higher level in performance than the current system in the near future. And then we started to dedicate ourselves mainly to developing new seafloor transponder. The current seafloor transponder system is stand-alone one which runs on internal batteries. We expect five to ten years for the lifetime of the current seafloor transponder, even though it depends on how often we perform measurements with the transponder. Replacement of the seafloor transponder will be needed when we target seafloor crustal deformation that has long time cycle more than several decades. Continuity of seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observation will be stopped. New seafloor transponder which we have been developing is one which can be connected to a submarine cable by wet-mate connectors. Power is supplied through submarine cable and then the new seafloor transponder will be a permanent reference station for seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> survey. Submarine cable can supply accurate GPS time (1pps) and clock</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ESASP.739E..89S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ESASP.739E..89S"><span>Current and Future <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Satellite Missions for Global Change Monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sneeuw, Nico; Li, Jiancheng; Cai, Jiangqing; Jiang, Weiping; Xu, Xinyu; Chu, Yonghai; Jin, Taoyong; Chao, Nengfang; Elmi, Omid; Tourian, Mohammad J.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Global change deals with large- and small-scale processes that modify the Earth's atmosphere, land and ocean. Using innovative <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> space-borne sensor systems, dedicated gravity field and altimeter satellites monitor these processes over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The integrated analysis of these geometric and gravimetric Earth observation data shall improve the knowledge of system processes of the changing Earth. We here report on valuable contributions from satellite altimetry and satellite gravimetry to Earth system science in general and to hydrology in particular.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760012443','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760012443"><span>On differential transformations between Cartesian and curvilinear (<span class="hlt">geodetic</span>) coordinates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Soler, T.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Differential transformations are developed between Cartesian and curvilinear orthogonal coordinates. Only matrix algebra is used for the presentation of the basic concepts. After defining the reference systems used the rotation (R), metric (H), and Jacobian (J) matrices of the transformations between cartesian and curvilinear coordinate systems are introduced. A value of R as a function of H and J is presented. Likewise an analytical expression for J(-1) as a function of H(-2) and R is obtained. Emphasis is placed on showing that differential equations are equivalent to conventional similarity transformations. Scaling methods are discussed along with ellipsoidal coordinates. Differential transformations between elipsoidal and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates are established.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6585676','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6585676"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> activities of the Department of Defense under IGY programs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Williams, O.W.; Daugherty, K.I.</p> <p>1983-10-16</p> <p>Attention is given to the U.S. Department of Defence (DOD) activities that contributed to the International Geophysical Year's active, passive, and cooperative satellite programs. The DOD continues to support the deployment, enhancement, and application of novel technology in such areas as satellite altimetry, gravity radiometry, inertial surveying, interferometry, airborne gravimetry, inertial surveying, and CCD and laser methods for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> astronomy. Also noted are such major department initiatives as the Global Positioning System, which will become operational toward the end of this decade.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986EOSTr..67..691B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986EOSTr..67..691B"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Refraction: Effects of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Through the Atmosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bossy, L.; Paquet, P.</p> <p></p> <p>The atmospheric refraction has always been one of the main perturbations of classical terrestrial geodesy. For the future, and taking into account that a precision of a few centimeters is attainable over distances of few thousand kilometers, the monitoring of the atmospheric perturbation also requires a strong improvement for space applications that are mainly based on radio techniques. This is the reason why, for 2 decades, the interest in refraction studies has increased, as reflected in this monograph, which is entirely devoted to the properties of the atmospheric effects on various <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements and to their evaluation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAI.....541006P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JAI.....541006P"><span>SWARM: A 32 GHz Correlator and <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Beamformer for the Submillimeter Array</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Primiani, Rurik A.; Young, Kenneth H.; Young, André; Patel, Nimesh; Wilson, Robert W.; Vertatschitsch, Laura; Chitwood, Billie B.; Srinivasan, Ranjani; MacMahon, David; Weintroub, Jonathan</p> <p></p> <p>A 32GHz bandwidth <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> capable correlator and phased array has been designed and deployeda at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory’s Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA Wideband Astronomical ROACH2 Machine (SWARM) integrates two instruments: a correlator with 140kHz spectral resolution across its full 32GHz band, used for connected interferometric observations, and a phased array summer used when the SMA participates as a station in the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) very long baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) array. For each SWARM quadrant, Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH2) units shared under open-source from the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) are equipped with a pair of ultra-fast analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), a field programmable gate array (FPGA) processor, and eight 10 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) ports. A <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data recorder interface designated the SWARM digital back end, or SDBE, is implemented with a ninth ROACH2 per quadrant, feeding four Mark6 <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> recorders with an aggregate recording rate of 64 Gbps. This paper describes the design and implementation of SWARM, as well as its deployment at SMA with reference to verification and science data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000AAS...197.0403D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000AAS...197.0403D"><span>Structure of Sagittarius A* at 86 GHz using <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Closure Quantities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Doeleman, S. S.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Bower, G. C.; Wright, M. C. H.; Zhao, J.-H.; Backer, D. C.; Crowley, J. W.; Freund, R. W.; Ho, P. T. P.; Lo, K. Y.; Woody, D. P.</p> <p>2000-12-01</p> <p>At radio wavelengths, <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> images of the compact radio source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) in the Galactic Center are scatter broadened with a λ 2 dependence due to an intervening ionized medium. High frequency <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> is the only technique available to see through this scattering and search for the intrinsic structure of Sgr A*. We present total intensity <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations of Sgr A* at 86 GHz using a six station array including the VLBA antennas at Pie Town, Fort Davis and Los Alamos, the 12m antenna at Kitt Peak and the millimeter arrays at Hat Creek and Owens Valley. To avoid systematic errors due to imperfect antenna calibration, the data were modeled using interferometric closure information. The data are best modeled by a circular Gaussian brightness distribution of FWHM 0.18 +/- 0.02 mas (30Rsch for a 2.6*E6Msun Black Hole). The data are also shown to be consistent with an elliptical model corresponding to the scattering of a point source. The source structure in the N-S direction, which is less well determined than in the E-W direction due to the limited N-S (u,v) coverage of the array, is constrained to be less than 0.27 mas (45Rsch) by these measurements. These results are marginally consistent with reasonable extrapolations of intrinsic structure estimates obtained with <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> at 7mm wavelength.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PShaO..13...94Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990PShaO..13...94Z"><span>Improvement of supporting electronics system of H-clock at Sher Shan <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> station.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Weiqun</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>The supporting electronics system is a very important part of the H-clock. The author improves the supporting electronics system of the two sets of H-clock at Sher Shan <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> station. Some design ideas and results are described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780024197&hterms=tutorial&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dtutorial','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780024197&hterms=tutorial&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dtutorial"><span>A tutorial introduction to Very Long Base-line Interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) using bandwidth synthesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Molinder, J. I.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>The basic principles underlying very long baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) are described by using bandwidth synthesis. The basic signal processing approach is detailed. Summarized results show the tradeoff of measurement accuracy with spanned bandwidth, source strength, antenna size and efficiency, system noise temperature, and data volume. Minimization of required antenna time for a given baseline measurement accuracy is also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011evga.conf...93N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011evga.conf...93N"><span>Status and future plans for the Vienna <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Software VieVS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nilsson, T.; Böhm, J.; Böhm, S.; Madzak, M.; Nafisi, V.; Plank, L.; Spicakova, H.; Sun, J.; Tierno Ros, C.; Schuh, H.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>The Vienna <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Software (VieVS) is a new <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> analysis software which has been developed at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics of the Vienna University of Technology since 2008. In this software, which is written in Matlab, the most recent IERS Conventions and are implemented, and through a graphical user interface it is easy to use. Lately, two new modules have been added to the official version of VieVS. One is a simulation module (VIE_SIM) which allows to create simulated <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations. The other is a global solution module (VIE_GLOB) which can be used for combining several sessions in a global solution in order to derive e.g. a terrestrial and/or a celestial reference frame. In this presentation an overview of VieVS and its current status will be given and its performance will be demonstrated by showing selected results. We also discuss the planned future developments of VieVS. These include the possibility to use external tropospheric delays obtained, e.g. by ray-tracing through numerical weather models, to use external ionospheric corrections from, e.g. GNSS TEC maps, and to implement a Kalman filter solution. We also plan to cover earlier steps in the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data processing chain, like ambiguity resolution, which have not been considered so far in VieVS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940025111','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940025111"><span>Combining GPS and <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> earth-rotation data for improved universal time</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Freedman, A. P.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The Deep Space Network (DSN) routinely measures Earth orientation in support of spacecraft tracking and navigation using very long-baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) with the deep-space tracking antennas. The variability of the most unpredictable Earth-orientation component, Universal Time 1 (UT1), is a major factor in determining the frequency with which the DSN measurements must be made. The installation of advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers at the DSN sites and elsewhere may soon permit routine measurements of UT1 variation with significantly less dependence on the deep-space tracking antennas than is currently required. GPS and <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data from the DSN may be combined to generate a precise UT1 series, while simultaneously reducing the time and effort the DSN must spend on platform-parameter calibrations. This combination is not straightforward, however, and a strategy for the optimal combination of these data is presented and evaluated. It appears that, with the aid of GPS, the frequency of required <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> measurements of Earth orientation could drop from twice weekly to once per month. More stringent real-time Earth orientation requirements possible in the future would demand significant improvements in both <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> and GPS capabilities, however.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010002406&hterms=polar+bears&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpolar%2Bbears','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010002406&hterms=polar+bears&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpolar%2Bbears"><span>Determination of Martian Northern Polar Insolation Levels Using a <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Elevation Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Arrell, J. R.; Zuber, M. T.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Solar insolation levels at the Martian polar caps bear significantly on the seasonal and climatic cycling of volatiles on that planet. In the northern hemisphere, the Martian surface slopes downhill from the equator to the pole such that the north polar cap is situated in a 5-km-deep hemispheric-scale depression. This large-scale topographic setting plays an important role in the insolation of the northern polar cap. Elevations measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) provide comprehensive, high-accuracy topographical information required to precisely determine polar insolation. In this study, we employ a <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> elevation model to quantify the north polar insolation and consider implications for seasonal and climatic changes. <span class="hlt">Additional</span> information is contained in original extended abstract.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981igrs.symp..219C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981igrs.symp..219C"><span>Miniature interferometer terminals for earth surveying /MITES/ - <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> results and multipath effects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Counselman, C. C., III</p> <p></p> <p>Experiments which confirm theoretical predictions regarding the use of MITES terminals for measuring baseline vectors on the ground using interferometric observations of earth-orbiting satellites are presented. A set of five global positioning satellites (GPS) were observed by MITES antennas at 1.3 hour time intervals on each of two days, and it is found that this distribution facilitates the correct resolution of interferometer fringe ambiguities. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, experiments show that multipath interference does not pose significant problems at the centimeter level. MITES is still being developed using baseline lengths of up to 4,000 km, and a new system should demonstrate improved <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> accuracy, and will probably require one hour observation intervals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.7064F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.7064F"><span>Current status of the EPOS WG4 - GNSS and Other <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fernandes, Rui; Bastos, Luisa; Bruyninx, Carine; D'Agostino, Nicola; Dousa, Jan; Ganas, Athanassios; Lidberg, Martin; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>WG4 - "EPOS <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Data and Other <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Data" is the Working Group of the EPOS project in charge of defining and preparing the integration of the existing Pan-European <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Infrastructures that will support European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries (23) but it is also open to the entire <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> community. In fact, WG4 also already includes members from countries that formally are not integrating EPOS in this first step. The <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> component of EPOS (WG4) is dealing essentially with Research Infrastructures focused on continuous operating GNSS (cGNSS) in the current phase. The option of concentrating the efforts on the presently most generalized <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> tool supporting research on Solid Earth was decided in order to optimize the existing resources. Nevertheless, WG4 will continue to pursue the development of tools and methodologies that permit the access of the EPOS community to other <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> information (e.g., gravimetry). Furthermore, although the focus is on Solid Earth applications, other research and technical applications (e.g., reference frames, meteorology, space weather) can also benefit from the efforts of WG4 EPOS towards the optimization of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> resources in Europe. We will present and discuss the plans for the implementation of the thematic and core services (TCS) for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data within EPOS and the related business plan. We will focus on strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Five pillars have been defined proposed for the TCS: Dissemination, Preservation, Monitoring, and Analysis of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data plus the Support and Governance Infrastructure. Current proposals and remaining open questions will be discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ArtSa..45...57S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ArtSa..45...57S"><span>Status and Prospects for Combined GPS LOD and <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> UT1 Measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Senior, K.; Kouba, J.; Ray, J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A Kalman filter was developed to combine <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> estimates of UT1-TAI with biased length of day (LOD) estimates from GPS. The <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> results are the analyses of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center group from 24-hr multi-station observing sessions several times per week and the nearly daily 1-hr single-baseline sessions. Daily GPS LOD estimates from the International GNSS Service (IGS) are combined with the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> UT1-TAI by modeling the natural excitation of LOD as the integral of a white noise process (i.e., as a random walk) and the UT1 variations as the integration of LOD, similar to the method described by Morabito et al. (1988). To account for GPS technique errors, which express themselves mostly as temporally correlated biases in the LOD measurements, a Gauss-Markov model has been added to assimilate the IGS data, together with a fortnightly sinusoidal term to capture errors in the IGS treatments of tidal effects. Evaluated against independent atmospheric and oceanic axial angular momentum (AAM + OAM) excitations and compared to other UT1/LOD combinations, ours performs best overall in terms of lowest RMS residual and highest correlation with (AAM + OAM) over sliding intervals down to 3 d. The IERS 05C04 and Bulletin A combinations show strong high-frequency smoothing and other problems. Until modified, the JPL SPACE series suffered in the high frequencies from not including any GPS-based LODs. We find, surprisingly, that further improvements are possible in the Kalman filter combination by selective rejection of some <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data. The best combined results are obtained by excluding all the 1-hr single-baseline UT1 data as well as those 24-hr UT1 measurements with formal errors greater than 5 μs (about 18% of the multi-baseline sessions). A rescaling of the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> formal errors, rather than rejection, was not an effective strategy. These results suggest that the UT1 errors of the 1-hr and weaker 24-hr <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> sessions are non-Gaussian and more heterogeneous than expected</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...581A..32W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...581A..32W"><span>First 230 GHz <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> fringes on 3C 279 using the APEX Telescope</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wagner, J.; Roy, A. L.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Alef, W.; Bansod, A.; Bertarini, A.; Güsten, R.; Graham, D.; Hodgson, J.; Märtens, R.; Menten, K.; Muders, D.; Rottmann, H.; Tuccari, G.; Weiss, A.; Wieching, G.; Wunderlich, M.; Zensus, J. A.; Araneda, J. P.; Arriagada, O.; Cantzler, M.; Duran, C.; Montenegro-Montes, F. M.; Olivares, R.; Caro, P.; Bergman, P.; Conway, J.; Haas, R.; Johansson, J.; Lindqvist, M.; Olofsson, H.; Pantaleev, M.; Buttaccio, S.; Cappallo, R.; Crew, G.; Doeleman, S.; Fish, V.; Lu, R.-S.; Ruszczyk, C.; SooHoo, J.; Titus, M.; Freund, R.; Marrone, D.; Strittmatter, P.; Ziurys, L.; Blundell, R.; Primiani, R.; Weintroub, J.; Young, K.; Bremer, M.; Sánchez, S.; Marscher, A. P.; Chilson, R.; Asada, K.; Inoue, M.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Aims: We report about a 230 GHz very long baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) fringe finder observation of blazar 3C 279 with the APEX telescope in Chile, the phased submillimeter array (SMA), and the SMT of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Methods: We installed <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> equipment and measured the APEX station position to 1 cm accuracy (1σ). We then observed 3C 279 on 2012 May 7 in a 5 h 230 GHz <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> track with baseline lengths of 2800 Mλ to 7200 Mλ and a finest fringe spacing of 28.6 μas. Results: Fringes were detected on all baselines with signal-to-noise ratios of 12 to 55 in 420 s. The correlated flux density on the longest baseline was ~0.3 Jy beam-1, out of a total flux density of 19.8 Jy. Visibility data suggest an emission region ≲ 38 μas in size, and at least two components, possibly polarized. We find a lower limit of the brightness temperature of the inner jet region of about 1010 K. Lastly, we find an upper limit of 20% on the linear polarization fraction at a fringe spacing of ~ 38 μas. Conclusions: With APEX the angular resolution of 230 GHz <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> improves to 28.6 μas. This allows one to resolve the last-photon ring around the Galactic Center black hole event horizon, expected to be 40 μas in diameter, and probe radio jet launching at unprecedented resolution, down to a few gravitational radii in galaxies like M 87. To probe the structure in the inner parsecs of 3C 279 in detail, follow-up observations with APEX and five other mm-<span class="hlt">VLBI</span> stations have been conducted (March 2013) and are being analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.9003Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.9003Z"><span>An updated set of nutations derived from the reanalysis of 3.5 decades <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Ping; Koot, Laurence; Rivoldini, Attilio; Dehant, Veronique</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The global <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observation started in the 1979. After that the qualities of the measurements are continuously improving by taking into account various instrumental and environmental effects. The MHB2000 models was introduced in 2002 (Mathews, et.al. 2002, [1]) and it has a good agreement (5 μas) on the short period nutation series (<400 days) with the values derived from 2 decades (1979-2000) <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data while a higher uncertainties up to 56 μas for those longer periods (>400 days) nutation series (Herring et.al. 2002). In MHB2000, the forcing frequencies of the nutation series are solved by least-squares fitting to the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data in frequency domain. Koot et al. (2008), have processed another similar set of nutation series by inversing the time series of <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data (1984-2005) using a Bayesian approach. In the present work, we will repeat both approaches using the up-to-date 3.5 decades <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations (1980-2014) meanwhile paying more attention on the results of longer period (>400 days). Finally some features of Earth's interior structure will be discussed based on the determined nutation series. [1] Mathews, P.M., Herring, T.A. & Buffett, B.A., 2002. Modeling of nutation and precession: new nutation series for nonrigid Earth and insights into the Earth's interior, J. Geophys. Res., 107, 2068, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000390. [2] Herring, T. A., P. M. Mathews, and B. A. Buffett, Modeling of nutation and precession: Very long baseline interferometry results, J. Geophys. Res., 107, B4, 2069, doi: 10.1029/2001JB000165, 2002 [3] Koot, L., Rivoldini, A., de Viron, O. & Dehant, V., 2008. Estimation of Earth interior parameters from a Bayesian inversion of very long baseline interferometry nutation time series, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 8414, doi: 10.1029/2007JB005409.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PASJ...68...78N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PASJ...68...78N"><span>Parallax of a Mira variable R Ursae Majoris studied with astrometric <span class="hlt">VLBI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nakagawa, Akiharu; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Matsui, Makoto; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Honma, Mareki; Shibata, Katsunori M.; Sato, Katsuhisa; Jike, Takaaki</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We have measured an annual parallax of the Mira variable R Ursae Majoris (R UMa) with the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Exploration for Radio Astronomy (VERA). From the monitoring <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations over a span of about two years, we detected H2O maser spots in the LSR velocity range from 37 to 42 km s-1. We derived an annual parallax of 1.97 ± 0.05 mas, and this gives a corresponding distance of 508 ± 13 pc. The <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> maps revealed 72 maser spots distributed in an ˜110 au area around the expected stellar position. Circumstellar kinematics of the maser spots were also revealed by subtracting a systemic motion in the Hipparcos catalog from proper motions of each maser spot derived from our <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations. Infrared photometry was also conducted to measure a K-band apparent magnitude, and we obtained a mean magnitude of mK = 1.19 ± 0.02 mag. Using the trigonometric distance, mK is converted to a K-band absolute magnitude of MK = -7.34 ± 0.06 mag. This result gives a much more accurate absolute magnitude for R UMa than previously provided. We solved a zero-point of the MK-log P relation for the Galactic Mira variables and obtained a relation of MK = -3.52 log P + (1.09 ± 0.14). Other long-period variables, including red supergiants, whose distances were determined with astrometric <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>, were also compiled to explore the different sequences of the MK-log P relation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.tmp..153C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.tmp..153C"><span><span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations of four radio quasars at z > 4: blazars or not?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, H. M.; Frey, S.; Gabányi, K. É.; Paragi, Z.; Yang, J.; Cseh, D.; Hong, X.-Y.; An, T.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Blazars are active galactic nuclei (AGN) whose relativistic jets point nearly to the line of sight. Their compact radio structure can be imaged with very long baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) on parsec scales. Blazars at extremely high redshifts provide a unique insight into the AGN phenomena in the early Universe. We observed four radio sources at redshift z > 4 with the European <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Network (EVN) at 1.7 and 5 GHz. These objects were previously classified as blazar candidates based on X-ray observations. One of them, J2134-0419 is firmly confirmed as a blazar with our <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations, due to its relativistically beamed radio emission. Its radio jet extended to ˜10 milli-arcsec scale makes this source a promising target for follow-up <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations to reveal any apparent proper motion. Another target, J0839+5112 shows a compact radio structure typical of quasars. There is evidence for flux density variability and its radio "core" has a flat spectrum. However, the EVN data suggest that its emission is not Doppler-boosted. The remaining two blazar candidates (J1420+1205 and J2220+0025) show radio properties totally unexpected from radio AGN with small-inclination jet. Their emission extends to arcsec scales and the Doppler factors of the central components are well below 1. Their structures resemble that of double-lobed radio AGN with large inclination to the line of sight. This is in contrast with the blazar-type modeling of their multi-band spectral energy distributions. Our work underlines the importance of high-resolution <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> imaging in confirming the blazar nature of high-redshift radio sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGeod..88..941W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGeod..88..941W"><span>M-estimation with probabilistic models of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wiśniewski, Z.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The paper concerns -estimation with probabilistic models of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations that is called estimation. The special attention is paid to estimation that includes the asymmetry and the excess kurtosis, which are basic anomalies of empiric distributions of errors of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> or astrometric observations (in comparison to the Gaussian errors). It is assumed that the influence function of estimation is equal to the differential equation that defines the system of the Pearson distributions. The central moments , are the parameters of that system and thus, they are also the parameters of the chosen influence function. The estimation that includes the Pearson type IV and VII distributions ( method) is analyzed in great detail from a theoretical point of view as well as by applying numerical tests. The chosen distributions are leptokurtic with asymmetry which refers to the general characteristic of empirical distributions. Considering -estimation with probabilistic models, the Gram-Charlier series are also applied to approximate the models in question ( method). The paper shows that estimation with the application of probabilistic models belongs to the class of robust estimations; method is especially effective in that case. It is suggested that even in the absence of significant anomalies the method in question should be regarded as robust against gross errors while its robustness is controlled by the pseudo-kurtosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cosp...35..830S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cosp...35..830S"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Mobil Solar Spectrometer for JASON Altimeter Satellite Calibration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Somieski, A.; Buerki, B.; Geiger, A.; Kahle, H.-G.; Becker-Ross, H.; Florek, S.; Okruss, M.</p> <p></p> <p>Atmospheric water vapor is a crucial factor in achieving highest accuracies for space <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements. Water vapor causes a delay of the propagation time of the altimeter satellite signal, which propagates into errors for the determination of surface heights. Knowledge of the precipitable water vapor (PW) enables a tropospheric correction of the satellite signal. Therefore, different remote sensing techniques have been pursued to measure the PW continuously. The prototype <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Mobil Solar Spectrometer (GEMOSS) was developed at the Geodesy and Geodynamics Laboratory (GGL, ETH Zurich) in cooperation with the Institute of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (ISAS) (Berlin, Germany). A new optical approach allows the simultaneous measurement of numerous single absorption lines of water vapor in the wide range between 728 nm and 915 nm. The large number of available absorption lines increases the accuracy of the absolute PW retrievals considerably. GEMOSS has been deployed during two campaigns in Greece in the framework of the EU-project GAVDOS, which deals with the calibration of the altimeter satellite JASON. During the overfly of JASON, the ground-based determination of PW enables the correction of the satellite measurements due to tropospheric water vapor. Comparisons with radiometer and radiosondes data allow to assess the accuracy and reliability of GEMOSS. The instrumental advancement of GEMOSS is presented together with the results of the campaigns carried out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930071961&hterms=satellite+orbit&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dsatellite%2Borbit','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930071961&hterms=satellite+orbit&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dsatellite%2Borbit"><span>Atmospheric gravitational influence on <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> satellite orbits - Starlette analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chao, B. F.; Chan, Joseph C.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The atmosphere is constantly in motion. The changing gravitational force due to the air mass movement will slightly perturb the orbit of a satellite. As the instrument accuracy for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> satellites improves, failure to model this perturbation can result in significant systematic errors in the orbit determination. The latter, in turn, will degrade the Earth's gravity solutions. A direct modeling technique to analyze the atmospheric gravitational influence on <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> satellite is developed. We use the global surface pressure data from the ECMWF Initial Analysis Database to compute the gravitational force due to atmospheric perturbation exerted on given satellite as a function of time during selected orbital arcs. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data for selected Starlette (altitude 900 km) orbital arcs are used to test the computed force model. Although only a slight reduction in the rms residuals is observed when the atmospheric gravitational perturbation is included in the force model for data reduction of the SLR data, significant improvement is obtained in the predictability of the satellite orbit. Comprehensive studies involving more definitive test criteria and more refined models are still needed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920024110&hterms=national+oceanic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dnational%2Boceanic','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920024110&hterms=national+oceanic&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dnational%2Boceanic"><span>GPS orbit determination at the National <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schenewerk, Mark S.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The National <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Survey (NGS) independently generates precise ephemerides for all available Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. Beginning in 1991, these ephemerides were produced from double-differenced phase observations solely from the Cooperative International GPS Network (CIGNET) tracking sites. The double-difference technique combines simultaneous observations of two satellites from two ground stations effectively eliminating satellite and ground receiver clock errors, and the Selective Availability (S/A) signal degradation currently in effect. CIGNET is a global GPS tracking network whose primary purpose is to provide data for orbit production. The CIGNET data are collected daily at NGS and are available to the public. Each ephemeris covers a single week and is available within one month after the data were taken. Verification is by baseline repeatability and direct comparison with other ephemerides. Typically, an ephemeris is accurate at a few parts in 10(exp 7). This corresponds to a 10 meter error in the reported satellite positions. NGS is actively investigating methods to improve the accuracy of its orbits, the ultimate goal being one part in 10(exp 8) or better. The ephemerides are generally available to the public through the Coast Guard GPS Information Center or directly from NGS through the <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Information Service. An overview of the techniques and software used in orbit generation will be given, the current status of CIGNET will be described, and a summary of the ephemeris verification results will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.1265F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.1265F"><span>A future <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> monitoring system for vertical land motion in the Perth basin, Australia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Filmer, Mick; Featherstone, Will; Morgan, Linda; Schenk, Andreas</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Vertical land movement (VLM) affects many regions around the world and can have various causes, such as tectonics, glacial isostatic adjustment and resource extraction. <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> monitoring systems are employed in different configurations to identify VLM to provide knowledge for hazard mapping, risk assessment and land planning. We describe results from historical <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations, and efforts to establish a monitoring system in the Western Australian city of Perth, which is subject to VLM, most probably caused by groundwater extraction over the past ~100 years. The most direct evidence of VLM in Perth is provided by two continuously operating GNSS (CGNSS) stations HIL1 (from 1997) and PERT (from 1992). However, these stations provide estimates only at discrete locations. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the data from HIL1 is subject to frequent equipment changes and PERT ceased operation in early 2012. The CGNSS VLM rates reach ~-6 mm/yr, but are not linear over time and appear to be highly correlated with the rates of groundwater extraction. Limited sequences of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images are available over short periods between 1992-2009, and although these suggest spatially variable VLM rates reaching -5 mm/yr at some locations, the uncertainty from the small number of images suggest that these results should be treated cautiously. If it remains necessary to extract groundwater for Perth (possibly at increased rates), an ongoing monitoring programme is needed. This should be based on combined GNSS, InSAR and levelling observation programmes. Historical levelling data from the early 1970s is currently being extracted from hardcopy archives into digital file format for analysis and adjustment. These data will be used to establish an original reference network for later <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations comprising repeat levelling campaigns connected to periodic GNSS campaigns and CGNSS stations, but most importantly, a regular and structured acquisition of In</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA106786','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA106786"><span>DMA Support to a Unified <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Datum for the African Continent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1981-11-01</p> <p>The third major <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> arc is in the northern part of the continent. It joins Marrakech to Alexandria. This North African Arc encompasses the...African <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> chains. One, in the northwest, extends about 14 degrees between Dakar and Marrakech through Mauritania and Western Sahara. A second</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012CG.....46..229C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012CG.....46..229C"><span>Transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates to <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates by using differential search algorithm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Civicioglu, Pinar</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>In order to solve numerous practical navigational, <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and astro-<span class="hlt">geodetic</span> problems, it is necessary to transform geocentric cartesian coordinates into <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates or vice versa. It is very easy to solve the problem of transforming <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates into geocentric cartesian coordinates. On the other hand, it is rather difficult to solve the problem of transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates into <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates as it is very hard to define a mathematical relationship between the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> latitude (φ) and the geocentric cartesian coordinates (X, Y, Z). In this paper, a new algorithm, the Differential Search Algorithm (DS), is presented to solve the problem of transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates and its performance is compared with the performances of the classical methods (i.e., Borkowski, 1989; Bowring, 1976; Fukushima, 2006; Heikkinen, 1982; Jones, 2002; Zhang, 2005; Borkowski, 1987; Shu, 2010 and Lin, 1995) and Computational-Intelligence algorithms (i.e., ABC, JDE, JADE, SADE, EPSDE, GSA, PSO2011, and CMA-ES). The statistical tests realized for the comparison of performances indicate that the problem-solving success of DS algorithm in transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates is higher than those of all classical methods and Computational-Intelligence algorithms used in this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1126525.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1126525.pdf"><span>Development of a Mathematical Model to Assess the Accuracy of Difference between <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Heights</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gairabekov, Ibragim; Kliushin, Evgenii; Gayrabekov, Magomed-Bashir; Ibragimova, Elina; Gayrabekova, Amina</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The article includes the results of theoretical studies of the accuracy of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> height survey and marks points on the Earth's surface using satellite technology. The dependence of the average square error of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> heights difference survey from the distance to the base point was detected. It is being proved that by using satellite…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.3963K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.3963K"><span>Detailed comparison of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and direct glaciological mass balances on an annual time scale at Hintereisferner, Austria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Klug, Christoph; Bollmann, Erik; Galos, Stephan; Kaser, Georg; Prinz, Rainer; Rieg, Lorenzo; Sailer, Rudolf</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p> eventually built up before the ALS acquisition, is corrected. As snow cover biases are particular uncertain, a statistical approach has been applied to assess combined DTM errors by using the population of DTM differences over stable terrain. This method incorporates all known and unknown error sources from the surface difference in stable areas and uses its median thickness for correction in all altitudinal belts. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, intensity data of the ALS surveys are used to classify the optical surface properties into ice and firn zones. The resulting grids with according conversion factors (900 and 700 kg/m³ for ice and firn, respectively) are combined to calculate mass changes. In a last step, the survey dates are adjusted, using numerous field observations. On an annual time scale, the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> mass balances of HEF corrected using this approach, correlate well with the results from the homogenized direct glaciological method. Significant deviations occur in years with few measurements in the uppermost areas applying the direct glaciological method, due to strong melt in areas not equipped with ablation stakes (cf. Figure 2 for 2002/03) or inaccessibility due to weather conditions. On the basis of these results, the conventional error risk (e.g. confidence levels), was adopted in order to test the null hypothesis and to check if unexplained discrepancies suggest reanalyses of glaciological mass balances. Regarding the cumulative mass balance, the deviations between the two methods tend to become smaller the longer the period of comparison extends. Averaged between 2001 and 2011 the largest sources of differences are snow cover and density assumptions having high uncertainties in their estimates and/or leading to higher error ranges in the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> mass balances. Some errors were found to have a minor impact and are not treated explicitly, such as uncertainties in different glacier outlines used in both methods or the influence of snow covered and snow free crevasses in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880012193','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880012193"><span>The Spring 1985 high precision baseline test of the JPL GPS-based <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Davidson, John M.; Thornton, Catherine L.; Stephens, Scott A.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Lichten, Stephen M.; Sovers, Ojars J.; Kroger, Peter M.; Skrumeda, Lisa L.; Border, James S.; Neilan, Ruth E.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The Spring 1985 High Precision Baseline Test (HPBT) was conducted. The HPBT was designed to meet a number of objectives. Foremost among these was the demonstration of a level of accuracy of 1 to 2:10 to the 7th power, or better, for baselines ranging in length up to several hundred kilometers. These objectives were all met with a high degree of success, with respect to the demonstration of system accuracy in particular. The results from six baselines ranging in length from 70 to 729 km were examined for repeatability and, in the case of three baselines, were compared to results from colocated <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> systems. Repeatability was found to be 5:10 to the 8th power (RMS) for the north baseline coordinate, independent of baseline length, while for the east coordinate RMS repeatability was found to be larger than this by factors of 2 to 4. The GPS-based results were found to be in agreement with those from colocated <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> measurements, when corrected for the physical separations of the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> and CPG antennas, at the level of 1 to 2:10 to the 7th power in all coordinates, independent of baseline length. The results for baseline repeatability are consistent with the current GPA error budget, but the GPS-<span class="hlt">VLBI</span> intercomparisons disagree at a somewhat larger level than expected. It is hypothesized that these differences may result from errors in the local survey measurements used to correct for the separations of the GPS and <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> antenna reference centers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S23B2258J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.S23B2258J"><span>Plate Coupling and Transient Events Detection from <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Measurements in Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Y.; McCaffrey, R.; Wdowinski, S.; Dixon, T.; Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V. M.; Newman, A. V.; Feng, L.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Aseismic tremor and slow slip events (SSE) are known to perturb the stress field at the plate subduction interface. Nicoya Peninsula in northern Costa Rica is located near the Middle America Trench (MAT), where the Cocos plate subducts underneath Caribbean plate. The subducting Cocos plate contains two types of subducting oceanic crust, East Pacific Rise (EPR) in the northern peninsula and Cocos-Nazca Spreading center (CNS) in the southern peninsula. The two crust types differ in subducting speed and orientation, topography, age and heat flow. This unique geological setting provides an opportunity to investigate the kinematics and dynamics of SSE and tremor. In the Nicoya peninsula SSE are found in high b-value regions and occur approximately every 20 months. However, the location and magnitude of SSE are still uncertain due to limited observations. Here we report <span class="hlt">additional</span> <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations and use a new GPS time-series inversion scheme to investigate simultaneously both SSE and interseismic locking patterns in the study area and their evolution with time. We solve for the steady inter-seismic velocity field and parameters characterizing SSE including slip amount and duration. A preliminary analysis of continuous and campaign GPS data using the time dependent <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> inversion software TDefnode [McCaffrey 2009] reveals three slow-slipping patches for events in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009. Previous inversion analysis of Outerbridge et al. [2010] of the 2007 SSE identified the two of the three patches, a deep on at depth of ~25 km, and a shallower patch at depth of ~7 km. The third patch identified by our inversion at depth of ~15 km is similar in area and location to that reported by Protti et al. [2004] for the 2003 event.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMED11A0032J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMED11A0032J"><span>Incorporating GPS <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data into the undergraduate classroom to improve data and information literacy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jansma, P. E.; Mattioli, G. S.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>As part of an NSF-funded project, we are incorporating Global Positioning System (GPS) geodesy into the classroom to improve data and information literacy among undergraduate students. Our objectives are: to introduce statistical concepts essential for the interpretation of large datasets; to promote communication skills; to enhance critical thinking; and to build teamwork. GPS geodesy is ideal for illustrating data literacy concepts. Data precision and accuracy depend upon several factors, including type of equipment, environmental conditions, length of occupations, monument design, site location, configuration of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> network, and processing strategies. All of these can be varied, allowing the students to learn the trade-offs among cost, time, and quality and to determine the most efficient methodology for specific problems. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, precision, accuracy, and errors govern the interpretations that can be made and the potential to distinguish among competing models. Our focus is a semester-long course that uses GPS geodesy in real-world applications and also requires integration of GPS data into oral presentations and written reports. Students work in teams on "cases" that pose hypotheses for testing. The cases are derived from our on-going research projects and take advantage of on-line continuous GPS (CGPS) data as well as our archived campaign data. The case studies are: 1) Microplate tectonics in the northeastern Caribbean; 2) Inflation/deflation cycles of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat; and 3) Contribution of monument instability to the overall error in <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data from the New Madrid Seismic Zone. All course materials will be on-line and available for the community.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGeo...82..138B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGeo...82..138B"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> and geological evidence of active tectonics in south-western Sicily (Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barreca, G.; Bruno, V.; Cocorullo, C.; Cultrera, F.; Ferranti, L.; Guglielmino, F.; Guzzetta, L.; Mattia, M.; Monaco, C.; Pepe, F.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Integrated geological, <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and marine geophysical data provide evidence of active deformation in south-western Sicily, in an area spatially coincident with the macroseismic zone of the destructive 1968 Belice earthquake sequence. Even though the sequence represents the strongest seismic event recorded in Western Sicily in historical times, focal solutions provided by different authors are inconclusive on possible faulting mechanism, which ranges from thrusting to transpression, and the seismogenic source is still undefined. Interferometric (DInSAR) observations reveal a differential ground motion on a SW-NE alignment between Campobello di Mazara and Castelvetrano (CCA), located just west of the maximum macroseismic sector. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, new GPS campaign-mode data acquired across the CCA alignment documents NW-SE contractional strain accumulation. Morphostructural analysis allowed to associate the alignment detected through <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements with a topographic offset of Pleistocene marine sediments. The on-land data were complemented by new high-resolution marine geophysical surveys, which indicate recent contraction on the offshore extension of the CCA alignment. The discovery of archaeological remains displaced by a thrust fault associated with the alignment provided the first likely surface evidence of coseismic and/or aseismic deformation related to a seismogenic source in the area. Results of the integrated study supports the contention that oblique thrusting and folding in response to NW-SE oriented contraction is still active. Although we are not able to associate the CCA alignment to the 1968 seismic sequence or to the historical earthquakes that destroyed the ancient Greek city of Selinunte, located on the nearby coastline, our result must be incorporated in the seismic hazard evaluation of this densely populated area of Sicily.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S43D..05W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S43D..05W"><span>Challenges in Defining Seismogenic Zone Using <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> and Structural Observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, K.; Hyndman, R. D.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>The coseismic fault slip area in recent subduction earthquakes can be determined from seismological, tsumani, and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations. The coseismic rupture appears to be limited generally by a temperature around 125° C at the updip end and a temperature around 350° C or the intersection of the plate interface with the forearc Moho at the downdip end, with significant along-strike variations. Defining the seismogenic zone from interseismic deformation is much more challenging, because of the fewer available observation methods and the poorly understood earthquake cycle deformation process. It is reasonable to expect the rupture zone to be locked in the interseismic period, but the updip and downdip limits of mechanical locking do not usually have clear simple <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> signatures. Fault motion outside the locked zone is not simply determined by frictional properties and fault stress. Surface deformation changes through the earthquake cycle due to both transient fault slip and viscoelastic stress relaxation. If an elastic dislocation model is used to explain decade- and century-scale viscoelastic interseismic deformation, a more gradual downdip tapering of locking is required to fit <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations long after the most recent earthquake. Rate- and state-dependent friction and nonlinear mantle rock rheology are both important candidates in explaining transient afterslip of duration of days to a few years downdip of coseismic rupture, although their distinction is obscured by strain localization in nonlinear deformation. Newtonian rheology is arguably applicable a few fault dimensions from the rupture zone and several years after the earthquake. Cascadia and Nankai episodic "silent" slips indicate that the forearc material at 30-40 km depths is able to accumulate and release elastic strain energy. It has been proposed that such slip may be shear deformation of a band of km's thickness above the subducting slab (and that the shear band terminates seismogenic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860017269','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860017269"><span>Plate motions and deformations from geologic and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jordan, T. H.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Research effort on behalf of the Crustal Dynamics Project focused on the development of methodologies suitable for the analysis of space-<span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data sets for the estimation of crustal motions, in conjunction with results derived from land-based <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data, neo-tectonic studies, and other geophysical data. These methodologies were used to provide estimates of both global plate motions and intraplate deformation in the western U.S. Results from the satellite ranging experiment for the rate of change of the baseline length between San Diego and Quincy, California indicated that relative motion between the North American and Pacific plates over the course of the observing period during 1972 to 1982 were consistent with estimates calculated from geologic data averaged over the past few million years. This result, when combined with other kinematic constraints on western U.S. deformation derived from land-based geodesy, neo-tectonic studies, and other geophysical data, places limits on the possible extension of the Basin and Range province, and implies significant deformation is occurring west of the San Andreas fault. A new methodology was developed to analyze vector-position space-<span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data to provide estimates of relative vector motions of the observing sites. The algorithm is suitable for the reduction of large, inhomogeneous data sets, and takes into account the full position covariances, errors due to poorly resolved Earth orientation parameters and vertical positions, and reduces baises due to inhomogeneous sampling of the data. This methodology was applied to the problem of estimating the rate-scaling parameter of a global plate tectonic model using satellite laser ranging observations over a five-year interval. The results indicate that the mean rate of global plate motions for that interval are consistent with those averaged over several million years, and are not consistent with quiescent or greatly accelerated plate motions. This methodology was also</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986mit..reptQ....J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986mit..reptQ....J"><span>Plate motions and deformations from geologic and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jordan, T. H.</p> <p>1986-06-01</p> <p>Research effort on behalf of the Crustal Dynamics Project focused on the development of methodologies suitable for the analysis of space-<span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data sets for the estimation of crustal motions, in conjunction with results derived from land-based <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data, neo-tectonic studies, and other geophysical data. These methodologies were used to provide estimates of both global plate motions and intraplate deformation in the western U.S. Results from the satellite ranging experiment for the rate of change of the baseline length between San Diego and Quincy, California indicated that relative motion between the North American and Pacific plates over the course of the observing period during 1972 to 1982 were consistent with estimates calculated from geologic data averaged over the past few million years. This result, when combined with other kinematic constraints on western U.S. deformation derived from land-based geodesy, neo-tectonic studies, and other geophysical data, places limits on the possible extension of the Basin and Range province, and implies significant deformation is occurring west of the San Andreas fault. A new methodology was developed to analyze vector-position space-<span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data to provide estimates of relative vector motions of the observing sites. The algorithm is suitable for the reduction of large, inhomogeneous data sets, and takes into account the full position covariances, errors due to poorly resolved Earth orientation parameters and vertical positions, and reduces baises due to inhomogeneous sampling of the data. This methodology was applied to the problem of estimating the rate-scaling parameter of a global plate tectonic model using satellite laser ranging observations over a five-year interval. The results indicate that the mean rate of global plate motions for that interval are consistent with those averaged over several million years, and are not consistent with quiescent or greatly accelerated plate motions. This methodology was also</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860052286&hterms=conformity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dconformity','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860052286&hterms=conformity&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dconformity"><span>Landsat Thematic Mapper <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> accuracy - Implications for geocoded map compatibility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.; Walker, R. E.; Gokhmann, B.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> accuracy and geometric fidelity of corrected thematic mapper (TM) imagery are evaluated. The positional accuracy requirements for the TM are for a single band to within 0.5 pixels of true earth-surface locations at any point over 90 percent of the image and for interband registration to within 0.3 pixel tolerance over 90 percent of the data. Landsat 4 and 5 TM data are analyzed to investigate: (1) single band geometric integrity, (2) 30 m resolution interband registration; (3) image to image conformity; (4) image to ground conformity; and (5) image projective geometry conformity to a mapped earth geometry. The procedures used to study these characteristics are described. The data reveal that Landsat TM digital data met or exceed map accuracy standards for horizontal control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6700973','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6700973"><span>Analysis of variance of an underdetermined <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> displacement problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Darby, D.</p> <p>1982-06-01</p> <p>It has been suggested recently that point displacements in a free <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> network traversing a strike-slip fault may be estimated from repeated surveys by minimizing only those displacement components normal to the strike. It is desirable to justify this procedure. We construct, from estimable quantities, a deformation parameter which is an F-statistic of the type occurring in the analysis of variance of linear models not of full rank. A test of its significance provides the criterion to justify the displacement solution. It is also interesting to study its behaviour as one varies the supposed strike of the fault. Justification of a displacement solution using data from a strike-slip fault is found, but not for data from a rift valley. The technique can be generalized to more complex patterns of deformation such as those expected near the end-zone of a fault in a dislocation model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760049323&hterms=lippincott&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dlippincott','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760049323&hterms=lippincott&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dlippincott"><span>A very-long-baseline interferometer system for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Whitney, A. R.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Levine, J. I.; Lippincott, S.; Clark, T. A.; Shapiro, I. I.; Robertson, D. S.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>A very-long-baseline interferometer system was designed and built for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> applications. Each interferometer terminal records a 360-kHz spectral band of noise from a compact extragalactic radio source. The center frequency of the spectral band can be selected to sample sequentially bands covering a much wider frequency range to obtain subnanosecond accuracy in group-delay measurements. A tunnel-diode pulse generator is used to calibrate the delays in the receiver. The necessary sets of algorithms and computer programs have been developed to analyze the data and have allowed the system to be employed to make accurate determinations of vector baselines, radio-source positions, polar motion, and universal time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.5789M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.5789M"><span>Finite volume method for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> boundary value problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Medľa, Matej; Mikula, Karol; Macák, Marek</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We present new finite volume numerical scheme for solving the <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> boundary value problem on non-uniform logically rentangular grids together with new second-order upwind treatment of the oblique derivative. First the logically rectangular grid is built above the Earth topography by evolving surface approach. Then the Laplace equation is solved on such grid by using the finite volume method in which the normal derivative on finite volume boundary face is split into derivative in tangential direction and a derivative in direction of the vector connecting representative points of neigbouring finite volumes. The oblique derivative boundary condition is understood as a stationary advection equation and second-order upwind method is developed for its discretization. The numerical experiments will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr41B8.1169S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr41B8.1169S"><span>Detection of Coastline Deformation Using Remote Sensing and <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Surveys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sabuncu, A.; Dogru, A.; Ozener, H.; Turgut, B.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection-usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique) has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> studies and classification outputs will be presented in this paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.5800D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.5800D"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Leveling Data In Northern-central Apennines (italy): Vertical <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Strain Versus Seismicity and Seismogenic Structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>D'Anastasio, E.; de Martini, P. M.; Selvaggi, G.; Pantosti, D.; Marchioni, A.</p> <p></p> <p>For over 120 years the Istituto Geografico Militare d'Italia (IGM) has repeatedly mea- sured the elevation of selected routes running along and across the Italian peninsula. Some of these routes have been measured three times during a time span of over a century, thus yielding a fundamental contribution to the quantification of vertical tec- tonic strains. Through the years, the main national first order leveling lines, for which the measurement accuracy is particularly good, have captured long-wavelength trends, interpreted as regional uplift or doming of volcanic areas, together with coseismic el- evation changes associated with large earthquakes. The scope of this contribution is to present our methodology in the analysis of the regional <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> signal and to stimu- late the discussion on its possible relations with the instrumental/historical seismicity and with known major seismogenic structures. As a first step of this project we have studied in detail four transects across the northern-central Apennines, using seven lev- eling lines for a total length of about 750 km. For each route we have at least a 20 years-long record and a benchmark's density higher than 0.3/km. The most important errors, both random and systematic, will be discussed together with IGM's standard for first order leveling lines and with the probable total error we adopted as a good measure of the overall uncertainty. Being very arduous to determine absolute heights for any benchmark in Italy, we decided to adopt a procedure involving relative eleva- tion changes, where the westernmost point (on the Thyrrenian side) of each transect is assumed stable. The observed elevation changes stand significantly above the detec- tion threshold of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> instruments and show regional long-wavelength signal. Along three of the four transects, a relative maximum elevation change rate of about 1 mm/yr has been observed. A preliminary comparison of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> signals with instrumental and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150004674&hterms=data+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Ddata%2Banalysis','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20150004674&hterms=data+analysis&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Ddata%2Banalysis"><span>Effects of Tropospheric Spatio-Temporal Correlated Noise on the Analysis of Space <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Romero-Wolf, A. F.; Jacobs, C. S.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The standard <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> analysis models measurement noise as purely thermal errors modeled according to uncorrelated Gaussian distributions. As the price of recording bits steadily decreases, thermal errors will soon no longer dominate. It is therefore expected that troposphere and instrumentation/clock errors will increasingly become more dominant. Given that both of these errors have correlated spectra, properly modeling the error distributions will become more relevant for optimal analysis. This paper will discuss the advantages of including the correlations between tropospheric delays using a Kolmogorov spectrum and the frozen ow model pioneered by Treuhaft and Lanyi. We will show examples of applying these correlated noise spectra to the weighting of <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008MsT..........1W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008MsT..........1W"><span>Development of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) techniques in New Zealand: Array simulation, image synthesis and analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Weston, S. D.</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>This thesis presents the design and development of a process to model Very Long Base Line Interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) aperture synthesis antenna arrays. In line with the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) Institute for Radiophysics and Space Research (IRSR) aims to develop the knowledge, skills and experience within New Zealand, extensive use of existing radio astronomical software has been incorporated into the process namely AIPS (Astronomical Imaging Processing System), MIRIAD (a radio interferometry data reduction package) and DIFMAP (a program for synthesis imaging of visibility data from interferometer arrays of radio telescopes). This process has been used to model various antenna array configurations for two proposed New Zealand sites for antenna in a <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> array configuration with existing Australian facilities and a passable antenna at Scott Base in Antarctica; and the results are presented in an attempt to demonstrate the improvement to be gained by joint trans-Tasman <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observation. It is hoped these results and process will assist the planning and placement of proposed New Zealand radio telescopes for cooperation with groups such as the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA), others in the Pacific Rim and possibly globally; also potential future involvement of New Zealand with the SKA. The developed process has also been used to model a phased building schedule for the SKA in Australia and the <span class="hlt">addition</span> of two antennas in New Zealand. This has been presented to the wider astronomical community via the Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand Journal, and is summarized in this thesis with some <span class="hlt">additional</span> material. A new measure of quality ("figure of merit") for comparing the original model image and final CLEAN images by utilizing normalized 2-D cross correlation is evaluated as an alternative to the existing subjective visual operator image comparison undertaken to date by other groups. This new unit of measure is then used ! in the presentation of the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985A%26A...143..292F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985A%26A...143..292F"><span>Compact Steep Spectrum 3CR radio sources - <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations at 18 CM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fanti, C.; Fanti, R.; Parma, P.; Schilizzi, R. T.; van Breugel, W. J. M.</p> <p>1985-02-01</p> <p>Results of a program to investigate the kiloparsec-sized radio structure of a representative sample of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources from the 3CR catalog (Jenkins et al., 1977) are presented. Ten objects (3C49,67, 119, 237, 241, 268.3, 287, 303.1, 343, 343.1) have been mapped at 18 cm with a resolution of about 30 marcsec using the European <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Network. In some cases the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data have been supplemented by MERLIN observations at the same wavelength to enhance sensitivity to large-scale structure. The overall sizes of the CSS sources range from about 0.1 to 1 or 2 arcsec, corresponding to linear sizes of the order of 1 to 10 kpc. The morphological classification ranges from double to core-jet to complex; CSS quasars are generally core-jets or complex, while CSS radio galaxies are doubles, although not necessarily simple doubles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004evn..conf..257S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004evn..conf..257S"><span>From truck to optical fibre: the coming-of-age of e<span class="hlt">VLBI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Szomoru, A.; Biggs, A.; Garrett, M.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Olnon, F.; Paragi, Z.; Parsley, S.; Pogrebenko, S.; Reynolds, C.</p> <p></p> <p>Spurred by the advent of disk-based recording systems and the nearly explosive increase of internet bandwidth, e<span class="hlt">VLBI</span> (Parsley et al. te{parsley}) has undergone a remarkable development over the past two years. From ftp-based transfers of small amounts of astronomical data, through near real-time correlation (disk-buffered at the correlator), it has culminated this spring in the first three telescope real-time correlation at JIVE (Onsala, Westerbork and Jodrell Bank). In this paper we will give a review of this development and the current state of affairs. We will also address the current limitations and the way we may improve both bandwidth and reliability and finally we will discuss the opportunities a true high-bandwidth real-time <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> correlator will provide. (astro-ph/0412686)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870036610&hterms=VX&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DVX','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870036610&hterms=VX&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DVX"><span>Physical conditions near red giant and supergiant stars - An interpretation of SiO <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> maps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Alcock, Charles; Ross, Randy R.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Understanding the dynamical structure of circumstellar envelopes around cool giant and supergiant stars depends critically on the knowledge of what happens in the 'near zone' of the envelope, within a few stellar radii of the star. One probe with adequate angular resolution to study the near zone is <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observation of the SiO masers. It is shown that <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> maps of VX Sgr establish that the particle density in the SiO masers is very high (about 10 to the 12th/cu cm), indicating that the masers form in dense cloudlets and not in a spherically expanding wind. The implications of these results for the mechanism of mass loss are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990RMxAA..21..504O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990RMxAA..21..504O"><span>Radio Brightness Temperatures and Angular Dimensions of Recently Predicted <span class="hlt">Vl-Bi</span> Small-Scale Structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Opher, R.</p> <p>1990-11-01</p> <p>RESUMEN. Muestro que analisis recientes publicados de fuentes de radio galacticas y extragalacticas predicen estructuras en pequera escala en fuentes de radio extendidas, remanentes de supernova, vientos protoestelares, nubes moleculares, distorsiones del fondo de 3 K, enanas blancas magnetizadas, estrellas de tipo tardio y el Sol. Discuto las temperatu- ras de brillo de radio de estas estructuras y sus ditnensiones. Muestro que estas estructuras son detectables con las sensibilidades actuales de <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> (o en el futuro cercano). ABSTRACT. I show that recently published analysis of galactic and extragalactic radio sources make predictions of small-scale structures in extended radio sources, supernovae remnants, protostellar winds, molecu- lar clouds, distortions of the 3 K background, magnetized white dwarf binaries, late-type stars and the sun. I discuss the radio brightness temperatures of these structures and their dimensions. I show that these structures are detectable with present (or near future) <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> sensitivities. : RADIO SOURCES-EXTENDED</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000074683','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000074683"><span>International <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Service for Geodesy and Astrometry: 2000 General Meeting Proceedings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vandenberg, Nancy R. (Editor); Baver, Karen D. (Editor)</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>This volume is the proceedings of the first General Meeting of the International Very Long Base Interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS), held in Koetzting, Germany, February 21-24, 2000. The content of this volume also appears on the IVS web site at: http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/publications/gm2000. The goal of the program committee for the General Meeting was to provide an interesting and informative program for a wide cross section of IVS members, including station operators, program managers, and analysts. The program included reports, tutorials, invited and contributed papers, and poster presentations. The tutorial papers should be particularly useful references because each one provides an overview and introduction to a topic relevant to <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800033447&hterms=Purcell&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DPurcell','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800033447&hterms=Purcell&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DPurcell"><span>Current results and developments in astrometric <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Cohen, E. J.; Fanselow, J. L.; Rogstad, D. H.; Skjerve, L. J.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Thomas, J. B.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's program of astrometric <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> as one element of a navigation system for interplanetary spacecraft includes developing a radioastrometric source catalog, and a catalog of positions of compact extragalactic radio sources correct to about 0.01 arc sec. The three (64 m) antenna complexes of the Deep Space Network in Spain, Australia, and the U.S. are involved, each equipped to receive simultaneously at wavelengths of 13 and 3.6 cm with total system temperatures of about 20-25 K at both wavelengths. The program is to provide precise values of parameters used in navigational computations, including UT1 accurate to about 0.001s, and current values of polar motion to 30 cm. Bandwidth synthesis methods were applied to measure delays as well as rates regarding source positions derived from observations using the Mark II <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> recording system which has a sampling rate of four million bits per second.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986ApJ...310..838A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986ApJ...310..838A"><span>Physical conditions near red giant and supergiant stars - an interpretation of SiO <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> maps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alcock, Charles; Ross, Randy R.</p> <p>1986-11-01</p> <p>Understanding the dynamical structure of circumstellar envelopes around cool giant and supergiant stars depends critically on the knowledge of what happens in the 'near zone' of the envelope, within a few stellar radii of the star. One probe with adequate angular resolution to study the near zone is <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observation of the SiO masers. It is shown that <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> maps of VX Sgr establish that the particle density in the SiO masers is very high (about 10 to the 12th/cu cm), indicating that the masers form in dense cloudlets and not in a spherically expanding wind. The implications of these results for the mechanism of mass loss are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010TCD.....4.1151F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010TCD.....4.1151F"><span>Comparison of direct and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> mass balances on a multi-annual time scale</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fischer, A.</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>Glacier mass balance is measured with the direct or the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> method. In this study, the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> mass balances of six Austrian glaciers in 19 periods between 1953 and 2006 are compared to the direct mass balances in the same periods. The mean annual <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> mass balance for all periods is -0.5 m w.e./year. The mean difference between the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and the direct data is -0.7 m w.e., the minimum -7.3 m w.e. and the maximum 5.6 m w.e. The accuracy of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> mass balance resulting from the accuracy of the DEMs ranges from 2 m w.e. for photogrammetric data to 0.002 m w.e. for LIDAR data. Basal melt, seasonal snow cover and density changes of the surface layer contribute up to 0.7 m w.e. for the period of 10 years to the difference to the direct method. The characteristics of published data of Griesgletscher, Gulkana Glacier, Lemon Creek glacier, South Cascade, Storbreen, Storglaciären, and Zongo Glacier is similar to these Austrian glaciers. For 26 analyzed periods with an average length of 18 years the mean difference between the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and the direct data is -0.4 m w.e., the minimum -7.2 m w.e. and the maximum 3.6 m w.e. Longer periods between the acquisition of the DEMs do not necessarily result in a higher accuracy of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> mass balance. Specific glaciers show specific trends of the difference between the direct and the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data according to their type and state. In conclusion, <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and direct mass balance data are complementary, but differ systematically.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGeod..86..221A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGeod..86..221A"><span>Methodology for the combination of sub-daily Earth rotation from GPS and <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Artz, T.; Bernhard, L.; Nothnagel, A.; Steigenberger, P.; Tesmer, S.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>A combination procedure of Earth orientation parameters from Global Positioning System (GPS) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) observations was developed on the basis of homogeneous normal equation systems. The emphasis and purpose of the combination was the determination of sub-daily polar motion (PM) and universal time (UT1) for a long time-span of 13 years. Time series with an hourly resolution and a model for tidal variations of PM and UT1-TAI (dUT1) were estimated. In both cases, 14-day nutation corrections were estimated simultaneously with the ERPs. Due to the combination procedure, it was warranted that the strengths of both techniques were preserved. At the same time, only a minimum of de-correlating or stabilizing constraints were necessary. Hereby, a PM time series was determined, whose precision is mainly dominated by GPS observations. However, this setup benefits from the fact that <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> delivered nutation and dUT1 estimates at the same time. An even bigger enhancement can be seen for the dUT1 estimation, where the high-frequency variations are provided by GPS, while the long term trend is defined by <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>. The estimated combined tidal PM and dUT1 model was predominantly determined from the GPS observations. Overall, the combined tidal model for the first time completely comprises the geometrical benefits of <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> and GPS observations. In terms of root mean squared (RMS) differences, the tidal amplitudes agree with other empirical single-technique tidal models below 4 μ as in PM and 0.25 μ s in dUT1. The noise floor of the tidal ERP model was investigated in three ways resulting in about 1 μ as for diurnal PM and 0.07 μ s for diurnal dUT1 while the semi-diurnal components have a slightly better accuracy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22340312','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22340312"><span>Early science with the Korean <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> network: evaluation of system performance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kim, Jongsoo; Jung, Taehyun; Song, Min-Gyu; Oh, Chung Sik; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Je, Do-Heung; Wi, Seog-Oh; Sohn, Bong Won; Oh, Se-Jin; Kim, Kee-Tae; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Chung, Moon-Hee; Kang, Jiman; Han, Seog-Tae; Lee, Jung-Won; Kim, Bong Gyu; Chung, Hyunsoo; Petrov, Leonid; and others</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>We report the very long baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) observing performance of the Korean <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Network (KVN). The KVN is the first millimeter-dedicated <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> network in East Asia. The KVN consists of three 21 m radio telescopes with baseline lengths in a range of 305-476 km. The quasi-optical system equipped on the antennas allows simultaneous observations at 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz. The first fringes of the KVN were obtained at 22 GHz on 2010 June 8. Test observations at 22 and 43 GHz on 2010 September 30 and 2011 April 4 confirmed that the full cycle of <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations works according to specification: scheduling, antenna control system, data recording, correlation, post-correlation data processing, astrometry, geodesy, and imaging analysis. We found that decorrelation due to instability in the hardware at times up to 600 s is negligible. The atmosphere fluctuations at KVN baseline are partly coherent, which allows us to extend integration time under good winter weather conditions up to 600 s without significant loss of coherence. The post-fit residuals at KVN baselines do not exhibit systematic patterns, and the weighted rms of the residuals is 14.8 ps. The KVN is ready to image compact radio sources both in snapshot and full-track modes with residual noise in calibrated phases of less than 2 deg at 22 and 43 GHz and with dynamic ranges of ∼300 for snapshot mode and ∼1000 for full-track mode. With simultaneous multi-frequency observations, the KVN can be used to make parsec-scale spectral index maps of compact radio sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcASn..57..719H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcASn..57..719H"><span>A New Try of Connecting Phase and Resolving Phase Delay in <span class="hlt">VLBI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>He, Q. B.; Liu, Q. H.; Chang, S. Q.; Zheng, X.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>In the deep space exploration, the differential very long baseline interferometry (Δ<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) technique is often used. It can help to achieve better orbit and position determinations of spacecraft. But in the Δ<span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observation, the correlation phases have gaps in time domain. Connecting the correlation phases without ambiguity 2π helps to resolve the phase delay and obtain spacecraft's orbit with a higher accuracy, and also can make contributions to the planetary science study. Meanwhile, the phase delay is a promising measurement in many fields because of its extremely high accuracy, but it's hard to be obtained. Thus we studied the correlation phase connection and phase delay resolution using the Chang'E-3 data. For the phase connection, we first implemented the idea that differential phase was changing in the same trend with a single spectral line's phase, and then we adjusted the phase ambiguities according to phase closure results. For the phase delay resolution, the method is using phases of two spectral lines which are spaced in a narrow band (1 MHz) to resolve the phase ambiguities. We calculated the phase delay of Chang'E-3 lander, and by only utilizing the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> phase delay results, we obtained the lander's location as 44.1239°N, 19.5106°W. The reference of the lander's location is 44.12189°N, 19.51129°W with an accuracy of 20 m. The difference between the two results is about one hundred meters, which proves that the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> phase delay can be used alone to determine the spacecraft's position.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810018627','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810018627"><span>Development of a composite <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> structure for space construction, phase 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Primary physical and mechanical properties were defined for pultruded hybrid HMS/E-glass P1700 rod material used for the fabrication of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> beams. Key properties established were used in the analysis, design, fabrication, instrumentation, and testing of a <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> parameter cylinder and a lattice cone closeout joined to a short cylindrical <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> beam segment. Requirements of structural techniques were accomplished. Analytical procedures were refined and extended to include the effect of rod dimensions for the helical and longitudinal members on local buckling, and the effect of different flexural and extensional moduli on general instability buckling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750003343','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750003343"><span>GEODYN system description, volume 1. [computer program for estimation of orbit and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> parameters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chin, M. M.; Goad, C. C.; Martin, T. V.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>A computer program for the estimation of orbit and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> parameters is presented. The areas in which the program is operational are defined. The specific uses of the program are given as: (1) determination of definitive orbits, (2) tracking instrument calibration, (3) satellite operational predictions, and (4) <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> parameter estimation. The relationship between the various elements in the solution of the orbit and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> parameter estimation problem is analyzed. The solution of the problems corresponds to the orbit generation mode in the first case and to the data reduction mode in the second case.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880018819&hterms=Soviet+Union&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DSoviet%2BUnion','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880018819&hterms=Soviet+Union&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DSoviet%2BUnion"><span>Determination of the Venus flyby orbits of the Soviet Vega probes using <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ellis, J.; Mcelrath, Timothy P.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>In December 1984, the Soviet Union launched two identical Vega spacecraft with the dual objective of exploring Venus and continuing to rendezvous with the comet Halley. The two Vega spacecraft encountered Venus in mid-June 1985 and successfully deployed entry probes and wind-measuring balloons into the Venus atmosphere. An objective of the Venus Balloon experiment was to measure the Venus winds using differential <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> from the balloon and the flyby bus. NASA's Deep Space 64 meter subnet was part of a world wide network organized to collect data from the Vega probes and balloons. A critical element of this experiment was an accurate determination of the Venus relative flyby orbits of the Vega spacecraft during the 46 hour balloon lifetime. Venus flyby solutions were independently determined by the Soviets using two-way range and Doppler from Soviet stations and by JPL using one-way Doppler and <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data collected from the DSN. The Vega flyby solutions determined by the Soviets using a sparse two-way tracking strategy with JPL solutions using the DSN <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> data to complement the Soviet data and with solutions using only one-way data collected by the DSN were compared.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.G13A0931B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.G13A0931B"><span>On estimation of the free core nutation parameters from analysis of the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> celestial pole offsets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brzezinski, A.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The free core nutation (FCN) resonance influences Earth rotation in two different ways: 1) through resonant enhancement of the amplitudes of those forced nutation components which are close to the FCN frequency (indirect effect); 2) it gives rise to the free oscillation of the pole in response to the irregular nearly-diurnal geophysical forcing (direct effect). It is commonly believed that the best estimate of the FCN parameters, the space-referred period T and the quality factor Q, is that from the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> determination of the nutation amplitudes. The estimated values corresponding to the MHB2000 precession-nutatin model are T=-430 days and Q=20 000 with quite narrow uncertainty limits (429.93,430.48) and (18 870,21 280), respectively. Here we focus attention on determination of T and Q from analysis of the FCN signal observed by <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> since 1984. The underlying stochastic model is similar to that applied since decades for analysis of the Chandler wobble, the so-called "pea-shooter" model proposed by Jeffreys (1940). We discuss here different ways of implementation of such model based on the methods of time series analysis. We also show and compare the FCN parameters derived from various available <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> nutation data sets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJWC..6101008N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EPJWC..6101008N"><span>Greenland Telescope (GLT) Project. "A Direct Confirmation of Black Hole with Submillimeter <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nakamura, M.; Algaba, J. C.; Asada, K.; Chen, B.; Chen, M.-T.; Han, J.; Ho, P. H. P.; Hsieh, S.-N.; Huang, T.; Inoue, M.; Koch, P.; Kuo, C.-Y.; Martin-Cocher, P.; Matsushita, S.; Meyer-Zhao, Z.; Nishioka, H.; Nystrom, G.; Pradel, N.; Pu, H.-Y.; Raffin, P.; Shen, H.-Y.; Tseng, C.-Y.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The GLT project is deploying a new submillimeter (submm) <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> station in Greenland. Our primary scientific goal is to image a shadow of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) of six billion solar masses in M87 at the center of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. The expected SMBH shadow size of 40-50 μas requires superbly high angular resolution, suggesting that the submm <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> would be the only way to obtain the shadow image. The Summit station in Greenland enables us to establish baselines longer than 9,000 km with ALMA in Chile and SMA in Hawaii as well as providing a unique u-v coverage for imaging M87. Our <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> network will achieve a superior angular resolution of about 20 μas at 350 GHz, corresponding to ˜ 2.5 times of the Schwarzschild radius of the supermassive black hole in M87. We have been monitoring the atmospheric opacity at 230 GHz since August. 2011; we have confirmed the value on site during the winter season is comparable to the ALMA site thanks to high altitude of 3,200 m and low temperature of -50°C. We will report current status and future plan of the GLT project towards our expected first light on 2015-2016.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089844','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089844"><span>THE IMPACT OF FREQUENCY STANDARDS ON COHERENCE IN <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> AT THE HIGHEST FREQUENCIES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rioja, M.; Dodson, R.; Asaki, Y.; Hartnett, J.; Tingay, S.</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>We have carried out full imaging simulation studies to explore the impact of frequency standards in millimeter and submillimeter very long baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>), focusing on the coherence time and sensitivity. In particular, we compare the performance of the H-maser, traditionally used in <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>, to that of ultra-stable cryocooled sapphire oscillators over a range of observing frequencies, weather conditions, and analysis strategies. Our simulations show that at the highest frequencies, the losses induced by H-maser instabilities are comparable to those from high-quality tropospheric conditions. We find significant benefits in replacing H-masers with cryocooled sapphire oscillator based frequency references in <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations at frequencies above 175 GHz in sites which have the best weather conditions; at 350 GHz we estimate a 20%-40% increase in sensitivity over that obtained when the sites have H-masers, for coherence losses of 20%-10%, respectively. Maximum benefits are to be expected by using co-located Water Vapor Radiometers for atmospheric correction. In this case, we estimate a 60%-120% increase in sensitivity over the H-maser at 350 GHz.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20130001831&hterms=bach&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbach','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20130001831&hterms=bach&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbach"><span>The Potential for a Ka-band (32 GHz) Worldwide <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jacobs, C. S.; Bach, U.; Colomer, F.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.; Gulyaev, S.; Horiuchi, S.; Ichikawa, R.; Kraus, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, J. A.; Lovell, J.; Majid, W.; Natusch, T.; Neidhardt, A.; Phillips, C.; Porcas, R.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Saldana, L.; Schreiber, U.; Sotuela, I.; Takeuchi, H.; Trinh, J.; Tzioumis, A.; deVincente, P.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Ka-band (32 GHz, 9mm) Very Long Baseline Interferometric (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) networking has now begun and has tremendous potential for expansion over the next few years. Ka-band <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> astrometry from NASA's Deep Space Network has already developed a catalog of 470 observable sources with highly accurate positions. Now, several antennas worldwide are planning or are considering adding Ka-band <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> capability. Thus, there is now an opportunity to create a worldwide Ka-band network with potential for high resolution imaging and astrometry. With baselines approaching a Giga-lambda, a Ka-band network would be able to probe source structure at the nano-radian (200 as) level ( 100X better than Hubble) and thus gain insight into the astrophysics of the most compact regions of emission in active galactic nuclei. We discuss the advantages of Ka-band, show the known sources and candidates, simulate projected baseline (uv) coverage, and discuss potential radio frequency feeds. The combination of these elements demonstrates the feasibility of a worldwide Ka network within the next few years!</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950016436','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950016436"><span>Observation model and parameter partials for the JPL <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> parameter estimation software MODEST, 19 94</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sovers, O. J.; Jacobs, C. S.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>This report is a revision of the document Observation Model and Parameter Partials for the JPL <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Parameter Estimation Software 'MODEST'---1991, dated August 1, 1991. It supersedes that document and its four previous versions (1983, 1985, 1986, and 1987). A number of aspects of the very long baseline interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) model were improved from 1991 to 1994. Treatment of tidal effects is extended to model the effects of ocean tides on universal time and polar motion (UTPM), including a default model for nearly diurnal and semidiurnal ocean tidal UTPM variations, and partial derivatives for all (solid and ocean) tidal UTPM amplitudes. The time-honored 'K(sub 1) correction' for solid earth tides has been extended to include analogous frequency-dependent response of five tidal components. Partials of ocean loading amplitudes are now supplied. The Zhu-Mathews-Oceans-Anisotropy (ZMOA) 1990-2 and Kinoshita-Souchay models of nutation are now two of the modeling choices to replace the increasingly inadequate 1980 International Astronomical Union (IAU) nutation series. A rudimentary model of antenna thermal expansion is provided. Two more troposphere mapping functions have been added to the repertoire. Finally, corrections among <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations via the model of Treuhaft and lanyi improve modeling of the dynamic troposphere. A number of minor misprints in Rev. 4 have been corrected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.V43B3139W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.V43B3139W"><span>Magma-tectonic interactions in Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone in 2006 through coupled <span class="hlt">geodetic</span>/seismological analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wauthier, C.; Roman, D. C.; Poland, M. P.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>For much of the first 20 years of Kīlauea's 1983-present Pu'u 'Ō'ō eruption, deformation was characterized by subsidence at the volcano's summit and along both the East Rift Zone (ERZ) and Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ). At the end of 2003, however, Kīlauea's summit began a 4-year period of inflation due to a surge in magma supply to the volcano. In 2006, the SWRZ also experienced atypical inflation, which was last observed in 1981-82 during a series of dike intrusions. To investigate the active magma sources and their interactions with faulting in the SWRZ during 2006, we integrate contemporary <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data from InSAR and GPS with double-couple fault-plane solutions for volcano-tectonic earthquakes and Coulomb stress modeling. According to the rate of deformation measured in daily GPS data, two distinct periods can be defined, spanning January to 15 March 2006 (period 1) and 16 March to 30 September 2006 (period 2). <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> models suggest that, during period 1, deformation, due to pressurization of magma in a vertical prolate-spheroidal conduit, in the south caldera area. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, a major seismic swarm occurred in both the SWRZ and ERZ. Our preliminary results also suggest that, during period 2, magma was still overpressurizing the same prolate-spheroid but a subhorizontal sill also intruded further to the southwest in the seismic SWRZ (SSWRZ). The beginning of period 2 also corresponds to a switch from subsidence to inflation of the SWRZ. Faulting in the upper ERZ is primarily strike-slip, with no obvious change in FPS orientation between periods 1 and 2. In contrast, faulting in the upper SSWRZ occurs as dip-slip motion on near-vertical faults. SSWRZ FPS show a mix of orientations including NW- and NE-striking faults, which along with relative earthquake locations, suggest a series of right-stepping fault segments, particularly during period 2. Calculated Coulomb stress changes indicate that faulting in the upper SSWRZ may result from stresses produced by</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800010867','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19800010867"><span>Development of a composite <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> structure for space construction, phase 1A</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The development of a <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> beam and beam builder for on orbit construction of large truss type space structures is discussed. The <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> beam is a lightweight, open lattice structure composed of an equilateral gridwork of crisscrossing rods. The beam provides a high degree of stiffness and minimizes structural distortion, due to temperature gradients, through the incorporation of a new graphite and glass reinforced thermoplastic composite material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion. A low power consuming, high production rate, beam builder automatically fabricates the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> beams in space using rods preprocessed on Earth. Three areas of the development are focused upon; (1) <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> beam designs for local attachment of equipment or beam to beam joining in a parallel or crossing configurations, (2) evaluation of long life pultruded rods capable of service temperatures higher than possible with the HMS/P1700 rod material, and (3) evalaution of high temperature joint encapsulant materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..4310663J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..4310663J"><span>Reconciling seismicity and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> locking depths on the Anza section of the San Jacinto fault</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Junle; Fialko, Yuri</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Observations from the Anza section of the San Jacinto Fault in Southern California reveal that microseismicity extends to depths of 15-18 km, while the <span class="hlt">geodetically</span> determined locking depth is less than 10 km. This contrasts with observations from other major faults in the region and also with predictions of fault models assuming a simple layered distribution of frictional properties with depth. We suggest that an anomalously shallow <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> fault locking may result from a transition zone at the bottom of seismogenic layer with spatially heterogeneous frictional properties. Numerical models of faults that incorporate stochastic heterogeneity at transitional depths successfully reproduce the observed depth relation between seismicity and <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> locking, as well as complex spatiotemporal patterns of microseismicity with relatively scarce repeating earthquakes. Our models predict propagation of large earthquakes to the bottom of the transition zone, and ubiquitous aseismic transients below the locked zone, potentially observable using high-precision <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> techniques.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150003895','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150003895"><span>Data Center at NICT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> sessions of the Key Stone Project <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> to the Key Stone Project <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> sessions, NICT has been conducting <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.4608P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.4608P"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Monitoring System Operating On Neapolitan Volcanic Area (southern Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pingue, F.; Ov-Geodesy Team</p> <p></p> <p> volcanic high risk, is monitored also by dense <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> networks using different methods: levelling, GPS, tiltmeter, tide-gauge, gravimetry, INSAR. Each of the collected data contributes to volcanic sources modelling, thus to the eruptive scenarios definition and the risk mitigation. Here the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> surveillance system in the Neapolitan area is described in detail and the main results obtained in the last years are shown and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.G52A0966M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.G52A0966M"><span>Trials for better precision of seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observation system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mochizuki, M.; Sato, M.; Fujita, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yabuki, T.; Asada, A.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, and Hydrographic Department, Japan, have been developing seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observation system and conducting observations using the system. Precise acoustic ranging and kinematic GPS positioning techniques are combined into the system. Seafloor reference station which consists of four mirror type transponders is deployed on the seafloor and measures its position in reference to GPS stations on land and ship. Fourteen seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> reference stations have been distributed on the forearc areas of Japan island arc. Subsea crustal deformation due to subducting two oceanic plates of the Pacific and the Philippine sea can be monitored by using the seafloor reference stations. Although we obtained satisfactory results with the already existing system, we come up with possible improvements of the system as we accumulate the experience of the observations using the system. Trials to improve the system are always done. In this poster, we will present two of such trials. 1. To improve the stability of the rigid pole connecting the GPS antenna and the ship-board transducer. The bending of the GPS pole was found by examining the offsets in the acoustic ranging residuals. Acoustic ranging is made with condition that the ship drifts over sea surface. Drag force generated between surface current and the pole makes the pole itself bend. The pole was replaced by new, more rigid pole to overcome the problem. Also, we monitor amount of bending of the pole, that is, the offset between the GPS antenna and the transducer, using tiltmeter through the observation. 2. To reduce the acoustic ranging error due to shape of the transducer. Coded sinusoidal acoustic wave with 15cm wave length is used as the ranging signal. This wave length is comparable to the dimension of the cylindrical transducers employed both on the ship-board system and on the seafloor transponder. Transducer can not be regarded as a point considering the wave</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T13F2699W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T13F2699W"><span>Stress coupling in the seismic cycle indicated from <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, L.; Hainzl, S.; Zoeller, G.; Holschneider, M.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The seismic cycle includes several phases, the interseismic, coseismic and postseismic phase. In the interseismic phase, strain gradually builds up around the overall locked fault in tens to thousands of years, while it is coseismically released in seconds. In the postseismic interval, stress relaxation lasts months to years, indicated by evident aseismic deformations which have been indicated to release comparable or even higher strain energy than the main shocks themselves. Benefiting from the development of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observatory, e.g., Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) in the last two decades, the measurements of surface deformation have been significantly improved and become valuable information for understanding the stress evolution on the large fault plane. In this study, we utilize the GPS/InSAR data to investigate the slip deficit during the interseismic phase, the coseismic slip and the early postseismic creep on the fault plane. However, it is already well-known that slip inversions based only on the surface measurements are typically non-unique and subject to large uncertainties. To reduce the ambiguity, we utilize the assumption of stress coupling between interseismic and coseismic phases, and between coseismic and postseismic phases. We use a stress constrained joint inversion in Bayesian approach (Wang et al., 2012) to invert simultaneously for (1) interseismic slip deficit and coseismic slip, and (2) coseismic slip and postseismic creep. As case studies, we analyze earthquakes occurred in well-instrumented regions such as the 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake, the 2010 M8.7 earthquake and the 2011 M9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We show that the inversion with the stress-coupling constraint leads to better constrained slip distributions. Meanwhile, the results also indicate that the assumed stress coupling is reasonable and can be well reflected from the available <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements. Reference: Lifeng</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V44B..02A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.V44B..02A"><span>Improved constraint on magmatic systems from <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and other data using physics-based eruption models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, K. R.; Segall, P.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Observations of ground deformation at volcanoes can be used with simple kinematic models of idealized magma chambers to place valuable constraints on the location, depth, volume change history, and possibly shape of volcanic source reservoirs, but cannot generally be used to estimate their total volume or the properties of the melt in the chamber (including pressure). Analysis of gas emissions, lava dome growth, and the petrology of extruded rock can provide constraints on melt properties and possibly chamber volume, but considered independently, these observations can paint only an incomplete picture of the volcanic system. We argue that a physics-based model of a volcanic eruption can link realistic magmatic processes with diverse time-evolving observations, and thereby make it possible to use all available information simultaneously to place better constraints on properties of the magmatic system than is possible by considering each independently. We have developed a model of an effusive silicic volcanic eruption that is capable of predicting time-evolving pressures, volatile concentrations, and other properties of melt in the chamber and conduit, and from which observations of ground deformation and lava dome extrusion may be calculated. A Bayesian inverse formulation allows for the incorporation of <span class="hlt">additional</span> information into the problem and generates probabilistic estimates for model parameters. We have applied the technique to the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), constraining model parameters using <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and extrusive flux time series, as well as independent estimates of chamber pressure (from plagioclase equilibration data) and dissolved water concentration (derived from gas emissions). In contrast to more traditional inversions using only <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data and kinematic forward models, we are able to provide constraint on the absolute volume of the magma chamber, properties of the melt including its compressibility and volatile content, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.G53B0900V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.G53B0900V"><span>Feasibility of Construction of the Continuously Operating <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> GPS Network of Sinaloa, Mexico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vazquez, G. E.; Jacobo, C.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>This research is based on the study and analysis of feasibility for the construction of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> network for GPS continuous operation for Sinaloa, hereafter called (RGOCSIN). A GPS network of continuous operation is defined as that materialized structure physically through permanent monuments where measurements to the systems of Global Positioning (GPS) is performed continuously throughout a region. The GPS measurements in this network are measurements of accuracy according to international standards to define its coordinates, thus constituting the basic structure of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> referencing for a country. In this context is that in the near future the RGOCSIN constitutes a system state only accurate and reliable georeferencing in real-time (continuous and permanent operation) and will be used for different purposes; i.e., in <span class="hlt">addition</span> to being fundamental basis for any lifting topographic or <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> survey, and other areas such as: (1) Different construction processes (control and monitoring of engineering works); (2) Studies of deformation of the Earth's crust (before and after a seismic event); (3) GPS meteorology (weather forecasting); (4) Demarcation projects (natural and political); (5) Establishment of bases to generate mapping (necessary for the economic and social development of the state); (6) Precision agriculture (optimization of economic resources to the various crops); (7) Geographic information systems (Organization and planning activities associated with the design and construction of public services); (8) Urban growth (possible settlements in the appropriate form and taking care of the environmental aspect), among others. However there are criteria and regulations according to the INEGI (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía, http://www.inegi.org.mx/) that must be met; even for this stage of feasibility of construction that sees this project as a first phase. The fundamental criterion to be taken into account according to INEGI is a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1996/0517/fema/index.html','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1996/0517/fema/index.html"><span>Damage and restoration of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> infrastructure caused by the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hodgkinson, Kathleen M.; Stein, Ross S.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Satalich, Jay; Richards, John H.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>We seek to restore the integrity of the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> network in the San Fernando, Simi, Santa Clarita Valleys and in the northern Los Angeles Basin by remeasurement of the network and identification of BMs which experienced non-tectonic displacements associated with the Northridge earthquake. We then use the observed displacement of BMs in the network to portray or predict the permanent vertical and horizontal deformation associated with the 1994 Northridge earthquake throughout the area, including sites where we lack <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements. To accomplish this, we find the fault geometry and earthquake slip that are most compatible with the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and independent seismic observations of the earthquake. We then use that fault model to predict the deformation everywhere at the earth's surface, both at locations where <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations exist and also where they are absent. We compare displacements predicted for a large number of numerical models of the earthquake faulting to the coseismic displacements, treating the earthquake fault as a cut or discontinuity embedded in a stiff elastic solid. This comparison is made after non-tectonic deformation has been removed from the measured elevation changes. The fault slip produces strain in the medium and deforms the ground surface. The model compatible with seismic observations that best fits the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data within their uncertainties is selected. The acceptable model fault bisects the mainshock focus, and the earthquake size , magnitude, is compatible with the earthquake size measured seismically. Our fault model was used to identify <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> monuments on engineered structures that were anomalously displaced by the earthquake.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PASJ...63.1229O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PASJ...63.1229O"><span>Design and Development of a High-Speed Data-Acquisition System for the Korean <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oh, Se-Jin; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Byun, Do-Young; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Je, Do-Heung; Han, Seog-Tae; Iguchi, Satoru; Kawakami, Kazuyuki; Ozeki, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Sasao, Tetsuo; Sohn, Bongwon; Kim, Jaeheon; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Oyama, Tomoaki; Kurayama, Tomoharu</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>A new high-speed Data Acquisition System (DAS) has been developed for the millimeter-wave <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> array newly constructed in Korea, the Korean <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Network (KVN). The KVN DAS is specially designed to support the most distinctive feature of the KVN, that is simultaneous reception of multiple frequency bands (22, 43, 86 and 129-GHz bands in the current KVN system) for realizing multi-frequency phase referencing, which is the key technology for successful millimeter-wave <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations toward active galactic nuclei and astronomical maser sources. Although the basic functions of the KVN DAS succeed technological elements originally developed in the VERA (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span> Exploration of Radio Astrometry) Project, essentially new designs have been introduced for the simultaneous processing of four data streams in the optical data-transmission system, the digital filter, and the digital spectrometer. The KVN DAS system consists of four Gigabit Samplers (GBS), Optical Transmission System (OTS), Digital Filter Bank (DFB), Digital Spectrometer (DSM), and the data recorder. The DFB realizes very flexible and phase-stable channelization of up to four data streams. The DSM facilitates quick look of power and cross-power spectra of observed data. The <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> output data from the DFB are recorded to the Mark5B recorder with a maximum rate of 1-Gbps. We discuss in the present paper the primary specifications, designs, and experimental results of the KVN DAS system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013BaltA..22...35N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013BaltA..22...35N"><span>A experiment on radio location of objects in the near-Earth space with <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> in 2012</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nechaeva, M.; Antipenko, A.; Bezrukovs, V.; Bezrukov, D.; Dementjev, A.; Dugin, N.; Konovalenko, A.; Kulishenko, V.; Liu, X.; Nabatov, A.; Nesteruk, V.; Pupillo, G.; Reznichenko, A.; Salerno, E.; Shmeld, I.; Shulga, O.; Sybiryakova, Y.; Tikhomirov, Yu.; Tkachenko, A.; Volvach, A.; Yang, W.-J.</p> <p></p> <p>An experiment on radar location of space debris objects using of the method of <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> was carried out in April, 2012. The radar <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> experiment consisted in irradiation of some space debris objects (4 rocket stages and 5 inactive satellites) with a signal of the transmitter with RT-70 in Evpatoria, Ukraine. Reflected signals were received by a complex of radio telescopes in the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> mode. The following <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> stations took part in the observations: Ventspils (RT-32), Urumqi (RT-25), Medicina (RT-32) and Simeiz (RT-22). The experiment included measurements of the Doppler frequency shift and the delay for orbit refining, and measurements of the rotation period and sizes of objects by the amplitudes of output interferometer signals. The cross-correlation of <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>-data is performed at a correlator NIRFI-4 of Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod). Preliminary data processing resulted in the series of Doppler frequency shifts, which comprised the information on radial velocities of the objects. Some results of the experiment are presented.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.202..763S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.202..763S"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> secular velocity errors due to interannual surface loading deformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Mémin, Anthony</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> vertical velocities derived from data as short as 3 yr are often assumed to be representative of linear deformation over past decades to millennia. We use two decades of surface loading deformation predictions due to variations of atmospheric, oceanic and continental water mass to assess the effect on secular velocities estimated from short time-series. The interannual deformation is time-correlated at most locations over the globe, with the level of correlation depending mostly on the chosen continental water model. Using the most conservative loading model and 5-yr-long time-series, we found median vertical velocity errors of 0.5 mm yr-1 over the continents (0.3 mm yr-1 globally), exceeding 1 mm yr-1 in regions around the southern Tropic. Horizontal velocity errors were seven times smaller. Unless an accurate loading model is available, a decade of continuous data is required in these regions to mitigate the impact of the interannual loading deformation on secular velocities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.T41D2944M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.T41D2944M"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Estimate of Water in the Wharton Basin Upper Mantle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Masuti, S. S.; Barbot, S.; Karato, S. I.; Feng, L.; Bannerjee, P.; Natawidjaja, D.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The formation of oceans at the Earth's surface and hence the origin of life can be directly linked to the fate of water after planetary formation, but how much water is now confined in the upper mantle remains elusive. Current estimates of water in olivine from geochemistry are between 200 and 3600 H/106 Si. Here, we exploit the water-sensitive rheology of olivine to estimate the water content in the Wharton Basin asthenosphere in the Indian Ocean. We explore the role of water stratification in the upper mantle and the transient behavior of olivine flow in the context of postseismic deformation following the 2012 Mw 8.6 Wharton Basin earthquake using <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data from the Sumatra GPS network. We build a model that incorporates afterslip in the brittle upper mantle and viscous flow in the asthenosphere. We introduce a formulation of the transient rheology of olivine in the form of a flow law coupled to a state evolution that characterizes the internal stress of the mineral before steady-state. We find that the Wharton Basin asthenosphere contains about 1000 H/106 Si, representing 10% of water saturation of olivine at 100 km depth. If these results can be extrapolated to other depths, this indicates an equivalent of about 0.7 ocean mass is now present in the Earth's upper mantle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeCar..65...13K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeCar..65...13K"><span>Empirical methods of reducing the observations in <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kadaj, Roman</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The paper presents empirical methodology of reducing various kinds of observations in <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> network. A special case of reducing the observation concerns cartographic mapping. For numerical illustration and comparison of methods an application of the conformal Gauss-Krüger mapping was used. Empirical methods are an alternative to the classic differential and multi-stages methods. Numerical benefits concern in particular very long geodesics, created for example by GNSS vectors. In conventional methods the numerical errors of reduction values are significantly dependent on the length of the geodesic. The proposed empirical methods do not have this unfavorable characteristics. Reduction value is determined as a difference (or especially scaled difference) of the corresponding measures of geometric elements (distances, angles), wherein these measures are approximated independently in two spaces based on the known and corresponding approximate coordinates of the network points. Since in the iterative process of the network adjustment, coordinates of the points are systematically improved, approximated reductions also converge to certain optimal values.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.3191C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.3191C"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Network For Crustal Deformation Control of Northernvictoria Land (antarctica)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Capra, A.; Bitelli, G.; Gandolfi, S.; Mancini, F.; Sarti, P.; Vittuari, L.</p> <p></p> <p>VLNDEF (Victoria Land Network for DEFormation control) project started in 1999 with the aim to measure a network for the study of regional geodynamics of northern Victoria Land. In 1999-2000 and 2000-01 italian expeditions, a network of 25 stations with an average distance of 70 km covering the area from Terra Nova Bay, italian sta- tion in Antarctica, to the northern Oates Coast on Pacific ocean, about 700 km long and about 300 km large, was established and surveyed. The network design and stations location were based on principal faults of the area pointed out by most recent tecton- ics studies. The research activity is made within GIANT (<span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Infrastructure of ANTarctica) program and ANTEC (ANtarctic neoTECtonics) Group of Specialists of SCAR (Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research).The network coordinates are de- fined in most recent ITRF 2000 system through the emanation from GPS permanent station TNB1. TNB1 was included in SCAR GPS Epoch measurements campaigns and, consequently, connected to IGS network in 2000. VLNDEF includes the first italian reference network about 5000 square km around Terra Nova Bay, and a small network for Mt.Melbourne volcano monitoring. The reference network was surveyed three time, while the detail network was surveyed five time. The data were processed with different software, more recently with Bernese and Gipsy. The processing results and a preliminary approach for deformation analysis are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JSeis..19....1C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JSeis..19....1C"><span>Local <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> and seismic energy balance for shallow earthquake prediction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cannavó, Flavio; Arena, Alessandra; Monaco, Carmelo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Earthquake analysis for prediction purposes is a delicate and still open problem largely debated among scientists. In this work, we want to show that a successful time-predictable model is possible if based on large instrumental data from dense monitoring networks. To this aim, we propose a new simple data-driven and quantitative methodology which takes into account the accumulated <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> strain and the seismically-released strain to calculate a balance of energies. The proposed index quantifies the state of energy of the selected area and allows us to evaluate better the ingoing potential seismic risk, giving a new tool to read recurrence of small-scale and shallow earthquakes. In spite of its intrinsic simple formulation, the application of the methodology has been successfully simulated in the Eastern flank of Mt. Etna (Italy) by tuning it in the period 2007-2011 and testing it in the period 2012-2013, allowing us to predict, within days, the earthquakes with highest magnitude.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900011223','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900011223"><span>Thin-plate spline quadrature of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> integrals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vangysen, Herman</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Thin-plate spline functions (known for their flexibility and fidelity in representing experimental data) are especially well-suited for the numerical integration of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> integrals in the area where the integration is most sensitive to the data, i.e., in the immediate vicinity of the evaluation point. Spline quadrature rules are derived for the contribution of a circular innermost zone to Stoke's formula, to the formulae of Vening Meinesz, and to the recursively evaluated operator L(n) in the analytical continuation solution of Molodensky's problem. These rules are exact for interpolating thin-plate splines. In cases where the integration data are distributed irregularly, a system of linear equations needs to be solved for the quadrature coefficients. Formulae are given for the terms appearing in these equations. In case the data are regularly distributed, the coefficients may be determined once-and-for-all. Examples are given of some fixed-point rules. With such rules successive evaluation, within a circular disk, of the terms in Molodensky's series becomes relatively easy. The spline quadrature technique presented complements other techniques such as ring integration for intermediate integration zones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614072D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614072D"><span>Tidal investigations at Borowa Gora <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span>-Geophysical Observatory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Sekowski, Marcin</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>In 2009 three LaCoste&Romberg model G gravimeters owed by the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography (IGiK) were equipped with a modern type of feedback system (LRFB-300) which gives a wide range of possibilities for gravimetric measurements. One of the modified LCR gravimeters (G1036) is used for continuous tidal recordings in Borowa Gora <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> - Geophysical Observatory of IGiK, is situated north of Warsaw. Good quality data is now collected from February of 2012. A set of Linux shell scripts have been developed to provide reliable readout recordings (via bluetooth) as well as automatic handling of any exceptional situations. The system runs with the LCR-G1036 from the beginning of February 2012, and since then the completeness of the recording visibly improved compared to previous recordings reaching nearly 98%. The tidal observation have been calibrated several times during the course of recordings, four times with the A10-020 and once with the FG5-230. Also some results concerning the calibration of the tidal recordings with relative meters is presented. A special period (end of 2013) is emphasized where the A10-020 performs measurements every hour for a two weeks alongside three LCR meters. The local tidal model is developed and presented with comparison to the model used in absolute gravity determinations with the A10-020 at Borowa Gora and on the stations of the gravity control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNG23A3795G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMNG23A3795G"><span>Detection of Aseismic <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Transients Using k-Nearest Neighbors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Granat, R. A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Observation and detection of aseismic transient signals in <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> data is an important part of improving understanding of the earthquake cycle. Recent work, conducted as part of the Southern California Earthquake Center's transient detection exercise, showed that transient detection results were improved by using multiple detection methods and by localizing results to specified geographical regions. While geographical regions can be defined on the basis of a priori science domain knowledge, regions defined in such a way are vulnerable to edge effects (i.e., observations collected near the region boundary are less reliable) and are not easily extendable to new regions or measurement modalities where a priori understanding is limited. We present an approach to overcoming these challenges that utilizes a k-nearest neighbor approach to defining geographical regions for GPS stations. In this approach, each station has its own individual region, defined by a chosen number k closest neighboring stations rather than any predefined geographical boundary. In this general framework, a weighting function controls the contributions of neighboring stations to the transient detection, while a distance function (e.g., Vincenty's method) controls which k stations are considered neighbors. The "proper" k depends both on the transient detection method and the weighting function; it can be defined by the user directly or optimized using hyperparameter optimization. For transient detection using multiple detection methods, this framework nests readily within an ensemble classifier.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/110235','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/110235"><span>An efficient algorithm for geocentric to <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinate conversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Toms, R.M.</p> <p>1995-09-01</p> <p>The problem of performing transformations from geocentric to <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> coordinates has received an inordinate amount of attention in the literature. Numerous approximate methods have been published. Almost none of the publications address the issue of efficiency and in most cases there is a paucity of error analysis. Recently there has been a surge of interest in this problem aimed at developing more efficient methods for real time applications such as DIS. Iterative algorithms have been proposed that are not of optimal efficiency, address only one error component and require a small but uncertain number of relatively expensive iterations for convergence. In this paper a well known rapidly convergent iterative approach is modified to eliminate intervening trigonometric function evaluations. A total error metric is defined that accounts for both angular and altitude errors. The initial guess is optimized to minimize the error for one iteration. The resulting algorithm yields transformations correct to one centimeter for altitudes out to one million kilometers. Due to the rapid convergence only one iteration is used and no stopping test is needed. This algorithm is discussed in the context of machines that have FPUs and legacy machines that utilize mathematical subroutine packages.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26685516','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26685516"><span>The Premedieval Origin of Portolan Charts: New <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Evidence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nicolai, Roel</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Portolan charts are highly realistic medieval charts that show remarkably accurate coastlines of the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. They emerged suddenly, without any predecessors or a clear developmental path, in Italy during the thirteenth century. There is broad scholarly agreement that these charts are original creations of European medieval culture. However, corroborating evidence is lacking, and a convincing explanation of the method of their construction has so far not been provided. In this essay it is demonstrated by means of <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> analysis that the overall shape of the coastlines corresponds closely to that on a modern map based on the Mercator projection. It is further demonstrated that this correspondence cannot possibly be due to chance. Consequently, the existence of a Mercator or Mercator-like map projection on portolan charts is incompatible with the assumed medieval origin of these charts. Portolan charts are far more sophisticated than has hitherto been recognized. Their construction was well beyond the capabilities of cartographers from either medieval Europe or the Arabic-Islamic world. This conclusion serves to reopen the question of the origins of the geometric data and the construction methods that until now have appeared to underlie medieval portolan charts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820009834','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820009834"><span>Session III of the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>/Laser intercomparison task of the NASA crustal dynamics project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fliegel, H.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Baseline vector measurements are reported for a line crossing most of the state of California from Quincy to Mt. Otay near the Mexican border. They were obtained to compare three space <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> techniques: very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging, and Doppler satellite tracking.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981vlbi.rept.....F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981vlbi.rept.....F"><span>Session III of the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span>/Laser intercomparison task of the NASA crustal dynamics project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fliegel, H.</p> <p>1981-11-01</p> <p>Baseline vector measurements are reported for a line crossing most of the state of California from Quincy to Mt. Otay near the Mexican border. They were obtained to compare three space <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> techniques: very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging, and Doppler satellite tracking.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016A%26A...586A..60K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016A%26A...586A..60K"><span>PKS 1502+106: A high-redshift Fermi blazar at extreme angular resolution. Structural dynamics with <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> imaging up to 86 GHz</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Karamanavis, V.; Fuhrmann, L.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Angelakis, E.; Hodgson, J.; Nestoras, I.; Myserlis, I.; Zensus, J. A.; Sievers, A.; Ciprini, S.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Context. Blazars are among the most energetic objects in the Universe. In 2008 August, Fermi/LAT detected the blazar PKS 1502+106, which showed a rapid and strong γ-ray outburst followed by high and variable flux over the next months. This activity at high energies triggered an intensive multi-wavelength campaign that also covered the radio, optical, UV, and X-ray bands, indicating that the flare was accompanied by a simultaneous outburst at optical/UV/X-rays and a delayed outburst at radio bands. Aims: We explore the phenomenology and physical conditions within the ultra-relativistic jet of the γ-ray blazar PKS 1502+106. <span class="hlt">Additionally</span>, we address the question of the spatial localization of the MeV/GeV-emitting region of the source. Methods: We used ultra-high angular resolution mm-<span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations at 43 and 86 GHz complemented by <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations at 15 GHz. We also employed single-dish radio data from the F-GAMMA program at frequencies matching the <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> monitoring. Results: PKS 1502+106 shows a compact core-jet morphology and fast superluminal motion with apparent speeds in the range 5-22 c. Estimating Doppler factors along the jet yields values of between ~7 up to ~50. This Doppler factor gradient implies an accelerating jet. The viewing angle towards the source differs between the inner and outer jet, with the former at θ ~ 3° and the latter at θ ~ 1°, after the jet bends towards the observer beyond 1 mas. The de-projected opening angle of the ultra-fast magnetically dominated jet is found to be (3.8 ± 0.5)°. A single jet component can be associated with the pronounced flare both at high energies and in radio bands. Finally, the γ-ray emission region is localized at ≤ 5.9 pc away from the jet base. Images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A60</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.G24A..01F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.G24A..01F"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Constraints on the Tectonics of Alaska and the North Pacific (Invited)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Freymueller, J. T.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>Alaska is one of the most tectonically active areas in the world, hosting a combination of subduction, arc volcanism, continental terrane collision and accretion, and large-scale deformation of the continental lithosphere. The general outline of Alaska tectonics was sketched extremely well by George Plafker and others by the 1980s, but many important details, and particularly rates of motion, are now known primarily through modern space <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> to steady tectonic deformation of the continent, the observed crustal deformation includes significant components due to earthquake cycle deformation, both steady and transient postseismic, volcanic inflation and eruption, and glacial isostatic adjustment. <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> data and the combination of plate configuration and geography have allowed us to study a wide variety of problems in the kinematics and dynamics of the lithosphere in one single area. Most of the crust in Alaska and the surrounding area is moving relative to the North American plate, and the location of the edge of the geologically stable North American continent in the region is not yet clearly defined. Even the Arctic coast of Alaska appears to move relative to the North American plate, although quite slowly. Typical permanent crustal motions are of the order of a few to several mm/yr, and GPS observations across the region define a broad plate boundary zone that comprises not only Alaska, but also most or all of the Pacific coast of Canada. Likewise, there is no well-defined boundary between Alaska and northeast Asia. It is better to think of the entire north Pacific region as a broad plate boundary zone between the North American, Pacific, and Eurasian plates; a collage of tectonic blocks of various sizes that forms a single, large, diffuse deforming belt. These large-scale tectonic motions are overprinted by deformation related to earthquake cycle processes, which often cause ground deformation that is larger than the long-term and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512560O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512560O"><span><span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> observations in Iceland: divergent plate boundary influenced by a hotspot</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ofeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Arnadottir, Thora; Vogfjord, Kristin; Geirsson, Halldor; Einarsson, Pall; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Villemin, Thierry; Fjalar Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Roberts, Matthew; Sturkell, Erik; Lafemina, Peter C.; Bennett, Richard; Voelksen, Christof; Valsson, Gudmundur; Sigurdsson, Thorarinn</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The mid Atlantic ridge, separating the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, is mostly buried below the Atlantic. There are, however, a few places where subaerial exposure of the mid-oceanic rift system allows <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> observations of the deformation associated with the plate boundary. Iceland is the largest portion of the system emerged above sea level, a consequence of excessive volcanism caused by the interaction of a mantle plume with the mid-oceanic ridge. Iceland is therefore a unique site to study processes associated with divergent plate boundaries, and the effects of the plume-ridge interaction. A network of continuous GPS stations have been operating in Iceland since 1995 when the first station was installed in Reykjavik. Since then, stations have been added to the network at different points in time, with over 70 stations presently in operation. The network has been used e.g. for studies of deformation associated with the divergent plate boundary, micro-plate formation due to rift jumps, the plate-spreading deformation cycle associated with rifting episodes, strain rates and stress accumulation on transform zones connecting the ridge segments and deformation due to magmatic processes. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> the GPS network is used in studies of the deformation associated with mass variations of Iceland's glaciers. The continuous GPS network serves as monitoring tool in Iceland, both for volcanic and seismic hazards but also as a research tool. In the recent Futurvolc project, which partly builds on EPOS, the data from the continuous GPS network along with data from the seismic network and InSAR observations, will serve as the main input in joint analyses of long and short term magma movements in volcanic regions. The establishment of the continuous GPS network in Iceland has provided an ideal tool to further increase our understanding of the geodynamic processes associated with divergent plate boundaries and plume-ridge interaction as well as establishing a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.5665K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.5665K"><span>Installation of a seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> network offshore northern Chile (GeoSEA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kopp, Heidrun; Lange, Dietrich; Hannemann, Katrin; Petersen, Florian; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The seafloor stores crucial information on sub-seafloor processes, including stress, elastic strain, and earthquake and tsunami generation. This information may be extracted through the nascent scientific field of seafloor geodesy. The target of the recently installed GeoSEA array (<span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Earthquake Observatory on the SEAfloor) is to measure crustal deformation in mm-scale on the marine forearc and outer rise of the South American subduction system around 21°S. This segment of the Nazca-South American plate boundary has last ruptured in an earthquake in 1877 and was identified as a seismic gap prior to the 2014 Iquique/Pisagua earthquake (Mw=8.1). The southern portion of the segment remains unbroken by a recent earthquake. Seafloor <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> measurements provide a way to monitor crustal deformation at high resolution comparable to the satellite-based GPS technique upon which terrestrial geodesy is largely based. The GeoSEA Network consists of autonomous seafloor transponders installed on 4 m high tripods, which were lowered to the seabed on the deep-sea cable of RV SONNE in December 2015. The transponders within an array intercommunicate via acoustic signals for a period of up to 3.5 years and measure acoustic distance, tilt and pressure. An <span class="hlt">additional</span> component of the network is GeoSURF, a self-steering autonomous surface vehicle (Wave Glider), which monitors system health and is capable to upload the seafloor data to the sea surface and to transfer it via satellite. We have chosen three areas on the middle and lower slope and the outer rise for the set-up of three sub-arrays. The array in Area 1 on the middle continental slope consists of 8 transponders located in pairs on four topographic ridges, which are surface expressions of faults at depth. Area 2 is located on the outer rise seaward of the trench where 5 stations monitor extension across plate-bending related normal faults. The third area is located at water depth >5000 m on the lower continental slope</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27034582','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27034582"><span>Non-linear <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> station motions and their impact on the celestial reference frame and Earth orientation parameters.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krásná, Hana; Malkin, Zinovy; Böhm, Johannes</p> <p></p> <p>The increasing accuracy and growing time span of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (<span class="hlt">VLBI</span>) observations allow the determination of seasonal signals in station positions which still remain unmodelled in conventional analysis approaches. In this study we focus on the impact of the neglected seasonal signals in the station displacement on the celestial reference frame and Earth orientation parameters. We estimate empirical harmonic models for selected stations within a global solution of all suitable <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> sessions and create mean annual models by stacking yearly time series of station positions which are then entered a priori in the analysis of <span class="hlt">VLBI</span> observations. Our results reveal that there is no systematic propagation of the seasonal signal into the orientation of celestial reference frame but position changes occur for radio sources observed non-evenly over the year. On the other hand, the omitted seasonal harmonic signal in horizontal station coordinates propagates directly into the Earth rotation parameters causing differences of several tens of microarcseconds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740010857','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740010857"><span>Calibration and evaluation of Skylab altimetry for <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> determination of the geoid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mourad, A. G.; Fubara, D. M. J. (Principal Investigator)</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The author has identified the following significant results. The analysis was based on a time series intrinsic relationship between the satellite ephemeris, altimeter measured ranges, and the corresponding a priori values of subsatellite geoidal heights. Using, least squares processing with parameter weighting, the objective was to recover: (1) the absolute geoidal heights of the subsatellite points; and (2) the associated altimeter calibration constants. Preliminary results from Skylab mission SL-2 are given, using various combinations from two sets of orbit ephemeris and altimeter ranges. It is shown that correctly scaled geoidal heights cannot be deduced by merely subtracting the altimeter range from the <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> height of the satellite unless the satellite ephemeris and the altimeter have no unknown significant systematic errors or biases and drifts. It is emphasized that the primary objective of the Skylab altimeter is to determine the instrument feasibility. Any <span class="hlt">additional</span> applications of the data such as for geodesy, geophysics, and oceanography are desirable. Although accurate orbit is required for such applications, it is not a prerequisite for determining the instrument feasibility.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.G43A0840S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.G43A0840S"><span>Determination of the Deformation along the Tuzla Fault, Izmir, Turkey by <span class="hlt">Geodetic</span> Techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sabuncu, A.; Ozener, H.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>The Aegean region is the most seismically active domain in Western Anatolia which comprises Greece, the Hellenic Arc, and Western Turkey. The Aegean region is mainly under pure shear stress from an internally deforming counter-clockwise direction of the Anatolian Plate relative to the Eurasia Plate. Izmir is the third largest city in Turkey with 2.7 million population. The Tuzla Fault is lying between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey which has NE-SW lineament trending. It is 42 km long through the land with 3 right lateral strike slip segments. This fault has a great importance as its proximity to the city of Izmir. The study aims to perform a large scale investigation, focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region’s tectonics. A micro-<span class="hlt">geodetic</span> network with 15 points has been established in the study area. In order to investigate the crustal deformation and relative displacements along the Tuzla Fault GPS and Precise leveling techniques were used. Observations of two GPS campaigns and two precise leveling measurements were performed in 2009 and 2010. In order to process collected data by GPS campaigns, GAMIT/GLOBK software was used. As a result of two GPS campaigns, the velocity vectors of points are rated between 21mm/yr to 25mm/yr. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, 6.6 mm vertical displacement was observed between two leveling benchmarks which seems critical and needs further investigation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr.XL5...25E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr.XL5...25E"><span>Development of AN Open-Source Automatic Deformation Monitoring System for <span class="hlt">Geodetical</span> and Geotechnical Measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Engel, P.; Schweimler, B.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The deformation monitoring of structures and buildings is an important task field of modern engineering surveying, ensuring the standing and reliability of supervised objects over a long period. Several commercial hardware and software solutions for the realization of such monitoring measurements are available on the market. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> to them, a research team at the Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences (NUAS) is actively developing a software package for monitoring purposes in geodesy and geotechnics, which is distributed under an open source licence and free of charge. The task of managing an open source project is well-known in computer science, but it is fairly new in a <span class="hlt">geodetic</span> context. This paper contributes to that issue by detailing applications, frameworks, and interfaces for the design and implementation of open hardware and software solutions for sensor control, sensor networks, and data management in automatic deformation monitoring. It will be discussed how the development effort of networked applications can be reduced by using free programming tools, cloud computing technologies, and rapid prototyping methods.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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